WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface elevation observations

  1. Full 2D observation of water surface elevation from SWOT under different flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy; Rui, Wei; Durand, Michael; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, France), the Canadian Space Agency, and the Space Agency of the UK that will provide a first global, high-resolution observation of ocean and terrestrial water surface heights. Characterized by an observation swath of 120 km and an orbit repeat interval of about 21 days, SWOT will provide unprecedented bi-dimensional observations of rivers wider than 50-100 m. Despite many research activities that have investigated potential uses of remotely sensed data from SWOT, potentials and limitations of the spatial observations provided by the satellite mission for flood modeling still remain poorly understood and investigated. In this study we present a first analysis of the spatial observation of water surface elevation that is expected from SWOT for a 140 km reach of the middle-lower portion of the Po River, in Northern Italy. The river stretch is characterized by a main channel varying from 200-500 m in width and a floodplain that can be as wide as 5 km and that is delimited by a system of major embankments. The reconstruction of the hydraulic behavior of the Po River is performed by means of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic and bathymetric information (LiDAR, 2 m resolution), while the simulation of the spatial observation sensed by SWOT is performed with a SWOT simulator that mimics the satellite sensor characteristics. Referring to water surface elevations associated with different flow conditions (maximum, minimum and average flow reproduced by means of the quasi-2d numerical model) this work provides a first characterization of the spatial observations provided by SWOT and highlights the strengths and limitations of the expected products. By referring to a real river reach the analysis provides a credible example of the type of spatial observations that will be available after launch of SWOT and offers a first

  2. Iowa Bedrock Surface Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface elevation in Iowa was compiled using all available data, principally information from GEOSAM, supplemented...

  3. Estimating Discharge, Depth and Bottom Friction in Sand Bed Rivers Using Surface Currents and Water Surface Elevation Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, J.; Czapiga, M. J.; Holland, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    We developed an inversion model for river bathymetry estimation using measurements of surface currents, water surface elevation slope and shoreline position. The inversion scheme is based on explicit velocity-depth and velocity-slope relationships derived from the along-channel momentum balance and mass conservation. The velocity-depth relationship requires the discharge value to quantitatively relate the depth to the measured velocity field. The ratio of the discharge and the bottom friction enter as a coefficient in the velocity-slope relationship and is determined by minimizing the difference between the predicted and the measured streamwise variation of the total head. Completing the inversion requires an estimate of the bulk friction, which in the case of sand bed rivers is a strong function of the size of dune bedforms. We explored the accuracy of existing and new empirical closures that relate the bulk roughness to parameters such as the median grain size diameter, ratio of shear velocity to sediment fall velocity or the Froude number. For given roughness parameterization, the inversion solution is determined iteratively since the hydraulic roughness depends on the unknown depth. We first test the new hydraulic roughness parameterization using estimates of the Manning roughness in sand bed rivers based on field measurements. The coupled inversion and roughness model is then tested using in situ and remote sensing measurements of the Kootenai River east of Bonners Ferry, ID.

  4. Unmanned aerial vehicle observations of water surface elevation and bathymetry in the cenotes and lagoons of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Filippo; Lopez-Tamayo, Alejandro; Merediz-Alonso, Gonzalo; Olesen, Daniel; Jakobsen, Jakob; Wang, Sheng; Garcia, Monica; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Observations of water surface elevation (WSE) and bathymetry of the lagoons and cenotes of the Yucatán Peninsula (YP) in southeast Mexico are of hydrogeological interest. Observations of WSE (orthometric water height above mean sea level, amsl) are required to inform hydrological models, to estimate hydraulic gradients and groundwater flow directions. Measurements of bathymetry and water depth (elevation of the water surface above the bed of the water body) improve current knowledge on how lagoons and cenotes connect through the complicated submerged cave systems and the diffuse flow in the rock matrix. A novel approach is described that uses unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to monitor WSE and bathymetry of the inland water bodies on the YP. UAV-borne WSE observations were retrieved using a radar and a global navigation satellite system on-board a multi-copter platform. Water depth was measured using a tethered floating sonar controlled by the UAV. This sonar provides depth measurements also in deep and turbid water. Bathymetry (wet-bed elevation amsl) can be computed by subtracting water depth from WSE. Accuracy of the WSE measurements is better than 5-7 cm and accuracy of the water depth measurements is estimated to be 3.8% of the actual water depth. The technology provided accurate measurements of WSE and bathymetry in both wetlands (lagoons) and cenotes. UAV-borne technology is shown to be a more flexible and lower cost alternative to manned aircrafts. UAVs allow monitoring of remote areas located in the jungle of the YP, which are difficult to access by human operators.

  5. Data Assimilation of AirSWOT and Synthetically Derived SWOT Observations of Water Surface Elevation in a Multichannel River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenau, E. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Andreadis, K.; Bates, P. D.; Neal, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Multichannel rivers continue to be challenging features to quantify, especially at regional and global scales, which is problematic because accurate representations of such environments are needed to properly monitor the earth's water cycle as it adjusts to climate change. It has been demonstrated that higher-complexity, 2D models outperform lower-complexity, 1D models in simulating multichannel river hydraulics at regional scales due to the inclusion of the channel network's connectivity. However, new remote sensing measurements from the future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission and it's airborne analog AirSWOT offer new observations that can be used to try and improve the lower-complexity, 1D models to achieve accuracies closer to the higher-complexity, 2D codes. Here, we use an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to assimilate AirSWOT water surface elevation (WSE) measurements from a 2015 field campaign into a 1D hydrodynamic model along a 90 km reach of Tanana River, AK. This work is the first to test data assimilation methods using real SWOT-like data from AirSWOT. Additionally, synthetic SWOT observations of WSE are generated across the same study site using a fine-resolution 2D model and assimilated into the coarser-resolution 1D model. Lastly, we compare the abilities of AirSWOT and the synthetic-SWOT observations to improve spatial and temporal model outputs in WSEs. Results indicate 1D model outputs of spatially distributed WSEs improve as observational coverage increases, and improvements in temporal fluctuations in WSEs depend on the number of observations. Furthermore, results reveal that assimilation of AirSWOT observations produce greater error reductions in 1D model outputs compared to synthetic SWOT observations due to lower measurement errors. Both AirSWOT and the synthetic SWOT observations significantly lower spatial and temporal errors in 1D model outputs of WSEs.

  6. AirSWOT observations versus hydrodynamic model outputs of water surface elevation and slope in a multichannel river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenau, Elizabeth H.; Pavelsky, Tamlin M.; Moller, Delwyn; Lion, Christine; Pitcher, Lincoln H.; Allen, George H.; Bates, Paul D.; Calmant, Stéphane; Durand, Michael; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Laurence C.

    2017-04-01

    Anabranching rivers make up a large proportion of the world's major rivers, but quantifying their flow dynamics is challenging due to their complex morphologies. Traditional in situ measurements of water levels collected at gauge stations cannot capture out of bank flows and are limited to defined cross sections, which presents an incomplete picture of water fluctuations in multichannel systems. Similarly, current remotely sensed measurements of water surface elevations (WSEs) and slopes are constrained by resolutions and accuracies that limit the visibility of surface waters at global scales. Here, we present new measurements of river WSE and slope along the Tanana River, AK, acquired from AirSWOT, an airborne analogue to the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Additionally, we compare the AirSWOT observations to hydrodynamic model outputs of WSE and slope simulated across the same study area. Results indicate AirSWOT errors are significantly lower than model outputs. When compared to field measurements, RMSE for AirSWOT measurements of WSEs is 9.0 cm when averaged over 1 km squared areas and 1.0 cm/km for slopes along 10 km reaches. Also, AirSWOT can accurately reproduce the spatial variations in slope critical for characterizing reach-scale hydraulics, while model outputs of spatial variations in slope are very poor. Combining AirSWOT and future SWOT measurements with hydrodynamic models can result in major improvements in model simulations at local to global scales. Scientists can use AirSWOT measurements to constrain model parameters over long reach distances, improve understanding of the physical processes controlling the spatial distribution of model parameters, and validate models' abilities to reproduce spatial variations in slope. Additionally, AirSWOT and SWOT measurements can be assimilated into lower-complexity models to try and approach the accuracies achieved by higher-complexity models.

  7. Tanzania Elevation and Surface Characteristics

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The dataset displays Elevation, Slope, Aspect, Topographic Position Index, Terrain Ruggedness, and Roughness based on Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) (3...

  8. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  9. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  10. Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Weather Observation Collection consists primarily of hourly, synoptic, daily, and monthly forms submitted to the archive by the National Weather Service...

  11. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  12. Surface Weather Observations Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  13. Competing effects of surface albedo and orographic elevated heating on regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shineng; Boos, William R.

    2017-07-01

    All else being equal, a given atmospheric pressure level is thought to be warmer over a plateau than over surrounding nonelevated terrain because of orographic "elevated heating." However, elevated surfaces are also typically brighter due to reduced vegetation and increased ice cover. Here we assess the degree to which surface albedo compensates for orographic elevated heating. We confirm that land surface albedo generally increases with surface elevation in observations. Using a cloud system-resolving model, we show that increased surface albedo strongly compensates for orographic elevated heating in radiative-convective equilibrium. A nonelevated surface with the albedo of modern India would enter a runaway greenhouse regime without ventilation by monsoonal winds, while a surface with the albedo and elevation of Tibet would achieve a cooler radiative-convective equilibrium. Surface albedo changes may thus be just as important as surface elevation changes for the evolution of low-latitude regional climate throughout Earth's history.

  14. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  15. Inclusion of Solar Elevation Angle in Land Surface Albedo Parameterization Over Bare Soil Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiyuan; Wei, Zhigang; Wen, Zhiping; Dong, Wenjie; Li, Zhenchao; Wen, Xiaohang; Zhu, Xian; Ji, Dong; Chen, Chen; Yan, Dongdong

    2017-12-01

    Land surface albedo is a significant parameter for maintaining a balance in surface energy. It is also an important parameter of bare soil surface albedo for developing land surface process models that accurately reflect diurnal variation characteristics and the mechanism behind the solar spectral radiation albedo on bare soil surfaces and for understanding the relationships between climate factors and spectral radiation albedo. Using a data set of field observations, we conducted experiments to analyze the variation characteristics of land surface solar spectral radiation and the corresponding albedo over a typical Gobi bare soil underlying surface and to investigate the relationships between the land surface solar spectral radiation albedo, solar elevation angle, and soil moisture. Based on both solar elevation angle and soil moisture measurements simultaneously, we propose a new two-factor parameterization scheme for spectral radiation albedo over bare soil underlying surfaces. The results of numerical simulation experiments show that the new parameterization scheme can more accurately depict the diurnal variation characteristics of bare soil surface albedo than the previous schemes. Solar elevation angle is one of the most important factors for parameterizing bare soil surface albedo and must be considered in the parameterization scheme, especially in arid and semiarid areas with low soil moisture content. This study reveals the characteristics and mechanism of the diurnal variation of bare soil surface solar spectral radiation albedo and is helpful in developing land surface process models, weather models, and climate models.

  16. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  17. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    FROK SOURLY OBSERVATIONS smsTICO N•IMER: 747880 S13MTIOR NAME: MACDILL AFB/ TAIPA FL PERIOD OF RECORD: AUG 80 - JUL 90 LST TO UPTC: + 5 MOMI*: SEP...AFB/ TAIPA FL PERIOD OF RECORD: AUG 80 - JUL 90 LST To UTC: + 5 MONTH: NOV HOURS: 15-17 °... o........° ..... ............ ........ .. o...OCCURRENCE OF CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY UsAFrTAC, ASHEVILLE NC FROM BOURLY OBSERVATIONS STATION NUMBER: 747880 STATION mk4: MAcDILL AFB/ TAiPA FL PERIOD OF

  18. Cokriging surface elevation and seismic refraction data for bedrock topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Davis, R.K.; Hopkins, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of seismic refraction data collected at a proposed site of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Facility showed a strong correlation between surface and bedrock topography. By combining seismically determined bedrock elevation data with surface elevation data using cokriging, we were able to significantly improve our map of bedrock topography without collecting additional seismic data

  19. Use of cokriging to estimate surface air temperature from elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, T.; Kawashima, S.

    1993-09-01

    Surface air temperature in central Japan was predicted from the temperature recordings from sensors in the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS), using seven different procedures: the usual simple and universal kriging and cokriging estimators, the traditional regression analysis and the inverse distance weighted method. The cokriging estimator integrated digital elevation data as well as the air temperature readings. The performance of the procedures was evaluated and compared using cross-validation. The kriging estimator provided a better estimate than the traditional regression analysis that treated the data as spatially independent observations. The kriging estimate was also better than the inverse distance weighted method. Further improvement in the estimation accuracy was achieved by using cokriging procedures because of high correlation of air temperature with elevation. The accuracy of spatial prediction decreased due to nocturnal cooling in winter and daytime heating in summer. This decrease implies that a strong radiation balance at the surface, whether positive or negative, causes a relatively short-range variation in surface air temperature through the effects of local environments.

  20. Roosevelt Island Bedrock and Surface Elevations, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of bedrock and surface elevation readings taken by ground penetrating radar and Global Positioning System (GPS) on Roosevelt Island, an ice...

  1. Measuring the role of seagrasses in regulating sediment surface elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potouroglou, Maria; Bull, James C; Krauss, Ken W; Kennedy, Hilary A; Fusi, Marco; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mangora, Mwita M; Githaiga, Michael N; Diele, Karen; Huxham, Mark

    2017-09-20

    Seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services and their rapid global loss may reduce human welfare as well as ecological integrity. In common with the other 'blue carbon' habitats (mangroves and tidal marshes) seagrasses are thought to provide coastal defence and encourage sediment stabilisation and surface elevation. A sophisticated understanding of sediment elevation dynamics in mangroves and tidal marshes has been gained by monitoring a wide range of different sites, located in varying hydrogeomorphological conditions over long periods. In contrast, similar evidence for seagrasses is sparse; the present study is a contribution towards filling this gap. Surface elevation change pins were deployed in four locations, Scotland, Kenya, Tanzania and Saudi Arabia, in both seagrass and unvegetated control plots in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal zone. The presence of seagrass had a highly significant, positive impact on surface elevation at all sites. Combined data from the current work and the literature show an average difference of 31 mm per year in elevation rates between vegetated and unvegetated areas, which emphasizes the important contribution of seagrass in facilitating sediment surface elevation and reducing erosion. This paper presents the first multi-site study for sediment surface elevation in seagrasses in different settings and species.

  2. Measuring the role of seagrasses in regulating sediment surface elevation

    KAUST Repository

    Potouroglou, Maria

    2017-09-13

    Seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services and their rapid global loss may reduce human welfare as well as ecological integrity. In common with the other \\'blue carbon\\' habitats (mangroves and tidal marshes) seagrasses are thought to provide coastal defence and encourage sediment stabilisation and surface elevation. A sophisticated understanding of sediment elevation dynamics in mangroves and tidal marshes has been gained by monitoring a wide range of different sites, located in varying hydrogeomorphological conditions over long periods. In contrast, similar evidence for seagrasses is sparse; the present study is a contribution towards filling this gap. Surface elevation change pins were deployed in four locations, Scotland, Kenya, Tanzania and Saudi Arabia, in both seagrass and unvegetated control plots in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal zone. The presence of seagrass had a highly significant, positive impact on surface elevation at all sites. Combined data from the current work and the literature show an average difference of 31 mm per year in elevation rates between vegetated and unvegetated areas, which emphasizes the important contribution of seagrass in facilitating sediment surface elevation and reducing erosion. This paper presents the first multi-site study for sediment surface elevation in seagrasses in different settings and species.

  3. Note on the surface wave due to the prescribed elevation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 62; Issue 1. Note on the surface wave due to the prescribed elevation. Niranjan Das. Brief Reports Volume 62 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 135-142. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/062/01/0135-0142 ...

  4. Note on the surface wave due to the prescribed elevation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oscillatory motion with the increase of time, leaving behind the highest elevation initially. On the other hand in case of spiral cyclonic motion for which the sea surface experiences the elliptical pressure distribution, the motion diminishes as g the ac- celeration due to gravity diminishes and oscillates with the variation of time.

  5. Geodetic Imaging of Marsh Surface Elevation with Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. T.; Starek, M. J.; Gibeaut, J. C.; Lord, A.

    2015-12-01

    The resilience of marshes to a rising sea is dependent on their elevation response. Given the level of precision required to measure minute changes in marsh elevation over time, survey methods have to be adapted to minimize impacts to the sediment surface. Current approaches include Surface Elevation Tables (SETs), which are used to monitor wetland surface change with respect to an in situ vertical benchmark. Although SETs have been proven as an effective technique to track subtle sedimentation rates (RTK GPS for comparison. Grand Bay in Mississippi USA is one of the most biologically productive estuarine ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico. The study region is covered by dense and tall saw-grass that makes it a challenging environment for bare-earth mapping. For this survey, a Riegl VZ-400 TLS (1550 nm wavelength) was utilized. The system is capable of recording multiple returns per a transmitted pulse (up to 15) and provides full-waveform output for signal post-processing to extract returns. The objectives of the study are twofold: 1) examine impacts of TLS survey design, scan angle and scan density on marsh elevation mapping; 2) assess the capabilities of multiple-echo and full-waveform TLS data to extract the bare-earth surface below the dense vegetation. This presentation will present results of the study including the developed TLS survey protocol and data processing workflow, details on waveform and multi-echo approaches for ground point detection, and a discussion on error analysis and challenges for measuring marsh surface elevation with TLS.

  6. The surface elevation table: marker horizon method for measuring wetland accretion and elevation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, John C.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Lynch, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Tidal wetlands are highly sensitive to processes that affect their elevation relative to sea level. The surface elevation table–marker horizon (SET–MH) method has been used to successfully measure these processes, including sediment accretion, changes in relative elevation, and shallow soil processes (subsidence and expansion due to root production). The SET–MH method is capable of measuring changes at very high resolution (±millimeters) and has been used worldwide both in natural wetlands and under experimental conditions. Marker horizons are typically deployed using feldspar over 50- by 50-cm plots, with replicate plots at each sampling location. Plots are sampled using a liquid N2 cryocorer that freezes a small sample, allowing the handling and measurement of soft and easily compressed soils with minimal compaction. The SET instrument is a portable device that is attached to a permanent benchmark to make high-precision measurements of wetland surface elevation. The SET instrument has evolved substantially in recent decades, and the current rod SET (RSET) is widely used. For the RSET, a 15-mm-diameter stainless steel rod is pounded into the ground until substantial resistance is achieved to establish a benchmark. The SET instrument is attached to the benchmark and leveled such that it reoccupies the same reference plane in space, and pins lowered from the instrument repeatedly measure the same point on the soil surface. Changes in the height of the lowered pins reflect changes in the soil surface. Permanent or temporary platforms provide access to SET and MH locations without disturbing the wetland surface.

  7. Elevation change of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface mass balance and firn processes, 1960-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.; Ligtenberg, S. R M; Noël, B. P Y; Howat, I. M.; Box, J. E.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Steffen, K.; Harper, J. T.; Das, S. B.; Van Den Broeke, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Observed changes in the surface elevation of the Greenland Ice Sheet are caused by ice dynamics, basal elevation change, basal melt, surface mass balance (SMB) variability, and by compaction of the overlying firn. The last two contributions are quantified here using a firn model that includes

  8. Comparison of Surface Flow Features from Lidar-Derived Digital Elevation Models with Historical Elevation and Hydrography Data for Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has taken the lead in the creation of a valuable remote sensing product by incorporating digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) into the National Elevation Dataset (NED), the elevation layer of 'The National Map'. High-resolution lidar-derived DEMs provide the accuracy needed to systematically quantify and fully integrate surface flow including flow direction, flow accumulation, sinks, slope, and a dense drainage network. In 2008, 1-meter resolution lidar data were acquired in Minnehaha County, South Dakota. The acquisition was a collaborative effort between Minnehaha County, the city of Sioux Falls, and the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. With the newly acquired lidar data, USGS scientists generated high-resolution DEMs and surface flow features. This report compares lidar-derived surface flow features in Minnehaha County to 30- and 10-meter elevation data previously incorporated in the NED and ancillary hydrography datasets. Surface flow features generated from lidar-derived DEMs are consistently integrated with elevation and are important in understanding surface-water movement to better detect surface-water runoff, flood inundation, and erosion. Many topographic and hydrologic applications will benefit from the increased availability of accurate, high-quality, and high-resolution surface-water data. The remotely sensed data provide topographic information and data integration capabilities needed for meeting current and future human and environmental needs.

  9. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations, 1998-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  10. Unusual surface morphology from digital elevation models of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, Simon; Keller, K.; Bamber, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this study of the North Greenland ice sheet, we have used digital elevation models to investigate the topographic signatures of a large ice flow feature discovered in 1993 and a unique surface anomaly which we believe has not been observed previously. The small scale topography of the flow...... feature is revealed in striking detail in a high-pass filtered elevation model. Furthermore, ice penetrating radar show that the sub-stream bed is rough with undulation amplitude increasing downstream. The new feature consists of two large depressions in the ice sheet connected by a long curving trench...

  11. Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) surface observation data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — GMOS global surface elemental mercury (Hg0) observations from 2013 & 2014. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Sprovieri, F., N. Pirrone,...

  12. Decadal changes of surface elevation over permafrost area estimated using reflected GPS signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Larson, Kristine M.

    2018-02-01

    Conventional benchmark-based survey and Global Positioning System (GPS) have been used to measure surface elevation changes over permafrost areas, usually once or a few times a year. Here we use reflected GPS signals to measure temporal changes of ground surface elevation due to dynamics of the active layer and near-surface permafrost. Applying the GPS interferometric reflectometry technique to the multipath signal-to-noise ratio data collected by a continuously operating GPS receiver mounted deep in permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, we can retrieve the vertical distance between the antenna and reflecting surface. Using this unique kind of observables, we obtain daily changes of surface elevation during July and August from 2004 to 2015. Our results show distinct temporal variations at three timescales: regular thaw settlement within each summer, strong interannual variability that is characterized by a sub-decadal subsidence trend followed by a brief uplift trend, and a secular subsidence trend of 0.26 ± 0.02 cm year-1 during 2004 and 2015. This method provides a new way to fully utilize data from continuously operating GPS sites in cold regions for studying dynamics of the frozen ground consistently and sustainably over a long time.

  13. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.

    2015-01-01

    . Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed...... surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface......An alternating current (AC) gliding arc can be conveniently operated at atmospheric pressure and efficiently elongated into the ambient air by an air flow and thus is useful for surface modification. A high speed camera was used to capture dynamics of the AC gliding arc in the presence of polymer...

  14. Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, Chile

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, in extreme southern Chile. WMO station ID 85934. Period of record 1896-1954. The original forms were scanned at the Museo...

  15. Use of remotely sensed land surface temperature as a proxy for air temperatures at high elevations: Findings from a 5000 m elevational transect across Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, N. C.; Maeda, E. E.; Williams, R.

    2016-09-01

    High elevations are thought to be warming more rapidly than lower elevations, but there is a lack of air temperature observations in high mountains. This study compares instantaneous values of land surface temperature (10:30/22:30 and 01:30/13:30 local solar time) as measured by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer MOD11A2/MYD11A2 at 1 km resolution from the Terra and Aqua platforms, respectively, with equivalent screen-level air temperatures (in the same pixel). We use a transect of 22 in situ weather stations across Kilimanjaro ranging in elevation from 990 to 5803 m, one of the biggest elevational ranges in the world. There are substantial differences between LST and Tair, sometimes up to 20°C. During the day/night land surface temperature tends to be higher/lower than Tair. LST-Tair differences (ΔT) show large variance, particularly during the daytime, and tend to increase with elevation, particularly on the NE slope which faces the morning Sun. Differences are larger in the dry seasons (JF and JJAS) and reduce in cloudy seasons. Healthier vegetation (as measured by normalized difference vegetation index) and increased humidity lead to reduced daytime surface heating above air temperature and lower ΔT, but these relationships weaken with elevation. At high elevations transient snow cover cools LST more than Tair. The predictability of ΔT therefore reduces. It will therefore be challenging to use satellite data at high elevations as a proxy for in situ air temperatures in climate change assessments, especially for daytime Tmax. ΔT is smaller and more consistent at night, so it will be easier to use LST to monitor changes in Tmin.

  16. Water surface elevation from the upcoming SWOT mission under different flows conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy J. P.; Wei, Rui; Frasson, Renato P. M.; Durand, Michael; Pavelsky, Tamlin; Castellarin, Attilio; Brath, Armando

    2017-04-01

    The upcoming SWOT (Surface Water and Ocean Topography) satellite mission will provide unprecedented bi-dimensional observations of terrestrial water surface heights along rivers wider than 100m. Despite the literature reports several activities showing possible uses of SWOT products, potential and limitations of satellite observations still remain poorly understood and investigated. We present one of the first analyses regarding the spatial observation of water surface elevation expected from SWOT for a 140 km reach of the middle-lower portion of the Po River, in Northern Italy. The river stretch is characterized by a main channel varying from 100-500 m in width and a floodplain delimited by a system of major embankments that can be as wide as 5 km. The reconstruction of the hydraulic behavior of the Po River is performed by means of a quasi-2D model built with detailed topographic and bathymetric information (LiDAR, 2m resolution), while the simulation of remotely sensed hydrometric data is performed with a SWOT simulator that mimics the satellite sensor characteristics. Referring to water surface elevations associated with different flow conditions (maximum, minimum and average flow) this work characterizes the spatial observations provided by SWOT and highlights the strengths and limitations of the expected products. The analysis provides a robust reference for spatial water observations that will be available from SWOT and assesses possible effects of river embankments, river width and river topography under different hydraulic conditions. Results of the study characterize the expected accuracy of the upcoming SWOT mission and provide additional insights towards the appropriate exploitation of future hydrological observations.

  17. Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-03-01

    The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

  18. IceBridge UAF Lidar Profiler L1B Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA IceBridge UAF Lidar Profiler L1B Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets data set contains surface profiles of Alaska Glaciers acquired using the airborne...

  19. IceBridge Riegl Laser Altimeter L2 Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IceBridge Riegl Laser Altimeter L2 Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets (ILUTP2) data set contains surface range values for Antarctica and Greenland derived...

  20. IceBridge Riegl Laser Altimeter L2 Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The IceBridge Riegl Laser Altimeter L2 Geolocated Surface Elevation Triplets (ILUTP2) data set contains surface range values for Antarctica and Greenland derived...

  1. Reconstructing surface elevation changes for the Greenland Ice Sheet (1993-2013) and analysis of Zachariae Isstrom, northeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kyle

    Previous studies investigating the velocity and elevation change records of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) revealed rapid and complex changes. It is therefore imperative to determine changes with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. By fusing multiple laser altimetry data sets, the Surface Elevation Reconstruction and Change (SERAC) program is capable of reconstructing surface elevation changes with high spatial and temporal resolution over the entire GrIS. The input data include observations from NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission (2003-2009) as well as data collected by NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) (1993-2013) and Land, Vegetation and Ice Sensor (LVIS) (2007-2012) airborne laser altimetry systems. This study extends the record of surface elevation changes over the GrIS by adding 2012 and 2013 laser altimetry data to the previous 1993-2011 record. Extending the record leads to a new, more accurate and detailed altimetry record for 1993-2013. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are fused with laser altimetry data over Zachariae Isstrom, northeast Greenland to analyze surface elevation changes and associated thinning rates during 1978-2014. Little to no elevation change occurred over Zachariae Isstrom from 1978-1999, however, from 1999-2014 elevation changes near the calving front became increasingly negative and accelerated. Calving front position showed steady retreat and grounding line position has been retreating towards the interior of the ice sheet at an increasing rate from 2010-2014 when compared to the 1996-2010 period. The measured elevation changes near the calving front have brought a large portion of the glacier close to the height of flotation. If the current thinning trend continues this portion of the glacier will reach flotation within the next 2-5 years allowing for further retreat and increased vulnerability to retreat for sections of

  2. SWOT: The Surface Water and Ocean Topography Mission. Wide- Swath Altimetric Elevation on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (Editor); Alsdorf, Douglas (Editor); Morrow, Rosemary; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Mognard, Nelly

    2012-01-01

    The elevation of the surface of the ocean and freshwater bodies on land holds key information on many important processes of the Earth System. The elevation of the ocean surface, called ocean surface topography, has been measured by conventional nadirlooking radar altimeter for the past two decades. The data collected have been used for the study of large-scale circulation and sea level change. However, the spatial resolution of the observations has limited the study to scales larger than about 200 km, leaving the smaller scales containing substantial kinetic energy of ocean circulation that is responsible for the flux of heat, dissolved gas and nutrients between the upper and the deep ocean. This flux is important to the understanding of the ocean's role in regulatingfuture climate change.The elevation of the water bodies on land is a key parameter required for the computation of storage and discharge of freshwater in rivers, lakes, and wetlands. Globally, the spatial and temporal variability of water storage and discharge is poorly known due to the lack of well-sampled observations. In situ networks measuring river flows are declining worldwide due to economic and political reasons. Conventional altimeter observations suffers from the complexity of multiple peaks caused by the reflections from water, vegetation canopy and rough topography, resulting in much less valid data over land than over the ocean. Another major limitation is the large inter track distance preventing good coverage of rivers and other water bodies.This document provides descriptions of a new measurement technique using radar interferometry to obtain wide-swath measurement of water elevation at high resolution over both the ocean and land. Making this type of measurement, which addresses the shortcomings of conventional altimetry in both oceanographic and hydrologic applications, is the objective of a mission concept called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), which was recommended by

  3. On Monin–Obukhov Scaling in and Above the Atmospheric Surface Layer: The Complexities of Elevated Scintillometer Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, M.; Bosveld, F.C.; Moene, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    In scintillometry Monin–Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) is used to calculate the surface sensible heat flux from the structure parameter of temperature (CT2)(CT2) . In order to prevent saturation a scintillometer can be installed at an elevated level. However, in that case the observation level

  4. The influence of changes in glacier extent and surface elevation on modeled mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are widely recognized as unique demonstration objects for climate change impacts, mostly due to the strong change of glacier length in response to small climatic changes. However, glacier mass balance as the direct response to the annual atmospheric conditions can be better interpreted in meteorological terms. When the climatic signal is deduced from long-term mass balance data, changes in glacier geometry (i.e. surface extent and elevation must be considered as such adjustments form an essential part of the glacier reaction to new climatic conditions. In this study, a set of modelling experiments is performed to assess the influence of changes in glacier geometry on mass balance for constant climatic conditions. The calculations are based on a simplified distributed energy/mass balance model in combination with information on glacier extent and surface elevation for the years 1850 and 1973/1985 for about 60 glaciers in the Swiss Alps. The results reveal that over this period about 50–70% of the glacier reaction to climate change (here a one degree increase in temperature is "hidden" in the geometric adjustment, while only 30–50% can be measured as the long-term mean mass balance. For larger glaciers, the effect of the areal change is partly reduced by a lowered surface elevation, which results in a slightly more negative balance despite a potential increase of topographic shading. In view of several additional reinforcement feedbacks that are observed in periods of strong glacier decline, it seems that the climatic interpretation of long-term mass balance data is rather complex.

  5. Electrochemical removal of segregated silicon dioxide impurities from yttria stabilized zirconia surfaces at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hansen, Karin Vels; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the electrochemical removal of segregated silicon dioxide impurities from Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) surfaces at elevated temperatures studied under Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) conditions. YSZ single crystals were heated in vacuum by an applied 18kHz a.c. voltage using the ion....... This was demonstrated by silicon enrichment of a gold foil placed behind the YSZ crystal surface while annealed. The results suggest a fast way to clean YSZ for trace silicon dioxide impurities found in the bulk of the cleanest crystals commercially available....... conductivity of YSZ. The crystals were annealed in vacuum and atmospheres of water or oxygen from 10−5 mbar to 100mbar in the temperature range of 1100°C to 1275°C. The surface was after annealing analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) without exposing the crystal to atmosphere between annealing...... and XPS analysis. Silicon enrichment of the surface was only observed at oxygen and water vapor partial pressures above 25mbar and 10mbar, respectively. No silicon was observed on crystals annealed in vacuum and at oxygen and water vapor partial pressures below 10mbar. The YSZ seems to get partially...

  6. Field verification of ADCP surface gravity wave elevation spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Peters, H.C.; Schroevers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can measure orbital velocities induced by surface gravity waves, yet the ADCP estimates of these velocities are subject to a relatively high noise level. The present paper introduces a linear filtration technique to significantly reduce the influence of

  7. Surface Elevation and Ice Thickness, Western Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides surface elevation and ice thickness data for a portion of the Marie Byrd Land sector of West Antarctica, including the Ford Ranges, the...

  8. Impact of the surface characteristics on the quality of INSAR elevation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelmeyer, G.; Klingauf, U.

    2006-09-01

    Due to upcoming new data driven technologies in the aviation the impact of digital terrain data is growing conspicuously. Especially for ground near operations reliable terrain information is necessarily demanded. Based on modern earth observation technologies a new generation of elevation data is obtainable. However it shall be analysed how far data derived from remote sensing techniques like INSAR or LIDAR can be applied for aviation purposes. Formerly terrain data were represented in relation to the bare earth to obtain a "Digital Terrain Model" (DTM). For aviation purposes a "Digital Surface Model" (DSM) representing the real surface of the earth including all cover like vegetation and buildings is recommended. Due to the characteristics of active remote sensors the derived model always describes an in between of the two elevation representations. To satisfy the special requirements the Institute of Flight Systems and Automatic Control (FSR) at the Technische Universitaet Darmstadt is dealing with the determination of the influencing factors which affect the quality of the terrain models being appropriate to be used as a DSM. In order to enhance the integrity of the data a "safety buffer" is created to allow the applicability for dedicated applications (figure 1).

  9. An experimental study of the surface elevation probability distribution and statistics of wind-generated waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Long, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to measure the surface elevation probability density function and associated statistical properties for a wind-generated wave field. The laboratory data along with some limited field data were compared. The statistical properties of the surface elevation were processed for comparison with the results derived from the Longuet-Higgins (1963) theory. It is found that, even for the highly non-Gaussian cases, the distribution function proposed by Longuet-Higgins still gives good approximations.

  10. The impact of elevated CO2 on the energy and water balance over terrestrial surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Michael; Donohue, Randall; Yang, Yuting; McVicar, Tim

    2017-04-01

    When we think of the enhanced greenhouse effect, the tendency is to focus on the effects on near-surface air temperature and the consequence impacts. On that approach the underlying cause of the enhanced greenhouse effect, that is, increasing atmospheric CO2 tends to be ignored. But laboratory experiments have long shown that increasing CO2 has a large impact on vegetation gas exchange, by, for example, increasing water use efficiency of photosynthesis. This tends to be a forgotten factor in the meteorological and hydrologic sciences. In this talk we outline some key expected effects of atmospheric CO2 on leaf-, canopy- and catchment-scale fluxes and compare those expectations with both site- (e.g. FACE) and catchment-scale observations. We find the expected effects have been observed over undisturbed vegetation. However, we find the effects of elevated CO2 are more complex in disturbed vegetation that is actively regrowing, This finding suggests the disturbance history will be a key factor on the canopy- and catchment-scale responses to elevated CO2.

  11. Control and perception of balance at elevated and sloped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Peter I; Hsiao, Hongwei; Dotson, Brian W; Ammons, Douglas E

    2003-01-01

    Understanding roof-work-related risk of falls and developing low-cost, practical engineering controls for reducing this risk remain in high demand in the construction industry. This study investigated the effects of the roof work environment characteristics of surface slope, height, and visual reference on standing balance in construction workers. The 24 participants were tested in a laboratory setting at 4 slopes (0 degrees, 18 degrees, 26 degrees, and 34 degrees), 2 heights (0, 3 m), and 2 visual conditions (with and without visual references). Postural sway characteristics were calculated using center of pressure recordings from a force platform. Workers' perceptions of postural sway and instability were also evaluated. The results indicated that slope and height synergistically increased workers' standing postural instability. Workers recognized the individual destabilizing effects of slope and height but did not recognize the synergistic effect of the two. Visual references significantly reduced the destabilizing effects of height and slope. Actual and potential applications of this research include the use of temporary level work surfaces and proximal vertical reference structures as postural instability control measures during roofing work.

  12. Observational study of surface wind along a sloping surface over mountainous terrain during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Gyuwon; Joo, Sangwon; Ahn, Kwang-Deuk

    2018-03-01

    The 2018 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held in Pyeongchang, Korea, during February and March. We examined the near surface winds and wind gusts along the sloping surface at two outdoor venues in Pyeongchang during February and March using surface wind data. The outdoor venues are located in a complex, mountainous terrain, and hence the near-surface winds form intricate patterns due to the interplay between large-scale and locally forced winds. During February and March, the dominant wind at the ridge level is westerly; however, a significant wind direction change is observed along the sloping surface at the venues. The winds on the sloping surface are also influenced by thermal forcing, showing increased upslope flow during daytime. When neutral air flows over the hill, the windward and leeward flows show a significantly different behavior. A higher correlation of the wind speed between upper- and lower-level stations is shown in the windward region compared with the leeward region. The strong synoptic wind, small width of the ridge, and steep leeward ridge slope angle provide favorable conditions for flow separation at the leeward foot of the ridge. The gust factor increases with decreasing surface elevation and is larger during daytime than nighttime. A significantly large gust factor is also observed in the leeward region.

  13. High-resolution pattern of mangrove species distribution is controlled by surface elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Rick C.; Friess, Daniel A.; Crase, Beth; Lee, Wei Kit; Webb, Edward L.

    2018-03-01

    Mangrove vegetation species respond to multiple environmental gradients, and an enhanced understanding of how mangrove species are distributed across these gradients will facilitate conservation and management. Many environmental gradients correlate with tidal inundation; however small-scale inundation patterns resulting from microtopographical changes are difficult to capture empirically. In contrast, surface elevation is often a suitable, measurable and cost-effective proxy for inundation. This study investigated the relationships between species distribution and surface elevation in a mangrove forest in northwest Singapore. Through high-resolution land surveying, we developed a digital elevation model (DEM) and conducted a comprehensive survey of 4380 trees with a stem diameter ≥ 5 cm. A total of 15 species were encountered, and elevation envelopes were generated for 12. Species envelopes were distributed along an elevation continuum, with most species overlapping within the continuum. Spatial autocorrelation (SAC) was present for nine of the 15 species, and when taken into account, species ordering was modified across the elevation continuum. The presence of SAC strongly reinforces the need for research to control for SAC: classical spatial description of mangrove species distribution should be revised to account for ecological factors. This study suggests that (1) surface elevation applies strong controls on species distribution and (2) most mangroves at our study site have similar physiological tolerances.

  14. Modelling Periglacial Processes on Low-Relief High-Elevation Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Egholm, D.L.

    Are low-relief high-elevation surfaces generally a result of uplift of flat surfaces formed close to sea-level or can they be formed "in situ" by climate dependent surface processes such as those associated with glaciation? This question is important to resolve in order to understand the geological...... as a function of mean annual air temperature and sediment thickness. This allows us to incorporate periglacial processes into a long-term landscape evolution model where surface elevation, sediment thickness, and climate evolve over time. With this model we are able to explore the slow feedbacks between...... periglacial erosion, sediment transport, and the evolving topography. We show that smooth peaks, convex hillslopes, and a few meters thick regolith cover at high elevation are emergent properties of the landscape evolution model. By varying climate and other model parameters, we discuss how the landscape...

  15. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  16. Evaluation of Airborne Lidar Elevation Surfaces for Propagation of Coastal Inundation: The Importance of Hydrologic Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Poppenga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information about coastal inundation is vital to understanding dynamic and populated areas that are impacted by storm surge and flooding. To understand these natural hazard risks, lidar elevation surfaces are frequently used to model inundation in coastal areas. A single-value surface method is sometimes used to inundate areas in lidar elevation surfaces that are below a specified elevation value. However, such an approach does not take into consideration hydrologic connectivity between elevation grids cells resulting in inland areas that should be hydrologically connected to the ocean, but are not. Because inland areas that should drain to the ocean are hydrologically disconnected by raised features in a lidar elevation surface, simply raising the water level to propagate coastal inundation will lead to inundation uncertainties. We took advantage of this problem to identify hydrologically disconnected inland areas to point out that they should be considered for coastal inundation, and that a lidar-based hydrologic surface should be developed with hydrologic connectivity prior to inundation analysis. The process of achieving hydrologic connectivity with hydrologic-enforcement is not new, however, the application of hydrologically-enforced lidar elevation surfaces for improved coastal inundation mapping as approached in this research is innovative. In this article, we propagated a high-resolution lidar elevation surface in coastal Staten Island, New York to demonstrate that inland areas lacking hydrologic connectivity to the ocean could potentially be included in inundation delineations. For inland areas that were hydrologically disconnected, we evaluated if drainage to the ocean was evident, and calculated an area exceeding 11 ha (~0.11 km2 that could be considered in inundation delineations. We also assessed land cover for each inland area to determine the type of physical surfaces that would be potentially impacted if the inland areas

  17. Improving maps of ice-sheet surface elevation change using combined laser altimeter and stereoscopic elevation model data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Howat, I. M.; Tscherning, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    ) and Kangerdlugssuaq (KL). We find that the main trunks of JI and KL lowered at rates of 30–35 and 7–20ma_1, respectively. The rates decreased inland. The corresponding errors were 0.3–5.2ma_1 for JI and 0.3–5.1ma_1 for KL, with errors increasing proportionally with distance from the altimeter paths....... that surface to extrapolate elevations away from altimeter flight lines. This reduces the DEM registration errors and fills the gap between the altimeter paths. We use data from ICESat and ATM as well as SPOT 5 DEMs from 2007 and 2008 and apply them to the outlet glaciers Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI...

  18. Filling the voids in the SRTM elevation model — A TIN-based delta surface approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedeling, Eike; Siebert, Stefan; Buerkert, Andreas

    The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is the most accurate near-global elevation model that is publicly available. However, it contains many data voids, mostly in mountainous terrain. This problem is particularly severe in the rugged Oman Mountains. This study presents a method to fill these voids using a fill surface derived from Russian military maps. For this we developed a new method, which is based on Triangular Irregular Networks (TINs). For each void, we extracted points around the edge of the void from the SRTM DEM and the fill surface. TINs were calculated from these points and converted to a base surface for each dataset. The fill base surface was subtracted from the fill surface, and the result added to the SRTM base surface. The fill surface could then seamlessly be merged with the SRTM DEM. For validation, we compared the resulting DEM to the original SRTM surface, to the fill DEM and to a surface calculated by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) from the SRTM data. We calculated the differences between measured GPS positions and the respective surfaces for 187,500 points throughout the mountain range (ΔGPS). Comparison of the means and standard deviations of these values showed that for the void areas, the fill surface was most accurate, with a standard deviation of the ΔGPS from the mean ΔGPS of 69 m, and only little accuracy was lost by merging it to the SRTM surface (standard deviation of 76 m). The CIAT model was much less accurate in these areas (standard deviation of 128 m). The results show that our method is capable of transferring the relative vertical accuracy of a fill surface to the void areas in the SRTM model, without introducing uncertainties about the absolute elevation of the fill surface. It is well suited for datasets with varying altitude biases, which is a common problem of older topographic information.

  19. Groundwater control of mangrove surface elevation: shrink and swell varies with soil depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, K.R.T.; Smith, T. J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Anderson, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    We measured monthly soil surface elevation change and determined its relationship to groundwater changes at a mangrove forest site along Shark River, Everglades National Park, Florida. We combined the use of an original design, surface elevation table with new rod-surface elevation tables to separately track changes in the mid zone (0?4 m), the shallow root zone (0?0.35 m), and the full sediment profile (0?6 m) in response to site hydrology (daily river stage and groundwater piezometric pressure). We calculated expansion and contraction for each of the four constituent soil zones (surface [accretion and erosion; above 0 m], shallow zone [0?0.35 m], middle zone [0.35?4 m], and bottom zone [4?6 m]) that comprise the entire soil column. Changes in groundwater pressure correlated strongly with changes in soil elevation for the entire profile (Adjusted R2 5 0.90); this relationship was not proportional to the depth of the soil profile sampled. The change in thickness of the bottom soil zone accounted for the majority (R2 5 0.63) of the entire soil profile expansion and contraction. The influence of hydrology on specific soil zones and absolute elevation change must be considered when evaluating the effect of disturbances, sea level rise, and water management decisions on coastal wetland systems.

  20. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Fernanda Adame, Maria; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  1. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  2. Architectural design and physical activity: an observational study of staircase and elevator use in different buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, David R; Browning, Ray; Conger, Scott A; Wolff, Dana L; Flynn, Jennifer I

    2013-05-01

    The indoor built environment has the potential to influence levels of physical activity. However, the extent to which architectural design in commercial buildings can influence the percentage of people choosing to use the stairs versus elevators is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if buildings with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases result in a greater percentage of people taking the stairs. Direct observations of stair and elevator use were conducted in 3 buildings on a university campus. One of the buildings had a bank of 4 centrally located elevators and a fire escape stairwell behind a steel door. The other 2 buildings had centrally located staircases and out-of-the-way elevators. The percentage of people who ascended the stairs was 8.1% in the elevator-centric building, compared with 72.8% and 81.1% in the 2 stair-centric buildings (P < .001). In addition, the percentage of people who descended the stairs was 10.8% in the first building, compared with 89.5% and 93.7% in the stair-centric buildings (P < .001). The results of the current study suggest that if buildings are constructed with centrally located, accessible, and aesthetically pleasing staircases, a greater percentage of people will choose to take the stairs.

  3. Foreshortened tiles in paths converging on an observer viewing a picture: elevation and visual angle ratio determine perceived size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juricevic, Igor; Kennedy, John M; Abramov, Izabella

    2009-02-01

    Observers were shown wide-angle pictures of tiles on a ground plane and were asked about the aspect ratios of the tiles. The observers viewed the pictures from a fixed center of projection. Some of the tiles were in a path coming straight toward the observer. In one picture, the path came from the center of the picture, and in two others the path came from the left side of the picture (one from 30 degrees and one from 45 degrees to the left of the center, from the observer's point of view). The apparent aspect ratios were a function of the elevations of the tiles and the ratios of visual angles of the sides of the tiles. Judgments were identical for all three paths. The local slant of the picture surface was not a significant factor.

  4. Surface elevation changes of the greenland ice sheet - results from ESA'S ice sheet CCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Khvorostovky, Kirill; Meister, Rakia

    2013-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term climate data records for the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), ESA have launched the Climate Change Initiative (CCI). This work presents the preliminary steps towards the Ice Sheet CCI's surface elevation change (SEC) derivation using radar altimeter data. In order to find...

  5. Leaf size and surface characteristics of Betula papyrifera exposed to elevated CO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanna Riikonen; Kevin E. Percy; Minna Kivimaenpaa; Mark E. Kubiske; Neil D. Nelson; Elina Vapaavuori; David F. Karnosky

    2010-01-01

    Betula papyrifera trees were exposed to elevated concentrations of CO2 (1.4 x ambient), O3 (1.2 x ambient) or CO2 + O3 at the Aspen Free-air CO2 Enrichment Experiment. The treatment effects on leaf surface characteristics were studied...

  6. Surface elevation changes of the greenland ice sheet - results from ESA'S ice sheet CCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Khvorostovky, Kirill; Meister, Rakia

    2013-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term climate data records for the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), ESA have launched the Climate Change Initiative (CCI). This work presents the preliminary steps towards the Ice Sheet CCI's surface elevation change (SEC) derivation using radar altimeter data. In order to find t...

  7. Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms (Keyed)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In order to fill in the observation gap prior to the time when commercial aviation began in the U.S., The NCDC Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP) retrieved...

  8. The microstructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcak, Petr, E-mail: petr.vlcak@fs.cvut.cz [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerny, Frantisek [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Drahokoupil, Jan [Department of Metals, Institute of Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Sepitka, Josef [Department of Mechanics, Biomechanics and Mechatronics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Tolde, Zdenek [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • The Ti6Al4V samples were implanted with 90 keV nitrogen ions. • The samples were annealed at 500 °C during the ion implantation process. • An elevated temperature increases the mobility of the atoms and the quantity of TiN. • The hardness showed a significant increase compared to room temperature implantation. - Abstract: The effect of an elevated temperature during nitrogen ion implantation on the microstructure and on the surface hardness of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was examined. The implantation process was carried out at fluences of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17}, 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 6 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and at ion energy 90 keV. The implanted samples were annealed at 500 °C during the implantation process. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to obtain a phase characterization and a phase quantification in the implanted sample surface. The surface hardness was investigated by nanoindentation testing, and the nitrogen depth distribution was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Elevated temperature led to increased formation of a TiN compound. It was found that a mixture of TiN and an α-Ti(+N) solid solution had a predominant amount of TiN for samples with fluence of 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} or higher. Elevated temperature during ion implantation caused an increase in surface hardening more towards the depth of the substrate in comparison with room temperature implantation. The hardness showed a remarkably significant increase at a fluence of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} compared to samples implanted at the same fluences and at room temperature. There is a discussion of such mechanisms that explain the observed hardening more towards the depth of the substrate, and the increase in hardness.

  9. Elevator talk: observational study of inappropriate comments in a public space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubel, P A; Zell, M M; Miller, D J; Fischer, G S; Peters-Stefani, D; Arnold, R M

    1995-08-01

    We conducted a study to determine the type and frequency of inappropriate comments made by hospital employees while riding hospital elevators. Four observers rode in elevators at five hospitals, listening for any comments made by hospital employees that might be deemed inappropriate. All potentially inappropriate comments were reviewed by the research team and were classified as inappropriate if they met at least one of the following criteria: violated patient confidentiality, raised concerns about the speaker's ability or desire to provide high-quality patient care, raised concerns about poor quality of care in the hospital (by persons other than the speaker), or contained derogatory remarks about patients or their families. We observed 259 one-way elevator trips offering opportunity for conversation. We overheard a total of 39 inappropriate comments, which took place on 36 rides (13.9% of the trips). The most frequent comments (18) were violations of patients confidentiality. Next most frequent (10 comments) were unprofessional remarks in which clinicians talked about themselves in ways that raised questions about their ability or desire to provide high-quality patient care. Other comments included derogatory statements about the general quality of hospital care (8) and derogatory remarks about patients (5). Physicians were involved in 15 of the comments, nurses in 10, and other hospital employees in the remainder. Inappropriate comments took place with disturbing frequency in the elevator rides we sampled. These comments did not exclusively involve violations of patient confidentiality, but encompassed a range of discussions that health care employees must be careful to avoid.

  10. Snow Grain Size Retrieval over the Polar Ice Sheets with the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Han, Mei; Palm, Stephen P.; Harding, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Snow grain size is an important parameter for cryosphere studies. As a proof of concept, this paper presents an approach to retrieve this parameter over Greenland, East and West Antarctica ice sheets from surface reflectances observed with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) onboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) at 1064 nanometers. Spaceborne lidar observations overcome many of the disadvantages in passive remote sensing, including difficulties in cloud screening and low sun angle limitations; hence tend to provide more accurate and stable retrievals. Results from the GLAS L2A campaign, which began on 25 September and lasted until 19 November, 2003, show that the mode of the grain size distribution over Greenland is the largest (approximately 300 microns) among the three, West Antarctica is the second (220 microns) and East Antarctica is the smallest (190 microns). Snow grain sizes are larger over the coastal regions compared to inland the ice sheets. These results are consistent with previous studies. Applying the broadband snow surface albedo parameterization scheme developed by Garder and Sharp (2010) to the retrieved snow grain size, ice sheet surface albedo is also derived. In the future, more accurate retrievals can be achieved with multiple wavelengths lidar observations.

  11. Forecasting tidal marsh elevation and habitat change through fusion of Earth observations and a process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kristin B.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Leeuw, Thomas; Downing, Bryan D.; Morris, James T.; Ferner, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing uncertainty in data inputs at relevant spatial scales can improve tidal marsh forecasting models, and their usefulness in coastal climate change adaptation decisions. The Marsh Equilibrium Model (MEM), a one-dimensional mechanistic elevation model, incorporates feedbacks of organic and inorganic inputs to project elevations under sea-level rise scenarios. We tested the feasibility of deriving two key MEM inputs—average annual suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and aboveground peak biomass—from remote sensing data in order to apply MEM across a broader geographic region. We analyzed the precision and representativeness (spatial distribution) of these remote sensing inputs to improve understanding of our study region, a brackish tidal marsh in San Francisco Bay, and to test the applicable spatial extent for coastal modeling. We compared biomass and SSC models derived from Landsat 8, DigitalGlobe WorldView-2, and hyperspectral airborne imagery. Landsat 8-derived inputs were evaluated in a MEM sensitivity analysis. Biomass models were comparable although peak biomass from Landsat 8 best matched field-measured values. The Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer SSC model was most accurate, although a Landsat 8 time series provided annual average SSC estimates. Landsat 8-measured peak biomass values were randomly distributed, and annual average SSC (30 mg/L) was well represented in the main channels (IQR: 29–32 mg/L), illustrating the suitability of these inputs across the model domain. Trend response surface analysis identified significant diversion between field and remote sensing-based model runs at 60 yr due to model sensitivity at the marsh edge (80–140 cm NAVD88), although at 100 yr, elevation forecasts differed less than 10 cm across 97% of the marsh surface (150–200 cm NAVD88). Results demonstrate the utility of Landsat 8 for landscape-scale tidal marsh elevation projections due to its comparable performance with the other sensors

  12. Quantification of morphological properties of terrace surface using digital elevation model and its application to stratigraphic correlation of terraces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Hataya, Ryuta; Hamada, Takaomi

    2008-01-01

    Uplift estimation during late Quaternary is required for site selection of geological disposal facility of high level radioactive waste (NUMO, 2004). Terrace level and/or difference in elevation of terraces are good indicators of uplift. Therefore, a reliable method of terrace correlation and chronology is a key issues. Air-photograph interpretation is generally carried out in the early stage of a terrace investigation. However, a terrace classification often depends on the observer's qualitative interpretation. In order to improve objectivity of geomorphic investigation with air-photograph interpretation, we examine to quantify the morphological properties of terrace surface by some morphometric variables that are computed from Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this study, four morphometric variables (average slope, average laplacian, remaining ratio of a terrace surface, and average depth of erosion) were calculated using data sets of terraces of which chronological data are clearly described. The relationship between these variables and terrace ages shows constant tendencies respond to the geomorphological process caused by the erosion. To examine capability of morphometric variables as an index of terrace correlation, regression analyses were carried out. The regression age estimated from morphometric variables allows to classify terraces in correct sequence, and the error with the observed age falls up to 100,000 years. In addition, to discuss appropriate quantities of DEM for terrace correlation, we used three different elevation data to create DEM: 1) aerial photogrammetry data; 2) airborne laser scanner data; 3) 1:25000-scale contour map. By comparing analysis results of each DEMs, we show suitable qualities of elevation data and DEM grid size to represent the degree of erosion correctly. (author)

  13. Simulated and observed 2010 floodwater elevations in selected river reaches in the Pawtuxet River Basin, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Olson, Scott A.; Flynn, Robert H.; Strauch, Kellan R.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy, persistent rains from late February through March 2010 caused severe flooding that set, or nearly set, peaks of record for streamflows and water levels at many long-term streamgages in Rhode Island. In response to this event, hydraulic models were updated for selected reaches covering about 56 river miles in the Pawtuxet River Basin to simulate water-surface elevations (WSEs) at specified flows and boundary conditions. Reaches modeled included the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Dry Brook, Meshanticut Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, Quidneck Brook, and two unnamed tributaries referred to as South Branch Pawtuxet River Tributary A1 and Tributary A2. All the hydraulic models were updated to Hydrologic Engineering Center-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) version 4.1.0 using steady-state simulations. Updates to the models included incorporation of new field-survey data at structures, high resolution land-surface elevation data, and updated flood flows from a related study. The models were assessed using high-water marks (HWMs) obtained in a related study following the March– April 2010 flood and the simulated water levels at the 0.2-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP), which is the estimated AEP of the 2010 flood in the basin. HWMs were obtained at 110 sites along the main stem of the Pawtuxet River, the North and South Branches of the Pawtuxet River, Pocasset River, Simmons Brook, Furnace Hill Brook, Flat River, and Quidneck Brook. Differences between the 2010 HWM elevations and the simulated 0.2-percent AEP WSEs from flood insurance studies (FISs) and the updated models developed in this study varied with most differences attributed to the magnitude of the 0.2-percent AEP flows. WSEs from the updated models generally are in closer agreement with the observed 2010 HWMs than with the FIS WSEs. The improved agreement of the updated simulated water elevations to

  14. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data 1928-1948 (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of hourly U.S. surface airways observations (SAO). These observations extend as far back as 1928, from the time when commercial aviation began...

  15. Surface melt effects on Cryosat-2 elevation retrievals in the ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T.; McMillan, M.; Shepherd, A.; Leeson, A.; Cornford, S. L.; Hogg, A.; Gilbert, L.; Muir, A. S.; Briggs, K.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an acceleration in the rate of mass losses from the Greenland ice sheet. This acceleration is, in part, attributed to an increasingly negative surface mass balance (SMB), linked to increasing melt water runoff rates due to enhanced surface melting. Understanding the past, present and future evolution in surface melting is central to ongoing monitoring of ice sheet mass balance and, in turn, to building realistic future projections. Currently, regional climate models are commonly used for this purpose, because direct in-situ observations are spatially and temporally sparse due to the logistics and resources required to collect such data. In particular, modelled SMB is used to estimate the extent and magnitude of surface melting, which influences (1) many geodetic mass balance estimates, and (2) snowpack microwave scattering properties. The latter is poorly understood and introduces uncertainty into radar altimeter estimates of ice sheet evolution. Here, we investigate the changes in CryoSat-2 waveforms and elevation measurements caused by the onset of surface melt in the summer months over the ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet. Specifically, we use CryoSat-2 SARIn mode data acquired between 2011 and 2016, to characterise the effect of high variability in surface melt during this period, and to assess the associated impact on estimates of ice mass balance.

  16. Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost W van Dam

    Full Text Available Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F'(m, while elevated temperatures (>30 °C, only 2 °C above current average summer temperatures were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v/F(m, interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced F(v/F(m and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥ 1 µg L(-1. The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures.

  17. Additive pressures of elevated sea surface temperatures and herbicides on symbiont-bearing foraminifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Joost W; Negri, Andrew P; Mueller, Jochen F; Altenburger, Rolf; Uthicke, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte) of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F'(m)), while elevated temperatures (>30 °C, only 2 °C above current average summer temperatures) were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)), interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced F(v)/F(m) and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥ 1 µg L(-1)). The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA) described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures.

  18. Where’s the Ground Surface? – Elevation Bias in LIDAR-derived Digital Elevation Models Due to Dense Vegetation in Oregon Tidal Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is a powerful resource for coastal and wetland managers and its use is increasing. Vegetation density and other land cover characteristics influence the accuracy of LIDAR-derived ground surface digital elevation models; however the degree to wh...

  19. Observation of elevated air pollutant concentrations in a residential neighborhood of Los Angeles California using a mobile platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shishan; Paulson, Suzanne E.; Fruin, Scott; Kozawa, Kathleen; Mara, Steve; Winer, Arthur M.

    2012-05-01

    We observed elevated air pollutant concentrations, especially of ultrafine particles (UFP), black carbon (BC) and NO, across the residential neighborhood of the Boyle Heights Community (BH) of Los Angeles, California. Using an electric vehicle mobile platform equipped with fast response instruments, real-time air pollutant concentrations were measured in BH in spring and summer of 2008. Pollutant concentrations varied significantly in the two seasons, on different days, and by time of day, with an overall average UFP concentration in the residential areas of ∼33 000 cm-3. The averaged UFP, BC, and NO concentrations measured on Soto St, a major surface street in BH, were 57 000 cm-3, 5.1 μg m-3, and 67 ppb, respectively. Concentrations of UFP across the residential areas in BH were nearly uniform spatially, in contrast to other areas in the greater metropolitan area of Los Angeles where UFP concentrations exhibit strong gradients downwind of roadways. We attribute this “UFP cloud” to high traffic volumes, including heavy duty diesel trucks on the freeways which surround and traverse BH, and substantial numbers of high-emitting vehicles (HEVs) on the surface streets traversing BH. Additionally, the high density of stop signs and lights and short block lengths, requiring frequent accelerations of vehicles, may contribute. The data also support a role for photochemical production of UFP in the afternoon. UFP concentration peaks (5 s average) of up to 9 million particles cm-3 were also observed immediately behind HEVs when they accelerated from stop lights in the BH neighborhood and areas immediately adjacent. Although encounters with HEV during mornings accounted for only about 6% and 17% of time spent monitoring residential areas and major surface streets, HEV contributed to about 28% and 53% of total ultrafine particles measured on the route, respectively. The observation of elevated pollutant concentrations across the Boyle Heights community highlights

  20. De novo biofilm community assembly from tap water source communities favors Nitrotoga over Nitrospira under elevated nitrite surface loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Marta; Dechesne, Arnaud; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    -through biofilm system to continuous immigration from a tap water metacommunity while applying different nitrite surface loading rates. After 63 days of operation, we extracted biofilms and analyzed the community composition via Illumina MiSeq targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Previous studies have shown...... in the metacommunity, Nitrotoga and Nitrospira were found at near equal abundances, in the biofilm community, elevated nitrite loading strongly selected for Nitrotoga over Nitrospira. The biofilms were also significantly different in their alpha-diversity (p... of the biofilm community decreased significantly (p=0.004) compared to the metacommunity. These observations indicate that the selection towards Nitrotoga and Nitrospira dominated community assembly under different nitrite loadings. Lastly, we compared our observations of community composition...

  1. Observation of optimal gecko's adhesion on nanorough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Nicola M; Lepore, Emiliano

    2008-12-01

    In this letter we report experimental observations on the times of adhesion of living Tokay geckos (Gekko geckos) on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) inverted surfaces. Two different geckos (male and female) and three surfaces with different root mean square (RMS) roughness (RMS=42, 618 and 931 nm) have been considered, for a total of 72 observations. The measured data are proved to be statistically significant, following the Weibull Statistics with coefficients of correlation between 0.781 and 0.955. The unexpected result is the observation of a maximal gecko adhesion on the surface with intermediate roughness of RMS=618 nm, that we note has waviness comparable to the seta size.

  2. The two-thumb technique using an elevated surface is preferable for teaching infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Trang K; Hemway, Rae Jean; Perlman, Jeffrey M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the two-thumb technique is superior to the two-finger technique for administering chest compressions using the floor surface and the preferred location for performing infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (ie, floor, table, or radiant warmer). Twenty Neonatal Resuscitation Program trained medical personnel performed CPR on a neonatal manikin utilizing the two-thumb vs two-finger technique, a compression to ventilation ratio of 30:2 for 2 minutes in random order on the floor, table, and radiant warmer. Compression depth favored the two-thumb over two-finger technique on the floor (27 ± 8 mm vs 23 ± 7), table (26 ± 7 mm vs 22 ± 7), and radiant warmer (29 ± 4 mm vs 23 ± 4) (all P CPR preferably using an elevated firm surface. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving surface stability of elevated spoil landforms using natural landform analogy and geological information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerton, Bevan; Burgess, Jon; Esterle, Joan; Erskine, Peter; Baumgartl, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale open cut mining in the Bowen Basin, Queensland, Australia has undergone an evolutionary process over the period of a few decades, transitioning from shallow mining depths, limited spoil elevation and pasture based rehabilitation to increased mining depths, escalating pre-stripping, elevated mesa-like landforms and native woody species rehabilitation. As a consequence of this development, the stabilisation of recent constructed landforms has to be assured through means other than the establishment of vegetative cover. Recent developments are the specific selection and partitioning of resilient fragmental spoil types for the construction of final landform surface. They can also be used as cladding resources for stabilizing steep erosive batters and this has been identified as a practical methodology that has the potential to significantly improve rehabilitation outcomes. Examples of improvements are an increase of the surface rock cover, roughness and infiltration and reducing inherent erodibility and runoff and velocity of surface flow. However, a thorough understanding of the properties and behavior of individual spoil materials disturbed during mining is required. Relevant information from published literature on the geological origins, lithology and weathering characteristics of individual strata within the Bowen Basin Coal Measures located in Queensland, Australia (and younger overlying weathered strata) has been studied, and related both to natural landforms and to the surface stability of major strata types when disturbed by mining. The resulting spoil classification developed from this study is based primarily on inherent geological characteristics and weathering behaviour of identifiable lithologic components, and as such describes the expected fragmental resilience likely within disturbed materials at Bowen Basin coal mines. The proposed classification system allows the allocation of spoil types to use categories which have application in pre

  4. Physical basis for river segmentation from water surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samine Montazem, A.; Garambois, P. A.; Calmant, S.; Moreira, D. M.; Monnier, J.; Biancamaria, S.

    2017-12-01

    With the advent of satellite missions such as SWOT we will have access to high resolution estimates of the elevation, slope and width of the free surface. A segmentation strategy is required in order to sub-sample the data set into reach master points for further hydraulic analyzes and inverse modelling. The question that arises is : what will be the best node repartition strategy that preserves hydraulic properties of river flow? The concept of hydraulic visibility introduced by Garambois et al. (2016) is investigated in order to highlight and characterize the spatio-temporal variations of water surface slope and curvature for different flow regimes and reach geometries. We show that free surface curvature is a powerful proxy for characterizing the hydraulic behavior of a reach since concavity of water surface is driven by variations in channel geometry that impacts the hydraulic properties of the flow. We evaluated the performance of three segmentation strategies by means of a well documented case, that of the Garonne river in France. We conclude that local extrema of free surface curvature appear as the best candidate for locating the segment boundaries for an optimal hydraulic representation of the segmented river. We show that for a given river different segmentation scales are possible: a fine-scale segmentation which is driven by fine-scale hydraulic to large-scale segmentation driven by large-scale geomorphology. The segmentation technique is then applied to high resolution GPS profiles of free surface elevation collected on the Negro river basin, a major contributor of the Amazon river. We propose two segmentations: a low-resolution one that can be used for basin hydrology and a higher resolution one better suited for local hydrodynamic studies.

  5. Surface anatomy of the lip elevator muscles for the treatment of gummy smile using botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Woo-Sang; Hur, Mi-Sun; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Song, Wu-Chul; Koh, Ki-Seok; Baik, Hyoung-Seon; Kim, Seong-Taek; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2009-01-01

    To propose a safe and reproducible injection point for botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) as a supplementary method for the treatment of gummy smile, as determined by assessment of the morphologic characteristics of three lip elevator muscles. A total of 50 hemi-faces from 25 adult cadavers (male 13, female 12; ages, 47 to 88 years) were used in this study. Topographic relations and the directions of the lip elevator muscles (ie, levator labii superioris [LLS], levator labii superioris alaeque nasi [LLSAN], and zygomaticus minor [ZMi]), were investigated. Possible injection points were examined through the study of predetermined surface landmarks. The insertion of the LLS was covered partially or entirely by the LLSAN and the ZMi, and the three muscles converged on the area lateral to the ala. The mean angle between the facial midline and each muscle vector was 25.8 +/- 4.8 degrees for the LLS, 55.7 +/- 6.4 degrees for the ZMi, and -20.2 +/- 3.2 degrees for the LLSAN; no significant differences were noted between male and female subjects or between left and right sides. The three vectors passed near a triangular region formed by three surface landmarks. The center of this triangle, named the "Yonsei point", was suggested as an appropriate injection point for BTX-A. The clinical effectiveness of the injection point was demonstrated in selected cases with or without orthodontic treatment. Under careful case selection, BTX-A may be an effective treatment alternative for patients with excessive gingival display caused by hyperactive lip elevator muscles.

  6. Development of a GNSS Buoy for Monitoring Water Surface Elevations in Estuaries and Coastal Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Pin; Huang, Ching-Jer; Chen, Sheng-Hsueh; Doong, Dong-Jiing; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2017-01-18

    In this work, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) buoy that utilizes a Virtual Base Station (VBS) combined with the Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning technology was developed to monitor water surface elevations in estuaries and coastal areas. The GNSS buoy includes a buoy hull, a RTK GNSS receiver, data-transmission devices, a data logger, and General Purpose Radio Service (GPRS) modems for transmitting data to the desired land locations. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to test the capability of the buoy and verify the accuracy of the monitored water surface elevations. For the field tests, the GNSS buoy was deployed in the waters of Suao (northeastern part of Taiwan). Tide data obtained from the GNSS buoy were consistent with those obtained from the neighboring tide station. Significant wave heights, zero-crossing periods, and peak wave directions obtained from the GNSS buoy were generally consistent with those obtained from an accelerometer-tilt-compass (ATC) sensor. The field tests demonstrate that the developed GNSS buoy can be used to obtain accurate real-time tide and wave data in estuaries and coastal areas.

  7. OBSERVED ASTEROID SURFACE AREA IN THE THERMAL INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  8. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data (1965-1981) (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists primarily of U.S. surface airways observations (SAO) data beginning in 1965 and extending through 1981. Note that a few stations have already...

  9. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1999-08-11

    Aug 11, 1999 ... This paper discusses the observations of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) parameters dur- ing the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999. Intensive surface layer experiments were conducted at. Ahmedabad (23◦21 N, 72◦36 E), the western part of India, which was close to the totality path. This rare event ...

  10. AirSWOT Measurements of Water Surface Elevations and Hydraulic Gradients over the Yukon Flats, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, L. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Smith, L. C.; Moller, D.; Altenau, E. H.; Lion, C.; Bertram, M.; Cooley, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    AirSWOT is an airborne, Ka-band synthetic aperture radar interferometer (InSAR) intended to quantify surface water fluxes by mapping water surface elevations (WSE). AirSWOT will also serve as a calibration/validation tool for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission (scheduled for launch in 2021). The hydrology objectives for AirSWOT and SWOT are to measure WSE with accuracies sufficient to estimate hydrologic fluxes in lakes, wetlands and rivers. However, current understanding of the performance of these related though not identical instruments when applied to complex river-lake-wetland fluvial environments remains predominantly theoretical. We present AirSWOT data acquired 15-June-2015 over the Yukon Flats, Alaska, USA, together with in situ field surveys, to assess the accuracy of AirSWOT WSE measurements in lakes and rivers. We use these data to demonstrate that AirSWOT can be used to estimate large-scale hydraulic gradients across wetland complexes. Finally, we present key lessons learned from this AirSWOT analysis for consideration in future campaigns, including: maximizing swath overlap for spatial averaging to minimize uncertainty as well as orienting flight paths parallel to river flow directions to reduce along track aircraft drift for neighboring flight paths. We conclude that spatially dense AirSWOT measurements of river and lake WSEs can improve geospatial understanding of surface water hydrology and fluvial processes.

  11. Flood Damage Analysis: First Floor Elevation Uncertainty Resulting from LiDAR-Derived Digital Surface Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Bodoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of high resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR datasets provides spatial density and vertical precision for obtaining highly accurate Digital Surface Models (DSMs. As a result, the reliability of flood damage analysis has improved significantly, owing to the increased accuracy of hydrodynamic models. In addition, considerable error reduction has been achieved in the estimation of first floor elevation, which is a critical parameter for determining structural and content damages in buildings. However, as with any discrete measurement technique, LiDAR data contain object space ambiguities, especially in urban areas where the presence of buildings and the floodplain gives rise to a highly complex landscape that is largely corrected by using ancillary information based on the addition of breaklines to a triangulated irregular network (TIN. The present study provides a methodological approach for assessing uncertainty regarding first floor elevation. This is based on: (i generation an urban TIN from LiDAR data with a density of 0.5 points·m−2, complemented with the river bathymetry obtained from a field survey with a density of 0.3 points·m−2. The TIN was subsequently improved by adding breaklines and was finally transformed to a raster with a spatial resolution of 2 m; (ii implementation of a two-dimensional (2D hydrodynamic model based on the 500-year flood return period. The high resolution DSM obtained in the previous step, facilitated addressing the modelling, since it represented suitable urban features influencing hydraulics (e.g., streets and buildings; and (iii determination of first floor elevation uncertainty within the 500-year flood zone by performing Monte Carlo simulations based on geostatistics and 1997 control elevation points in order to assess error. Deviations in first floor elevation (average: 0.56 m and standard deviation: 0.33 m show that this parameter has to be neatly characterized in order

  12. Some observations on boiling heat transfer with surface oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of surface oscillation on pool boiling heat transfer are experimentally studied. Experiments were performed in saturated ethanol and distilled water, covering the range from nucleate to film boiling except in the transition region. Two different geometries were employed as the heating surface with the same wetting area, stainless steel pipe and molybdenum ribbon. The results confirm earlier work on the effect of surface oscillation especially in lower heat flux region of nucleate boiling. Interesting boiling behavior during surface oscillation is observed, which was not referred to in previous work. (2 figures) (Author)

  13. Volcanic Eruption Observations from an Elevated Point of the Stromboli Using Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, V.; Gagnon, M. A.; Marcotte, F.; Gouhier, M.; Smekens, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Many urban areas are located near active volcanoes around the world. Therefore, scientific research on different indicators of imminent eruptions is carried out on an ongoing basis. Due to the hazardous and unpredictable behavior of volcanoes, remote sensing technologies are normally preferred for investigations. Over the years, the Telops Hyper-Cam, a high-performance infrared hyperspectral camera, has established itself as a reference tool for investigating gas clouds over large distances. In order to illustrate the benefits of standoff infrared hyperspectral imaging for characterizing volcanic processes, many different measurements were carried out from an elevated point ( 800 m) of the Stromboli volcano (Italy) by researchers from the Université Blaise-Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand, France). The Stromboli volcano is well known for its periodic eruptions of small magnitude containing various proportions of ash, lava and gases. Imaging was carried out at a relatively high spectral and spatial resolution before and during eruptions from the North-East (NE) craters. Both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur tetrafluoride (SiF4) could be successfully identified within the volcano's plume from their distinct spectral features. During the passive degassing phase, a total amount of 3.3 kg of SO2 and 0.8 g of SiF4 were estimated. A violent eruption from NE1 crater was then observed and a total of 45 g and and 7 g of SO2 and SiF4 were estimated respectively. These results are in good agreement with previous work using a UV-SO2 camera. Finally, a smaller eruption from NE2 crater was observed. Total amounts of 3 kg and 17 g of SO2 and SiF4 were estimated respectively. Quantitative chemical maps for both gases will be presented. The results show that standoff thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging provides unique insights for a better understanding of volcanic eruptions.

  14. A Global Map of Coherent M2 Internal Tide Surface Elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite altimetry reveals small surface waves, with elevations of order 1 cm or smaller, associated with internal tides in the deep ocean. The global satellite data provide an unprecedented picture of such waves, potentially yielding much information about the ocean interior. Accurate knowledge of these waves is also needed for de-tiding altimetry in certain sensitive applications, including the future SWOT mission. Several approaches have been initiated recently to map these tiny waves, usually with some reliance on hydrographic information (e.g., recent work by Dushaw et al., 2011). Here we explore the feasibility of a purely empirical approach which avoids assumptions about stratification or modal wavelengths. A global elevation map is constructed based on tidal analysis of Topex/Poseidon, Jason, ERS-2, Envisat and GFO data. Small (order 5 mm) residuals, with wavelengths much longer than the baroclinic tide, appear unless now-standard along-track high-pass filters are applied, but filtering is shown to cause serious loss of information for east-west propagating waves (given typical track patterns). The technique is probably infeasible for S2 because of Envisat's and ERS's sun-synchronous orbits. Independent data from Cryosat-2 is used to validate the results. Applying our internal-tide 'correction' to Cryosat-2 data confirms a small reduction in variance in expected locations of significant internal tides.

  15. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  16. Observation of melt surface depressions during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    Depths of depressed surface of liquid gadolinium, cerium and copper during electron beam evaporation were measured by triangulation method using a CCD camera. The depression depths estimated from the balance of the vapor pressure and the hydrostatic pressure at the evaporation surface agreed with the measured values. The periodic fluctuation of atomic beam was observed when the depression of 3∼4 mm in depth was formed at the evaporation spot. (author)

  17. Observation of a prewetting transition during surface melting of caprolactam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandavarkar, Sumant; Geertman, Rob M.; de Jeu, Wim H.

    1992-10-01

    The surface-induced melting of the closed-packed (100) face of the anisotropic molecular crystal caprolactam has been studied using x-ray reflectivity. A thin-to-thick film prewetting transition is observed at about 13 K below the bulk melting point. Only above this transition does the thickness of the quasiliquid layer increase continuously with temperature. We speculate that initially the surface melting proceeds via layering transitions.

  18. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  19. Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling in Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan K Betts

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle and the daily mean at the land-surface result from the coupling of many physical processes. The framework of this review is largely conceptual; looking for relationships and information in the coupling of processes in models and observations. Starting from the surface energy balance, the role of the surface and cloud albedos in the shortwave and longwave fluxes is discussed. A long-wave radiative scaling of the diurnal temperature range and the night-time boundary layer is summarized. Several aspects of the local surface energy partition are presented: the role of soilwater availability and clouds; vector methods for understanding mixed layer evolution, and the coupling between surface and boundary layer that determines the lifting condensation level. Moving to larger scales, evaporation-precipitation feedback in models is discussed; and the coupling of column water vapor, clouds and precipitation to vertical motion and moisture convergence over the Amazon. The final topic is a comparison of the ratio of surface shortwave cloud forcing to the diabatic precipitation forcing of the atmosphere in ERA-40 with observations.

  20. Preliminary results of the ice_sheet_CCI round robin activity on the estimation of surface elevation changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ticconi, F.; Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Khvorostovsky, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the first results of a research activity aiming to compare estimates of Surface Elevation Changes (SEC) over the Jakobshavn Isbræ basin (Greenland) using different repeat altimetry techniques and different sensors (laser vs. radar altimetry). The goal of this comparison...... is the identification of the best performing algorithm, in terms of accuracy, coverage and processing effort, for the generation of surface elevation change maps. The methods investigated here are the cross-over and repeat-track. The results of the inter-comparison are here reported and, from a first analysis......, it is found that both radar and laser altimetry resolve the surface elevation changes quite well, and that the problems found mainly in the coastal region and along the main trunk can be solved by combining the two methods. The comparison with airborne lidar data from the NASA ICEBridge and the ESA Cryo...

  1. ESA ice sheet CCI: derivation of the optimal method for surface elevation change detection of the Greenland ice sheet – round robin results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Khvorostovsky, Kirill; Ticconi, F.

    2015-01-01

    For more than two decades, radar altimetry missions have provided continuous elevation estimates of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). Here, we propose a method for using such data to estimate ice-sheet-wide surface elevation changes (SECs). The final data set will be based on observations acquired...... from the European Space Agency’s Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT), European Remote Sensing (ERS)-1 and -2, CryoSat-2, and, in the longer term, Sentinel-3 satellites. In order to find the best-performing method, an intercomparison exercise has been carried out in which the scientific community...... was asked to provide their best SEC estimates as well as feedback sheets describing the applied method. Due to the hitherto few radar-based SEC analyses as well as the higher accuracy of laser data, the participants were asked to use either ENVISAT radar or ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite...

  2. Surface mapping of magnetic hot stars. Theories versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.

    2018-01-01

    This review summarises results of recent magnetic and chemical abundance surface mapping studies of early-type stars. We discuss main trends uncovered by observational investigations and consider reliability of spectropolarimetric inversion techniques used to infer these results. A critical assessment of theoretical attempts to interpret empirical magnetic and chemical maps in the framework of, respectively, the fossil field and atomic diffusion theories is also presented. This confrontation of theory and observations demonstrates that 3D MHD models of fossil field relaxation are successful in matching the observed range of surface magnetic field geometries. At the same time, even the most recent time-dependent atomic diffusion calculations fail to reproduce diverse horizontal abundance distributions found in real magnetic hot stars.

  3. Estimates of surface methane emissions over Europe using observed surface concentrations and the FLEXPART trajectory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. J.; Kiemle, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Aalto, T.; Necki, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Arduini, J.; Apadula, F.; Berkhout, H.; Hatakka, J.; O'Doherty, S.

    2013-12-01

    We use surface methane observations from nine European ground stations, and the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport model to obtain surface methane emissions for 2010. Our inversion shows the strongest emissions from the Netherlands and the coal mines in Upper Silesia Poland. This is qualitatively consistent with the EDGAR surface flux inventory. We also report significant surface fluxes from wetlands in southern Finland during July and August and reduced wetland fluxes later in the year. Our simulated methane surface concentration captures at least half of the daily variability in the observations, suggesting that the transport model is correctly simulating the regional transport pathways over Europe. We also use our trajectory model to determine whether future space-based remote sensing instruments (MERLIN) will be able to detect both natural and anthropogenic changes in the surface flux strengths.

  4. Analysis of overdeepened valleys using the digital elevation model of the bedrock surface of Northern Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, P.

    2010-11-15

    Based on surface and borehole information, together with pre-existing regional and local interpretations, a 7,150 square kilometre Raster Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface of northern Switzerland was constructed using a 25 m cell size. This model represents a further important step in the understanding of Quaternary sediment distribution and is open to a broad field of application and analysis, including hydrogeological, geotechnical and geophysical studies as well as research in the field of Pleistocene landscape evolution. An analysis of the overdeepened valleys in the whole model area and, more specifically in the Reuss area, shows that, in most cases, overdeepening is restricted to the areas covered by the Last Glaciation Maximum (LGM). However, at various locations relatively narrow overdeepened valleys outreach the tongue basins and the LGM ice shield limits. Therefore, an earlier and further-reaching glacial event has probably contributed significantly to the overdeepening of these valleys. No significant overdeepening has been identified downstream of Boettstein (Aare) and Kaiserstuhl (Rhine), although the ice extended considerably further downstream, at least during the most extensive glaciation. Except for the bedrock between Brugg and Boettstein, no overdeepened valleys are found significantly north of the outcrop of Mesozoic limestone of the Folded and Tabular Jura. A detailed analysis of the Reuss area shows that the Lake and Suhre valleys are separated from the Emmen-Gisikon Reuss valley basin by a significant bedrock barrier. The individual bedrock valleys are divided into several sub-basins, indicating a multiphase evolution of the valleys. Some of the swells or barriers separating the sub-basins coincide with known late LGM retreat stages. In the Suhre valley, an old fluvial valley floor with restricted overdeepened sections is documented. (author)

  5. Aerosol Observing System Surface Meteorology (AOSMET) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrouac, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerosol Observing System (AOS) surface meteorology instrument is an ancillary sensor that provides temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed and direction, and precipitation data relevant to the AOS. It consists of a Vaisala WXT520 Weather Transmitter mounted on top of the AOS aerosol inlet, at a height of approximately 10 meters.

  6. Attribution of observed surface humidity changes to human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Katharine M; Gillett, Nathan P; Jones, Philip D; Thorne, Peter W

    2007-10-11

    Water vapour is the most important contributor to the natural greenhouse effect, and the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere is expected to increase under conditions of greenhouse-gas-induced warming, leading to a significant feedback on anthropogenic climate change. Theoretical and modelling studies predict that relative humidity will remain approximately constant at the global scale as the climate warms, leading to an increase in specific humidity. Although significant increases in surface specific humidity have been identified in several regions, and on the global scale in non-homogenized data, it has not been shown whether these changes are due to natural or human influences on climate. Here we use a new quality-controlled and homogenized gridded observational data set of surface humidity, with output from a coupled climate model, to identify and explore the causes of changes in surface specific humidity over the late twentieth century. We identify a significant global-scale increase in surface specific humidity that is attributable mainly to human influence. Specific humidity is found to have increased in response to rising temperatures, with relative humidity remaining approximately constant. These changes may have important implications, because atmospheric humidity is a key variable in determining the geographical distribution and maximum intensity of precipitation, the potential maximum intensity of tropical cyclones, and human heat stress, and has important effects on the biosphere and surface hydrology.

  7. Surface elevation change and susceptibility of different mangrove zones to sea-level rise on Pacific high islands of Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, K.W.; Cahoon, D.R.; Allen, J.A.; Ewel, K.C.; Lynch, J.C.; Cormier, N.

    2010-01-01

    Mangroves on Pacific high islands offer a number of important ecosystem services to both natural ecological communities and human societies. High islands are subjected to constant erosion over geologic time, which establishes an important source of terrigeneous sediment for nearby marine communities. Many of these sediments are deposited in mangrove forests and offer mangroves a potentially important means for adjusting surface elevation with rising sea level. In this study, we investigated sedimentation and elevation dynamics of mangrove forests in three hydrogeomorphic settings on the islands of Kosrae and Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). Surface accretion rates ranged from 2.9 to 20.8 mm y-1, and are high for naturally occurring mangroves. Although mangrove forests in Micronesian high islands appear to have a strong capacity to offset elevation losses by way of sedimentation, elevation change over 61/2 years ranged from -3.2 to 4.1 mm y-1, depending on the location. Mangrove surface elevation change also varied by hydrogeomorphic setting and river, and suggested differential, and not uniformly bleak, susceptibilities among Pacific high island mangroves to sea-level rise. Fringe, riverine, and interior settings registered elevation changes of -1.30, 0.46, and 1.56 mm y-1, respectively, with the greatest elevation deficit (-3.2 mm y-1) from a fringe zone on Pohnpei and the highest rate of elevation gain (4.1 mm y-1) from an interior zone on Kosrae. Relative to sea-level rise estimates for FSM (0.8-1.8 mm y-1) and assuming a consistent linear trend in these estimates, soil elevations in mangroves on Kosrae and Pohnpei are experiencing between an annual deficit of 4.95 mm and an annual surplus of 3.28 mm. Although natural disturbances are important in mediating elevation gain in some situations, constant allochthonous sediment deposition probably matters most on these Pacific high islands, and is especially helpful in certain hydrogeomorphic zones

  8. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Sensitivity of surface meteorological analyses to observation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Daniel Paul

    A computationally efficient variational analysis system for two-dimensional meteorological fields is developed and described. This analysis approach is most efficient when the number of analysis grid points is much larger than the number of available observations, such as for large domain mesoscale analyses. The analysis system is developed using MATLAB software and can take advantage of multiple processors or processor cores. A version of the analysis system has been exported as a platform independent application (i.e., can be run on Windows, Linux, or Macintosh OS X desktop computers without a MATLAB license) with input/output operations handled by commonly available internet software combined with data archives at the University of Utah. The impact of observation networks on the meteorological analyses is assessed by utilizing a percentile ranking of individual observation sensitivity and impact, which is computed by using the adjoint of the variational surface assimilation system. This methodology is demonstrated using a case study of the analysis from 1400 UTC 27 October 2010 over the entire contiguous United States domain. The sensitivity of this approach to the dependence of the background error covariance on observation density is examined. Observation sensitivity and impact provide insight on the influence of observations from heterogeneous observing networks as well as serve as objective metrics for quality control procedures that may help to identify stations with significant siting, reporting, or representativeness issues.

  10. Structure-from-Motion Using Historical Aerial Images to Analyse Changes in Glacier Surface Elevation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Mölg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of structure-from-motion (SfM to generate digital terrain models (DTMs derived from different image sources has strongly increased, the major reason for this being that processing is substantially easier with SfM than with conventional photogrammetry. To test the functionality in a demanding environment, we applied SfM and conventional photogrammetry to archival aerial images from Zmuttgletscher, a mountain glacier in Switzerland, for nine dates between 1946 and 2005 using the most popular software packages, and compared the results regarding bundle adjustment and final DTM quality. The results suggest that by using SfM it is possible to produce DTMs of similar quality as with conventional photogrammetry. Higher point cloud density and less noise allow a higher ground resolution of the final DTM, and the time effort from the user is 3–6 times smaller, while the controls of the commercial software packages Agisoft PhotoScan (Version 1.2; Agisoft, St. Petersburg, Russia and Pix4Dmapper (Version 3.0; Pix4D, Lausanne, Switzerland are limited in comparison to ERDAS photogrammetry. SfM performs less reliably when few images with little overlap are processed. Even though SfM facilitates the largely automated production of high quality DTMs, the user is not exempt from a thorough quality check, at best with reference data where available. The resulting DTM time series revealed an average change in surface elevation at the glacier tongue of −67.0 ± 5.3 m. The spatial pattern of changes over time reflects the influence of flow dynamics and the melt of clean ice and that under debris cover. With continued technological advances, we expect to see an increasing use of SfM in glaciology for a variety of purposes, also in processing archival aerial imagery.

  11. Surface Elevation Change of Transantarctic Outlet Glaciers using Historical Aerial Imagery and Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, S. F.; Stearns, L. A.; Girod, L.

    2017-12-01

    Transantarctic Mountain outlet glaciers drain ice from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet to the Ross Ice Shelf and are generally considered to be stable. However, studies that assess these glaciers typically use data with coarse spatial resolutions (1 - 20 km) and span only the last 15 - 20 years. Here, we use trimetrogon aerial (TMA) photographs collected by the United States Geological Survey from 1960 - 1965 to create historical surface elevation maps. We construct elevations from both the vertical (0° nadir) and oblique photographs using MicMac, a Structure-from-Motion (SfM) software. With typical SfM processing, accurate ground control points (GCPs) are necessary for the best results; however, in situ GCPs are extremely sparse in Antarctica, so we manually identify GCPs using exposed rock outcrops in the WorldView imagery. The historical glacier surface elevations are then compared with present-day elevations derived from WorldView imagery. With this methodology, we assess how Transantarctic outlet glaciers have changed over 55 years. Recent studies indicate thinning of the eastern Ross Ice Shelf, where it borders the Transantarctic Mountains. With long-term records of glacier elevation change, we can differentiate whether ice shelf thinning is driven by changes in glacier or ocean dynamics. These results give us a better understanding of the long-term stability of East Antarctic outlet glaciers, which is essential in improving predictive models of ice sheet behavior.

  12. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  13. Asian Dust Weather Categorization with Satellite and Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tang-Huang; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study categorizes various dust weather types by means of satellite remote sensing over central Asia. Airborne dust particles can be identified by satellite remote sensing because of the different optical properties exhibited by coarse and fine particles (i.e. varying particle sizes). If a correlation can be established between the retrieved aerosol optical properties and surface visibility, the intensity of dust weather can be more effectively and consistently discerned using satellite rather than surface observations. In this article, datasets consisting of collocated products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua and surface measurements are analysed. The results indicate an exponential relationship between the surface visibility and the satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth, which is subsequently used to categorize the dust weather. The satellite-derived spatial frequency distributions in the dust weather types are consistent with China s weather station reports during 2003, indicating that dust weather classification using satellite data is highly feasible. Although the period during the springtime from 2004 to 2007 may be not sufficient for statistical significance, our results reveal an increasing tendency in both intensity and frequency of dust weather over central Asia during this time period.

  14. Venus Surface Composition Constrained by Observation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Martha; Treiman, Allan; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    New observations from the Venus Express spacecraft as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of Venus analogue materials have advanced our understanding of the petrology of Venus melts and the mineralogy of rocks on the surface. The VIRTIS instrument aboard Venus Express provided a map of the southern hemisphere of Venus at ˜1 μm allowing, for the first time, the definition of surface units in terms of their 1 μm emissivity and derived mineralogy. Tessera terrain has lower emissivity than the presumably basaltic plains, consistent with a more silica-rich or felsic mineralogy. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental production of melts with Venera and Vega starting compositions predict derivative melts that range from mafic to felsic. Large volumes of felsic melts require water and may link the formation of tesserae to the presence of a Venus ocean. Low emissivity rocks may also be produced by atmosphere-surface weathering reactions unlike those seen presently. High 1 μm emissivity values correlate to stratigraphically recent flows and have been used with theoretical and experimental predictions of basalt weathering to identify regions of recent volcanism. The timescale of this volcanism is currently constrained by the weathering of magnetite (higher emissivity) in fresh basalts to hematite (lower emissivity) in Venus' oxidizing environment. Recent volcanism is corroborated by transient thermal anomalies identified by the VMC instrument aboard Venus Express. The interpretation of all emissivity data depends critically on understanding the composition of surface materials, kinetics of rock weathering and their measurement under Venus conditions. Extended theoretical studies, continued analysis of earlier spacecraft results, new atmospheric data, and measurements of mineral stability under Venus conditions have improved our understanding atmosphere-surface interactions. The calcite-wollastonite CO2 buffer has been discounted due, among other things, to

  15. Ocean Surface Wind Speed of Hurricane Helene Observed by SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Cheng, Yongcun; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The hurricanes can be detected by many remote sensors, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can yield high-resolution (sub-kilometer) and low-level wind information that cannot be seen below the cloud by other sensors. In this paper, an assessment of SAR capability of monitoring high......-resolution hurricane was conducted. A case study was carried out to retrieve ocean surface wind field from C-band RADARSAT-1 SAR image which captured the structure of hurricane Helene over the Atlantic Ocean on 20 September, 2006. With wind direction from the outputs of U.S. Navy Operational Global Atmospheric...... CIWRAP models have been tested to extract wind speed from SAR data. The SAR retrieved ocean surface winds were compared to the aircraft wind speed observations from stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR). The results show the capability of hurricane wind monitoring by SAR....

  16. Ocean Surface Carbon Dioxide Fugacity Observed from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiaosu

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and validated a statistical model to estimate the fugacity (or partial pressure) of carbon dioxide (CO2) at sea surface (pCO2sea) from space-based observations of sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll, and salinity. More than a quarter million in situ measurements coincident with satellite data were compiled to train and validate the model. We have produced and made accessible 9 years (2002-2010) of the pCO2sea at 0.5 degree resolutions daily over the global ocean. The results help to identify uncertainties in current JPL Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) model-based and bottom-up estimates over the ocean. The utility of the data to reveal multi-year and regional variability of the fugacity in relation to prevalent oceanic parameters is demonstrated.

  17. The TOAR database on observations of surface ozone (and more)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M. G.; Schröder, S.; Cooper, O. R.; Galbally, I. E.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Tanimoto, H.; Elshorbany, Y. F.; Naja, M. K.; Seguel, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    In support of the first Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) a relational database of global surface ozone observations has been developed and populated with hourly measurement data and enhanced metadata. A comprehensive suite of ozone data products including standard statistics, health and vegetation impact metrics, and trend information, are made available through a common data portal and a web interface. These data form the basis of the TOAR analyses focusing on human health, vegetation, and climate relevant ozone issues. Cooperation among many data centers and individual researchers worldwide made it possible to build the world's largest collection of in-situ hourly surface ozone data covering the period from 1970 to 2015. By combining the data from almost 10,000 measurement sites around the world with global metadata information, new analyses of surface ozone have become possible, such as the first globally consistent characterisations of measurement sites as either urban or rural/remote. Exploitation of these global metadata allows for new insights into the global distribution, and seasonal and long-term changes of tropospheric ozone and they enable TOAR to perform the first, globally consistent analysis of present-day ozone concentrations and recent ozone changes with relevance to health, agriculture, and climate. This presentation will provide a summary of the TOAR surface observations database including recent additions of ozone precursor and meteorological data. We will demonstrate how the database can be accessed and the data can be used, and we will discuss its limitations and the potential for closing some of teh remaining data gaps.

  18. ENSO impact on surface radiative fluxes as observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, R. T.; Grodsky, S. A.; Zhang, B.; Busalacchi, A.; Chen, W.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on surface radiative fluxes over the tropical Pacific using satellite observations and fluxes derived from selected atmospheric reanalyses. Agreement between the two in this region is important because reanalysis information is frequently used to assess surface energy budget sensitivity to ENSO. We found that during the traditional ENSO, the maximum variance of anomalous incoming solar radiation is located just west of the dateline and coincides with the area of the largest anomalous SST gradient. It can reach up to 60 W/m2 and lags behind the Niño3 index by about a month, suggesting a response to anomalous SST gradient. The magnitude of longwave anomaly is only half that large and varies in phase with the SST anomaly. Similar anomalies were derived from outputs: from the European Centre for Medium-Weather Forecasts Reanalysis Interim (ERA-I), from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis version 2 (MERRA-2), from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 (R1), and from the Japanese JRA55 reanalysis. Among the four reanalyses used, results from ERA-I are the closest to observations. We have also investigated the surface wind divergence/convergence and found that the main factor limiting eastward excursions of convection is the surface wind convergence. Due to the wind divergence pattern normally present over the eastern cold tongue, anomalous convection extends into the eastern equatorial Pacific only during the strongest warm events. Our analysis also considers the El Niño Modoki events, for which the radiation flux patterns are shifted westward following the SST pattern.

  19. A surface elevation changes of the Greenland ice sheet from SARAL/AltiKa satellite radar altimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khvorostovsky, Kirill; Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard

    Radar altimeter measurements from ERS, Envisat and Cryosat-2 ESA’s satellites have been used for study of the ice sheet elevation changes for more than two decades. The follow-on SARAL ISRO/CNES mission with the radar altimeter AltiKa on board was launched in February 2013 on the same orbit...... as Envisat. However, in contrast to the previous Ku-band radar altimeters, AltiKa operates in Ka-band (36.8 GHz) resulting in smaller footprint, better vertical resolution and decreased penetration of the signal in the snowpack. This work presents Greenland ice sheet surface elevation changes (SEC) derived...... from the first years of SARAL/AltiKa operation as part of the ESA’s Climate Change Initiative program, which addresses the GrIS as one of the Essential Climate Variables. Seasonal changes in elevation and radar altimeter waveform parameters are estimated using crossover and stacking methods...

  20. Suzaku observations of low surface brightness cluster Abell 1631

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazaki, Yasunori; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ota, Naomi; Sasaki, Shin; Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Matsumoto, Hironori

    2018-04-01

    We present analysis results for a nearby galaxy cluster Abell 1631 at z = 0.046 using the X-ray observatory Suzaku. This cluster is categorized as a low X-ray surface brightness cluster. To study the dynamical state of the cluster, we conduct four-pointed Suzaku observations and investigate physical properties of the Mpc-scale hot gas associated with the A 1631 cluster for the first time. Unlike relaxed clusters, the X-ray image shows no strong peak at the center and an irregular morphology. We perform spectral analysis and investigate the radial profiles of the gas temperature, density, and entropy out to approximately 1.5 Mpc in the east, north, west, and south directions by combining with the XMM-Newton data archive. The measured gas density in the central region is relatively low (a few ×10-4 cm-3) at the given temperature (˜2.9 keV) compared with X-ray-selected clusters. The entropy profile and value within the central region (r < 0.1 r200) are found to be flatter and higher (≳400 keV cm2). The observed bolometric luminosity is approximately three times lower than that expected from the luminosity-temperature relation in previous studies of relaxed clusters. These features are also observed in another low surface brightness cluster, Abell 76. The spatial distributions of galaxies and the hot gas appear to be different. The X-ray luminosity is relatively lower than that expected from the velocity dispersion. A post-merger scenario may explain the observed results.

  1. Planetary surface characterization from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, Anne; Planetary Radar Team of the Arecibo Observatory

    2017-10-01

    We present a new method to investigate the physical properties of planetary surfaces using dual-polarization radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased radically during the last five years, allowing us to compare the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. There has also been progress in the laboratory studies of the materials that are relevant to asteroids and comets.In a typical planetary radar measurement a circularly polarized signal is transmitted using a frequency of 2380 MHz (wavelength of 12.6 cm) or 8560 MHz (3.5 cm). The echo is received simultaneously in the same circular (SC) and the opposite circular (OC) polarization as the transmitted signal. The delay and doppler frequency of the signal give highly accurate astrometric information, and the intensity and the polarization are suggestive of the physical properties of the target's near-surface.The radar albedo describes the radar reflectivity of the target. If the effective near-surface is smooth and homogeneous in the wavelength-scale, the echo is received fully in the OC polarization. Wavelength-scale surface roughness or boulders within the effective near-surface volume increase the received echo power in both polarizations. However, there is a lack in the literature describing exactly how the physical properties of the target affect the radar albedo in each polarization, or how they can be derived from the radar measurements.To resolve this problem, we utilize the information that the diffuse components of the OC and SC parts are correlated when the near-surface contains wavelength-scale scatterers such as boulders. A linear least-squares fit to the detected values of OC and SC radar albedos allows us to separate the diffusely scattering part from the quasi-specular part. Combined with the spectro-photometric information of the target and laboratory studies of the permittivity-density dependence, the method provides us with a

  2. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surfaceemissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze theeffects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane.A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy is considered and the information on therelief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refersto a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E,i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impacton surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboringelevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects arenegligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the localobservation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respectto the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of thepolarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization, or attenuates (horizontal polarizationthis decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, theconclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated,whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which bothunder- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to aflat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval areyielded.

  3. First observations of surface ozone concentration from the summit region of Mount Everest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John L.; Moore, G. W. K.

    2008-10-01

    The extreme height of Mount Everest is such that its summit region may periodically be in the lower stratosphere. In this regard it provides a unique location for observing the exchange of ozone between the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Here we report the first surface ozone measurements from the summit region of Mount Everest. Simultaneous measurements were recorded at different elevations on the north side from base camp (5676 m) to the summit (8848 m) during May 2005. The concentrations measured were as high as 70 ppb. Meteorological diagnostics suggest that the stratosphere as well as the long range transport of polluted tropospheric air masses from South East Asia are sources of the observed ozone. There is evidence that the source region for ozone in the vicinity of Mount Everest may vary with the onset of the summer monsoon.

  4. Use of new satellite sea surface temperature observations in OSTIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Emma; Mao, Chongyuan; Good, Simon

    2017-04-01

    OSTIA is the Met Office's Operational SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and Ice Analysis system, which produces L4 (globally complete, gridded) analyses on a daily basis. The product is made freely available through CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service). Additional satellite SST datasets have been assimilated into the OSTIA analysis operationally from 15 March 2016. These datasets are ACSPO VIIRS L3U from NOAA/NESDIS/STAR and AMSR2 L2P from REMSS (Remote Sensing Systems). This has led to a sizable improvement in the RMS error of the OSTIA analysis compared to independent Argo observations. Test runs assimilating ACSPO VIIRS and REMSS AMSR2 observations separately have indicated that the total improvement is due to the action of both datasets together rather than one or the other. In addition, ACSPO VIIRS replaced MetOp-A AVHRR as the reference satellite dataset used in OSTIA on 6 November 2016. The reference satellite data, in addition to in situ observations, are used for bias correction of the other satellite data types used in the analysis. The change to using VIIRS as a reference has led to notable improvements in regional biases for OSTIA compared to Argo, drifters and other satellite SST datasets, particularly in the high latitudes. Methods will be described and validation results shown in this presentation.

  5. Elevation and forest clearing effects on foraging differ between surface--and subterranean--foraging army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anjali; O'Donnell, Sean

    2009-01-01

    1. Forest fragmentation often results in a matrix of open areas mixed with patches of forest. Both biotic and abiotic factors can affect consumer species' ability to utilize the altered habitat, especially for species that range over large areas searching for prey. 2. Army ants (Formicidae: Ecitoninae) are highly mobile top predators in terrestrial Neotropical ecosystems. Army ant foraging behaviour is influenced by forest clearing at lowland sites, and clearing can reduce army ant population persistence. 3. Because high temperatures are implicated in hindering above-ground army ant foraging, we predicted that forest clearing effects on army ant foraging would be reduced at higher (cooler) elevations in montane forest. We also predicted that subterranean foraging, employed by some army ant species, would buffer them from the negative effects of forest clearing. 4. We quantified the foraging rates of above-ground and underground foraging army ants at eight sites along an elevational gradient from 1090 to 1540 m a.s.l. We asked whether these two foraging strategies cause a difference in the ability of army ants to forage in open matrix areas relative to elevationally matched forested habitats, and whether elevation predicts open area vs. forest foraging rate differences. 5. As predicted, army ants that forage above-ground had lower foraging rates in open areas, but the open area vs. forest difference declined with elevation. In contrast, underground foragers were not affected by habitat type, and underground foraging rates increased with elevation. Ground surface temperatures were higher in open areas than forested areas. Temperatures declined with elevation, and temperature differences between open and forested areas decreased with elevation. 6. We conclude that army ants that forage above-ground may be restricted to forested areas due to a thermal tolerance threshold, but that they are released from this limitation at higher elevations. We further suggest that

  6. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  7. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  8. Adatom Fe(III on the hematite surface: Observation of a key reactive surface species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosso Kevin M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of a mineral surface is determined by the variety and population of different types of surface sites (e.g., step, kink, adatom, and defect sites. The concept of "adsorbed nutrient" has been built into crystal growth theories, and many other studies of mineral surface reactivity appeal to ill-defined "active sites." Despite their theoretical importance, there has been little direct experimental or analytical investigation of the structure and properties of such species. Here, we use ex-situ and in-situ scanning tunneling microcopy (STM combined with calculated images based on a resonant tunneling model to show that observed nonperiodic protrusions and depressions on the hematite (001 surface can be explained as Fe in an adsorbed or adatom state occupying sites different from those that result from simple termination of the bulk mineral. The number of such sites varies with sample preparation history, consistent with their removal from the surface in low pH solutions.

  9. The Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document for the Derivation of Range and Range Distributions from Laser Pulse Waveform Analysis for Surface Elevations, Roughness, Slope, and Vegetation Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anita C.; Zwally, H. Jay; Bentley, Charles R.; Csatho, Bea M.; Harding, David J.; Hofton, Michelle A.; Minster, Jean-Bernard; Roberts, LeeAnne; Saba, Jack L.; Thomas, Robert H.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the GLAS instrument is to detect ice elevation changes over time which are used to derive changes in ice volume. Other objectives include measuring sea ice freeboard, ocean and land surface elevation, surface roughness, and canopy heights over land. This Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document (ATBD) describes the theory and implementation behind the algorithms used to produce the level 1B products for waveform parameters and global elevation and the level 2 products that are specific to ice sheet, sea ice, land, and ocean elevations respectively. These output products, are defined in detail along with the associated quality, and the constraints, and assumptions used to derive them.

  10. Observations. Surface and Atmospheric Climate Change. Chapter 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenberth, K.E.; Jones, P.D.; Ambenje, P.; Bojariu, R.; Easterling, D.; Klein Tank, A.; Parker, D.; Rahimzadeh, F.; Renwick, J.A.; Rusticucci, M.; Soden, B.; Zhai, P.

    2007-09-15

    This chapter assesses the observed changes in surface and atmospheric climate, placing new observations and new analyses made during the past six years (since the Third Assessment Report TAR) in the context of the previous instrumental record. In previous IPCC reports, palaeo-observations from proxy data for the pre-instrumental past and observations from the ocean and ice domains were included within the same chapter. This helped the overall assessment of the consistency among the various variables and their synthesis into a coherent picture of change. A short synthesis and scrutiny of the consistency of all the observations is included here (see Section 3.9). In the TAR, surface temperature trends were examined from 1860 to 2000 globally, for 1901 to 2000 as maps and for three sub-periods (1910-1945, 1946-1975 and 1976-2000). The first and third sub-periods had rising temperatures, while the second sub-period had relatively stable global mean temperatures. The 1976 divide is the date of a widely acknowledged 'climate shift' and seems to mark a time when global mean temperatures began a discernible upward trend that has been at least partly attributed to increases in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The picture prior to 1976 has essentially not changed and is therefore not repeated in detail here. However, it is more convenient to document the sub-period after 1979, rather than 1976, owing to the availability of increased and improved satellite data since then (in particular Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) data) in association with the Global Weather Experiment (GWE) of 1979. The post-1979 period allows, for the first time, a global perspective on many fields of variables, such as precipitation, that was not previously available. The availability of high-quality data has led to a focus on the post-1978 period, although physically this new regime seems to have begun in 1976

  11. Quantifying Surface Energy Flux Estimation Uncertainty Using Land Surface Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, A. N.; Hunsaker, D.; Thorp, K.; Bronson, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing with thermal infrared is widely recognized as good way to estimate surface heat fluxes, map crop water use, and detect water-stressed vegetation. When combined with net radiation and soil heat flux data, observations of sensible heat fluxes derived from surface temperatures (LST) are indicative of instantaneous evapotranspiration (ET). There are, however, substantial reasons LST data may not provide the best way to estimate of ET. For example, it is well known that observations and models of LST, air temperature, or estimates of transport resistances may be so inaccurate that physically based model nevertheless yield non-meaningful results. Furthermore, using visible and near infrared remote sensing observations collected at the same time as LST often yield physically plausible results because they are constrained by less dynamic surface conditions such as green fractional cover. Although sensitivity studies exist that help identify likely sources of error and uncertainty, ET studies typically do not provide a way to assess the relative importance of modeling ET with and without LST inputs. To better quantify model benefits and degradations due to LST observational inaccuracies, a Bayesian uncertainty study was undertaken using data collected in remote sensing experiments at Maricopa, Arizona. Visible, near infrared and thermal infrared data were obtained from an airborne platform. The prior probability distribution of ET estimates were modeled using fractional cover, local weather data and a Penman-Monteith mode, while the likelihood of LST data was modeled from a two-source energy balance model. Thus the posterior probabilities of ET represented the value added by using LST data. Results from an ET study over cotton grown in 2014 and 2015 showed significantly reduced ET confidence intervals when LST data were incorporated.

  12. Surface Modification of Austenitic Stainless Steels by High-Flux Elevated-Temperature Nitrogen-Ion Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Orhan

    Nitrogen diffusivity is found to be enhanced under unusual N ion beam conditions used for modification of fcc AISI 304 stainless steel surfaces. The unusual conditions also lead to the development of various near-surface microstructures and enhanced mechanical properties. The relative importance of ion energy and current density on N penetration was studied in order to help understand the enhanced N diffusivity. The role of residual stresses in the N implanted layers was also investigated. The N beam conditions included: (1) ion beam energies from 0.4 to 60 keV; (2) beam current densities from 0.1 to 5 mA/cm^2; (3) an elevated substrate temperature of 400^ circC; (4) implantation times of 10 to 30 minutes. Mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the near-surface N ion implanted microstructures. Supplemental data were obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) on selected samples. A metastable, fcc, high-N phase (gamma _{N}) is found to be generally produced in fcc 304 SS for all ion energies and current densities at 400^circC. The gamma_{N} was found to be either paramagnetic or magnetic in nature depending on the N content. With a low-energy, high-flux N beam, magnetic gamma_{N} was found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature. The N contents and depths were found to depend on the grain orientation relative to the ion beam direction for low -energy, high-flux conditions. The N was found to diffuse deeper in the (200) oriented grains compared to the (111) oriented grains and the N contents were significantly higher in the (200) planes relative to the (111) planes. Post-implantation annealing experiments showed that the magnetic gamma_{N} phase was destabilized as a result of annealing it at 400^circC, thereby resulting in thicker and predominantly paramagnetic gamma _{N} layers with less N in solution and less lattice

  13. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  14. TanDEM-X the Earth surface observation project from space level - basis and mission status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Wiśniowski

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available TanDEM-X is DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt the Earth surface observation project using high-resolution SAR interferometry. It opens a new era in space borne radar remote sensing. The system is based on two satellites: TerraSAR-X (TSX and TanDEM-X (TDX flying on the very close, strictly controlled orbits. This paper gives an overview of the radar technology and overview of the TanDEM-X mission concept which is based on several innovative technologies. The primary objective of the mission is to deliver a global digital elevation model (DEM with an unprecedented accuracy, which is equal to or surpass the HRTI-3 specifications (12 m posting, relative height accuracy ±2 m for slope < 20% and ±4 m for slope > 20% [8]. Beyond that, TanDEM-X provides a highly reconfigurable platform for the demonstration of new radar imaging techniques and applications.[b]Keywords[/b]: remote sensing, Bistatic SAR, digital elevation model (DEM, Helix formation, SAR interferomery, HRTI-3, synchronization

  15. Hydrolytic Stability of 3-Aminopropylsilane Coupling Agent on Silica and Silicate Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okhrimenko, Denis; Budi, Akin; Ceccato, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    in coupling efficiency, thus decreasing the product quality and the mechanical strength of the polymer-inorganic material interface. Therefore, a better understanding of the chemical state and stability of APS on inorganic surfaces is needed. In this work, we investigated APS adhesion on silica wafers...... and compared its properties with those on complex silicate surfaces such as those used by industry (mineral fibers and fiber melt wafers). The APS was deposited from aqueous and organic (toluene) solutions and studied with surface sensitive techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic......- and laboratory-scale APS deposition methods and increasing adhesion and stability, thus increasing the quality and effectiveness of materials where APS is used as a coupling agent....

  16. First observations of elevated ducts associated with intermittent turbulence in the stable boundary layer over Bosten Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Ning, Hui; Song, Shihui; Yan, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    Nocturnal radiative cooling is a main driver for atmospheric duct formation. Within this atmospheric process, the impacts of intermittent turbulence on ducting have seldom been studied. In this paper, we reported two confusing ducting events observed in the early morning in August 2014 over Bosten Lake, China, when a stable boundary layer (SBL) still survived, by using tethered high-resolution GPS radiosondes. Elevated ducts with strong humidity inversions were observed during the balloon ascents but were absent during observations made upon the balloon descents several minutes later. This phenomenon was initially hypothesized to be attributable to turbulence motions in the SBL, and the connection between the turbulence event and the radar duct was examined by the statistical Thorpe method. Turbulence patches were detected from the ascent profiles but not from the descent profiles. The possible reasons for the duct formation and elimination were discussed in detail. The turbulent transport of moisture in the SBL and the advection due to airflows coming from the lake are the most probable reasons for duct formation. In one case, the downward transport of moisture by turbulence mixing within a Kelvin-Helmholtz billow at the top of the low-level jet resulted in duct elimination. In another case, the passage of density currents originating from the lake may have caused the elimination of the duct. Few studies have attempted to associate intermittent turbulence with radar ducts; thus, this work represents a pioneering study into the connection between turbulent events and atmospheric ducts in a SBL.

  17. Observing the Agulhas Current with sea surface temperature and altimetry data: challenges and perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -Red Sea Surface Temperature datasets still suffer from inadequate cloud masking algorithms, particularly in regions of strong temperature gradient. Despite both Sea Surface Height and Sea Surface Temperature observations being severely compromised...

  18. Some observations on the greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akitt, J. W.

    2018-01-01

    It is shown that the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and water vapour reflect back to the surface, all IR radiation originating at the surface within their respective spectral bands. This reflection occurs in a very thin layer at the surface, not much over 12 cm in thickness. Heat is lost from the surface by heat exchange with the atmosphere and by loss of radiation. About 52% of radiation leaves the surface in two principal window regions but this is not enough to account for the earth's equilibrium temperature. This window radiation seems to disappear quite quickly and is replaced by black body radiation. It is this which eventually contributes to the earth's radiation balance, and has to originate approximately between 40 and 50 km altitude where the temperature is about correct, near 255 K. Doubling the CO2 concentration increases the surface temperature by about 0.9 °C and this need not have any influence higher up in the atmosphere. The surface temperature seems indeed to have no direct influence on the earth's external radiation balance.

  19. Detection of surface elevation changes using an unmanned aerial vehicle on the debris-free Storbreen glacier in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenbrink, Philip; Andreassen, Liss; Immerzeel, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has great potential to investigate the dynamic behavior of glaciers. The studies have successfully deployed UAVs over generally contrast-rich surfaces of debris-covered glaciers and highly crevassed bare ice glaciers. In this study, the potential of UAVs in glaciology is further exploited, as we use a fixed-wing UAV over the largely snow-covered Storbreen glacier in Norway in September 2015. The acquired UAV-imagery was processed into accurate digital elevation models and image mosaics using a Structure from Motion workflow. Georeferencing of the data was obtained by ingesting ground control points into the workflow that were accurately measured with a differential global navigation satellite system (DGNSS). Geodetic accuracy was determined by comparison with DGNSS surface profiles and stake positions that were measured on the same day. The processed data were compared with a LIDAR survey and airborne imagery acquisition from September and October 2009 to examine mass loss patterns and glacier retreat. Results show that the UAV is capable of producing high-quality elevation models and image mosaics for the low-contrast snow-covered Storbreen at unprecedented detail. The accuracy of the output product is lower when compared to contrast-rich debris-covered glaciers, but still considerably more accurate than spaceborne data products. Comparison with LIDAR data shows a spatially heterogeneous downwasting pattern of about 0.75 m a-1 over 2009-2015 for the upper part of Storbreen. The lower part exhibits considerably more downwasting in the range of 0.9-2.1 m a-1. We conclude that UAVs can be valuable for surveys of snow-covered glaciers to provide sufficient accurate elevation models and image mosaics, and we recommend the use of UAVs for the routine monitoring of benchmark glaciers such as Storbreen.

  20. Created mangrove wetlands store belowground carbon and surface elevation change enables them to adjust to sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W; Cormier, Nicole; Osland, Michael J; Kirwan, Matthew L; Stagg, Camille L; Nestlerode, Janet A; Russell, Marc J; From, Andrew S; Spivak, Amanda C; Dantin, Darrin D; Harvey, James E; Almario, Alejandro E

    2017-04-21

    Mangrove wetlands provide ecosystem services for millions of people, most prominently by providing storm protection, food and fodder. Mangrove wetlands are also valuable ecosystems for promoting carbon (C) sequestration and storage. However, loss of mangrove wetlands and these ecosystem services are a global concern, prompting the restoration and creation of mangrove wetlands as a potential solution. Here, we investigate soil surface elevation change, and its components, in created mangrove wetlands over a 25 year developmental gradient. All created mangrove wetlands were exceeding current relative sea-level rise rates (2.6 mm yr -1 ), with surface elevation change of 4.2-11.0 mm yr -1 compared with 1.5-7.2 mm yr -1 for nearby reference mangroves. While mangrove wetlands store C persistently in roots/soils, storage capacity is most valuable if maintained with future sea-level rise. Through empirical modeling, we discovered that properly designed creation projects may not only yield enhanced C storage, but also can facilitate wetland persistence perennially under current rates of sea-level rise and, for most sites, for over a century with projected medium accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 6.0). Only the fastest projected accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 8.5) led to widespread submergence and potential loss of stored C for created mangrove wetlands before 2100.

  1. Created mangrove wetlands store belowground carbon and surface elevation change enables them to adjust to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Cormier, Nicole; Osland, Michael J.; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Stagg, Camille L.; Nestlerode, Janet A.; Russell, Marc J.; From, Andrew; Spivak, Amanda C.; Dantin, Darrin D.; Harvey, James E.; Almario, Alejandro E.

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands provide ecosystem services for millions of people, most prominently by providing storm protection, food and fodder. Mangrove wetlands are also valuable ecosystems for promoting carbon (C) sequestration and storage. However, loss of mangrove wetlands and these ecosystem services are a global concern, prompting the restoration and creation of mangrove wetlands as a potential solution. Here, we investigate soil surface elevation change, and its components, in created mangrove wetlands over a 25 year developmental gradient. All created mangrove wetlands were exceeding current relative sea-level rise rates (2.6 mm yr−1), with surface elevation change of 4.2–11.0 mm yr−1 compared with 1.5–7.2 mm yr−1 for nearby reference mangroves. While mangrove wetlands store C persistently in roots/soils, storage capacity is most valuable if maintained with future sea-level rise. Through empirical modeling, we discovered that properly designed creation projects may not only yield enhanced C storage, but also can facilitate wetland persistence perennially under current rates of sea-level rise and, for most sites, for over a century with projected medium accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 6.0). Only the fastest projected accelerations in sea-level rise (IPCC RCP 8.5) led to widespread submergence and potential loss of stored C for created mangrove wetlands before 2100.

  2. Surface wave propagation over sinusoidally varying topography: Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.; Heathershaw, A. D.

    Linear perturbation theory is used to show that the reflection coefficient of a patch of sinusoidal ripples on an otherwise flat bed is oscillatory in the quotient of the length of the patch and the surface wave length, and strongly dependent upon the quotient of the surface and bed wave numbers. Resonant interaction between the surface waves and the ripples if the surface wavenumber is half the ripple wavenumber is demonstrated. Few ripples, of relatively small steepness, are required to produce a substantial reflected wave. In resonant cases, the partially standing wave on the up-wave side of the ripple patch gives way, in an almost linear manner over the the ripple patch itself, to a progressive (transmitted) wave on the down-wave side. Wave tank data agree well with predictions, and suggest coupling between wave reflection and ripple growth on an erodible bed.

  3. Spectroscopic observations of the Moon at the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunzhao; Hapke, Bruce

    2018-02-01

    The Moon's reflectance spectrum records many of its important properties. However, prior to Chang'E-3 (CE-3), no spectra had previously been measured on the lunar surface. Here we show the in situ reflectance spectra of the Moon acquired on the lunar surface by the Visible-Near Infrared Spectrometer (VNIS) onboard the CE-3 rover. The VNIS detected thermal radiation from the lunar regolith, though with much shorter wavelength range than typical thermal radiometer. The measured temperatures are higher than expected from theoretical model, indicating low thermal inertia of the lunar soil and the effects of grain facet on soil temperature in submillimeter scale. The in situ spectra also reveal that 1) brightness changes visible from orbit are related to the reduction in maturity due to the removal of the fine and weathered particles by the lander's rocket exhaust, not the smoothing of the surface and 2) the spectra of the uppermost soil detected by remote sensing exhibit substantial differences with that immediately beneath, which has important implications for the remote compositional analysis. The reflectance spectra measured by VNIS not only reveal the thermal, compositional, and space-weathering properties of the Moon but also provide a means for the calibration of optical instruments that view the surface remotely.

  4. Observed linear trend in few surface weather elements over the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    total precipitation amount (TP). Linear regression analysis is used to construct the trend in variables listed in table 1 (Pant and. Rupa Kumar 1997; Bhutiyani et al. 2007, 2009,. Dimri and Das 2011). Linear regression equation of the following form is developed at each station for surface weather variables listed in table 1 to.

  5. High-resolution observations of combustion in heterogeneous surface fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Louise Loudermilk; Gary L. Achtemeier; Joseph J. O' Brien; J. Kevin Hiers; Benjamin S. Hornsby

    2014-01-01

    In ecosystems with frequent surface fires, fire and fuel heterogeneity at relevant scales have been largely ignored. This could be because complete burns give an impression of homogeneity, or due to the difficulty in capturing fine-scale variation in fuel characteristics and fire behaviour. Fire movement between patches of fuel can have implications for modelling fire...

  6. Groundwater withdrawals 1976, 1990, and 2000--10 and land-surface-elevation changes 2000--10 in Harris, Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmarek, Mark C.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    The study area comprising Harris County and parts of Galveston, Fort Bend, Montgomery, and Brazoria Counties in southeastern Texas forms part of one of the largest areas of land-surface-elevation change in the United States. Land-surface-elevation change in the study area primarily is caused by the withdrawal of groundwater. Groundwater withdrawn from the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers has been the primary source of water for municipal supply, industrial and commercial use, and irrigation in the study area. Groundwater withdrawals cause compaction of clay and silt layers abundant in the aquifers, which has in turn resulted in the widespread, substantial land-surface-elevation changes in the region with increased flooding. To estimate land-surface-elevation changes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Harris-Galveston Subsidence District (HGSD), documented land-surface-elevation changes in the study area that occurred during 2000–10 and 2005–10 based on elevation data measured by 11 USGS borehole-extensometer sites, a National Geodetic Survey Continuously Operating Reference Station, and Global Positioning System Port-A-Measure (PAM) sites operated by the HGSD and the Fort Bend Subsidence District. Groundwater withdrawals in the study area also were documented for 1976, 1990, and 2000–10.

  7. Analysis of the demagnetization process of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures by magnetic domain observation using a Kerr microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, M.; Ogimoto, H.; Kimura, Y.; Morimoto, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetization reversal and its propagation in sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets were clearly observed at elevated temperatures up to 150 °C using a Kerr microscope, image processing, and photo editing. Simultaneous magnetization reversal in several grains along the easy axis direction occurred at elevated temperature, and the extent of simultaneous magnetization reversal increased with temperature. This indicates that reduction in the coercivity of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures is attributable to decrease in anisotropy and insufficient pinning of domain walls at grain boundaries.

  8. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  9. A New Method to Estimate Changes in Glacier Surface Elevation Based on Polynomial Fitting of Sparse ICESat—GLAS Footprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjin Huang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present in this paper a polynomial fitting method applicable to segments of footprints measured by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS to estimate glacier thickness change. Our modification makes the method applicable to complex topography, such as a large mountain glacier. After a full analysis of the planar fitting method to characterize errors of estimates due to complex topography, we developed an improved fitting method by adjusting a binary polynomial surface to local topography. The improved method and the planar fitting method were tested on the accumulation areas of the Naimona’nyi glacier and Yanong glacier on along-track facets with lengths of 1000 m, 1500 m, 2000 m, and 2500 m, respectively. The results show that the improved method gives more reliable estimates of changes in elevation than planar fitting. The improved method was also tested on Guliya glacier with a large and relatively flat area and the Chasku Muba glacier with very complex topography. The results in these test sites demonstrate that the improved method can give estimates of glacier thickness change on glaciers with a large area and a complex topography. Additionally, the improved method based on GLAS Data and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission-Digital Elevation Model (SRTM-DEM can give estimates of glacier thickness change from 2000 to 2008/2009, since it takes the 2000 SRTM-DEM as a reference, which is a longer period than 2004 to 2008/2009, when using the GLAS data only and the planar fitting method.

  10. Chemical reaction on solid surface observed through isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the role of atoms and ions on solid surfaces as the partners participating in elementary processes, the literatures related to the isomerization and hydrogen exchanging reaction of olefines, the hydrogenation of olefines, the metathesis reaction and homologation of olefines based on solid catalysts were reviewed. Various olefines, of which the hydrogen atoms were substituted with deuterium at desired positions, were reacted using various solid catalysts such as ZnO, K 2 CO 3 on C, MoS 2 (single crystal and powder) and molybdenum oxide (with various carriers), and the infra-red spectra of adsorbed olefines on catalysts, the isotope composition of reaction products and the production rate of the reaction products were measured. From the results, the bonding mode of reactant with the atoms and ions on solid surfaces, and the mechanism of the elementary process were considered. The author emphasized that the mechanism of the chemical reaction on solid surfaces and the role of active points or catalysts can be made clear to the considerable extent by combining isotopes suitably. (Yoshitake, I.)

  11. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  12. Prediction of the shape of inline wave force and free surface elevation using First Order Reliability Method (FORM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghadirian, Amin; Bredmose, Henrik; Schløer, Signe

    2017-01-01

    In design of substructures for offshore wind turbines, the extreme wave loads which are of interest in Ultimate Limit States are often estimated by choosing extreme events from linear random sea states and replacing them by either stream function wave theory or the NewWave theory of a certain...... as the free surface elevation time series. The discrepancies between the FORM results and the measurements is found to be a result of more nonlinearity in the selected events than second order and negligence of the drag forces above still water level in the present analysis. This paper is one step toward more...... precise prediction of extreme wave shape and loads. Ultimately such waves can be used in the design process of offshore structures. The approach can be generalized to fully nonlinear models....

  13. [Responses of rice growth and development to elevated near-surface layer ozone (O3) concentration: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yu-long; Shi, Guang-yao; Wang, Yun-xia; Zhu, Jian-guo

    2008-04-01

    Ozone (O3) is recognized as one of the most important air pollutants. At present, the worldwide average tropospheric O3 concentration has been increased from an estimated pre-industrial level of 38 nl L(-1) (25-45 nl L(-1), 8-h summer seasonal average) to approximately 50 nl L(-1) in 2000, and to 80 nl L(-1) by 2100 based on most pessimistic projections. Oryza sativa L. (rice) is the most important grain crop in the world, and thus, to correctly evaluate how the elevated near-surface layer O3 concentration will affect the growth and development of rice is of great significance. This paper reviewed the chamber (including closed and open top chamber)-based studies about the effects of atmospheric ozone enrichment on the rice visible injury symptoms, photosynthesis, water relationship, phenology, dry matter production and allocation, leaf membrane protective system, and grain yield and its components. Further research directions in this field were discussed.

  14. Effects of rapid, high-dose, elevated temperature ion implantation on the microstructure and tribology of ferrous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, D. L.; Wei, R.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1991-05-01

    High-current, broad-beam ion implantation at 60 keV using a relatively simple system produces elevated target temperatures and results in remarkable enhancements in the wear resistance of ferrous materials compared to lower implantation temperatures. Effects of N, C and O implantation into AISI 304 stainless steel at 200 and 400°C on the microstructure and tribology are evaluated by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and a specially designed pin-on-disc tribotester. C and N implantation at 400°C yields unusually thick layers of austenite containing high concentrations of C and N in interstitial solid solution thereby accounting for the enhanced mechanical properties. O implantation at 400°C results in Fe 2O 3-like oxide rather than O in solid solution so a dispersion strengthening of the surface layer is suggested.

  15. Observations of atmospheric ozone - 38 to 76 deg north latitude at altitudes from 8 km to the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, G. L.; Beck, S. M.; Hudgins, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Ozone data were obtained from 8 km to the surface and at latitudes from 38 to 76 deg N during January and February 1983. Flight lines covered northeastern U.S., Canada, and Greenland. The results of the latitudinal survey at 5- to 8-km altitude showed O3 mixing ratios to be about 40 ppbv with little variation in latitude. One region of elevated O3 was observed and extended from 54 N to 57 deg N latitude. Ozone reached 150 ppbv at 6.4-km altitude. This sampling was stratospheric air as the tropopause height was 5.6-km altitude. Profiles at 76, 67, and 53 deg N showed O3 to be be well mixed from about 5 km to the surface. In some cases, profiles identified a layer of 1 km to 100 m vertical dimension at the surface, in which O3 destruction had occurred.

  16. Investigating stellar surface rotation using observations of starspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Heidi Helena

    2011-01-01

    Rapid rotation enhances the dynamo operating in stars, and thus also introduces significantly stronger magnetic activity than is seen in slower rotators. Many young cool stars still have the rapid, primordial rotation rates induced by the interstellar molecular cloud from which they were formed...... information on the rotation of the star. At times even information on the spot rotation at different stellar latitudes can be obtained, similarly to the solar surface differential rotation measurements using magnetic features as tracers. Here, I will review investigations of stellar rotation based...

  17. Impact of additional surface observation network on short range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    has recently deployed a high-density network of. AWS over whole of India ... Weather with Observational Meso-Network and. Atmospheric Modeling .... of data assimilation in cyclic mode. In the cyclic data assimilation, model integrates forward in time and the information content propagates with the model flow. Advection of ...

  18. Soesterberg, Netherlands. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-13

    r____ 7__ C NE o4 2.6 2±2 ;d___ ___ 6.1 6.7 ENE 301 6.6 . .~___ ___ . E lei i.7 2.1 *7_ 9,g_ (,.s __ CESE 7 _ 2.2 lei .e____ _ _ 4.2 r,. 8 SE 60 i_ .5... MEC OBSOLETE -4- N, ~ - f* f*i7 NNE- UATA PRUCESSING BRANCH ETAC/USAF SURFACE WINDS 3 AIR wEATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND I DIRECTION...73 73 74 8-T 30/ 29 4. 3.9’ 62 62 70 66 23/ 2714.3 46j ~ 46 5-7 -- T 26f 25 2.6 .9, __ 1, _ 27_7_2 4 6 24/ 23 1.6 lei 20~ -20 23 4 2 22/ 211 ___9 7 7

  19. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  20. Reconstruction of cloud-free time series satellite observations of land surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghafarian Malamiri, H.R.; Menenti, M.; Jia, L.; den Ouden, H.

    2012-01-01

    Time series satellite observations of land surface properties, like Land Surface Temperature (LST), often feature missing data or data with anomalous values due to cloud coverage, malfunction of sensor, atmospheric aerosols, defective cloud masking and retrieval algorithms. Preprocessing procedures

  1. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Imperial Beach, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    OBSERVATIONS) #!11’ IMPV’!AL B[ACH, CALIFORNIA 7Oct7-12 OCT STA~e " ATUM lM Tune MONTS ALL WEATHER 2CASS OSONS (L.0T..l~nM TAIIW IlmlceAU.IT.N~ MEAN...PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY Im f il ,it r, AI r ti. LektF L +NJ I A- 02 rc m ’A e L vrn seon" ItOW"il U aT I TmP6 WE V UM ATUM DIP01 (3) TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 1

  2. How frequently will the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) observe floods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, R. P. M.; Schumann, G.

    2017-12-01

    The SWOT mission will measure river width and water surface elevations of rivers wider than 100 m. As the data gathered by this mission will be freely available, it can be of great use for flood modeling, especially in areas where streamgage networks are exceedingly sparse, or when data sharing barriers prevent the timely access to information. Despite having world-wide coverage, SWOT's temporal sampling is limited, with most locations being revisited once or twice every 21 days. Our objective is to evaluate which fraction of world-wide floods SWOT will observe and how many observations per event the satellite will likely obtain. We take advantage of the extensive database of floods constructed by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory, who, since 1985, searches through news sources and governmental agencies, and more recently remote sensing imagery for flood information, including flood duration, location and affected area. We cross-referenced the flood locations in the DFO archive with the SWOT prototype prior database of river centerlines and the anticipated satellite's orbit to identify how many of the SWOT swaths were located within 10 km, 20 km, and 50 km from a flood centroid. Subsequently, we estimated the probability that SWOT would have at least one observation of a flood event per distance bin by multiplying the number of swaths in the distance bin by the flood duration divided by the SWOT orbit repeat period. Our analysis contemplated 132 world-wide floods recorded between May 2016 and May 2017. From these, 29, 52, and 86 floods had at least a 50% probability of having one overpass within 10 km, 20 km, and 50 km respectively. Moreover, after excluding flood events with no river centerlines within 10 km of its centroid, the average number of swaths within 10 km of a flood centroid was 1.79, indicating that in the 37 flood events that were likely caused by river flooding, at least one measurement was guaranteed to happen during the event.

  3. Ozone time scale decomposition and trend assessment from surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleti, Eirini; Hueglin, Christoph; Takahama, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of ozone precursors have been regulated in Europe since around 1990 with control measures primarily targeting to industries and traffic. In order to understand how these measures have affected air quality, it is now important to investigate concentrations of tropospheric ozone in different types of environments, based on their NOx burden, and in different geographic regions. In this study, we analyze high quality data sets for Switzerland (NABEL network) and whole Europe (AirBase) for the last 25 years to calculate long-term trends of ozone concentrations. A sophisticated time scale decomposition method, called the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) (Huang,1998;Wu,2009), is used for decomposition of the different time scales of the variation of ozone, namely the long-term trend, seasonal and short-term variability. This allows subtraction of the seasonal pattern of ozone from the observations and estimation of long-term changes of ozone concentrations with lower uncertainty ranges compared to typical methodologies used. We observe that, despite the implementation of regulations, for most of the measurement sites ozone daily mean values have been increasing until around mid-2000s. Afterwards, we observe a decline or a leveling off in the concentrations; certainly a late effect of limitations in ozone precursor emissions. On the other hand, the peak ozone concentrations have been decreasing for almost all regions. The evolution in the trend exhibits some differences between the different types of measurement. In addition, ozone is known to be strongly affected by meteorology. In the applied approach, some of the meteorological effects are already captured by the seasonal signal and already removed in the de-seasonalized ozone time series. For adjustment of the influence of meteorology on the higher frequency ozone variation, a statistical approach based on Generalized Additive Models (GAM) (Hastie,1990;Wood,2006), which corrects for meteorological

  4. Recent variations of cloudiness over Russia from surface daytime observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernokulsky, A V; Mokhov, I I; Bulygina, O N

    2011-01-01

    Changes of total and low cloud fraction and the occurrence of different cloud types over Russia were assessed. The analysis was based on visual observations from more than 1600 meteorological stations. Differences between the 2001-10 and 1991-2000 year ranges were evaluated. In general, cloud fraction has tended to increase during recent years. A major increase of total cloud fraction and a decrease of the number of days without clouds are revealed in spring and autumn mostly due to an increase of the occurrence of convective and non-precipitating stratiform clouds. In contrast, the occurrence of nimbostratus clouds has tended to decrease. In general, the ratio between the occurrence of cumulonimbus and nimbostratus clouds has increased for the period 2001-10 relative to 1991-2000. Over particular regions, a decrease of total cloud fraction and an increase of the number of days without clouds are noted.

  5. Land surface water cycles observed with satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Njoku, E. G.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Kim, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration of the global water cycle may lead to increased global precipitation, faster evaporation and a consequent exacerbation of hydrologic extreme. In the U.S. national assessment of the potential consequences of climate variability and change, two GCMs (CGCM1 and HadCM2) show a large increase in precipitation in the future over the southwestern U.S. particularly during winter (Felzer and Heard, 1999). Increased precipitation potentially has important impacts on agricultural and water use in the southeast U.S. (Hatch et al., 1999) and in the central Great Plains (Nielsen, 1997). A hurricane model predicts a 40% precipitation increase for severe hurricanes affecting southeastern Florida, which provokes substantially greater flooding that could negate most of the benefits of present water-management practices in this basin (Gutowski et al., 1994). Thus, it is important to observe the hydroclimate on a continuous longterm basis to address the question of increased precipitation in the enhanced water cycle.

  6. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  7. Imaging of surface wave phase velocities from array phase observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    While temporary deployments some 10 years ago were largely based on short-period seismometers, the availability of broadband instruments in instrument pools increased strongly in recent years and as such modern temporary deployments for passive seismological recordings often consist to a large extent, if not exclusively, of broadband instruments. This opens for new analysis approaches as the broadband seismic wavefield is obtained at a relatively high spatial sampling relative to the wavelength. In an attempt to infer surface wave phase velocity anomalies beneath Southern Norway based on data from a temporary network of 41 broadband instruments, we present a new approach to overcome the limitations of two-station phase measurements (on the great circle with the source) and instead exploit the two-dimensional nature of the wavefield by taking into account phase measurements at all stations of the array from a single event. This is based on the assumption that the wavefield is at least piecewise linear within the study region. By triangulation of the network region and linear estimation of the phase gradient in each triangle we get without further a priori assumptions a coarse image of the phase velocity variations within our network. The image can be significantly refined for a single event recording by stacking multiple images based on arbitrary subsets of the available data. Phase velocity anomalies measured from single event recordings can be biased and blurred by non-plane arriving wavefield, reflections and diffractions of heterogeneities. Therefore, by averaging over velocity fields from different events with varying backazimuths, artefacts are reduced and the recovered image significantly improved. Another way to improve the recovered structures is to take into account the spatial variation of the amplitude field. However, while the phase between two neighboring stations may be (at least close to) linear, the amplitude may not, hence estimation of the second

  8. From Ground Truth to Space: Surface, Subsurface and Remote Observations Associated with Nuclear Test Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Burt, C.; Craven, J.; Kimblin, C.; McKenna, I.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Miller, E.; Yocky, D. A.; Haas, D.

    2016-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) result in numerous signatures that manifest on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Currently, prompt signals, such as the detection of seismic waves provide only generalized locations and the timing and amplitude of non-prompt signals are difficult to predict. As such, research into improving the detection, location, and identification of suspect events has been conducted, resulting in advancement of nuclear test detection science. In this presentation, we demonstrate the scalar variably of surface and subsurface observables, briefly discuss current capabilities to locate, detect and characterize potential nuclear explosion locations, and explain how emergent technologies and amalgamation of disparate data sets will facilitate improved monitoring and verification. At the smaller scales, material and fracture characterization efforts on rock collected from legacy UNE sites and from underground experiments using chemical explosions can be incorporated into predictive modeling efforts. Spatial analyses of digital elevation models and orthoimagery of both modern conventional and legacy nuclear sites show subtle surface topographic changes and damage at nearby outcrops. Additionally, at sites where such technology cannot penetrate vegetative cover, it is possible to use the vegetation itself as both a companion signature reflecting geologic conditions and showing subsurface impacts to water, nutrients, and chemicals. Aerial systems based on RGB imagery, light detection and ranging, and hyperspectral imaging can allow for combined remote sensing modalities to perform pattern recognition and classification tasks. Finally, more remote systems such as satellite based synthetic aperture radar and satellite imagery are other techniques in development for UNE site detection, location and characterization.

  9. A 65--70 year oscillation in observed surface temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, M.E.; Ramankutty, N.

    1994-01-01

    There are three possible sources for the 65--70-year ''global'' oscillation: (1) random forcing of the ocean by the atmosphere, such as by white noise; (2) external oscillatory forcing of the climate system, such as by a variation in the solar irradiance; and (3) an internal oscillation of the atmosphere-ocean system. It is unlikely that putative variations in solar irradiance are the source of the oscillation because solar forcing should generate a global response, but the oscillation is not global. It is also unlikely that white-noise forcing is the source of the oscillation because such forcing should generate an oceanwide response, but the oscillation is not panoceanic. Consequently, the most probable cause of the oscillation is an internal oscillation of the atmosphere-ocean system. This conclusion is supported by a growing body of observational evidence and coupled atmosphere/ocean general circulation model simulation results. Comparison of the regional and global-mean temperature changes caused by the oscillation with those induced by GHG + ASA forcing shows that the rapid rise in global-mean temperature between about 1908 and 1946, and the subsequent reversal of this warming until about 1965 were the result of the oscillation. In the North Atlantic and North American regions, the domination of the GHG + ASA-induced warming by the oscillation has obscured and confounded detection of this warming

  10. The relation between Arctic sea ice surface elevation and draft: A case study using coincident AUV sonar and airborne scanning laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doble, Martin J.; Skourup, Henriette; Wadhams, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Data are presented from a survey by airborne scanning laser profilometer and an AUV-mounted, upward looking swath sonar in the spring Beaufort Sea. The air-snow (surface elevation) and water-ice (draft) surfaces were mapped at 1 x 1 m resolution over a 300 x 300 m area. Data were separated...... into level and deformed ice fractions using the surface roughness of the sonar data. The relation (R = d/f) between draft, d, and surface elevation, f, was then examined. Correlation between top and bottom surfaces was essentially zero at full resolution, requiring averaging over patches of at least 11 m...... diameter to constrain the relation largely because of the significant error (similar to 15 cm) of the laser instrument. Level ice points were concentrated in two core regions, corresponding to level FY ice and refrozen leads, with variations in R attributed primarily to positive snow thickness variability...

  11. [Ca2+]i Elevation and Oxidative Stress Induce KCNQ1 Protein Translocation from the Cytosol to the Cell Surface and Increase Slow Delayed Rectifier (IKs) in Cardiac Myocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Zankov, Dimitar P.; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Henderson, Scott C.; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2013-01-01

    Our goals are to simultaneously determine the three-dimensional distribution patterns of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 in cardiac myocytes and to study the mechanism and functional implications for variations in KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization in myocytes. We monitored the distribution patterns of KCNQ1, KCNE1, and markers for subcellular compartments/organelles using immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and confirmed the findings in ventricular myocytes by directly observing fluorescently tagged KCNQ1-GFP and KCNE1-dsRed expressed in these cells. We also monitored the effects of stress on KCNQ1-GFP and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling during live cell imaging. The data showed that 1) KCNE1 maintained a stable cell surface localization, whereas KCNQ1 exhibited variations in the cytosolic compartment (striations versus vesicles) and the degree of presence on the cell surface; 2) the degree of cell surface KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization was positively correlated with slow delayed rectifier (IKs) current density; 3) KCNQ1 and calnexin (an ER marker) shared a cytosolic compartment; and 4) in response to stress ([Ca2+]i elevation, oxidative overload, or AT1R stimulation), KCNQ1 exited the cytosolic compartment and trafficked to the cell periphery in vesicles. This was accompanied by partial ER fragmentation. We conclude that the cellular milieu regulates KCNQ1 distribution in cardiac myocytes and that stressful conditions can increase IKs by inducing KCNQ1 movement to the cell surface. This represents a hitherto unrecognized mechanism by which IKs fulfills its function as a repolarization reserve in ventricular myocytes. PMID:24142691

  12. [Ca2+]i elevation and oxidative stress induce KCNQ1 protein translocation from the cytosol to the cell surface and increase slow delayed rectifier (IKs) in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Zankov, Dimitar P; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Mei; Henderson, Scott C; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2013-12-06

    Our goals are to simultaneously determine the three-dimensional distribution patterns of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 in cardiac myocytes and to study the mechanism and functional implications for variations in KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization in myocytes. We monitored the distribution patterns of KCNQ1, KCNE1, and markers for subcellular compartments/organelles using immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and confirmed the findings in ventricular myocytes by directly observing fluorescently tagged KCNQ1-GFP and KCNE1-dsRed expressed in these cells. We also monitored the effects of stress on KCNQ1-GFP and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling during live cell imaging. The data showed that 1) KCNE1 maintained a stable cell surface localization, whereas KCNQ1 exhibited variations in the cytosolic compartment (striations versus vesicles) and the degree of presence on the cell surface; 2) the degree of cell surface KCNQ1/KCNE1 colocalization was positively correlated with slow delayed rectifier (IKs) current density; 3) KCNQ1 and calnexin (an ER marker) shared a cytosolic compartment; and 4) in response to stress ([Ca(2+)]i elevation, oxidative overload, or AT1R stimulation), KCNQ1 exited the cytosolic compartment and trafficked to the cell periphery in vesicles. This was accompanied by partial ER fragmentation. We conclude that the cellular milieu regulates KCNQ1 distribution in cardiac myocytes and that stressful conditions can increase IKs by inducing KCNQ1 movement to the cell surface. This represents a hitherto unrecognized mechanism by which IKs fulfills its function as a repolarization reserve in ventricular myocytes.

  13. Below-ground process responses to elevated CO2 and temperature: a discussion of observations, measurement methods, and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elise Pendall; Scott Bridgham; Paul J. Hanson; Bruce Hungate; David W. Kicklighter; Dale W. Johnson; Beverly E. Law; Yiqi Luo; J. Patrick Megonigal; Maria Olsrud; Michael G. Ryan; Shiqiang Wan

    2004-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 and temperatures are probably altering ecosystem carbon cycling, causing both positive and negative feedbacks to climate. Below-ground processes play a key role in the global carbon (C) cycle because they regulate storage of large quantities of C, and are potentially very sensitive to direct and indirect effects of elevated...

  14. Mechanism of degradation of surface hardening at elevated temperature in TiAlV-alloys by in situ synchrotron radiation diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Berberich, F; Kreissig, U; Schell, N; Mücklich, A

    2003-01-01

    The surface hardness of the technically important alloy Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) can be improved by nitrogen implantation. The structural mechanisms of hardening and of the stability of the improved hardness at elevated temperatures are studied. Ion implanted (II) and plasma immersion ion implanted (PII) samples were used. The formation of small TiN crystallites was detected in the as-implanted state, but only for the II samples a considerable surface hardness increase (factor 3) is observed. The in situ XRD experiments showed, that the TiN phase is stable up to temperatures of 650 deg. C for both types of implantation. At higher temperature Ti sub 2 N is formed which is stable up to 770 deg. C. ERDA results indicate a diffusion of nitrogen into the bulk material. The redistribution of N is responsible for the hardness changes: a slight decrease for II samples but an improvement by a factor of 2.5 for PII samples. The improvements/degradations of hardness and wear are discussed in correlation with the nitrogen depth ...

  15. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  16. Elevated surface temperature depresses survival of banner-tailed kangaroo rats: will climate change cook a desert icon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Martin R; Frey, Jennifer K; Roemer, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    Modest increases in global temperature have been implicated in causing population extirpations and range shifts in taxa inhabiting colder environs and in ectotherms whose thermoregulation is more closely tied to environmental conditions. Many arid-adapted endotherms already experience conditions at their physiological limits, so it is conceivable that they could be similarly affected by warming temperatures. We explored how climatic variables might influence the apparent survival of the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis), a rodent endemic to the Chihuahuan Desert of North America and renowned for its behavioral and physiological adaptations to arid environments. Relative variable weight, strength of variable relationships, and other criteria indicated that summer, diurnal land surface temperature (SD_LST) was the primary environmental driver of apparent survival in these arid-adapted rodents. Higher temperatures had a negative effect on apparent survival, which ranged from 0.15 (SE = 0.04) for subadults to 0.50 (SE = 0.07) for adults. Elevated SD_LST may negatively influence survival through multiple pathways, including increased water loss and energy expenditure that could lead to chronic stress and/or hyperthermia that could cause direct mortality. Land surface temperatures are predicted to increase by as much 6.5°C by 2099, reducing apparent survival of adults to ~0.15 in some regions of the species' range, possibly causing a shift in their distribution. The relationship between SD_LST and survival suggests a mechanism whereby physiological tolerances are exceeded resulting in a reduction to individual fitness that may ultimately cause a shift in the species' range over time.

  17. Transport processes associated with the initial elevated concentrations of Chernobyl radioactivity in surface air in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.J.; Haagenson, P.L.; Reiss, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of radioactivity from the Chernobyl accident were encountered in the surface air over the United States along the east coast and in the north-west on 9 and 10 May 1986. The nearly simultaneous arrival of radioactive debris at widely separated locations resulted from different paths being taken by the debris released at different times during the course of the accident. Debris released during the explosion at the Chernobyl reactor was transported across the Arctic, within the lower troposphere, and zonally across Asia and the North Pacific Ocean, within the mid-troposphere. This debris descended into the planetary boundary layer along the east coast of the US. The descent was associated with a quasi-stationary cyclone located over the western North Atlantic Ocean. Debris that had a different composition of radioactivity was released from the damaged reactor during the week immediately following the initial explosion. This debris was then transported zonally across Asia and the North Pacific Ocean within the planetary boundary layer and lower troposphere and was swept into the north-western US. (author)

  18. Wettability of quartz surface as observed by NMR transverse relaxation time (T2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Katika, Konstantina; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    the wettability property of quartz surface by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) method. The principle of this method is that protons in water relax faster when it comes close to solid surface. We observed that quart is highly water wet. A layer of water (bound water) forms on the quartz surface when...

  19. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of

  20. Surface potential effects in low-energy current image diffraction patterns observed on the Al(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine structure observed in high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements near the energy threshold for emergence of new beams has been attributed to surface barrier effects. Recently, the surface barrier has been suggested as the source of the fine structure observed in current image diffraction (CID) patterns obtained by rastering the primary beam across an Al(001) crystal surface at a constant energy. This suggestion was based on kinematic arguments which correlated the emergence angle for a new electron beam with the observed structure in the CID pattern. In this work, the angular dependence of the elastic component of the total crystal reflectivity is calculated at constant energy. The calculations are based on full dynamical theories such as used in LEED but incorporating different surface barrier models to account for the saturating image potential. The results are compared with the experimental CID results

  1. Microscopic observation of pattern attack by aggressive ions on finished surface of aluminium alloy sacrificial anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhammad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Azali Muhammad; Mohd Shaari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a microscopic observation on submerged finished surface of aluminium alloy sacrificial anode. Experimental tests were carried out on polished surface aluminium anode exposed to seawater containing aggressive ions in order to observe of pattern corrosion attack on corroding surface of anode. Results have shown, at least under the present testing condition, that surface of sacrificial anode were attack by an aggressive ion such as chloride along grain boundaries. In addition, results of microanalysis showed that the corrosion products on surface of aluminium alloy have Al, Zn and O element for all sample and within the pit was consists of Al, Zn, O and Cl element. (author)

  2. Spatial regression between soil surface elevation, water storage in root zone and biomass productivity of alfalfa within an irrigated field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Ermolaeva, Olga

    2014-05-01

    with formation of water flow and water storage. The major changes are formed as a result of imposing of the intensity fields on a soil surface and its field capillary infiltration rate. Excess of the first intensity over the second in each point of soil surface leads to formation of a layer of intensity of water not infiltrated in soil. Thus generate the new field of vectors of intensity which can consist of vertically directed vector of speed of evaporation, a quasi horizontal vector of intensity of a surface water flow and quasi vertical vector of intensity of a preferential flow directed downwards. Principal cause of excess of irrigation water application intensity over capillary infiltration rate can be on the one hand spatial non-uniformity of irrigation water application, and with other spatial variability of capillary infiltration rate, connected with spatial variability of water storage in the top layers of soil. As a result the spatial redistribution of irrigation water over irrigated filed forms distortions of ideal model of irrigation water storage in root zone of soil profile. The major differences consist in increasing of water storage in the depressions of a relief of an irrigated field and accordingly in their reduction on elevated zones of a relief, as well as losses of irrigation water outside of boundaries of a root zone of an irrigated field, in vertical, and horizontal directions. One of key parameters characterizing interaction between irrigation technology and soil state an irrigated field are intensity of water application, intensity and volume of a capillary infiltration, the water storage in root zone at the moment of infiltration starting and a topography of an irrigated field. Fnalyzing of spatial links between these characteristics a special research had been carried out on irrigated by sprinkler machine called Fregate at alfalfa field during the summer of 2012. This research carried out at experimental farm of the research institute Volg

  3. Consolidated ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers at elevated temperature by Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered with inulinase expression through cell surface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, M Mahfuza; Liu, Chen-Guang; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Yuan, Wen-Jie; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2017-02-01

    Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke tubers was performed at elevated temperatures by the consolidated bioprocessing strategy using Saccharomyces cerevisiae MK01 expressing inulinase through cell surface display. No significant difference was observed in yeast growth when temperature was controlled at 38 and 40 °C, respectively, but inulinase activity with yeast cells was substantially enhanced at 40 °C. As a result, enzymatic hydrolysis of inulin was facilitated and ethanol production was improved with 89.3 g/L ethanol produced within 72 h from 198.2 g/L total inulin sugars consumed. Similar results were also observed in ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers with 85.2 g/L ethanol produced within 72 h from 185.7 g/L total sugars consumed. On the other hand, capital investment on cooling facilities and energy consumption for running the facilities would be saved, since regular cooling water instead of chill water could be used to cool down the fermentation system.

  4. Changes in canopy cover alter surface air and forest floor temperature in a high-elevation red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnny L. Boggs; Steven G. McNulty

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe winter and summer surface air and forest floor temperature patterns and diurnal fluctuations in high-elevation red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) forests with different levels of canopy cover. In 1988, a series of 10- x 10-meter plots (control, low nitrogen [N] addition, and high nitrogen addition) were...

  5. Direct Observation of Domain-Wall Surface Tension by Deflating or Inflating a Magnetic Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueying; Vernier, Nicolas; Zhao, Weisheng; Yu, Haiming; Vila, Laurent; Zhang, Yue; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2018-02-01

    The surface energy of a magnetic domain wall (DW) strongly affects its static and dynamic behaviors. However, this effect is seldom directly observed, and some of the related phenomena are not well understood. Moreover, a reliable method to quantify the DW surface energy is still absent. Here, we report a series of experiments in which the DW surface energy becomes a dominant parameter. We observe that a semicircular magnetic domain bubble can spontaneously collapse under the Laplace pressure induced by DW surface energy. We further demonstrate that the surface energy can lead to a geometrically induced pinning when the DW propagates in a Hall cross or from a nanowire into a nucleation pad. Based on these observations, we develop two methods to quantify the DW surface energy, which can be very helpful in the estimation of intrinsic parameters such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions or exchange stiffness in magnetic ultrathin films.

  6. Solar irradiance at the earth's surface: long-term behavior observed at the South Pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Frederick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research examines a 17-year database of UV-A (320–400 nm and visible (400–600 nm solar irradiance obtained by a scanning spectroradiometer located at the South Pole. The goal is to define the variability in solar irradiance reaching the polar surface, with emphasis on the influence of cloudiness and on identifying systematic trends and possible links to the solar cycle. To eliminate changes associated with the varying solar elevation, the analysis focuses on data averaged over 30–35 day periods centered on each year's austral summer solstice. The long-term average effect of South Polar clouds is a small attenuation, with the mean measured irradiances being about 5–6% less than the clear-sky values, although at any specific time clouds may reduce or enhance the signal that reaches the sensor. The instantaneous fractional attenuation or enhancement is wavelength dependent, where the percent deviation from the clear-sky irradiance at 400–600 nm is typically 2.5 times that at 320–340 nm. When averaged over the period near each year's summer solstice, significant correlations appear between irradiances at all wavelengths and the solar cycle as measured by the 10.7 cm solar radio flux. An approximate 1.8 ± 1.0% decrease in ground-level irradiance occurs from solar maximum to solar minimum for the wavelength band 320–400 nm. The corresponding decrease for 400–600 nm is 2.4 ± 1.9%. The best-estimate declines appear too large to originate in the sun. If the correlations have a geophysical origin, they suggest a small variation in atmospheric attenuation with the solar cycle over the period of observation, with the greatest attenuation occurring at solar minimum.

  7. Homogenizing Surface and Satellite Observations of Cloud. Aspects of Bias in Surface Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-10

    configuration, as well as the experience, location and procedure adopted by the observer. Where the clouds exhibit vertical development the observer includes the...Australasia which was thus removed from the list of analysis areas. 2.4 Discuuios of Ressite Figures 3 to 6 illustrate diurnal plots of the frequency of...a small group of stations may be expected to exhibit more marked variability compaed to the mean result for a larger number of stations. Figure 7 to

  8. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 ma.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH4(+) and Ca(2+), whereas the main anion was HCO3(-), which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO3(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). Data analysis suggested that Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and HCO3(-) were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO3(-) and SO4(2-) concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH4(+) was derived from gaseous NH3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from -1.9 to -23.2‰ in δ(18)O, and from -0.8 to -174‰ in δ(2)H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha(-1) y(-1)) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO3(-) concentrations in the surface waters

  9. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 m a.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH 4 + and Ca 2+ , whereas the main anion was HCO 3 − , which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO 3 − , SO 4 2− and Cl − . Data analysis suggested that Na + , Cl − and K + were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and HCO 3 − were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO 3 − and SO 4 2− concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH 4 + was derived from gaseous NH 3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from − 1.9 to − 23.2‰ in δ 18 O, and from − 0.8 to − 174‰ in δ 2 H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha −1 y −1 ) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO 3

  10. [Observation of osteoclasts on the root surface during human deciduous teeth resorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiang-jun; Liang, Xing; Chen, Ming; Wang, Hang; Xie, Zhi-gang; Yang, Xiao-yu

    2004-08-01

    To observe osteoclasts on the resorbing surface of human deciduous teeth. After fixing the collected deciduous teeth, we prepared the tooth slices without decalcification, treated them with HE and TRAP dyestuff, and observed the osteoclasts under light and scanning electron microscope. There were large quantity of various forms of overlapping and huge osteoclasts with many nuclei and silk-like protuberances on the resorbing surface of deciduous teeth. The multinucleated osteoclasts align on the surface of coarse dentin. On the resorbing surface of human deciduous teeth there are large amount of osteoclasts which can be used as a source of studying human osteoclast.

  11. ISED: Constructing a high-resolution elevation road dataset from massive, low-quality in-situ observations derived from geosocial fitness tracking data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant McKenzie

    Full Text Available Gaining access to inexpensive, high-resolution, up-to-date, three-dimensional road network data is a top priority beyond research, as such data would fuel applications in industry, governments, and the broader public alike. Road network data are openly available via user-generated content such as OpenStreetMap (OSM but lack the resolution required for many tasks, e.g., emergency management. More importantly, however, few publicly available data offer information on elevation and slope. For most parts of the world, up-to-date digital elevation products with a resolution of less than 10 meters are a distant dream and, if available, those datasets have to be matched to the road network through an error-prone process. In this paper we present a radically different approach by deriving road network elevation data from massive amounts of in-situ observations extracted from user-contributed data from an online social fitness tracking application. While each individual observation may be of low-quality in terms of resolution and accuracy, taken together they form an accurate, high-resolution, up-to-date, three-dimensional road network that excels where other technologies such as LiDAR fail, e.g., in case of overpasses, overhangs, and so forth. In fact, the 1m spatial resolution dataset created in this research based on 350 million individual 3D location fixes has an RMSE of approximately 3.11m compared to a LiDAR-based ground-truth and can be used to enhance existing road network datasets where individual elevation fixes differ by up to 60m. In contrast, using interpolated data from the National Elevation Dataset (NED results in 4.75m RMSE compared to the base line. We utilize Linked Data technologies to integrate the proposed high-resolution dataset with OpenStreetMap road geometries without requiring any changes to the OSM data model.

  12. Impact of Assimilating Surface Velocity Observations on the Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    surface velocity observations available in 15-min intervals for each drifter. The observations are given an error standard deviation value of 0.02m s21... Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting... statistical analysis is done by not only examining the SSH forecast error across the entire do- main, but also by concentrating on the areamost densely covered

  13. Enhancing Extreme Heat Health-Related Intervention and Preparedness Activities Using Remote Sensing Analysis of Daily Surface Temperature, Surface Observation Networks and Ecmwf Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. L.; Booth, J.; Hondula, D.; Ross, K. W.; Stuyvesant, A.; Alm, G.; Baghel, E.

    2015-12-01

    Extreme heat causes more human fatalities in the United States than any other natural disaster, elevating the concern of heat-related mortality. Maricopa County Arizona is known for its high heat index and its sprawling metropolitan complex which makes this region a perfect candidate for human health research. Individuals at higher risk are unequally spatially distributed, leaving the poor, homeless, non-native English speakers, elderly, and the socially isolated vulnerable to heat events. The Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona State University and NASA DEVELOP LaRC are working to establish a more effective method of placing hydration and cooling centers in addition to enhancing the heat warning system to aid those with the highest exposure. Using NASA's Earth Observation Systems from Aqua and Terra satellites, the daily spatial variability within the UHI was quantified over the summer heat seasons from 2005 - 2014, effectively establishing a remotely sensed surface temperature climatology for the county. A series of One-way Analysis of Variance revealed significant differences between daily surface temperature averages of the top 30% of census tracts within the study period. Furthermore, synoptic upper tropospheric circulation patterns were classified to relate surface weather types and heat index. The surface weather observation networks were also reviewed for analyzing the veracity of the other methods. The results provide detailed information regarding nuances within the UHI effect and will allow pertinent recommendations regarding the health department's adaptive capacity. They also hold essential components for future policy decision-making regarding appropriate locations for cooling centers and efficient warning systems.

  14. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in g...

  15. Direct observation of surface reconstruction and termination on a complex metal oxide catalyst by electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-03-19

    On the surface: The surface reconstruction of an MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst was observed directly by various electron microscopic techniques and the results explain the puzzling catalytic behavior. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker; Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Abermann, Jakob; Andersen, Morten L.; Andersen, Signe B.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Box, Jason E.; Braithwaite, Roger J.; Bøggild, Carl E.; Citterio, Michele; Clement, Poul; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Gleie, Karin; Gubler, Stefanie; Hasholt, Bent; Hynek, Bernhard; Knudsen, Niels T.; Larsen, Signe H.; Mernild, Sebastian H.; Oerlemans, Johannes; Oerter, Hans; Olesen, Ole B.; Smeets, C. J P Paul; Steffen, Konrad; Stober, Manfred; Sugiyama, Shin; Van As, Dirk; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Van De Wal, Roderik S W

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in

  17. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  18. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Parinussa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the current Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP satellite missions observe the Earth's surface in the L-band frequency. In the past, several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E and WindSat have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture using multi-channel observations obtained at higher microwave frequencies. While AMSR-E and WindSat lack an L-band channel, they are able to leverage multi-channel microwave observations to estimate additional land surface parameters. In particular, the availability of Ka-band observations allows AMSR-E and WindSat to obtain coincident surface temperature estimates required for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. In contrast, SMOS and SMAP carry only a single frequency radiometer and therefore lack an instrument suited to estimate the physical temperature of the Earth. Instead, soil moisture algorithms from these new generation satellites rely on ancillary sources of surface temperature (e.g. re-analysis or near real time data from weather prediction centres. A consequence of relying on such ancillary data is the need for temporal and spatial interpolation, which may introduce uncertainties. Here, two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques, the triple collocation (TC approach and the Rvalue data assimilation approach, are applied to quantify the global-scale impact of replacing Ka-band based surface temperature retrievals with Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA surface temperature output on the accuracy of WindSat and AMSR-E based surface soil moisture retrievals. Results demonstrate that under sparsely vegetated conditions, the use of

  19. Observation on Surface Change of Fragile Glass: Temperature - Time Dependence Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Amane; Takahashi, Isao

    2004-01-01

    The structural change of a fragile glass surface close to the glass transition temperature Tg is studied by using X-ray reflectivity. Measurements were performed on surfaces of maltitol, which is a typical polyalcohol fragile glass with Tg = 320K. Upon both heating and cooling, we find the following features which are also noticed in silicate glass surfaces: (i) On heating, the surface morphology indicates a variation at temperatures below Tg; (ii) A drastic increase in surface roughness occurs at a temperature about 333K on heating, which is 13K higher than Tg; (iii) During the cooling of the sample, formation of a low-density surface layer (3nm at 293K) is observed. Prior to the crystallization, nm - μm sized domains were grown at the surface, which might not be reported for other glasses

  20. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestrini, Raffaella, E-mail: balestrini@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute, National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), Via del Mulino 19, Brugherio, MB (Italy); Polesello, Stefano [Water Research Institute, National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), Via del Mulino 19, Brugherio, MB (Italy); Sacchi, Elisa [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pavia and IGG-CNR, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 m a.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}, whereas the main anion was HCO{sub 3}{sup −}, which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO{sub 3}{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and Cl{sup −}. Data analysis suggested that Na{sup +}, Cl{sup −} and K{sup +} were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+} and HCO{sub 3}{sup −} were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO{sub 3}{sup −} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH{sub 4}{sup +} was derived from gaseous NH{sub 3} scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from − 1.9 to − 23.2‰ in δ{sup 18}O, and from − 0.8 to − 174‰ in δ{sup 2}H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha{sup −1} y{sup −1

  1. Observation of modified radiative properties of cold atoms in vacuum near a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V V; Cornelussen, R A; Heuvell, H B van Linden van den; Spreeuw, R J C

    2004-01-01

    We have observed a distance-dependent absorption linewidth of cold 87 Rb atoms close to a dielectric-vacuum interface. This is the first observation of modified radiative properties in vacuum near a dielectric surface. A cloud of cold atoms was created using a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and optical molasses cooling. Evanescent waves (EW) were used to observe the behaviour of the atoms near the surface. We observed an increase of the absorption linewidth by up to 25% with respect to the free-space value. Approximately half the broadening can be explained by cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) as an increase of the natural linewidth and inhomogeneous broadening. The remainder we attribute to local Stark shifts near the surface. By varying the characteristic EW length we have observed a distance dependence characteristic for CQED

  2. Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Trigo, Isabel F.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2017-05-01

    The land surface forms an essential part of the climate system. It interacts with the atmosphere through the exchange of water and energy and hence influences weather and climate, as well as their predictability. Correspondingly, the land surface model (LSM) is an essential part of any weather forecasting system. LSMs rely on partly poorly constrained parameters, due to sparse land surface observations. With the use of newly available land surface temperature observations, we show in this study that novel satellite-derived datasets help improve LSM configuration, and hence can contribute to improved weather predictability. We use the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) and validate it comprehensively against an array of Earth observation reference datasets, including the new land surface temperature product. This reveals satisfactory model performance in terms of hydrology but poor performance in terms of land surface temperature. This is due to inconsistencies of process representations in the model as identified from an analysis of perturbed parameter simulations. We show that HTESSEL can be more robustly calibrated with multiple instead of single reference datasets as this mitigates the impact of the structural inconsistencies. Finally, performing coupled global weather forecasts, we find that a more robust calibration of HTESSEL also contributes to improved weather forecast skills. In summary, new satellite-based Earth observations are shown to enhance the multi-dataset calibration of LSMs, thereby improving the representation of insufficiently captured processes, advancing weather predictability, and understanding of climate system feedbacks.

  3. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes...... in glacier melt independently from model output. Here, we present a comprehensive database of Greenland glacier surface mass-balance observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. The database spans the 123 a from 1892 to 2015, contains a total of similar to 3000 measurements from......-term time series of which there are only two exceeding 20 a. We use the data to analyse uncertainties in point measurements of surface mass balance, as well as to estimate surface mass-balance profiles for most regions of Greenland....

  4. Recent Observations in Surface Electromyography Recording of Triceps Brachii Muscle in Patients and Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asraf Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe and analyse the literature on the use of surface electromyography electrodes, including the shape, size, and metal composition of the electrodes used, the interelectrode distance, and the anatomical locations on the muscle at which the electrodes are placed, for the observation of the triceps brachii muscle activity in patients and athletes.

  5. The weight of a storm: what observations of Earth surface deformation can tell us about Hurricane Harvey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, A. A.; Mencin, D.; van Dam, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Harvey was the first major hurricane to impact the USA in over a decade, making landfall southwest of Houston, TX on August 26, 2017. Although Harvey was downgraded to a tropical storm shortly after landfall, it dropped a record amount of rain and was responsible for epic flooding across much of southeast Texas. While precipitation from a large storm like Harvey can be estimated from in-situ rain gages and Doppler radar, the accompanying surface water changes that lead to flooding are imperfectly observed due to the limited coverage of existing stream and lake level gages and because floodwaters inundate areas that are typically unmonitored. Earth's response to changes in surface loading provides an opportunity to observe the local hydrological response to Hurricane Harvey, specifically the dramatic changes in water storage coincident with and following the storm. Continuous GPS stations in southeastern Texas observed an average drop in land surface elevations of 1.8 cm following Harvey's landfall, followed by a gradual recovery to pre-storm levels over the following month. We interpret this surface motion as Earth's elastic response to the weight of cumulative rainfall during the storm, followed by rebound as that weight was removed by runoff and evapotranspiration (ET). Using observations of surface displacements from GPS stations in the HoustonNET and Plate Boundary Observatory networks, we model the daily water storage changes across Texas and Louisiana associated with Harvey. Because Harvey's barometric pressure low caused surface uplift at the cm level which temporarily obscured the subsidence signal due to precipitation, we model and remove the effect of atmospheric loading from the GPS data prior to our analysis. We also consider the effect on GPS position time series of non-tidal ocean loading due to the hurricane storm surge, which at the coast was an order of magnitude larger than loads due to precipitation alone. Finally, we use our results to

  6. SEM observation and wettability of variously processed and fractured surface of dental zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Naoyoshi; Uo, Motohiro; Yamaga, Eiji; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    Current dental zirconia has several problems in clinical application such as chipping, fracture and detachment. To reduce these problems the surface after various treatments was analyzed by SEM observation, contact angle measurement and surface roughness measurement, and compared. The surface after mirror polishing was smooth. Porcelain layering was smooth except large formed grooves by bubbles. After sandblast and tribochemical treatments, the surfaces showed several micron-sized caving with micron to submicron-level irregularities. Sandblast and tribochemical treatments with the lager roughness had the smaller water contact angle than silicone wheel polishing. Clinically fractured surface of zirconia showed a more complex structure than manually fractured surface, which may be due to the various mode of stress to be imposed repetitively to various direction.

  7. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas

  8. Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Trigo, Isabel F.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2017-04-01

    The land surface forms an essential part of the climate system. It interacts with the atmosphere through the exchange of water and energy and hence influences weather and climate, as well as their predictability. Correspondingly, the land surface model (LSM) is an essential part of any weather forecasting system. LSMs rely on partly poorly constrained parameters, due to sparse land surface observations. With the use of newly available land surface temperature observations, we show in this study that novel satellite-derived datasets help to improve LSM configuration, and hence can contribute to improved weather predictability. We use the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) and validate it comprehensively against an array of Earth observation reference datasets, including the new land surface temperature product. This reveals satisfactory model performance in terms of hydrology, but poor performance in terms of land surface temperature. This is due to inconsistencies of process representations in the model as identified from an analysis of perturbed parameter simulations. We show that HTESSEL can be more robustly calibrated with multiple instead of single reference datasets as this mitigates the impact of the structural inconsistencies. Finally, performing coupled global weather forecasts we find that a more robust calibration of HTESSEL also contributes to improved weather forecast skills. In summary, new satellite-based Earth observations are shown to enhance the multi-dataset calibration of LSMs, thereby improving the representation of insufficiently captured processes, advancing weather predictability and understanding of climate system feedbacks. Orth, R., E. Dutra, I. F. Trigo, and G. Balsamo (2016): Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., doi:10.5194/hess-2016-628

  9. Observations of elevated formaldehyde over a forest canopy suggest missing sources from rapid oxidation of arboreal hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Choi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the processing of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs in the pine forests of the US Sierra Nevada, we measured HCHO at Blodgett Research Station using Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy (QCLS during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX of late summer 2007. Four days of the experiment exhibited particularly copious HCHO, with midday peaks between 15–20 ppbv, while the other days developed delayed maxima between 8–14 ppbv in the early evening. From the expansive photochemical data set, we attempt to explain the observed HCHO concentrations by quantifying the various known photochemical production and loss terms in its chemical budget. Overall, known chemistry predicts a factor of 3–5 times less HCHO than observed. By examining diurnal patterns of the various budget terms we conclude that, during the high HCHO period, local, highly reactive oxidation chemistry produces an abundance of formaldehyde at the site. The results support the hypothesis of previous work at Blodgett Forest suggesting that large quantities of oxidation products, observed directly above the ponderosa pine canopy, are evidence of profuse emissions of very reactive volatile organic compounds (VR-VOCs from the forest. However, on the majority of days, under generally cooler and more moist conditions, lower levels of HCHO develop primarily influenced by the influx of precursors transported into the region along with the Sacramento plume.

  10. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  11. Surface lowering of the debris-covered area of Kanchenjunga Glacier in the eastern Nepal Himalaya since 1975, as revealed by Hexagon KH-9 and ALOS satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, Damodar; Fujita, Koji; Sakai, Akiko

    2017-12-01

    This study presents the geodetic mass balance of Kanchenjunga Glacier, one of the largest debris-covered glaciers in the easternmost Nepal Himalaya, which possesses a negative mass balance of -0.18 ± 0.17 m w.e. a-1 for the 1975-2010 study period, estimated using digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from Hexagon KH-9 and ALOS PRISM stereo images. Accurate DEMs, with a relative uncertainty of ±5.5 m, were generated from the intensive and manual editing of triangulated irregular network (TIN) models on a stereo MirrorTM/3D Monitor. The glacier ice-flow velocity field was also calculated using a feature-tracking method that was applied to two ALOS orthoimages taken in 2010. The elevation differences between the two DEMs highlight considerable surface lowering across the debris-covered area, and a slight thickening in the accumulation area of Kanchenjunga Glacier between 1975 and 2010. The magnitude and gradient of surface lowering are similar among the six glacier tributaries, even though they are situated at different elevations, which may reflect variations in the ice-flow velocity field. The pattern of surface lowering correlates well with the ice-flow velocity field over the debris-covered portion of the main tributary, suggesting that the glacier dynamics significantly affect surface lowering by altering the emergence velocity along the glacier, particularly in the compressive ablation area. Surface-lowering patterns partially correspond to the supraglacial pond area fraction of the glacier, with enhanced surface lowering observed in areas that possess a larger pond area fraction. These findings support the hypothesis that supraglacial ponds may intensify ice wastage and play a key role in the heterogeneous surface lowering of debris-covered glaciers. The estimated mass loss of Kanchenjunga Glacier is moderate compared with other debris-covered glaciers in neighboring Himalayan regions, which may be due to the lower pond area fraction of Kanchenjunga

  12. Observation of a distinct surface molecular orientation in films of a high mobility conjugated polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettfort, Torben; Thomsen, Lars; McNeill, Christopher R

    2013-01-23

    The molecular orientation and microstructure of films of the high-mobility semiconducting polymer poly(N,N-bis-2-octyldodecylnaphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis-dicarboximide-2,6-diyl-alt-5,5-2,2-bithiophene) (P(NDI2OD-T2)) are probed using a combination of grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. In particular a novel approach is used whereby the bulk molecular orientation and surface molecular orientation are simultaneously measured on the same sample using NEXAFS spectroscopy in an angle-resolved transmission experiment. Furthermore, the acquisition of bulk-sensitive NEXAFS data enables a direct comparison of the information provided by GIWAXS and NEXAFS. By comparison of the bulk-sensitive and surface-sensitive NEXAFS data, a distinctly different molecular orientation is observed at the surface of the film compared to the bulk. While a more "face-on" orientation of the conjugated backbone is observed in the bulk of the film, consistent with the lamella orientation observed by GIWAXS, a more "edge-on" orientation is observed at the surface of the film with surface-sensitive NEXAFS spectroscopy. This distinct edge-on surface orientation explains the high in-plane mobility that is achieved in top-gate P(NDI2OD-T2) field-effect transistors (FETs), while the bulk face-on texture explains the high out-of-plane mobilities that are observed in time-of-flight and diode measurements. These results also stress that GIWAXS lacks the surface sensitivity required to probe the microstructure of the accumulation layer that supports charge transport in organic FETs and hence may not necessarily be appropriate for correlating film microstructure and FET charge transport.

  13. Terminal Sliding Mode Control with Unidirectional Auxiliary Surfaces for Hypersonic Vehicles Based on Adaptive Disturbance Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naibao He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel flight control scheme is proposed using the terminal sliding mode technique, unidirectional auxiliary surfaces and the disturbance observer model. These proposed dynamic attitude control systems can improve control performance of hypersonic vehicles despite uncertainties and external disturbances. The terminal attractor is employed to improve the convergence rate associated with the critical damping characteristics problem noted in short-period motions of hypersonic vehicles. The proposed robust attitude control scheme uses a dynamic terminal sliding mode with unidirectional auxiliary surfaces. The nonlinear disturbance observer is designed to estimate system uncertainties and external disturbances. The output of the disturbance observer aids the robust adaptive control scheme and improves robust attitude control performance. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed terminal sliding mode with unidirectional auxiliary surfaces.

  14. Failure modes observed on worn surfaces of W-C-Co sputtered coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, A.; Cavaleiro, A.; Miranda, A.S.; Vieira, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    During scratch testing, the indenter gives rise to a distribution of stresses similar to that observed in tribocontacts. In this work, r.f.-sputtered W-C-Co coatings deposited from sintered WC + Co (6, 10 and 15 wt.% Co) at various substrate biases were scratched and tested tribologically and the morphology of the damaged surfaces was analysed. The cobalt content of the coatings is the main factor determining their tribological characteristics. The failure modes observed on the worn pin-on-disc tested surfaces are explained and compared with those obtained by scratch testing. In spite of it not being possible to establish quantitative results for the wear resistance of W-C-Co coatings from scratch testing, an estimation can be performed based on the observation of the failure modes in the scratch track. Thus scratch testing can be used to predict the tribological behaviour of coated surfaces. This possibility can reduce the number and cost of tribological tests. (orig.)

  15. Observation of surface superconductivity and paramagnetic Meissner effect in a spherical single crystal of Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Pradip; Tomy, C.V.; Takeya, H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grover, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    We report the observation of surface superconductivity as well as paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), along with peak effect phenomena (PE) in ac and dc magnetization measurements in a high purity spherical single crystal of niobium. We study how the surface superconductivity and the PME evolve over the field (H) and the temperature (T) phase-space. We observe from our data that the magnitude of the PME progressively weakens as the temperature is decreased or magnetic field is increased. A vortex phase diagram is constructed by marking the onset positions of the PE (H p on ), the upper critical field (H c2 ) and the surface critical field (H c3 ). Unlike a previous report which shows the existence of a multi-critical point in the phase diagram of a Nb crystal, where H p , H c2 and H c3 lines meet, we do not observe a multi-critical point in our weak pinning crystal. (author)

  16. Water Surface Reconstruction in Airborne Laser Bathymetry from Redundant Bed Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandlburger, G.; Pfeifer, N.; Soergel, U.

    2017-09-01

    In airborne laser bathymetry knowledge of exact water level heights is a precondition for applying run-time and refraction correction of the raw laser beam travel path in the medium water. However, due to specular reflection especially at very smooth water surfaces often no echoes from the water surface itself are recorded (drop outs). In this paper, we first discuss the feasibility of reconstructing the water surface from redundant observations of the water bottom in theory. Furthermore, we provide a first practical approach for solving this problem, suitable for static and locally planar water surfaces. It minimizes the bottom surface deviations of point clouds from individual flight strips after refraction correction. Both theoretical estimations and practical results confirm the potential of the presented method to reconstruct water level heights in dm precision. Achieving good results requires enough morphological details in the scene and that the water bottom topography is captured from different directions.

  17. WATER SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION IN AIRBORNE LASER BATHYMETRY FROM REDUNDANT BED OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mandlburger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In airborne laser bathymetry knowledge of exact water level heights is a precondition for applying run-time and refraction correction of the raw laser beam travel path in the medium water. However, due to specular reflection especially at very smooth water surfaces often no echoes from the water surface itself are recorded (drop outs. In this paper, we first discuss the feasibility of reconstructing the water surface from redundant observations of the water bottom in theory. Furthermore, we provide a first practical approach for solving this problem, suitable for static and locally planar water surfaces. It minimizes the bottom surface deviations of point clouds from individual flight strips after refraction correction. Both theoretical estimations and practical results confirm the potential of the presented method to reconstruct water level heights in dm precision. Achieving good results requires enough morphological details in the scene and that the water bottom topography is captured from different directions.

  18. Observation of hidden Fermi surface nesting in a two dimensional conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, K.; Stagerescu, C.; Smith, K.E.; Greenblatt, M.; Ramanujachary, K.

    1996-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of hidden Fermi surface nesting in a two dimensional conductor. The system studied was Na 0.9 Mo 6 O 17 , and the measured Fermi surface consists of electron and hole pockets that can be combined to form sets of pseudo-one-dimensional Fermi surfaces, exhibiting the nesting necessary to drive a Peierls transition to a charge density wave state. The observed nesting vector is shown to be in excellent agreement with theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Observation of surface-guided waves in holey hypersonic phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchabane, Sarah; Gaiffe, Olivier; Ulliac, Gwenn; Salut, Roland; Achaoui, Younes; Laude, Vincent

    2011-04-01

    We observe experimentally the propagation of surface-guided waves in a hypersonic phononic crystal, both in the radiative and nonradiative regions of the spectrum. Combining electrical measurements in reflection and transmission as well as optical maps of the surface displacement, a band gap extending from 0.6 to 0.95 GHz is identified in a square lattice array of 1 μm radius air holes milled in lithium niobate. The optical measurements reveal the transmission of surface-guided waves above the band gap, well inside the sound cone.

  20. Detecting tangential dislocations on planar faults from traction free surface observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Ioan R; Volkov, Darko

    2009-01-01

    We propose in this paper robust reconstruction methods for tangential dislocations on planar faults. We assume that only surface observations are available, and that a traction free condition applies at that surface. This study is an extension to the full three dimensions of Ionescu and Volkov (2006 Inverse Problems 22 2103). We also explore in this present paper the possibility of detecting slow slip events (such as silent earthquakes, or earthquake nucleation phases) from GPS observations. Our study uses extensively an asymptotic estimate for the observed surface displacement. This estimate is first used to derive what we call the moments reconstruction method. Then it is also used for finding necessary conditions for a surface displacement field to have been caused by a slip on a fault. These conditions lead to the introduction of two parameters: the activation factor and the confidence index. They can be computed from the surface observations in a robust fashion. They indicate whether a measured displacement field is due to an active fault. We also infer a second, combined, reconstruction technique blending least square minimization and the moments method. We carefully assess how our reconstruction method is affected by the sensitivity of the observation apparatus and the stepsize for the grid of surface observation points. The maximum permissible stepsize for such a grid is computed for different values of fault depth and orientation. Finally we present numerical examples of reconstruction of faults. We demonstrate that our combined method is sharp, robust and computationally inexpensive. We also note that this method performs satisfactorily for shallow faults, despite the fact that our asymptotic formula deteriorates in that case

  1. Constraining the physical properties of compositionally distinctive surfaces on Mars from overlapping THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, A.; Rogers, D.

    2017-12-01

    Better constraints on the physical properties (e.g. grain size, rock abundance, cohesion, porosity and amount of induration) of Martian surface materials can lead to greater understanding of outcrop origin (e.g. via sedimentary, effusive volcanic, pyroclastic processes). Many outcrop surfaces on Mars likely contain near-surface (thermal conductivity of the outcrop materials just below. Fortunately, vertical heterogeneity within near-surface materials can result in unique, and possibly predictable, diurnal and seasonal temperature patterns. The KRC thermal model has been utilized in a number of previous studies to predict thermal inertia of surface materials on Mars. Here we use KRC to model surface temperatures from overlapping Mars Odyssey THEMIS surface temperature observations that span multiple seasons and local times, in order to constrain both the nature of vertical heterogeneity and the underlying outcrop thermal inertia for various spectrally distinctive outcrops on Mars. We utilize spectral observations from TES and CRISM to constrain the particle size of the uppermost surface. For this presentation, we will focus specifically on chloride-bearing units in Terra Sirenum and Meridiani Planum, as well as mafic and feldspathic bedrock locations with distinct spectral properties, yet uncertain origins, in Noachis Terra and Nili Fossae. We find that many of these surfaces exhibit variations in apparent thermal inertia with season and local time that are consistent with low thermal inertia materials overlying higher thermal inertia substrates. Work is ongoing to compare surface temperature measurements with modeled two-layer scenarios in order to constrain the top layer thickness and bottom layer thermal inertia. The information will be used to better interpret the origins of these distinctive outcrops.

  2. How to most effectively expand the global surface ozone observing network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Surface ozone observations with modern instrumentation have been made around the world for more than 40 years. Some of these observations have been made as one-off activities with short-term, specific science objectives and some have been made as part of wider networks which have provided a foundational infrastructure of data collection, calibration, quality control, and dissemination. These observations provide a fundamental underpinning to our understanding of tropospheric chemistry, air quality policy, atmosphere-biosphere interactions, etc. brought together eight of these networks to provide a single data set of surface ozone observations. We investigate how representative this combined data set is of global surface ozone using the output from a global atmospheric chemistry model. We estimate that on an area basis, 25 % of the globe is observed (34 % land, 21 % ocean). Whereas Europe and North America have almost complete coverage, other continents, Africa, South America, Australia, and Asia (12-17 %) show significant gaps. Antarctica is surprisingly well observed (78 %). Little monitoring occurs over the oceans, with the tropical and southern oceans particularly poorly represented. The surface ozone over key biomes such as tropical forests and savanna is almost completely unmonitored. A chemical cluster analysis suggests that a significant number of observations are made of polluted air masses, but cleaner air masses whether over the land or ocean (especially again in the tropics) are significantly under-observed. The current network is unlikely to see the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) but may be capable of detecting other planetary-scale signals. Model assessment and validation activities are hampered by a lack of observations in regions where the models differ substantially, as is the ability to monitor likely changes in surface ozone over the next century. Using our methodology we are able to suggest new sites which would help to close

  3. How to most effectively expand the global surface ozone observing network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Sofen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface ozone observations with modern instrumentation have been made around the world for more than 40 years. Some of these observations have been made as one-off activities with short-term, specific science objectives and some have been made as part of wider networks which have provided a foundational infrastructure of data collection, calibration, quality control, and dissemination. These observations provide a fundamental underpinning to our understanding of tropospheric chemistry, air quality policy, atmosphere–biosphere interactions, etc. brought together eight of these networks to provide a single data set of surface ozone observations. We investigate how representative this combined data set is of global surface ozone using the output from a global atmospheric chemistry model. We estimate that on an area basis, 25 % of the globe is observed (34 % land, 21 % ocean. Whereas Europe and North America have almost complete coverage, other continents, Africa, South America, Australia, and Asia (12–17 % show significant gaps. Antarctica is surprisingly well observed (78 %. Little monitoring occurs over the oceans, with the tropical and southern oceans particularly poorly represented. The surface ozone over key biomes such as tropical forests and savanna is almost completely unmonitored. A chemical cluster analysis suggests that a significant number of observations are made of polluted air masses, but cleaner air masses whether over the land or ocean (especially again in the tropics are significantly under-observed. The current network is unlikely to see the impact of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO but may be capable of detecting other planetary-scale signals. Model assessment and validation activities are hampered by a lack of observations in regions where the models differ substantially, as is the ability to monitor likely changes in surface ozone over the next century. Using our methodology we are able to suggest new

  4. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  5. Design and development of an environmental cell for dynamic in situ observation of gas-solid reactions at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Pushkarraj Vasant

    In situ monitoring of events in transmission electron microscopy provides information on how materials behave in their true state while varying environmental conditions (i.e. temperature and pressure) and exposure to reactant gas mixtures. In-situ results are usually different from static, post-reaction observations because they provide valuable real time---rather than post mortem---information. To facilitate applications that demand in situ observations, a transmission electron microscope specimen holder assembly has been developed in this dissertation. This assembly incorporates a gas flow and heating mechanism along with a novel window-type environmental cell. A controlled mixture of up to four different gases can be circulated through the cell during an experiment. In addition, the specimen can be heated up to a temperature of 1500°C using a specially designed carbon dioxide laser mechanism. This heating technique provides major advantages over conventional methods in terms of product life, specimen heating time and design size. The cell design incorporates a gas reaction chamber less than 1 mm in height, enclosed between a pair of 20 nm thick silicon nitride windows. The chamber can accommodate a specimen or a grid having a diameter of 3 mm and thicknesses in the range of 50 to 100 microns. The volume for the gas environment within the chamber is approximately 3 mm 3 and the gas path length is less than 1 mm. This holder has been designed by incorporating cutting edge heating and Si3N4 window fabrication technology to achieve excellent resolution along with a low thermal drift. Successful application of the holder has been shown to provide scientists with an economical alternative to dedicated transmission electron microscopes for a vast array of in situ applications. These applications include understanding the basic material properties, catalysis reactions, semiconductor device development, and nano structure fabrication.

  6. The observed sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, Phillip A; Janowiak, John; Smith, Thomas M; Sapiano, Mathew R P

    2010-01-01

    Climate models project large changes in global surface temperature in coming decades that are expected to be accompanied by significant changes in the global hydrological cycle. Validation of model simulations is essential to support their use in decision making, but observing the elements of the hydrological cycle is challenging, and model-independent global data sets exist only for precipitation. We compute the sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature using available global precipitation data sets and compare the results against the sensitivities derived from model simulations of 20th century climate. The implications of the results for the global climate observing system are discussed.

  7. Extreme dust storm over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015: satellite, lidar, and surface observations in the Cyprus region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-E. Mamouri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A record-breaking dust storm originating from desert regions in northern Syria and Iraq occurred over the eastern Mediterranean in September 2015. In this contribution of a series of two articles (part 1, observations; part 2, atmospheric modeling, we provide a comprehensive overview of the aerosol conditions during this extreme dust outbreak in the Cyprus region. These observations are based on satellite observations (MODIS, moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer of aerosol optical thickness (AOT and Ångström exponent, surface particle mass (PM10 concentrations measured at four sites in Cyprus, visibility observations at three airports in southern Cyprus and corresponding conversion products (particle extinction coefficient, dust mass concentrations, EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network lidar observations of dust vertical layering over Limassol, particle optical properties (backscatter, extinction, lidar ratio, linear depolarization ratio, and derived profiles of dust mass concentrations. Maximum 550 nm AOT exceeded values of 5.0, according to MODIS, and the mass loads were correspondingly >  10 g m−2 over Larnaca and Limassol during the passage of an extremely dense dust front on 8 September 2015. Hourly mean PM10 values were close to 8000 µg m−3 and the observed meteorological optical range (visibility was reduced to 300–750 m at Larnaca and Limassol. The visibility observations suggest peak values of the near-surface total suspended particle (TSP extinction coefficients of 6000 Mm−1 and thus TSP mass concentrations of 10 000 µg m−3. The Raman polarization lidar observations mainly indicated a double layer structure of the dust plumes (reaching to about 4 km height, pointing to at least two different dust source regions. Dust particle extinction coefficients (532 nm already exceeded 1000 Mm−1 and the mass concentrations reached 2000 µg m−3 in the elevated dust layers on

  8. Characterization of Surface Heterogeneity among Asteroid Taxonomic Classes according to Sloan Digital Sky Survey Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Sunny; Ziffer, Julie; Nelson, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    This research characterizes the extent of surface heterogeneity among asteroid classes by the extent of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) color variance within multiple observations of the same asteroid. The SDSS MOC4 database includes data from 220,101 observations of 104,449 unique objects. The amount of multiple observations of one target makes it ideal for statistically analyzing the surface inhomogeneity of asteroid surfaces. Information from the SDSS MOC4 database (below an error threshold determined from standard error propagation techniques and the interquartile range) is combined with information from the classification in Carvano et al. (2010) to analyze asteroid surface heterogeneity based on taxonomic class. Individual observations are grouped by asteroid, and asteroids are grouped by class. The standard deviation of each normalized SDSS color (i.e. u-r, g-r, r-i, r-z) for each asteroid with multiple observations is calculated. The mean of the standard deviations is then computed for a given class. Comparison of the size of the average standard deviation to the size of the error determines the extent of true variance within a normalized color in a class. The effect of phase angles on SDSS data, as discussed in Carvano et al. (2015), are considered. Additionally, implications for space weathering and evolutionary relationships between taxonomic classes are explored.

  9. Assimilation of Freeze-Thaw Observations into the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, L.; Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J.; Kimball, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The land surface freeze/thaw (F/T) state plays a key role in the hydrological and carbon cycles and thus affects water and energy exchanges and net primary productivity at the land surface. To support the level 4 soil moisture and carbon products (value-added, i.e. using a combination of remote sensing data and modeling) for the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, an F/T assimilation algorithm is developed for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) modeling and assimilation framework. The algorithm includes a newly developed observation operator that diagnoses the landscape F/T state in the GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. A rule-based approach that incorporates model and observational errors is developed and used for assimilating the categorical F/T measurements into the land surface model (F/T analysis). An Observing System Simulation Experiment is conducted using synthetically generated measurements of the F/T state for a region in North America (90-110oW longitude, 45-55oN latitude). The synthetic 'truth' is generated using the NASA Catchment land surface model forced with surface meteorological fields from the Modern-Era Retrospective Reanalysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). To generate synthetic measurements, the true categorical F/T state is corrupted with a prescribed amount of F/T classification error. The assimilation experiment employs the same Catchment model except that forcing errors (relative to truth) are introduced via the application of meteorological forcing fields from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). The effect of the F/T analysis and classification error on land surface temperature and soil temperature predictions is examined in this research.

  10. Observations of flow path interactions with surface structures during initial soil development stage using irrigation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Steffen; Biemelt, Detlef; Badorreck, Annika; Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Structures and processes are dynamically linked especially during initial stages of soil and ecosystem development. Here we assume that soil pore structures and micro topography determine the flow paths and water fluxes as well as further structure changes. Reports about flow path developments at the soil surface are still limited because of an insufficient knowledge of the changing micro topography at the surface. The objective of this presentation is to evaluate methods for parameterisation of surface micro topography for analysing interactions between infiltration and surface runoff. Complex irrigation experiments were carried out at an experimental site in the neighbourhood of the artificially created water catchment "Chicken Creek". The irrigation rates between 160 mm/h and 250 mm/h were held constant over a time period of 20 minutes. The incoming intensities were measured as well as the raindrop-velocity and -size distributions. The surface runoff was continuously registered, soil samples were taken, and soil water potential heads were monitored using tensiometers. Surface and subsurface flow paths were identified using different tracers. The soil surface structures were recorded using a high resolution digital camera before, during, and after irrigation. Micro topography was surveyed using close-range photogrammetry. With this experimental design both, flow paths on the surface and in the soil as well as structure and texture changes could be observed simultaneously. In 2D vertical cross-sections, the effect of initial sediment deposition structure on infiltration and runoff was observed. Image analysis of surface pictures allowed identifying structural and soil textural changes during the runoff process. Similar structural changes related to surface flow paths were found with the photogrammetric surface analysis. We found evidence for the importance of the initial structures on the flow paths as well as a significant influence of the system development

  11. Simultaneous inversion of multiple land surface parameters from MODIS optical-thermal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Han; Liang, Shunlin; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Hanyu

    2017-06-01

    Land surface parameters from remote sensing observations are critical in monitoring and modeling of global climate change and biogeochemical cycles. Current methods for estimating land surface variables usually focus on individual parameters separately even from the same satellite observations, resulting in inconsistent products. Moreover, no efforts have been made to generate global products from integrated observations from the optical to Thermal InfraRed (TIR) spectrum. Particularly, Middle InfraRed (MIR) observations have received little attention due to the complexity of the radiometric signal, which contains both reflected and emitted radiation. In this paper, we propose a unified algorithm for simultaneously retrieving six land surface parameters - Leaf Area Index (LAI), Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR), land surface albedo, Land Surface Emissivity (LSE), Land Surface Temperature (LST), and Upwelling Longwave radiation (LWUP) by exploiting MODIS visible-to-TIR observations. We incorporate a unified physical radiative transfer model into a data assimilation framework. The MODIS visible-to-TIR time series datasets include the daily surface reflectance product and MIR-to-TIR surface radiance, which are atmospherically corrected from the MODIS data using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance program (MODTRAN, ver. 5.0). LAI was first estimated using a data assimilation method that combines MODIS daily reflectance data and a LAI phenology model, and then the LAI was input to the unified radiative transfer model to simulate spectral surface reflectance and surface emissivity for calculating surface broadband albedo and emissivity, and FAPAR. LST was estimated from the MIR-TIR surface radiance data and the simulated emissivity, using an iterative optimization procedure. Lastly, LWUP was estimated using the LST and surface emissivity. The retrieved six parameters were extensively validated across six representative sites with

  12. Temperate forest impacts on maritime snowpacks across an elevation gradient: An assessment of the snow surface energy balance and airborne lidar derived forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, T. R.; Nolin, A. W.

    2016-12-01

    Temperate forests modify snow evolution patterns both spatially and temporally relative to open areas. Dense, warm forests both impede snow accumulation through increased canopy snow interception and increase sub-canopy longwave energy inputs onto the snow surface. These process modifications vary in magnitude and duration depending on climatic, topographic and forest characteristics. Here we present results from a four year study of paired forested and open sites at three elevations, Low - 1150 m, Mid - 1325 m and High - 1465 m. Snowpacks are deeper and last up to 3-4 weeks longer at the Low and Mid elevation Open sites relative to the adjacent Forest sites. Conversely, at the High Forest site, snow is retained 2-4 weeks longer than the Open site. This change in snowpack depth and persistence is attributed to deposition patterns at higher elevations and forest structure differences that alter the canopy interception efficiency and the sub-canopy energy balance. Canopy interception efficiency (CIE) in the Low and Mid Forest sites, over the duration of the study were 79% and 76% of the total event snowfall, whereas CIE was 31% at the High Forest site. Longwave radiation in forested environments is the primary energy component across each elevation band due to the warm winter environment and forest presence, accounting for 82%, 88%, and 59% of the energy balance at the Low, Mid, and High Forest sites, respectively. High wind speeds in the High elevation Open site significantly increases the turbulent energy and creates preferential snowfall deposition in the nearby Forest site. These results show the importance of understanding the effects of forest cover on sub-canopy snowpack evolution and highlight the need for improved forest cover model representation to accurately predict water resources in maritime forests.

  13. Observations of Near-Surface Heat-Flux and Temperature Profiles Through the Early Evening Transition over Contrasting Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Derek D.; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2016-06-01

    Near-surface turbulence data from the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program are used to study countergradient heat fluxes through the early evening transition. Two sites, subjected to similar large-scale forcing, but with vastly different surface and sub-surface characteristics, are considered. The Playa site is situated at the interior of a large dry lakebed desert with high sub-surface soil moisture, shallow water table, and devoid of vegetation. The Sagebrush site is located in a desert steppe region with sparse vegetation and little soil moisture. Countergradient sensible heat fluxes are observed during the transition at both sites. The transition process is both site and height dependent. At the Sagebrush site, the countergradient flux at 5 m and below occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux precedes the local temperature gradient sign change. For 10 m and above, the countergradient flux occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. At the Playa site, the countergradient flux at all tower levels occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. The phenomenon is explained in terms of the mean temperature and heat-flux evolution. The temperature gradient sign reversal is a top-down process while the flux reversal occurs nearly simultaneously at all heights. The differing countergradient behaviour is primarily due to the different subsurface thermal characteristics at the two sites. The combined high volumetric heat capacity and high thermal conductivity at the Playa site lead to small vertical temperature gradients that affect the relative magnitude of terms in the heat-flux tendency equation. A critical ratio of the gradient production to buoyant production of sensible heat flux is suggested so as to predict the countergradient behaviour.

  14. Numerical and Observational Investigations of Long-Lived Mcs-Induced Severe Surface Wind Events: the Derecho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jerome Michael

    This study addresses the production of sustained, straight-line, severe surface winds associated with mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) of extratropical origin otherwise known as derechos. The physical processes which govern the observed derecho characteristics are identified and their possible forcing mechanisms are determined. Detailed observations of two derechos are presented along with simulations using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CSU-RAMS). The observations revealed a derecho environment characterized by strong vertical wind shear through the depth of the troposphere and large values of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The thermodynamic environment of the troposphere in each case had a distinct three-layer structure consisting of: (i) a surface-based stable layer of 1-to-2 km in depth, (ii) an elevated well -mixed layer of 2-4 km in depth, and (iii) an upper tropospheric layer of intermediate stability that extended to the tropopause. Two primary sets of simulations were performed to assess the impact of the observed environmental profiles on the derecho structure, propagation, and longevity. The first set consisted of nested-grid regional-scale simulations initialized from the standard NMC analyses on a domain having relatively coarse horizontal resolution (75 km). The second set of simulations consisted of two and three-dimensional experiments initialized in a horizontally homogeneous environment having a relatively fine horizontal resolution (2 km) and explicit microphysics. The results from these experiments indicate the importance of convectively -induced gravity waves on the MCS structure, propagation, longevity, and severe surface wind development. The sensitivity of the simulated convection and gravity waves to variations in the vertical wind shear and moisture profiles are described. Detailed Doppler radar analyses and 3-D simulations of a severe, bow echo squall line are presented which reveal

  15. Land surface skin temperature climatology: benefitting from the strengths of satellite observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Menglin; Dickinson, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Surface skin temperature observations (T skin ), as obtained by satellite remote sensing, provide useful climatological information of high spatial resolution and global coverage that enhances the traditional ground observations of surface air temperature (T air ) and so, reveal new information about land surface characteristics. This letter analyzes nine years of moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) skin temperature observations to present monthly skin temperature diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations at a 0.05 deg. latitude/longitude grid over the global land surface and combines these measurements with other MODIS-based variables in an effort to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for T skin variations. In particular, skin temperature variations are found to be closely related to vegetation cover, clouds, and water vapor, but to differ from 2 m surface T air in terms of both physical meaning and magnitude. Therefore, the two temperatures (T skin and T air ) are complementary in their contribution of valuable information to the study of climate change.

  16. Geared-elevator flutter study. [wind tunnel tests of transonic flutter effects on control surfaces of supersonic transport tail assemblies, conducted in a NASA-Langley transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Gregory, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was made of the transonic flutter characteristics of a supersonic transport tail assembly model having an all-movable, horizontal tail with a geared elevator. Two model configurations, namely, one with a gear-elevator (2.8 to 1.0 gear ratio) and one with locked-elevator (1.0 to 1.0 gear ratio), were flutter tested in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel with an empennage cantilever-mounted on a sting. The geared-elevator configuration fluttered experimentally at about 20% higher dynamic pressures than the locked-elevator configuration. The experimental flutter dynamic pressure boundaries for both configurations were nearly flat over a Mach number range from 0.9 to 1.1. Flutter calculations (mathematical models) were made for the geared-elevator configuration using three subsonic lifting-surface methods. In one method, the elevator was treated as a discrete surface, and in the other two methods, the stabilizer and elevator were treated as a single warped-surface with the primary difference between these two methods being in the mathematical implementation used. A comparison of the experimental and analytical results shows that the discrete-elevator method predicted best the experimental flutter dynamic pressure level. However, the single warped-surface methods predicts more closely the experimental flutter frequencies and Mach number trends.

  17. Intrinsic Charge Trapping Observed as Surface Potential Variations in diF-TES-ADT Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Benjamin C; McAfee, Terry; Conrad, Brad R; Loth, Marsha A; Anthony, John E; Ade, Harald W; Dougherty, Daniel B

    2016-08-24

    Spatial variations in surface potential are measured with Kelvin probe force microscopy for thin films of 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophenes (diF-TES-ADT) grown on SiO2 and silane-treated SiO2 substrates by organic molecular beam deposition. The variations are observed both between and within grains of the polycrystalline organic film and are quantitatively different than electrostatic variations on the substrate surfaces. The skewness of surface potential distributions is larger on SiO2 than on HMDS-treated substrates. This observation is attributed to the impact of substrate functionalization on minimizing intrinsic crystallographic defects in the organic film that can trap charge.

  18. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park

  19. Role of subsurface physics in the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture controls the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly time scales. Though spatially distributed observations of soil moisture are increasingly becoming available from remotely sense...

  20. Comparing optimized CO emission estimates using MOPITT or NOAA surface network observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, P.B.; Krol, M.C.; Bergamaschi, P.; Laat, de A.T.J.; Werf, van der G.R.; Novelli, P.C.; Deeter, M.N.; Aben, I.; Rockmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares two global inversions to estimate carbon monoxide (CO) emissions for 2004. Either surface flask observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) or CO total columns from the

  1. Water level observations from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for improving estimates of surface water-groundwater interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo; Butts, Michael; Vammen Jacobsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . However, traditional river gauging stations are normally spaced too far apart to capture spatial patterns in the water surface, while spaceborne observations have limited spatial and temporal resolution. UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) can retrieve river water level measurements, providing: i) high...

  2. Experimental observations of surface electrostatic wave on KT-5B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shiyao; Han Shensheng

    1991-01-01

    Shear Alfven waves have been successfully excited in KT-5B small tokamak by means of the one turn longitudinal loop antenna located in the shadow area. The measured antenna loadings show their rich structure, and the loadings are also found to be sensitive to the plasma current. Preliminary evidence of surface electrostatic wave was observed

  3. In-situ observations of catalyst dynamics during surface-bound carbon nanotube nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Du, G

    2007-01-01

    We present atomic-scale, video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy and in situ time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of surface-bound catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. We observe that transition metal catalyst...

  4. Estimating Global Impervious Surface based on Social-economic Data and Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Z.; Zhang, K.; Xue, X.; Hong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Impervious surface areas around the globe are expanding and significantly altering the surface energy balance, hydrology cycle and ecosystem services. Many studies have underlined the importance of impervious surface, r from hydrological modeling to contaminant transport monitoring and urban development estimation. Therefore accurate estimation of the global impervious surface is important for both physical and social sciences. Given the limited coverage of high spatial resolution imagery and ground survey, using satellite remote sensing and geospatial data to estimate global impervious areas is a practical approach. Based on the previous work of area-weighted imperviousness for north branch of the Chicago River provided by HDR, this study developed a method to determine the percentage of impervious surface using latest global land cover categories from multi-source satellite observations, population density and gross domestic product (GDP) data. Percent impervious surface at 30-meter resolution were mapped. We found that 1.33% of the CONUS (105,814 km2) and 0.475% of the land surface (640,370km2) are impervious surfaces. To test the utility and practicality of the proposed method, National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2011 percent developed imperviousness for the conterminous United States was used to evaluate our results. The average difference between the derived imperviousness from our method and the NLCD data across CONUS is 1.14%, while difference between our results and the NLCD data are within ±1% over 81.63% of the CONUS. The distribution of global impervious surface map indicates that impervious surfaces are primarily concentrated in China, India, Japan, USA and Europe where are highly populated and/or developed. This study proposes a straightforward way of mapping global imperviousness, which can provide useful information for hydrologic modeling and other applications.

  5. Venus surface peeking through the atmosphere - gaining a global perspective on the surface composition through near infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mueller, N. T.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like of the terrestrial planets, though very little is known about its surface composition. Thanks to recent advances in laboratory spectroscopy and spectral analysis techniques, this is about to change. Although the atmosphere prohibits observations of the surface with traditional imaging techniques over much of the EM spectral range, five transparent windows between 0.86 µm and 1.18 µm occur in the atmosphere's CO2 spectrum. New high temperature laboratory spectra from the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory at DLR show that spectra in these windows are highly diagnostic for surface mineralogy [1]. The Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM) [2] builds on these recent advances. It is proposed for NASA's Venus Origins Explorer where a radar will provided the needed high-resolution altimetry and ESA's EnVision would provide stereo topography instead. VEM is the first flight instrument specially designed to focus solely on mapping Venus' surface using the windows around 1 µm. Operating in situ from Venus orbit, VEM will provide a global map of composition as well as redox state of the surface, enabling a comprehensive picture of surface-atmosphere interaction on Venus. VEM will return a complex data set containing surface, atmospheric, cloud, and scattering information. Total planned data volume for a typical mission scenario exceeds 1TB. Classical analysis techniques have been successfully used for VIRTIS on Venus Express [3-5] and could be employed with the VEM data. However, application of machine learning approaches to this rich dataset is vastly more efficient, as has already been confirmed with laboratory data. Binary classifiers [6] demonstrate that at current best estimate errors, basalt spectra are confidently discriminated from basaltic andesites, andesites, and rhyolite/granite. Applying the approach of self-organizing maps to the increasingly large set of laboratory measurements allows searching for additional mineralogical indicators

  6. Coupled atmosphere and land-surface assimilation of surface observations with a single column model and ensemble data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Hacker, Joshua P.; Snyder, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction and data assimilation models are composed of coupled atmosphere and land-surface (LS) components. If possible, the assimilation procedure should be coupled so that observed information in one module is used to correct fields in the coupled module. There have been some attempts in this direction using optimal interpolation, nudging and 2/3DVAR data assimilation techniques. Aside from satellite remote sensed observations, reference height in-situ observations of temperature and moisture have been used in these studies. Among other problems, difficulties in coupled atmosphere and LS assimilation arise as a result of the different time scales characteristic of each component and the unsteady correlation between these components under varying flow conditions. Ensemble data-assimilation techniques rely on flow dependent observations-model covariances. Provided that correlations and covariances between land and atmosphere can be adequately simulated and sampled, ensemble data assimilation should enable appropriate assimilation of observations simultaneously into the atmospheric and LS states. Our aim is to explore assimilation of reference height in-situ temperature and moisture observations into the coupled atmosphere-LS modules(simultaneously) in NCAR's WRF-ARW model using the NCAR's DART ensemble data-assimilation system. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using the single column model (SCM) version of WRF. Numerical experiments during a warm season are centered on an atmospheric and soil column in the South Great Plains. Synthetic observations are derived from "truth" WRF-SCM runs for a given date,initialized and forced using North American Regional Reanalyses (NARR). WRF-SCM atmospheric and LS ensembles are created by mixing the atmospheric and soil NARR profile centered on a given date with that from another day (randomly chosen from the same season) with weights drawn from a logit-normal distribution. Three

  7. Deriving surface soil moisture from reflected GNSS signal observations from a grassland site in southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work assesses the estimation of surface volumetric soil moisture (VSM using the global navigation satellite system interferometric reflectometry (GNSS-IR technique. Year-round observations were acquired from a grassland site in southwestern France using an antenna consecutively placed at two contrasting heights above the ground surface (3.3 and 29.4 m. The VSM retrievals are compared with two independent reference datasets: in situ observations of soil moisture, and numerical simulations of soil moisture and vegetation biomass from the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere land surface model. Scaled VSM estimates can be retrieved throughout the year removing vegetation effects by the separation of growth and senescence periods and by the filtering of the GNSS-IR observations that are most affected by vegetation. Antenna height has no significant impact on the quality of VSM estimates. Comparisons between the VSM GNSS-IR retrievals and the in situ VSM observations at a depth of 5 cm show good agreement (R2 =  0.86 and RMSE  =  0.04 m3 m−3. It is shown that the signal is sensitive to the grass litter water content and that this effect triggers differences between VSM retrievals and in situ VSM observations at depths of 1 and 5 cm, especially during light rainfall events.

  8. Deriving surface soil moisture from reflected GNSS signal observations from a grassland site in southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Darrozes, José; Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Bouhours, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    This work assesses the estimation of surface volumetric soil moisture (VSM) using the global navigation satellite system interferometric reflectometry (GNSS-IR) technique. Year-round observations were acquired from a grassland site in southwestern France using an antenna consecutively placed at two contrasting heights above the ground surface (3.3 and 29.4 m). The VSM retrievals are compared with two independent reference datasets: in situ observations of soil moisture, and numerical simulations of soil moisture and vegetation biomass from the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere) land surface model. Scaled VSM estimates can be retrieved throughout the year removing vegetation effects by the separation of growth and senescence periods and by the filtering of the GNSS-IR observations that are most affected by vegetation. Antenna height has no significant impact on the quality of VSM estimates. Comparisons between the VSM GNSS-IR retrievals and the in situ VSM observations at a depth of 5 cm show good agreement (R2 = 0.86 and RMSE = 0.04 m3 m-3). It is shown that the signal is sensitive to the grass litter water content and that this effect triggers differences between VSM retrievals and in situ VSM observations at depths of 1 and 5 cm, especially during light rainfall events.

  9. Continental-scale water fluxes from continuous GPS observations of Earth surface loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, A. A.; Agnew, D. C.; Cayan, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    After more than a decade of observing annual oscillations of Earth's surface from seasonal snow and water loading, continuous GPS is now being used to model time-varying terrestrial water fluxes on the local and regional scale. Although the largest signal is typically due to the seasonal hydrological cycle, GPS can also measure subtle surface deformation caused by sustained wet and dry periods, and to estimate the spatial distribution of the underlying terrestrial water storage changes. The next frontier is expanding this analysis to the continental scale and paving the way for incorporating GPS models into the National Climate Assessment and into the observational infrastructure for national water resource management. This will require reconciling GPS observations with predictions from hydrological models and with remote sensing observations from a suite of satellite instruments (e.g. GRACE, SMAP, SWOT). The elastic Earth response which transforms surface loads into vertical and horizontal displacements is also responsible for the contamination of loading observations by tectonic and anthropogenic transients, and we discuss these and other challenges to this new application of GPS.

  10. The Cryospheres of Mars and Ceres - What thermal observations tell us about near surface ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, T. N.; Li, J. Y.; Moullet, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mars and Ceres both have near surface water ice that forms a cryosphere at polar latitudes. Gamma ray and neutron observations have provided important constraints on the location and depths of the cryosphere for both planetary bodies, but these observations have very low spatial resolution [e.g. 1, 2]. Thermal observations, which are also sensitive to the presence of a near-surface cryosphere as demonstrated by several studies of Mars [e.g. 3, 4], provide additional constraints. Thermal observations can identify depth to the cryosphere (as long as it is within a few thermal skin depths) and water-ice stability. This presentation will compare both the similarities and the differences of these two planetary cryospheres, as well as the thermal observations from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) [5], the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) [6], and publically available Dawn Visible Infrared spectrometer (VIR) [7]. The KRC thermal model [8] will use these observed surface temperatures to constrain depths to near surface ice (i.e. the cyropshere). References: [1] Feldman et al., 2002, Science, 297(5578), 75-78. [2] Prettyman et al., 2017, Science, 355(6320), 55-59. [3] Titus et al., 2003, Science, 299(5609), 1048-1051 [4] Mellon et al., 2008, JGR, 113(E12), CiteID E00A25. [5] Christensen et al., 1998, Science, 279(5357), 1692. [6] Wootten A. et al. (2015) IAU General Assembly, Meeting #29, #2237199 [7] de Santis et al., 2011, Space Science Reviews, 163(1-4), 329-369. [8] Kieffer, 2013, JGR, 118, Issue 3, pp. 451-470.

  11. Preliminary SEM Observations on the Surface of Elastomeric Impression Materials after Immersion or Ozone Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prombonas, Anthony; Yannikakis, Stavros; Karampotsos, Thanasis; Katsarou, Martha-Spyridoula; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surface integrity of dental elastomeric impression materials that are subjected to disinfection is of major importance for the quality of the final prosthetic restorations. Aim The aim of this qualitative Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) study was to reveal the effects of immersion or ozone disinfection on the surface of four dental elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods Four dental elastomeric impression material brands were used (two vinyl polysiloxane silicones, one polyether, and one vinyl polyether silicone). Total of 32 specimens were fabricated, eight from each impression material. Specimens were immersion (0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution or 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution) or ozone disinfected or served as controls and examined with SEM. Results Surface degradation was observed on several speci-mens disinfected with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution. Similar wavy-wrinkling surface structures were observed in almost all specimens, when treated either with 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution or ozone. Conclusion The SEM images obtained from this study revealed that both immersion disinfectants and ozone show similar impression material surface alterations. Ozone seems to be non-inferior as compared to immersion disinfectants, but superior as to environmental protection. PMID:28208993

  12. Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation, which is presumably due to the predominance of different cloud types throughout the day. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged by using the temporally averaged column water vapor amount and the temporally averaged cosine of the solar zenith angle. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  13. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment.

  14. Results of the measurement survey of elevation and environmental media in surface impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Coe, R.H.C. III; Lawrence, J.D.; Winton, W.

    1998-07-01

    A measurement survey of the elevation and environmental media in impoundments 3513 (B) and 3524 (A) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during April 1998. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of Bechtel Jacobs Company. Measurement activities were conducted at selected locations in order to determine the depth and appearance of the sediment and describe the clay underlying the impoundments prior to remediation. The survey was a follow-up to a previous elevation survey. The survey included the following: collection of sediment/clay cores from selected locations in each impoundment; measurement and documentation of the elevation at the water surface, at the top of sediment, at the top of clay, and at the bottom of each core; visual inspection of each core by a soil scientist to confirm the presence of clay and not material such as fly ash and soda lime compacted over the last 50 years; measurement and documentation of the background beta-gamma radiation level at the time and location of collection of each core, the highest beta-gamma level along the sediment portion of each core, and the highest beta-gamma level along the clay portion of each core; measurement and documentation of the length of the clay and of the sediment portion of each core; photographic documentation of each core; and replacement of each core in the impoundment

  15. Inactivation of Avian Influenza Viruses on Porous and Non-porous Surfaces is Enhanced by Elevating Absolute Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, J; Chan, M; VanderZaag, A

    2017-08-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of absolute humidity (AH), a combined factor of temperature and relative humidity (RH), on inactivation of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) on surfaces. Suspensions of the H9N2 or H6N2 AIV were deposited onto carrier surfaces that were either porous (pine wood) or non-porous (stainless steel, synthetic rubber and glass). The inoculated carriers were incubated at 23, 35 or 45°C with 25% or 55% RH for up to 28 days. After incubation, virus was recovered and quantified by chicken embryo assays. The time required to obtain a log 10 reduction in virus infectivity (D-value) was estimated using a linear regression model. At AH of 5.2 g/m 3 (23°C & 25% RH), both viruses survived up to 14 days on the porous surface and for at least 28 days on the non-porous surfaces. The corresponding D-values for H9N2 and H6N2 were 1.49 and 6.90 days on the porous surface and 7.81 and 12.5 days on the non-porous surfaces, respectively. In comparison, at AH of 9.9 g/m 3 (35°C & 25% RH) or 11.3 g/m 3 (23°C & 55% RH), the D-values for H9N2 and H6N2 dropped to ≤0.76 day on the porous surface and to ≤1.81 days on the non-porous surfaces. As the AH continued to rise from 11.3 to 36.0 g/m 3 , the D-value for both viruses decreased further. The relationship between D-value and AH followed a form of y = ax -b for both viruses. The D-values for H9N2 virus were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those for H6N2 virus. Exposure to ammonia gas at concentrations of 86 and 173 ppm did not significantly alter test results. The findings give evidence that increasing the AH in poultry buildings following an outbreak of disease could greatly reduce the length of time required for their decontamination. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2016.

  16. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  17. Observation of surface-plasmon-polariton transmission through a silver film sputtered on a photorefractive substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jing; Li Yudong; Lu Wenqiang; Qi Jiwei; Cui Guoxin; Liu Hongbing; Xu Jingjun; Sun Qian

    2007-01-01

    The diffraction of holographic gratings in a photorefractive iron-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 :Fe) crystal, on which surface a silver film was sputtered, was experimentally investigated. Besides the Bragg diffraction, an additional diffraction was observed. The experimental results present evidence of surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) transmission through the silver film on the photorefractive substrate. The excitation of SPPs is speculated to be due to the corrugations of the silver film, which are caused by the photorefractive and the converse piezoelectric effect in the LiNbO3:Fe sample

  18. Disordered electrical potential observed on the surface of SiO2 by electric field microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa, N; Yan Zang; Ballestar, A; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Bern, F; Esquinazi, P

    2010-01-01

    The electrical potential on the surface of ∼300 nm thick SiO 2 grown on single-crystalline Si substrates has been characterized at ambient conditions using electric field microscopy. Our results show an inhomogeneous potential distribution with fluctuations up to ∼0.4 V within regions of 1 μm. The potential fluctuations observed at the surface of these usual dielectric holders of graphene sheets should induce strong variations in the graphene charge densities and provide a simple explanation for some of the anomalous behaviors of the transport properties of graphene.

  19. Study of luminous phenomena observed on contaminated metallic surfaces submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Bonin, B.; Luong, M.; Safa, H.; Tan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The RF field emission from a sample subjected to high RF fields in a copper cavity has been investigated. The study is focused on the luminous emissions occurring on the RF surface simultaneously with the electron emission. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to observe the evolution of the emitters and the direct effects of the surface conditioning. Also, the parameters of the emitted radiation (intensity, glowing duration, spectral distribution) may provide additional informations on the field emission phenomena. Some results concerning samples intentionally contaminated with particles (metallic or dielectric) are presented. (K.A.)

  20. The use of radar and visual observations to characterize the surface structure of the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Kobrick, M.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of available topographic profiles and scattering parameters derived from earth-based S- and X-band radar observations of Mercury, in order to determine the nature and origin of regional surface variations and structures that are typical of the planet. Attention is given to the proposal that intercrater plains on Mercury formed from extensive volcanic flooding during bombardment, so that most craters were formed on a partially molten surface and were thus obliterated, together with previously formed tectonic features.

  1. Near-surface bulk densities of asteroids derived from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, A.; Taylor, P. A.; Zambrano-Marin, L. F.; Howell, E. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Lejoly, C.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Aponte, B. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new method to constrain the near-surface bulk density and surface roughness of regolith on asteroid surfaces using planetary radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased rapidly during the last five years, allowing us to compare and contrast the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. This provides us with new opportunities to investigate their near-surface physical properties such as the chemical composition, bulk density, porosity, or the structural roughness in the scale of centimeters to meters. Because the radar signal can penetrate into a planetary surface up to a few decimeters, radar can reveal information that is hidden from other ground-based methods, such as optical and infrared measurements. The near-surface structure of asteroids and comets in centimeter-to-meter scale is essential information for robotic and human space missions, impact threat mitigation, and understanding the history of these bodies as well as the formation of the whole Solar System.

  2. Observation of contact area of bubbles with heating surface in pool boiling of water under microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kawamura, H.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, S.; Abe, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Burnout heat flux was measured in subcooled pool boiling of water under attached boiling bubbles on heating surface with bubble holding plate in ground experiment. A thin stainless flat plate was employed for heating surface. The experimental setup and the heating procedures were same as used in reduced gravity experiment performed by a parabolic flight of jet aircraft. Same burnout heat flux as in the reduced gravity was obtained by adjusting the clearance between the bubble holder and the heating surface. They were 100 ∝ 400 percent higher than the widely accepted existing theories. As extending heating time longer than the reduced gravity duration until burnout occurred, burnout heat flux decreased gradually and became a constant value calculated from the existing theories. In a result of observing contact area of boiling bubbles with transparent heating surface, the contact area was smaller in quick heating time than that in long time heating at same heat flux. The experimental results suggest in microgravity that liquid layer is remained between rapidly expanded bubbles and heating surface. In microgravity experiment by a drop shaft facility, contact area of bubbles with heating surface increased considerably at starting of microgravity. (orig.)

  3. Detection of surface elevation changes using an unmanned aerial vehicle on the debris-free Storbreen glacier in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaijenbrink, P.D.A.; Andreassen, Liss M.; Immerzeel, W.W.

    Recent studies have shown that the application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has great potential to investigate the dynamic behavior of glaciers. The studies have successfully deployed UAVs over generally contrast-rich surfaces of debris-covered glaciers and highly crevassed bare ice glaciers.

  4. How well will the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission observe global reservoirs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solander, Kurt C.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate observations of global reservoir storage are critical to understand the availability of managed water resources. By enabling estimates of surface water area and height for reservoir sizes exceeding 250 m2 at a maximum repeat orbit of up to 21 days, the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission (anticipated launch date 2020) is expected to greatly improve upon existing reservoir monitoring capabilities. It is thus essential that spatial and temporal measurement uncertainty for water bodies is known a priori to maximize the utility of SWOT observations as the data are acquired. In this study, we evaluate SWOT reservoir observations using a three-pronged approach that assesses temporal aliasing, errors due to specific reservoir spatial properties, and SWOT performance over actual reservoirs using a combination of in situ and simulated reservoir observations from the SWOTsim instrument simulator. Results indicate temporal errors to be less than 5% for the smallest reservoir sizes (100 km2). Surface area and height errors were found to be minimal (area SWOT, this study will be have important implications for future applications of SWOT reservoir measurements in global monitoring systems and models.

  5. Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulson, Brian, E-mail: brian.gulson@mq.edu.au [Graduate School of the Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde NSW 2109 (Australia); CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, North Ryde NSW 2113 (Australia); Anderson, Phil [Information and Statistics Group, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Taylor, Alan [Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ≥15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels (<10 µg/dL). Methods: Thermal ionisation and isotope dilution mass spectrometry were used to determine high precision lead isotopic ratios ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI −0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=−0.003, 95% CI −0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ≥15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10

  6. Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulson, Brian; Anderson, Phil; Taylor, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ≥15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels ( 208 Pb/ 206 Pb, 207 Pb/ 206 Pb and 206 Pb/ 204 Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI −0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=−0.003, 95% CI −0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ≥15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10 µg/dL. • High precision lead isotopic ratios in blood, house dust wipes, soil, water, paint. • Associations for isotopic measures of blood and dust, blood and

  7. Simulation of water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenbrock, C.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Delineation of areas at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory that would be inundated by a 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek is needed by the US Department of Energy to fulfill flood-plain regulatory requirements. Birch Creek flows southward about 40 miles through an alluvium-filled valley onto the northern part of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory site on the eastern Snake River Plain. The lower 10-mile reach of Birch Creek that ends in Birch Creek Playa near several Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities is of particular concern. Twenty-six channel cross sections were surveyed to develop and apply a hydraulic model to simulate water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek. Model simulation of the 100-year peak flow (700 cubic feet per second) in reaches upstream from State Highway 22 indicated that flow was confined within channels even when all flow was routed to one channel. Where the highway crosses Birch Creek, about 315 cubic feet per second of water was estimated to move downstream--115 cubic feet per second through a culvert and 200 cubic feet per second over the highway. Simulated water-surface elevation at this crossing was 0.8 foot higher than the elevation of the highway. The remaining 385 cubic feet per second flowed southwestward in a trench along the north side of the highway. Flow also was simulated with the culvert removed. The exact location of flood boundaries on Birch Creek could not be determined because of the highly braided channel and the many anthropogenic features (such as the trench, highway, and diversion channels) in the study area that affect flood hydraulics and flow. Because flood boundaries could not be located exactly, only a generalized flood-prone map was developed

  8. Limiter surface observation by infrared techniques, AES, and SEM in the JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomay, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Maeno, M.

    1979-01-01

    The surface characteristics of molybdenum rail-type limiters in the JFT-2 tokamak have been studied by means of infrared techniques, AES, and SEM. The maximum temperature of the limiter surface during the discharge was 550 0 C which is low enough to neglect the evaporation. The limiter surface was found to be eroded uniformly by exposure to the plasma, probably by ion sputtering. Microarcing with arc spots of 0.5-20 μm diameters was observed on the limiter exposed only to stable discharges. Since the arc current of microarcing is estimated to be 1-40 A, the return current can be supplied with electron flow to the nearby area of arc spots. Microarcing as well as ion sputtering may play important roles in limiter material injection into the plasma. (orig.)

  9. Global Model Comparison with NOAA Observed Surface Ozone to Understand Transport in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; McClure-Begley, A.; Tummon, F.; Tilmes, S.; Yudina, A.; Crepinsek, S.; Uttal, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly gaining interest and support for scientific studies to help understand and characterize the processes, sources, and chemical composition of the Arctic environment. In order to understand the Arctic climate system and the changes that are occurring, it is imperative to know the behavior and impact of atmospheric constituents. As a secondary pollutant which impacts the oxidation capacity and radiative forcing of the atmosphere, ozone is an imperative species to characterize. Global atmospheric models help to confirm and understand the influence of long-distance transport on local ozone conditions. This analysis highlights the winter season when ozone conditions are not being driven by photochemical influence, and transport is the prevalent means of ozone variation. In order to ensure adequate representation of ozone conditions and source regions, model comparison verifies the ability of models to represent the behavior of ozone at the surface. Ozone mixing ratios observed from Barrow, Alaska and Summit, Greenland, are critical observations to provide fundamental knowledge of the behavior and trends of ground-level ozone in the Arctic. The observed surface ozone and wind data are compared against two different global climate-chemistry models to assess the ability for models to simulate surface ozone in the arctic region. The CCM SOCOL (Modeling tools for studies of Solar Climate Ozone Links) and Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem are compared to observational measurements. Comparisons between the model and observations are used as the first step in understanding of the long-range transport contribution to ozone variability in the boundary layer of the Arctic environment. An improvement in agreement between observations and chemistry-climate hind cast is found when the model is forced with reanalysis wind conditions.

  10. In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of dislocation motion in 9Cr steel at elevated temperatures: influence of shear stress on dislocation behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Susumu; Sakai, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate high-temperature plastic deformation (creep) mechanism in materials, it is essential to observe dislocation motion under tensile loading. There are many reports on in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations in the literature; however, the relationship between the dislocation motion and shear stress in 9Cr steel is still not clear. In this study, in order to evaluate this relationship quantitatively, in situ TEM observations were carried out in conjunction with finite element method (FEM) analysis. A tensile test sample was strained at an elevated temperature (903 K) inside a transmission electron microscope, and the stress distribution in the strained sample was analyzed by FEM. The dislocation behavior was clearly found to depend on the shear stress. At a shear stress of 66 MPa, both the dislocation velocity and mobile dislocation density were low. However, a high shear stress level of 95 MPa caused a noticeable increase in the dislocation velocity and mobile dislocation density. Furthermore, in this article, we discuss the dependence of the dislocation behavior on stress. The results presented here also indicate that the relationship between the microstructure and the strength of materials can be revealed by the methods used in this work. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Impacts of land cover transitions on surface temperature in China based on satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhen; Liang, Shunlin

    2018-02-01

    China has experienced intense land use and land cover changes during the past several decades, which have exerted significant influences on climate change. Previous studies exploring related climatic effects have focused mainly on one or two specific land use changes, or have considered all land use and land cover change types together without distinguishing their individual impacts, and few have examined the physical processes of the mechanism through which land use changes affect surface temperature. However, in this study, we considered satellite-derived data of multiple land cover changes and transitions in China. The objective was to obtain observational evidence of the climatic effects of land cover transitions in China by exploring how they affect surface temperature and to what degree they influence it through the modification of biophysical processes, with an emphasis on changes in surface albedo and evapotranspiration (ET). To achieve this goal, we quantified the changes in albedo, ET, and surface temperature in the transition areas, examined their correlations with temperature change, and calculated the contributions of different land use transitions to surface temperature change via changes in albedo and ET. Results suggested that land cover transitions from cropland to urban land increased land surface temperature (LST) during both daytime and nighttime by 0.18 and 0.01 K, respectively. Conversely, the transition of forest to cropland tended to decrease surface temperature by 0.53 K during the day and by 0.07 K at night, mainly through changes in surface albedo. Decreases in both daytime and nighttime LST were observed over regions of grassland to forest transition, corresponding to average values of 0.44 and 0.20 K, respectively, predominantly controlled by changes in ET. These results highlight the necessity to consider the individual climatic effects of different land cover transitions or conversions in climate research studies. This short

  12. Reconstruction of Sub-Surface Velocities from Satellite Observations Using Iterative Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Christopher; Charantonis, Anastase

    2017-04-01

    A new method based on modified self-organizing maps is presented for the reconstruction of deep ocean current velocities from surface information provided by satellites. This method takes advantage of local correlations in the data-space to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed deep velocities. No assumptions regarding the structure of the water column, nor the underlying dynamics of the flow field, are made. Using satellite observations of surface velocity, sea-surface height and sea-surface temperature, as well as observations of the deep current velocity from autonomous Argo floats to train the map, we are able to reconstruct realistic high-resolution velocity fields at a depth of 1000m. Validation reveals promising results, with a speed root mean squared error of approximately 2.8cm/s, more than a factor of two smaller than competing methods, and direction errors consistently smaller than 30 degrees. The shortcomings of this method will be discussed, as well as recent work to extend the method to produce a fully 3D reconstruction of the interior temperature and velocity fields.

  13. Persistent aeolian activity at Endeavour crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars; new observations from orbit and the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.; Fenton, Lori K.; Michaels, Timothy I.; Bell, James F., III

    2015-05-01

    Aeolian-driven bedform activity is now known to occur in many regions of Mars, based on surface and orbital observation of contemporary martian ripple and dune mobility events. Many of these sites have only been monitored with sufficient resolution data for the last few Mars years, when the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) began acquiring images of Mars. One exception is the well-monitored Endeavour crater in Meridiani Planum, which was one of the first known sites of unambiguous dune activity (migration and deflation). However, those early detections used lower resolution images over longer temporal baselines (versus the HIRISE data now available), leaving some measurements poorly constrained. New orbital and surface observations of Endeavour show multiple spatial (cm, m, km) and temporal (seasons, Mars year) scales of aeolian-driven surface change, which confirms earlier reports. Dome dunes in the eastern portion of the crater persistently deflate, disseminating dark sand across lighter-toned regolith and/or eroded bright dust, and likely contribute to the crater interior's episodic decreases in orbital albedo measurements. Other dome dunes are detected with the highest migration rates (4-12 m per Mars year) and volumetric sand fluxes reported yet for Mars. Estimated dune construction times or "turnover times" here and elsewhere on Mars are significantly shorter than martian obliquity cycles, implying that it is not necessary to invoke paleoclimate wind regimes to explain current dune morphologies. Located on the crater rim, the Opportunity rover detected evidence for near- and far-field aeolian-driven activity, with observations of spherules/sand movement in the rover workspace, bedform albedo alteration, and dust-lifting events. Observations of intracrater dunes show periodic shifting dark streaks that significantly constrain local wind regimes (directionality and seasonality). Constraints on wind directions from surface and orbital images

  14. Interactive Computing and Processing of NASA Land Surface Observations Using Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew; Burks, Jason; Bell, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Google's Earth Engine offers a "big data" approach to processing large volumes of NASA and other remote sensing products. h\\ps://earthengine.google.com/ Interfaces include a Javascript or Python-based API, useful for accessing and processing over large periods of record for Landsat and MODIS observations. Other data sets are frequently added, including weather and climate model data sets, etc. Demonstrations here focus on exploratory efforts to perform land surface change detection related to severe weather, and other disaster events.

  15. Comparison of land surface humidity between observations and CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert J. H.; Willett, Kate M.; Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter A.

    2017-08-01

    We compare the latest observational land surface humidity dataset, HadISDH, with the latest generation of climate models extracted from the CMIP5 archive and the ERA-Interim reanalysis over the period 1973 to present. The globally averaged behaviour of HadISDH and ERA-Interim are very similar in both humidity measures and air temperature, on decadal and interannual timescales. The global average relative humidity shows a gradual increase from 1973 to 2000, followed by a steep decline in recent years. The observed specific humidity shows a steady increase in the global average during the early period but in the later period it remains approximately constant. None of the CMIP5 models or experiments capture the observed behaviour of the relative or specific humidity over the entire study period. When using an atmosphere-only model, driven by observed sea surface temperatures and radiative forcing changes, the behaviour of regional average temperature and specific humidity are better captured, but there is little improvement in the relative humidity. Comparing the observed climatologies with those from historical model runs shows that the models are generally cooler everywhere, are drier and less saturated in the tropics and extra-tropics, and have comparable moisture levels but are more saturated in the high latitudes. The spatial pattern of linear trends is relatively similar between the models and HadISDH for temperature and specific humidity, but there are large differences for relative humidity, with less moistening shown in the models over the tropics and very little at high latitudes. The observed drying in mid-latitudes is present at a much lower magnitude in the CMIP5 models. Relationships between temperature and humidity anomalies (T-q and T-rh) show good agreement for specific humidity between models and observations, and between the models themselves, but much poorer for relative humidity. The T-q correlation from the models is more steeply positive than

  16. Adjusting altimetric sea surface height observations in coastal regions. Case study in the Greek Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mintourakis Ioannis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When processing satellite altimetry data for Mean Sea Surface (MSS modelling in coastal environments many problems arise. The degradation of the accuracy of the Sea Surface Height (SSH observations close to the coastline and the usually irregular pattern and variability of the sea surface topography are the two dominant factors which have to be addressed. In the present paper, we study the statistical behavior of the SSH observations in relation to the range from the coastline for many satellite altimetry missions and we make an effort to minimize the effects of the ocean variability. Based on the above concepts we present a process strategy for the homogenization of multi satellite altimetry data that takes advantage ofweighted SSH observations and applies high degree polynomials for the adjustment and their uniffcation at a common epoch. At each step we present the contribution of each concept to MSS modelling and then we develop a MSS, a marine geoid model and a grid of gravity Free Air Anomalies (FAA for the area under study. Finally, we evaluate the accuracy of the resulting models by comparisons to state of the art global models and other available data such as GPS/leveling points, marine GPS SSH’s and marine gravity FAA’s, in order to investigate any progress achieved by the presented strategy

  17. Direct observation of surface-state thermal oscillations in SmB6 oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Brian; Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2018-01-01

    SmB6 is a mixed valence Kondo insulator that exhibits a sharp increase in resistance following an activated behavior that levels off and saturates below 4 K. This behavior can be explained by the proposal of SmB6 representing a new state of matter, a topological Kondo insulator, in which a Kondo gap is developed, and topologically protected surface conduction dominates low-temperature transport. Exploiting its nonlinear dynamics, a tunable SmB6 oscillator device was recently demonstrated, where a small dc current generates large oscillating voltages at frequencies from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz. This behavior was explained by a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. However, a crucial aspect of this model, the predicted temperature oscillation in the surface state, has not been experimentally observed to date. This is largely due to the technical difficulty of detecting an oscillating temperature of the very thin surface state. Here we report direct measurements of the time-dependent surface-state temperature in SmB6 with a RuO2 microthermometer. Our results agree quantitatively with the theoretically simulated temperature waveform, and hence support the validity of the oscillator model, which will provide accurate theoretical guidance for developing future SmB6 oscillators at higher frequencies.

  18. Surface Freshwater Storage Variations in the Orinoco Floodplains Using Multi-Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Frappart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Variations in surface water extent and storage are poorly characterized from regional to global scales. In this study, a multi-satellite approach is proposed to estimate the water stored in the floodplains of the Orinoco Basin at a monthly time-scale using remotely-sensed observations of surface water from the Global Inundation Extent Multi-Satellite (GIEMS and stages from Envisat radar altimetry. Surface water storage variations over 2003–2007 exhibit large interannual variability and a strong seasonal signal, peaking during summer, and associated with the flood pulse. The volume of surface water storage in the Orinoco Basin was highly correlated with the river discharge at Ciudad Bolivar (R = 0.95, the closest station to the mouth where discharge was estimated, although discharge lagged one month behind storage. The correlation remained high (R = 0.73 after removing seasonal effects. Mean annual variations in surface water volume represented ~170 km3, contributing to ~45% of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE-derived total water storage variations and representing ~13% of the total volume of water that flowed out of the Orinoco Basin to the Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Observation of the spin-polarized surface state in a noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Dimitri, Klauss; Xu, Su-Yang; Dhakal, Nagendra; Sankar, Raman; Belopolski, Ilya; Sanchez, Daniel S; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-11-07

    Recently, noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd has attracted considerable research interest due to the possibility of hosting topological superconductivity. Here we report a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES study of the normal state electronic and spin properties of BiPd. Our experimental results show the presence of a surface state at higher-binding energy with the location of Dirac point at around 700 meV below the Fermi level. The detailed photon energy, temperature-dependent and spin-resolved ARPES measurements complemented by our first-principles calculations demonstrate the existence of the spin-polarized surface states at high-binding energy. The absence of such spin-polarized surface states near the Fermi level negates the possibility of a topological superconducting behaviour on the surface. Our direct experimental observation of spin-polarized surface states in BiPd provides critical information that will guide the future search for topological superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric materials.

  20. Tracking changes of river morphology in Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar using earth observations and surface water mapping tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piman, T.; Schellekens, J.; Haag, A.; Donchyts, G.; Apirumanekul, C.; Hlaing, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    River morphology changes is one of the key issues in Ayeyarwady River in Myanmar which cause impacts on navigation, riverine habitats, agriculture lands, communities and livelihoods near the bank of the river. This study is aimed to track the changes in river morphology in the middle reach of Ayeyarwady River over last 30 years from 1984-2014 to improve understanding of riverbank dynamic, erosion and deposition procress. Earth observations including LandSat-7, LandSat-8, Digital Elevation Model from SRTM Plus and, ASTER-2 GoogleMap and Open Street Map were obtained for the study. GIS and remote sensing tools were used to analyze changes in river morphology while surface water mapping tool was applied to determine how the dynamic behaviour of the surface river and effect of river morphology changes. The tool consists of two components: (1) a Google Earth Engine (GEE) javascript or python application that performs image analysis and (2) a user-friendly site/app using Google's appspot.com that exposes the application to the users. The results of this study shown that the fluvial morphology in the middle reach of Ayeyarwady River is continuously changing under the influence of high water flows in particularly from extreme flood events and land use change from mining and deforestation. It was observed that some meandering sections of the riverbank were straightened, which results in the movement of sediment downstream and created new sections of meandering riverbank. Several large islands have formed due to the stabilization by vegetation and is enforced by sedimentation while many small bars were formed and migrated dynamically due to changes in water levels and flow velocity in the wet and dry seasons. The main channel was changed to secondary channel in some sections of the river. This results a constant shift of the navigation route. We also found that some villages were facing riverbank erosion which can force villagers to relocate. The study results demonstrated

  1. Influence of aerosol and surface reflectance variability on hyperspectral observed radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bassani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Current aerosol retrievals based on visible and near infrared remote-sensing, are prone to loss of accuracy, where the assumptions of the applied algorithm are violated. This happens mostly over land and it is related to misrepresentation of specific aerosol conditions or surface properties. New satellite missions, based on high spectral resolution instruments, such as PRISMA (Hyperspectral Precursor of the Application Mission, represent a valuable opportunity to improve the accuracy of τa550 retrievable from a remote-sensing system developing new atmospheric measurement techniques. This paper aims to address the potential of these new observing systems in more accurate retrieving τa550, specifically over land in heterogeneous and/or homogeneous areas composed by dark and bright targets. The study shows how the variation of the hyperspectral observed radiance can be addressed to recognise a variation of Δτa550 = 0.02. The goal has been achieved by using simulated radiances by combining two aerosol models (urban and continental and two reflecting surfaces: dark (represented by water and bright (represented by sand for the PRISMA instrument, considering the environmental contribution of the observed radiance, i.e., the adjacency effect. Results showed that, in the continental regime, the expected instrument sensitivity would allow for retrieval accuracy of the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm of 0.02 or better, with a dark surface surrounded by dark areas. The study also showed that for the urban regime, the surface plays a more significant role, with a bright surface surrounded by dark areas providing favourable conditions for the aerosol load retrievals, and dark surfaces representing less suitable situations for inversion independently of the surroundings. However, over all, the results obtained provide evidence that high resolution observations of Earth spectrum between

  2. Long-term surface pCO2 trends from observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry F. Tjiputra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We estimate regional long-term surface ocean pCO2 growth rates using all available underway and bottled biogeochemistry data collected over the past four decades. These observed regional trends are compared with those simulated by five state-of-the-art Earth system models over the historical period. Oceanic pCO2 growth rates faster than the atmospheric growth rates indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake, while ocean pCO2 growth rates slower than the atmospheric growth rates indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 uptake. Aside from the western subpolar North Pacific and the subtropical North Atlantic, our analysis indicates that the current observation-based basin-scale trends may be underestimated, indicating that more observations are needed to determine the trends in these regions. Encouragingly, good agreement between the simulated and observed pCO2 trends is found when the simulated fields are subsampled with the observational coverage. In agreement with observations, we see that the simulated pCO2 trends are primarily associated with the increase in surface dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC associated with atmospheric carbon uptake, and in part by warming of the sea surface. Under the RCP8.5 future scenario, DIC continues to be the dominant driver of pCO2 trends, with little change in the relative contribution of SST. However, the changes in the hydrological cycle play an increasingly important role. For the contemporary (1970–2011 period, the simulated regional pCO2 trends are lower than the atmospheric growth rate over 90% of the ocean. However, by year 2100 more than 40% of the surface ocean area has a higher oceanic pCO2 trend than the atmosphere, implying a reduction in the atmospheric CO2 uptake rate. The fastest pCO2 growth rates are projected for the subpolar North Atlantic, while the high-latitude Southern Ocean and eastern equatorial Pacific have the weakest growth rates, remaining below the atmospheric pCO2 growth rate. Our work

  3. New Scheme for Validating Remote-Sensing Land Surface Temperature Products with Station Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuous land-surface temperature (LST observations from ground-based stations are an important reference dataset for validating remote-sensing LST products. However, a lack of evaluations of the representativeness of station observations limits the reliability of validation results. In this study, a new practical validation scheme is presented for validating remote-sensing LST products that includes a key step: assessing the spatial representativeness of ground-based LST measurements. Three indicators, namely, the dominant land-cover type (DLCT, relative bias (RB, and average structure scale (ASS, are established to quantify the representative levels of station observations based on the land-cover type (LCT and LST reference maps with high spatial resolution. We validated MODIS LSTs using station observations from the Heihe River Basin (HRB in China. The spatial representative evaluation steps show that the representativeness of observations greatly differs among stations and varies with different vegetation growth and other factors. Large differences in the validation results occur when using different representative level observations, which indicates a large potential for large error during the traditional T-based validation scheme. Comparisons show that the new validation scheme greatly improves the reliability of LST product validation through high-level representative observations.

  4. Nanoripple formation on GaAs (001) surface by reverse epitaxy during ion beam sputtering at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Debasree; Ghose, Debabrata, E-mail: debabrata1.ghose@gmail.com

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • GaAs (001) surfaces are sputtered by 1 keV Ar{sup +} at sample temperature of 450 °C. • Highly ordered defect-free ripples develop at near-normal incidence angles (θ ≈ 0–25{sup 0}). • Concurrent sample rotation does not alter the ripple orientation with respect to the ion beam. • At grazing incidence angles anisotropic structure is formed. • Concurrent sample rotation shows that the structure orientation depends on the beam direction. - Abstract: Self-organized pattern formation by the process of reverse epitaxial growth has been investigated on GaAs (001) surfaces during 1 keV Ar{sup +} bombardment at target temperature of 450 °C for a wide range of incident angles. Highly ordered ripple formation driven by diffusion instability is evidenced at near normal incidence angles. Concurrent sample rotation shows that the ripple morphology and its orientation do not depend on the incident beam direction; rather they are determined by the symmetry of the crystal face.

  5. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  6. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  7. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions in Africa (and other global locations), surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The US National Weather Service (NWS) International Activities Office (IAO) in partnership with University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The goal is to provide observations for environmental monitoring, and early warning alert systems that can be deployed at weather services in developing countries. Instrumentation is being designed using innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The initial effort is focused on designing a surface network using GIS-based tools, deploying an initial network in Zambia, and providing training to Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD) staff. The presentation will provide an overview of the project concepts, design of the low cost instrumentation, and initial experiences deploying a surface network deployment in Zambia.

  8. Surface flow observations from a gauge-cam station on the Tiber river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Petroselli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the kinematic organization of natural water bodies is central to hydrology and environmental engineering practice. Reliable and continuous flow observations are essential to comprehend flood generation and propagation mechanisms, erosion dynamics, sediment transport, and drainage network evolution. In engineering practice, flood warning systems largely rely on real-time discharge measurements, and flow velocity monitoring is important for the design and management of hydraulic structures, such as reservoirs and hydropower plants. Traditionally, gauging stations have been equipped with water level meters, and stage-discharge relationships (rating curves) have been established through few direct discharge measurements. Only in rare instances, monitoring stations have integrated radar technology for local measurement of surface flow velocity. Establishing accurate rating curves depends on the availability of a comprehensive range of discharge values, including measurements recorded during extreme events. However, discharge values during high-flow events are often difficult or even impossible to obtain, thereby hampering the reliability of discharge predictions. Fully remote observations have been enabled in the past ten years through optics-based velocimetry techniques. Such methodologies enable the estimation of the surface flow velocity field over extended regions from the motion of naturally occurring debris or floaters dragged by the current. Resting on the potential demonstrated by such approaches, here, we present a novel permanent gauge-cam station for the observation of the flow velocity field in the Tiber river. This new station captures one-minute videos every 10 minutes over an area of up to 20.6 × 15.5m2. In a feasibility study, we demonstrate that experimental images analyzed via particle tracking velocimetry and particle image velocimetry can be used to obtain accurate surface flow velocity estimations in close agreement with radar records

  9. Application of Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope-Nanomanipulation System on Spheroplast Yeast Cells Surface Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The preparation and observations of spheroplast W303 cells are described with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). The spheroplasting conversion was successfully confirmed qualitatively, by the evaluation of the morphological change between the normal W303 cells and the spheroplast W303 cells, and quantitatively, by determining the spheroplast conversion percentage based on the OD 800 absorbance data. From the optical microscope observations as expected, the normal cells had an oval shape whereas spheroplast cells resemble a spherical shape. This was also confirmed under four different mediums, that is, yeast peptone-dextrose (YPD), sterile water, sorbitol-EDTA-sodium citrate buffer (SCE), and sorbitol-Tris-Hcl-CaCl 2 (CaS). It was also observed that the SCE and CaS mediums had a higher number of spheroplast cells as compared to the YPD and sterile water mediums. The OD 800 absorbance data also showed that the whole W303 cells were fully converted to the spheroplast cells after about 15 minutes. The observations of the normal and the spheroplast W303 cells were then performed under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The normal cells showed a smooth cell surface whereas the spheroplast cells had a bleb-like surface after the loss of its integrity when removing the cell wall.

  10. Dynamic surface tracking controller design for a constrained hypersonic vehicle based on disturbance observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The tracking control problem of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle subjects to aerodynamic parameter uncertainty and input constraint is investigated by combining nonlinear disturbance observer and dynamic surface control. To design controller simply, a control-oriented model is firstly derived and divided into two subsystems, velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem based on the engineering backgrounds of flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. In every subsystem, compounded disturbances are included to consider aerodynamic uncertainty and the effect of the flexible modes. Then, disturbance observer is not only used to handle the compounded disturbance but also to handle the input constraint, where the estimation error converges to a random small region through appropriately choosing the observer parameters. To sequel, the disturbance observer–based robust control scheme and the disturbance observer-based dynamic surface control scheme are developed for the velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem, respectively. Besides, novel filters are designed to alleviate the problem of “explosion of terms” induced by backstepping method. On the basis of Lyapunov stability theory, the presented control scheme can assure that tracking error converges to an arbitrarily small neighborhood around zero by rigorous theoretical analysis. At last, simulation result shows the effectiveness of the presented control method.

  11. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations in Data Sparse Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions of the World, surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), with support from USAID, has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The project is focused on improving weather observations for environmental monitoring and early warning alert systems on a regional to global scale. Instrumentation that has been developed use innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The goal of the project is to make the weather station designs, software, and processing tools an open community resource. The weather stations can be built locally by agencies, through educational institutions, and residential communities as a citizen effort to augment existing networks to improve detection of natural hazards for disaster risk reduction. The presentation will provide an overview of the open source weather station technology and evaluation of sensor observations for the initial networks that have been deployed in Africa.

  12. Observations and simulations of microplastic marine debris in the ocean surface boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, T.; Brunner, K.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Lavender Law, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD) in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL), this study applies a large eddy simulation model and a parametric one-dimensional column model to examine vertical distributions of MPMD. MPMD is widely distributed in vast regions of the subtropical gyres and has emerged as a major open ocean pollutant whose distribution is subject to upper ocean turbulence. The models capture wind-driven turbulence, Langmuir turbulence (LT), and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BW). Model results are only consistent with MPMD observations if LT effects are included. Neither BW nor shear-driven turbulence is capable of deeply submerging MPMD, suggesting that the observed vertical MPMD distributions are a characteristic signature of wave-driven LT. Thus, this study demonstrates that LT substantially increases turbulent transport in the OSBL, resulting in deep submergence of buoyant tracers. The parametric model is applied to eleven years of observations in the North Atlantic and North Pacific subtropical gyres to show that surface measurements substantially underestimate MPMD concentrations by a factor of three to thirteen.

  13. Assimilation of ocean sea-surface height observations of mesoscale eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeffrey B.; Grooms, Ian

    2017-12-01

    Mesoscale eddies are one of the dominant sources of variability in the world's oceans. With eddy-resolving global ocean models, it becomes important to assimilate observations of mesoscale eddies to correctly represent the state of the mesoscale. Here, we investigate strategies for assimilating a reduced number of sea-surface height observations by focusing on the coherent mesoscale eddies. The study is carried out in an idealized perfect-model framework using two-layer forced quasigeostrophic dynamics, which captures the dominant dynamics of ocean mesoscale eddies. We study errors in state-estimation as well as error growth in forecasts and find that as fewer observations are assimilated, assimilating at vortex locations results in reduced state estimation and forecast errors.

  14. The study of discharge cleaning in the JFT-2 tokamak with surface observation by AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomay, Yoshio; Tazima, Teruhiko; Fujisawa, Noboru; Suzuki, Norio; Konoshima, Shigeru

    1976-07-01

    Noticeable correlations were observed between the changes of discharge characteristics, wall conditions and typical mass peaks with discharge cleaning in the JFT-2 tokamak. Atomic composition of the vacuum wall surface observed by AES becomes constant with continuing discharge cleaning in the level except hydrogen and helium: 30-50% C, 20-30% Mo, 15-30% stainless steel elements and 10-15% O. The stable reproducible plasma with Z sub(eff)=4.5 was obtained in this wall condition. The limiter and vacuum wall materials (Mo and 304 stainless steel, respectively), carbon and oxygen were observed depositing on the wall in the thickness of about 300 A at the minimum inner radius of the vacuum chamber and 40 A nearly at the maximum after 2900 cleaning pulses. The mechanism determining the wall condition is also discussed. (auth.)

  15. The bursts of high energy events observed by the telescope array surface detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-08-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is designed to detect air showers induced by ultra high energy cosmic rays. The TA ground Surface particle Detector (TASD) observed several short-time bursts of air shower like events. These bursts are not likely due to chance coincidence between single shower events. The expectation of chance coincidence is less than 10-4 for five-year's observation. We checked the correlation between these bursts of events and lightning data, and found evidence for correlations in timing and position. Some features of the burst events are similar to those of a normal cosmic ray air shower, and some are not. On this paper, we report the observed bursts of air shower like events and their correlation with lightning.

  16. Multi sensor validation and error characteristics of Arctic satellite sea surface temperature observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna; Tonbo, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    in the satellite products related to observation techniques, data processing and cloud masking. Temporal and spatial error scales are derived for all satellite products using the satellite versus in situ match-up dataset. Temporal error scales are typically between 1 and 2 days and the characteristic spatial error......Six of the operational global satellite sea surface temperature products from infrared and microwave sensors are validated in a consistent way in waters north of 60° N. The 15-month validation with drifting buoy in situ observations shows that data from the Advanced Along-Tracking Scanning...... Radiometer (AATSR) on-board the ENVISAT satellite and NAVOCEANO data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on-board the NOAA 18 satellite are superior in terms of bias and standard deviation. The observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) on-board the Aqua...

  17. Ultraviolet Characterization of Comet and Asteroid Surfaces as Observed by the Rosetta Alice Instrument (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaga, L. M.; Holt, C. E.; Steffl, A.; Stern, S. A.; Bertaux, J. L.; Parker, J. W.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feldman, P.; Keeney, B. A.; Knight, M. M.; Noonan, J.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016, Alice, NASA's lightweight and low-power far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph onboard ESA's comet-orbiting spacecraft Rosetta, completed a 2-year characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G), a bi-lobed Jupiter family comet with extreme seasons and diverse surface features. In addition to coma studies, Alice monitored the sunlit surface of C-G from 700-2050 Å to establish the FUV bidirectional reflectance properties and albedo of the surface, determine homogeneity, correlate spectral features with morphological regions, and infer the compositional makeup of the comet. The heliocentric distance coverage (3.7 AU from the Sun, through perihelion at 1.24 AU, and back out to 3.8 AU) over a period of 2 years and spatial resolution of the Alice data (e.g., 30 m by 150 m at the comet from a spacecraft distance of 30 km) resulted in the first resolved observations of a cometary nucleus in the FUV throughout much of its orbit. Upon arrival in 2014, initial characteristics and properties of the surface were derived for the northern hemisphere, revealing a dark, homogeneous, and blue-sloped surface in the FUV with an average geometric albedo of 5% at 1475 Å, consistent with a homogeneous layer of dust covering that hemisphere and similar to nucleus properties derived for this and other comets in the visible. Now, with a fully calibrated dataset, properties of the southern and northern hemispheres, before and after perihelion, have been quantified and preliminarily show minimal change in the comet's surface in the FUV through the apparition. Analyses are ongoing and we will highlight any detected variability. En-route to C-G, Alice made history during the flybys of asteroid (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia obtaining the first global FUV reflectivity measurement and acquiring spatially resolved observations of an asteroid surface, respectively. The asteroid properties will be compared to those derived for C-G to demonstrate commonalities across small bodies

  18. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere–surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable quantification of air–surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0 is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc. in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere–surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air–surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.. However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann–Whitney U test. The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia. The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0

  19. Observations of surface momentum exchange over the marginal ice zone and recommendations for its parametrisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Elvidge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive aircraft observations are used to characterise surface roughness over the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ and consequently make recommendations for the parametrisation of surface momentum exchange in the MIZ. These observations were gathered in the Barents Sea and Fram Strait from two aircraft as part of the Aerosol–Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA project. They represent a doubling of the total number of such aircraft observations currently available over the Arctic MIZ. The eddy covariance method is used to derive estimates of the 10 m neutral drag coefficient (CDN10 from turbulent wind velocity measurements, and a novel method using albedo and surface temperature is employed to derive ice fraction. Peak surface roughness is found at ice fractions in the range 0.6 to 0.8 (with a mean interquartile range in CDN10 of 1.25 to 2.85  ×  10−3. CDN10 as a function of ice fraction is found to be well approximated by the negatively skewed distribution provided by a leading parametrisation scheme (Lüpkes et al., 2012 tailored for sea-ice drag over the MIZ in which the two constituent components of drag – skin and form drag – are separately quantified. Current parametrisation schemes used in the weather and climate models are compared with our results and the majority are found to be physically unjustified and unrepresentative. The Lüpkes et al. (2012 scheme is recommended in a computationally simple form, with adjusted parameter settings. A good agreement holds for subsets of the data from different locations, despite differences in sea-ice conditions. Ice conditions in the Barents Sea, characterised by small, unconsolidated ice floes, are found to be associated with higher CDN10 values – especially at the higher ice fractions – than those of Fram Strait, where typically larger, smoother floes are observed. Consequently, the important influence of sea-ice morphology and floe size on

  20. Observations of surface momentum exchange over the marginal ice zone and recommendations for its parametrisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, A. D.; Renfrew, I. A.; Weiss, A. I.; Brooks, I. M.; Lachlan-Cope, T. A.; King, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Comprehensive aircraft observations are used to characterise surface roughness over the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) and consequently make recommendations for the parametrisation of surface momentum exchange in the MIZ. These observations were gathered in the Barents Sea and Fram Strait from two aircraft as part of the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) project. They represent a doubling of the total number of such aircraft observations currently available over the Arctic MIZ. The eddy covariance method is used to derive estimates of the 10 m neutral drag coefficient (CDN10) from turbulent wind velocity measurements, and a novel method using albedo and surface temperature is employed to derive ice fraction. Peak surface roughness is found at ice fractions in the range 0.6 to 0.8 (with a mean interquartile range in CDN10 of 1.25 to 2.85 × 10-3). CDN10 as a function of ice fraction is found to be well approximated by the negatively skewed distribution provided by a leading parametrisation scheme (Lüpkes et al., 2012) tailored for sea-ice drag over the MIZ in which the two constituent components of drag - skin and form drag - are separately quantified. Current parametrisation schemes used in the weather and climate models are compared with our results and the majority are found to be physically unjustified and unrepresentative. The Lüpkes et al. (2012) scheme is recommended in a computationally simple form, with adjusted parameter settings. A good agreement holds for subsets of the data from different locations, despite differences in sea-ice conditions. Ice conditions in the Barents Sea, characterised by small, unconsolidated ice floes, are found to be associated with higher CDN10 values - especially at the higher ice fractions - than those of Fram Strait, where typically larger, smoother floes are observed. Consequently, the important influence of sea-ice morphology and floe size on surface roughness is recognised, and

  1. Observations of surface momentum exchange over the marginal-ice-zone and recommendations for its parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, A. D.; Renfrew, I. A.; Weiss, A. I.; Brooks, I. M.; Lachlan-Cope, T. A.; King, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive aircraft observations are used to characterise surface roughness over the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) and consequently make recommendations for the parameterization of surface momentum exchange in the MIZ. These observations were gathered in the Barents Sea and Fram Strait from two aircraft as part of the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) project. They represent a doubling of the total number of such aircraft observations currently available over the Arctic MIZ. The eddy covariance method is used to derive estimates of the 10 m neutral drag coefficient (CDN10) from turbulent wind velocity measurements, and a novel method using albedo and surface temperature is employed to derive ice fraction. Peak surface roughness is found at ice fractions in the range 0.6 to 0.8 (with a mean interquartile range in CDN10 of 1.25 to 2.85 × 10-3). CDN10 as a function of ice fraction is found to be well approximated by the negatively skewed distribution provided by a leading parameterization scheme (Lüpkes et al., 2012) tailored for sea ice drag over the MIZ in which the two constituent components of drag - skin and form drag - are separately quantified. Current parameterization schemes used in the weather and climate models are compared with our results and the majority are found to be physically unjustified and unrepresentative. The Lüpkes et al. (2012) scheme is recommended in a computationally simple form, with adjusted parameter settings. A good agreement is found to hold for subsets of the data from different locations despite differences in sea ice conditions. Ice conditions in the Barents Sea, characterised by small, unconsolidated ice floes, are found to be associated with higher CDN10 values - especially at the higher ice fractions - than those of Fram Strait, where typically larger, smoother floes are observed. Consequently, the important influence of sea ice morphology and floe size on surface roughness is

  2. Observation of surface features on an active landslide, and implications for understanding its history of movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parise

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface features are produced as a result of internal deformation of active landslides, and are continuously created and destroyed by the movement. Observation of their presence and distribution, and surveying of their evolution may provide insights for the zonation of the mass movement in sectors characterized by different behaviour. The present study analyses and describes some example of surface features observed on an active mass movement, the Slumgullion earthflow, in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. The Slumgullion earthflow is one of the most famous and spectacular landslides in the world; it consists of a younger, active part which moves on and over an older, much larger, inactive part. Total length of the earthflow is 6.8 km, with an estimated volume of 170 × 10 6 m 3 . Its nearly constant rate of movement (ranging from about 2 m per year at the head, to a maximum of 6–7 m per year at its narrow and central part, to values between 1.3 and 2 m per year at the active toe, and the geological properties of moving material, are well suited for the observation of the development and evolution of surface features. In the last 11 years, repeated surveying at the Slumgullion site has been performed through recognition of surface features, measurements of their main characteristics, and detailed mapping. In this study, two sectors of the Slumgullion earthflow are analysed through comparison of the features observed in this time span, and evaluation of the changes occurred: they are the active toe and an area located at the left flank of the landslide. Choice of the sectors was dictated in the first case, by particular activity of movement and the nearby presence of elements at risk (highway located only 250 m downhill from the toe; and in the second case, by the presence of many surface features, mostly consisting of several generations of flank ridges. The active toe of the landslide is characterized by continuous movement

  3. Broad Band Data and Noise Observed with Surface Station and Borehole Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Suleyman; Ozel, Oguz; Safa Arslan, Mehmet; Behiye Akşahin, Bengi; Hatipoglu, Mustafa; Cagin Yalcintepe, Ragip; Ada, Samim; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Marmara region tectonically is very active and many destructive earthquakes happened in the past. North Anatolian Fault Zone crosses the Marmara region and it has three branches. The northern branch passes through Marmara Sea and expected future large earthquake will happen along this fault zone. There is a gap in seismic network in the Marmara region at offshore and onshore areas. We have started broadband borehole seismographic observations to obtain the detailed information about fault geometry and its stick-slip behavior beneath the western Marmara Sea, as a part of the MARsite collaborative Project, namely "New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite-MARsite". The target area western Marmara of Turkey. In the beginning of the project, we installed eight Broadband surface station around Marmara Sea in April 2014. Then, we added broadband sensor and broadband surface sensor at the same location in November 2014. In this study, we developed a Matlab application to calculate Power Spectral Density against the New Low Noise Model (NLNM) and New High Noise Model (NHNM) determined for one-hour segments of the data. Also we compared ambient noise of broadband borehole sensor and surface broadband sensor.

  4. Observation of inner surface of flame-tower type reactor for uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Terai, Takayuki; Umetsu, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A fluorination reactor, which has been used to convert uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) into uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), was completed after approximately 6000 hours operation at the uranium conversion facility in Japan. The observation of its inner surface was carried out to understand its corrosive condition and mechanism. The main wall of the reactor is made of Monel Alloy and its operational temperature is approximately 450degC at external surface under gaseous fluorine atmosphere. A sampling was undertaken from the most corrosive part of the reactor wall, and its analysis was carried out to obtain the data for the condition of appearance, thickness, macro and micro structure, etc. The results of observation are as follows: (1) The thickness decreased evenly (average 3.9 mm/year); (2) The chemical composition of corrosive products as coating was mainly nickel fluoride (NiF 2 ), which suggested that the corrosion mechanism could have been caused by the high temperature gas corrosion; (3) The total amount of coating was lower than that of a loss in thickness. For some reason, some of coating would seem to become extinct on the surface of the wall. The deterioration of coating, which formed a protector on the wall due to excess heating of the wall, the sand erosion effect by UF 4 , etc. have contributed to this state of condition. (author)

  5. In situ nanoscale observations of metatorbernite surfaces interacted with aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astilleros, José Manuel; Pinto, André Jorge; Gonçalves, Mário A; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    2013-03-19

    Metatorbernite (Cu(UO(2))(2)(PO(4))(2)·8H(2)O) has been identified in contaminated sediments as a phase controlling the fate of U. Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe in situ the interaction between metatorbernite cleavage surfaces and flowing aqueous solutions (residence time = 1 min) with different pHs. In contact with deionized water the features of (001) surfaces barely modify. However, changes are remarkable both under acidic and basic conditions. In acidic solutions (pH = 2.5) metatorbernite surface develops a rough altered layer and large pits nucleate on it. The altered layer shows a low adhesion and is removed by the AFM tip during the scanning. The large pits spread rapidly, at few tens of nm/s, indicating a collapse of the structure. The combination of dissolution and the presence of defects in the metatorbernite structure can explain both the collapse process and the alteration of the surfaces under acidic conditions. Other mechanisms such as ion exchange reactions remain speculative. In NaOH solutions (pH = 11.5) metatorbernite dissolves by formation of etch pits bounded by steps parallel to [100], the direction of the most straight periodic bond chains (PBCs) in metatorbernite structure. These steps retreat at ∼0.15 nm/s. Under these conditions dissolution is promoted by the formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes in solution.

  6. Diagnostics comparing sea surface temperature feedbacks from operational hurricane forecasts to observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Lloyd

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ability of recent versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Operational Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricane intensity and hurricane-induced Sea Surface Temperature (SST cooling. The analysis was performed by taking a Lagrangian composite of all hurricanes in the North Atlantic from 1998–2009 in observations and 2005–2009 for the GHM. A marked improvement in the intensity-SST relationship for the GHM compared to observations was found between the years 2005 and 2006–2009 due to the introduction of warm-core eddies, a representation of the loop current, and changes to the drag coefficient parameterization for bulk turbulent flux computation. A Conceptual Hurricane Intensity Model illustrates the essential steady-state characteristics of the intensity-SST relationship and is explained by two coupled equations for the atmosphere and ocean. The conceptual model qualitatively matches observations and the 2006–2009 period in the GHM, and presents supporting evidence for the conclusion that weaker upper oceanic thermal stratification in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by the introduction of the loop current and warm core eddies, is crucial to explaining the observed SST-intensity pattern. The diagnostics proposed by the conceptual model offer an independent set of metrics for comparing operational hurricane forecast models to observations.

  7. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. II. Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. O. I.; Virtanen, I. I.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Yeates, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. Methods: We tested the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and studied how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affected the simulation. We compared the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion, and input data. We also compared the simulated magnetic field with observations. Results: We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. Although the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, which often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are somewhat minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  8. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations: Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Iiro; Virtanen, Ilpo; Pevtsov, Alexei; Yeates, Anthony; Mursula, Kalevi

    2017-04-01

    We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. We test the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and study how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affect the simulation. We compare the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion and input data. We also compare the simulated magnetic field with observations. We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. While the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, that often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are rather minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  9. Assimilation of Gridded Terrestrial Water Storage Observations from GRACE into a Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Manuela; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Rodell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Observations of terrestrial water storage (TWS) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have a coarse resolution in time (monthly) and space (roughly 150,000 km(sup 2) at midlatitudes) and vertically integrate all water storage components over land, including soil moisture and groundwater. Data assimilation can be used to horizontally downscale and vertically partition GRACE-TWS observations. This work proposes a variant of existing ensemble-based GRACE-TWS data assimilation schemes. The new algorithm differs in how the analysis increments are computed and applied. Existing schemes correlate the uncertainty in the modeled monthly TWS estimates with errors in the soil moisture profile state variables at a single instant in the month and then apply the increment either at the end of the month or gradually throughout the month. The proposed new scheme first computes increments for each day of the month and then applies the average of those increments at the beginning of the month. The new scheme therefore better reflects submonthly variations in TWS errors. The new and existing schemes are investigated here using gridded GRACE-TWS observations. The assimilation results are validated at the monthly time scale, using in situ measurements of groundwater depth and soil moisture across the U.S. The new assimilation scheme yields improved (although not in a statistically significant sense) skill metrics for groundwater compared to the open-loop (no assimilation) simulations and compared to the existing assimilation schemes. A smaller impact is seen for surface and root-zone soil moisture, which have a shorter memory and receive smaller increments from TWS assimilation than groundwater. These results motivate future efforts to combine GRACE-TWS observations with observations that are more sensitive to surface soil moisture, such as L-band brightness temperature observations from Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) or Soil Moisture Active

  10. Estimating Temperature Fields from MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature Observations in a Sub-Arctic Alpine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N. Williamson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatially continuous satellite infrared temperature measurements are essential for understanding the consequences and drivers of change, at local and regional scales, especially in northern and alpine environments dominated by a complex cryosphere where in situ observations are scarce. We describe two methods for producing daily temperature fields using MODIS “clear-sky” day-time Land Surface Temperatures (LST. The Interpolated Curve Mean Daily Surface Temperature (ICM method, interpolates single daytime Terra LST values to daily means using the coincident diurnal air temperature curves. The second method calculates daily mean LST from daily maximum and minimum LST (MMM values from MODIS Aqua and Terra. These ICM and MMM models were compared to daily mean air temperatures recorded between April and October at seven locations in southwest Yukon, Canada, covering characteristic alpine land cover types (tundra, barren, glacier at elevations between 1,408 m and 2,319 m. Both methods for producing mean daily surface temperatures have advantages and disadvantages. ICM signals are strongly correlated with air temperature (R2 = 0.72 to 0.86, but have relatively large variability (RMSE = 4.09 to 4.90 K, while MMM values had a stronger correlation to air temperature (R2 = 0.90 and smaller variability (RMSE = 2.67 K. Finally, when comparing 8-day LST averages, aggregated from the MMM method, to air temperature, we found a high correlation (R2 = 0.84 with less variability (RMSE = 1.54 K. Where the trend was less steep and the y-intercept increased by 1.6 °C compared to the daily correlations. This effect is likely a consequence of LST temperature averages being differentially affected by cloud cover over warm and cold surfaces. We conclude that satellite infrared skin temperature (e.g., MODIS LST, which is often aggregated into multi-day composites to mitigate data reductions caused by cloud cover, changes in its relationship to air temperature

  11. Ellipso-Microscopic Observation of Titanium Surface under UV-Light Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, K.; Kurauchi, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ueda, M.; Ohtsuka, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ellipso-microscopic observation of a titanium surface undergoing anodization in 0.05 mol dm -3 of H 2 SO 4 was conducted. During irradiation by ultra-violet (UV) light with a wavelength of 325 nm, the titanium surface allowed for the flow of a photo-induced current and showed up as a bright, patch-like image on an ellipso-microscopic view. The brightness and patch-pattern in the image changed with flowing photo-induced current. The changes in the brightness and the image corresponded to the formation and/or degradation of titanium oxide due to the photo-electrochemical reaction of the oxide. An in situ monitoring using the ellipso-microscope revealed that the film change was dependent on the irradiation light power, by UV-light increases the anodic current and results in the initiation of pitting at lower potentials as compared with the non-irradiated condition.

  12. Hyper fast radiative transfer for the physical retrieval of surface parameters from SEVIRI observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liuzzi, G; Masiello, G; Serio, C; Blasi, M G; Venafra, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical aspects of a fast scheme for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI data, their implementation and some sample results obtained. The scheme is based on a Kalman Filter approach, which effectively exploits the temporal continuity in the observations of the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, on which SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) operates. Such scheme embodies in its core a physical retrieval algorithm, which employs an hyper fast radiative transfer code highly customized for this retrieval task. Radiative transfer and its customizations are described in detail. Fastness, accuracy and stability of the code are fully documented for a variety of surface features, showing a peculiar application to the massive Greek forest fires in August 2007. (paper)

  13. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  14. Observation of Zenneck-Like Waves over a Metasurface Designed for Launching HF Radar Surface Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Jangal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 20th century a controversy has been continuously revived about the existence of the Zenneck Wave. This wave is a theoretical solution of Maxwell’s equations and might be propagated along the interface between the air and a dielectric medium. The expected weak attenuation at large distance explains the constant interest for this wave. Notably in the High Frequency band such a wave had been thought as a key point to reduce the high attenuation observed in High Frequency Surface Wave Radar. Despite many works on that topic and various experiments attempted during one century, there is still an alternation of statements between its existence and its nonexistence. We report here an experiment done during the optimisation of the transmitting antennas for Surface Wave Radars. Using an infrared method, we visualize a wave having the structure described by Zenneck above a metasurface located on a dielectric slab.

  15. A Method to Simulate the Observed Surface Properties of Proton Irradiated Silicon Strip Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00335524; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichhorn, T.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.

    2015-04-23

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. To upgrade the tracker to required performance level, extensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. A defect model of Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD simulation package for the bulk properties of proton irradiated devices has been producing simulations closely matching with measurements of silicon strip detectors. However, the model does not provide expected behavior due to the fluence increased surface damage. The solution requires an approach that does not affect the accurate bulk properties produced by the proton model, but only adds to it the required radiation induced properties close to the surface. These include the observed position dependency of the strip detector's charge collec...

  16. Determination of surface parameters and fluxes for climate studies from space observation. Methods, results and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F.; Seguin, B.

    Climate being the result of many interconnected processes, it can hardly be understood without models which describe these various processes as quantitatively as possible and define the parameters which are relevant for climate studies. Among those, surface processes and therefore surface parameters are now recognized to be of great importance. Some examples are discussed in the first part, showing the great interest to measure the relevant parameters on a multi-year basis, over large areas with sufficiently dense array and on a stable basis, in order to monitor climate changes or to study the impact on climate of the modifications of some relevant parameters which are analysed. Since space observations from satellites fulfil these requirements, it is clear that they will become very soon a fundamental tool for climate studies. Unfortunately, as it is discussed in the second part, satellites do measure only spectral radiances at the top of the atmosphere and the determination of the relevant surface parameters (or fluxes) from these radiances still raises many problems which have to be solved, although many progresses have already been made. The aim of this paper is therefore to review and discuss these problems and the various ways they have been tackled until now. The first part is devoted to an overview of what needs to be measured and why, while the existing methods for determining the most important surface parameters from space observations are presented in the second part where a particular attention is given to the theoretical and experimental validations of these methods, their limits and the problems still to be solved.

  17. Observations of surface radiation and stratospheric processes at Thule Air Base, Greenland, during the IPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Muscari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of atmospheric parameters have been carried out for more than 20 years at the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC station at Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W, on the north-western coast of Greenland. Various instruments dedicated to the study of the lower and middle polar atmosphere are installed at Thule in the framework of a long standing collaboration among Danish, Italian, and US research institutes and universities. This effort aims at monitoring the composition, structure and dynamics of the polar stratosphere, and at studying the Arctic energy budget and the role played by different factors, such as aerosols, water vapour, and surface albedo. During the International Polar Year (IPY, in winter 2008-2009, an intensive measurement campaign was conducted at Thule within the framework of the IPY project “Ozone layer and UV radiation in a changing climate evaluated during IPY” (ORACLE-O3 which sought to improve our understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to the Arctic stratospheric O3 depletion. The campaign involved a lidar system, measuring aerosol backscatter and depolarization ratios up to 35 km and atmospheric temperature profiles from 25 to 70 km altitude, a ground-based millimeter-wave spectrometer (GBMS used to derive stratospheric mixing ratio profiles of different chemical species involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion cycle, and then ground-based radiometers and a Cimel sunphotometer to study the Arctic radiative budget at the surface. The observations show that the surface radiation budget is mainly regulated by the longwave component throughout most of the year. Clouds have a significant impact contributing to enhance the role of longwave radiation. Besides clouds, water vapour seasonal changes produce the largest modification in the shortwave component at the surface, followed by changes in surface albedo and in aerosol amounts. For what concerns the

  18. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Remedios, J.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for recent improvements in techniques and data quality. The GlobTemperature initiative under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013

  19. Variational assimilation of land surface temperature observations for enhanced river flow predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolani, Giulia; Castelli, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) has the potential of improving hydrologic forecasts. However, many issues arise in case it is employed for spatially distributed hydrologic models that describes processes in various compartments: large dimensionality of the inverse problem, layers governed by different equations, non-linear and discontinuous model structure, complex topology of domains such as surface drainage and river network.On the other hand, integrated models offer the possibility of improving prediction of specific states by exploiting observations of quantities belonging to other compartments. In terms of forecasting river discharges, and hence for their enhancement, soil moisture is a key variable, since it determines the partitioning of rainfall into infiltration and surface runoff. However, soil moisture measurements are affected by issues that could prevent a successful DA and an actual improvement of discharge predictions.In-situ measurements suffer a dramatic spatial scarcity, while observations from satellite are barely accurate and provide spatial information only at a very coarse scale (around 40 km).Hydrologic models that explicitly represent land surface processes of coupled water and energy balance provide a valid alternative to direct DA of soil moisture.They gives the possibility of inferring soil moisture states through DA of remotely sensed Land Surface Temperature (LST), whose measurements are more accurate and with a higher spatial resolution in respect to those of soil moisture. In this work we present the assimilation of LST data in a hydrologic model (Mobidic) that is part of the operational forecasting chain for the Arno river, central Italy, with the aim of improving flood predictions. Mobidic is a raster based, continuous in time and distributed in space hydrologic model, with coupled mass and energy balance at the surface and coupled groundwater and surface hydrology. The variational approach is adopted for DA, since it requires less

  20. Inverse modeling of hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in the Community Land Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Hou, Z.; Huang, M.; Tian, F.; Leung, L. Ruby

    2013-12-01

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Both deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)-Bayesian inversion approaches are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites with different climate and soil conditions. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches provides significant improvements in the model simulations compared to using default CLM4 parameter values, and that as more information comes in, the predictive intervals (ranges of posterior distributions) of the calibrated parameters become narrower. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  1. Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of small bodies from light scattering observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Hadamcik, E.; Lasue, J.; Renard, J. B.

    Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of small bodies from light scattering observations and simulations A.C. Levasseur-Regourd (1), E. Hadamcik (1), J. Lasue (1), J.B. Renard (2) (1) Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris6, UMR 7620, Aéronomie, BP-3, Verrières, 91371 France, (2) LPCE-CNRS, 3A av. Recherche Scientifique, Orléans, F-45071 France Investigating surface and subsurface physical properties of asteroids and comet nuclei is of major interest to i) assess future space missions and ii) constrain formation and evolution models. Our purpose is to infer such properties from the properties of solar light scattered by such media. We will first summarize recent remote polarimetric observations of small bodies, which confirm the main characteristics of the variation of the linear polarization of solar scattered light in the visible domain with the scattering geometry and the wavelength (1). To interpret such characteristics in terms of physical properties of the regoliths (e.g. albedo, size distribution, complex refractive index, porosity), experimental and numerical simulations on various types of particles and aggregates are mandatory, together with some comparisons between experimental and numerical simulations (2,3). We will thus present recent results of such simulations (for dust around bright comets, for core-mantle particles, for loose deposited transparent and dark materials), and point out the trends already suggested by this approach. Finally, we will mention future key observations and elaborate simulations, which could solve open questions about surface and subsurface properties of small bodies. References 1. Levasseur-Regourd et al., ASR 37, 161, 2006. 2. Hadamcik et al., JQSRT 100, 143, 2006. 3. Lasue et al., JQSRT 100, 220, 2006.

  2. Keratoconus Progression in Patients With Allergy and Elevated Surface Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Point-of-Care Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Mellace, Pierfrancesco; Bagaglia, Simone A; Zuccarini, Silvio; Mencucci, Rita; Jacob, Soosan

    2017-10-04

    To assess keratoconus (KC) progression in patients with allergies who also tested positive to surface matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) point-of-care test. Prospective comparative study including 100 stage I-II keratoconic patients, mean age 16.7±4.6 years. All patients underwent an anamnestic questionnaire for concomitant allergic diseases and were screened with the MMP-9 point-of-care test. Patients were divided into two groups: patients KC with allergies (KC AL) and patients KC without allergies (KC NAL). Severity of allergy was established by papillary subtarsal response grade and KC progression assessed by Scheimpflug corneal tomography, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) measurement in a 12-month follow-up. The KC AL group included 52 patients and the KC NAL group 48. In the KC AL group, 42/52 of patients (81%) were positive to MMP-9 point-of-care test versus two positive patients in the KC NAL group (4%). The KC AL group data showed a statistically significant decrease of average CDVA, from 0.155±0.11 to 0.301±0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (Paverage. The KC NAL group revealed a slight KC progression without statistically significant changes. Pearson correlation test showed a high correlation between Kmax worsening and severity of PSR in the KC AL group. The study demonstrated a statistically significant progression of KC in patients with concomitant allergies, positive to MMP-9 point-of-care test versus negative. A high correlation between severity of allergy and KC progression was documented.

  3. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    As the land space suitable for wind turbine installations becomes saturated, there is a growing interest for oshore locations. There, available measurements of various environmental parameters are limited and the physical environment is still not well understood. Thus, there is a need for readily......, demonstrate that wind information from SAR is more appropriate when small scale local features are of interest, not resolved by scatterometers. Hourly satellite observations of the sea surface temperature, from a thermal infra-red sensor, are used to identify and quantify the daily variability of the sea...

  4. Uncertainty in Land Cover observations and its impact on near surface climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgievski, Goran; Hagemann, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Land Cover (LC) and its bio-geo-physical feedbacks are important for the understanding of climate and its vulnerability to changes on the surface of the Earth. Recently ESA has published a new LC map derived by combining remotely sensed surface reflectance and ground-truth observations. For each grid-box at 300m resolution, an estimate of confidence is provided. This LC data set can be used in climate modelling to derive land surface boundary parameters for the respective Land Surface Model (LSM). However, the ESA LC classes are not directly suitable for LSMs, therefore they need to be converted into the model specific surface presentations. Due to different design and processes implemented in various climate models they might differ in the treatment of artificial, water bodies, ice, bare or vegetated surfaces. Nevertheless, usually vegetation distribution in models is presented by means of plant functional types (PFT), which is a classification system used to simplify vegetation representation and group different vegetation types according to their biophysical characteristics. The method of LC conversion into PFT is also called "cross-walking" (CW) procedure. The CW procedure is another source of uncertainty, since it depends on model design and processes implemented and resolved by LSMs. These two sources of uncertainty, (i) due to surface reflectance conversion into LC classes, (ii) due to CW procedure, have been studied by Hartley et al (2016) to investigate their impact on LSM state variables (albedo, evapotranspiration (ET) and primary productivity) by using three standalone LSMs. The present study is a follow up to that work and aims at quantifying the impact of these two uncertainties on climate simulations performed with the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) using prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice. The main focus is on the terrestrial water cycle, but the impacts on surface albedo, wind patterns, 2m temperatures

  5. Comments on "The "Elevated Heat Pump" Hypothesis for the Aerosol-Monsoon Hydroclimate Link: "Grounded" in Observations?" by S. Nigam and M. Bollasina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In their recent paper Nigam and Bollasina [2010, hereafter NB] claimed to have found observational evidences that are at variance with the Elevated Heat Pump (EHP) hypothesis regarding the possible impacts of absorbing aerosols on the South Asian summer monsoon [Lau et al., 2006; Lau and Km 2006). We found NB's arguments and inferences against the EHP hypothesis flawed, stemming from a lack of understanding and an out-of-context interpretation of the hypothesis. It was argued that the simultaneous negative correlation of aerosol with rainfall, and correlations with other quantities in May as evidences against the EHP hypothesis. They cannot be more wrong in that argument. First, Lau and Kim [2006, hereafter, LKO6] never stated that the main rainfall response to EHP is in May. Second, the EHP is about responses of the entire Indian monsoon system that are non-local in space and time with respect to the aerosol forcing. Third, the correlation maps shown in NB, including the increased convection over the Bay of Bengal is not the response to EHP but rather represents the large-scale circulation that provides the build-up of the aerosols, before the onset of the monsoon rainfall over India. Because aerosol can only accumulate where there is little or no wash-out by rain, the negative correlation is a necessary condition for increased atmospheric loading of aerosols.

  6. Bardenas Reales Range, Spain. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (Russwo). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-30

    VAIIIL .3. _____ i TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS 141, USAFETAC Ft6 0-8-5 ( EL A) IP0Mvous SO)T)OOS OF THI OIl S 0* 8oLMT0 -f--. .. ’ . ___ SURFACE...88 4 8 88 8 88a8 A 6 ; 8.4 89.2 ;39.5 b9. 5 9 9.8: 89.9; A9.9, 90. 1 90. 9,.l 90.1 90.11) 0. el 90.3 91.2! 92.0 cI2.3* -9 2 7zj 92.81 92.8 93.0 93: q...00.0 TOTAL NUMBER OF OBSERVATIONS - 147 USAF )TAC ’ 0-4-5 L A , , ’) f.I 0 0 tn-t.c DATA P’ CESSIJC tifO -CH V RU /,DIT USAF ETAC CEILING VES S IIBLT AI

  7. Investigating the influence of long-range transport on surface O3 in Nevada, USA, using observations from multiple measurement platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu B; Yates, Emma L; Iraci, Laura T; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-10-15

    The current United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O3 (75 ppb) is expected to be revised to between 60 and 70 ppb. As the NAAQS becomes more stringent, characterizing the extent of O3 and precursors transported into the US is increasingly important. Given the high elevation, complex terrain, and location in the Intermountain West, the State of Nevada is ideally situated to intercept air transported into the US. Until recently, measurements of O3 and associated pollutants were limited to areas in and around the cities of Las Vegas and Reno. In 2011, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative began and through this project 13 surface monitoring sites were established. Also in 2011, the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) began making routine aircraft measurements of O3 and other greenhouse gases in Nevada. The availability of aircraft and surface measurements in a relatively rural, remote setting in the Intermountain West presented a unique opportunity to investigate sources contributing to the O3 observed in Nevada. Our analyses indicate that stratosphere to troposphere transport, long-range transport of Asian pollution, and regional emissions from urban areas and wildfires influence surface observations. The complexity of sources identified here along with the fact that O3 frequently approaches the threshold being considered for a revised NAAQS indicate that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to achieve compliance with a more stringent regulatory standard. Further, on a seasonal basis we found no significant difference between daily 1-h maximum O3 at surface sites, which ranged in elevation from 888 to 2307 m, and aircraft measurements of O3 O3 across rural Nevada and indicates that column measurements from Railroad Valley, NV are useful in understanding these processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Observing hydrological processes: recent advancements in surface flow monitoring through image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2017-04-01

    Recently, several efforts have been devoted to the design and development of innovative, and often unintended, approaches for the acquisition of hydrological data. Among such pioneering techniques, this presentation reports recent advancements towards the establishment of a novel noninvasive and potentially continuous methodology based on the acquisition and analysis of images for spatially distributed observations of the kinematics of surface waters. The approach aims at enabling rapid, affordable, and accurate surface flow monitoring of natural streams. Flow monitoring is an integral part of hydrological sciences and is essential for disaster risk reduction and the comprehension of natural phenomena. However, water processes are inherently complex to observe: they are characterized by multiscale and highly heterogeneous phenomena which have traditionally demanded sophisticated and costly measurement techniques. Challenges in the implementation of such techniques have also resulted in lack of hydrological data during extreme events, in difficult-to-access environments, and at high temporal resolution. By combining low-cost yet high-resolution images and several velocimetry algorithms, noninvasive flow monitoring has been successfully conducted at highly heterogeneous scales, spanning from rills to highly turbulent streams, and medium-scale rivers, with minimal supervision by external users. Noninvasive image data acquisition has also afforded observations in high flow conditions. Latest novelties towards continuous flow monitoring at the catchment scale have entailed the development of a remote gauge-cam station on the Tiber River and integration of flow monitoring through image analysis with unmanned aerial systems (UASs) technology. The gauge-cam station and the UAS platform both afford noninvasive image acquisition and calibration through an innovative laser-based setup. Compared to traditional point-based instrumentation, images allow for generating surface

  9. Synergistic estimation of surface parameters from jointly using optical and microwave observations in EOLDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Joris; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Lewis, Philip; Loew, Alexander; Schlenz, Florian

    2017-04-01

    The large amount of remote sensing data nowadays available provides a huge potential for monitoring crop development, drought conditions and water efficiency. This potential however not been realized yet because algorithms for land surface parameter retrieval mostly use data from only a single sensor. Consequently products that combine different low-level observations from different sensors are hard to find. The lack of synergistic retrieval is caused because it is easier to focus on single sensor types/footprints and temporal observation times, than to find a way to compensate for differences. Different sensor types (microwave/optical) require different radiative transfer (RT) models and also require consistency between the models to have any impact on the retrieval of soil moisture by a microwave instrument. Varying spatial footprints require first proper collocation of the data before one can scale between different resolutions. Considering these problems, merging optical and microwave observations have not been performed yet. The goal of this research was to investigate the potential of integrating optical and microwave RT models within the Earth Observation Land Data Assimilation System (EOLDAS) synergistically to derive biophysical parameters. This system uses a Bayesian data assimilation approach together with observation operators such as the PROSAIL model to estimate land surface parameters. For the purpose of enabling the system to integrate passive microwave radiation (from an ELBARRA II passive microwave radiometer), the Community Microwave Emission Model (CMEM) RT-model, was integrated within the EOLDAS system. In order to quantify the potential, a variety of land surface parameters was chosen to be retrieved from the system, in particular variables that a) impact only optical RT (such as leaf water content and leaf dry matter), b) only impact the microwave RT (such as soil moisture and soil temperature), and c) Leaf Area Index (LAI) that impacts both

  10. Aerosol-Driven Surface Solar Dimming Over Asia: Insights from a Model-Observation Intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, G.; Ming, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2012-12-01

    Sun photometer and satellite data have indicated a reduction in surface solar radiation (SSR) over India and China during the second half of the 20th century that is at least partly due to anthropogenic aerosols. Recent integrated observational studies of aerosol properties also suggest that this SSR reduction may have a strong contribution from atmospheric absorption by carbonaceous aerosols over Asia. The reduction in SSR and associated redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere may have significant implications for regional hydrological systems like the summertime monsoon. Previous generations of general circulation models (GCMs), however, have been largely unsuccessful at recreating aerosol-driven trends in SSR, hindering theoretical investigation of causes and effects of these trends in regional climate. We analyze the behavior of SSR over Asia in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's AM3 Atmospheric General Circulation Model—the updated aerosol treatment of which contains internal mixing of aerosols and interactive dry and wet deposition—in the context of new satellite and ground-based observational estimates of aerosol-driven SSR reduction. We find that AM3 is more successful than the previous generation of GCMs at recreating the observed SSR trend over South and East Asia and also suggests that as much as half of the clear-sky trend may be attributable to increases in atmospheric absorption in both regions. We will discuss the SSR and atmospheric absorption trends over China and India, as depicted in both observations and AM3, as well the particular aerosol processes responsible for the model's recreation of the trends and their implications for regional climate.

  11. Observational study comparing pharmacoinvasive strategy with primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients presenting with ST elevation myocardial infarction to a tertiary care centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, A G; Lahiri, A; Geevar, T; George, O K

    2017-10-23

    The objective was to study whether the incidence of composite end points (mortality, cardiogenic shock and re-myocardial infarction [re-MI]) in pharmacoinvasive strategy was noninferior to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). This was an observational study which included 138 patients. The study included patients admitted with a diagnosis of STEMI within 24 h of symptom onset, who underwent primary PCI or pharmacoinvasive therapy in a single center over a 9-month period. Primary end points (death within 30 days, re-MI within 30 days, and cardiogenic shock) and secondary end points (arrhythmias, bleeding manifestations, ischemic stroke, ejection fraction, mechanical complications, and duration of hospital stay) were compared between the two groups at 1 month after intervention. At one month follow-up, the incidence rate for primary end points was 5 events per 43 patients (11.6%) in pharmacoinvasive arm and 18 events per 95 patients (18.9%) in primary PCI arm, a difference of - 7.3% (95% confidence interval: 18.5, 7.1). This finding shows that pharmacoinvasive strategy as compared with primary PCI in the management of STEMI was equivalent in terms of composite primary outcome. There was no significant difference between the secondary outcomes between the two groups. Use of thrombus aspiration device and in turn the thrombus burden was significantly lower in the pharmacoinvasive arm. This observational study showed that pharmacoinvasive strategy was as good as primary PCI in STEMI, in our setting, where primary PCI may be delayed or not possible at all due to financial and logistic constraints.

  12. Origin, dynamics and evolution of ocean garbage patches from observed surface drifters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sebille, Erik; England, Matthew H; Froyland, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Much of the debris in the near-surface ocean collects in so-called garbage patches where, due to convergence of the surface flow, the debris is trapped for decades to millennia. Until now, studies modelling the pathways of surface marine debris have not included release from coasts or factored in the possibilities that release concentrations vary with region or that pathways may include seasonal cycles. Here, we use observational data from the Global Drifter Program in a particle-trajectory tracer approach that includes the seasonal cycle to study the fate of marine debris in the open ocean from coastal regions around the world on interannual to centennial timescales. We find that six major garbage patches emerge, one in each of the five subtropical basins and one previously unreported patch in the Barents Sea. The evolution of each of the six patches is markedly different. With the exception of the North Pacific, all patches are much more dispersive than expected from linear ocean circulation theory, suggesting that on centennial timescales the different basins are much better connected than previously thought and that inter-ocean exchanges play a large role in the spreading of marine debris. This study suggests that, over multi-millennial timescales, a significant amount of the debris released outside of the North Atlantic will eventually end up in the North Pacific patch, the main attractor of global marine debris. (letter)

  13. Computational studies of experimentally observed structures of sulfur on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, Dominic

    2011-09-01

    First-principles electronic structure calculations were carried out to examine the experimentally observed structures of sulfur on close packed surfaces of a number of important metals - Ag(111), Cu(111), Ni(111), Pt(111), Rh(111), Re(0001) and Ru(0001). At low coverages ({le} 1/3 ML), the prediction is consistent with the typical pattern of preferred sulfur occupancy of threefold hollow sites, notably the fcc site on the (111) surfaces and the hcp site on the (0001) surfaces. Theoretical confirmation for the existence of pure sulfur overlayer phases on Pt(111), Rh(111), Re(0001) and Ru(0001) at higher coverages (> 1/3 ML) was provided. For the ({radical}7 x {radical}7) phase seen on Ag(111), the most preferred structure identified for adsorbed S trimer consists of an S atom on the top site bonded to two S atoms situated on the nearest neighbor off-bridge site positions. Among the different densely packed mixed sulfur-metal overlayer models suggested for the ({radical}7 x {radical}7) phase on Cu(111), the structure which consists of metal and S atoms in a hexagonal-like arrangement on the top substrate was found to be the most energetically favorable. For the (5{radical}3 x 2) phase on Ni(111), the calculations confirm the existence of clock-reconstructed top layer metal atoms onto which sulfur atoms are adsorbed.

  14. A mechanism for comet surface collapse as observed by Rosetta on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prialnik, D.; Sierks, H.

    2017-07-01

    We explore a possible mechanism that may explain sudden depressions of surface areas on a comet nucleus, as suggested by observations of the Rosetta mission on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (hereafter, 67P/C-G). Assuming the area is covered by a thin, compact dust layer of low permeability to gas flow compared to deeper, porous layers, gas can accumulate below the surface when a surge of gas release from amorphous ice occurs upon crystallization. The gas pressure is found to exceed the hydrostatic pressure down to a depth of a few metres. The rapid build-up of pressure may weaken the already fragile, highly porous structure. Eventually, the high pressure gradient that arises drives the gas out and the pressure falls well below the hydrostatic pressure. The rapid pressure drop may result in collapse. Since the crystallization front lies at some depth below the surface, the location on the orbit when this phenomenon occurs is determined by the thermal lag, which, in turn, depends on the thermal conductivity. Numerical simulations show that mostly such activity occurs post-perihelion, but it may also occur pre-perihelion. When permeability is uniform, crystallization still causes increased gas production, but the gas pressure inside the nucleus remains below hydrostatic pressure.

  15. Photoelectron binding energy shifts observed during oxidation of group IIA, IIIA and IVA elemental surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, P.A.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    An extensive re-evaluation of XPS binding energies (BE's) and binding energy shifts (ΔBE's) from metals, oxides and the carbonates of the group II, III and IVA elements (exceptions are Be, Mg and Hf) has been carried out using a substrate specific BE referencing approach. From this, O-1s BE's are found to fall into surface oxide, bulk oxide and carbonate groupings, with bulk oxides showing the lowest BE's followed by surface oxides (+∼1.5 eV) and then carbonates (+∼3.0 eV). The O-1s BE's from the bulk oxides also appear to scale with 1/d, where d is inter-atomic distance. The same is noted in the ΔBE's observed from the metallic counterparts during oxidation of the elemental surfaces. This, and the decreasing BE exhibited by Ca, Sr and Ba on oxidation is explained within the charge potential model as resulting from competing inter- and intra-atomic effects, and is shown to be consistent with partial covalency arguments utilizing Madulung potentials. The ΔBE's also fall into groups according to the elements location in the periodic table, i.e. s, p or d block. These trends open up the possibility of approximating ΔBE's arising from initial and final state effects, and bond distances

  16. Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report: Database and Metrics Data of Global Surface Ozone Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. Schultz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In support of the first Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR a relational database of global surface ozone observations has been developed and populated with hourly measurement data and enhanced metadata. A comprehensive suite of ozone data products including standard statistics, health and vegetation impact metrics, and trend information, are made available through a common data portal and a web interface. These data form the basis of the TOAR analyses focusing on human health, vegetation, and climate relevant ozone issues, which are part of this special feature. Cooperation among many data centers and individual researchers worldwide made it possible to build the world's largest collection of 'in-situ' hourly surface ozone data covering the period from 1970 to 2015. By combining the data from almost 10,000 measurement sites around the world with global metadata information, new analyses of surface ozone have become possible, such as the first globally consistent characterisations of measurement sites as either urban or rural/remote. Exploitation of these global metadata allows for new insights into the global distribution, and seasonal and long-term changes of tropospheric ozone and they enable TOAR to perform the first, globally consistent analysis of present-day ozone concentrations and recent ozone changes with relevance to health, agriculture, and climate. Considerable effort was made to harmonize and synthesize data formats and metadata information from various networks and individual data submissions. Extensive quality control was applied to identify questionable and erroneous data, including changes in apparent instrument offsets or calibrations. Such data were excluded from TOAR data products. Limitations of 'a posteriori' data quality assurance are discussed. As a result of the work presented here, global coverage of surface ozone data for scientific analysis has been significantly extended. Yet, large gaps remain in the surface

  17. Field and LiDAR observations of the Hector Mine California 1999 surface rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, F.; Akciz, S. O.; Harvey, J. C.; Hudnut, K. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Scharer, K. M.; Stock, J. M.; Witkosky, R.; Kendrick, K. J.; Wespestad, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report new field- and computer-based investigations of the surface rupture of the October 16, 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake. Since May 2012, in cooperation with the United States Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) at Twentynine Palms, CA, our team has been allowed ground and aerial access to the entire surface rupture. We have focused our new field-based research and imagery analysis along the ~10 kilometer-long maximum slip zone (MSZ) which roughly corresponds to the zone of >4 meter dextral horizontal offset. New data include: 1) a 1 km wide aerial LiDAR survey along the entire surface rupture (@ 10 shots/m2, May 2012, www.opentopography.org); 2) terrestrial LiDAR surveys at 5 sites within the MSZ (@ >1000 shots/m2, April 2014); 3) low altitude aerial photography and ground based photography of the entire MSZ; 4) a ground-truthed database of 87 out of the 94 imagery-based offset measurements made within the MSZ; and 5) a database of 50 new field-based offset measurements made within the MSZ by our team on the ground, 31 of which have also been made on the computer (Ladicaoz) with both the 2000 LiDAR data (@ 0.5 m DEM resolution; Chen et al, in review) and 2012 LiDAR data (@ 35 cm DEM resolution; our team). New results to date include 1) significant variability (> 2 m) in horizontal offsets measured along short distances of the surface rupture (~100 m) within segments of the surface rupture that are localized to a single fault strand; 2) strong dependence of decadal scale fault scarp preservation on local lithology (bedrock vs. alluvial fan vs. fine sediment) and geomorphology (uphill vs. downhill facing scarp); 3) newly observed offset features which were never measured during the post-event field response; 4) newly observed offset features too small to be resolved in airborne LiDAR data (judged by our team to warrant removal from the database due to incorrect feature reconstruction; and 6) significant variability in both accuracy of LiDAR offset

  18. The 3D Mesonet Concept: Extending Networked Surface Meteorological Tower Observations Through Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilson, P. B.; Fiebrich, C. A.; Huck, R.; Grimsley, J.; Salazar-Cerreno, J.; Carson, K.; Jacob, J.

    2017-12-01

    Fixed monitoring sites, such as those in the US National Weather Service Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) and the Oklahoma Mesonet provide valuable, high temporal resolution information about the atmosphere to forecasters and the general public. The Oklahoma Mesonet is comprised of a network of 120 surface sites providing a wide array of atmospheric measurements up to a height of 10 m with an update time of five minutes. The deployment of small unmanned aircraft to collect in-situ vertical measurements of the atmospheric state in conjunction with surface conditions has potential to significantly expand weather observation capabilities. This concept can enhance the safety of individuals and support commerce through improved observations and short-term forecasts of the weather and other environmental variables in the lower atmosphere. We report on a concept of adding the capability of collecting vertical atmospheric measurements (profiles) through the use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) at remote Oklahoma sites deemed suitable for this application. While there are a number of other technologies currently available that can provide measurements of one or a few variables, the proposed UAS concept will be expandable and modular to accommodate several different sensor packages and provide accurate in-situ measurements in virtually all weather conditions. Such a system would facilitate off-site maintenance and calibration and would provide the ability to add new sensors as they are developed or as new requirements are identified. The small UAS must be capable of accommodating the weight of all sensor packages and have lighting, communication, and aircraft avoidance systems necessary to meet existing or future FAA regulations. The system must be able to operate unattended, which necessitates the inclusion of risk mitigation measures such as a detect and avoid radar and the ability to transmit and receive transponder signals. Moreover, the system should be able to

  19. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  20. Observed modes of sea surface temperature variability in the South Pacific region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurral, Ramiro I.; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; García-Serrano, Javier

    2018-02-01

    The South Pacific (SP) region exerts large control on the climate of the Southern Hemisphere at many times scales. This paper identifies the main modes of interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the SP which consist of a tropical-driven mode related to a horseshoe structure of positive/negative SST anomalies within midlatitudes and highly correlated to ENSO and Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) variability, and another mode mostly confined to extratropical latitudes which is characterized by zonal propagation of SST anomalies within the South Pacific Gyre. Both modes are associated with temperature and rainfall anomalies over the continental regions of the Southern Hemisphere. Besides the leading mode which is related to well known warmer/cooler and drier/moister conditions due to its relationship with ENSO and the IPO, an inspection of the extratropical mode indicates that it is associated with distinct patterns of sea level pressure and surface temperature advection. These relationships are used here as plausible and partial explanations to the observed warming trend observed within the Southern Hemisphere during the last decades.

  1. Improved identification of clouds and ice/snow covered surfaces in SCIAMACHY observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krijger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the ultra-violet, visible and near infra-red wavelength range the presence of clouds can strongly affect the satellite-based passive remote sensing observation of constituents in the troposphere, because clouds effectively shield the lower part of the atmosphere. Therefore, cloud detection algorithms are of crucial importance in satellite remote sensing. However, the detection of clouds over snow/ice surfaces is particularly difficult in the visible wavelengths as both clouds an snow/ice are both white and highly reflective. The SCIAMACHY Polarisation Measurement Devices (PMD Identification of Clouds and Ice/snow method (SPICI uses the SCIAMACHY measurements in the wavelength range between 450 nm and 1.6 μm to make a distinction between clouds and ice/snow covered surfaces, specifically developed to identify cloud-free SCIAMACHY observations. For this purpose the on-board SCIAMACHY PMDs are used because they provide higher spatial resolution compared to the main spectrometer measurements. In this paper we expand on the original SPICI algorithm (Krijger et al., 2005a to also adequately detect clouds over snow-covered forests which is inherently difficult because of the similar spectral characteristics. Furthermore the SCIAMACHY measurements suffer from degradation with time. This must be corrected for adequate performance of SPICI over the full SCIAMACHY time range. Such a correction is described here. Finally the performance of the new SPICI algorithm is compared with various other datasets, such as from FRESCO, MICROS and AATSR, focusing on the algorithm improvements.

  2. Observed modes of sea surface temperature variability in the South Pacific region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurral, Ramiro I.; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; García-Serrano, Javier

    2017-04-01

    The South Pacific (SP) region exerts large control on the climate of the Southern Hemisphere at many times scales. This paper identifies the main modes of interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the SP which consist of a tropical-driven mode related to a horseshoe structure of positive/negative SST anomalies within midlatitudes and highly correlated to ENSO and Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) variability, and another mode mostly confined to extratropical latitudes which is characterized by zonal propagation of SST anomalies within the South Pacific Gyre. Both modes are associated with temperature and rainfall anomalies over the continental regions of the Southern Hemisphere. Besides the leading mode which is related to well known warmer/cooler and drier/moister conditions due to its relationship with ENSO and the IPO, an inspection of the extratropical mode indicates that it is associated with distinct patterns of sea level pressure and surface temperature advection. These relationships are used here as plausible and partial explanations to the observed warming trend observed within the Southern Hemisphere during the last decades.

  3. Possible origin of linear magnetoresistance: Observation of Dirac surface states in layered PtBi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirupathaiah, S.; Kushnirenko, Y.; Haubold, E.; Fedorov, A. V.; Rienks, E. D. L.; Kim, T. K.; Yaresko, A. N.; Blum, C. G. F.; Aswartham, S.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The nonmagnetic compounds showing extremely large magnetoresistance are attracting a great deal of research interest due to their potential applications in the field of spintronics. PtBi2 is one of such interesting compounds showing large linear magnetoresistance (MR) in both the hexagonal and pyrite crystal structure. We use angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to understand the mechanism of liner MR observed in the layered PtBi2. Our results uncover linear dispersive surface Dirac states at the Γ ¯ point, crossing the Fermi level with a node at a binding energy of ≈900 meV, in addition to the previously reported Dirac states at the M ¯ point in the same compound. We further notice from our dichroic measurements that these surface states show an asymmetric spectral intensity when measured with left and right circularly polarized light, hinting at a substantial spin polarization of the bands. Following these observations, we suggest that the linear dispersive Dirac states at the Γ ¯ and M ¯ points are likely to play a crucial role for the linear field dependent magnetoresistance recorded in this compound.

  4. Helioseismic Observations of the Structure and Dynamics of a Rotating Sunspot Beneath the Solar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2003-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is applied to study the subphotospheric structures and dynamics of an unusually fast-rotating sunspot observed by the Michelson Doppler Imager on bead SOH0 in 2000 August. The subsurface sound speed structures and velocity fields are obtained for the sunspot region at different depths from 0 to 12 Mm. By comparing the subsurface sound speed variations with the surface magnetic field, we find evidence for structural twists beneath the visible surface of this active region, which may indicate that magnetic twists often seen at the photosphere also exist beneath the photosphere. We also report on the observation of subsurface horizontal vortical flows that extend to a depth of 5 Mm around this rotating sunspot and present evidence that opposite vortical flows may exist below 9 Mm. It is suggested that the vortical flows around this active region may build up a significant amount of magnetic helicity and energy to power solar eruptions. Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to estimate the error propagation, and in addition the sunspot umbra is masked to test the reliability of our inversion results. On the basis of the three-dimensional velocity fields obtained from the time-distance helioseismology inversions, we estimate the subsurface kinetic helicity at different depths for the first time and conclude that it is comparable to the current helicity estimated from vector magnetograms.

  5. Observational estimation of radiative feedback to surface air temperature over Northern High Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jiwon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Kim, WonMoo; Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan H.

    2018-01-01

    The high-latitude climate system contains complicated, but largely veiled physical feedback processes. Climate predictions remain uncertain, especially for the Northern High Latitudes (NHL; north of 60°N), and observational constraint on climate modeling is vital. This study estimates local radiative feedbacks for NHL based on the CERES/Terra satellite observations during March 2000-November 2014. The local shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative feedback parameters are calculated from linear regression of radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere on surface air temperatures. These parameters are estimated by the de-seasonalization and 12-month moving average of the radiative fluxes over NHL. The estimated magnitudes of the SW and the LW radiative feedbacks in NHL are 1.88 ± 0.73 and 2.38 ± 0.59 W m-2 K-1, respectively. The parameters are further decomposed into individual feedback components associated with surface albedo, water vapor, lapse rate, and clouds, as a product of the change in climate variables from ERA-Interim reanalysis estimates and their pre-calculated radiative kernels. The results reveal the significant role of clouds in reducing the surface albedo feedback (1.13 ± 0.44 W m-2 K-1 in the cloud-free condition, and 0.49 ± 0.30 W m-2 K-1 in the all-sky condition), while the lapse rate feedback is predominant in LW radiation (1.33 ± 0.18 W m-2 K-1). However, a large portion of the local SW and LW radiative feedbacks were not simply explained by the sum of these individual feedbacks.

  6. Assessment of clear sky radiative fluxes in CMIP5 climate models using surface observations from BSRN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, M.; Hakuba, M. Z.; Folini, D.; Ott, P.; Long, C. N.

    2017-12-01

    Clear sky fluxes in the latest generation of Global Climate Models (GCM) from CMIP5 still vary largely particularly at the Earth's surface, covering in their global means a range of 16 and 24 Wm-2 in the surface downward clear sky shortwave (SW) and longwave radiation, respectively. We assess these fluxes with monthly clear sky reference climatologies derived from more than 40 Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) sites based on Long and Ackermann (2000) and Hakuba et al. (2015). The comparison is complicated by the fact that the monthly SW clear sky BSRN reference climatologies are inferred from measurements under true cloud-free conditions, whereas the GCM clear sky fluxes are calculated continuously at every timestep solely by removing the clouds, yet otherwise keeping the prevailing atmospheric composition (e.g. water vapor, temperature, aerosols) during the cloudy conditions. This induces the risk of biases in the GCMs just due to the additional sampling of clear sky fluxes calculated under atmospheric conditions representative for cloudy situations. Thereby, a wet bias may be expected in the GCMs compared to the observational references, which may induce spurious low biases in the downward clear sky SW fluxes. To estimate the magnitude of these spurious biases in the available monthly mean fields from 40 CMIP5 models, we used their respective multi-century control runs, and searched therein for each month and each BSRN station the month with the lowest cloud cover. The deviations of the clear sky fluxes in this month from their long-term means have then be used as indicators of the magnitude of the abovementioned sampling biases and as correction factors for an appropriate comparison with the BSRN climatologies, individually applied for each model and BSRN site. The overall correction is on the order of 2 Wm-2. This revises our best estimate for the global mean surface downward SW clear sky radiation, previously at 249 Wm-2 infered from the GCM clear sky

  7. Myocardium at risk in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction comparison of T2-weighted edema imaging with the MR-assessed endocardial surface area and validation against angiographic scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuernau, Georg; Eitel, Ingo; Franke, Vinzenz; Hildebrandt, Lysann; Meissner, Josefine; de Waha, Suzanne; Lurz, Philipp; Gutberlet, Matthias; Desch, Steffen; Schuler, Gerhard; Thiele, Holger

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the area at risk (AAR) in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction with 2 different cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging methods and to compare them with the validated angiographic Alberta Provincial Project for Outcome Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease Score (APPROACH-score) in a large consecutive patient cohort. Edema imaging with T(2)-weighted CMR and the endocardial surface area (ESA) assessed by late gadolinium enhancement have been introduced as relatively new methods for AAR assessment in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. However, data on the utility and validation of these techniques are limited. A total of 197 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were included. AAR (assessed with T(2)-weighted edema imaging and the ESA method), infarct size, and myocardial salvage (AAR minus infarct size) were determined by CMR 2 to 4 days after primary angioplasty. Angiographic AAR scoring was performed by use of the APPROACH-score. All measurements were done offline by blinded observers. The AAR assessed by T(2)-weighted imaging showed good correlation with the angiographic AAR (r = 0.87; p myocardial salvage index. In contrast, no dependence of T(2)-weighted edema imaging or the APPROACH-score on myocardial salvage index was seen. The AAR can be reliably assessed by T(2)-weighted CMR, whereas assessment of the AAR by ESA seems to be dependent on the degree of myocardial salvage, thereby underestimating the AAR in patients with high myocardial salvage such as aborted infarction. Thus, assessment of the AAR with the ESA method cannot be recommended. (Myocardial Salvage and Contrast Dye Induced Nephropathy Reduction by N-Acetylcystein [LIPSIA-N-ACC]; NCT00463749). Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Satellite Observed Variability in Antarctic and Arctic Surface Temperatures and Their Correlation to Open Water Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Josefino C.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies using meterological station data have indicated that global surface air temperature has been increasing at a rate of 0.05 K/decade. Using the same set of data but for stations in the Antarctic and Arctic regions (>50 N) only, the increases in temperature were 0.08, and 0.22 K/decade, when record lengths of 100 and 50 years, respectively, were used. To gain insights into the increasing rate of warming, satellite infrared and passive microwave observations over the Arctic region during the last 20 years were processed and analyzed. The results show that during this period, the ice extent in the Antarctic has been increasing at the rate of 1.2% per decade while the surface temperature has been decreasing at about 0.08 K per decade. Conversely, in the Northern Hemisphere, the ice extent has been decreasing at a rate of 2.8% per decade, while the surface temperatures have been increasing at the rate of 0.38 K per decade. In the Antarctic, it is surprising that there is a short term trend of cooling during a global period of warming. Very large anomalies in open water areas in the Arctic were observed especially in the western region, that includes the Beaufort Sea, where the observed open water area was about 1x10(exp 6) sq km, about twice the average for the region, during the summer of 1998. In the eastern region, that includes the Laptev Sea, the area of open water was also abnormally large in the summer of 1995. Note that globally, the warmest and second warmest years in this century, were 1998 and 1995, respectively. The data, however, show large spatial variability with the open water area distribution showing a cyclic periodicity of about ten years, which is akin to the North Atlantic and Arctic Oscillations. This was observed in both western and eastern regions but with the phase of one lagging the other by about two years. This makes it difficult to interpret what the trends really mean. But although the record length of satellite data is still

  9. Comparison of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes over the Tibetan Plateau from reanalysis and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin; Yu, Ye; Li, Jiang-lin; Ge, Jun; Liu, Chuan

    2018-02-01

    Surface sensible and latent heat fluxes (SH and LE) over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) have been under research since 1950s, especially for recent several years, by mainly using observation, reanalysis, and satellite data. However, the spatiotemporal changes are not consistent among different studies. This paper focuses on the spatiotemporal variation of SH and LE over the TP from 1981 to 2013 using reanalysis data sets (ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and MERRA) and observations. Results show that the spatiotemporal changes from the three reanalysis data sets are significantly different and the probable causes are discussed. Averaged for the whole TP, both SH and LE from MERRA are obviously higher than the other two reanalysis data sets. ERA-Interim shows a significant downward trend for SH and JRA-55 shows a significant increase of LE during the 33 years with other data sets having no obvious changes. By comparing the heat fluxes and some climate factors from the reanalysis with observations, it is found that the differences of heat fluxes among the three reanalysis data sets are closely related to their differences in meteorological conditions as well as the different parameterizations for surface transfer coefficients. In general, the heat fluxes from the three reanalysis have a better representation in the western TP than that in the eastern TP under inter-annual scale. While in terms of monthly variation, ERA-Interim may have better applicability in the eastern TP with dense vegetation conditions, while SH of JRA-55 and LE of MERRA are probably more representative for the middle and western TP with poor vegetation conditions.

  10. Airborne hyperspectral observations of surface and cloud directional reflectivity using a commercial digital camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spectral radiance measurements by a digital single-lens reflex camera were used to derive the directional reflectivity of clouds and different surfaces in the Arctic. The camera has been calibrated radiometrically and spectrally to provide accurate radiance measurements with high angular resolution. A comparison with spectral radiance measurements with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer showed an agreement within the uncertainties of both instruments (6% for both. The directional reflectivity in terms of the hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF was obtained for sea ice, ice-free ocean and clouds. The sea ice, with an albedo of ρ = 0.96 (at 530 nm wavelength, showed an almost isotropic HDRF, while sun glint was observed for the ocean HDRF (ρ = 0.12. For the cloud observations with ρ = 0.62, the cloudbow – a backscatter feature typically for scattering by liquid water droplets – was covered by the camera. For measurements above heterogeneous stratocumulus clouds, the required number of images to obtain a mean HDRF that clearly exhibits the cloudbow has been estimated at about 50 images (10 min flight time. A representation of the HDRF as a function of the scattering angle only reduces the image number to about 10 (2 min flight time.

    The measured cloud and ocean HDRF have been compared to radiative transfer simulations. The ocean HDRF simulated with the observed surface wind speed of 9 m s−1 agreed best with the measurements. For the cloud HDRF, the best agreement was obtained by a broad and weak cloudbow simulated with a cloud droplet effective radius of Reff = 4 μm. This value agrees with the particle sizes derived from in situ measurements and retrieved from the spectral radiance of the SMART-Albedometer.

  11. Validation of VIIRS Land Surface Phenology using Field Observations, PhenoCam Imagery, and Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Jayavelu, S.; Wang, J.; Henebry, G. M.; Gray, J. M.; Friedl, M. A.; Liu, Y.; Schaaf, C.; Shuai, A.

    2016-12-01

    A large number of land surface phenology (LSP) products have been produced from various detection algorithms applied to coarse resolution satellite datasets across regional to global scales. However, validation of the resulting LSP products is very challenging because in-situ observations at comparable spatiotemporal scales are generally not available. This research focuses on efforts to evaluate and validate the global 500m LSP product produced from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) NBAR time series for 2013 and 2014. Specifically, we used three different datasets to evaluate six VIIRS LSP metrics of greenup onset, mid-point of greenup phase, maturity onset, senescence onset, mid-point of senescence phase, and dormancy onset. First, we obtained the field observations from the USA National Phenology Network that has gathered extensive phenological data on individual species. Although it is inappropriate to compare these data directly with the LSP footprints, this large and spatially distributed dataset allows us to evaluate the overall quality of VIIRS LSP results. Second, we gathered PhenoCam imagery from 164 sites, which was used to extract the daily green chromatic coordinate (GCC) and vegetation contrast index (VCI)values. Utilizing these PhenoCam time series, the phenological events were quantified using a hybrid piecewise logistic models for each site. Third, we detected the phenological timing at the landscape scale (30m) from surface reflectance simulated by fusing MODIS data and Landsat 8 OLI observations in an agricultural area (in the central USA) and from overlap zones of OLI scenes in semiarid areas (California and Tibetan Plateau). The phenological timing from these three datasets was used to compare with VIIRS LSP data. Preliminary results show that the VIIRS LSP are generally comparable with phenological data from the USA-NPN, PhenoCam, and Landsat data, with differences arising in specific phenological events and land cover types.

  12. Interannual Variation of the Surface Temperature of Tropical Forests from Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperatures (LSTs within tropical forests contribute to climate variations. However, observational data are very limited in such regions. This study used passive microwave remote sensing data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS, providing observations under all weather conditions, to investigate the LST over the Amazon and Congo rainforests. The SSM/I and SSMIS data were collected from 1996 to 2012. The morning and afternoon observations from passive microwave remote sensing facilitate the investigation of the interannual changes of LST anomalies on a diurnal basis. As a result of the variability of cloud cover and the corresponding reduction of solar radiation, the afternoon LST anomalies tend to vary more than the morning LST anomalies. The dominant spatial and temporal patterns for interseasonal variations of the LST anomalies over the tropical rainforest were analyzed. The impacts of droughts and El Niños on this LST were also investigated. Differences between early morning and late afternoon LST anomalies were identified by the remote sensing product, with the morning LST anomalies controlled by humidity (according to comparisons with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data.

  13. CONSTRAINING THE NFW POTENTIAL WITH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXY VELOCITY FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Mihos, J. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    We model the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) potential to determine if, and under what conditions, the NFW halo appears consistent with the observed velocity fields of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. We present mock DensePak Integral Field Unit (IFU) velocity fields and rotation curves of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric potentials that are well matched to the spatial resolution and velocity range of our sample galaxies. We find that the DensePak IFU can accurately reconstruct the velocity field produced by an axisymmetric NFW potential and that a tilted-ring fitting program can successfully recover the corresponding NFW rotation curve. We also find that nonaxisymmetric potentials with fixed axis ratios change only the normalization of the mock velocity fields and rotation curves and not their shape. The shape of the modeled NFW rotation curves does not reproduce the data: these potentials are unable to simultaneously bring the mock data at both small and large radii into agreement with observations. Indeed, to match the slow rise of LSB galaxy rotation curves, a specific viewing angle of the nonaxisymmetric potential is required. For each of the simulated LSB galaxies, the observer's line of sight must be along the minor axis of the potential, an arrangement that is inconsistent with a random distribution of halo orientations on the sky.

  14. Estimating Antarctic near-surface magnetic anomalies from Oersted and CHAMP satellite magnetometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Frese, R. R.; Kim, H.; Gaya-Pique, L. R.; Taylor, P. T.; Golynsky, A. V.; Kim, J.

    2004-12-01

    Significant improvement in predicting near-surface magnetic anomalies can result from the highly accurate magnetic observations of the CHAMP satellite that is orbiting at about 400 km altitude. In general, regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations due to wavelength coupling in the spherical harmonic representation and thus are difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. However, efforts to isolate the regional lithospheric from core field components can exploit the correlations between the CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations. In addition, we can use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric field components from the dynamic external field effects. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Oersted and noisier Magsat observations, CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intra-crustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic. Moreover, these results greatly facilitate predicting magnetic anomalies in the regional coverage gaps of the ADMAP compilation of Antarctic magnetic anomalies from shipborne, airborne and ground surveys. Our analysis suggests that considerable new insights on the magnetic properties of the lithosphere may be revealed by a further order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of the magnetometer measurements at minimum orbital altitude.

  15. Simultaneous observations of ULF waves in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere and surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Georgiou, Marina; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Zesta, Eftyhia; Mann, Ian; Haagmans, Roger

    2013-04-01

    We have found a specific time interval during the Halloween 2003 magnetic storm, when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction, and have examined the Pc3 (22-100 mHz) and Pc4-5 (1-22 mHz) ULF wave activity using data from Cluster, CHAMP and the CARISMA magnetometer network. We provide evidence for the first simultaneous observation of a Pc3 ULF wave event in the magnetosphere, in the topside ionosphere and on the ground, by Cluster, CHAMP and the Dawson (DAWS) magnetic station respectively at ~ 13:00 LT. Moreover, we show the remarkably clear transition of the wave's frequency into a higher regime within the Pc3 range, simultaneously detected in the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere and on the Earth's surface. The commonly observed wave parameters (i.e., onset, duration and frequency content) at Cluster, CHAMP and DAWS provide evidence that we are, indeed, observing manifestation of the same phenomenon. This work has received support from the European Space Agency under contract ESTEC 4000103770/11/NL/JA/ef and from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  16. Does present use of cardiovascular medication reflect elevated cardiovascular risk scores estimated ten years ago? A population based longitudinal observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straand Jørund

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is desirable that those at highest risk of cardiovascular disease should have priority for preventive measures, eg. treatment with prescription drugs to modify their risk. We wanted to investigate to what extent present use of cardiovascular medication (CVM correlates with cardiovascular risk estimated by three different risk scores (Framingham, SCORE and NORRISK ten years ago. Methods Prospective logitudinal observational study of 20 252 participants in The Hordaland Health Study born 1950-57, not using CVM in 1997-99. Prescription data obtained from The Norwegian Prescription Database in 2008. Results 26% of men and 22% of women aged 51-58 years had started to use some CVM during the previous decade. As a group, persons using CVM scored significantly higher on the risk algorithms Framingham, SCORE and NORRISK compared to those not treated. 16-20% of men and 20-22% of women with risk scores below the high-risk thresholds for the three risk scores were treated with CVM, while 60-65% of men and 25-45% of women with scores above the high-risk thresholds received no treatment. Among women using CVM, only 2.2% (NORRISK, 4.4% (SCORE and 14.5% (Framingham had risk scores above the high-risk values. Low education, poor self-reported general health, muscular pains, mental distress (in females only and a family history of premature cardiovascular disease correlated with use of CVM. Elevated blood pressure was the single factor most strongly predictive of CVM treatment. Conclusion Prescription of CVM to middle-aged individuals by large seems to occur independently of estimated total cardiovascular risk, and this applies especially to females.

  17. Impacts of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric Surface Layer: Simulations and Observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sullivan, Peter P; McWilliams, James C; Melville, W. K

    2008-01-01

    ... planetary boundary layers (PBL). Efforts were focused on the effects of surface gravity waves on the near-surface dynamics, surface fluxes, and coupling between the atmospheric and oceanic PBLs...

  18. Crustal velocity structure of the Deccan Volcanic Province, Indian Peninsula, from observed surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddale Suresh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Through inversion of fundamental mode group velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves, we study the crustal and subcrustal structure across the central Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP, which is one of the world’s largest terrestrial flood basalts. Our analysis is based on broadband seismograms recorded at seismological station Bhopal (BHPL in the central India from earthquakes located near west coast of India, with an average epicentral distance about 768 km. The recording station and epicentral zone are situated respectively on the northern and southern edges of DVP with wave paths across central DVP. The period of group velocity data ranges from 5 to 60 s for Rayleigh waves and 5 to 45 s for Love waves. Using the genetic algorithm, the observed data have been inverted to obtain the crust and subcrustal velocity structure along the wavepaths. Using this procedure, a similar velocity structure was also obtained earlier for the northwestern DVP, which is in the west of the present study region. Comparison of results show that the crustal thickness decreases westward from central DVP (39.6 km to northwestern DVP (37.8 km along with the decrease of thickness of upper crust; while the thickness of lower crust remains nearly same. From east to west S-wave velocity in the upper crust decreases by 2 to 3 per cent, while P-wave velocity in the whole crust and subcrust decreases by 3 to 6 per cent. The P- and S-wave velocities are positively correlated with crustal thickness and negatively correlated with earth’s heat flow. It appears that the elevated crustal and subcrustal temperature in the western side is the main factor for low velocities on this side.

  19. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  20. Modeling and observational occurrences of near-surface drainage in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F.; Sejourne, A.; Kargel, J.; Godin, E.

    2016-12-01

    During the past 15 years, evidence for an ice-rich planet Mars has rapidly mounted, become increasingly varied in terms of types of deposits and types of observational data, and has become more widespread across the surface. The mid-latitudes of Mars, especially Utopia Planitia, show many types of interesting landforms similar to those in periglacial landscapes on Earth that suggest the presence of ice-rich permafrost. These include thermal contraction polygonal networks, scalloped terrains similar to thermokarst pits, debris flows, small mounds like pingos and rock glaciers. Here, we address questions concerning the influence of meltwater in the Utopia Planitia (UP) landscape using analogs of near-surface melting and drainage along ice-wedge troughs on Bylot Island, northern Canada. In Utopia Planitia, based on the identification of sinuous channel-like pits within polygonal networks, we suggest that episodic underground melting was possible under severe periglacial climate conditions. In UP, the collapse pattern and morphology of unconnected sinuous elongated pits that follow the polygon crack are similar to underground melting in Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada). Based on this terrestrial analogue, we develop a thermal model that consists of a thick insulating dusty layer over ice-saturated dust during a period of slight climatic warming relative to today's climate. In the model, the melting point is reached at depths down to 150 m. We suggest that small-scale melting could have occurred below ground within ground-ice polygonal fractures and pooled in underground cavities. Then the water may have been released episodically causing mechanical erosion as well as undermining and collapse. After melting, the dry surface dusty layer might have been blown away, thus exposing the degraded terrain of the substrate layer.

  1. Observations of Near-Surface Current Shear Help Describe Oceanic Oil and Plastic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxague, Nathan J. M.; Ö-zgökmen, Tamay M.; Haus, Brian K.; Novelli, Guillaume; Shcherbina, Andrey; Sutherland, Peter; Guigand, Cédric M.; Lund, Björn; Mehta, Sanchit; Alday, Matias; Molemaker, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    Plastics and spilled oil pose a critical threat to marine life and human health. As a result of wind forcing and wave motions, theoretical and laboratory studies predict very strong velocity variation with depth over the upper few centimeters of the water column, an observational blind spot in the real ocean. Here we present the first-ever ocean measurements of the current vector profile defined to within 1 cm of the free surface. In our illustrative example, the current magnitude averaged over the upper 1 cm of the ocean is shown to be nearly four times the average over the upper 10 m, even for mild forcing. Our findings indicate that this shear will rapidly separate pieces of marine debris which vary in size or buoyancy, making consideration of these dynamics essential to an improved understanding of the pathways along which marine plastics and oil are transported.

  2. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  3. Observed metre scale horizontal variability of elemental carbon in surface snow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, J; Lihavainen, H; Ström, J; Hansson, M; Kerminen, V-M

    2013-01-01

    Surface snow investigated for its elemental carbon (EC) concentration, based on a thermal–optical method, at two different sites during winter and spring of 2010 demonstrates metre scale horizontal variability in concentration. Based on the two sites sampled, a clean and a polluted site, the clean site (Arctic Finland) presents the greatest variability. In side-by-side ratios between neighbouring samples, 5 m apart, a ratio of around two was observed for the clean site. The median for the polluted site had a ratio of 1.2 between neighbouring samples. The results suggest that regions exposed to snowdrift may be more sensitive to horizontal variability in EC concentration. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of carefully choosing sampling sites and timing, as each parameter will have some effect on EC variability. They also emphasize the importance of gathering multiple samples from a site to obtain a representative value for the area. (letter)

  4. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  5. Large surface meltwater discharge from the Kangerlussuaq sector of the Greenland ice sheet during the record-warm year 2010 explained by detailed energy balance observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. van As

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study uses data from six on-ice weather stations, calibrated MODIS-derived albedo and proglacial river gauging measurements to drive and validate an energy balance model. We aim to quantify the record-setting positive temperature anomaly in 2010 and its effect on mass balance and runoff from the Kangerlussuaq sector of the Greenland ice sheet. In 2010, the average temperature was 4.9 °C (2.7 standard deviations above the 1974–2010 average in Kangerlussuaq. High temperatures were also observed over the ice sheet, with the magnitude of the positive anomaly increasing with altitude, particularly in August. Simultaneously, surface albedo was anomalously low in 2010, predominantly in the upper ablation zone. The low albedo was caused by high ablation, which in turn profited from high temperatures and low winter snowfall. Surface energy balance calculations show that the largest melt excess (∼170% occurred in the upper ablation zone (above 1000 m, where higher temperatures and lower albedo contributed equally to the melt anomaly. At lower elevations the melt excess can be attributed to high atmospheric temperatures alone. In total, we calculate that 6.6 ± 1.0 km3 of surface meltwater ran off the ice sheet in the Kangerlussuaq catchment in 2010, exceeding the reference year 2009 (based on atmospheric temperature measurements by ∼150%. During future warm episodes we can expect a melt response of at least the same magnitude, unless a larger wintertime snow accumulation delays and moderates the melt-albedo feedback. Due to the hypsometry of the ice sheet, yielding an increasing surface area with elevation, meltwater runoff will be further amplified by increases in melt forcings such as atmospheric heat.

  6. Estimating surface soil moisture from SMAP observations using a Neural Network technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolassa, J; Reichle, R H; Liu, Q; Alemohammad, S H; Gentine, P; Aida, K; Asanuma, J; Bircher, S; Caldwell, T; Colliander, A; Cosh, M; Collins, C Holifield; Jackson, T J; Martínez-Fernández, J; McNairn, H; Pacheco, A; Thibeault, M; Walker, J P

    2018-01-01

    A Neural Network (NN) algorithm was developed to estimate global surface soil moisture for April 2015 to March 2017 with a 2-3 day repeat frequency using passive microwave observations from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, surface soil temperatures from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) land modeling system, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-based vegetation water content. The NN was trained on GEOS-5 soil moisture target data, making the NN estimates consistent with the GEOS-5 climatology, such that they may ultimately be assimilated into this model without further bias correction. Evaluated against in situ soil moisture measurements, the average unbiased root mean square error (ubRMSE), correlation and anomaly correlation of the NN retrievals were 0.037 m 3 m -3 , 0.70 and 0.66, respectively, against SMAP core validation site measurements and 0.026 m 3 m -3 , 0.58 and 0.48, respectively, against International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) measurements. At the core validation sites, the NN retrievals have a significantly higher skill than the GEOS-5 model estimates and a slightly lower correlation skill than the SMAP Level-2 Passive (L2P) product. The feasibility of the NN method was reflected by a lower ubRMSE compared to the L2P retrievals as well as a higher skill when ancillary parameters in physically-based retrievals were uncertain. Against ISMN measurements, the skill of the two retrieval products was more comparable. A triple collocation analysis against Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture retrievals showed that the NN and L2P retrieval errors have a similar spatial distribution, but the NN retrieval errors are generally lower in densely vegetated regions and transition zones.

  7. The ThRombolysis in UnconTrolled Hypertension (TRUTH) protocol: an observational study on treatment strategy of elevated blood pressure in stroke patients eligible for IVT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, T P; Algra, A; Dippel, D W J; Kappelle, L J; van Oostenbrugge, R J; Roos, Y B W E M; Wermer, M J; van der Worp, H B; Nederkoorn, P J; Kruyt, N D

    2015-11-23

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with (recombinant) tissue plasminogen activator is an effective treatment in acute ischemic stroke. However, IVT is contraindicated when blood pressure is above 185/110 mmHg, because of an increased risk on symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. In current Dutch clinical practice, two distinct strategies are used in this situation. The active strategy comprises lowering blood pressure with antihypertensive agents below these thresholds to allow start of IVT. In the conservative strategy, IVT is administered only when blood pressure drops spontaneously below protocolled thresholds. A retrospective analysis in two recent stroke trials showed a non-significant signal towards better functional outcome in the active group; robust evidence for either strategy, however, is lacking. We hypothesize that (I) the active strategy leads to a better functional outcome three months after acute ischemic stroke. Secondary hypotheses are that this effect occurs despite (II) increasing the number of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhages, and could be attributable to (III) a higher rate of IVT treatments and (IV) a shorter door-to-needle time. The TRUTH is a prospective, observational, cluster-based, parallel group follow-up study; in which participating centers continue their current local treatment guidelines. Outcomes of patients admitted to centers with an active will be compared to those admitted to centers with a conservative strategy. The primary outcome is functional outcome on the modified Rankin Scale at three months. Secondary outcomes are symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage, IVT treatment and door-to-needle time. We based our sample size estimate on an ordinal analysis of the mRS with the "proportional odds" model. With the aforementioned signal observed in a recent retrospective study in these patients as an estimate of the effect size and with alpha 0 · 05, this analysis would have an 80 % power with a total number of 600 patients

  8. The French Contribution to the Voluntary Observing Ships Network of Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcroix, T. C.; Alory, G.; Téchiné, P.; Diverrès, D.; Varillon, D.; Cravatte, S. E.; Gouriou, Y.; Grelet, J.; Jacquin, S.; Kestenare, E.; Maes, C.; Morrow, R.; Perrier, J.; Reverdin, G. P.; Roubaud, F.

    2016-02-01

    Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is an essential climate variable that requires long term in situ observation. The French SSS Observation Service (SSS-OS) manages a network of Voluntary Observing Ships equipped with thermosalinographs (TSG). The network is global though more concentrated in the tropical Pacific and North Atlantic oceanic basins. The acquisition system is autonomous with real time transmission and is regularly serviced at harbor calls. There are distinct real time and delayed time processing chains. Real time processing includes automatic alerts to detect potential instrument problems, in case raw data are outside of climatic limits, and graphical monitoring tools. Delayed time processing relies on a dedicated software for attribution of data quality flags by visual inspection, and correction of TSG time series by comparison with daily water samples and collocated Argo data. A method for optimizing the automatic attribution of quality flags in real time, based on testing different thresholds for data deviation from climatology and retroactively comparing the resulting flags to delayed time flags, is presented. The SSS-OS real time data feed the Coriolis operational oceanography database, while the research-quality delayed time data can be extracted for selected time and geographical ranges through a graphical web interface. Delayed time data have been also combined with other SSS data sources to produce gridded files for the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. A short review of the research activities conducted with such data is given. It includes observation-based process-oriented and climate studies from regional to global scale as well as studies where in situ SSS is used for calibration/validation of models, coral proxies or satellite data.

  9. Remote Sensing of Surface Soil Moisture using Semi-Concurrent Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Ouellette, J. D.; Colliander, A.; Cosh, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Walker, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Radar backscatter and radiometer brightness temperature both have well-documented sensitivity to surface soil moisture, particularly in the microwave regime. While radiometer-derived soil moisture retrievals have been shown to be stable and accurate, they are only available at coarse spatial resolutions on the order of tens of kilometers. Backscatter from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is similarly sensitive to soil moisture but can yield higher spatial resolutions, with pixel sizes about an order of magnitude smaller. Soil moisture retrieval from radar backscatter is more difficult, however, due to the combined sensitivity of radar scattering to surface roughness, vegetation structure, and soil moisture. The algorithm uses a time-series of SAR data to retrieval soil moisture information, constraining the SAR-derived soil moisture estimates with radiometer observations. This effectively combines the high spatial resolution offered by SAR with the precision offered by passive radiometry. The algorithm is a change detection approach which maps changes in the radar backscatter to changes in surface soil moisture. This new algorithm differs from existing retrieval techniques in that it does not require ancillary vegetation information, but assumes vegetation and surface roughness are stable between pairs of consecutive radar overpasses. Furthermore, this method does not require a radar scattering model for the vegetation canopy, nor the use of a training data set. The algorithm works over a long time series, and is constrained by hard bounds which are defined using a coarse-resolution radiometer soil moisture product. The presentation will include soil moisture retrievals from Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) SAR data. Two sets of optimization bounds will constrain the radar change detection algorithm: one defined by SMAP radiometer retrievals and one defined by WindSat radiometer retrievals. Retrieved soil moisture values will be presented on a world map and will

  10. Intraseasonal Variability of the Equatorial Indian Ocean Observed from Sea Surface Height, Wind, and Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2007-01-01

    The forcing of the equatorial Indian Ocean by the highly periodic monsoon wind cycle creates many interesting intraseasonal variabilities. The frequency spectrum of the wind stress observations from the European Remote Sensing Satellite scatterometers reveals peaks at the seasonal cycle and its higher harmonics at 180, 120, 90, and 75 days. The observations of sea surface height (SSH) from the Jason and Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon radar altimeters are analyzed to study the ocean's response. The focus of the study is on the intraseasonal periods shorter than the annual period. The semiannual SSH variability is characterized by a basin mode involving Rossby waves and Kelvin waves traveling back and forth in the equatorial Indian Ocean between 10(deg)S and 10(deg)N. However, the interference of these waves with each other masks the appearance of individual Kelvin and Rossby waves, leading to a nodal point (amphidrome) of phase propagation on the equator at the center of the basin. The characteristics of the mode correspond to a resonance of the basin according to theoretical models. The theory also calls for similar modes at 90 and 60 days.

  11. The composition of pollutted air in Moscow based on surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratova, Natalia; Elansky, Nikolai; Skorokhod, Andrey

    2013-04-01

    Moscow is the one of the biggest world megacities. Population, industry, transport are strong sources of air pollution. This pollution influences on the air quality in the city and in the neighbor regions due to spreading by the wind. Here we present an analysis of variations of atmospheric compounds in Moscow since 2002 until the present in its dependence on different atmospheric characteristics, particularly cyclonic and anticyclonic conditions, heat waves and anthropogenic factors. The following variables are considered: NO2, NO, CO, CO2, O3, SO2, NMHC. The monitoring site is located at Moscow State University meteorological observatory on the South-West of Moscow. All observations are provided by A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. Due to these continuous measurements, the typical (ore basic) level of pollution as well as the extreme cases have been studied. The temporal variability of the atmospheric compounds, and the chemical interaction of ozone and nitrogen oxides are investigated. High concentrations of nitrogen oxides are observed throughout the year. During some months the 90th NO2 percentile exceeds 60 ppb, NO - 80 ppb. Based on surface observations, we show that extremes of pollutant concentrations correspond with anticyclonic conditions and anthropogenic processes. These often increase the impact on the weather. These situations correspond with the anomalous cold winter in 2006 and heat wave in 2002. In these periods, concentrations of air pollutions exceed MAC, but the ozone concentration usually decreases due to interaction with NOx. Only two times, ozone concentration exceeded MAC - the heat waves 2002 and 2010. Also in the study we obtain the logarithmic dependence between ozone mix ratio and NO2/NO, which can be used for prediction of the surface ozone concentrations in Moscow: [O3] = 12.22Ln([NO2]/[NO]) + 15.3 However, this equation is not possible to use in smog conditions. From 29 July to 15 August Moscow was in a dense smoke

  12. Sea Surface Salinity and Ocean Color Observations in the Northern Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, J. C.; Burrage, D. M.; Wang, D. W.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne mapping of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) has been performed using L-Band radiometers for over 15 years, and has been operationally practical for over a decade. Ocean scale L-band observations of SSS are now obtained by satellite. ESA's SMOS has been operational for over two years and NASA's Aquarius satellite, launched in Jun, 2011, for over 6 months. Aircraft SSS complements satellite measurements by measuring nearer to coasts and with finer (˜1 km) spatial resolution. Due to the large effective pixel size of the satellite L-Band SSS measurements(˜35-80km), SMOS measurements do not reach the coast. Land microwave brightness signal in a given pixel contaminates the measurement of sea surface brightness temperature. However, the high signal to noise ratio (salinity contrast of 7-15 psu over 10km in some cases) of the coastal salinity signal, due to large freshwater sources, may dominate land contamination effects, to allow closer than usual SMOS SSS observations of strong coastal salinity patterns. An additional method to estimate SSS near coasts is using ocean color. Very near to coasts, freshwater sources such as rivers are relatively rich in Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). As freshwater mixes with saltwater, salinity increases and CDOM concentrations fall. For conservative mixing, there is an inverse linear relation between CDOM and salinity, allowing estimates of SSS based on CDOM. The airborne sensors we use during STARRS flights include 2 SeaWifs airborne simulator sensors, one upward looking and one downward looking, as well as digital cameras, which we have used to identify color fronts. These provide ocean color measurements in addition to the STARRS microwave SSS measurements. We present results from an airborne campaign in the northern Gulf of Mexico, June 2-13, 2011. We made four types of flights. 1) Underflights of SMOS tracks at times coincident with SMOS passes. 2) Zig-zag flights along the coast, between Texas and Mississippi. 3

  13. Comment on "'Elevated Heat Pump' Hypothesis for the Aerosol-Monsoon Hydroclimate Link: 'Grounded' in Observations?" by S. Nigam and M. Bollasina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    In their recent paper, Nigam and Bollasina [2010] (hereinafter NB) claimed to have found observational evidences that are at variance with the elevated heat pump (EHP) hypothesis regarding the possible impacts of absorbing aerosols on the South Asian summer monsoon [Lau et al., 2006; Lau and Kim, 2006]. We found NB's arguments and inferences against the EHP hypothesis flawed, stemming from their own out of context interpretation of the hypothesis. NB argued that the simultaneous negative correlation of aerosol with rainfall, and correlations with other quantities in May, are evidence against the EHP hypothesis. Their argument cannot be justified. First, Lau and Kim [2006] (hereinafter LK06) never stated that the main rainfall response to EHP is in May. Second, the EHP is about responses of the entire Indian monsoon system that are nonlocal in space and time with respect to the aerosol forcing. As shown in Figure 4 of LK06, while the aerosol anomalies are strongest in April-May, the strongest rainfall response is in June-July, with the enhanced rainfall fed by an induced thermally driven circulation which brings additional moisture from the ocean to the Indian subcontinent. Third, the increased rainfall over the Bay of Bengal as shown in Figure 1a of NB and the increased low-level convergence in Figure 1f of NB do not necessarily reflect responses associated with EHP but rather the large ]scale circulation that provides the buildup of the aerosols before the onset of the monsoon rainfall over India. Because aerosol can only accumulate where there is little or no washout by rain, the negative correlation is a necessary condition for increased atmospheric loading of aerosols. For the same reason, the spatial distributions of rainfall and aerosol generally are offset with each other, i.e., high aerosol in regions of low rainfall. This is evident in Figure 1, which shows the climatological mean of the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD), and TRMM rainfall over India in

  14. Observations of orientation dependence of surface morphology in tungsten implanted by low energy and high flux D plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H.Y.; Zhang, Yubin; Yuan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Surface modification by formation of blistering and nanostructures with pronounced orientation dependence has been observed on surfaces of rolled tungsten and recrystallized tungsten after exposure to a low energy (38 eV) deuterium (D) plasma with a high flux of 1024 m-2 s -1. The correlation bet...

  15. Effect of surface BRDF of various land cover types on geostationary observations of tropospheric NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, V.; Rozanov, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Irie, H.; Kita, K.

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the effect of surface reflectance anisotropy, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), on satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2. We assume the geometry of geostationary measurements over Tokyo, which is one of the worst air-polluted regions in East Asia. We calculated air mass factors (AMF) and box AMFs (BAMF) for tropospheric NO2 to evaluate the effect of BRDF by using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. To model the BRDF effect, we utilized the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products (MOD43B1 and MOD43B2), which provide three coefficients to express the RossThick-LiSparse reciprocal model, a semi-empirical and kernel-based model of BRDF. Because BRDF depends on the land cover type, we also utilized the High Resolution Land-Use and Land-Cover Map of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS)/Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2), which classifies the ground pixels over Tokyo into six main types: water, urban, paddy, crop, deciduous forest, and evergreen forest. We first develop an empirical model of the three BRDF coefficients for each land cover type over Tokyo and then apply the model to the calculation of land-cover-type-dependent AMFs and BAMFs. Results show that the variability of AMF among the land types is up to several tens of percent, and if we neglect the reflectance anisotropy, the difference with AMFs based on BRDF reaches 10% or more. The evaluation of the BAMFs calculated shows that not considering BRDF will cause large errors if the concentration of NO2 is high close to the surface, although the importance of BRDF for AMFs decreases for large aerosol optical depth (AOD).

  16. Characterizing Surface Energy Budget Components in Urban Regions Using Combination of Flux Tower Observations and Satellite Remote Sensing Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Vant-hull, B.; Ramamurthy, P.; Blake, R.; Prakash, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Urban and built regions because of their lack of surface moisture and their surface impermeability significantly perform differently in surface energy budget than natural and non-urban regions. Characterizing the effect and the response of each surface type in the cities can help to increase our understanding of climate, anthropogenic heat, and urban heat islands. Both ground observations and remote sensing observations are important when the extent of the heat energy balance components in big cities is targeted. This is study aims to provide a novel approach to use ground observations and map the maxima and minima air temperature in New York City using satellite measurements. Complete energy balance stations are installed over distinct materials such as concrete, asphalt, and rooftops. The footprint of these stations is restricted to the individual materials. The energy balance stations monitor the sensible and latent heat fluxes through eddy covariance method. To account for the incoming and outgoing radiation, a 4-component radiometer is used that can observe both incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Moreover, satellite observations from Landsat 8 are utilized to classify the city surfaces to distinct defined surfaces where ground observations were performed. The mapped temperatures will be linked to MODIS surface temperatures to develop a model that can downscale MODIS skin temperatures to fine resolution air temperature over urban regions. The results are compared with ground observations, which they reveal a great potential of using synergetic use of flux tower observations and satellite measurement to study urban surface energy budget. The results of this study can enhance our understanding about urban heat islands as well as climate studies and their effects on the environment.

  17. Remote sensing of ocean surface currents: a review of what is being observed and what is being assimilated

    OpenAIRE

    Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Turiel, Antonio; García-Ladona, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Ocean currents play a key role in Earth's climate – they impact almost any process taking place in the ocean and are of major importance for navigation and human activities at sea. Nevertheless, their observation and forecasting are still difficult. First, no observing system is able to provide direct measurements of global ocean currents on synoptic scales. Consequently, it has been necessary to use sea surface height and sea surface temperature measurements and refer to dy...

  18. Surface Wind Observational Database in North Eastern North America: Quality Control Procedure and Climatological Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Eceiza, Etor E.; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Navarro, Jorge; Hidalgo, Ángela; Conte, Jorge; Beltrami, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    This work summarizes the design and application of a Quality Control (QC) procedure for an observational surface wind database located in North Eastern North America. It also presents some insights of the long-term climatological variability over the region. The database consists of 527 sites (487 land stations and 40 buoys) with varying resolutions of hourly, 3 hourly and 6 hourly data, compiled from three different source institutions. The records span from 1940 to 2010 and cover an approximate spatial extension of 2.2 × 106 km2. The QC process is composed of different phases focused either on problems related with the providing source institutions or measurement errors. Due to the size of the data set, a great effort has been made on the automation of the procedures. A number of problems are associated with data management and data conventions: unification of measurement units and recording times due to the variety of institutional sources; detection of erroneous data sequence duplications within a station or among different ones; and detection of errors related with physically unrealistic data measurements. From the other hand there is a variety of treated instrumental errors: problems related with low variability, placing particular emphasis on the detection of unrealistic low wind speed records with the help of regional references; high variability related erroneous records; wind speed biases on week to monthly timescales and homogenization of wind direction records. As a result, around 1.7% of wind speed records and 0.4% of wind direction records have been deleted, making a combined total of 1.9% of removed records. Around 2.4% of wind direction data have been also corrected. The already quality controlled database allows for subsequent climatological analyses. The intra and inter decadal variability of the monthly surface wind field in such a vast and orographically complex region as the North Eastern North America is explored. Several decades of quality

  19. Observationally constrained surface mass balance of Larsen C ice shelf, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kuipers Munneke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The surface mass balance (SMB of the Larsen C ice shelf (LCIS, Antarctica, is poorly constrained due to a dearth of in situ observations. Combining several geophysical techniques, we reconstruct spatial and temporal patterns of SMB over the LCIS. Continuous time series of snow height (2.5–6 years at five locations allow for multi-year estimates of seasonal and annual SMB over the LCIS. There is high interannual variability in SMB as well as spatial variability: in the north, SMB is 0.40 ± 0.06 to 0.41 ± 0.04 m w.e. year−1, while farther south, SMB is up to 0.50 ± 0.05 m w.e. year−1. This difference between north and south is corroborated by winter snow accumulation derived from an airborne radar survey from 2009, which showed an average snow thickness of 0.34 m w.e. north of 66° S, and 0.40 m w.e. south of 68° S. Analysis of ground-penetrating radar from several field campaigns allows for a longer-term perspective of spatial variations in SMB: a particularly strong and coherent reflection horizon below 25–44 m of water-equivalent ice and firn is observed in radargrams collected across the shelf. We propose that this horizon was formed synchronously across the ice shelf. Combining snow height observations, ground and airborne radar, and SMB output from a regional climate model yields a gridded estimate of SMB over the LCIS. It confirms that SMB increases from north to south, overprinted by a gradient of increasing SMB to the west, modulated in the west by föhn-induced sublimation. Previous observations show a strong decrease in firn air content toward the west, which we attribute to spatial patterns of melt, refreezing, and densification rather than SMB.

  20. Developing a Model to Estimate Freshwater Gross Primary Production Using MODIS Surface Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, S. J.; Weathers, K. C.; Norouzi, H.; Prakash, S.; Solomon, C.; Boucher, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Lakes contribute to local and regional climate conditions, cycle nutrients, and are viable indicators of climate change due to their sensitivity to disturbances in their water and airsheds. Utilizing spaceborne remote sensing (RS) techniques has considerable potential in studying lake dynamics because it allows for coherent and consistent spatial and temporal observations as well as estimates of lake functions without in situ measurements. However, in order for RS products to be useful, algorithms that relate in situ measurements to RS data must be developed. Estimates of lake metabolic rates are of particular scientific interest since they are indicative of lakes' roles in carbon cycling and ecological function. Currently, there are few existing algorithms relating remote sensing products to in-lake estimates of metabolic rates and more in-depth studies are still required. Here we use satellite surface temperature observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product (MYD11A2) and published in-lake gross primary production (GPP) estimates for eleven globally distributed lakes during a one-year period to produce a univariate quadratic equation model. The general model was validated using other lakes during an equivalent one-year time period (R2=0.76). The statistical analyses reveal significant positive relationships between MODIS temperature data and the previously modeled in-lake GPP. Lake-specific models for Lake Mendota (USA), Rotorua (New Zealand), and Taihu (China) showed stronger relationships than the general combined model, pointing to local influences such as watershed characteristics on in-lake GPP in some cases. These validation data suggest that the developed algorithm has a potential to predict lake GPP on a global scale.

  1. Assimilation of MODIS Snow Cover Fraction Observations into the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ally M. Toure

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The NASA Catchment land surface model (CLSM is the land model component used for the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA. Here, the CLSM versions of MERRA and MERRA-Land are evaluated using snow cover fraction (SCF observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. Moreover, a computationally-efficient empirical scheme is designed to improve CLSM estimates of SCF, snow depth, and snow water equivalent (SWE through the assimilation of MODIS SCF observations. Results show that data assimilation (DA improved SCF estimates compared to the open-loop model without assimilation (OL, especially in areas with ephemeral snow cover and mountainous regions. A comparison of the SCF estimates from DA against snow cover estimates from the NOAA Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System showed an improvement in the probability of detection of up to 28% and a reduction in false alarms by up to 6% (relative to OL. A comparison of the model snow depth estimates against Canadian Meteorological Centre analyses showed that DA successfully improved the model seasonal bias from −0.017 m for OL to −0.007 m for DA, although there was no significant change in root-mean-square differences (RMSD (0.095 m for OL, 0.093 m for DA. The time-average of the spatial correlation coefficient also improved from 0.61 for OL to 0.63 for DA. A comparison against in situ SWE measurements also showed improvements from assimilation. The correlation increased from 0.44 for OL to 0.49 for DA, the bias improved from −0.111 m for OL to −0.100 m for DA, and the RMSD decreased from 0.186 m for OL to 0.180 m for DA.

  2. Impact of satellite-based lake surface observations on the initial state of HIRLAM. Part II: Analysis of lake surface temperature and ice cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Kheyrollah Pour

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from a study on the impact of remote-sensing Lake Surface Water Temperature (LSWT observations in the analysis of lake surface state of a numerical weather prediction (NWP model. Data assimilation experiments were performed with the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM, a three-dimensional operational NWP model. Selected thermal remote-sensing LSWT observations provided by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR sensors onboard the Terra/Aqua and ENVISAT satellites, respectively, were included into the assimilation. The domain of our experiments, which focussed on two winters (2010–2011 and 2011–2012, covered northern Europe. Validation of the resulting objective analyses against independent observations demonstrated that the description of the lake surface state can be improved by the introduction of space-borne LSWT observations, compared to the result of pure prognostic parameterisations or assimilation of the available limited number of in-situ lake temperature observations. Further development of the data assimilation methods and solving of several practical issues are necessary in order to fully benefit from the space-borne observations of lake surface state for the improvement of the operational weather forecast. This paper is the second part of a series of two papers aimed at improving the objective analysis of lake temperature and ice conditions in HIRLAM.

  3. Investigating the influence of long-range transport on surface O3 in Nevada, USA, using observations from multiple measurement platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu B.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-01-01

    The current United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O 3 (75 ppb) is expected to be revised to between 60 and 70 ppb. As the NAAQS becomes more stringent, characterizing the extent of O 3 and precursors transported into the US is increasingly important. Given the high elevation, complex terrain, and location in the Intermountain West, the State of Nevada is ideally situated to intercept air transported into the US. Until recently, measurements of O 3 and associated pollutants were limited to areas in and around the cities of Las Vegas and Reno. In 2011, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative began and through this project 13 surface monitoring sites were established. Also in 2011, the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) began making routine aircraft measurements of O 3 and other greenhouse gases in Nevada. The availability of aircraft and surface measurements in a relatively rural, remote setting in the Intermountain West presented a unique opportunity to investigate sources contributing to the O 3 observed in Nevada. Our analyses indicate that stratosphere to troposphere transport, long-range transport of Asian pollution, and regional emissions from urban areas and wildfires influence surface observations. The complexity of sources identified here along with the fact that O 3 frequently approaches the threshold being considered for a revised NAAQS indicate that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to achieve compliance with a more stringent regulatory standard. Further, on a seasonal basis we found no significant difference between daily 1-h maximum O 3 at surface sites, which ranged in elevation from 888 to 2307 m, and aircraft measurements of O 3 < 2500 m which suggests that similar processes influence daytime O 3 across rural Nevada and indicates that column measurements from Railroad Valley, NV are useful in understanding these processes. - Highlights: • Measurements indicate Asian LRT, STT, and

  4. Investigating the influence of long-range transport on surface O{sub 3} in Nevada, USA, using observations from multiple measurement platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fine, Rebekka, E-mail: rebekkafine@gmail.com [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Miller, Matthieu B. [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States); Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T. [Atmospheric Science Branch, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Gustin, Mae Sexauer, E-mail: mgustin@cabnr.unr.edu [Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The current United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for O{sub 3} (75 ppb) is expected to be revised to between 60 and 70 ppb. As the NAAQS becomes more stringent, characterizing the extent of O{sub 3} and precursors transported into the US is increasingly important. Given the high elevation, complex terrain, and location in the Intermountain West, the State of Nevada is ideally situated to intercept air transported into the US. Until recently, measurements of O{sub 3} and associated pollutants were limited to areas in and around the cities of Las Vegas and Reno. In 2011, the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative began and through this project 13 surface monitoring sites were established. Also in 2011, the NASA Ames Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) began making routine aircraft measurements of O{sub 3} and other greenhouse gases in Nevada. The availability of aircraft and surface measurements in a relatively rural, remote setting in the Intermountain West presented a unique opportunity to investigate sources contributing to the O{sub 3} observed in Nevada. Our analyses indicate that stratosphere to troposphere transport, long-range transport of Asian pollution, and regional emissions from urban areas and wildfires influence surface observations. The complexity of sources identified here along with the fact that O{sub 3} frequently approaches the threshold being considered for a revised NAAQS indicate that interstate and international cooperation will be necessary to achieve compliance with a more stringent regulatory standard. Further, on a seasonal basis we found no significant difference between daily 1-h maximum O{sub 3} at surface sites, which ranged in elevation from 888 to 2307 m, and aircraft measurements of O{sub 3} < 2500 m which suggests that similar processes influence daytime O{sub 3} across rural Nevada and indicates that column measurements from Railroad Valley, NV are useful in understanding these processes. - Highlights:

  5. Numerical simulations and observations of surface wave fields under an extreme tropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Wright, C.W.; Walsh, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the wave model WAVEWATCH III under a very strong, category 5, tropical cyclone wind forcing is investigated with different drag coefficient parameterizations and ocean current inputs. The model results are compared with field observations of the surface wave spectra from an airborne scanning radar altimeter, National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) time series, and satellite altimeter measurements in Hurricane Ivan (2004). The results suggest that the model with the original drag coefficient parameterization tends to overestimate the significant wave height and the dominant wavelength and produces a wave spectrum with narrower directional spreading. When an improved drag parameterization is introduced and the wave-current interaction is included, the model yields an improved forecast of significant wave height, but underestimates the dominant wavelength. When the hurricane moves over a preexisting mesoscale ocean feature, such as the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico or a warm-and cold-core ring, the current associated with the feature can accelerate or decelerate the wave propagation and significantly modulate the wave spectrum. ?? 2009 American Meteorological Society.

  6. Global land-surface evaporation estimated from satellite-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Miralles

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a new strategy to derive evaporation from satellite observations. The approach uses a variety of satellite-sensor products to estimate daily evaporation at a global scale and 0.25 degree spatial resolution. Central to this methodology is the use of the Priestley and Taylor (PT evaporation model. The minimalistic PT equation combines a small number of inputs, the majority of which can be detected from space. This reduces the number of variables that need to be modelled. Key distinguishing features of the approach are the use of microwave-derived soil moisture, land surface temperature and vegetation density, as well as the detailed estimation of rainfall interception loss. The modelled evaporation is validated against one year of eddy covariance measurements from 43 stations. The estimated annual totals correlate well with the stations' annual cumulative evaporation (R=0.80, N=43 and present a low average bias (−5%. The validation of the daily time series at each individual station shows good model performance in all vegetation types and climate conditions with an average correlation coefficient of R=0.83, still lower than the R=0.90 found in the validation of the monthly time series. The first global map of annual evaporation developed through this methodology is also presented.

  7. TEM observation on phase separation and interfaces of laser surface alloyed high-entropy alloy coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhaobing; Cui, Xiufang; Jin, Guo; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yang; Dong, Meiling

    2017-12-01

    Phase separation is a common phenomenon in traditional alloys. Under the condition of appropriate undercooling, the segregation phenomenon can be also found in blue-chip high-entropy alloys (HEAs). In this work, the phase separation behavior and interfacial investigation of laser surface alloyed HEA coating with high content Ti were studied principally by transmission electron microscopy. The results show that crystal structure and elementary composition on both sides of the interface of coating/substrate are quite different, and the interfaces between different phases are incoherent or semi-coherent boundarys, resolved by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. In the interface of (Co, Ni)Ti 2 phase/β-Ti phase, there is angle of 80° between BCC〈100〉 and FCC〈201〉. An interesting 'island' structure, that β-Ti phases are embraced by (Co, Ni)Ti 2 compounds in the BCC matrix, was observed definitely, which is attributed to the combined action of Ti segregation and inter-attraction of Ti and other elements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An evaluation of ASCAT surface soil moisture products with in-situ observations in Southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Albergel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 13 automatic weather stations located in Southwestern France. In this study, the soil moisture measured in-situ at 5 cm is used to evaluate the normalised surface soil moisture (SSM estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km active microwave data of the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (onboard METOP, issued by EUMETSAT for a period of 6 months (April–September in 2007. The seasonal trend is removed from the satellite and in-situ time series by considering scaled anomalies. One station (Mouthoumet of the ground network, located in a mountainous area, is removed from the analysis as very few ASCAT SSM estimates are available. No correlation is found for the station of Narbonne, which is close to the Mediterranean sea. On the other hand, nine stations present significant correlation levels. For two stations, a significant correlation is obtained when considering only part of the ASCAT data. The soil moisture measured in-situ at those stations, at 30 cm, is used to estimate the characteristic time length (T of an exponential filter applied to the ASCAT product. The best correlation between a soil water index derived from ASCAT and the in-situ soil moisture observations at 30 cm is obtained with a T-value of 14 days.

  9. An evaluation of ASCAT surface soil moisture products with in-situ observations in Southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albergel, C.; Rüdiger, C.; Carrer, D.; Calvet, J.-C.; Fritz, N.; Naeimi, V.; Bartalis, Z.; Hasenauer, S.

    2009-02-01

    A long term data acquisition effort of profile soil moisture is currently underway at 13 automatic weather stations located in Southwestern France. In this study, the soil moisture measured in-situ at 5 cm is used to evaluate the normalised surface soil moisture (SSM) estimates derived from coarse-resolution (25 km) active microwave data of the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (onboard METOP), issued by EUMETSAT for a period of 6 months (April-September) in 2007. The seasonal trend is removed from the satellite and in-situ time series by considering scaled anomalies. One station (Mouthoumet) of the ground network, located in a mountainous area, is removed from the analysis as very few ASCAT SSM estimates are available. No correlation is found for the station of Narbonne, which is close to the Mediterranean sea. On the other hand, nine stations present significant correlation levels. For two stations, a significant correlation is obtained when considering only part of the ASCAT data. The soil moisture measured in-situ at those stations, at 30 cm, is used to estimate the characteristic time length (T) of an exponential filter applied to the ASCAT product. The best correlation between a soil water index derived from ASCAT and the in-situ soil moisture observations at 30 cm is obtained with a T-value of 14 days.

  10. Fine surface structure of unfixed and hydrated macrophages observed by laser-plasma x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Friedman, Herman; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shioda, Seiji; Debari, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kunio; Rajyaguru, Jayshree; Richardson, Martin

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, laser-plasma, x-ray contact microscope using a table-top Nd:glass laser system has been developed and utilized for the analysis of the surface structure of live macrophages. Fine fluffy surface structures of murine peritoneal macrophages, which were live, hydrolyzed and not sliced and stained, were observed by the x-ray microscope followed by analysis using an atomic force microscopy. In order to compare with other techniques, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface structure of the macrophages. The SEM offered a fine whole cell image of the same macrophages, which were fixed and dehydrated, but the surfaces were ruffled and different from that of x-ray images. A standard light microscope was also utilized to observe the shape of live whole macrophages. Light microscopy showed some fluffy surface structures of the macrophages, but the resolution was too low to observe the fine structures. Thus, the findings of fine fluffy surface structures of macrophages by x-ray microscopy provide valuable information for studies of phagocytosis, cell spreading and adherence, which are dependent on the surface structure of macrophages. Furthermore, the present study also demonstrates the usefulness of x-ray microscopy for analysis of structures of living cells

  11. Validation and inter-comparison of surface elevation changes derived from altimetry over the Jakobshavn Isbræ drainage basin, Greenland – Round Robin results from ESA's Ice_Sheets_CCI (ID #EGU2013-6007)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Khvorostovsky, Kirill; Ticconi, Francesca

    elevation changes (SEC), surface velocities, calving front locations, and grounding line locations. This work focuses on SEC, and the goal is to develop the best routine for estimating this by means of radar altimetry. In order to find the most optimal approach we have completed a Round Robin experiment (RR...

  12. Global Sea Surface Temperature: A Harmonized Multi-sensor Time-series from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the methods used to obtain a new global sea surface temperature (SST) dataset spanning the early 1980s to the present, intended for use as a climate data record (CDR). The dataset provides skin SST (the fundamental measurement) and an estimate of the daily mean SST at depths compatible with drifting buoys (adjusting for skin and diurnal variability). The depth SST provided enables the CDR to be used with in situ records and centennial-scale SST reconstructions. The new SST timeseries is as independent as possible from in situ observations, and from 1995 onwards is harmonized to an independent satellite reference (namely, SSTs from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (Advanced ATSR)). This maximizes the utility of our new estimates of variability and long-term trends in interrogating previous datasets tied to in situ observations. The new SSTs include full resolution (swath, level 2) data, single-sensor gridded data (level 3, 0.05 degree latitude-longitude grid) and a multi-sensor optimal analysis (level 4, same grid). All product levels are consistent. All SSTs have validated uncertainty estimates attached. The sensors used include all Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers from NOAA-6 onwards and the ATSR series. AVHRR brightness temperatures (BTs) are calculated from counts using a new in-flight re-calibration for each sensor, ultimately linked through to the AATSR BT calibration by a new harmonization technique. Artefacts in AVHRR BTs linked to varying instrument temperature, orbital regime and solar contamination are significantly reduced. These improvements in the AVHRR BTs (level 1) translate into improved cloud detection and SST (level 2). For cloud detection, we use a Bayesian approach for all sensors. For the ATSRs, SSTs are derived with sufficient accuracy and sensitivity using dual-view coefficients. This is not the case for single-view AVHRR observations, for which a physically based retrieval is employed, using a hybrid

  13. Dyess AFB, Texas, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-21

    psychromtrlc swumary of wet-bulb temperature depression versus dry-bulb te rau . jjmi and standrd doviatinnit ftf Awrixf-l 1.k.. 1. Alan 1473... Iame 722665 DysaS AFB TX/Ablese 26 W 099 F1789 ftr Dats STATION LOCATION ANDINSTRUMENTATION HISTORY ___ TYS~ErPE AT MEIS LOCATION ELEVATION ABOVE ESL...frequency distribution of wet-bulb depression in 17 classes spread horizontally; by 2-degree intervals of dry-bulb temperature spread vertically. Also

  14. Real-Time Observation of Surface Bond Breaking with an X-ray Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Molecules Not Quite Desorbing The dynamics of molecules desorbing from or adsorbing on surfaces requires that molecules rapidly gain or lose a large amount or translational and rotational energy to enter or leave the gas phase. An intermediate precursor state has long been invoked in which...... molecules interact weakly with the surface but translate along it and exchange energy without forming localized surface bonds. Dell'Angela et al. (p. 1302) found evidence for such a state in changes in x-ray absorption and emission spectra of CO molecules adsorbed on a ruthenium surface after optical...... excitation rapidly heated the surface. The use of a free electron laser provided high time resolution for x-ray spectroscopy studies. Density function theory and modeling of high temperature states revealed a state that forms from molecules that have not overcome the desorption barrier during heating...

  15. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  16. Quality Control Methodology Of A Surface Wind Observational Database In North Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Eceiza, Etor E.; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Navarro, Jorge; Conte, Jorge; Beltrami, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    This work summarizes the design and application of a Quality Control (QC) procedure for an observational surface wind database located in North Eastern North America. The database consists of 526 sites (486 land stations and 40 buoys) with varying resolutions of hourly, 3 hourly and 6 hourly data, compiled from three different source institutions with uneven measurement units and changing measuring procedures, instrumentation and heights. The records span from 1953 to 2010. The QC process is composed of different phases focused either on problems related with the providing source institutions or measurement errors. The first phases deal with problems often related with data recording and management: (1) compilation stage dealing with the detection of typographical errors, decoding problems, site displacements and unification of institutional practices; (2) detection of erroneous data sequence duplications within a station or among different ones; (3) detection of errors related with physically unrealistic data measurements. The last phases are focused on instrumental errors: (4) problems related with low variability, placing particular emphasis on the detection of unrealistic low wind speed records with the help of regional references; (5) high variability related erroneous records; (6) standardization of wind speed record biases due to changing measurement heights, detection of wind speed biases on week to monthly timescales, and homogenization of wind direction records. As a result, around 1.7% of wind speed records and 0.4% of wind direction records have been deleted, making a combined total of 1.9% of removed records. Additionally, around 15.9% wind speed records and 2.4% of wind direction data have been also corrected.

  17. Linking atmospheric synoptic transport, cloud phase, surface energy fluxes, and sea-ice growth: observations of midwinter SHEBA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P. Ola G.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Perovich, Don; Solomon, Amy

    2017-08-01

    Observations from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) project are used to describe a sequence of events linking midwinter long-range advection of atmospheric heat and moisture into the Arctic Basin, formation of supercooled liquid water clouds, enhancement of net surface energy fluxes through increased downwelling longwave radiation, and reduction in near-surface conductive heat flux loss due to a warming of the surface, thereby leading to a reduction in sea-ice bottom growth. The analyses provide details of two events during Jan. 1-12, 1998, one entering the Arctic through Fram Strait and the other from northeast Siberia; winter statistics extend the results. Both deep, precipitating frontal clouds and post-frontal stratocumulus clouds impact the surface radiation and energy budget. Cloud liquid water, occurring preferentially in stratocumulus clouds extending into the base of the inversion, provides the strongest impact on surface radiation and hence modulates the surface forcing, as found previously. The observations suggest a minimum water vapor threshold, likely case dependent, for producing liquid water clouds. Through responses to the radiative forcing and surface warming, this cloud liquid water also modulates the turbulent and conductive heat fluxes, and produces a thermal wave penetrating into the sea ice. About 20-33 % of the observed variations of bottom ice growth can be directly linked to variations in surface conductive heat flux, with retarded ice growth occurring several days after these moisture plumes reduce the surface conductive heat flux. This sequence of events modulate pack-ice wintertime environmental conditions and total ice growth, and has implications for the annual sea-ice evolution, especially for the current conditions of extensive thinner ice.

  18. Reactions of BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) at fluorinated and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer surfaces: observations of chemical selectivity in ion--surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, N; Shen, J; Koskinen, J; Cooks, R G

    2001-07-01

    Ion-surface reactions involving BBr(n)(+) (n = 0--2) with a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface were investigated using a multi-sector scattering mass spectrometer. Collisions of the B(+) ion yield BF(2)(+) at threshold energy with the simpler product ion BF(+)* appearing at higher collision energies and remaining of lower abundance than BF(2)(+) at all energies examined. In addition, the reactively sputtered ion CF(+) accompanies the formation of BF(2)(+) at low collision energies. These results stand in contrast with previous data on the ion-surface reactions of atomic ions with the F-SAM surface in that the threshold and most abundant reaction products in those cases involved the abstraction of a single fluorine atom. Gas-phase enthalpy data are consistent with BF(2)(+) being the thermodynamically favored product. The fact that the abundance of BF(2)(+) is relatively low and relatively insensitive to changes in collision energy suggests that this reaction proceeds through an entropically demanding intermediate at the vacuum--surface interface, one which involves interaction of the B(+) ion simultaneously with two fluorine atoms. By contrast with the reaction of B(+), the odd-electron species BBr(+)* reacts with the F-SAM surface to yield an abundant single-fluorine abstraction product, BBrF(+). Corresponding gas-phase ion--molecule experiments involving B(+) and BBr(+)* with C(6)F(14) also yield the products BF(+)* and BF(2)(+), but only in extremely low abundances and with no preference for double fluorine abstraction. Ion--surface reactions were also investigated for BBr(n)(+) (n = 0-2) with a hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayer (H-SAM) surface. Reaction of the B(+) ion and dissociative reactions of BBr(+)* result in the formation of BH(2)(+), while the thermodynamically less favorable product BH(+)* is not observed. Collisions of BBr(2)(+) with the H-SAM surface yield the dissociative ion-surface reaction products, BBrH(+) and BBrCH(3

  19. Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO), Edwards AFB, Lancaster, California (Revised)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-09

    10o1K 0-88 5 (Oil) U S AIR FORCE ENVIROMENTAL TECHICAL APPLICATIONS CENTER PART C SURFACE WINDS Presented in this part are various tabulations of surface...4966 580 7,614 846 14#4 491 11 84_ I_ 11-- -- A----- -- - Elencot Xl R ~ No Obo MON Noof Hotsnoit Tespottot -5_77

  20. Retrieving near surface soil moisture from microwave radiometric observations: current status and future plans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigneron, J.P.; Calvet, J.C.; Pellarin, T.; vd Griend, A.A.; Berger, M.; Ferrazzoli, P.

    2003-01-01

    Surface soil moisture is a key variable used to describe water and energy exchanges at the land surface/atmosphere interface. Passive microwave remotely sensed data have great potential for providing estimates of soil moisture with good temporal repetition on a daily basis and on a regional scale (∼

  1. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...

  2. Monitoring Multidecadal satellite earth observation of soil moisture products through land surface reanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albergel, C.; Dorigo, W.; Balsamo, G.; Sabatar, J; de Rosnay, P.; Isaksen, I; Brocca, L; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Wagner, W.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture from ERA-Land, a revised version of the land surface components of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim), is used to monitor at a global scale the consistency of a new microwave based multi-satellite surface soil moisture date set

  3. Neural Network-Based Retrieval of Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture using Multi-Frequency Remotely-Sensed Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Alemohammad, Seyed; Kolassa, Jana; Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of root zone soil moisture is essential in studying plant's response to different stress conditions since plant photosynthetic activity and transpiration rate are constrained by the water available through their roots. Current global root zone soil moisture estimates are based on either outputs from physical models constrained by observations, or assimilation of remotely-sensed microwave-based surface soil moisture estimates with physical model outputs. However, quality of these estimates are limited by the accuracy of the model representations of physical processes (such as radiative transfer, infiltration, percolation, and evapotranspiration) as well as errors in the estimates of the surface parameters. Additionally, statistical approaches provide an alternative efficient platform to develop root zone soil moisture retrieval algorithms from remotely-sensed observations. In this study, we present a new neural network based retrieval algorithm to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture from passive microwave observations of SMAP satellite (L-band) and AMSR2 instrument (X-band). SMAP early morning observations are ideal for surface soil moisture retrieval. AMSR2 mid-night observations are used here as an indicator of plant hydraulic properties that are related to root zone soil moisture. The combined observations from SMAP and AMSR2 together with other ancillary observations including the Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) estimates from GOME-2 instrument provide necessary information to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture. The algorithm is applied to observations from the first 18 months of SMAP mission and retrievals are validated against in-situ observations and other global datasets.

  4. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Maloyarovslavtesv, D.A.; Prokopov, O.I.; Tukayev, Sh.V.; Zanilov, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body with a turning collar locking device and a rod with longitudinal grooves, which are flexibly linked with jaws positioned in grooves in the body. To increase safety through ensuring automatic locking of the jaws in the closed position, the locking device is made in the form of head on wedges, spring loaded relative to the collar and made with cams and positioned with the capability of interacting with the grooves of the rod and through the cams with the collar.

  5. LANDSAT remote sensing: observations of an Appalachian mountaintop surface coal mining and reclamation operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The potential benefits of using LANDSAT remote sensing data by state agencies as an aide in monitoring surface coal mining operations are reviewed. A mountaintop surface mine in eastern Kentucky was surveyed over a 5 year period using satellite multispectral scanner data that were classified by computer analyses. The analyses were guided by aerial photography and by ground surveys of the surface mines procured in 1976. The application of the LANDSAT data indicates that: (1) computer classification of the various landcover categories provides information for monitoring the progress of surface mining and reclamation operations, (2) successive yearly changes in barren and revegetated areas can be qualitatively assessed for surface mines of 100 acres or more of disrupted area, (3) barren areas consisting of limestone and shale mixtures may be recognized, and revegetated areas in various stages of growth may be identified against the hilly forest background

  6. Surface Freshwater Storage and Variability in the Amazon Basin from Multi-Satellite Observations, 1993-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Fabrice; Frappart, Frederic; Guntner, Andreas; Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Getirana, Augusto; Maurer, Raffael

    2013-01-01

    The amount of water stored and moving through the surface water bodies of large river basins (river, floodplains, wetlands) plays a major role in the global water and biochemical cycles and is a critical parameter for water resources management. However, the spatio-temporal variations of these freshwater reservoirs are still widely unknown at the global scale. Here, we propose a hypsographic curve approach to estimate surface freshwater storage variations over the Amazon basin combining surface water extent from a multi-satellite-technique with topographic data from the Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) from Advance Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Monthly surface water storage variations for 1993-2007 are presented, showing a strong seasonal and interannual variability, and are evaluated against in situ river discharge and precipitation. The basin-scale mean annual amplitude of approx. 1200 cu km is in the range of previous estimates and contributes to about half of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) total water storage variations. For the first time, we map the surface water volume anomaly during the extreme droughts of 1997 (October-November) and 2005 (September-October) and found that during these dry events the water stored in the river and flood-plains of the Amazon basin was, respectively, approx. 230 (approx. 40%) and 210 (approx. 50%) cu km below the 1993-2007 average. This new 15year data set of surface water volume represents an unprecedented source of information for future hydrological or climate modeling of the Amazon. It is also a first step toward the development of such database at the global scale.

  7. Hyper-Resolution Global Land Surface Model at Regional-to-Local Scales with observed Groundwater data assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Raj Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling groundwater is challenging: it is not readily visible and is difficult to measure, with limited sets of observations available. Even though groundwater models can reproduce water table and head variations, considerable drift in modeled land surface states can nonetheless result from partially known geologic structure, errors in the input forcing fields, and imperfect Land Surface Model (LSM) parameterizations. These models frequently have biased results that are very different from o...

  8. Impact of the surface wind flow on precipitation characteristics over the southern Himalayas: GPM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aoqi; Fu, Yunfei; Chen, Yilun; Liu, Guosheng; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2018-04-01

    The distribution and influence of precipitation over the southern Himalayas have been investigated on regional and global scales. However, previous studies have been limited by the insufficient emphasis on the precipitation triggers or the lack of droplet size distribution (DSD) data. Here, precipitating systems were identified using Global Precipitation Mission dual-frequency radar data, and then categorized into five classes according to surface flow from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Interim data. The surface flow is introduced to indicate the precipitation triggers, which is validated in this study. Using case and statistical analysis, we show that the precipitating systems with different surface flow had different precipitation characteristics, including spatio-temporal features, reflectivity profile, DSD, and rainfall intensity. Furthermore, the results show that the source of the surface flow influences the intensity and DSD of precipitation. The terrain exerts different impacts on the precipitating systems of five categories, leading to various distributions of precipitation characteristics over the southern Himalayas. Our results suggest that the introduction of surface flow and DSD for precipitating systems provides insight into the complex precipitation of the southern Himalayas. The different characteristics of precipitating systems may be caused by the surface flow. Therefore, future study on the orographic precipitations should take account the impact of the surface flow and its relevant dynamic mechanism.

  9. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Chromek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  10. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models with different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  11. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei REN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models using different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  12. Real-time observation of initial stages of thermal oxidation on Si(001) surface by using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshigoe, A; Moritani, K

    2003-01-01

    Real-time observation of initial stages of thermal oxidation processes on the Si(001) surface using O sub 2 gas (1x10 sup - sup 4 Pa) was performed by means of the O-1s and Si-2p photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. From the analysis of the time evolution of oxygen uptake curves on the basis of the reaction kinetics model, the oxide-layer growth depending on the surface temperature was categorized by the Langmuir adsorption and the auto-catalytic reaction models, respectively. It was found that the oxidation rates increased with increasing the surface temperature. The time evolution of Si oxidation states depending on the surface temperature was well monitored. We found that the surface temperature enhanced the diffusion and/or migration of adsorbed oxygen and the bulk Si atom. (author)

  13. New Observations of Crustal Plateau Surface Histories, Venus: Implications for Crustal Plateau Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, V. L.

    2005-03-01

    Geohistories documented for four crustal plateaus surface presents challenges to both downwelling and plume hypotheses of plateau formation, and lead to a third hypothesis, plateau formation involving crystallization of a huge lava pond.

  14. ClimoBase: Rouse Canadian Surface Observations of Weather, Climate, and Hydrological Variables, 1984-1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ClimoBase is a collection of surface climate measurements collected in Northern Canada by Dr. Wayne Rouse between 1984 and 1998 in three locations: Churchill,...

  15. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    a weak (2002) monsoon. The resultant near-surface thermal inversions also have shown large differences in the life cycle and depth of occurrence between these two winters. Citation: Gopalakrishna, V. V., Z. Johnson, G. Salgaonkar, K. Nisha, C. K...

  16. Sembach AB, Germany (West). Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-28

    TECHICAL APPLIZATIONS CENTER * PART C SURFACE WINDS Presented in this part are various tabulations of surface winds as follows: *1. Extreme Values - Peak...I7 *1______ _____11 2 9! 71TA 1.014.8 8.4 .9 696 696 = I ’ , - x__- -- .4 . 696 696 I ,i ()5921N.. Obo . Me. No. FeN..... Tepro’... R0.INN. 4 . 32 P

  17. Impacts of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric Surface Layer: Simulations and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    than about 5 m s −1 (Makin, Kudryavtsev & Mastenbroek 1995; Banner & Peirson 1998). Ocean boundary layers with vortex force and stochastic breaking...amplitude. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 342, 157–174. Makin, V. K., Kudryavtsev , V. N. & Mastenbroek, C. 1995 Drag of the sea surface. Boundary- Layer Met. 73...to study some of the impacts of fast-moving waves on marine surface layers (e.g., Gent and Taylor 1976; Gent 1977; Li 1995; Kudryavtsev and Makin 2004

  18. Direct Observation of Molecular Preorganization for Chirality Transfer on a Catalyst Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demers-Carpentier, Vincent; Goubert,, Guillaume; Masini, Federico

    2011-01-01

    functional theory calculations reveals the stereodirecting forces governing preorganization into precise chiral modifier-substrate bimolecular surface complexes. The study shows that the chiral modifier induces prochiral switching on the surface and that different prochiral ratios prevail at different...... that continued progress in the area is uncertain. We show that the investigation of heterogeneous asymmetric induction with single-site resolution sufficient to distinguish stereochemical conformations at the submolecular level is finally accessible. A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density...

  19. Global shortwave energy budget at the earth's surface from ERBE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, Francois-Marie; Frouin, Robert

    1994-01-01

    A method is proposed to compute the net solar (shortwave) irradiance at the earth's surface from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data in the S4 format. The S4 data are monthly averaged broadband planetary albedo collected at selected times during the day. Net surface shortwave irradiance is obtained from the shortwave irradiance incident at the top of the atmosphere (known) by subtracting both the shortwave energy flux reflected by the earth-atmosphere system (measured) and the energy flux absorbed by the atmosphere (modeled). Precalculated atmospheric- and surface-dependent functions that characterize scattering and absorption in the atmosphere are used, which makes the method easily applicable and computationally efficient. Four surface types are distinguished, namely, ocean, vegetation, desert, and snow/ice. Over the tropical Pacific Ocean, the estimates based on ERBE data compare well with those obtained from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) B3 data. For the 9 months analyzed the linear correlation coefficient and the standard difference between the two datasets are 0.95 and 14 W/sq m (about 6% of the average shortwave irradiance), respectively, and the bias is 15 W/sq m (higher ERBE values). The bias, a strong function of ISCCP satellite viewing zenith angle, is mostly in the ISCCP-based estimates. Over snow/ice, vegetation, and desert no comparison is made with other satellite-based estimates, but theoretical calculations using the discrete ordinate method suggest that over highly reflective surfaces (snow/ice, desert) the model, which accounts crudely for multiple reflection between the surface and clouds, may substantially overestimate the absorbed solar energy flux at the surface, especially when clouds are optically thick. The monthly surface shortwave irradiance fields produced for 1986 exhibit the main features characteristic of the earth's climate. As found in other studies, our values are generally higher than

  20. Exploring Vesta's Surface Roughness and Dielectric Properties Using VIR Spectrometer and Bistatic Radar Observations by the Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, E. M.; Heggy, E.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; Kofman, W. W.; Russell, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple lines of evidence from NASA's Dawn mission suggest transient volatile presence at the surface of asteroid Vesta. Radar remote sensing is a useful technique for the investigation of volatile content at the surface and shallow subsurface, but requires the use of accurate dielectric and topographic models in order to deconvolve the effect of surface roughness from the total observed radar backscatter. Toward this end, we construct a dielectric model for the dry, volatile-poor case of Vesta's surface to represent average surface conditions, and to assess the expected average range of dielectric properties due to known variations in mineralogy, temperature, and density as inferred from Dawn VIR data. We employ dielectric studies of lunar samples to serve as a suitable analog to the Vestan regolith, and in the case of 10-wavelength penetration depth of X-band frequency radar observations, our model yields ɛ' from 2.5 to 2.6 from the night to dayside of Vesta, and tan δ from 0.011 to 0.014. Our estimation of ɛ' corresponds to specular surface reflectivity of ~0.05. In addition to modeling, we have also conducted an opportunistic bistatic radar (BSR) experiment at Vesta using the communications antennas aboard Dawn and on Earth. In this configuration, Dawn transmits a continuous radar signal toward the Earth while orbiting Vesta. As the Dawn spacecraft passes behind Vesta (entering an occultation), the line of sight between Dawn and Earth intersects Vesta's surface, resulting in a reflection of radar waves from the surface and shallow subsurface, which are then received on Earth for analysis. The geometry of the Dawn BSR experiment results in high incidence angles on Vesta's surface, and leads to a differential Doppler shift of only a few 10s of Hz between the direct signal and the surface echo. As a consequence, this introduces ambiguity in the measurement of bandwidth and peak power of each surface echo. We report our interpretations of each surface echo in

  1. Extended Simulations for the Link Stress and Elevation Control of a Tethered Aerial Robot : Technical Attachment to: “Nonlinear Observer-based Tracking Control of Link Stress and Elevation for a Tethered Aerial Robot using Inertial-only Measurements” presented at 2015 IEEE Intern. Conf. on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), Seattle WA, May 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Tognon, Marco; Franchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Rapport LAAS n° 15028; This document is a technical attachment to the paper: M. Tognon and A. Franchi, “Nonlinear observer-based tracking control of link stress and elevation for a tethered aerial robot using inertial-only measurements,” in 2015 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Seattle, WA, 2015; as an extension of the simulation’s section.

  2. Fluoro-apatite surface composition in aqueous solution deduced from potentiometric, electrokinetic, and solubility measurements, and spectroscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chairat, C.; Oelkers, E.H.; Schott, J.; Lartigue, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    The surface chemistry of fluoro-apatite in aqueous solution was investigated using electrokinetic techniques, potentiometric titrations, solubility measurements, and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. All methods indicate the formation of Ca/F depleted, P enriched altered layer via exchange reactions between H + and Ca 2+ , and OH - and F - at the fluoro-apatite (FAP) surface. Observations suggest that this leached layer has a di-calcium phosphate (CaHPO 4 ) composition and that it controls the apparent solubility of FAP. Electrokinetic measurements yield an iso-electric point value of 1 ± 0.5 consistent with a negatively charged FAP surface at pH ≥ 1. In contrast, surface titrations give an apparent pH of point of zero charge of similar to 7.7, consistent with a positively charged surface at pH ≤ 7.7. These differences are shown to stem from proton consumption by both proton exchange and dissolution reactions at the FAP surface. After taking account for these effects, FAP surface charge is shown to be negative to at least pH 4 by surface titration analysis. (authors)

  3. Probabilistic nowcast of PBL profiles with a single column model and ensemble filter assimilation of surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, D.; Hacker, J. P.

    2009-09-01

    A long-term goal of this work is to find an efficient system for probabilistic planetary boundary layer (PBL) nowcasting that can be deployed wherever surface observations are present. One approach showing promise is the use of a single column model (SCM) and ensemble filter (EF) data assimilation techniques. Earlier work showed that surface observations can be an important source of information with an SCM and an EF. Here we extend that work to quantify the deterministic and probabilistic skill of ensemble SCM predictions with added complexity. Although it is appealing to add additional physics and dynamics to the SCM model it is not immediately clear that additional complexity will improve the performance of a PBL nowcasting system based on a simple model. We address this question with regard to treatment of surface assimilation, radiation in the column, and also advection to account for realistic 3D dynamics (a timely WRF prediction). We adopt factor separation analysis to quantify the individual contribution of each model component to the deterministic and probabilistic skill of the system, as well as any beneficial or detrimental interactions between them. Deterministic skill of the system is evaluated through the mean absolute error, and probabilistic skill through the Brier Skill Score (BSS) and the area under the relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUR). The BSS is further decomposed into both a reliability and resolution term to understand the trade-offs in different components of probabilistic skill. An alternative system based on climatological covariances and surface observations is used as a reference to assess the real utility of the flow-dependent covariances estimated with the ensemble system. In essence it is a dressing technique, whereby a deterministic 3D mesoscale forecast (e.g. WRF) is corrected with surface forecast errors and covariances computed from a distribution of available historical mesoscale forecasts. The adjusted profile

  4. Evaluation of Oceanic Surface Observation for Reproducing the Upper Ocean Structure in ECHAM5/MPI-OM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Better constraints of initial conditions from data assimilation are necessary for climate simulations and predictions, and they are particularly important for the ocean due to its long climate memory; as such, ocean data assimilation (ODA) is regarded as an effective tool for seasonal to decadal predictions. In this work, an ODA system is established for a coupled climate model (ECHAM5/MPI-OM), which can assimilate all available oceanic observations using an ensemble optimal interpolation approach. To validate and isolate the performance of different surface observations in reproducing air-sea climate variations in the model, a set of observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) was performed over 150 model years. Generally, assimilating sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and sea surface height (SSH) can reasonably reproduce the climate variability and vertical structure of the upper ocean, and assimilating SSH achieves the best results compared to the true states. For the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), assimilating different surface observations captures true aspects of ENSO well, but assimilating SSH can further enhance the accuracy of ENSO-related feedback processes in the coupled model, leading to a more reasonable ENSO evolution and air-sea interaction over the tropical Pacific. For ocean heat content, there are still limitations in reproducing the long time-scale variability in the North Atlantic, even if SSH has been taken into consideration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of assimilating surface observations in capturing the interannual signal and, to some extent, the decadal signal but still highlight the necessity of assimilating profile data to reproduce specific decadal variability.

  5. Relationship between pulmonary function and elevated glycated hemoglobin levels in health checkups: A cross-sectional observational study in Japanese participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saigo Baba

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin resistance has been associated with cytokines, including interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha soluble receptor, both of which are elevated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Few studies have investigated the relationship between pulmonary function tests using spirometry (PFT and fasting plasma glucose (FPG or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels in Japanese participants. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between PFT in Japanese people who had health checkups and their FPG or HbA1c levels. In the context of preventative medicine, we intend to connect early detection of COPD to an index of blood sugar. Methods: From August 2013 through March 2014, 1019 participants underwent health checkups. PFT, FPG, and HbA1c measurements were conducted. HbA1c levels were measured according to National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program guidelines. Results: Participants with FPG ≥100 mg/dL and HbA1c ≥5.6% showed a significantly lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s:forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC compared to participants with lower FPG and Hb1Ac levels. Prevalence of FEV1/FVC values <70% in PFT differed significantly depending on sex, age, body mass index, FPG, HbA1c, and smoking habits. Age (≥60 years, HbA1c (≥5.6%, and current or former smoking were associated with FEV1/FVC values <70%. Conclusion: In Japan, HbA1c levels were higher in participants with FEV1/FVC values <70% in PFT than in those with FEV1/FVC ≥70%. In preventive medicine, PFT by spirometry should be performed in elderly participants with elevated HbA1c levels who are current or former smokers.

  6. Observing reduction of 4-nitrobenzenthiol on gold nanoparticles in situ using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoqian; Tan, Enzhong; Lang, Xiufeng; You, Tingting; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Hongyan; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2013-09-14

    In this article, reduction of 4-nitrobenzenthiol (4-NBT) on Au nanoparticles (NPs) was characterized using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Plasmon-driven chemical transformation from 4-NBT dimering into p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB) has been investigated on the surface of Au NPs. The laser power-dependent SERS spectra of 4-NBT on the surface of Au substrates were studied, and show that the laser power has an influence on the SERS signals of 4-NBT on Au NPs and production of DMAB by a plasmon-driven surface-catalyzed chemical reaction tends to be much easier under relative high laser power. Furthermore, we have used simple and efficient Au substrates (gold NPs with a size around 45 nm) exhibiting both catalytic properties and SERS activities to monitor the catalytic reaction of surface catalytic reaction process with borohydride solution. The experiments prove that the nitro-to-amino group conversion could be completed by borohydride at ambient conditions on Au substrates. Illuminated with high laser power, 4-NBT molecules and already formed DMAB molecules are further reduced into 4-aminobenzenthiol (4-ABT) by the addition of borohydride, While with low laser power 4-NBT molecules are transformed into 4-ABT with DMAB as the intermediate, which proves Au NPs are a mild and promising catalyst. Our studies might be helpful in extending the understanding of chemical reactions of 4-NBT and related research as well as providing a new strategy synthesis of azo dyes and anilines.

  7. Observation of topological superconductivity on the surface of an iron-based superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yaji, Koichiro; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Ota, Yuichi; Kondo, Takeshi; Okazaki, Kozo; Wang, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Gu, G D; Ding, Hong; Shin, Shik

    2018-03-08

    Topological superconductors are predicted to host exotic Majorana states that obey non-Abelian statistics and can be used to implement a topological quantum computer. Most of the proposed topological superconductors are realized in difficult-to-fabricate heterostructures at very low temperatures. Here by using high-resolution spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that the iron-based superconductor FeTe 1- x Se x ( x = 0.45, superconducting transition temperature T c = 14.5 K) hosts Dirac-cone type spin-helical surface states at Fermi level; the surface states exhibit an s -wave superconducting gap below T c Our study shows that the surface states of FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 are 2D topologically superconducting, providing a simple and possibly high temperature platform for realizing Majorana states. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G., E-mail: giulia.berti@polimi.it; Calloni, A.; Brambilla, A.; Bussetti, G.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented.

  9. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...... antiferroelectric double layers develop that can be distinguished from the bulk single layer structure. A model is developed that separates the electron density in a contribution from the molecular form factor, and from the structure factor of the mono- and the bilayers, respectively. It shows that (i) the first...

  10. A system suitable for observing surface plasmon in a semi-infinite semiconductor superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yun; Cai Shengshan; Zhou Shixun.

    1987-08-01

    A model of semi-infinite semiconductor superlattice topped with a metal-insulator(M-I-SL) is suggested. A modified Giuliani-Quinn surface plasmon is found. It is interesting to note that the frequency and critical wavelength can be arbitrarily chosen by varying thickness of the insulator. In particular, a new type of surface plasmon with null critical wave vector exists only below the bulk plasmon continuum, and the frequency is directly related to the ratio of thickness of the insulator d to the superlattice spacing a. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  11. Shear induced hexagonal ordering observed in an ionic viscoelastic fluid in flow past a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.A.; Butler, P.D.; Baker, S.M.; Smith, G.S.; Hayter, J.B.; Magid, L.J.; Pynn, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first clear evidence of a shear induced hexagonal phase in a polyionic fluid in flow past a plane quartz surface. The dilute surfactant solution studied is viscoelastic due to the formation and entanglement of highly extended charged threadlike micelles many thousands of A long, which are known to align along the flow direction under shear. Small-angle neutron diffraction data show that in the high shear region within a few tens of microns of the surface these micelles not only align, but form a remarkably well ordered hexagonal array separated by 370 A, 8 times their 46 A diameter

  12. Observed seasonal and interannual variability of the near-surface thermal structure of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R. R.; Ramakrishna, S. S. V. S.

    2017-06-01

    The observed seasonal and interannual variability of near-surface thermal structure of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool (ASWP) is examined utilizing a reanalysis data set for the period 1990-2008. During a year, the ASWP progressively builds from February, reaches its peak by May only in the topmost 60 m water column. The ASWP Index showed a strong seasonal cycle with distinct interannual signatures. The years with higher (lower) sea surface temperature (SST) and larger (smaller) spatial extent are termed as strong (weak) ASWP years. The differences in the magnitude and spatial extent of thermal structure between the strong and weak ASWP regimes are seen more prominently in the topmost 40 m water column. The heat content values with respect to 28 °C isotherm (HC28) are relatively higher (lower) during strong (weak) ASWP years. Even the secondary peak in HC28 seen during the preceding November-December showed higher (lower) magnitude during the strong ASWP (weak) years. The influence of the observed variability in the surface wind field, surface net air-sea heat flux, near-surface mixed layer thickness, sea surface height (SSH) anomaly, depth of 20 °C isotherm and barrier layer thickness is examined to explain the observed differences in the near-surface thermal structure of the ASWP between strong and weak regimes. The surface wind speed is much weaker in particular during the preceding October and February-March corresponding to the strong ASWP years when compared to those of the weak ASWP years implying its important role. Both stronger winter cooling during weak ASWP years and stronger pre-monsoon heating during strong ASWP years through the surface air-sea heat fluxes contribute to the observed sharp contrast in the magnitudes of both the regimes of the ASWP. The upwelling Rossby wave during the preceding summer monsoon, post-monsoon and winter seasons is stronger corresponding to the weak ASWP regime when compared to the strong ASWP regime resulting in greater

  13. An observational and modeling study of impacts of bark beetle-caused tree mortality on surface energy and hydrological cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei Chen; Guo Zhang; Michael Barlage; Ying Zhang; Jeffrey A. Hicke; Arjan Meddens; Guangsheng Zhou; William J. Massman; John Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks have killed billions of trees and affected millions of hectares of forest during recent decades. The objective of this study was to quantify responses of surface energy and hydrologic fluxes 2-3 yr following a spruce beetle outbreak using measurements and modeling. The authors used observations at the Rocky Mountains Glacier Lakes Ecosystem...

  14. Observational Characterization of the Downward Atmospheric Longwave Radiation at the Surface in the City of São Paulo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde Barbaro, E.; Oliveira, A.P.; Soares, J.; Codato, G.; Ferreira, M.J.; Mlakar, P.; Boznar, M.Z.; Escobedo, J.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the seasonal and diurnal variations of downward longwave atmospheric irradiance (LW) at the surface in São Paulo, Brazil, using 5-min-averaged values of LW, air temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation observed continuously and simultaneously from 1997 to 2006 on a

  15. Surface structure of polymers and their model compounds observed by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stocker, W.; Bickmann, B.; Magonov, S.N.; Cantow, H.J.; Lotz, B.; Wittmann, J.C.; Moller, M.; Möller, M.

    1992-01-01

    Results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) of normal alkanes, polyethylene, isotactic polypropylene and of a diblock copolymer are presented. Various types of surfaces - naturally and epitaxially grown on different substrates - have been examined from hundreds of nanometers down to the atomic scale.

  16. Surface magneto-optical and Mössbauer observations of Fe-Al

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirásková, Yvonna; Hendrych, A.; Životský, O.; Buršík, Jiří; Žák, Tomáš; Procházka, I.; Janičkovič, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 276, JUL 1 (2013), s. 68-75 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7AMB12SK009 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Iron aluminides * Surface structure * Magnetic domain * Magneto-optical effect * Mössbauer spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  17. Atlantic City, New Jersey, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-23

    blowing dubt, blowing sand, and dust. Continued on Reverse A-1 - - mtr Blowing spray - This item if reported, is not shown in a separate category on this...ImvioNs OF Twos O M An osomlql i---------------I-l------i.. . . *) CLCTAL CLIMATOLOGY RRANCH &SArETAC SURFACE WINDS AT9 .EATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE

  18. On artifacts in limited data spherical Radon transform: curved observation surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barannyk, Lyudmyla L.; Frikel, Jürgen; Nguyen, Linh V.

    2015-01-01

    We study the limited data problem of the spherical Radon transform in two and three-dimensional spaces with general acquisition surfaces. In such situations, it is known that the application of filtered-backprojection reconstruction formulas might generate added artifacts and degrade the quality...

  19. Observations on the near-surface behaviour of sardinella schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The schooling dynamics and swimming behaviour of sardinella Sardinella maderensis and S. aurita schooling near the surface in Angolan waters were recorded visually, using a calibrated echo integration system and a 95kHz high resolution sonar on board RV Dr Fridtjof Nansen during three cruises; July 1996, May 1997 ...

  20. Direct observation of adhesion and spreading of emulsion droplets at solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresselhuis, D.M.; Aken, van G.A.; Hoog, de E.H.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sensory perception of fat is related to orally perceived in-mouth friction. From this perspective, we investigate adhesion and spreading of emulsion droplets on solid surfaces and connect it to the ability of food emulsions to lower friction. Furthermore, we study what the contribution is of the

  1. Cloud Properties Observed From the Surface and by Satellite at the Northern Edge of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, S. P.; Protat, A.

    2018-01-01

    A Raman depolarization lidar was deployed at Cape Grim, Australia (40.7°S, 144.7°E), at the northern edge of the Southern Ocean from July 2013 to February 2014 from which we determine cloud boundaries, cloud phase, ice virga, and cloud effective top heights. We compare surface-based lidar with results from the raDAR/liDAR (DARDAR) data set within 1,000 km of Cape Grim. DARDAR combines information from the CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instruments. We extract single-layer clouds that are sufficiently thin for signal to be present on the farside of the cloud and which have a liquid cloud top phase. These conditions maximize the likelihood that both surface-based lidar and DARDAR are observing the full vertical extent of the same clouds. Differences in low-level cloud occurrence frequencies for these single-layer clouds reveal that DARDAR underestimates cloud at 0.2-1.0 km altitude by a factor of 3 compared with the surface-based lidar. When multiple cloud decks are present, the underestimate in this altitude region is around 2.5 times. Heterogeneous glaciation observed by the Cape Grim lidar in midlevel stratiform supercooled water clouds is similar to that reported by previous surface-based observations adjacent to the Southern Ocean, with half of these clouds precipitating ice at cloud top temperatures of -20°C. This transition occurs around -15°C in the DARDAR data set, and this difference is likely due to the reduced sensitivity of surface-based lidar in detecting precipitating ice compared with what a surface-based radar could observe.

  2. Near-surface Salinity and Temperature structure Observed with Dual-Sensor Drifters in the Subtropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Volkov, D.; Goni, G. J.; Lumpkin, R.; Foltz, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Three surface drifters equipped with temperature and salinity sensors at 0.2 m and 5 m depths were deployed in April/May 2015 in the subtropical South Pacific with the objective of measuring near-surface salinity differences seen by satellite and in situ sensors and examining the causes of these differences. Measurements from these drifters indicate that water at a depth of 0.2 m is about 0.013 psu fresher than at 5 m and about 0.024°C warmer. Events with large temperature and salinity differences between the two depths are caused by anomalies in surface freshwater and heat fluxes, modulated by wind. While surface freshening and cooling occurs during rainfall events, surface salinification is generally observed under weak wind conditions (≤4 m/s). Further examination of the drifter measurements demonstrates that (i) the amount of surface freshening and strength of the vertical salinity gradient heavily depend on wind speed during rain events, (ii) salinity differences between 0.2 m and 5 m are positively correlated with the corresponding temperature differences for cases with surface salinification, and (iii) temperature exhibits a diurnal cycle at both depths, whereas the diurnal cycle of salinity is observed only at 0.2 m when the wind speed is less than 6 m/s. The amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of temperature at both depths decrease with increasing wind speed. The mean diurnal cycle of surface salinity is dominated by events with winds less than 2 m/s.

  3. A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Bamber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new bed elevation dataset for Greenland derived from a combination of multiple airborne ice thickness surveys undertaken between the 1970s and 2012. Around 420 000 line kilometres of airborne data were used, with roughly 70% of this having been collected since the year 2000, when the last comprehensive compilation was undertaken. The airborne data were combined with satellite-derived elevations for non-glaciated terrain to produce a consistent bed digital elevation model (DEM over the entire island including across the glaciated–ice free boundary. The DEM was extended to the continental margin with the aid of bathymetric data, primarily from a compilation for the Arctic. Ice thickness was determined where an ice shelf exists from a combination of surface elevation and radar soundings. The across-track spacing between flight lines warranted interpolation at 1 km postings for significant sectors of the ice sheet. Grids of ice surface elevation, error estimates for the DEM, ice thickness and data sampling density were also produced alongside a mask of land/ocean/grounded ice/floating ice. Errors in bed elevation range from a minimum of ±10 m to about ±300 m, as a function of distance from an observation and local topographic variability. A comparison with the compilation published in 2001 highlights the improvement in resolution afforded by the new datasets, particularly along the ice sheet margin, where ice velocity is highest and changes in ice dynamics most marked. We estimate that the volume of ice included in our land-ice mask would raise mean sea level by 7.36 m, excluding any solid earth effects that would take place during ice sheet decay.

  4. Comparison of Thermodynamic Predictions and Experimental Observations on B Additions in Powder-Processed Ni-Based Superalloys Containing Elevated Concentrations of Nb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Stoichko; Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Sun, Eugene; Tin, Sammy

    2018-03-01

    Boron additions to Ni-based superalloys are considered to be beneficial to the creep properties of the alloy, as boron has often been reported to increase grain boundary cohesion, increase ductility, and promote the formation of stable boride phases. Despite the importance, it is not well understood whether these improvements are associated with the presence of elemental boron or stable borides along the grain boundaries. In this investigation, two experimental powder-processed Ni-based superalloys containing elevated levels of Nb were found to exhibit increased solubility for B in the γ matrix when compared to similar commercial Ni-based superalloys. This resulted in an overall lower B concentration at grain boundaries that suppressed boride formation. As the predictive capability of CALPHAD database models for Ni-based superalloys have improved over the years, some discrepancies may still persist around compositionally heterogeneous features such as grain boundaries. Improved quantification of the characteristic partitioning of B as a function of the bulk alloy composition is required for understanding and predicting the stability of borides.

  5. Transitioning MODIS to VIIRS observations for Land: Surface Reflectance results, Status and Long-term Prospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermote, E.

    2015-12-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products from VIIRS and as with MODIS, is used in developing several higher-order land products. The VIIRS Surface Reflectance (SR) IP is based on the heritage MODIS Collection 5 product (Vermote et al. 2002). The quality and character of surface reflectance depends on the accuracy of the VIIRS Cloud Mask (VCM) and aerosol algorithms and of course on the adequate calibration of the sensor. Early evaluation of the VIIRS SR product in the context of the maturity of the operational processing system known as the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), has been a major focus of work to-date, but is now evolving into the development of a VIIRS suite of Climate Data Records produced by the NASA Land Science Investigator Processing System (SIPS). We will present the calibration performance and the role of the surface reflectance in calibration monitoring, the performance of the cloud mask with a focus on vegetation monitoring (no snow conditions), the performance of the aerosol input used in the atmospheric correction with quantitative results of the performance of the SR product over AERONET sites. Based on those elements and further assessment, we will address the readiness of the SR product for the production of higher-order land products such as Vegetation Indices, Albedo and LAI/FPAR, the its application to agricultural monitoring and in particular the integration of VIIRS data into the global agricultural monitoring (GLAM) system developed at UMd. Finally from the lessons learned, we will articulate a set of critical recommendations to ensure consistency and continuity of the JPSS mission with the MODIS data record.

  6. Minot AFB, North Dakota. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Responsible Individual: Marianne L. Cavanauigh 22b Telephone: (618)256-2625 22c Office Symbol: USAFETAC/LDD DD FORN 1473UNCLASSIFIED REVIEW AND APPROVAL...document has been reviewed and is approved for publication. FOR THE COMMANDER WALTER S. BURGMANNio r Scientific and Technical Information Program Manager...70TAL NUMBER OF 0O8SE RVA T IONS: QL) GLOBAL CLIMATIOLOG BRANCH PERCENTAGE FREOLENCY OF OCCLRRFNCE OF SURFACE WIND DIRECTION VERSLS WINE SEEU USAFETAC

  7. Observations of discrete energy loss effects in spectra of positrons reflected from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, J.M.; Hulett, L.D.; Pendyala, S.

    1980-01-01

    Surfaces of tungsten and silicon have been bombarded with monoenergetic beams of positrons and electrons. Spectra of reflected particles show energy loss tails with discrete peaks at kinetic energies about 15 eV lower than that of the elastic peaks. In the higher energy loss range for tungsten, positron spectra show fine structure that is not apparent in the electron spectra. This suggests that the positrons are losing energy through mechanisms different from that of the electrons

  8. Observed and predicted sensitivities of extreme surface ozone to meteorological drivers in three US cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Miranda J.; Cooley, Daniel; Hodzic, Alma; Gilleland, Eric; Russell, Brook T.; Porter, William C.; Pfister, Gabriele G.

    2018-03-01

    We conduct a case study of observed and simulated maximum daily 8-h average (MDA8) ozone (O3) in three US cities for summers during 1996-2005. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of a high resolution atmospheric chemistry model to reproduce observed relationships between meteorology and high or extreme O3. We employ regional coupled chemistry-transport model simulations to make three types of comparisons between simulated and observational data, comparing (1) tails of the O3 response variable, (2) distributions of meteorological predictor variables, and (3) sensitivities of high and extreme O3 to meteorological predictors. This last comparison is made using two methods: quantile regression, for the 0.95 quantile of O3, and tail dependence optimization, which is used to investigate even higher O3 extremes. Across all three locations, we find substantial differences between simulations and observational data in both meteorology and meteorological sensitivities of high and extreme O3.

  9. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prabhakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an analysis of combined airborne and ground observations of particulate nitrate (NO3−(p concentrations made during the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality study at one of the most polluted cities in the United States – Fresno, CA – in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV and focuses on developing an understanding of the various processes that impact surface nitrate concentrations during pollution events. The results provide an explicit case-study illustration of how nighttime chemistry can influence daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations, complementing previous studies in the SJV. The observations exemplify the critical role that nocturnal chemical production of NO3−(p aloft in the residual layer (RL can play in determining daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Further, they indicate that nocturnal production of NO3−(p in the RL, along with daytime photochemical production, can contribute substantially to the buildup and sustaining of severe pollution episodes. The exceptionally shallow nocturnal boundary layer (NBL heights characteristic of wintertime pollution events in the SJV intensify the importance of nocturnal production aloft in the residual layer to daytime surface concentrations. The observations also demonstrate that dynamics within the RL can influence the early-morning vertical distribution of NO3−(p, despite low wintertime wind speeds. This overnight reshaping of the vertical distribution above the city plays an important role in determining the net impact of nocturnal chemical production on local and regional surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Entrainment of clean free-tropospheric (FT air into the boundary layer in the afternoon is identified as an important process that reduces surface-level NO3−(p and limits buildup during pollution episodes. The influence of dry deposition of HNO

  10. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Gouri; Parworth, Caroline L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Kim, Hwajin; Young, Dominique E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Nowak, John B.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Zhang, Qi; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    This study discusses an analysis of combined airborne and ground observations of particulate nitrate (NO3-(p)) concentrations made during the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality) study at one of the most polluted cities in the United States - Fresno, CA - in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and focuses on developing an understanding of the various processes that impact surface nitrate concentrations during pollution events. The results provide an explicit case-study illustration of how nighttime chemistry can influence daytime surface-level NO3-(p) concentrations, complementing previous studies in the SJV. The observations exemplify the critical role that nocturnal chemical production of NO3-(p) aloft in the residual layer (RL) can play in determining daytime surface-level NO3-(p) concentrations. Further, they indicate that nocturnal production of NO3-(p) in the RL, along with daytime photochemical production, can contribute substantially to the buildup and sustaining of severe pollution episodes. The exceptionally shallow nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) heights characteristic of wintertime pollution events in the SJV intensify the importance of nocturnal production aloft in the residual layer to daytime surface concentrations. The observations also demonstrate that dynamics within the RL can influence the early-morning vertical distribution of NO3-(p), despite low wintertime wind speeds. This overnight reshaping of the vertical distribution above the city plays an important role in determining the net impact of nocturnal chemical production on local and regional surface-level NO3-(p) concentrations. Entrainment of clean free-tropospheric (FT) air into the boundary layer in the afternoon is identified as an important process that reduces surface-level NO3-(p) and limits buildup during pollution episodes. The influence of dry deposition of HNO3 gas to the surface on

  11. An Anisotropic Ocean Surface Emissivity Model Based on WindSat Polarimetric Brightness Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. F.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Sandeep, S.; Weber, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this research has been to develop a standardized fast full-Stokes ocean surface emissivity model with Jacobian for a wind-driven ocean surface applicable at arbitrary microwave frequencies, polarizations, and incidence angles. The model is based on the Ohio State University (OSU) two-scale code for surface emission developed by Johnson (2006, IEEE TGRS, 44, 560) but modified as follows: (1) the Meissner-Wentz dielectric permittivity (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) replaces the original permittivity, (2) the Elfouhaily sea surface spectrum (1997, JGR, 102, C7,15781) replaces the Durden-Vesecky spectrum (1985, IEEE TGRS, OE-10, 445), but the Durden-Vesecky angular spreading function is retained, (3) the high-frequency portion of the Elfouhaily spectrum is multiplied by the Pierson-Moskowitz shape spectrum to correct an error in the original paper, (4) the generalized Phillips-Kitaigorodskii equilibrium range parameter for short waves is modeled as a continuous function of the friction velocity at the water surface to eliminate a discontinuous jump in the original paper. A total of five physical tuning parameters were identified, including the spectral strength and the hydrodynamic modulation factor. The short wave part of the spectrum is also allowed to have an arbitrary ratio relative to the long wave part. The foam fraction is multiplied by a variable correction factor, and also modulated to allow an anisotropic foam fraction with more foam on the leeward side of a wave. The model is being tuned against multi-year sequences of WindSat and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI) data as analyzed by Meissner and Wentz (2012, IEEE TGRS, 50, 3004) for up to four Stokes brightnesses and in all angular harmonics up to two in twenty five wind bins from 0.5-25.5 m/s and of 1 m/s width. As a result there are 40 brightnesses per wind bin, for a total of 1000 brightnesses used to constrain the modified model. A chi-squared tuning criterion based on error standard

  12. Comparison of ScaRaB, GOES 8, Aircraft, and Surface Observations of the Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Shelly K.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Collins, William D.; Minnis, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Data obtained by the Scanner for Radiation Budget (ScaRaB) instrument on the Meteor 3 satellite have been analyzed and compared to satellite (GOES 8), aircraft (Radiation Measurement System, RAMS), and surface (Baseline Solar Radiation Network (BSRN), Solar and Infrared Observations System (SIROS), and RAMS) measurements of irradiance obtained during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). It is found that the ScaRaB data covering the period from March 1994 to February 1995 (the instrument's operational lifetime) indicate excess absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere in agreement with previous aircraft, surface, and GOES 8 results. The full ScaRaB data set combined with BSRN and SIROS surface observations gives an average all-sky absorptance of 0.28. The GOES 8 data set combined with RAMS surface observations gives an average all-sky absorptance of 0.26. The aircraft data set (RAMS) gives a mean all-sky absorptance of 0.24 (for the column between 0.5 and 13 km).

  13. Safety of prasugrel in real-world patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 1-year results from a prospective observational study (Bleeding and Myocardial Infarction Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquelin, Raoul; Oger, Emmanuel; Filippi, Emmanuelle; Hacot, Jean-Philippe; Auffret, Vincent; Le Guellec, Marielle; Coudert, Isabelle; Castellant, Philippe; Moquet, Benoît; Druelles, Philippe; Rialan, Antoine; Rouault, Gilles; Boulanger, Bertrand; Treuil, Josiane; Leurent, Guillaume; Bedossa, Marc; Boulmier, Dominique; Avez, Bertrand; Gilard, Martine; Le Breton, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapies, including prasugrel, are a cornerstone in the treatment of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but are associated with a bleeding risk. This risk has been evaluated in randomized trials, but few data on real-world patients are available. To evaluate prasugrel safety in real-world patients with STEMI. Consecutive patients with STEMI were recruited over 1 year. Follow-up was done at 3 months and 1 year to evaluate prasugrel safety from hospital discharge to the STEMI anniversary date. The primary outcome was occurrence of any major bleeding according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) 3 or 5 definitions, or minor bleeding according to the BARC 2 definition. Overall, 1083 patients were recruited. Compared to patients treated with aspirin+clopidogrel, patients treated with aspirin+prasugrel had fewer BARC 3 or 5 bleedings (two [0.4%] patients vs. nine [1.8%] patients; P=0.04), but more BARC 2 bleedings (45 [9.3%] patients vs. 20 [4.0%] patients; P<0.001). The baseline characteristics of prasugrel- and clopidogrel-treated patients differed because the former were carefully selected (younger, higher body mass index, less frequent history of stroke). In the overall population, rates of in-hospital and out-of-hospital major bleeding were 2.6% (n=28) and 1.3% (n=13), respectively. The rate of major bleeding, particularly out-of-hospital bleeding, in patients treated with prasugrel is low within 1 year after a STEMI. Accurate selection of patient candidates for prasugrel is likely to have reduced the risk of bleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation of calcite, chalk, and coccoliths-do we observe the mineral surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Hem, Caroline Piper; Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    broadening from macroscopic dielectric effects. We detect water adsorbed on the high surface area synthetic calcite, which permits observation of the chemistry of thin liquid films on calcite using transmission infrared spectroscopy. The combination of infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory also...... asymmetric for the coccoliths and the synthetic calcite prepared using the carbonation method. It can be very well fitted by two peaks: a narrow Lorenzian at lower frequency and a broader Gaussian at higher frequency. These two samples both have a high specific surface area. Density functional theory...

  15. Far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool surface salinity variability observed by SMOS and Aquarius sensors over the period 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Alory, Gael; Maes, Christophe; Illig, Serena; Chapron, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) deduced from SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D satellite missions are analyzed over the period 2010-2012 in the Far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool. The lowest values of salinity in surface layers (migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over Central America (Alory et al., 2012). During the boreal winter, as the ITCZ moves southward, the north-easterly Panama gap wind creates a south-westward jet-like current in its path with a dipole of Ekman pumping/eddies on its flanks. As a result, upwelling in the Panama Bight brings cold and salty waters to the surface which erode the fresh pool on its eastern side while surface currents stretch the pool westward. The present study focuses on the fresh pool patterns ranging from the seasonal and interannual variability over the last 3 year period. Each year, satellite SSS products reveal the erosion of the fresh pool by the Panama upwelling. Compared to the SSS climatology from the World Ocean Atlas, satellite SSS data systematically exhibit fresher surface water (by ~0.5 to 1 unit in SSS) just after the occurrence of the maximum SSS reached in the region during the Panama upwelling events (April-May). Using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, we found that these fresh anomalies coincide with local excess precipitation. Moreover, except during the boreal winter 2011, saltier surface waters than in the climatology were observed during the intensification phase of the Panama upwelling events (Fev-March). Using ASCAT sensor surface winds, TRMM data, surface current deduced from altimeter data combined with the satellite SSS, the study will analyze how these observed SSS anomalies could be related to the interannual variability in the dominant physical mechanisms involved in the freshpool dynamics. A particular focus will be set on the consistency between SMOS and Aquarius observations and on the potential role of the surface freshwater

  16. Analyzing the uncertainty of ensemble-based gridded observations in land surface simulations and drought assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadalipour, Ali; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2017-12-01

    Hydrologic modeling is one of the primary tools utilized for drought monitoring and drought early warning systems. Several sources of uncertainty in hydrologic modeling have been addressed in the literature. However, few studies have assessed the uncertainty of gridded observation datasets from a drought monitoring perspective. This study provides a hydrologic modeling oriented analysis of the gridded observation data uncertainties over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) and its implications on drought assessment. We utilized a recently developed 100-member ensemble-based observed forcing data to simulate hydrologic fluxes at 1/8° spatial resolution using Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, and compared the results with a deterministic observation. Meteorological and hydrological droughts are studied at multiple timescales over the basin, and seasonal long-term trends and variations of drought extent is investigated for each case. Results reveal large uncertainty of observed datasets at monthly timescale, with systematic differences for temperature records, mainly due to different lapse rates. The uncertainty eventuates in large disparities of drought characteristics. In general, an increasing trend is found for winter drought extent across the PNW. Furthermore, a ∼3% decrease per decade is detected for snow water equivalent (SWE) over the PNW, with the region being more susceptible to SWE variations of the northern Rockies than the western Cascades. The agricultural areas of southern Idaho demonstrate decreasing trend of natural soil moisture as a result of precipitation decline, which implies higher appeal for anthropogenic water storage and irrigation systems.

  17. Satellite observations of rainfall effect on sea surface salinity in the waters adjacent to Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chung-Ru; Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Chen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2017-10-01

    Changes of oceanic salinity are highly related to the variations of evaporation and precipitation. To understand the influence of rainfall on the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the waters adjacent to Taiwan, satellite remote sensing data from the year of 2012 to 2014 are employed in this study. The daily rain rate data obtained from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR), and WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer. The SSS data was derived from the measurements of radiometer instruments onboard the Aquarius satellite. The results show the average values of SSS in east of Taiwan, east of Luzon and South China Sea are 33.83 psu, 34.05 psu, and 32.84 psu, respectively, in the condition of daily rain rate higher than 1 mm/hr. In contrast to the rainfall condition, the average values of SSS are 34.07 psu, 34.26 psu, and 33.09 psu in the three areas, respectively at no rain condition (rain rate less than 1 mm/hr). During the cases of heavy rainfall caused by spiral rain bands of typhoon, the SSS is diluted with an average value of -0.78 psu when the average rain rate is higher than 4 mm/hr. However, the SSS was increased after temporarily decreased during the typhoon cases. A possible reason to explain this phenomenon is that the heavy rainfall caused by the spiral rain bands of typhoon may dilute the sea surface water, but the strong winds can uplift the higher salinity of subsurface water to the sea surface.

  18. Observations of the sub-inertial, near-surface East India Coastal Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Shankar, D.; Aparna, S. G.; Mukherjee, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present surface current measurements made using two pairs of HF (high-frequency) radars deployed on the east coast of India. The radar data, used in conjunction with data from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements on the shelf and slope off the Indian east coast, confirm that the East India Coastal Current (EICC) flows poleward as a deep current during February-March. During the summer monsoon, when the EICC flows poleward, and October-December, when the EICC flows equatorward, the current is shallow (ADCP data does not always extend to the surface. Even within the seasons, however, the poleward and equatorward flows show variability at periods of the order of 20-45 days, implying that the EICC direction is the same over the top ∼100 m for short durations. The high spatial resolution of the HF radar data brings out features at scales shorter than those resolved by the altimeter and the high temporal resolution captures short bursts that are not captured in satellite-derived estimates of surface currents. The radar data show that the EICC, which is a boundary current, leaves a strong imprint on the current at the coast. Since the EICC is known to be affected significantly by remote forcing, this correlation between the boundary and nearshore current implies the need to use large-domain models even for simulating the nearshore current. Comparison with a simulation by a state-of-the-art Ocean General Circulation Model, run at a resolution of 0.1 ° × 0.1 ° , shows that the model is able to simulate only the low-frequency variability.

  19. Passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer: 2. Observations and simulations of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, K.; Kukulka, T.; Proskurowski, G.; Law, K. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is the second of a two-part series that investigates passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL). The first part examines the influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical tracer distributions, based on large eddy simulations (LESs) of the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. Motivated by observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD), this study applies the LES model and the parametric one-dimensional column model from part one to examine the vertical distributions of MPMD. MPMD is widely distributed in vast regions of the subtropical gyres and has emerged as a major open ocean pollutant whose distribution is subject to upper ocean turbulence. The models capture shear-driven turbulence, Langmuir turbulence (LT), and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BWs). Model results are only consistent with observations of MPMD profiles and the relationship between surface concentrations and wind speed if LT effects are included. Neither BW nor shear-driven turbulence is capable of deeply submerging MPMD, suggesting that the observed vertical MPMD distributions are a characteristic signature of wave-driven LT. Thus, this study demonstrates that LT substantially increases turbulent transport in the OSBL, resulting in deep submergence of buoyant tracers. The parametric model is applied to 11 years of observations in the North Atlantic and North Pacific subtropical gyres to show that surface measurements substantially underestimate MPMD concentrations by a factor of 3-13.

  20. Malmstrom AFB, Montana. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    for ALL WRKINR surface inds, all years cobined, by: (i) An ual - all bours oobl4ed, (9) BY mAth - all hours oomblned, and (3) BY mth - by standard 3... clIL . .5 .1I~ 1 I A.2 1 ’ 4 o 𔃾𔃼 1t !Q/ 37 3~ 1. 2.4 . 42 4 37 1-4/ 33. 1 .79 *9 2.7 .14, 43 6- : ~ / 7 9 .2 1.11 2.c5 .6 𔃿 4" 56 31, ’/ 2’ . 1.7

  1. Direct observation of surface mode excitation and slow light coupling in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V.S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to systematically study the properties of guided modes in linear and slow-light regimes of silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with different terminations of the photonic lattice. High quality SNOM images...... are obtained for light at telecom wavelengths propagating in the PhCW, demonstrating directly, for the first time to our knowledge, drastic widening of the PhCW guided mode in the slow-light regime and excitation of surface waves at the PhCW interface along with their feeding into the guided mode...

  2. Quality assessment of spaceborne sea surface salinity observations over the northern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia; Sena Martins, Meike; Serra, Nuno; Stammer, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Spaceborne sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements provided by the European Space Agency's (ESA) "Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity" (SMOS) and the National Aeronautical Space Agency's (NASA) "Aquarius/SAC-D" missions, covering the period from May 2012 to April 2013, are compared against in situ salinity measurements obtained in the northern North Atlantic between 20°N and 80°N. In cold water, SMOS SSS fields show a temperature-dependent negative SSS bias of up to -2 g/kg for temperatures associated sampling errors there.

  3. Recognition processes at a functionalized lipid surface observed with molecular resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaknin, D.; Als-Nielsen, J.; Piepenstock, M.

    1991-01-01

    The specific binding of proteins to functionalized lipid monolayers on aqueous subphases was characterized by neutron reflectivity and fluorescence microscopy measurements. Due to the high affinity and high specificity of their noncovalent interaction, streptavidin (SA) and biotin (vitamin H) were...... with each protein molecule. Quantitative binding was found to occur at biotin surface concentrations as low as 1 molecule/1,250 angstrom 2 (compared with approximately 1 molecule/40 angstrom 2 for dense packing). This study demonstrates the application of a promising new tool for the systematic...

  4. Microscopic observation of zenithal bistable switching in nematic devices with different surface relief structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uche, C; Elston, S J; Parry-Jones, L A

    2005-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystals have been shown to exhibit zenithal electro-optic bistability in devices containing sinusoidal and deformed sinusoidal gratings. Recently it has been shown that zenithal bistable states can also be supported at isolated edges of square gratings. In this paper, we present microscopic observations of bistability in cells containing sinusoidal gratings and long-pitch square gratings. We have also investigated a novel display based on square wells. High frame-rate video microscopy was used to obtain time-sequenced images when the devices were switched with monopolar pulses. These show that zenithal bistable switching can occur by two different processes: (i) domain growth (observed in cells containing sinusoidal gratings) and (ii) homogenous switching (observed in cells containing isolated edges

  5. Direct observations of surface water-groundwater interaction using electrical resistivity tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noell, Ursula; Wießner, Claudia; Ganz, Christina; Westhoff, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography is a helpful tool to observe the infiltration process in and through the soil. Array 3-D measurements and 3-D inversion schemes are required for reliable interpretation of heterogeneous subsurface structures. Smoothing of the inversion can be minimized by using

  6. Global land-surface evaporation estimated from satellite-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miralles, D.G.; Holmes, T.R.H.; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Gash, J.H.C.; Meesters, A.G.C.A.; Dolman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a new strategy to derive evaporation from satellite observations. The approach uses a variety of satellite-sensor products to estimate daily evaporation at a global scale and 0.25 degree spatial resolution. Central to this methodology is the use of the Priestley and Taylor (PT)

  7. Global land-surface evaporation estimated from satellite-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miralles, D.G.; Holmes, T.R.H.; De Jeu, R.A.M.; Gash, J.H.C.; Dolman, A.J.; Meesters, A.G.C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines a new strategy to derive evaporation from satellite observations. The approach uses a variety of satellite-sensor products to estimate daily evaporation at a global scale and 0.25 degree spatial resolution. Central to this methodology is the use of the Priestley and Taylor (PT)

  8. Observations of Lagrangian transport in the Adriatic Sea from GPS-tracked surface drifters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Daniel Frazier

    2014-01-01

    While most large-scale studies of population connectivity use numerical ocean model output to compute statistics of thousands of virtual particles, large uncertainties persist as models have limited spatial resolution and often do not reproduce observed ocean variability. Furthermore, scale-depen...

  9. Thule AB, Greenland. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-18

    Blowing spray - This item if reported, is not shorn in a separate category on this form but Is included In the computation Percentage of Observations with...sj32F 67F 73F -11f glF Totl Dry Bulb Wet Bulb S Dew Poeint GLCBAL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH USArETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY AT9 WEATHER SERVICE/MAC 1A, Twilr

  10. Modeling surface deformation observed with synthetic aperture radar interferometry at Campi Flegrei caldera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundgren, P.; Usai, S.; Sansosti, E.; Lanari, R.; Tesauro, M.; Fornaro, G.; Berardino, P.

    2001-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometry of Campi Flegrei caldera, Italy, reveals a pattern of subsidence during the period 1993–1998. Interferograms spanning the first half of the observation period (1993–1995) have a lower amplitude and average rate of subsidence than those spanning either the second half

  11. Direct Observation of Asperity Deformation of Specimen with Random Rough Surface in Upsetting Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azushima, A.; Kuba, S.; Tani, S.

    2004-01-01

    The trapping behavior of liquid lubricant and contact behavior of asperities at the workpiece-tool interface during upsetting and indentation are observed directly using a compression subpress which consists of a transparent die made of sapphire, a microscope with a CCD camera and a video system....

  12. Field Observation on Seed Arrival into Surface Layers of Sand Bars after Several Floods in Kinugawa River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Oishi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Kazuaki; Ohmura, Sohei; Iimura, Hayata

    2017-04-01

    This presentation gives the results of field observation on seed arrival into surface layers of sand bars after several floods during 2016 in Kinugawa River, Japan. The seed arrival could be an onset of secondary succession on sand bars, leading to their well-vegetated states after several decades that cause river management issues both on flood disaster prevention and riverine ecosystem alteration. Kinugawa River had the largest record flood in September 9-10, 2015. It resulted in the levee failure and the corresponding flood disaster in Joso City located in the downstream part of Kinugawa River. It also had the large impact on the riverine vegetation environment, resulting in making many sand bars and gravel beds be bare surface states. In order to investigate the very initial state of the seed arrival into the created bare surfaces by small to medium flood events, 3 channel sections with 6 observation points in total were chosen and observed during the rainy season in 2016. A steel ling with a pile was used for measuring the depth of active surface layers on the sand bars during the flood events. The sediments in the active surface layers were sampled for making the grain size accumulation curve as well as for counting the number of seeds within the sample sediments. The results showed that the sample sediments with the smaller mean diameters, ranging around 0.1 - 6.4 mm, kept much more seeds than those with the larger mean diameters over 12 mm. The number of seeds decreases with the small percentile (around 10-20th) in particle diameter rather than the mean diameter. Furthermore, relationships were discussed in detail between the number of seeds, the depth of the active layers, and bed shear stresses calculated by a numerical simulation model.

  13. An Evaluation of Satellite Estimates of Solar Surface Irradiance Using Ground Observations in San Antonio, Texas, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Xia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of solar irradiance at the earth’s surface from satellite observations are useful for planning both the deployment of distributed photovoltaic systems and their integration into electricity grids. In order to use surface solar irradiance from satellites for these purposes, validation of its accuracy against ground observations is needed. In this study, satellite estimates of surface solar irradiance from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES are compared with ground observations at two sites, namely the main campus of the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA and the Alamo Solar Farm of San Antonio (ASF. The comparisons are done mostly on an hourly timescale, under different cloud conditions classified by cloud types and cloud layers, and at different solar zenith angle intervals. It is found that satellite estimates and ground observations of surface solar irradiance are significantly correlated (p < 0.05 under all sky conditions (r: 0.80 and 0.87 on an hourly timescale and 0.94 and 0.91 on a daily timescale, respectively for the UTSA and ASF sites; on the hourly timescale, the correlations are 0.77 and 0.86 under clear-sky conditions, and 0.74 and 0.84 under cloudy conditions, respectively for the UTSA and ASF sites, and mostly >0.60 under different cloud types and layers for both sites. The correlations under cloudy-sky conditions are mostly stronger than those under clear-sky conditions at different solar zenith angles. The correlation coefficients are mostly the smallest with solar zenith angle in the range of 75–90° under all sky, clear-sky and cloudy-sky conditions. At the ASF site, the overall bias of GOES surface solar irradiance is small (+1.77 Wm−2 under all sky while relatively larger under clear-sky (−22.29 Wm−2 and cloudy-sky (+40.31 Wm−2 conditions. The overall good agreement of the satellite estimates with the ground observations underscores the usefulness of the GOES surface solar

  14. Confirmation of Elevated Methane Emissions in Utah's Uintah Basin With Ground-Based Observations and a High-Resolution Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C. S.; Crosman, E. T.; Holland, L.; Mallia, D. V.; Fasoli, B.; Bares, R.; Horel, J.; Lin, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Large CH4 leak rates have been observed in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah, an area with over 10,000 active and producing natural gas and oil wells. In this paper, we model CH4 concentrations at four sites in the Uintah Basin and compare the simulated results to in situ observations at these sites during two spring time periods in 2015 and 2016. These sites include a baseline location (Fruitland), two sites near oil wells (Roosevelt and Castlepeak), and a site near natural gas wells (Horsepool). To interpret these measurements and relate observed CH4 variations to emissions, we carried out atmospheric simulations using the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model driven by meteorological fields simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting and High Resolution Rapid Refresh models. These simulations were combined with two different emission inventories: (1) aircraft-derived basin-wide emissions allocated spatially using oil and gas well locations, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and (2) a bottom-up inventory for the entire U.S., from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). At both Horsepool and Castlepeak, the diurnal cycle of modeled CH4 concentrations was captured using NOAA emission estimates but was underestimated using the EPA inventory. These findings corroborate emission estimates from the NOAA inventory, based on daytime mass balance estimates, and provide additional support for a suggested leak rate from the Uintah Basin that is higher than most other regions with natural gas and oil development.

  15. Satellite observations of surface temperature patterns induced by synoptic circulation over the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensky, Itamar; Dayan, Uri

    2013-04-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) controls most physical and biological processes on Earth. Knowledge of the LST at high spatial resolution enables representation of different climate regimes. The main factors controlling LST are the seasonal and diurnal cycles, land cover, cloud cover, and atmospheric processes at several scales. Lensky and Dayan analyzed atmospheric processes at the topoclimatic scale, and the mesoscale (Lensky and Dayan 2011, 2012). Here we will demonstrate an analysis of the spatial distribution of LST anomaly as affected by typical synoptic circulation patterns over the Eastern Mediterranean (EM). LST anomaly is defined as the difference between daily and climatological LST. Using LST anomaly reduces the effects of land cover and the seasonal and diurnal cycles, enabling a better detection of surface temperature patterns induced by synoptic circulation. In this study we used all available 2000-2012 NASA daily MODIS LST data over the EM, together with NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data of SLP, surface winds and Omega (at 700hPa). We will present two frequent synoptic circulation patterns as classified by Levy and Dayan (2008) to demonstrate the LST patterns induced by synoptic circulation over the EM. The first is the "Red Sea Trough" (RST) with eastern axis, which is an extension of a low surface pressure from a tropical depression toward the Red Sea, penetrating up north as far as Turkey. It migrates from south to north and mostly frequent during the autumn. The axis of the RST separates distinctively between regions of positive (warm) anomalies over Turkey and regions of negative anomalies (cold) over Egypt induced by the wind flow from both sides of the axis. The second synoptic circulation pattern is "shallow Cyprus low to the north", which is a disturbance of the polar front extending southward. This synoptic system some times migrates over the Mediterranean eastward toward the EM during the winter season. The strong northwesterly flow featuring the

  16. Visibility of lunar surface features - Apollo 14 orbital observations and lunar landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziedman, K.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an in-flight visibility test conducted during the Apollo 14 mission for the purpose of validating and extending the mathematical visibility models used previously in the course of the Apollo program to examine the constraints on descent operations imposed by lunar visibility limitations. Following a background review of the effects on mission planning of the visibility limitations due to downsun lunar surface detail 'washout' and a discussion of the visibility prediction techniques previously used for studying lunar visibility problems, the visibility test rationale and procedures are defined and the test results presented. The results appear to confirm the validity of the visibility prediction techniques employed in lunar visibility problem studies. These results provide also a basis for improving the accuracy of the prediction techniques by appropriate modifications.

  17. Taipei IAP, Taiwan. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-09-07

    AN & AN 4 1 71 S.~ ,, v,(, ,a,.i ,,s,-.* ’., - a *.1 ’ { " La . i’I’ [ __ ’ 64, TOTALS ’" a ,i . , <,* 0’, ii 𔃾 1210 WS FORM 0-10-5 (OL, 1, PREVIOUS...TOTA NUBE OP5 OBS3RVATIONS A 22 N6 Fb 6 3 1 USAFETAC FOM 0-8-S (0. A) PREAIOS EDITION$ Of THIS FORM ARE OBSOLETE vV TAe C/usA SURFACE WINDS tIi .EAr E4...U7 2.1j 2___0 .7__ .11__ 10. SE -4 9 A 1 .1 ~7 S ! SSW EIt 0-- LA )IVIU DTOS0 l~ OT T UT S(44. 2 . WS . r)ATA PRUCFSS!IN, ’IRANC’S<RA FTAC/USA

  18. Eddy covariance observations of surface leakage during shallow subsurface CO2 releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Fischer, Marc L.; Pan, Lehua; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Dobeck, Laura; Spangler, Lee

    2009-06-01

    We tested the ability of eddy covariance (EC) to detect, locate, and quantify surface CO2 flux leakage signals within a background ecosystem. For 10 days starting on 9 July 2007, and for 7 days starting on 3 August 2007, 0.1 (Release 1) and 0.3 (Release 2) t CO2 d-1, respectively, were released from a horizontal well ˜100 m in length and ˜2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, Montana. An EC station measured net CO2 flux (Fc) from 8 June 2006 to 4 September 2006 (mean and standard deviation = -12.4 and 28.1 g m-2 d-1, respectively) and from 28 May 2007 to 4 September 2007 (mean and standard deviation = -12.0 and 28.1 g m-2 d-1, respectively). The Release 2 leakage signal was visible in the Fc time series, whereas the Release 1 signal was difficult to detect within variability of ecosystem fluxes. To improve detection ability, we calculated residual fluxes (Fcr) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from Fc. Fcr had reduced variability and lacked the negative bias seen in corresponding Fc distributions. Plotting the upper 90th percentile Fcr versus time enhanced the Release 2 leakage signal. However, values measured during Release 1 fell within the variability assumed to be related to unmodeled natural processes. Fcr measurements and corresponding footprint functions were inverted using a least squares approach to infer the spatial distribution of surface CO2 fluxes during Release 2. When combined with flux source area evaluation, i