WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface electronic structures

  1. Unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Dowben, P.A.; Ortega, J.E.; Himpsel, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) was investigated with high-resolution inverse-photoemission spectroscopy. An empty surface state near E F is observed at bar Γ. Two other surface-sensitive features are also revealed at 1.2 and 3.1 eV above the Fermi level. Hydrogen adsorption on Gd surfaces was used to distinguish the surface-sensitive features from the bulk features. The unoccupied bulk-band critical points are determined to be Γ 3 + at 1.9 eV and A 1 at 0.8 eV

  2. Atomic and electronic structures of novel silicon surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.H. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The modification of silicon surfaces is presently of great interest to the semiconductor device community. Three distinct areas are the subject of inquiry: first, modification of the silicon electronic structure; second, passivation of the silicon surface; and third, functionalization of the silicon surface. It is believed that surface modification of these types will lead to useful electronic devices by pairing these modified surfaces with traditional silicon device technology. Therefore, silicon wafers with modified electronic structure (light-emitting porous silicon), passivated surfaces (H-Si(111), Cl-Si(111), Alkyl-Si(111)), and functionalized surfaces (Alkyl-Si(111)) have been studied in order to determine the fundamental properties of surface geometry and electronic structure using synchrotron radiation-based techniques.

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  4. The surface electronic structure of Y(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, C.

    1998-12-01

    Yttrium has been grown epitaxially on W(110). The growth was monitored by using photoemission spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. The film thickness has been gauged by the attenuation of the W 4f 7/2 bulk component. The films have been grown reproducibly and show a prominent surface state which is indicative of good order and low contamination. Angle-Resolved Ultra-Violet Photoemission Spectroscopy has been used to examine the valence band of these ultra-thin films. The films show a very different structure to the valence band of a bulk crystal of yttrium. The differences have been investigated by a series of model calculations using the LMASA-46 tight-binding LMTO program. The calculations suggest that the ultra-thin film surface state may be hybridised with a tungsten orbital having (x 2 - y 2 ) character. (author)

  5. Structural and electronic properties of hydrosilylated silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumer, A.

    2005-11-15

    The structural and electronic properties of alkyl-terminated Si surfaces prepared by thermallyinduced hydrosilylation have been studied in detail in the preceding chapters. Various surfaces have been used for the functionalization ranging from crystalline Si over amorphous hydrogenated Si to nanoscaled materials such as Si nanowires and nanoparticles. In each case, the alkyl-terminated surfaces have been compared to the native oxidized and H-terminated surfaces. (orig.)

  6. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  7. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  8. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  9. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudikov, D.A.; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  10. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This thesis constitutes a comprehensive study of the surface physics of epitaxial CuInSe 2 films. It comprises analyses of the surface morphology and reconstruction, electronic band structure as well as hetero-junctions relevant to photovoltaic applications. Therefore, especially the aspect of stoichiometry variation from the CuInSe 2 to the copper-deficient defect phases was considered. Preparation and analysis was completely performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions in order to ensure the investigation of well-defined samples free of contaminants. For some of the analysis techniques, single-crystalline samples are indispensable: They allow for the determination of surface periodicity by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). In combination with concentration depth profiling by angle-resolved x-ray photoemission, to types of surface reconstructions could be distinguished for the near-stoichiometric CuInSe 2 (112) surface. In the copper-rich case, it is stabilized by Cu In anti-site defects and on the indium-rich side by 2 V Cu defects, as predicted by surface total energy calculations by Jaffe and Zunger. Both configurations correspond to a c(4 x 2) reconstruction of the zinc blende type (111) surface. For the defect compound CuIn 3 Se 5 , a sphalerite order of the surface was found, which points at a weakening or absence of the chalcopyrite order in the bulk of the material. The unusual stability of the (112) surface could also be proven by comparison with the reconstruction and surface order of (001) and (220) surfaces. The results from surface analysis were used to measure the valence band structure of the epitaxial samples by synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The CuInSe 2 (001) surface gives access to the high symmetry directions Γ-T and Γ-N of momentum space. By contrasting the data obtained for the stoichiometric surface with the copper-poor defect compound, a reduction of the valence band dispersion and a broadening of

  11. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  12. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  13. Surface and interface electronic structure: Three year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3-year activity report covers surface structure and phonon anomalies (surface reconstruction on W(001) and Mo(001), adsorbate lateral ordering, surface Fermi contours and phonon anomalies on Pt(111) and Pd(001)), adsorbate vibrational damping, charge transfer in momentum space: W(011)-K, surface states and resonances (relativistic effects ampersand computations, surface resonances)

  14. Relation between surface crystallography and surface electron structure of the superlattice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Igor; Strasser, T.; Schattke, W.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, 2&3 (2003), s. 195-199 ISSN 0218-625X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : surface electron structure * superlattices * one-step photoemission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.586, year: 2003

  15. Effects of electronic correlation, physical structure, and surface termination on the electronic structure of V2O3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, Amanda L.; Li, Jing-bin; Sutter, Eli; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Fernández-Serra, M.-V.

    2012-09-01

    We report on a density functional theory (DFT) study of the electronic structure of vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) in both bulk and nanowire form. In particular, our study focuses on the role of spin polarization and electronic correlations, as computed within the local (spin) density approximation (L(S)DA) and the LDA+U formalism. As expected for a mean-field approach such as DFT, our optimized bulk V2O3 structure is shown to be metallic in nature, while an adequate choice of the Hubbard U parameter (U = 4 eV) is enough to open the band gap, making the system insulating. However, this formalism predicts a nonmagnetic insulator, as opposed to the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic structure, to be the ground state. The electronic structure of the V2O3 nanowire system is more complex, and it strongly depends on the surface termination of the structures. Our results show that non-spin-polarized LDA calculations of 001-grown nanowires are metallic in nature. However, LSDA predicts that some surface terminations are half-metals, with a large band gap opening for one of the spins. When LSDA+U was used to study the nanowire model with a closed-shell oxygen surface termination, we observe insulating behavior with no net magnetic moment, with a 104 meV band gap. This is consistent with the experimentally observed gap recently reported in the literature for similar wires. To experimentally address the surface structure of these nanowires, we perform surface specific nano-Auger electron spectroscopy on as-synthesized V2O3 nanowires. Our experimental results show a higher O:V peak ratio (1.93:1) than expected for pure V2O3, thereby suggesting higher oxygen content at the surface of the nanowires. From our results, we conclude that oxygen termination is likely the termination for our as-synthesized V2O3 nanowires.

  16. Surface Relaxations, Surface Energies and Electronic Structures of BaSnO3 (001) Surfaces: Ab Initio Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slassi, A.; Hammi, M.; El Rhazouani, O.

    2017-07-01

    The surface relaxations, surface energies and electronic structures of BaO- and SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surfaces have been studied by employing the first-principles density functional theory. For both terminations, we find that the upper-layer Ba and Sn atoms move inward, whereas upper-layer O atoms move outward from the surface. Moreover, the largest relaxations are occurred on the first-layer atoms of both terminations. The surface rumpling of BaO-terminated BaSnO3 (001) is slightly less than that of the SnO2-terminated BaSnO3 (001) surface. The surface energies show that both terminated surfaces are energetically stable and favorable. Finally, the surface band gap is slightly decreased for the BaO termination, while it is dramatically decreased for the SnO2 termination.

  17. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  18. Study on surface structures with the aid of slow electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedyanin, V.K.; Mozol'kov, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    A short review is presented on experimental and theoretical data published on slow electron diffraction. The theory of slow electron diffraction on two-dimensional surface structures caused by the presence of an absorbed gas on the surface which has been earlier proposed by the authors is discussed. The model is based on a quantum-statistical model of adsorption on a homogeneous surface. Its application allows one to explain most important aspects of this problem

  19. Calculating the SnS(010) surface electronic structure using the green function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirli, Z. A.

    2011-08-01

    The electronic structure of the (010) surface in a layered SnS semiconductor terminating with Sn and S atomic planes is calculated by the Green function method. The electronic structure of a perfect crystal is calculated according to the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) using Slater s-, p-, and d-orbitals. Defect-induced changes in the density of states and the origin and orbital composition of electronic states in the band gap are discussed.

  20. Surface and interface electronic structure: Sixth year activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    Several productive runs were made on beamline U4A at NSLS. An upgrade of angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer was largely completed on the beamline. Progress was made on studies of surface states and reconstruction on Mo(001) and W(001), and of surface states and resonances on Pt(111)

  1. Self-consistent electronic structure of the contracted tungsten (001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posternak, M.; Krakauer, H.; Freeman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent linearized-augmented-plane-wave energy-band studies using the warped muffin-tin approximation for a seven-layer W(001) single slab with the surface-layer separation contracted by 6% of the bulk interlayer spacing are reported. Surface electronic structure, local densities of states, generalized susceptibility for the surface, work function, and core-level shifts are found to have insignificant differences with corresponding results for the unrelaxed surface. Several differences in surface states between theory and recent angle-resolved photoemission experiments are discussed in the light of new proposed models of the actual unreconstructed surface structure at high temperatures

  2. Electronic Structure of Solids and Their Surfaces and Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    I!*l.7* ser~iccrd--otors and the more iconic I-VII ~nslatT’. Tey servo! yis %_test of calculationp.1 mothods previo-usly ,j s I o n t h c! i1, pr I1I...upper bon -.s, since electrons and holes are not as localized as this mo4el potrays them. The Hartree-Fock calculation and the following correlation

  3. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  4. Magnetite Fe3O4 (111) Surfaces: Impact of Defects on Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Jung Hyun

    2015-08-04

    We present a comprehensive investigation, via first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, of various surface terminations of magnetite, Fe3O4 (111), a major iron oxide which has also a number of applications in electronics and spintronics. We compare the thermodynamic stability and electronic structure among the different surfaces terminations. Interestingly, we find that surfaces modified with point defects and adatoms can be more stable than bulk-like terminations. These surfaces show different surface chemistry, electronic structures and distinctive spin polarization features near the Fermi level from those previously considered in the literature. Our studies provide an atomic level insight for magnetite surfaces, which is a necessary step to understanding their interfaces with organic layers in OLED and spintronic devices.

  5. The electronic structure of anodized and etched aluminum alloy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, W. M.; Averbach, B. L.

    1988-11-01

    Specimens of 6061 and 5052 aluminum alloys which had been anodized and etched by several commonly used procedures were examined by means of bias-reference X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The spectra were compared with those obtained from single crystals of pure aluminum oxides. The chemical shifts observed from the A12p surface oxide lines were interpreted as differences in the Fermi energy levels relative to those in the bulk oxide crystals, and the Fermi energy levels of the surface oxides were thus determined. Using an earlier experimental correlation obtained for values of the point of zero charge (pzc) with Fermi energy levels in aluminum oxide powders, a value of the pzc of the surface oxide was then determined. The surface exhibited the maximum alkalinity, pzc = 8.9, after a caustic etch, and the maximum acidity, pzc = 3.6, after a phosphoric acid anodizing treatment. The significance of these pzc values in the adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys is discussed.

  6. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedenberg, K. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  7. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  8. Electronic and structural characterizations of unreconstructed {0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emtsev, Konstantin

    2009-01-01

    The present work is focused on the characterization of the clean unreconstructed SiC{0001} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers thereon. Electronic properties of SiC surfaces and their interfaces with graphene and few layer graphene films were investigated by means of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Structural characterizations of the epitaxial graphene films grown on SiC were carried out by atomic force microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. Supplementary data was obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.)

  9. Electronic structure of (001) semiconducting MTe surfaces (M = Zn, Cd, Hg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Camacho, A.; Quiroga, L.; Baquero, R.

    1990-01-01

    By using the tight-binding scheme with ten orbitals per atom (SP 3 s * and two spin orientations) the electronic projected bulk band structure, surface band structure (both anion- and cation-terminated surfaces), and the wave-vector-resolved density of states for these II-VI semiconductors are calculated. A quickly convergent iterative technique is employed for calculating the Green function of the actual semi-infinite crystal. This calculational method allows to precise very accurately, the energy of localized surface states. All the materials considered in this work present surface states with energies lying in the fundamental gap as well as surface states in the lenses opened in the projected bulk valence-band continuum. The atomic weight of each surface state is determined. The states in the fundamental gap turn out to be 'bridge-bond'-type states for anion-terminated surfaces and 'dangling-bond'-type states for cation-terminated surfaces. (author)

  10. Characterizing the geometric and electronic structure of defects in the "29" copper surface oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Andrew J.; Hensley, Alyssa J. R.; Zhang, Renqin; Pronschinske, Alex; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2017-12-01

    The geometric and electronic structural characterization of thin film metal oxides is of fundamental importance to many fields such as catalysis, photovoltaics, and electrochemistry. Surface defects are also well known to impact a material's performance in any such applications. Here, we focus on the "29" oxide Cu2O/Cu(111) surface and we observe two common structural defects which we characterize using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and density functional theory. The defects are proposed to be O vacancies and Cu adatoms, which both show unique topographic and spectroscopic signatures. The spatially resolved electronic and charge state effects of the defects are investigated, and implications for their reactivity are given.

  11. Electronic structure and band alignment of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone passivated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Sushobhan; Qi, Yabing; Vertelov, Grigory K.; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Kahn, Antoine; Sturm, James C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we demonstrate that the room-temperature deposition of the organic molecule 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) reduces the surface defect density of the silicon (100) surface by chemically bonding to the surface dangling bonds. Using various spectroscopic measurements we have investigated the electronic structure and band alignment properties of the PQ/Si interface. The band-bending at the PQ-passivated silicon surface is negligible for both n- and p-type substrates, demonstrating a low density of surface defects. Finally we show that PQ forms a semiconducting wide-bandgap type-I heterojunction with silicon.

  12. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  13. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lollobrigida, V.; Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F.; Borgatti, F.; Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G.; Tortora, L.; Stefani, G.; Offi, F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  14. Surface buckling of black phosphorus: Determination, origin, and influence on electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhongwei; Jin, Wencan; Yu, Jie-Xiang; Grady, Maxwell; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Kim, Young Duck; Hone, James; Dadap, Jerry I.; Zang, Jiadong; Osgood, Richard M.; Pohl, Karsten

    2017-12-01

    The surface structure of black phosphorus materials is determined using surface-sensitive dynamical microspot low energy electron diffraction (μ LEED ) analysis using a high spatial resolution low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) system. Samples of (i) crystalline cleaved black phosphorus (BP) at 300 K and (ii) exfoliated few-layer phosphorene (FLP) of about 10 nm thickness which were annealed at 573 K in vacuum were studied. In both samples, a significant surface buckling of 0.22 Å and 0.30 Å, respectively, is measured, which is one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. As direct evidence for large buckling, we observe a set of (for the flat surface forbidden) diffraction spots. Using first-principles calculations, we find that the presence of surface vacancies is responsible for the surface buckling in both BP and FLP, and is related to the intrinsic hole doping of phosphoresce materials previously reported.

  15. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  16. Impact of Surface Treatment on the Structural and Electronic Properties of Polished CdZnTe Surfaces for Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Suleyman; Aqariden, F.; Chang, Y.; Grein, C.; Li, Jin; Kioussis, N.

    2013-11-01

    We present the effects of surface treatments on the structural and electronic properties of chemomechanically polished Cd0.9Zn0.1Te before contact deposition. Specifically, polished CdZnTe (CZT) samples were treated with four distinct chemical etchants: (1) bromine methanol (BM), (2) bromine in lactic acid, (3) bromine in methanol followed by bromine-20% lactic acid in ethylene glycol, and (4) hydrochloric acid (HCl). The surface structure and surface electronic properties were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images showed that three of the four etchants significantly altered the surface morphology and structure of CZT. All etchants created smoother surfaces; however, all except HCl also introduced high densities of defects. HCl was found to not affect the surface structure. XPS measurements indicated that a thick, ˜3 nm to 4 nm, TeO2 layer formed about 1 h after etching; hence, it is very important to process devices immediately after etching to prevent oxide formation.

  17. InN/GaN quantum dot superlattices: Charge-carrier states and surface electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanouni, F.; Brezini, A.; Djenane, M.; Zou, Q.

    2018-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the electron energy spectra and surface states energy in the three dimensionally ordered quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) made of InN and GaN semiconductors. The QDSL is assumed in this model to be a matrix of GaN containing cubic dots of InN of the same size and uniformly distributed. For the miniband’s structure calculation, the resolution of the effective mass Schrödinger equation is done by decoupling it in the three directions within the framework of Kronig-Penney model. We found that the electrons minibands in infinite ODSLs are clearly different from those in the conventional quantum-well superlattices. The electrons localization and charge-carrier states are very dependent on the quasicrystallographic directions, the size and the shape of the dots which play a role of the artificial atoms in such QD supracrystal. The energy spectrum of the electron states localized at the surface of InN/GaN QDSL is represented by Kronig-Penney like-model, calculated via direct matching procedure. The calculation results show that the substrate breaks symmetrical shape of QDSL on which some localized electronic surface states can be produced in minigap regions. Furthermore, we have noticed that the surface states degeneracy is achieved in like very thin bands located in the minigaps, identified by different quantum numbers nx, ny, nz. Moreover, the surface energy bands split due to the reduction of the symmetry of the QDSL in z-direction.

  18. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  19. Electronic structures and adsorption configurations of gold nanoclusters on cerium oxide defect surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Lawrence, Neil; Brewer, Joseph R.; Wells-Kingsbury, James; Ihrig, Marcella; Wang, Gonghua; Cheung, Chin Li; Soo, Yun-Liang

    2012-02-01

    Fluorite-structured cerium oxide (or ceria, CeO2-x, 0 fluorite-structured slab model of defective ceria with a chemical formula corresponding to CeO1.5. The optimized surface structure of this model was found to contain both surface and sub-surface OVDs, similar to those observed in our HRTEM data for low pressure activated nanoceria. Significantly, the model captures comparable reduction in the average Ce-O bond distance and also atomic coordination numbers observed in our EXAFS data. To explore the roles of Au nanoclusters, we adsorbed flat clusters of 3, 4, 9, 10, and 19 Au atoms on ceria slabs, optimized their configurations, and computed the corresponding electronic structures applying first-principle approach. Consequently, we present the density of states results to elucidate the experimentally observed optical property change and s-d hybridization.

  20. Electronic structure at metal-smiconductor surfaces and interfaces: effects of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main concern of this work is the study of the electronic structure at metal and semiconductor surfaces or interfaces, with special emphasis in the effects of disorder and local microstructure upon them. Various factors which determine this structure are presented and those of central importance are identified. A model that allows the efficient and exact calculation of the local density of states at disordered interfaces is described. This model is based on a tight-binding hamiltonian that has enough flexibility so as to allow an adequate description of real solids. The disorder is taken into account by including stochastic perturbations in the diagonal elements of the hamiltonian in a site orbital basis. These perturbations are taken at each layer from a lorentzian probability distribution. An exact expression for the calculation of the local density of states is derived and applied to a model surface built up from a type orbitals arranged in a simple cubic lattice. The effects of disorder on the local densities of states and on the existence of surface Tamm states are studied. The properties of the electronic states with this kind of model of disorder are considered. The self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of the Si(111) - (1x1) surface is presented. The effects of disorder on the electronic properties such as the work function or the position of surface states within the gap are evaluated. The surface of the metallic compound NiSi 2 is also treated. The first self-consistent calculation of the electronic structure of its (111) surface is presented. The electronic structure of the Si/NiSi 2 (111) interfaces is calculated for the two types of junctions that can be grown experimentally. The origin of the difference between the Schottky barrier heights at both interfaces is discussed. The results are compared with available experimental data. The implications of this calculation on existing theories about the microscopic mechanism that causes

  1. Surface structures from low energy electron diffraction: Atoms, small molecules and an ordered ice film on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materer, Nicholas F. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We investigated the surface bonding of various adsorbates (0, S, C2H3 and NO) along with the resulting relaxation of the Pt(111) surface using low energy electron diffiraction (LEED). LEED experiments have been performed on these ordered overlayers along with theoretical structural analysis using automated tensor LEED (ATLEED). The resulting surface structures of these ordered overlayers exhibit similar adsorbate-induced relaxations. In all cases the adsorbate occupies the fcc hollow site and induces an approximately 0.1 A buckling of the metal surface. The three metal atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate are ``pulled`` out of the surface and the metal atom that is not bound to the adsorbate is `pushed`` inward. In order to understand the reliability of such details, we have carried out a comprehensive study of various non-structural parameters used in a LEED computation. We also studied the adsorption of water on the Pt(lll) surface. We ordered an ultra thin ice film on this surface. The film`s surface is found to be the (0001) face of hexagonal ice. This surface is apparently terminated by a full-bilayer, in which the uppermost water molecules have large vibrational amplitudes even at temperatures as low as 90 K. We examined two other metal surfaces besides Pt(111): Ni(111) and Fe(lll). On Ni(111), we have studied the surface under a high coverage of NO. On both Ni(111) and Pt(111) NO molecules occupy the hollow sites and the N-0 bond distances are practically identical. The challenging sample preparation of an Fe(111) surface has been investigated and a successful procedure has been obtained. The small interlayer spacing found on Fe(111) required special treatment in the LEED calculations. A new ATLEED program has been developed to handle this surface.

  2. Effects of surface functionalization on the electronic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Pascoini, A. L.; Knupp, W. G.; Camps, I.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important electronic, mechanical and optical properties. These features may be different when comparing a pristine nanotube with other presenting its surface functionalized. These changes can be explored in areas of research and application, such as construction of nanodevices that act as sensors and filters. Following this idea, in the current work, we present the results from a systematic study of CNT's surface functionalized with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Using the entropy as selection criterion, we filtered a library of 10k stochastically generated complexes for each functional concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%). The structurally related parameters (root-mean-square deviation, entropy, and volume/area) have a monotonic relationship with functionalization concentration. Differently, the electronic parameters (frontier molecular orbital energies, electronic gap, molecular hardness, and electrophilicity index) present and oscillatory behavior. For a set of concentrations, the nanotubes present spin polarized properties that can be used in spintronics.

  3. Surface morphology and electronic structure of halogen etched InAs (1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eassa, N., E-mail: nashwa.eassa@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Murape, D.M. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Betz, R. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (South Africa); Neethling, J.H.; Venter, A.; Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    The reaction of halogen-based etchants with n-InAs (1 1 1)A and the resulting surface morphology and surface electronic structure are investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using the intensity ratio of the unscreened longitudinal optical (LO) phonon to the transverse optical (TO) phonon in the Raman spectrum, a significant reduction in band bending is deduced after exposure of the InAs surface to HCl:H{sub 2}O, Br-methanol and I-ethanol for moderate times and concentrations. These procedures also lead to smooth and defect-free InAs surfaces. The improvements in surface properties are reversed, however, if the concentrations of the etchants are increased or the etch time is too long. In the worst cases, pit formation and inverted pyramids with {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} side facets are observed. The influence of the etchant concentration and etch time on the morphological and electronic properties of the etched surfaces is reported.

  4. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn3N2(0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Wang, Kangkang; Takeuchi, Noboru; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Smith, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Spin-polarized first-principles total energy calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn 3 N 2 (0 0 1) surfaces. It is found that three surface terminations are energetically stable, in agreement with previous scanning tunneling microscopy experiments that have found three different electronic contrasts in their images. It is also found that in all three cases, the topmost layer has a MnN stoichiometry. Density of states calculations show a metallic behavior for all the stable structures with the most important contribution close to the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. Our Tersoff–Hamann scanning tunneling microscopy simulations are in good agreement with previous experimental results.

  5. Investigations of the Electronic Properties and Surface Structures of Aluminium-Rich Quasicrystalline Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, Jason A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    equations. Transport behavior is described in terms of charge carriers and the mean-free time between carrier collisions. It is concluded that the mean-free time is much longer in the periodic direction than in the aperiodic direction. This difference produces the observed anisotropy in thermal transport. The third study presented a detailed analysis of the reversible, sputter-induced phase transformation which occurs on the 5-fold surface of an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) data were collected as a function of annealing temperature and were used to probe surface structure, surface composition, and electronic structure, respectively. The composition and structure of the sputtered surface are consistent with a transformation to the β-Al-Cu-Fe cubic structure, and shows a sharp metallic cut-off in the spectral intensity of the electronic structure at the Fermi edge. Upon annealing the surface reverts to a quasicrystalline composition and structure. This transformation has been correlated with a reduction in the spectral intensity of the electronic structure at the Fermi level. This data clearly demonstrates that the observed reduction is intrinsic to a quasicrystalline surface. It is concluded that this is due to the opening of a pseudo-gap in the electronic density of states as the surface reverts from β-Al-Cu-Fe to quasicrystalline.

  6. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Graphene Using Surface-Adsorbate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    able to achieve relatively good control over the concentration of defects in graphene by introducing oxide impurities into the Ni(111) substrate and...1 Controlling the electronic structure of graphene using surface-adsorbate interactions Piotr Matyba, Adra V. Carr, Cong Chen, David L. Miller...atomic orbitals in graphene on Ni(111) opens a large energy gap of ≈2.8 eV between non-hybridized states at the K-point. Here we use alkali metal

  7. Ultrafast electron dynamics at alkali/ice structures adsorbed on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study the interaction between excess electrons in water ice structures adsorbed on metal surfaces and other charged or neutral species, like alkali ions, or chemically reactive molecules, like chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), respectively. The excess electrons in the ice can interact with the ions directly or indirectly via the hydrogen bonded water molecules. In both cases the presence of the alkali influences the population, localization, and lifetime of electronic states of excess electrons in the ice adlayer. These properties are of great relevance when considering the highly reactive character of the excess electrons, which can mediate chemical reactions by dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The influence of alkali adsorption on electron solvation and transfer dynamics in ice structures is investigated for two types of adsorption configurations using femtosecond time-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. In the first system alkali atoms are coadsorbed on top of a wetting amorphous ice film adsorbed on Cu(111). At temperatures between 60 and 100 K alkali adsorption leads to the formation of positively charged alkali ions at the ice/vacuum interface. The interaction between the alkali ions at the surface and the dipole moments of the surrounding water molecules results in a reorientation of the water molecules. As a consequence new electron trapping sites, i.e. at local potential minima, are formed. Photoinjection of excess electrons into these alkali-ion covered amorphous ice layers, results in the trapping of a solvated electron at an alkali-ion/water complex. In contrast to solvation in pure amorphous ice films, where the electrons are located in the bulk of the ice layer, solvated electrons at alkali-ion/water complexes are located at the ice/vacuum interface. They exhibit lifetimes of several picoseconds and show a fast energetic stabilization. With ongoing solvation, i.e. pump-probe time delay, the electron transfer is

  8. Structural and electronic properties of low-index stoichiometric BiOI surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wen-Wu; Zhao, Zong-Yan, E-mail: zzy@kmust.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    As promising photocatalyst driven by visible-light, BiOI has attracted more and more attention in the past years. However, the surface structure and properties of BiOI that is the most important place for the photocatalytic have not been investigated in details. To this end, density functional theory was performed to calculate the structural and electronic properties of four low-index stoichiometric surfaces of BiOI. It is found that the relaxation of the low-index BiOI surfaces are relatively small, especially the (001) surface. Thus, the surface energies of BiOI are very relatively small. Moreover, there are a few surface states below the bottom of conduction band in the first layer except the (001) surface, which maybe capture the photo-excited carriers. In all of the most stable terminated planes, all the dangling bonds are cleaved from the broken Bi-O bonds. In the case of (001) surface, the dangling bond density of Bi atoms for the (001) surface is zero per square nano. Therefore, the (001) surface is thermodynamically lowest-energy surface of BiOI, and it is the predominant surface (51.4%). As a final remark, the dangling bonds density of bismuth atoms determines not only the surface energy, but also the surface relaxation. Finally, the equilibrium morphology of BiOI was also proposed and provided, which is determined through the Wulff construction. These results will help us to better understand the underlying photocatalytic mechanism that is related to BiOI surfaces, and provide theoretical support for some experimental studies about BiOI-based photocatalyst in future. - Highlights: • Four low-index BiOI surfaces have been calculated by DFT method. • The relaxations of the low-index BiOI surfaces are relatively small. • There are a few surface states below the bottom of conduction band in the first layer. • The dangling bonds density of bismuth atoms determines not only the surface energy, but also the surface relaxation. • The thermodynamic

  9. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2017-02-21

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis1, 2, 3. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation4, 5, 6, 7. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  10. Surface Electronic Structure of Hybrid Organo Lead Bromide Perovskite Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Komesu, Takashi

    2016-08-24

    The electronic structure and band dispersion of methylammonium lead bromide, CH3NH3PbBr3, has been investigated through a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES), as well as theoretical modeling based on density functional theory. The experimental band structures are consistent with the density functional calculations. The results demonstrate the presence of a dispersive valence band in MAPbBr3 that peaks at the M point of the surface Brillouin zone. The results also indicate that the surface termination of the CH3NH3PbBr3 is the methylammonium bromide (CH3NH3Br) layer. We find our results support models that predict a heavier hole effective mass in the region of -0.23 to -0.26 me, along the Γ (surface Brillouin center) to M point of the surface Brillouin zone. The surface appears to be n-type as a result of an excess of lead in the surface region. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  11. Surface composition, chemistry, and structure of polystyrene modified by electron-beam-generated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Evgeniya H; Petrovykh, Dmitri Y; Mack, Paul; Carney, Tim; White, Richard G; Walton, Scott G; Fernsler, Richard F

    2010-06-01

    Polystyrene (PS) surfaces were treated by electron-beam-generated plasmas in argon/oxygen, argon/nitrogen, and argon/sulfur hexafluoride environments. The resulting modifications of the polymer surface energy, morphology, and chemical composition were analyzed by a suite of complementary analytical techniques: contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS). The plasma treatments produced only minimal increases in the surface roughness while introducing the expected chemical modifications: oxygen-based after Ar/O(2) plasma, oxygen- and nitrogen-based after Ar/N(2) plasma, and fluorine-based after Ar/SF(6) plasma. Fluorinated PS surfaces became hydrophobic and did not significantly change their properties over time. In contrast, polymer treated in Ar/O(2) and Ar/N(2) plasmas initially became hydrophilic but underwent hydrophobic recovery after 28 days of aging. The aromatic carbon chemistry in the top 1 nm of these aged surfaces clearly indicated that the hydrophobic recovery was produced by reorientation/diffusion of undamaged aromatic polymer fragments from the bulk rather than by contamination. Nondestructive depth profiles of aged plasma-treated PS films were reconstructed from parallel angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) measurements using a maximum-entropy algorithm. The salient features of reconstructed profiles were confirmed by sputter profiles obtained with 200 eV Ar ions. Both types of depth profiles showed that the electron-beam-generated plasma modifications are confined to the topmost 3-4 nm of the polymer surface, while valence band measurements and unsaturated carbon signatures in ARXPS and REELS data indicated that much of the PS structure was preserved below 9 nm.

  12. Geometric and electronic structure of the Cs-doped Bi2Se3 (0001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrokov, M. M.; Ernst, A.; Mohseni, K.; Fulara, H.; Roy, S.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Ryabishchenkova, A. G.; Kokh, K. A.; Tereshchenko, O. E.; Aliev, Z. S.; Babanly, M. B.; Chulkov, E. V.; Meyerheim, H. L.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Using surface x-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy in combination with first-principles calculations, we have studied the geometric and electronic structure of Cs-deposited Bi2Se3 (0001) surface kept at room temperature. Two samples were investigated: a single Bi2Se3 crystal, whose surface was Ar sputtered and then annealed at ˜500°C for several minutes prior to Cs deposition, and a 13-nm-thick epitaxial Bi2Se3 film that was not subject to sputtering and was annealed only at ˜350°C. In the first case, a considerable fraction of Cs atoms occupy top layer Se atoms sites both on the terraces and along the upper step edges where they form one-dimensional-like structures parallel to the step. In the second case, Cs atoms occupy the f c c hollow site positions. First-principles calculations reveal that Cs atoms prefer to occupy Se positions on the Bi2Se3 (0001) surface only if vacancies are present, which might be created during the crystal growth or during the surface preparation process. Otherwise, Cs atoms prefer to be located in f c c hollow sites in agreement with the experimental finding for the MBE-grown sample.

  13. Structural dynamics of surfaces by ultrafast electron crystallography: experimental and multiple scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sascha; Liang, Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2011-12-07

    Recent studies in ultrafast electron crystallography (UEC) using a reflection diffraction geometry have enabled the investigation of a wide range of phenomena on the femtosecond and picosecond time scales. In all these studies, the analysis of the diffraction patterns and their temporal change after excitation was performed within the kinematical scattering theory. In this contribution, we address the question, to what extent dynamical scattering effects have to be included in order to obtain quantitative information about structural dynamics. We discuss different scattering regimes and provide diffraction maps that describe all essential features of scatterings and observables. The effects are quantified by dynamical scattering simulations and examined by direct comparison to the results of ultrafast electron diffraction experiments on an in situ prepared Ni(100) surface, for which structural dynamics can be well described by a two-temperature model. We also report calculations for graphite surfaces. The theoretical framework provided here allows for further UEC studies of surfaces especially at larger penetration depths and for those of heavy-atom materials. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  14. Surface and Bulk Electronic Structure and Chemisorption Properties of Titanium and Vanadium Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin Eugene

    The unusual electronic properties of Ti _2O_3 and V _2O_3, in particular the metal-insulator transitions which they undergo, have produced widespread interest in the physics of these materials, while the use of titanium and vanadium oxides as catalysts and catalyst supports makes a detailed understanding of their surface properties of great importance. The electronic structure and gas adsorption properties of single crystal titanium and vanadium oxides have been studied here using ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Spatially anisotropic resonant photoemission from 3d states in Ti_2O_3 and V_2O_3 was observed and shown to originate from localised molecular orbitals. This contrasts with an energy analysis of the photoemission data which revealed dispersing, delocalised d-bands in both oxides. A large resonance was observed in the O 2p emission at the cation 3p to 3d absorption edge in Ti_2O _3 which is inconsistent with hybridisation, indicating the possible existence of inter-atomic resonances. The first detailed photoemission observation of metal-insulator transitions in Cr-doped V_2O _3 is reported; large changes in the density of states at the Fermi level are seen at these transitions. The surface electronic structure of single crystal TiO_2, Ti_2O _3 and V_2O _3 was found to be indistinguishable from that of the bulk. The interaction of SO_2 with these oxides was extensively studied since sulfur is a notorious catalyst poison. SO_2 reacts vigorously with the titanium oxides, dissociating in the presence of Ti^{3+} cations to form TiO_2 and TiS _2; in their absence no reaction occurs. Surprisingly, SO_2 reacts very weakly with V _2O_3, adsorbing in both dissociated and molecular form. Additionally, only a weak reaction of H_2S and TiO _2 was found. The electronic structure of these oxides is shown to be extremely complex, displaying both localised and

  15. Fermi surfaces and electronic structure of the Heusler alloy Co2TiSn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickey, M C; Husmann, A; Holmes, S N; Jones, G A C

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of the Heusler alloy Co 2 TiSn is investigated here, with particular attention paid to its potential as a half-metallic ferromagnet. Ab initio calculations are performed using a plane wave pseudopotential code in the framework of density functional theory. These accurate calculations are done with convergence tolerances of 10 -5 and 10 -4 eV on the total energy and Fermi energy, respectively. The alloy is found not to be a half-metal. Minority spin electrons undergo distinctly hole-like dispersion at the Γ point in k space while the majority spin bands are metallic with a multiply connected tube-like Fermi surface. Further, the computed minority band gap and spin polarization at the Fermi level are larger when the calculation is performed using the generalized gradient approximation

  16. Surface characterization and surface electronic structure of organic quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Claessen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We have thoroughly characterized the surfaces of the organic charge-transfer salts TTF-TCNQ and (TMTSF)(2)PF6 which are generally acknowledged as prototypical examples of one-dimensional conductors. In particular x-ray-induced photoemission spectroscopy turns out to be a valuable nondestructive d...

  17. Electronic Structure of Hydrogenated and Surface-Modified GaAs Nanocrystals: Ab Initio Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamsa Naji Nasir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two methods are used to simulate electronic structure of gallium arsenide nanocrystals. The cluster full geometrical optimization procedure which is suitable for small nanocrystals and large unit cell that simulates specific parts of larger nanocrystals preferably core part as in the present work. Because of symmetry consideration, large unit cells can reach sizes that are beyond the capabilities of first method. The two methods use ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory, respectively. The results show that both energy gap and lattice constant decrease in their value as the nanocrystals grow in size. The inclusion of surface part in the first method makes valence band width wider than in large unit cell method that simulates the core part only. This is attributed to the broken symmetry and surface passivating atoms that split surface degenerate states and adds new levels inside and around the valence band. Bond length and tetrahedral angle result from full geometrical optimization indicate good convergence to the ideal zincblende structure at the centre of hydrogenated nanocrystal. This convergence supports large unit cell methodology. Existence of oxygen atoms at nanocrystal surface melts down density of states and reduces energy gap.

  18. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces: Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengio, Silvina

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) √3x √3R30 0 , H 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( √3√3)R30 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was establishing the limits of precision with which one can determine not only the location of the adsorbed hydroxyl (OH) species, but also the extent to which this adsorption modifes the asymmetric dimers of the clean surface to which it is bonded.On the Si(111)(7x7) surface the problem is particularly complex because there are several different potentially active sites for NH3 adsorption and fragmentation.The application of the PhD method, however, has shown that the majority of the N atoms are on so-called 'rest atom' sites when deposited at RT.This is consistent with the N in the NH2 chemical state.This investigation represents the first quantitative structural study of any molecular adsorbate on the complex Si(111)(7x7) surface.This atomic structures determination shows the PhD is a powerful tool for the atomic structure determination.The molecular systems interacting with the active sites of the substrate fragments producing a short-range order surface.This long-range disorder is produced by the

  19. The use of angle resolved electron and photon stimulated desorption for the determination of molecular structure at surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madey, T.E.; Stockbauer, R.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review of recent data related to the use of angle-resolved electron stimulated desorption and photon stimulated desorption in determining the structures of molecules at surfaces is made. Examples include a variety of structural assignments based on ESIAD (electron stimulated desorption ion angular distributions), the observation of short-range local ordering effects induced in adsorbed molecules by surface impurities, and the application of photon stimulated desorption to both ionic and covalent adsorbate systems. (Author) [pt

  20. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  1. Electronic and structural properties of TiB2: Bulk, surface, and nanoscale effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volonakis, George; Tsetseris, Leonidas; Logothetidis, Stergios

    2011-01-01

    Titanium diboride (TiB 2 ), is a widely used hard material that comprises graphene-like layers of B and intercalated Ti atoms. Here we report the results of extensive first-principles calculations on key properties of bulk TiB 2 , TiB 2 surfaces, and TiB 2 nanocrystals (NCs). The computational approach is first validated based on the agreement between calculated structural and electronic properties of bulk TiB 2 and available experimental and theoretical data. We then obtain the formation energies for several surface cuts and use these values to construct TiB 2 NCs based on the Wulff theorem. Finally, we demonstrate by studying the adsorption of small molecules that hydrogen and oxygen adatoms can be attached through strongly exothermic chemisorption reactions on TiB 2 surfaces. Likewise, water molecules bind on various TiB 2 surfaces and NC facets, with an energetic preference for the latter. The results are relevant to applications that depend on reactivity-related TiB 2 properties, for example resistance to corrosion and interactions with water-based solutions.

  2. Study of the Adsorption of Atoms and Molecules on Silicon Surfaces Crystallographics and Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bengio, S

    2003-01-01

    This thesis work has been concerned with adsorption properties of silicon surfaces.The atomic and electronic structure of molecules and atoms adsorbed on Si has been investigated by means of photoemission experiments combined with synchrotron radiation.The quantitative atomic structure determination was held applying the photoelectron diffraction technique.This technique is sensible to the local structure of a reference atomic specie and has elemental and chemical-state specificity.This approach has been applied to three quite different systems with different degrees of complexity, Sb/Si(111) sq root 3x sq root 3R30 sup 0 , H sub 2 O/Si(100)2x1 and NH sub 3 /Si(111)7x7.Our results show that Sb which forms a ( sq root 3 sq root 3)R30 sup 0 phase produces a bulklike-terminated Si(111)1x1 substrate free of stacking faults.Regarding the atomic structure of its interface, this study strongly favours the T4-site milkstool model over the H3 one.An important aspect regarding the H sub 2 O/Si(100)(2x1) system was esta...

  3. Structural, electronic and mechanical properties of inner surface modified imogolite nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Chagas Da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the modified imogolites have been investigated using self consistent charge-density functional-tight binding method with a posteriori treatment of the dispersion interaction (SCC-DFTB-D. The zigzag (12,0 imogolite has been used as the initial structure for the calculations. The functionalization of the interior (12,0 imogolite nanotubes by organosilanes and by heat treatment leading to the dehydroxylation of the silanols were investigated. The reaction of the silanols with the trimethylmethoxysilanes is favored and the arrangement of the different substitutions that leads to the most symmetrical structures are preferred. The Young moduli and band gaps are slightly decreased. However, the dehydroxylation of the silanol groups in the inner surface of the imogolite leads to the increase of the Young moduli and a drastic decrease of the band gap of about 4.4 eV. It has been shown that the degree of the dehydroxylation can be controlled by heat treatment and tune the band gap, eventually, leading to a semiconductor material with well defined nanotube structure.

  4. Structure and properties of titanium surface layers after electron beam alloying with powder mixtures containing carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenivtseva, O.G.; Bataev, I.A.; Golkovskii, M.G.; Bataev, A.A.; Samoilenko, V.V.; Plotnikova, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wear resistant coatings up to 2 mm thick were clad on titanium by an electron beam in air. • The microhardness of the alloys was increased from 2 to 8 GPa due to the formation of TiC particles. • Alloying of titanium increased the abrasive wear resistance of the alloy by a factor of 9.3. - Abstract: The structure and tribological properties of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) samples after non-vacuum electron beam surface alloying with carbon were studied. Two types of powders were used to introduce carbon in surface layer of cp-Ti: titanium carbide (TiC) and mixture of pure titanium and graphite (“Ti + C”). Single layer and multilayer coatings were studied. Application of electron beam for alloying provided cladding rate of 4.5 m 2 /h. The thickness of the clad coatings was 1.6–2.0 mm. The main phases received after “Ti + C” powder cladding were α-titanium, TiC, and retained graphite. In the samples obtained by cladding of TiC, graphite was not observed. A factor determining the microhardness and tribological properties of the cladded layer was the volume fraction of TiC. Maximum coating microhardness of 8 GPa was obtained by cladding of single layer of TiC powder or two layers of the “Ti + C” mixture. Two types of tests were carried out to evaluate the wear resistance of the samples. In friction tests against loose abrasive particles, the wear rate of the best samples was 9.3 times lower than that of cp-Ti. In wear tests using fixed abrasive particles, the relative wear resistance of the best samples was 2.3 times higher than that of cp-Ti.

  5. An Investigation of Ni2P Single Crystal Surfaces : Structure, Electronic State and Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Qiuyi; Ariga, Hiroko; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2015-01-01

    Ni2P has demonstrated high catalytic activity for hydrodesulfurization and has recently been employed as a catalyst in a variety of other reactions. We have thoroughly reviewed the literature concerning Ni2P single crystal surfaces, with the aim of determining the relationship between surface structure and catalytic properties. Published results to date indicate that Ni2P single crystal surfaces exhibit reconstructed structures, and so the bulk terminated structure may not be stable. We have ...

  6. Electron beam induced Hg desorption and the electronic structure of the Hg depleted surface of Hg1/sub -//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, C.K.; Friedman, D.J.; Bertness, K.A.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.; Wilson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and angle-resolved ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) were used to study the electron beam induced Hg desorption from a cleaved (110)Hg/sub 1-//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te surface and the electronic structure of the Hg depleted surface. Solid state recrystallized Hg/sub 1-//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te single crystals were used. It was found that the electron beam heating dominated the electron beam induced Hg desorption on Hg/sub 1-//sub x/Cd/sub x/Te. At the electron beam energy used, the electron beam heating extended several thousand angstroms deep. However, the Hg depletion saturated after a few monolayers were depleted of Hg atoms. At the initial stage of Hg loss (only 3%), the surface band bends upward (more p type). The ARPES spectrum showed the loss of some E vs k dispersion after 22% Hg atoms were removed from the surface region, and no dispersion was observed after 43% Hg atoms were removed. These results have important implications on the electronic structure of the surfaces and interfaces of which the stoichiometry is altered

  7. Electronic ceramic structure within the Voronoi cells model and microstructure fractals contacts surfaces new frontier applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, in order to establish grain shapes of sintered ceramics, new approach on correlation between microstructure and doped BaTiO3 -ceramics properties based, on Voronoi model and mathematical statistics calculations on fractal geometry, has been developed. BaTiO3-ceramics doped with Yb2O3 (from 0.1 to 1.0wt% of Yb were prepared by using conventional solid state procedure and were sintered from 1320°C to 1380°C for four hours. The microstructure of sintered specimens was investigated by Scanning electron microscope JEOL-SEM-5300. For better and deeper characterization and understanding of the ceramics material microstructure, the methods which include the fractal nature structure, and also Voronoi model and mathematical statistics calculations, are applied. In our research the Voronoi is one specific interface between fractal structure nature and different stochastically contact surfaces, defined by statistical mathematical methods. Also, the Voronoi model practically provided possibility to control the ceramics microstructure fractal nature. Mathematical statistic methods enabled establishing the real model for the prognosis based on correlation: synthesis-structures-properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057 i br. III44006

  8. Surface-Bound Molecular Film Structure Effects on Electronic and Magnetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronschinske, Alex M.

    This thesis dissertation will discuss the importance of understanding the driving forces of molecular assembly on surfaces and the need to characterize the electronic and magnetic properties of the resulting organic films. Furthermore, experimental results on model organic molecular assemblies, benzoate on Cu(110) and Fe[(H2BPz2)2bpy] ("Fe-bpy") on Au(111), and their novel film properties will be presented. The primary experimental techniques used in this work are scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM, STS), and so a theoretical characterization of constant current distance-voltage STS (z(V)-STS) will also be developed. Deposition of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) on to Cu(110) will be used to create a diverse molecular environment of benzoate molecules (C6H5COO+). In this film we will utilize structural phases consisting of co-existing orientation (alpha-phase) and uniform molecular orientation (c(8x2) phase) to probe electric potential variation across the surface of the film. Using z( V)-STS find that the electron affinity level of a molecule's near-neighbor will exert a substrate-mediated influence on the energy of the molecule's image potential state; which we describe using a 1-D dielectric continuum model. Motivated by the unique utility of z(V)-STS for gentle probing of molecular electronic structure and electric potential we perform a thorough theoretical characterize of z( V)-STS. We derive a differential equation for simulating z(V)-STS spectra under the standard approximation of a square tunneling barrier. Moreover, we derive an equation for sample density of states (DOS) that is applicable for all modes of STS. The central result of this work for interpretation of z(V)-STS results is a characterization of systematic error between state energy and z(V)-STS peak location, as well we show that empirical normalization procedure for removing background distortion from constant height current-voltage STS, (V/I)dI/dV, is also applicable to z(V)-STS is

  9. Structural and electronic analysis of Hf on Si(1 1 1) surface studied by XPS, LEED and XPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carazzolle, M.F. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: mcarazzo@ifi.unicamp.br; Schuermann, M.; Fluechter, C.R.; Weier, D. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); Berges, U. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); DELTA, Universitaet Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, D44227 Dortmund (Germany); Siervo, A. de [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, C.P. 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Landers, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, C.P. 6192, 13084-971 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Kleiman, G.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6165, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Westphal, C. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D44221 Dortmund (Germany); DELTA, Universitaet Dortmund, Maria-Goeppert-Mayer-Str. 2, D44227 Dortmund (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    In this work, we present a systematic electronic and structural study of the Hf-silicide formation upon annealing on Si(1 1 1) surface. The electronic structure and surface composition were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). To determine the atomic structure of the surface alloy we used low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron diffraction (XPD). It was possible to verify that, after 600 deg. C annealing, there is alloy formation and after 700 deg. C the Hf diffusion process is predominant. Using LEED and XPD measurements we detected the ordered island formation simultaneously with alloy formation.

  10. Electronic and structural characterizations of unreconstructed {l_brace}0001{r_brace} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emtsev, Konstantin

    2009-06-03

    The present work is focused on the characterization of the clean unreconstructed SiC{l_brace}0001{r_brace} surfaces and the growth of graphene overlayers thereon. Electronic properties of SiC surfaces and their interfaces with graphene and few layer graphene films were investigated by means of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Structural characterizations of the epitaxial graphene films grown on SiC were carried out by atomic force microscopy and low energy electron microscopy. Supplementary data was obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. (orig.)

  11. Electron microscopy of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venables, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam techniques used to study clean surfaces and surface processes on a microscopic scale are reviewed. Recent experimental examples and possible future developments are discussed. Special emphasis is given to (i) transmission diffraction and microscopy techniques, including atomic imaging; (ii) Auger microscopy on bulk and thin film samples; (iii) secondary electron microscopy, especially low energy secondaries for work-function imaging and photoelectron imaging; and (iv) reflection electron microscopy and diffraction. (orig.)

  12. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by ...

  13. Effect of Ag Doping on the Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of ZnO(0001 Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Qian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principle calculations, the geometrical structure, the electronic and optical properties of Ag-doped ZnO(0001 surface have been investigated. We found that Ag-doped ZnO(0001 surface is more easily formed on the first layer. On the other hand, the doped surface has gradually become an equipotential body, showing obvious metallic characteristics. We found that a new peak appeared in the low energy region after Ag doping, which was mainly due to the electron transition between the two orbital levels of Ag-4d and O-2p.

  14. Construction and characterization of a spin polarized helium ion beam for surface electronic structure studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Ion neutralization and metastable de-excitation spectroscopy, INS and MDS, allow detailed analysis of the surface electronic configuration of metals. The orthodox application of these spectroscopies may be enhanced by electronic spin polarization of the probe beams. For this reason, a spin polarized helium ion beam has been constructed. The electronic spin of helium metastables created within an rf discharge may be spacially aligned by optically pumping the atoms. Subsequent collisions between metastables produce helium ions which retain the orientation of the electronic spin. Extracted ion polarization, although not directly measurable, may be estimated from extracted electron polarization, metastable polarization, pumping radiation absorption and current modulation measurements. Ions extracted from the optically pumped discharge exhibit an estimated polarization of about ten per cent at a beam current of a few tenths of a microampere. Extraction of helium ions from the discharge requires that the ions have a high kinetic energy. However, to avoid undesirable kinetic electron ejection from the target surface, the ions must be decelerated. Examination of various deceleration configurations, in paticular exponential and linear deceleration fields, and experimental observation indicate that a linear decelerating field produces the best low energy beam to the target surface

  15. Dependence of secondary electron emission on the incident angle and the energy of primary electrons bombarding bowl-structured beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the secondary electron emission from beryllium is combined with a model of bowl structure for surface roughness, for analyzing the difference between the electron emissions for normal and oblique incidences. At normal incidence, with increasing the roughness parameter H/W, the primary energy E pm at which the maximum electron yield occurs becomes higher, and at more than the E pm , the decrease in the yield is slower; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The dispersion of incident angle to the microscopic surface causes a small increase in the yield at oblique incidence, whereas the blocking of primary electrons from bombarding the bottom of the structure causes an opposite trend. The strong anisotropy in the polar angular distribution with respect to the azimuthal angle is calculated at oblique incidence. (author)

  16. Structure and electronic properties of the V 2O 3(0001) surface: ab initio density functional theory cluster studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, I.; Witko, M.; Hermann, K.

    2003-02-01

    Electronic properties of the V 2O 3(0001) surface are studied using ab initio density functional theory method. In addition, the nature of surface V-O bonding as well as the electronic states of the structurally different surface oxygen and vanadium sites are discussed and compared with bulk oxygen/vanadium centers. The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide is modeled using clusters of different size where the three ideal bulk-terminated surfaces, denoted as VV 'O (terminated by a double layer of vanadium atoms), V 'OV (terminated by one layer of V atoms), and OVV ' (terminated by one layer of oxygen atoms), are considered. For these surface terminations electronic properties of various surface and bulk centers are discussed. The results confirm bonding in vanadium sesquioxide as a mixture of ionic and covalent characters. Further, charging of structurally non-equivalent surface vanadium and oxygen sites is found to increase with the corresponding coordination number. Large differences in charging between surface and bulk vanadium atoms are found. In addition, the strong interaction between neighboring vanadium ions are observed.

  17. Structural stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic Mn4N(0 0 1) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface formation energy calculations demonstrate a N-dependent stability. • The magnetic alignment of these surfaces remains bulk-like, in a ferrimagnetic fashion. • A ferrimagnetic behavior in both structures is confirmed by density of states calculations. - Abstract: We have carried out spin-polarized first principles calculations to describe the surface stability and the electronic and magnetic properties of Mn 4 N(0 0 1) surfaces. Results show two different surface terminations with different N content. The surface formation energies indicate that for manganese rich conditions the most stable structure is a MnN terminated surface. Whereas, from intermediate to nitrogen rich conditions, a MnN terminated surface with excess of nitrogen atoms is the most favorable. The stability of these surfaces can be traced to the formation of Mn–N bonds at the surface. The stable surfaces are Ferrimagnetic along the direction perpendicular to the surface, retaining a bulk-like behavior. However, there is a decrease in the Mn magnetic moments due to the presence of the surface. Density of states shows an asymmetric behavior, inherent of a Ferrimagnetic state. Finally, the surfaces are metallic with the main contributions around the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. The knowledge about the atomic arrangements of the Mn 4 N surfaces may serve to explain and understand the formation of more complex and technologically applicable ferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic and antiferromagnetic/ferrimagnetic heterostructures.

  18. Implementing and evaluating a fictitious electron dynamics method for the calculation of electronic structure: Application to the Si(100) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M J H; Claassens, C H

    2006-01-01

    A density matrix based fictitious electron dynamics method for calculating electronic structure has been implemented within a semi-empirical quantum chemistry environment. This method uses an equation of motion that implicitly ensures the idempotency constraint on the density matrix. Test calculations showed that this method has potential of being combined with simultaneous atomic dynamics, in analogy to the popular Car-Parrinello method. In addition, the sparsity of the density matrix and the sophisticated though flexible way of ensuring idempotency conservation while integrating the equation of motion creates the potential of developing a fast linear scaling method

  19. InP quantum dots: Electronic structure, surface effects, and the redshifted emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, H.; Zunger, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present pseudopotential plane-wave electronic-structure calculations on InP quantum dots in an effort to understand quantum confinement and surface effects and to identify the origin of the long-lived and redshifted luminescence. We find that (i) unlike the case in small GaAs dots, the lowest unoccupied state of InP dots is the Γ 1c -derived direct state rather than the X 1c -derived indirect state and (ii) unlike the prediction of k·p models, the highest occupied state in InP dots has a 1sd-type envelope function rather than a (dipole-forbidden) 1pf envelope function. Thus explanations (i) and (ii) to the long-lived redshifted emission in terms of an orbitally forbidden character can be excluded. Furthermore, (iii) fully passivated InP dots have no surface states in the gap. However, (iv) removal of the anion-site passivation leads to a P dangling bond (DB) state just above the valence band, which will act as a trap for photogenerated holes. Similarly, (v) removal of the cation-site passivation leads to an In dangling-bond state below the conduction band. While the energy of the In DB state depends only weakly on quantum size, its radiative lifetime increases with quantum size. The calculated ∼300-meV redshift and the ∼18 times longer radiative lifetime relative to the dot-interior transition for the 26-Angstrom dot with an In DB are in good agreement with the observations of full-luminescence experiments for unetched InP dots. Yet, (vi) this type of redshift due to surface defect is inconsistent with that measured in selective excitation for HF-etched InP dots. (vii) The latter type of (open-quotes resonantclose quotes) redshift is compatible with the calculated screened singlet-triplet splitting in InP dots, suggesting that the slow emitting state seen in selective excitation could be a triplet state. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Stimulated emission of surface plasmons by electron tunneling in metal-barrier-metal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, D. P.; Gustafson, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that correlation currents arising from the superposition of pairs of states on distinct sides of a potential barrier in metal-barrier-metal structures can result in inelastic tunneling through the emission of surface plasmons. Net gain of an externally excited plasmon field is possible.

  1. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2}(0 0 1) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J., E-mail: guerrero@ifuap.buap.mx [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Instituto de Física “Ing Luis Rivera Terrazas”, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Wang, Kangkang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Takeuchi, Noboru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada, Baja California, Codigo Postal 22800 (Mexico); Cocoletzi, Gregorio H. [Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Instituto de Física “Ing Luis Rivera Terrazas”, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Smith, Arthur R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Spin-polarized first-principles total energy calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 3}N{sub 2}(0 0 1) surfaces. It is found that three surface terminations are energetically stable, in agreement with previous scanning tunneling microscopy experiments that have found three different electronic contrasts in their images. It is also found that in all three cases, the topmost layer has a MnN stoichiometry. Density of states calculations show a metallic behavior for all the stable structures with the most important contribution close to the Fermi level coming from the Mn-d orbitals. Our Tersoff–Hamann scanning tunneling microscopy simulations are in good agreement with previous experimental results.

  2. Generation of nanometer structures on surfaces of ionic solids generated by laser and electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, M. L.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    2001-03-01

    Radiation effects on hydrated single crystals are poorly understood. We find that dense arrays of nanoscale conical structures, with aspect ratios on the order of 200, are produced when single crystal brushite (CaHPO_4^.2H_2O) is exposed to energetic electrons (2 keV). Other three dimensional nanostructures are generated by exposing brushite to excimer laser irradiation. We show that the mechanism involves: (a) photo/electron stimulated decomposition of the matrix, and (b) thermally stimulated migration of water (in this case, crystalline) and ionic material. We have isolated these factors to some extent and present plausible mechanisms for structure formation. In addition, we have recently exposed non-hydrated ionic crystals to radiation in the presence of background water (pp_water ~ 10-7 Torr), which produces exceedingly fine structures (sub-10 nm). The optical and luminescence properties of these features will be presented. An example of a “stealth surface” will be given with possible applications for the laser generation of x-rays.

  3. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, S.Z., E-mail: ebeam@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110870 (China); Xu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Liaoning Technical University, Fuxin 123000 (China); Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T. [Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Dong, C. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification and School of Physics and Optoelectronics Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Université de Lorraine, Laboratoire d’Excellence on Design of Alloy Metals for Low-Mass Structure (DAMAS), Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France)

    2013-11-15

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC{sub 1−x}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 9}C{sub 4}, Co{sub 3}W{sub 3}C phases and graphite precipitate domains ∼50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ∼0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10{sup −5} mm{sup 3}/min to 6.3 × 10{sup −6} mm{sup 3}/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  4. Self-consistent electronic structure and segregation profiles of the Cu-Ni (001) random-alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Abrikosov, I. A.; Kats, D. Ya.

    1994-01-01

    -density approximation. Temperature effects were accounted for by means of the cluster-variation method and, for comparison, by mean-field theory. The necessary interaction parameters were calculated by the Connolly-Williams method generalized to the case of a surface of a random alloy. We find the segregation profiles......We have calculated the electronic structure and segregation profiles of the (001) surface of random Cu-Ni alloys with varying bulk concentrations by means of the coherent potential approximation and the linear muffin-tin-orbitals method. Exchange and correlation were included within the local...

  5. Relaxation and electronic structure of the V 2O 3(0001) surface: ab initio cluster model studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, I.; Hermann, K.; Witko, M.

    2003-02-01

    The electronic structure and geometric relaxation of the (0001) surface of rhombohedral vanadium sesquioxide, V 2O 3, is studied theoretically with large surface cluster models where ab initio density functional theory is used to characterize charging and bonding. Geometric relaxation in the topmost surface region, up to 5 layers, with its three different bulk terminations is determined by minimizing total energies of the clusters. This yields major relaxation effects depending on the termination. The oxygen layer termination OVV ' exhibits strong relaxation of sub-surface vanadium layers resulting in increased ionic charging at the surface (measured by corresponding atom charges). The metal layer termination VV 'O leads to inwards relaxation of the two topmost vanadium layers by over 40% resulting also in increased surface charging. Ionic charging at the surface is the smallest for the half metal layer V 'OV termination where only the topmost vanadium layer relaxes inwards by 30% in addition to some rearrangement of sub-surface vanadium. This termination is believed to be the most stable of the three relaxed bulk-type terminations based also on analogies with experiments for Cr 2O 3(0001). However, total density-of-states and atom-projected partial densities-of-states curves depend relatively little on surface termination to allow a clear discrimination which could assist an unambiguous experimental identification.

  6. Electronic structure of Si(1 1 1)2 sq root 7x3-(Pb,Sn) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Yuhara, J; Yoshimoto, O; Nakamura, D; Soda, K; Kamada, M

    2003-01-01

    An Si(1 1 1)2 sq root 7x3-(Pb,Sn) surface was studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) to identify its electronic structure. The dispersion relationships along the [1 0 1-bar] direction and [1-bar 2 1-bar] direction were obtained by ARPES and two surface states of S1 and S2 were clearly observed on the 2 sq root 7x3-(Pb,Sn) surface. There was no surface band across the Fermi level and the dispersion of both surface states S1 and S2 were rather flat. The S1 band had peaks at GAMMA and K points, and the S2 band had a maximum at M point. The periodicity of S1 band did not match both 2 sq root 7x3 and 1x1 surface Brillouin zones. STM images of the 2 sq root 7x3-(Pb,Sn) surface showed bright spot arrays and continuous bright lines that exhibit 1D charge density wave along [1 0 1-bar] direction for both empty and filled states. The 2 sq root 7x3-(Pb,Sn) surface intrinsically has domain boundary. The surface states S1 and S2 seem to correspond to t...

  7. Flight time beta spectrometer with position sensitive detectors for electronic structure investigation at points of hydrogen adsorption on surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, V.S.; Petukhov, V.K.; Burminsky, V.P.; Lubov, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The basis of flight time beta spectrometer for investigation of electronic emission with energy not over 500 eV have been created. This device will be used for carrying out the first study of electronic structure at the points of hydrogen adsorption through the measuring of spectra of Auger relaxation electrons emitted by the system investigated surface-tritium. The momentum resolution of beta spectrometer accounts for (0,1 - 0,2)% at 'traditional' solid angle equals to 0,25% from 4π sr owing to the use positron sensitive start and stop detectors on a basis of microchannel plates. Taking into consideration that the area of our beta source is minimum 100 times larger as compared to 'traditional' spectrometers and a spectrum here is registered simultaneously over all energy interval containing useful information, we obtain high quality beta spectrometer. (author)

  8. Surface structure and physicomechanical properties of NiTi exposed to electron beam and ion-plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Stanislav; Meisner, Ludmila; Rotshtein, Vladimir; Ozur, Grigory; Yakovlev, Evgeny; Semin, Victor; D'yachenko, Filipp

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents research data on the physicomechanical surface properties of NiTi alloy after microsecond low-energy high-current electron beam treatment and subsequent magnetron TiTa coating deposition. Nanoindentation shows that after electron beam treatment, the material at a depth of 2 µm, these properties correspond to their initial values. After subsequent deposition of a TiTa coating 1 µm thick, the material reveals changes in its bulk physicomechanical properties. The dependences of Hµ, δH, and η on the indentation depth h feature three quasilinear portions with constant slopes of Hµ, δH, and η which correlate with the multilayer structure formed in the material during electron beam treatment and coating deposition.

  9. Ab-initio investigation of structural, electronic and optical properties BSb compound in bulk and surface (110 states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H A Badehian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent work the structural, electronic and optical properties of BSb compound in bulk and surface (110 states have been studied. Calculations have been performed using Full-Potential Augmented Plane Wave (FP-LAPW method by WIEN2k code in Density Functional Theory (DFT framework. The structural properties of the bulk such as lattice constant, bulk module and elastic constants have been investigated using four different approximations. The band gap energy of the bulk and the (110 surface of BSb were obtained about 1.082 and 0.38 eV respectively. Moreover the surface energy, the work function, the surface relaxation, surface state and the band structure of BSb (110 were investigated using symmetric and stoichiometric 15 layers slabs with the vacuum of 20 Bohr. In addition, the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function of the bulk and the BSb (110 slab were calculated and compared to each other. Our obtained results have a good agreement with the available results.

  10. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics; Elektronische Struktur epitaktischer Chalkopyrite und deren Heterokontakte fuer die Photovoltaik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-02-14

    This thesis constitutes a comprehensive study of the surface physics of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2} films. It comprises analyses of the surface morphology and reconstruction, electronic band structure as well as hetero-junctions relevant to photovoltaic applications. Therefore, especially the aspect of stoichiometry variation from the CuInSe{sub 2} to the copper-deficient defect phases was considered. Preparation and analysis was completely performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions in order to ensure the investigation of well-defined samples free of contaminants. For some of the analysis techniques, single-crystalline samples are indispensable: They allow for the determination of surface periodicity by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). In combination with concentration depth profiling by angle-resolved x-ray photoemission, to types of surface reconstructions could be distinguished for the near-stoichiometric CuInSe{sub 2}(112) surface. In the copper-rich case, it is stabilized by Cu{sub In} anti-site defects and on the indium-rich side by 2 V{sub Cu} defects, as predicted by surface total energy calculations by Jaffe and Zunger. Both configurations correspond to a c(4 x 2) reconstruction of the zinc blende type (111) surface. For the defect compound CuIn{sub 3}Se{sub 5}, a sphalerite order of the surface was found, which points at a weakening or absence of the chalcopyrite order in the bulk of the material. The unusual stability of the (112) surface could also be proven by comparison with the reconstruction and surface order of (001) and (220) surfaces. The results from surface analysis were used to measure the valence band structure of the epitaxial samples by synchrotron-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The CuInSe{sub 2}(001) surface gives access to the high symmetry directions {Gamma}-T and {Gamma}-N of momentum space. By contrasting the data obtained for the stoichiometric surface with the copper-poor defect compound, a reduction of the

  11. The effects of surface conditions on electronic transportation mechanism of Al/SnO2/p-Si/Al structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadeniz, S.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work it was aimed to determine the effect of surface states on the electronic conductivity of Al/SnO 2 /p-Si/Al structure. In order to realize that goal, the Al/SnO 2 /p-Si/Al diodes were prepared p-types, 0.8 Ω-cm resistivity from single crystalline silicon of orientation (111). A spraying system was established in order to produce SnO 2 thin films. The morphology of SnO 2 thin films were measured by means of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The physical parameters which effected on the electronical conductivity of the structures were determined. The forward current-voltage (I-V) measurements were performed in the temperature range of 173-313 K. The reverse capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics were measured at 100 Hz, 1 kHz,10 kHz, 100 kHz, 500 kHz and 1 MHz frequencies at the same temperature range. The energy profile of the surface states effecting on diodes were determined by using high-low frequency capacitance method, Chattopadhyay method and the relation between surface states and ideality factor

  12. MO LCAO approximation in solid state approach for calculations of electronic structure of a crystal surface and chemisorbed molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapilin, V.M.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of calculation of the electronic structure of a solid state surface and chemisorbed molecules is discussed. The method of the Green's function and MO LCAO approximation are used which permits to perform calculations, taking into account the whole crystal but not its fragment only, with the accuracy adopted by quantum chemistry. Results of model calculations are presented: chemisorption of hydrogen-like atom on the (100) face of the one-band crystal model and dispersion curves for the density of states of nickel (100) face. (Auth.)

  13. Three-dimensional structure of the surface layer protein of Aquaspirilium serpens VHA determined by electron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, M.R.; Downing, K.H.; Wu, W.H.; Glaeser, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the protein which forms the S layer of Aquaspirilium serpens strain VHA has been determined by electron microscopy. Structures have been reconstructed to a resolution of about 1.6 nm for single-layered specimens and about 4 nm for two-layered specimens. The structure, which has hexagonal symmetry, consists of a core in the shape of a cup, with six projections arising from the rim of the cup to join adjacent subunits at the threefold symmetry axes. The model is consistent with edge views of the S layer which have been obtained in this and other work. It is now clear from this work and from three-dimensional reconstructions of other bacterial S layers that a wide diversity exists in the morphology of surface layers.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of the surface layer protein of Aquaspirillum serpens VHA determined by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, M R; Downing, K H; Wu, W H; Glaeser, R M

    1986-09-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the protein which forms the S layer of Aquaspirillum serpens strain VHA has been determined by electron microscopy. Structures have been reconstructed to a resolution of about 1.6 nm for single-layered specimens and about 4 nm for two-layered specimens. The structure, which has hexagonal symmetry, consists of a core in the shape of a cup, with six projections arising from the rim of the cup to join adjacent subunits at the threefold symmetry axes. The model is consistent with edge views of the S layer which have been obtained in this and other work. It is now clear from this work and from three-dimensional reconstructions of other bacterial S layers that a wide diversity exists in the morphology of surface layers.

  15. Triple layered core–shell structure with surface fluorinated ZnO-carbon nanotube composites and its electron emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Chua, Daniel H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effects of CF 4 plasma on ZnO-CNT core–shell structures were studied. ► ZnO was effective in protecting the aligned CNTs core for as long as 30 min of plasma etching. ► SEM showed the surface morphology was nearly similar between pristine, 2 min and 30 min plasma etched specimens. ► F was observed to displace O in ZnO. ► This is the first report of an ultra long plasma etch of fluorine onto ZnO surface. - Abstract: Core-shelled structures such as zinc oxide (ZnO) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) give rise to interesting material properties. In this work, a triple-layered core–shell–shell structure is presented where the effects of fluorine (F) incorporation on the outmost shell of the ZnO-CNT structure are studied. The samples prepared ranged from a short 2 min to a 30 min immersion in carbon tetraflouride (CF 4 ) plasma. In addition, its effects on the electron emission properties also studied and it is shown that the plasma immersions create thinner field emitters with sharp tiny wrinkles giving rise to more electron emission sites and higher enhancement factor. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that F ions replace O in ZnO coatings during immersion process, thus increasing the electrical conductivity and shifts the Fermi level of ZnO upwards. Both physical and electronic effects further contribute to a lower threshold field.

  16. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things

  17. Atomic displacements and the electronic structure of the Mo(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inglesfield, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    The uniform surface contraction on Mo(001) and the phase transition observed below 300 K are due to the peak in the surface density of states at the Fermi energy. This is essentially a virtual bound 4d state on the surface atoms and contraction increases its interaction with the substrate and lowers the energy. The phase transition probably consists of a sideways displacement of the atoms which introduces new Brillouin zone boundaries broadening surface resonances at the Fermi energy. (author)

  18. Influence of thermal annealing on microstructural, morphological, optical properties and surface electronic structure of copper oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgul, Funda Aksoy, E-mail: fundaaksoy01@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nigde University, 51240 Nigde (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Akgul, Guvenc, E-mail: guvencakgul@gmail.com [Bor Vocational School, Nigde University, 51700 Nigde (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Nurcan [Department of Physics Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Unalan, Husnu Emrah [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Turan, Rasit [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, effect of the post-deposition thermal annealing on copper oxide thin films has been systemically investigated. The copper oxide thin films were chemically deposited on glass substrates by spin-coating. Samples were annealed in air at atmospheric pressure and at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 600°C. The microstructural, morphological, optical properties and surface electronic structure of the thin films have been studied by diagnostic techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet–visible (UV–VIS) absorption spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the films was about 520 nm. Crystallinity and grain size was found to improve with annealing temperature. The optical bandgap of the samples was found to be in between 1.93 and 2.08 eV. Cupric oxide (CuO), cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) and copper hydroxide (Cu(OH){sub 2}) phases were observed on the surface of as-deposited and 600 °C annealed thin films and relative concentrations of these three phases were found to depend on annealing temperature. A complete characterization reported herein allowed us to better understand the surface properties of copper oxide thin films which could then be used as active layers in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and photodetectors. - Highlights: • Effect of post-deposition annealing on copper oxide thin films was investigated. • Structural, optical, and electronic properties of the thin films were determined. • Oxidation states of copper oxide thin films were confirmed by XPS analysis. • Mixed phases of CuO and Cu{sub 2}O were found to coexist in copper oxide thin films.

  19. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J., E-mail: fwilliams@qi.fcen.uba.ar [INQUIMAE-CONICET, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química-Física, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  20. Surfaces and interfaces of electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brillson, Leonard J

    2012-01-01

    An advanced level textbook covering geometric, chemical, and electronic structure of electronic materials, and their applications to devices based on semiconductor surfaces, metal-semiconductor interfaces, and semiconductor heterojunctions. Starting with the fundamentals of electrical measurements on semiconductor interfaces, it then describes the importance of controlling macroscopic electrical properties by atomic-scale techniques. Subsequent chapters present the wide range of surface and interface techniques available to characterize electronic, optical, chemical, and structural propertie

  1. Multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC (000- 1) surface; structure and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprinkle, M.; Hicks, J.; Tejeda, A.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Le Fevre, P.; Bertran, F.; Tinkey, H.; Clark, M.C.; Soukiassian, P.; Martinotti, D.; Hass, J.; Conrad, E.H. (CNRS-UMR); (CEAS); (GIT)

    2010-10-22

    We review the progress towards developing epitaxial graphene as a material for carbon electronics. In particular, we discuss improvements in epitaxial graphene growth, interface control and the understanding of multilayer epitaxial graphene's (MEG's) electronic properties. Although graphene grown on both polar faces of SiC will be discussed, our discussions will focus on graphene grown on the (000{bar 1}) C-face of SiC. The unique properties of C-face MEG have become apparent. These films behave electronically like a stack of nearly independent graphene sheets rather than a thin Bernal stacked graphite sample. The origins of multilayer graphene's electronic behaviour are its unique highly ordered stacking of non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. While these rotations do not significantly affect the inter-layer interactions, they do break the stacking symmetry of graphite. It is this broken symmetry that leads to each sheet behaving like isolated graphene planes.

  2. Real time nanoscale structural evaluation of gold structures on Si (100) surface using in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, A.; Juluri, R. R.; Satyam, P. V.

    2014-01-01

    Transport behavior of gold nanostructures on Si(100) substrate during annealing under high vacuum has been investigated using in-situ real time transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A comparative study has been done on the morphological changes due to annealing under different vacuum environments. Au thin films of thickness ∼2.0 nm were deposited on native oxide covered silicon substrate by using thermal evaporation system. In-situ real time TEM measurements at 850 °C showed the isotropic growth of rectangular/square shaped gold-silicon alloy structures. During the growth, it is observed that the alloying occurs in liquid phase followed by transformation into the rectangular shapes. For similar system, ex-situ annealing in low vacuum (10 −2 millibars) at 850 °C showed the spherical gold nanostructures with no Au-Si alloy formation. Under low vacuum annealing conditions, the rate of formation of the oxide layer dominates the oxide desorption rate, resulting in the creation of a barrier layer between Au and Si, which restricts the inter diffusion of Au in to Si. This work demonstrates the important role of interfacial oxide layer on the growth of nanoscale Au-Si alloy structures during the initial growth. The time dependent TEM images are presented to offer a direct insight into the fundamental dynamics of the sintering process at the nanoscale

  3. Electronic materials high-T(sub c) superconductivity polymers and composites structural materials surface science and catalysts industry participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The fifth year of the Center for Advanced Materials was marked primarily by the significant scientific accomplishments of the research programs. The Electronics Materials program continued its work on the growth and characterization of gallium arsenide crystals, and the development of theories to understand the nature and distribution of defects in the crystals. The High Tc Superconductivity Program continued to make significant contributions to the field in theoretical and experimental work on both bulk materials and thin films and devices. The Ceramic Processing group developed a new technique for cladding YBCO superconductors for high current applications in work with the Electric Power Research Institute. The Polymers and Composites program published a number of important studies involving atomistic simulations of polymer surfaces with excellent correlations to experimental results. The new Enzymatic Synthesis of Materials project produced its first fluorinated polymers and successfully began engineering enzymes designed for materials synthesis. The structural Materials Program continued work on novel alloys, development of processing methods for advanced ceramics, and characterization of mechanical properties of these materials, including the newly documented characterization of cyclic fatigue crack propagation behavior in toughened ceramics. Finally, the Surface Science and Catalysis program made significant contributions to the understanding of microporous catalysts and the nature of surface structures and interface compounds.

  4. Cu/ZnO nanocatalysts in response to environmental conditions: surface morphology, electronic structure, redox state and CO2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Suárez, Luis; Frenzel, Johannes; Marx, Dominik

    2014-12-21

    Methanol synthesis is one of the landmarks of heterogeneous catalysis due to the great industrial significance of methanol as a clean liquid fuel and as a raw material for industry. Understanding in atomistic detail the properties of the underlying metal/oxide catalyst materials as a function of temperature and composition of the reactive gas phase is of utmost importance in order to eventually improve the production process. By performing extensive density functional theory based slab calculations in combination with a thermodynamic formalism we establish an atomistic understanding of gas phase-induced changes of surface morphology, redox properties and reactivity of ZnO supported Cu nanocatalysts. Extending our recent insights [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013, 110, 086108], we explore surface stabilization mechanisms and site-dependent redox states of both catalyst components as well as the pronounced electronic charge transfer processes across the metal-support interface. Moreover, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations unveil the vital role played by dynamical shape fluctuations of the deposited Cu8 cluster. The pronounced structural flexibility of the metal nanoparticle is found to enhance CO2 activation over Cu8 at the elevated temperature conditions of the industrial methanol synthesis process, in addition to activation of CO2via electronic charge transfer from the ZnO support.

  5. Atomic and electronic structure of V-Rh(110) near-surface alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píš, I.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Kettner, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Dvořák, F.; Mazur, D.; Matolín, V.; Nehasil, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 24 (2013), s. 12679-12688 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : V−Rh(110) near-surface alloy * STM * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.835, year: 2013

  6. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E.S.

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin's resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  7. Electronic excited states as a probe of surface adsorbate structure and dynamics in liquid xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Eric Scott [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    A combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and a simple dipole-dipole interaction model is presented as a new technique for determining adsorbate geometries on surfaces. The polarization dependence of SHG is used to define possible geometries of the adsorbate about the surface normal. Absorption band shifts using geometry constraints imposed by SHG data are derived for a dimer constructed from two arbitrarily placed monomers on the surface using the dipole-dipole interaction potential. These formulae can be used to determine the orientation of the two monomers relative to each other. A simplified version of this formalism is used to interpret absorption band shifts for rhodamine B adsorbed on fused silica. A brief history of the exciton is given with particular detail to Xe. Data are presented for transient absorption at RT in liquid xenon on the picosecond time scale. These are observations of both tunneling through the barrier that separates the free and trapped exciton states and the subsequent trapping of the exciton. In high densities both of these processes are found to occur within 2 to 6 picoseconds in agreement with theories of Kmiecik and Schreiber and of Martin. A threshold density is observed that separates relaxation via single binary collisions and relaxation that proceeds via Martin`s resonant energy transfer hopping mechanism.

  8. Phase and structural states in the NiTi-based alloy surface layer formed by electron-ion-plasma methods using tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiman, Aleksei A., E-mail: nasa@ispms.tsc.ru; Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Meisner, Ludmila L., E-mail: meisner2l@yahoo.com; Semin, Viktor O. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a study of regularities of formation gradient nano-, submicron and microstructural conditions in the surface layers of the samples after pulsed electron-beam melting of tantalum coating on the substrate NiTi alloy. Experimentally revealed the presence of submicron columnar structure in the upper layers of the tantalum coating. After irradiation modified NiTi surface takes on a layered structure in which each layer differs in phase composition and structural phase state.

  9. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  10. Secondary electron emission from textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, C. E.; Patino, M. I.; Wirz, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a Monte Carlo model is used to investigate electron induced secondary electron emission for varying effects of complex surfaces by using simple geometric constructs. Geometries used in the model include: vertical fibers for velvet-like surfaces, tapered pillars for carpet-like surfaces, and a cage-like configuration of interlaced horizontal and vertical fibers for nano-structured fuzz. The model accurately captures the secondary electron emission yield dependence on incidence angle. The model shows that unlike other structured surfaces previously studied, tungsten fuzz exhibits secondary electron emission yield that is independent of primary electron incidence angle, due to the prevalence of horizontally-oriented fibers in the fuzz geometry. This is confirmed with new data presented herein of the secondary electron emission yield of tungsten fuzz at incidence angles from 0-60°.

  11. Atomic and electronic structure of N-terminated GaN(0001) (1 × 1) surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Jiříček, Petr; Paskova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 398, č. 1 (2012), s. 1-6 ISSN 1742-6588. [17th International School on Condensed Matter Pjysics (ISCMP): Open Problems in Condesed Matter Physics, BIiomedical Physics and their Applications. Varna, 02.09.2012-07..09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P028 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101201 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : clean surfaces * GaN * photoelectron diffraction * REELS * ab initio DFT * optical response Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/398/1/012013

  12. Extending the range of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) surface structure determination: Co-adsorbed molecules, incommensurate overlayers and alloy surface order studied by new video and electron counting LEED techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D.F.

    1986-11-01

    LEED multiple scattering theory is briefly summarized, and aspects of electron scattering with particular significance to experimental measurements such as electron beam coherence, instrument response and phonon scattering are analyzed. Diffuse LEED experiments are discussed. New techniques that enhance the power of LEED are described, including a real-time video image digitizer applied to LEED intensity measurements, along with computer programs to generate I-V curves. The first electron counting LEED detector using a ''wedge and strip'' position sensitive anode and digital electronics is described. This instrument uses picoampere incident beam currents, and its sensitivity is limited only by statistics and counting times. Structural results on new classes of surface systems are presented. The structure of the c(4 x 2) phase of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt(111) has been determined, showing that carbon monoxide molecules adsorb in both top and bridge sites, 1.85 +- 0.10 A and 1.55 +- 0.10 A above the metal surface, respectively. The structure of an incommensurate graphite overlayer on Pt(111) is analyzed. The graphite layer is 3.70 +- 0.05 A above the metal surface, with intercalated carbon atoms located 1.25 +- 0.10 A above hollow sites supporting it. The (2..sqrt..3 x 4)-rectangular phase of benzene and carbon monoxide coadsorbed on Pt(111) is analyzed. Benzene molecules adsorb in bridge sites parallel to and 2.10 +- 0.10 A above the surface. The carbon ring is expanded, with an average C-C bond length of 1.72 +- 0.15 A. The carbon monoxide molecules also adsorb in bridge sites. The structure of the (..sqrt..3 x ..sqrt..3) reconstruction on the (111) face of the ..cap alpha..-CuAl alloy has been determined.

  13. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge-transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  14. Structural analysis of the surface-layer protein of Aquaspirillium serpens by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W.H.

    1983-07-01

    Aquaspirillum serpens possesses a surface layer protein exhibiting a regular hexagonal packing of the morphological subunits (HP-protein). A method was developed to isolate large quantities of outer wall fragments of Aquaspirillum serpens. Two models for crystal formation were presented in this thesis. Low dose, low temperature electron microscopy were applied to the frozen hydrated specimens of HP-protein. Computer image processing was applied to selected areas of micrographs. Statistical analysis showed the existence of peaks above a local background. For those peaks identified, the adjusted phases were determined to be close to 0 or 180. A computer processed image of the frozen hydrated specimen was obtained with a resolution of 13.70 A. Structural details at 6.9 A were preserved and were retrieved in the image of the frozen hydrated specimen. A method was developed where the specimen was negatively stained, air dried, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and transferred to the high resolution cold stage (NSFT). A computer processed image with a resolution of 13.70 A was obtained for the specimen prepared by the NSFT method. Structural details at 5.7 A were preserved and retrieved in the image of the specimen prepared by the NSFT method. The computer processed images for the two methods appear to be fairly different. In the NSFT method both protein and stain seem to contribute image contrast making interpretation difficult. An advantage of the NSFT method is ease with which high quality micrographs can be taken.

  15. Ballistic transport and electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Kees M.; Kelly, Paul J.; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the electronic structure in determining the transport properties of ballistic point contacts is studied. The conductance in the ballistic regime is related to simple geometrical projections of the Fermi surface. The essential physics is first clarified for simple models. For real

  16. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned

  17. Structure and Electronic Properties of In Situ Synthesized Single-Layer MoS2 on a Gold Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Signe Grønborg; Füchtbauer, Henrik Gøbel; Tuxen, Anders Kyrme

    2014-01-01

    with scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of two-dimensional single-layer islands of MoS2 synthesized directly on a gold single crystal substrate. Thanks to a periodic modulation of the atom stacking induced by the lattice mismatch, we observe a structural buckling...... structure appears modified at the band gap edges. This electronic effect is further modulated by the moiré periodicity and leads to small substrate-induced electronic perturbations near the conduction band minimum in the band gap of MoS2. The results may be highly relevant in the context of nanopatterned......When transition metal sulfides such as MoS2 are present in the single-layer form, the electronic properties change in fundamental ways, enabling them to be used, e.g., in two-dimensional semiconductor electronics, optoelectronics, and light harvesting. The change is related to a subtle modification...

  18. Electron spectroscopy of nanodiamond surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belobrov, P.I.; Bursill, L.A.; Maslakov, K.I.; Dementjev, A.P

    2003-06-15

    Electronic states of nanodiamond (ND) were investigated by PEELS, XPS and CKVV Auger spectra. Parallel electron energy loss spectra (PEELS) show that the electrons inside of ND particles are sp{sup 3} hybridized but there is a surface layer containing distinct hybridized states. The CKVV Auger spectra imply that the HOMO of the ND surface has a shift of 2.5 eV from natural diamond levels of {sigma}{sub p} up to the Fermi level. Hydrogen (H) treatment of natural diamond surface produces a chemical state indistinguishable from that of ND surfaces using CKVV. The ND electronic structure forms {sigma}{sub s}{sup 1}{sigma}{sub p}{sup 2}{pi}{sup 1} surface states without overlapping of {pi}-levels. Surface electronic states, including surface plasmons, as well as phonon-related electronic states of the ND surface are also interesting and may also be important for field emission mechanisms from the nanostructured diamond surface.

  19. Chlorine-induced modifications in the electronic structure of Ag surfaces: a metastable deexcitation spectroscopy and photoemission comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, L; Canepa, M; Staicu-Casagrande, E M; Esaulov, V A

    2003-01-01

    Surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques, namely metastable deexcitation spectroscopy (MDS) and ultraviolet photoemission (UPS), have been applied to investigate the effects of chlorine chemisorption on the electronic properties (surface density of states and charge density) of Ag(100), Ag(110) and Ag(111) surfaces. Initial stages of chemisorption, up to the formation of a saturated Cl overlayer, have been examined. In particular, MDS permitted us to observe at low Cl gas exposure a progressive depletion of the Ag (5s) charge due to transfer and bonding with Cl atoms. From both MDS and UPS it was possible to observe the development of Cl (3p) bonding and anti-bonding states, the amount of their splitting increasing with coverage. Differences between chemisorption at the three surfaces have been noticed and they have been justified in terms of the different adatom packing and possible formation of small AgCl clusters (especially for the Ag(111) surface).

  20. Chlorine-induced modifications in the electronic structure of Ag surfaces: a metastable deexcitation spectroscopy and photoemission comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquali, L; Nannarone, S; Canepa, M; Staicu-Casagrande, E M; Esaulov, V A

    2003-01-01

    Surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques, namely metastable deexcitation spectroscopy (MDS) and ultraviolet photoemission (UPS), have been applied to investigate the effects of chlorine chemisorption on the electronic properties (surface density of states and charge density) of Ag(100), Ag(110) and Ag(111) surfaces. Initial stages of chemisorption, up to the formation of a saturated Cl overlayer, have been examined. In particular, MDS permitted us to observe at low Cl gas exposure a progressive depletion of the Ag (5s) charge due to transfer and bonding with Cl atoms. From both MDS and UPS it was possible to observe the development of Cl (3p) bonding and anti-bonding states, the amount of their splitting increasing with coverage. Differences between chemisorption at the three surfaces have been noticed and they have been justified in terms of the different adatom packing and possible formation of small AgCl clusters (especially for the Ag(111) surface)

  1. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment – a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Feiten, F.; Kuhlenbeck, H.; Freund, H.

    2016-01-01

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the order...

  2. Surface structure determination of group 11 metals adsorbed on a rhenium(10 anti 10) surface by low-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messahel, Lyria

    2012-11-12

    This thesis deals with the computational surface determination of various long-range ordered phases formed by thin films of copper, silver, and gold adsorbed on the rhenium- (10 anti 10) surface. It is based upon LEED-I,V curves for these phases that were recorded in the course of detailed experimental investigations of the respective films carried out in our group (using techniques such as LEED, MEED, and TPD). In order to solve the intricate puzzle of surface structural analysis, the electron elastic scattering behaviour of the investigated coinage metal phases was calculated using the Erlangen TensErLEED program package. Thereby first a set of theoretical LEED-I,V curves is derived for a guessed reference structure. Subsequently its structural input parameters are varied in a trial-and-error procedure until optimal agreement between experiment and theory is attained. The (1 x 1) phases formed by the deposited metals were tackled first to establish an absolute coverage calibration and to elucidate the respective growth modes on the Re(10 anti 10) surface. In all three cases the (1 x 1) structure is developed best at a coverage {Theta}{sub Cu,Ag,Au}=2 ML=1 BL. Extension of the investigation to experimental I,V curves for higher Cu coverages revealed that this element continues to grow bilayerwise, thereby retaining the Re hcp morphology. Ag, in contrast to Cu and Au, happens not to grow as homogeneously, and the TPD data suggest that Ag films exhibit the so-called simultaneous-multilayer (SM) growth mode. The following analysis of the sub-bilayer coverage range shows that the three systems exhibit considerable differences. While Cu, having a negative lattice misfit compared to Re, shows no long-range ordered superstructures, Ag and Au with a similar positive misfit form a couple of such phases. Ag features both a (1 x 4) phase, stable at ambient temperatures, that upon heating transforms into a c(2 x 2) phase that only exists at elevated temperatures. The

  3. Surface structure determination of group 11 metals adsorbed on a rhenium(10 anti 10) surface by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messahel, Lyria

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the computational surface determination of various long-range ordered phases formed by thin films of copper, silver, and gold adsorbed on the rhenium- (10 anti 10) surface. It is based upon LEED-I,V curves for these phases that were recorded in the course of detailed experimental investigations of the respective films carried out in our group (using techniques such as LEED, MEED, and TPD). In order to solve the intricate puzzle of surface structural analysis, the electron elastic scattering behaviour of the investigated coinage metal phases was calculated using the Erlangen TensErLEED program package. Thereby first a set of theoretical LEED-I,V curves is derived for a guessed reference structure. Subsequently its structural input parameters are varied in a trial-and-error procedure until optimal agreement between experiment and theory is attained. The (1 x 1) phases formed by the deposited metals were tackled first to establish an absolute coverage calibration and to elucidate the respective growth modes on the Re(10 anti 10) surface. In all three cases the (1 x 1) structure is developed best at a coverage Θ Cu,Ag,Au =2 ML=1 BL. Extension of the investigation to experimental I,V curves for higher Cu coverages revealed that this element continues to grow bilayerwise, thereby retaining the Re hcp morphology. Ag, in contrast to Cu and Au, happens not to grow as homogeneously, and the TPD data suggest that Ag films exhibit the so-called simultaneous-multilayer (SM) growth mode. The following analysis of the sub-bilayer coverage range shows that the three systems exhibit considerable differences. While Cu, having a negative lattice misfit compared to Re, shows no long-range ordered superstructures, Ag and Au with a similar positive misfit form a couple of such phases. Ag features both a (1 x 4) phase, stable at ambient temperatures, that upon heating transforms into a c(2 x 2) phase that only exists at elevated temperatures. The structure

  4. Oxides Surfaces and Novel Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Pratik

    The scope of this thesis extends to the study of surface structures and electronic properties in a number of complex oxides. The c(6x2) surface reconstruction on SrTiO3 (001) was solved using a combination of plan view transmission electron microscopy imaging, atomic resolution secondary electron imaging, and density functional theory calculations. This work provided fundamental insights on the effects of dielectric screening in secondary electron generation. A thorough analysis on the limitation and functionality of transmission plan view imaging showed that the kinematical approximations used in the separation of top and bottom surfaces is only valid in thin samples (˜5 nm or less for SrTiO3). The presence of an inversion center in the surface structure also made separation of the top and bottom surfaces more robust. Surface studies of two other oxides, KTaO3 and NdGaO3, provided understanding on the mechanism of surface heterogeneity and segregation. In the case of KTaO3, selective ion sputtering and the loss of K resulted in large stoichiometric variations at the surface. Annealing of such samples led to the formation of a potassium deficient tetragonal phase (K 6Ta10.8O30) on the surface. A similar phenomenon was also observed in NdGaO3. Exploratory surface studies of the rare earth scandates (ReScO3 , Re = Gd, Tb, Dy) led to the observation of large flexoelectric bending inside an electron microscope. Thin rods of these scandates bent by up to 90 degree under a focused electron beam; the bending was fully reversible. Ex-situ measurements of flexoelectric coe cient performed by an- other graduate student, Christopher Mizzi, confirmed that the scandates have a large flexocoupling voltage (˜42 V). Electronic structure of the lanthanide scandates was studied using temperature depen- dent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hybrid density functional theory calculations. The amount of charging under X-ray illumination was greatly reduced with increasing

  5. First principles investigations on the electronic structure of anchor groups on ZnO nanowires and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, A.; Lorke, M.; Rosa, A. L.; Frauenheim, Th.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Dalpian, G. M.; Rocha, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We report on density functional theory investigations of the electronic properties of monofunctional ligands adsorbed on ZnO-(1010) surfaces and ZnO nanowires using semi-local and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We consider three anchor groups, namely thiol, amino, and carboxyl groups. Our results indicate that neither the carboxyl nor the amino group modify the transport and conductivity properties of ZnO. In contrast, the modification of the ZnO surface and nanostructure with thiol leads to insertion of molecular states in the band gap, thus suggesting that functionalization with this moiety may customize the optical properties of ZnO nanomaterials.

  6. Dependency of magnetic microwave absorption on surface architecture of Co20Ni80 hierarchical structures studied by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghe; Xu, Xianhui; Xia, Weixing; Che, Renchao; Chen, Chen; Cao, Qi; He, Jingang

    2015-02-07

    To design and fabricate rational surface architecture of individual particles is one of the key factors that affect their magnetic properties and microwave absorption capability, which is still a great challenge. Herein, a series of Co20Ni80 hierarchical structures with different surface morphologies, including flower-, urchin-, ball-, and chain-like morphologies, were obtained using structure-directing templates via a facile one-step solvothermal treatment. The microwave reflection loss (RL) of urchin-like Co20Ni80 hierarchical structures reaches as high as -33.5 dB at 3 GHz, with almost twice the RL intensity of the ball- and chain-like structures, and the absorption bandwidth (structures might become an effective path to achieve high-performance microwave absorption for electromagnetic shielding and stealth camouflage applications.

  7. Surface structures of normal paraffins and cyclohexane monolayers and thin crystals grown on the (111) crystal face of platinum. A low-energy electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firment, L.E.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The surfaces of the normal paraffins (C 3 --C 8 ) and cyclohexane have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The samples were prepared by vapor deposition on the (111) face of a platinum single crystal in ultrahigh vacuum, and were studied both as thick films and as adsorbed monolayers. These molecules form ordered monolayers on the clean metal surface in the temperature range 100--220 K and at a vapor flux corresponding to 10 -7 Torr. In the adsorbed monolayers of the normal paraffins (C 4 --C 8 ), the molecules lie with their chain axes parallel to the Pt surface and Pt[110]. The paraffin monolayer structures undergo order--disorder transitions as a function of temperature. Multilayers condensed upon the ordered monolayers maintained the same orientation and packing as found in the monolayers. The surface structures of the growing organic crystals do not corresond to planes in their reported bulk crystal structures and are evidence for epitaxial growth of pseudomorphic crystal forms. Multilayers of n-octane and n-heptane condensed upon disordered monolayers have also grown with the (001) plane of the triclinic bulk crystal structures parallel to the surface. n-Butane has three monolayer structures on Pt(111) and one of the three is maintained during growth of the crystal. Cyclohexane forms an ordered monolayer, upon which a multilayer of cyclohexane grows exhibiting the (001) surface orientation of the monoclinic bulk crystal structure. Surface structures of saturated hydrocarbons are found to be very susceptible to electron beam induced damage. Surface charging interferes with LEED only at sample thicknesses greater than 200 A

  8. electronic and structural investigations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-03-30

    Mar 30, 2018 ... Indian Academy of Sciences https://doi.org/10.1007/s12034-018-1572-8. Milling effect on the photo-activated properties of TiO2 nanoparticles: electronic and structural investigations. YOUCEF MESSAI1,2, BERTRAND VILENO2,4, DAVID MARTEL3, PHILIPPE TUREK2,4 and. DJAMEL EDDINE MEKKI1,∗.

  9. Modification of Structure and Tribological Properties of the Surface Layer of Metal-Ceramic Composite under Electron Irradiation in the Plasmas of Inert Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, K. V.; Mohovikov, A. A.; Yu, B.; Xu, Yu; Zhong, L.

    2018-01-01

    Metal-ceramic composites are the main materials for high-load parts in tribomechanical systems. Modern approaches to extend the operation life of tribomechanical systems are based on increasing the strength and tribological properties of the surface layer having 100 to 200 microns in depth. The essential improvement of the properties occurs when high dispersed structure is formed in the surface layer using high-energy processing. As a result of the dispersed structure formation the more uniform distribution of elastic stresses takes place under mechanical or thermal action, the energy of stress concentrators emergence significantly increases and the probability of internal defects formation reduces. The promising method to form the dispersed structure in the surface layer is pulse electron irradiation in the plasmas of inert gases combining electron irradiation and ion bombardment in one process. The present work reports upon the effect of pulse electron irradiation in plasmas of different inert gases with different atomic mass and ionization energy on the structure and tribological properties of the surface layer of TiC/(Ni-Cr) metal-ceramic composite with the volume ratio of the component being 50:50. It is experimentally shown that high-dispersed heterophase structure with a fraction of nanosized particles is formed during the irradiation. Electron microscopy study reveals that refining of the initial coarse TiC particles occurs via their dissolution in the molten metal binder followed by the precipitation of secondary fine particles in the interparticle layers of the binder. The depth of modified layer and the fraction of nanosized particles increase when the atomic number of the plasma gas increases and ionization energy decreases. The wear resistance of metal-ceramic composite improves in accordance to the formation of nanocrystalline structure in the surface layer.

  10. Studies of the surface structures of molecular crystals and of adsorbed molecular monolayers on the (111) crystal faces of platinum and silver by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firment, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    The structures of molecular crystal surfaces were investigated for the first time by the use of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The experimental results from a variety of molecular crystals were examined and compared as a first step towards understanding the properties of these surfaces on a microscopic level. The method of sample preparation employed, vapor deposition onto metal single-crystal substrates at low temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum, allowed concurrent study of the structures of adsorbed monolayers on metal surfaces and of the growth processes of molecular films on metal substrates. The systems investigated were ice, ammonia, naphthalene, benzene, the n-paraffins (C 3 to C 8 ), cyclohexane, trioxane, acetic acid, propionic acid, methanol, and methylamine adsorbed and condensed on both Pt(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. Electron-beam-induced damage of the molecular surfaces was observed after electron exposures of 10 -4 A sec cm -2 at 20 eV. Aromatic molecular crystal samples were more resistant to damage than samples of saturated molecules. The quality and orientation of the grown molecular crystal films were influenced by substrate preparation and growth conditions. Forty ordered monolayer structures were observed. 110 figures, 22 tables, 162 references

  11. Structural and electronic properties of Mg and Mg-Nb co-doped TiO2 (101) anatase surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasani, Alireza [Department of Science, Karaj Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Alborz, P.O. Box 31485-313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baktash, Ardeshir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirabbaszadeh, Kavoos, E-mail: mirabbas@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, P. O. Box 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshnevisan, Bahram [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Formation energy of Mg and Mg-Nb co-doped TiO{sub 2} anatase surface (101) is studied. • Effect of Mg defect to the TiO{sub 2} anatase (101) surface and bond length distribution of the surface is studied and it is shown that Mg defects tend to stay far from each other. • Effect of Mg and Nb to the bond length distribution of the surface studied and it is shown that these defects tend to stay close to each other. • Effects of Mg and Mg-Nb defects on DSSCs using TiO{sub 2} anatase hosting these defects are studied. - Abstract: In this paper, by using density functional theory, Mg and Nb-Mg co-doping of TiO{sub 2} anatase (101) surfaces are studied. By studying the formation energy of the defects and the bond length distribution of the surface, it is shown that Mg defects tend to stay as far as possible to induce least possible lattice distortion while Nb and Mg defects stay close to each other to cause less stress to the surface. By investigating band structure of the surface and changes stemmed from the defects, potential effects of Mg and Mg-Nb co-doping of TiO{sub 2} surface on dye-sensitized solar cells are investigated. In this study, it is shown that the Nb-Mg co-doping could increase J{sub SC} of the surface while slightly decreasing V{sub OC} compared to Mg doped surface, which might result in an increase in efficiency of the DSSCs compared to Nb or Mg doped surfaces.

  12. Reducing the V2O3(0001) surface through electron bombardment--a quantitative structure determination with I/V-LEED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiten, Felix E; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-28

    The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, is terminated by vanadyl groups under standard ultra high vacuum preparation conditions. Reduction with electrons results in a chemically highly active surface with a well-defined LEED pattern indicating a high degree of order. In this work we report the first quantitative structure determination of a reduced V2O3(0001) surface. We identify two distinct surface phases by STM, one well ordered and one less well ordered. I/V-LEED shows the ordered phase to be terminated by a single vanadium atom per surface unit cell on a quasi-hexagonal oxygen layer with three atoms per two-dimensional unit cell. Furthermore we compare the method of surface reduction via electron bombardment with the deposition of V onto a vanadyl terminated film. The latter procedure was previously proposed to result in a structure with three surface vanadium atoms in the 2D unit cell and we confirm this with simulated STM images.

  13. Charge transfer driven surface segregation of gold atoms in 13-atom Au-Ag nanoalloys and its relevance to their structural, optical and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fuyi; Johnston, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    The structural, optical and electronic properties of 13-atom Ag-Au nanoalloys are determined by a combination of global optimization using semi-empirical potentials and density functional theory calculations. A family of Au surface-segregated structures are found for core-shell Ag n Au 13-n (n = 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12) and hollow Ag n Au 13-n (n = 4, 6, 10, 11) clusters, whose stability is enhanced by directional charge transfer. The atomic ordering in core-shell structures is related to the electric dipole moment and odd-numbered surface Au-atom clusters have high moments. Their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties provide a potential approach for tailoring their surface plasmonic modes

  14. KF post-deposition treatment of industrial Cu(In, Ga)(S, Se)2 thin-film surfaces: Modifying the chemical and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezher, Michelle; Mansfield, Lorelle M.; Horsley, Kimberly; Blum, Monika; Wieting, Robert; Weinhardt, Lothar; Ramanathan, Kannan; Heske, Clemens

    2017-08-01

    The chemical and electronic structures of industrial chalcopyrite photovoltaic absorbers after KF post-deposition treatment (KF-PDT) are investigated using electron spectroscopies to probe the occupied and unoccupied electronic states. In contrast to a variety of recent publications on the impact of KF-PDT, this study focuses on industrial Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 absorbers that also contain sulfur at the surface. We find that the KF-PDT removes surface adsorbates and oxides and also observe a change in the S/Se ratio. Furthermore, the KF-PDT leads to a Cu reduction at the surface but to a much lower degree than the strongly Cu-depleted or even Cu-free surfaces reported for (non-industrial) sulfur-free Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorbers. The valence band maximum at the surface is found at a lower energy compared to the untreated absorber, and the conduction band minimum is found at a higher energy, overall revealing a widening of the bandgap in the surface region.

  15. Structural analysis of the surface-layer protein of spirillum serpens by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W.H.; Glaeser, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In order to understand the detailed association of the macro-molecules of the structure of the protein, a high resolution structural analysis was performed. Large, single layered arrays of the surface layer protein have been obtained for this purpose by means of extensive heating in high CaCl/sub 2/. The computer processed image reveals a pore of about 10 Angstrom diameter at the 6-fold symmetry center; the handedness of the images is quite evident. The individual molecular envelope of the protein monomers are apparent and details of the protein-protein contact at the three-fold lattice positions emerge.

  16. Fabrication of large area plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure on silver halide based transmission electron microscope film and its application as a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in; Tiwari, P.; Singh, M. N.; Sinha, A. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K. [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Laser Material Development and Device Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Mukherjee, C. [Mechanical and Optical Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2015-08-14

    The plasmonic responses of silver nanoparticle grating structures of different periods made on silver halide based electron microscope film are investigated. Raster scan of the conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to carry out electron beam lithography for fabricating the plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structures. Morphological characterization of the PNG structures, carried out by the SEM and the atomic force microscope, indicates that the depth of the groove decreases with a decrease in the grating period. Elemental characterization performed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy and the x-ray diffraction shows the presence of nanoparticles of silver in the PNG grating. The optical characterization of the gratings shows that the localized surface plasmon resonance peak shifts from 366 to 378 nm and broadens with a decrease in grating period from 10 to 2.5 μm. The surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the Rhodamine-6G dye coated PNG structure shows the maximum enhancement by two orders of magnitude in comparison to the randomly distributed silver nanoparticles having similar size and shape as the PNG structure.

  17. Fabrication of large area plasmonic nanoparticle grating structure on silver halide based transmission electron microscope film and its application as a surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudheer,; Tiwari, P.; Singh, M. N.; Sinha, A. K.; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Bhartiya, S.; Mukherjee, C.

    2015-01-01

    The plasmonic responses of silver nanoparticle grating structures of different periods made on silver halide based electron microscope film are investigated. Raster scan of the conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to carry out electron beam lithography for fabricating the plasmonic nanoparticle grating (PNG) structures. Morphological characterization of the PNG structures, carried out by the SEM and the atomic force microscope, indicates that the depth of the groove decreases with a decrease in the grating period. Elemental characterization performed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy and the x-ray diffraction shows the presence of nanoparticles of silver in the PNG grating. The optical characterization of the gratings shows that the localized surface plasmon resonance peak shifts from 366 to 378 nm and broadens with a decrease in grating period from 10 to 2.5 μm. The surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the Rhodamine-6G dye coated PNG structure shows the maximum enhancement by two orders of magnitude in comparison to the randomly distributed silver nanoparticles having similar size and shape as the PNG structure

  18. Effect of template-induced surface species on electronic structure and photocatalytic activity of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Xiaojuan; Bo, Xiangkun; Wang, Yongzheng [Key Lab of Mesoscopic Chemistry MOE, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Guo, Xiangke [Key Lab of Mesoscopic Chemistry MOE, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory for Processing and Application of Catalytic Materials, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China); Xie, Mingjiang, E-mail: xiemingjiang@hotmail.com [Key Lab of Mesoscopic Chemistry MOE, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Guo, Xuefeng, E-mail: guoxf@nju.edu.cn [Key Lab of Mesoscopic Chemistry MOE, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory for Processing and Application of Catalytic Materials, Huanggang Normal University, Huanggang 438000 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The effect of template on the surface chemistry of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} were investigated. • Template induces more non-graphitic species (sp{sup 3}−C−C− and −NH{sub x}) on g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. • Non-graphitic species influence electronic structure and performance of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. - Abstract: In view of the fact that the photocatalytic activity of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) is greatly influenced by its electronic structure, herein, effect of templates induced surface species variation on the electronic structure and photocatalytic activity of the templated g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was investigated. By mixing the precursor of cyanamide with different templates (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and template-free) in the preparation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}), carbon nitrides with different surface species were obtained. The obtained carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Si) templated by SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibits enlarged band gap (3.26 eV) and enhanced photo-degradation ability towards Methyl Orange (MO) compared to that of bulk g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (2.67 eV) synthesized from direct condensation/carbonization of melamine and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-templated g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Al (2.76 eV). Detailed characterizations confirm that the introduction of templates in the synthesis process resulted in more non-graphitic species (sp{sup 3}−C−C− and −NH{sub x}) on the surface of the derived carbon nitrides, exerting remarkable effect on the electronic structure and photocatalytic performance.

  19. The electronic structures of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, B R

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Structures of Solids aims to provide students of solid state physics with the essential concepts they will need in considering properties of solids that depend on their electronic structures and idea of the electronic character of particular materials and groups of materials. The book first discusses the electronic structure of atoms, including hydrogen atom and many-electron atom. The text also underscores bonding between atoms and electrons in metals. Discussions focus on bonding energies and structures in the solid elements, eigenstates of free-electron gas, and electrical co

  20. First-principles study of structure, electronic properties and stability of tungsten adsorption on TiC(111) surface with disordered vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyasov, Victor V.; Pham, Khang D.; Zhdanova, Tatiana P.; Phuc, Huynh V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Nguyen, Chuong V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we systematically investigate the atomic structure, electronic and thermodynamic properties of adsorbed W atoms on the polar Ti-terminated TixCy (111) surface with different configurations of adsorptions using first principle calculations. The bond length, adsorption energy, and formation energy for different reconstructions of the atomic structure of the W/TixCy (111) systems were established. The effect of the tungsten coverage on the electronic structure and the adsorption mechanism of tungsten atom on the TixCy (111) are also investigated. We also suggest the possible mechanisms of W nucleation on the TixCy (111) surface. The effective charges on W atoms and nearest-neighbor atoms in the examined reconstructions were identified. Additionally, we have established the charge transfer from titanium atom to tungsten and carbon atoms which determine by the reconstruction of the local atomic and electronic structures. Our calculations showed that the charge transfer correlates with the electronegativity of tungsten and nearest-neighbor atoms. We also determined the effective charge per atom of titanium, carbon atoms, and neighboring adsorbed tungsten atom in different binding configurations. We found that, with reduction of the lattice symmetry associated with titanium and carbon vacancies, the adsorption energy increases by 1.2 times in the binding site A of W/TixCy systems.

  1. Characterization of the Fermi surface of BEDT-TTF4[Hg2Cl6].PhCl by electronic band structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiros, L.F.; Canadell, E.

    1994-01-01

    Tight-binding band structure calculations for the room temperature structure of BEDT-TTF 4 [Hg 2 Cl 6 ]-PhCl show the existence of closed electron and hole Fermi surfaces, in agreement with the 2D metallic conductivity of this salt. It is shown that these closed Fermi surfaces result from the hybridization of two hidden 1D Fermi surfaces. However, our study also shows that a transition associated with either a usual or a hidden nesting type mechanism is unlikely. This explains why this salt retains its metallic properties without any resistivity anomaly down to 1.3 K. Our study suggests that BEDT-TTF 4 [Hg 2 Cl 6 ]-PhCl is somewhat anisotropic 2D semimetal and should exhibit Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations corresponding to a cross-sectional area of approximately 13% of the first Brillouin zone. (orig.)

  2. Electronic structure in the bulk and at the surface of lanthanide materials. A detailed study with X-ray emission and inverse photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Huebinger, F

    2000-01-01

    LaTe. With measurements of the O3-XE in the Lanthanum-Chalcogenides we could demonstrate the transfer of s-like valence electrons from the Lanthanum atom to the Chalcogen atom. Furthermore, the binding energy of the state at the Lanthanum atom was determined. The surface core-level shift is smaller by 25 % in the Chalcogenides than in La-metal. We also describe a theoretical model, which qualitatively explains the observed larger shifts of the core-level binding energy in PE than in IPE from Lanthan-Chalcogenides. This dissertation is concerned with the occupied and unoccupied electronic structure of lanthanide materials. With surface sensitive electron-excited x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) we could experimentally determine a surface and bulk partial density of states (p-DOS) for the metals Lanthanum, Lutetium and Samarium. From calculations of the O3-XE transition probability we anticipate a three times higher probability for s-like than for d-like electrons to fill the 5p3/2-hole; this was confirmed exp...

  3. The Adsorption Geometry and Electronic Structure of Organic Dye Molecule on TiO2(101 Surface from First Principles Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Mang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Using density functional theory (DFT, we have investigated the structural and electronic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs comprised of I-doped anatase TiO2(101 surface sensitized with NKX-2554 dye. The calculation results indicate that the cyanoacrylic acid anchoring group in NKX-2554 has a strong binding to the TiO2(101 surface. The dissociative and bidentate bridging type was found to be the most favorable adsorption configuration. On the other hand, the incorporations of I dopant can reduce the band gap of TiO2 photoanode and improve the of NKX-2554 dye, which can improve the visible-light absorption of anatase TiO2 and can also facilitate the electron injection from the dye molecule to the TiO2 substrate. As a result, the I doping can significantly enhance the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE of DSSCs.

  4. Simulation of secondary electron emission from rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, J.; Ohya, K.; Nishimura, K.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the secondary electron emission from a beryllium surface under low-energy (≤1 keV) electron bombardment is investigated using a Monte Carlo simulation combined with the model of bowl-structured surface. With increasing aspect ratio H/W of the bowl structure, the secondary electron yield becomes greater than that for a flat surface, whereas for large H/W the yield is smaller; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The former is due to emission of electrons, which cannot escape from the flat surface, from an inclined plane; it increases the low-energy component in the energy distribution. The latter is due to re-entrance of once-emitted electrons into the next part of the topographic surface; it decreases the number of electrons emitted with oblique angles. ((orig.))

  5. Understanding the electronic structures of graphene quantum dot physisorption and chemisorption onto the TiO2 (110) surface: a first-principles calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run

    2013-02-25

    We investigated the interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer properties of graphene quantum dot (GQD) physisorption and chemisorption on the TiO(2) (110) surface from density functional theory calculations. The simulations show that a slight charge transfer occurs in physisorption case while a significant charge transfer takes place in chemisorption configuration. We present a detailed comparison of the similarities and differences between the electronic structures. The similarities originate from the positive work function difference in both the physisorption and chemisorption configurations, which is able to drive electron transfer from GQD into TiO(2), leading to charge separation across the GQD-TiO(2) interface. The differences stem from the interaction between the GQD and TiO(2) substrate. For example, GQD bounds to TiO(2) surface through van der Waals interactions in the case of physisorption. In the chemisorption configuration, however, there exists strong covalent bonding between them. This leads to much more efficient charge separation for chemisorption than for physisorption. Furthermore, the GQD-TiO(2) composites show large band-gap narrowing that could extend the optical absorption edge into the visible-light region. This should imply that chemisorbed GQDs produce a composite with better photocatalytic and photovoltaic performance than composites formed through physisorption. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Electronic structure, Fermi surface topology and spectroscopic optical properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5} compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, Pilsen 306 14 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Al-Douri, Y. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Département de Technologie, Université de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Khan, Wilayat; Khan, Saleem Ayaz [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, Pilsen 306 14 (Czech Republic); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, Pilsen 306 14 (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the electronic band structure, Fermi surface topology, chemical bonding and optical properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5} compound. The first-principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method were employed. The atomic positions of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5} compound were optimized by minimizing the forces acting on atoms. We employed the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and Engel–Vosko GGA (EVGGA) to treat the exchange correlation potential by solving Kohn–Sham equations. Electronic structure and bonding properties are studied throughout the calculation of densities of states, Fermi surfaces and charge densities. Furthermore, the optical properties are investigated via the calculation of the dielectric tensor component in order to characterize the linear optical properties. Optical spectra are analyzed by means of the electronic structure, which provides theoretical understanding of the conduction mechanism of the investigated compound. - Highlights: • DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5} compound. • This study shows that nature of the compound is metallic. • Crystallographic plane which shows covalent character of O–Co bond. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5} is composed of five bands crossing along Γ–Z direction.

  7. Electronic structure of the buried interface between an organic semiconductor, N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), and metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ito, Eisuke; Hara, Masahiko; Sato, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structures of buried interfaces between an organic semiconductor, N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD) and metal surfaces of Au, Ag, Al and Ca were examined by the new experimental method that we have developed recently. In this method the energy levels at the organic/metal interface can be examined without changing the film thickness and related physical parameters e.g., the vacuum levels of the sample in contrast to the widely-used thickness-dependent photoemission experiments. The results were discussed in view of large interfacial dipole moment of the TPD and metal (Au and Ag) contacts.

  8. Distinct effects of Cr bulk doping and surface deposition on the chemical environment and electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Turgut; Hines, William; Sun, Fu-Chang; Pletikosić, Ivo; Budnick, Joseph; Valla, Tonica; Sinkovic, Boris

    2017-06-01

    In this report, it is shown that Cr doped into the bulk and Cr deposited on the surface of Bi2Se3 films produced by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have strikingly different effects on both the electronic structure and chemical environment. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) shows that Cr doped into the bulk opens a surface state energy gap which can be seen at room temperature; much higher than the measured ferromagnetic transition temperature of ≈10 K. On the other hand, similar ARPES measurements show that the surface states remain gapless down to 15 K for films with Cr surface deposition. In addition, core-level photoemission spectroscopy of the Bi 5d, Se 3d, and Cr 3p core levels show distinct differences in the chemical environment for the two methods of Cr introduction. Surface deposition of Cr results in the formation of shoulders on the lower binding energy side for the Bi 5d peaks and two distinct Cr 3p peaks indicative of two Cr sites. These striking differences suggests an interesting possibility that better control of doping at only near surface region may offer a path to quantum anomalous Hall states at higher temperatures than reported in the literature.

  9. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  10. Surface characteristics and electronic structure of photocatalytic reactions on TiO II and doped TiO II nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlund, L.; Mattsson, A.

    2006-08-01

    A molecular approach to understand the photocatalytic degradation of small organic molecules adsorbed from the gas phase on anatase, rutile and doped TiO II nanoparticles is presented. Using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry the rate determining steps for the photocatalytic degradation of formic acid, acetone and propane are unraveled. Key intermediates are identified and correlated to structural properties of the TiO II nanoparticles. Specifically, stable bridging bidentate carboxylate (R-CO II) and (bi)carbonate species forms preferentially on rutile particles, and are proposed to inhibit the total photodegradation efficiency. In particular, the concentration of R-CO II is found to decrease with increasing size of the anatase particles, and may at least partly explain why Degussa P25 is a good photocatalyst. Means to avoid R-CO II site-blocking is discussed. Improved solar light efficiencies are difficulty to achieve in cation doped TiO II despite higher visible light absorption and stronger adsorbate-surface interactions.

  11. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  12. Electronic structure and polar catastrophe at the surface of LixCoO2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Y.; Matsumoto, R.; Yagihara, T.; Iwai, C.; Miyoshi, K.; Takeuchi, J.; Horiba, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Saini, N. L.; Mizokawa, T.

    2017-09-01

    We report an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of LixCoO2 single crystals which have a hole-doped CoO2 triangular lattice. Similar to NaxCoO2 , the Co 3 d a1 g band crosses the Fermi level with strongly renormalized band dispersion while the Co 3 d eg' bands are fully occupied in LixCoO2 (x =0.46 and 0.71). At x =0.46 , the Fermi surface area is consistent with the bulk hole concentration indicating that the ARPES result represents the bulk electronic structure. On the other hand, at x =0.71 , the Fermi surface area is larger than the expectation which can be associated with the inhomogeneous distribution of Li reported in the previous scanning tunneling microscopy study by Iwaya et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 126104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.126104]. However, the Co 3 d peak is systematically shifted towards the Fermi level with hole doping excluding phase separation between hole rich and hole poor regions in the bulk. Therefore, the deviation of the Fermi surface area at x =0.71 can be attributed to hole redistribution at the surface avoiding polar catastrophe. The bulk Fermi surface of Co 3 d a1 g is very robust around x =0.5 even in the topmost CoO2 layer due to the absence of the polar catastrophe.

  13. Multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the (SiC 000 1-bar ) surface; structure and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, M; Hicks, J; Tinkey, H; Clark, M C; Hass, J; Conrad, E H; Tejeda, A; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Le Fevre, P; Bertran, F; Soukiassian, P; Martinotti, D

    2010-01-01

    We review the progress towards developing epitaxial graphene as a material for carbon electronics. In particular, we discuss improvements in epitaxial graphene growth, interface control and the understanding of multilayer epitaxial graphene's (MEG's) electronic properties. Although graphene grown on both polar faces of SiC will be discussed, our discussions will focus on graphene grown on the (0 0 0 1-bar ) C-face of SiC. The unique properties of C-face MEG have become apparent. These films behave electronically like a stack of nearly independent graphene sheets rather than a thin Bernal stacked graphite sample. The origins of multilayer graphene's electronic behaviour are its unique highly ordered stacking of non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. While these rotations do not significantly affect the inter-layer interactions, they do break the stacking symmetry of graphite. It is this broken symmetry that leads to each sheet behaving like isolated graphene planes.

  14. Photoelectric effect in surface-barrier structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, V.K.; Tupenevich, P.A.

    1985-08-01

    Deviations from the Fowler law were observed when investigating photoelectric emission in p-type ZnTe surface-barrier structures. The revealed peculiarities of the structure photosensitivity spectrum are explained by the electron transitions involving surface states at the metal-semiconductor interface. (author)

  15. Theoretical model of fast electron emission from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, C.; Burgdoerfer, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Electron emission in glancing-angle ion-surface collisions has become a focus of ion-surface interactions. Electron spectra can provide detailed information on the above surface neutralization dynamics of multiply charged ions, the electronic structure of the surface (surface density of states), and the long-ranged image interactions near the surface. Recent experiments have found that the convoy peak, well known from ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is dramatically altered. The peak is broadened and shifted in energy which has been attributed to dynamical image interactions. We present a microscopic model for the emission of fast electrons in glancing-angle surface collisions. A classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach is utilized to calculate the evolution of electrons in the presence of their self image, the projectile Coulomb field and the image potential induced by the projectile. The excitation of collective surface modes is also incorporated.

  16. Electronic structure, Fermi surface and optical properties of metallic compound Be{sub 8}(B{sub 48})B{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of Complex Systems, FFPW, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Alahmed, Z.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chyský, Jan [Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, Fermi surface and optical properties for B{sub 8}(Be{sub 48})B{sub 2} compound has been investigated in the support of density functional theory (DFT). The atomic positions of B{sub 8}(Be{sub 48})B{sub 2} compound were optimized by minimization of the forces acting on the atoms using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. We have employed the local density approximation (LDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and Engal-Vosko GGA (EVGGA) to indulgence the exchange correlation potential by solving Kohn–Sham equations. The result shows that the compound is metallic with sturdy hybridization near the Fermi energy level (E{sub F}). The density of states at Fermi energy, N(E{sub F}), is determined by the overlaping between B-p, B-s and Be-s states. This overlaping is strong enough indicating metallic origin with different values of N(E{sub F}). These values are 16.4, 16.27 and 14.89 states/eV, and the corresponding bare linear low-temperature electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be 2.84, 2.82 and 2.58 mJ/mol K{sup 2} for EVGGA, GGA and LDA respectively. There exists a strong hybridization between B-s and B-p states, also between B-s and Be-p states around the Fermi level. The Fermi surface is composed of three sheets. These sheets consist of set of holes and electrons. The bonding features of the compounds are analyzed using the electronic charge density in the (101 and −101) crystallographic planes and also the analyzing of charge density shows covalent bonding between B and B. The linear optical properties are also deliberated and discussed in particulars. - Highlights: • The compound is metallic. • The density of states at the Fermi energy is calculated. • The bare linear low-temperature electronic specific heat coefficient is obtained. • Fermi surface is composed of three sheets. • The bonding features are analyzed using the electronic

  17. Study of the modes of adsorption and electronic structure of hydrogen peroxide and ethanol over TiO2 rutile (110) surface within the context of water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, H.; Idriss, H.

    2018-03-01

    While photocatalytic water splitting over many materials is favourable thermodynamically the kinetic of the reaction is very slow. One of the proposed reasons linked to the slow oxidation reaction rate is H2O2 formation as a reaction intermediate. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) H2O2 is investigated on TiO2 rutile (110) surface to determine its most stable adsorption modes: molecular, (H)O(H)O - (a), partially dissociated, (H)OO - (a), and fully dissociated (a) - OO - (a). We then compare H2O2 interaction to that of a fast hole scavenger molecule, ethanol. Geometry, electronic structure, charge density difference and work function determination of both adsorbates are presented and compared using DFT with different functionals (PBE, PBE-D, PBE-U, and HSE + D). H2O2 is found to be strongly adsorbed on TiO2 rutile (110) surface with adsorption energies reaching 0.95 eV, comparable to that of ethanol (0.89 eV); using GGA PBE. The negative changes in the work function upon adsorption were found to be highest for molecular adsorption ( - 1.23 eV) and lowest for the fully dissociated mode ( - 0.54 eV) of H2O2. This may indicate that electrons flow from the surface to the adsorbate in order to make O(s)-H partially offset the overall magnitude of the oxygen lone pair interaction (of H2O2) with Ti4+ cations. Examination of the electronic structure through density of states (DOS) at the PBE level of computation, indicates that the H2O2 highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is not overlapping with oxygen atoms of TiO2 surface at any of its adsorption modes and at any of the computation methods. Some overlap is seen using the HSE + D computational method. On the other hand the dissociated mode of ethanol (ethoxides) does overlap with all computational methods used. The high adsorption energy and the absence of overlapping of the HOMO level of H2O2 with TiO2 rutile (110) surface may explain why water splitting is slow.

  18. Multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the (SiC 000 1-bar) surface; structure and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprinkle, M; Hicks, J; Tinkey, H; Clark, M C; Hass, J; Conrad, E H [The Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States); Tejeda, A [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS - Univ. de Nancy - UPV-Metz, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Taleb-Ibrahimi, A [UR1 CNRS/Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Le Fevre, P; Bertran, F [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Soukiassian, P; Martinotti, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, SIMA, DSM-IRAMIS-SPCSI, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2010-09-22

    We review the progress towards developing epitaxial graphene as a material for carbon electronics. In particular, we discuss improvements in epitaxial graphene growth, interface control and the understanding of multilayer epitaxial graphene's (MEG's) electronic properties. Although graphene grown on both polar faces of SiC will be discussed, our discussions will focus on graphene grown on the (0 0 0 1-bar) C-face of SiC. The unique properties of C-face MEG have become apparent. These films behave electronically like a stack of nearly independent graphene sheets rather than a thin Bernal stacked graphite sample. The origins of multilayer graphene's electronic behaviour are its unique highly ordered stacking of non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. While these rotations do not significantly affect the inter-layer interactions, they do break the stacking symmetry of graphite. It is this broken symmetry that leads to each sheet behaving like isolated graphene planes.

  19. Surface-site-selective study of valence electronic structures of clean Si(100)-2x1 using Si-L23VV Auger electron-Si-2p photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Nagaoka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Mase, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Valence electronic structures of a clean Si(100)-2x1 surface are investigated in a surface-site-selective way using Si-L 23 VV Auger electron-Si-2p photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy. The Si-L 23 VV Auger electron spectra measured in coincidence with Si-2p photoelectrons emitted from the Si up-atoms or Si 2nd-layer of Si(100)-2x1 suggest that the position where the highest density of valence electronic states located in the vicinity of the Si up-atoms is shifted by 0.8 eV towards lower binding energy relative to that in the vicinity of the Si 2nd-layer. Furthermore, the valence band maximum in the vicinity of the Si up-atoms is indicated to be shifted by 0.1 eV towards lower binding energy relative to that in the vicinity of the Si 2nd-layer. These results are direct evidence of the transfer of negative charge from the Si 2nd-layer to the Si up-atoms. (author)

  20. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  1. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Stroscio, Joseph A [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Haddon, Robert [Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Departments of Chemistry and Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek [LNCMI -CNRS, Grenoble, 38042 Cedex 9 (France); Moon, Jeong-Sun, E-mail: walt.deheer@physics.gateh.ed [HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, CA 90265 (United States)

    2010-09-22

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  2. Gold-induced nanowires on the Ge(001) surface yield a 2D, and not a 1D electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, N.; Heimbuch, Rene; Eliëns, S.; Smit, S.; Frantzeskakis, E.; Caux, J.-S.; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Golden, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic nanowires on semiconductor surfaces induced by the adsorption of metallic atoms have attracted a lot of attention as possible hosts of the elusive, one-dimensional Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The Au/Ge(100) system in particular is the subject of controversy as to whether the Au-induced

  3. Method for surface treatment by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, S.; Doehler, H.; Bartel, R.; Ardenne, T. von.

    1985-01-01

    The invention has been aimed at simplifying the technology and saving energy in modifying surfaces with the aid of electron beams. The described beam-object geometry allows to abandon additional heat treatments. It can be used for surface hardening

  4. Atomic Scale Imaging of the Electronic Structure and Chemistry of Graphene and Its Precursors on Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, George W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-02-16

    The objectives of this project were to reveal the mechanisms and reaction processes that solid carbon materials undergo when combining with gases such as oxygen, water vapor and hydrocarbons. This research was focused on fundamental chemical events taking place on single carbon sheets of graphene, a two-dimensional, polycyclic carbon material that possesses remarkable chemical and electronic properties. Ultimately, this work is related to the role of these materials in mediating the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s), their reactions at interfaces, and the growth of soot particles. Our intent has been to contribute to a fundamental understanding of carbon chemistry and the mechanisms that control the formation of PAH’s, which eventually lead to the growth of undesirable particulates. We expect increased understanding of these basic chemical mechanisms to spur development of techniques for more efficient combustion of fossil fuels and to lead to a concomitant reduction in the production of undesirable solid carbon material.

  5. A facility for the analysis of the electronic structures of solids and their surfaces by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesch, M.; Kim, T. K.; Dudin, P.; Wang, H.; Scott, S.; Harris, P.; Patel, S.; Matthews, M.; Hawkins, D.; Alcock, S. G.; Richter, T.; Mudd, J. J.; Basham, M.; Pratt, L.; Leicester, P.; Longhi, E. C.; Tamai, A.; Baumberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation beamline in the photon energy range of 18-240 eV and an electron spectroscopy end station have been constructed at the 3 GeV Diamond Light Source storage ring. The instrument features a variable polarisation undulator, a high resolution monochromator, a re-focussing system to form a beam spot of 50 × 50 μm2, and an end station for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) including a 6-degrees-of-freedom cryogenic sample manipulator. The beamline design and its performance allow for a highly productive and precise use of the ARPES technique at an energy resolution of 10-15 meV for fast k-space mapping studies with a photon flux up to 2 ṡ 1013 ph/s and well below 3 meV for high resolution spectra.

  6. A facility for the analysis of the electronic structures of solids and their surfaces by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesch, M; Kim, T K; Dudin, P; Wang, H; Scott, S; Harris, P; Patel, S; Matthews, M; Hawkins, D; Alcock, S G; Richter, T; Mudd, J J; Basham, M; Pratt, L; Leicester, P; Longhi, E C; Tamai, A; Baumberger, F

    2017-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation beamline in the photon energy range of 18-240 eV and an electron spectroscopy end station have been constructed at the 3 GeV Diamond Light Source storage ring. The instrument features a variable polarisation undulator, a high resolution monochromator, a re-focussing system to form a beam spot of 50 × 50 μm 2 , and an end station for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) including a 6-degrees-of-freedom cryogenic sample manipulator. The beamline design and its performance allow for a highly productive and precise use of the ARPES technique at an energy resolution of 10-15 meV for fast k-space mapping studies with a photon flux up to 2 ⋅ 10 13 ph/s and well below 3 meV for high resolution spectra.

  7. Electronic structure and electron dynamics at Si(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Kutschera, M.; Schmidt, R.; Orth, C.; Fauster, T. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany); Rohlfing, M. [International University Bremen, School of Engineering and Science, P.O. Box 750 561, Bremen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The electronic structure and electron dynamics at a Si(100) surface is studied by two-photon photoemission (2PPE). At 90 K the occupied D{sub up} dangling-bond state is located 150{+-}50 meV below the valence-band maximum (VBM) at the center of the surface Brillouin zone anti {gamma} and exhibits an effective hole mass of (0.5{+-}0.15)m{sub e}. The unoccupied D{sub down} band has a local minimum at anti {gamma} at 650{+-}50 meV above the VBM and shows strong dispersion along the dimer rows of the c(4 x 2) reconstructed surface. At 300 K the D{sub down} position shifts comparable to the Si conduction-band minimum by 40 meV to lower energies but the dispersion of the dangling-bond states is independent of temperature. The surface band bending for p-doped silicon is less than 30 meV, while acceptor-type defects cause significant and preparation-dependent band bending on n-doped samples. 2PPE spectra of Si(100) are dominated by interband transitions between the occupied and unoccupied surface states and emission out of transiently and permanently charged surface defects. Including electron-hole interaction in many-body calculations of the quasi-particle band structure leads us to assign a dangling-bond split-off state to a quasi-one-dimensional surface exciton with a binding energy of 130 meV. Electrons resonantly excited to the unoccupied D{sub down} dangling-bond band with an excess energy of about 350 meV need 1.5{+-}0.2 ps to scatter via phonon emission to the band bottom at anti {gamma} and relax within 5 ps with an excited hole in the occupied surface band to form an exciton living for nanoseconds. (orig.)

  8. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  9. THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF AG/CU(100) SURFACE ALLOYS STUDIES BY AUGER-PHOTOELECTRON COINCIDENCE SPECTROSCOPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARENA,D.A.; BARTYNSKI,R.A.; HULBERT,S.L.

    2001-10-08

    We have measured the Ag and Pd M{sub 5}VV Auger spectrum in coincidence with Ag and Pd 4d{sub 5/2} photoelectrons for the Ag/Cu(100) and Pd/Cu(100) systems, respectively, as a function of admetal coverage. These systems form surface alloys (i.e. random substitutional alloys in the first atomic layer) for impurity concentrations in the 0.1 monolayer range. For these systems, the centroid of the impurity 4d levels is expected to shift away from the Fermi level by {approx}1 eV [Ruban et al., Journal of Molecular Catalysis. A 115 (1997) 421], an effect that should be easily seen in coincidence core-valence-valence Auger spectra. We find that the impurity Auger spectra of both systems shift in a manner that is consistent with d-band moving away from EF. However, the shift for Pd is considerably smaller than expected, and a shift almost absent for Ag. The disagreement between theory and experiment is most likely caused by the neglect of lattice relaxations in the calculations.

  10. Porphyrin adsorbed on the (101[combining macron]0) surface of the wurtzite structure of ZnO--conformation induced effects on the electron transfer characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Mika; Kuisma, Mikael; Cramariuc, Oana; Golovanov, Viacheslav; Hukka, Terttu I; Tkachenko, Nikolai; Rantala, Tapio T

    2013-10-28

    Electron transfer at the adsorbate-surface interface is crucial in many applications but the steps taking place prior to and during the electron transfer are not always thoroughly understood. In this work a model system of 4-(porphyrin-5-yl)benzoic acid adsorbed as a corresponding benzoate on the ZnO wurtzite (101[combining macron]0) surface is studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT. Emphasis is on the initial photoexcitation of porphyrin and on the strength of coupling between the porphyrin LUMO or LUMO + 1 and the ZnO conduction band that plays a role in the electron transfer. Firstly, ZnO wurtzite bulk is optimized to minimum energy geometry and the properties of the isolated ZnO (101[combining macron]0) surface model and the porphyrin model are discussed to gain insight into the combined system. Secondly, various orientations of the model porphyrin on the ZnO surface are studied: the porphyrin model standing perpendicularly to the surface and gradually brought close to the surface by tilting the linker in a few steps. The porphyrin model approaches the surface either sideways with hydrogen atoms of the porphyrin ring coming down first or twisted in a ca. 45° angle, giving rise to π-interactions of the porphyrin ring with ZnO. Because porphyrins are closely packed and near the surface, emerging van der Waals (vdW) interactions are examined using Grimme's D2 method. While the orientation affects the initial excitation of porphyrin only slightly, the coupling between the LUMO and LUMO + 1 of porphyrin and the conduction band of ZnO increases considerably if porphyrin is close to the surface, especially if the π-electrons are interacting with the surface. Based on the results of coupling studies, not only the distance between porphyrin and the ZnO surface but also the orientation of porphyrin can greatly affect the electron transfer.

  11. Electronic structure and scanning tunnelling microscope images of missing-atom defects on MoS{sub 2} and MoTe{sub 2} surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, J.C.; Fisher, A.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-05

    Missing-atom defects on the transition metal dichalcogenides MoS{sub 2} and MoTe{sub 2} have been studied using the projector augmented-wave method, based on ab initio density functional theory. The presence of the vacancies results in localized electronic states in the surface band gap which can affect the STM image, and on the basis of our results we believe that the hole and trimer defects such as those observed by Fuchs et al could be explained by single-missing-chalcogen and single-missing-metal-atom defects respectively. It is found that the chalcogen vacancy systems behave in a similar way for both MoS{sub 2} and MoTe{sub 2}; however, the system of MoTe{sub 2} with a metal vacancy is discovered to be a Jahn-Teller system, while the equivalent MoS{sub 2} system is not. The effects that this has on the atomic and electronic structure and the STM images are discussed. (author)

  12. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  13. Electronic structure of silicon superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Moriarty, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Utilizing a new complex-band-structure technique, the electronic structure of model Si-Si/sub 1-x/Ge/sub x/ and MOS superlattices has been obtained over a wide range of layer thickness d (11 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 110 A). For d greater than or equal to 44 A, it is found that these systems exhibit a direct fundamental band gap. Further calculations of band-edge effective masses and impurity scattering rates suggest the possibility of a band-structure-driven enhancement in electron mobility over bulk silicon

  14. Electronic structure of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Susumu [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2000-03-01

    The electronic structure of superheavy elements, from element 121 to 131, studied using the relativistic density-functional theory with quantum electrodynamical corrections (Berit interaction) by MacDonald and Vosko, is reported. These corrections give rise to a modification to previous results, and the g electron is found to appear from element 126. Since a recent study on molecular systems has clarified the surprising accuracy of the density-functional approach in evaluating the relative energy difference of ground and excited states, a further study of the electronic configuration of heavy elements using the relativistic density-functional theory and the further improvement of the theory are both awaited. (author)

  15. First principle study of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals are studied. The calculations are based on the full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), in addition the Engel–Vosko (EV-GGA) formalism was also applied. The DFT calculations show that these compounds have metallic origin. The contribution of different bands was analyzed from total and partial density of states curves. The values of the density of states at Fermi energy (N(E{sub F})) for ThCu{sub 5}In (ThCu{sub 5}Sn) is 1.75 (1.63) states/eV unit cell. The bare electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be equal to 0.30 and 0.28 mJ/mol-K{sup 2} for ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn, respectively. The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction. The bonding features are analyzed by using the electronic charge density contour in the (101) crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. - Highlights: • The DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn compounds. • This study shows that the nature of the two compounds is metallic. • Crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction.

  16. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots.

  17. Computational Electronic Structure of Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachiyo, Teepanis; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2003-03-01

    Hemoglobin is an oxygen transporting protein whereby O2 binds reversibly to an iron-porphyrin active site. Upon binding of O2 the iron-porphyrin complex undergoes subtle structural rearrangements with a concomitant change from the ferrous (deoxyhemoglobin) to the ferric (oxyhemoglobin) oxidation states. We have studied the electronic structure of oxyhemoglobin within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). A geometrical model based on the X-ray crystallographic structure was fully optimized utilizing all-electron basis sets and gradient-corrected exchange correlation density functionals. As suggested by experiment, assuming that the molecular ground state was a singlet, the calculations showed an ``incipient" open-shell electronic structure. There was a very small but finite amount of spin density at the iron site and a spin density of equal magnitude but opposite sign localized on O_2. The bonding between Fe and O2 was dominated by two pairs of electrons nominally occupying d orbitals of Fe or π orbitals of O_2. However, strong electron delocalization was predicted between iron and dioxygen consistent with the incipient open-shell singlet configuration of the active site. Upon binding to iron, the bond length of O2 increased as compared to that of the free ligand due to weaker interaction among the two oxygens. Simulations of the binding process were carried out which show that the orientation of O2 with respect to the porphyrin plane follows a specific trend which minimizes the overall electronic energy. Finally, our calculations found a ``side-on" geometry, where both oxygens bind to Fe, as a stable but excited state configuration.

  18. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  19. The powerful pulsed electron beam effect on the metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Yuferov, V.B.; Kosik, N.A.; Druj, O.S.; Skibenko, E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results of the influence of powerful pulsed electron beams on the surface structure,hardness and corrosion resistance of the Cr18ni10ti steel are presented. The experiments were carried out in the powerful electron accelerators of directional effect VGIK-1 and DIN-2K with an energy up to approx 300 KeV and a power density of 10 9 - 10 11 W/cm 2 for micro- and nanosecond range. The essential influence of the irradiation power density on the material structure was established. Pulsed powerful beam action on metallic surface leads to surface melting,modification of the structure and structure-dependent material properties. The gas emission and mass-spectrometer analysis of the beam-surface interaction were defined

  20. Surface-Plasmon-Driven Hot Electron Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchao; He, Shuai; Guo, Wenxiao; Hu, Yue; Huang, Jiawei; Mulcahy, Justin R; Wei, Wei David

    2017-11-30

    Visible-light-driven photochemistry has continued to attract heightened interest due to its capacity to efficiently harvest solar energy and its potential to solve the global energy crisis. Plasmonic nanostructures boast broadly tunable optical properties coupled with catalytically active surfaces that offer a unique opportunity for solar photochemistry. Resonant optical excitation of surface plasmons produces energetic hot electrons that can be collected to facilitate chemical reactions. This review sums up recent theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding the underlying photophysical processes in hot electron generation and discusses various electron-transfer models on both plasmonic metal nanostructures and plasmonic metal/semiconductor heterostructures. Following that are highlights of recent examples of plasmon-driven hot electron photochemical reactions within the context of both cases. The review concludes with a discussion about the remaining challenges in the field and future opportunities for addressing the low reaction efficiencies in hot-electron-induced photochemistry.

  1. Reflection of Slow Electrons from Solid Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaev, Alexander; Ainov, Matsak; Kaganovich, Igor; Demidov, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    Given that progress of future plasma technologies depends on control of electron coefficient reflection r0, the development of methods of measurement and control of r0 is of great importance. Published experimental data on r0 for slow electrons are inconsistent and sometime give large values up to r0 ~ 0 , 8 and even higher. This talk presents a technique for r0 measurements in low pressure plasmas in the presence of transverse magnetic field. It is found that for poly-crystal surface, effective reflection coefficient can really reach value of 0.8. It is demonstrated that it is connected to additional reflection from potential barrier near the surfaces. The contribution of electron reflection from the barrier and the surface has been divided and studied. The data have been confirmed at different mono-crystal surfaces. This work was supported by DoE Fusion Energy Sciences contract DE-SC0001939 and Education Ministry of the RF.

  2. Phosphogypsum surface characterisation using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of application of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to examinations of the samples of natural gypsum and phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has a well developed crystalline structure, and appear in two polymorphous forms, of rombic and hexagonal shape crystals. Natural gypsum has a poorly crystalline structure. The differences in crystalline structure influence the chemical behavior of these row materials.

  3. Surface roughness from highlight structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Rong; Koenderink, Jan J.; Kappers, Astrid M L

    1999-01-01

    Highlights are due to specular reflection and cause the lustrous or mirrorlike appearance of many material surfaces. We investigated in detail the structure of highlight patterns that are due to material surface roughness. We interpret results in terms of a simple model of a random Gaussian surface.

  4. Single crystal surface structure by bragg scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens

    1985-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is becoming an important tool in the measurements of surface structures. Single crystalline samples are used as in Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED)-studies. The X-ray technique is somewhat more involved due to the need of bright, collimated photon sources, in general...

  5. Bioinspired structured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-24

    Nature has evolved objects with desired functionality using commonly found materials. Nature capitalizes on hierarchical structures to achieve functionality. The understanding of the functions provided by objects and processes found in nature can guide us to produce nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes with desirable functionality. Various natural objects which provide functionality of commercial interest have been characterized to understand how a natural object provides functionality. We have modeled and fabricated structures in the lab using nature's route and developed optimum structures. Once it is understood how nature does it, optimum structures have been fabricated using smart materials and fabrication techniques. This feature article provides an overview of four topics: Lotus effect, rose petal effect, gecko feet, and shark skin.

  6. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-12-19

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  7. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  8. Size effects and charge transport in metals: Quantum theory of the resistivity of nanometric metallic structures arising from electron scattering by grain boundaries and by rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Raul C.; Arenas, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    We discuss recent progress regarding size effects and their incidence upon the coefficients describing charge transport (resistivity, magnetoresistance, and Hall effect) induced by electron scattering from disordered grain boundaries and from rough surfaces on metallic nanostructures; we review recent measurements of the magneto transport coefficients that elucidate the electron scattering mechanisms at work. We review as well theoretical developments regarding quantum transport theories that allow calculating the increase in resistivity induced by electron-rough surface scattering (in the absence of grain boundaries) from first principles—from the parameters that describe the surface roughness that can be measured with a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). We evaluate the predicting power of the quantum version of the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory and of the model proposed by Calecki, abandoning the method of parameter fitting used for decades, but comparing instead theoretical predictions with resistivity measured in thin films where surface roughness has also been measured with a STM, and where electron-grain boundary scattering can be neglected. We also review the theory of Mayadas and Shatzkes (MS) [Phys. Rev. B 1, 1382 (1970)] used for decades, and discuss its severe conceptual difficulties that arise out of the fact that: (i) MS employed plane waves to describe the electronic states within the metal sample having periodic grain boundaries, rather than the Bloch states known since the thirties to be the solutions of the Schrödinger equation describing electrons propagating through a Krönig-Penney [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 130, 499 (1931)] periodic potential; (ii) MS ignored the fact that the wave functions describing electrons propagating through a 1-D disordered potential are expected to decay exponentially with increasing distance, a fact known since the work of Anderson [Phys. Rev. 109, 1492 (1958)] in 1958 for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in

  9. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, A.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq); Mohammad, F.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Tikreet, Tikreet (Iraq); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Mukesh [Physics Division, Forensic Science Laboratory, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using {sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  10. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaleb, A.M.; Mohammad, F.M.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Sharma, Mukesh; Ahuja, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using 241 Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi

  11. Study of the structure of a thin aluminum layer on the vicinal surface of a gallium arsenide substrate by high-resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovygin, M. V., E-mail: lemi@miee.ru; Borgardt, N. I. [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation); Seibt, M. [Universität Göttingen, IV Physikalisches Institut (Germany); Kazakov, I. P.; Tsikunov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of electron-microscopy studies of a thin epitaxial aluminum layer deposited onto a misoriented gallium-arsenide substrate are reported. It is established that the layer consists of differently oriented grains, whose crystal lattices are coherently conjugated with the substrate with the formation of misfit dislocations, as in the case of a layer on a singular substrate. Atomic steps on the substrate surface are visualized, and their influence on the growth of aluminum crystal grains is discussed.

  12. Electron emission at the rail surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, L.; Battech, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors examine the processes by which current is transferred from the cathode rail to the plasma armature in an arc-driven railgun. Three electron emission mechanisms are considered, namely thermionic emission, field-enhanced thermionic emission (or Schottky emission), and photoemission. The author's calculations show that the dominant electron emission mechanism depends, to a great extent, on the work function of the rail surface, the rail surface temperature, the electric field at the rail surface, and the effective radiation temperature of the plasma. For conditions that are considered to be typical of a railgun armature, Schottky emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism, providing current densities on the order of 10 9 A/m 2

  13. Electronic structure of lanthanide scandates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Christopher A.; Koirala, Pratik; Marks, Laurence D.

    2018-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations were used to study the electronic structure of three lanthanide scandates: GdSc O3,TbSc O3 , and DySc O3 . X-ray photoelectron spectra simulated from first-principles calculations using a combination of on-site hybrid and GGA +U methods were found to be in good agreement with experimental x-ray photoelectron spectra. The hybrid method was used to model the ground state electronic structure and the GGA +U method accounted for the shift of valence state energies due to photoelectron emission via a Slater-Janak transition state approach. From these results, the lanthanide scandate valence bands were determined to be composed of Ln 4 f ,O 2 p , and Sc 3 d states, in agreement with previous work. However, contrary to previous work the minority Ln 4 f states were found to be located closer to, and in some cases at, the valence band maximum. This suggests that minority Ln 4 f electrons may play a larger role in lanthanide scandate properties than previously thought.

  14. Surface study of liquid 3He using surface state electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahama, K.; Ito, S.; Suto, H.; Kono, K.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of surface state electrons (SSE) on liquid 3 He, μ 3 , aiming to study the elementary surface excitations of the Fermi liquid. A gradual increase of μ 3 below 300 mK is attributed to the scattering of electrons by ripplons. Ripplons do exist in 3 He down to 100 mK. We observe an abrupt decrease of μ 3 , due to the transition to the Wigner solid (WS). The dependences of the WS conductivity and mobility on temperature and magnetic field differ from the SSE behavior on liquid 4 He

  15. Generation of X-rays by 850 MeV electrons in a novel periodic multicrystal structure on a GaAs plate surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplin, V.V.; Uglov, S.R.; Zabaev, V.N.; Kanaev, V.G.; Litvin, S.V.; Timchenko, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    A novel type of a periodical crystalline target for the generation of coherent X-rays by relativistic electrons is described. The target has been done on the surface of a GaAs crystal plate by means of microlitography. The etched microstructure is a system of about 300 stripes 14 μm thick, 100 μm high and the gaps between the stripes are 29 μm. The measured spectra and orientational dependences of the X-rays emitted at an angle of 19 deg. to the 850 MeV electron beam of the Tomsk synchrotron are discussed. The generated 63 keV radiation consists of parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) and diffracted X-ray transition radiation (DTR). It has been shown that the intensity of the DTR component of the generated X-rays is much more great than that of the PXR

  16. Generation of X-rays by 850 MeV electrons in a novel periodic multicrystal structure on a GaAs plate surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplin, V V; Zabaev, V N; Kanaev, V G; Litvin, S V; Timchenko, N A

    2000-01-01

    A novel type of a periodical crystalline target for the generation of coherent X-rays by relativistic electrons is described. The target has been done on the surface of a GaAs crystal plate by means of microlitography. The etched microstructure is a system of about 300 stripes 14 mu m thick, 100 mu m high and the gaps between the stripes are 29 mu m. The measured spectra and orientational dependences of the X-rays emitted at an angle of 19 deg. to the 850 MeV electron beam of the Tomsk synchrotron are discussed. The generated 63 keV radiation consists of parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) and diffracted X-ray transition radiation (DTR). It has been shown that the intensity of the DTR component of the generated X-rays is much more great than that of the PXR.

  17. Structure determination of disordered organic molecules on surfaces from the Bragg spots of low-energy electron diffraction and total energy calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, H.C.; Weinert, M.; Saldin, D.K.; Stacchiola, D.; Zheng, T.; Tysoe, W.T.

    2004-01-01

    We show that an analysis of the intensity versus energy variation of Bragg spots due to low-energy electron diffraction from a disordered overlayer of molecules on a crystal surface allows a much more convenient method of determining the local adsorption geometries of such molecules than previously analyzed weak diffuse diffraction patterns. For the case of methanol on Pd(111), we show that the geometry determined by this means from experimental diffraction data is in excellent agreement with the predictions of density functional total energy calculations

  18. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of η e (le) 130 and η 0 ∼ 10 4 respectively, with 1 MeV K + incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as η e ∝ 1/cos(θ), where θ is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90 o ) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62 o . Gas desorption varies more slowly with θ (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of ∼2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K + ions backscatter when incident at 88-89 o from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within ∼10 o of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90 o . Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams

  19. Contact lens surface by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jung Hyuck; Lee, Suk Ju; Hwang, Kwang Ha; Jeon Jin

    2011-01-01

    Contact lens materials needs good biocompatibility, high refractive index, high optical transparency, high water content etc. Surface treat method by using plasma and radiation can modify the physical and/or chemical properties of the contact lens surface. Radiation technology such as electron beam irradiation can apply to polymerization reaction and enhance the functionality of the polymer.The purpose of this study is to modify of contact lens surface by using Eb irradiation technology. Electron beam was irradiated to the contact lens surface which was synthesized thermal polymerization method and commercial contact lens to modify physical and chemical properties. Ft-IR, XP, UV-vis spectrophotometer, water content, oxygen trans-metastability were used to characterize the surface state, physicochemical, and optical property of the contact lens treated with Eb. The water content and oxygen transmissibility of the contact lens treated with Eb were increased due to increase in the hydrophilic group such as O-C=O and OH group on the contact lens surface which could be produced by possible reaction between carbon and oxygen during the Eb irradiation. All of the lenses showed the high optical transmittance above 90%. In this case of B/Es, TES, Ti contact lens, the optical transmittance decreased about 5% with increasing Eb dose in the wavelength of UV-B region. The contact lens modified by Eb irradiation could improve the physical properties of the contact lens such as water content and oxygen transmissibility

  20. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  1. Electronically controllable spoof localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong Jin; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Liu; Xun Xiao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Electronically controllable multipolar spoof localized surface plasmons (LSPs) are experimentally demonstrated in the microwave frequencies. It has been shown that half integer order LSPs modes exist on the corrugated ring loaded with a slit, which actually arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances. By mounting active components across the slit in the corrugated rings, electronic switchability and tunability of spoof LSPs modes have been accomplished. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate efficient dynamic control of the spoof LSPs. These elements may form the basis of highly integrated programmable plasmonic circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  2. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  3. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunnik, J.N.M. van.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  4. Local electronic structure, work function, and line defect dynamics of ultrathin epitaxial ZnO layers on a Ag(1 1 1) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, T; Liu, S; Shiotari, A; Baugh, D; Shaikhutdinov, S; Wolf, M

    2016-12-14

    Using combined low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy we studied the local electronic structure and work function change of the (0 0 0 1)-oriented epitaxial ZnO layers on a Ag(1 1 1) substrate. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) revealed that the conduction band minimum monotonically downshifts as the number of the ZnO layers increases up to 4 monolayers (ML). However, it was found by field emission resonance (FER) spectroscopy that the local work function of Ag(1 1 1) slightly decreases for 2 ML thick ZnO but it dramatically changes and drops by about 1.2 eV between 2 and 3 ML, suggesting a structural transformation of the ZnO layer. The spatial variation of the conduction band minimum and the local work function change were visualized at the nanometer scale by mapping the STS and FER intensities. Furthermore, we found that the ZnO layers contained line defects with a few tens of nm long, which can be removed by the injection of a tunneling electron into the conduction band.

  5. First Principle Calculation of Electronic, Optical Properties and Photocatalytic Potential of CuO Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Faozan

    2016-01-01

    We have performed DFT calculations of electronic structure, optical properties and photocatalytic potential of the low-index surfaces of CuO. Photocatalytic reaction on the surface of semiconductor requires the appropriate band edge of the semiconductor surface to drive redox reactions. The calculation begins with the electronic structure of bulk system; it aims to determine realistic input parameters and band gap prediction. CuO is an antiferromagnetic material with strong electronic correla...

  6. Surface dynamics using pulsed electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ally S. Y.; Jones, Robert G.

    2000-04-01

    Line of sight time of flight has been used to measure the translational energy of ethene formed by dissociative electron attachment of adsorbed dihalocarbons (XCH 2CH 2Y) on Cu(111) at 100 K. A pulsed electron beam was used to generate low energy secondary electrons at the surface, which were the active agents in initiating the decomposition, XCH 2CH 2Y(ads)+e -→XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)+Y(chem)+e -, XCH 2CH 2rad (ads)→C 2H 4(g)+X(chem). For 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) adsorbed with a spacer layer of chemisorbed chlorine between it and the Cu(111)surface, the TOF data could be fitted using three Maxwell distributions with fast (960 K), slow (180 K) and diffusion ('20 K') components. For a single monolayer of DCE adsorbed directly on the clean Cu(111) surface the fast (1230 K) and slow (225 K) components increased in temperature, indicating that the copper surface was affecting the reaction. For 1-bromo-2-chloroethane the results were the same, consistent with both molecules dissociating via a common intermediate, ClC 2H 4rad (ads). For 1,2-dibromoethane the intermediate is different, BrC 2H 4rad , and decomposition of a monolayer of this molecule on clean Cu(111) exhibited fast (1850 K) and slow (270 K) components, both higher than the corresponding temperatures for DCE. The dynamics of these reactions and the origin of the two Maxwell distributions are discussed in terms of the energy available within the radical, and from the formation of the chemisorbed halogen when the radical dissociates.

  7. Electronic structure and Compton profiles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal Ahuja, Babu; Rathor, Ashish; Sharma, Vinit; Sharma, Yamini; Ramniklal Jani, Ashvin; Sharma, Balkrishna

    2008-01-01

    The energy bands, density of states and Compton profiles of tungsten have been computed using band structure methods, namely the spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (SPR-KKR) approach as well as the linear combination of atomic orbitals with Hartree-Fock scheme and density functional theory. The full potential linearized augmented plane wave scheme to calculate these properties and the Fermi surface topology(except the momentum densities) have also been used to analyze the theoretical data on the electron momentum densities. The directional Compton profiles have been measured using a 100 mCi 241 Am Compton spectrometer. From the comparison, the measured anisotropies are found to be in good agreement with the SPR-KKR calculations. The band structure calculations are also compared with the available data. (orig.)

  8. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  9. The structure of stepped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) as far as multiple scattering effects are concerned, is discussed. The ion fractions of lithium, sodium and potassium scattered from a copper (100) surface have been measured as a function of several experimental parameters. The ratio of the intensities of the single and double scattering peaks observed in ion scattering spectroscopy has been determined and ion scattering spectroscopy applied in the multiple scattering mode is used to determine the structure of a stepped Cu(410) surface. The average relaxation of the (100) terraces of this surface appears to be very small. The adsorption of oxygen on this surface has been studied with LEIS and it is indicated that oxygen absorbs dissociatively. (C.F.)

  10. Investigation of structural, surface morphological, optical properties and first-principles study on electronic and magnetic properties of (Ce, Fe)-co doped ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arul Mary, J. [Catalysis and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry Loyola College, Chennai 600 034 (India); Judith Vijaya, J., E-mail: jjvijayaloyola@yahoo.co.in [Catalysis and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry Loyola College, Chennai 600 034 (India); Bououdina, M. [Departments of Physics, College of Science, University of Bahrain, PO Box 32038 Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); John Kennedy, L. [Materials Division, School of Advanced Sciences, Vellore Institute of Technology (VIT) University, Chennai Campus, Chennai 600 127 (India); Daie, J.H.; Song, Y. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, 2 West Wenhua Road, Weiahi 264209 (China)

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of ((Zn{sub 1−2x}Ce{sub x}Fe{sub x}) O (x=0.00, 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0.05)) nanoparticles via microwave combustion by using urea as a fuel. To understand how the dopant influenced the structural, magnetic and optical properties of nanoparticles, it was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The stability and magnetic properties of Ce and Fe co-doped ZnO were probed by first principle calculations. From the analysis of X-ray diffraction, the samples are identified with the wurtzite crystal structure. The change in lattice parameters, micro-strain, and a small shift in XRD peaks confirms the substitution of co dopants into the ZnO lattice. Morphological investigation of the products revealed the existence of irregular shapes, such as spherical, spherodial and hexagonal. DRS measurements showed a decrease in the energy gap with increasing dopants contents, probably due to an increase in the lattice parameters. PL spectra consist of visible emission, due to the electronic defects, which are related to deep level emissions, such as oxide antisite (O{sub Zn}), interstitial zinc (Zn{sub i}), interstitial oxygen (O{sub i}) and zinc vacancy (V{sub Zn}). Magnetic measurements showed a ferromagnetic behavior for all the doped samples at room temperature. The first principle calculation results showed that the Ce governs the stability, while the Fe adjusts the magnetic characteristics in the Ce and Fe co-doped ZnO.

  11. Structure of the moon's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Fielder, Gilbert

    1961-01-01

    Structure of the Moon's Surface aims to assemble and marshal relevant matter, and to produce a largely unprejudiced text which brings lunar studies up to date and stresses the importance of certain features of the Moon which have frequently been disregarded in the past, largely because of lack of knowledge about them. The book contains 14 chapters organized into two parts. Part I reviews and summarizes important physical problems. These include the liberations of the moon; height determinations of points of the moon's surface; the figure of the moon; and the moon's temperature and atmosphere.

  12. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  13. Electron scattering and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, T.W.; Walecka, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Electron scattering is treated within the framework of the one-photon exchange approximation. Electron excitation of collective particle-hole states (including the giant dipole resonance) is detailed. The process of quasi-elastic scattering is then discussed within the framework of the Fermi gas model. A brief review is presented of the relationship between electromagnetic interactions and semileptonic weak interactions, stressing the extra knowledge that the electron scattering yields. Finally, a few special topics of interest in intermediate energy physics are examined. 221 references

  14. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  15. On the structure of Si(100) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Back, Seoin; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Ji, Hyunjun

    2013-01-01

    We revisit a dangling theoretical question of whether the surface reconstruction of the Si(100) surface would energetically favor the symmetric or buckled dimers on the intrinsic potential energy surfaces at 0 K. This seemingly simple question is still unanswered definitively since all existing...... of the electron-electron correlation as well as proper multireference wave functions when exploring the extremely delicate potential energy surfaces of the reconstructed Si(100) surface. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC....

  16. Electronic Structure at Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    electronic properties of rnio 3 (r = pr, nd, eu, ho and y) perovskites studied by resonant soft x-ray magnetic powder diffraction. Journal of Physics...artificially nanostructured materials based on transition metal oxides, thereby enabling the design of materials with desired correlated electron properties ... properties . The means of achieving this goal is the implementation and development of the hybrid methodology of density functional theory and

  17. Possible scenarios for SiS formation in the interstellar medium: Electronic structure calculations of the potential energy surfaces for the reactions of the SiH radical with atomic sulphur and S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Marzio; Mancini, Luca; Skouteris, Dimitrios; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Faginas Lago, Noelia; Podio, Linda; Codella, Claudio; Lefloch, Bertrand; Balucani, Nadia

    2018-03-01

    In this Letter we report on the first characterization of the reactions SiH + S and SiH + S2 by means of electronic structure calculations of the stationary points along the reactive potential energy surfaces. According to our calculations, both reactions are barrierless and can lead to the formation of SiS (a species observed in interstellar objects) for which there are no convincing formation routes in current astrochemical models. Furthermore, we have verified that SiS2 cannot be considered an interstellar reservoir of sulphur because it is easily attacked by the abundant H atoms.

  18. Solvated electron structure in glassy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, L.

    1981-01-01

    Current knowledge of the detailed geometrical structure of solvated electrons in aqueous and organic media is summarized. The geometry of solvated electrons in glassy methanol, ethanol, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran is discussed. Advanced electron magnetic resonance methods and development of new methods of analysis of electron spin echo modulation patterns, second moment line shapes, and forbidden photon spin-flip transitions for paramagnetic species in these disordered systems are discussed. 66 references are cited

  19. Electronic structure and tautomerism of thioamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); McGlynn, Sean P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of thioamide group and its relation to Lewis basicity. • Tautomerism of the (thio)amide groups. • Substituent effects on the electronic structure of (thio)amide group. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several thioamides have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of thioamide derivatives are discussed. The predominant tautomers in the gas phase are of keto–(thio)keto form. The addition of cyclohexanone moiety to the thioamide group enhances the Lewis base character of the sulfur atom. The addition of phenyl group to the (thio)amide group significantly affects its electronic structure.

  20. Wetting of geometrically structured surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, L; Mistura, G

    2003-01-01

    We review recent experiments on the growth of cryogenic fluids adsorbed on various substrates structured in different ways. On a very well defined array of microscopic linear wedges sculpted on thin Si wafers, the film mass is found to diverge as a power law in the chemical potential difference from saturation with an exponent x=-1.96+-0.10, in very good agreement with recent scaling analysis results. For the other, more irregular patterns, the observed exponents range from -0.95 to -2. In any case, they are always much smaller than those found for flat or rough surfaces.

  1. Electron scattering and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the historical development and the theory necessary to the interpretation of the experimental results is made. Some measurement techniques, experimental results and the technique of analysis of these data are presented. Future perspectives, due to the appearence of continous electron current accelerators, in this field of study are discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  2. The electronic structure of core states under extreme compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    At normal density and for modest compressions, the electronic structure of a metal can be accurately described by treating the conduction electrons and their interactions with the usual methods of band theory. The core electrons remain essentially the same as for an isolated free atom and do not participate in the bonding forces responsible for creating a condensed phase. As the density increases, the core electrons begin to ''see'' one another as the overlap of the tails of wave functions can no longer be neglected. The electronic structure of the core electrons is responsible for an effective repulsive interaction that eventually becomes free-electron-like at very high compressions. The electronic structure of the interacting core electrons may be treated in a simple manner using the Atomic Surface Method (ASM). The ASM is a first-principles treatment of the electronic structure involving a rigorous integration of the Schroedinger equation within the atomic-sphere approximation. Solid phase wave functions are constructed from isolated atom wave functions and the band width W l and the center of gravity of the band C l are obtained from simple formulas. The ASM can also utilize analytic forms of the atomic wave functions and thus provide direct functional dependence of various aspects of the electronic structure. Of particular use in understanding the behavior of the core electrons, the ASM provides the ability to analytically determine the density dependence of the band widths and positions. The process whereby core states interact with one another is best viewed as the formation of narrow electron bands formed from atomic states. As the core-core overlap increases, the bands increase in width and mean energy. In Sec.3 this picture is further developed and from the ASM one obtains the analytic dependence on density of the relative motion of the different bands. Also in Sec. 3 is a discussion of the transition to free electron bands

  3. STRUCTURAL STABILITY AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-31

    Dec 31, 2012 ... of YCu for B1, B2, B3, and L10 phase, and elastic constants Cij (in GPa) for B2 phase. We calculated band structure of YCu compound in the B2 phase at equilibrium volume using the FP-LAPW method within DFT along the higher symmetry directions is presented in Fig. 2. The band structure of this phase ...

  4. Electronic structure and tautomerism of aryl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Šket, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Sket@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 (Slovenia); McGlynn, S.P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Photoelectron spectroscopy, tautomerism. - Highlights: • UV photoelectron spectroscopy of aryl ketones. • The relative stability of tautomers and their electronic structures. • The factors influencing tautomerism. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several aryl ketones (AK) and their α-halo derivatives have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of the AK derivatives are discussed.

  5. Soft electronic structure modulation of surface (thin-film) and bulk (ceramics) morphologies of TiO{sub 2}-host by Pb-implantation: XPS-and-DFT characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zatsepin, D.A. [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Boukhvalov, D.W., E-mail: danil@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Theoretical Physics and Applied Mathematics Department, Ural Federal University, Mira Street 19, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, N.V. [Institute of Electrophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Zatsepin, A.F. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Shur, V.Ya.; Esin, A.A. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 51 Lenin Ave, 620000 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kim, S.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kurmaev, E.Z. [M.N. Miheev Institute of Metal Physics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics and Technology, Ural Federal University, 620002 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Experiment and theory demonstrate significant difference between patterns of Pb-ion implantation in TiO{sub 2}. • In bulk TiO{sub 2} Pb-impurities leads formation of PbO phase. • On the surface of TiO{sub 2}:Pb occur formation of PbxOy configurations. • In both bulk and surface TiO{sub 2}:Pb occur decreasing of the bandgap by shift of valence band about 1 eV up. - Abstract: The results of combined experimental and theoretical study of substitutional and clustering effects in the structure of Pb-doped TiO{sub 2}-hosts (bulk ceramics and thin-film morphologies) are presented. Pb-doping of the bulk and thin-film titanium dioxide was made with the help of pulsed ion-implantation without posterior tempering (Electronic Structure Modulation Mode). The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) qualification of core-levels and valence bands and Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were employed in order to study the yielded electronic structure of Pb-ion modulated TiO{sub 2} host-matrices. The combined XPS-and-DFT analysis has agreed definitely with the scenario of the implantation stimulated appearance of PbO-like structures in the bulk morphology of TiO{sub 2}:Pb, whereas in thin-film morphology the PbO{sub 2}-like structure becomes dominating, essentially contributing weak O/Pb bonding (Pb{sub x}O{sub y} defect clusters). The crucial role of the oxygen hollow-type vacancies for the process of Pb-impurity “insertion” into the structure of bulk TiO{sub 2} was pointed out employing DFT-based theoretical background. Both experiment and theory established clearly the final electronic structure re-arrangement of the bulk and thin-film morphologies of TiO{sub 2} because of the Pb-modulated deformation and shift of the initial Valence Base-Band Width about 1 eV up.

  6. Influence of the projectile charge state on electron emission spectra from a Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Silkin, V. M.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Double differential electron emission distributions produced by grazing impact of fast dressed ions on a Cu(111) surface are investigated focusing on the effects of the electronic band structure. The process is described within the Band-Structure-Based approximation, which is a perturbative method that includes an accurate representation of the electron-surface interaction, incorporating information of the electronic band structure of the solid. Differences in the behavior of the emission spectra for He+ q, Li+ q, Be+ q and C+ q projectiles with different charge states q are explained by the combined effect of the projectile trajectory and the projectile charge distribution.

  7. Magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer at the multichannel surface scattering of conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutsishin, P.P.; Nakhodkin, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer with the (110) surface was studied at the adsorption of tungsten dioxide. The method of low-energy electron diffraction was used to study the symmetry of ordered surface structures. Using the method of the magnetoresistance measurement the character of the scattering of conduction electrons was investigated. THe dependence of magnetoresistance on the surface concentration of tungsten dioxide correlated w1th the structure of the surface layer of atoms, what was explained with allowance for diffraction of conduction electrons at the metal boundary. The magnetoresistance maximum for the (2x2) structure, which characterised decrease in surface conduction under the conditions of static skin effect, was explained by multichannel mirror reflection with the recombinations of electron and ho.le sections of Fermi Surface

  8. Extremely large magnetoresistance and electronic structure of TmSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Hongyun; Lu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Lin; Xu, Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Liu, Kai; Zhou, Shuyun; Xia, Tian-Long

    2018-02-01

    We report the magnetotransport properties and the electronic structure of TmSb. TmSb exhibits extremely large transverse magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Interestingly, the split of Fermi surfaces induced by the nonsymmetric spin-orbit interaction has been observed from SdH oscillation. The analysis of the angle-dependent SdH oscillation illustrates the contribution of each Fermi surface to the conductivity. The electronic structure revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations demonstrates a gap at the X point and the absence of band inversion. Combined with the trivial Berry phase extracted from SdH oscillation and the nearly equal concentrations of electron and hole from Hall measurements, it is suggested that TmSb is a topologically trivial semimetal and the observed XMR originates from the electron-hole compensation and high mobility.

  9. Surface structure and electronic states of epitaxial β-FeSi.sub.2./sub.(100)/Si(001) thin films: Combined quantitative LEED, ab initio DFT, and STM study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Hattori, K.; Someta, M.; Daimon, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 15 (2014), "155305-1"-"155305-9" ISSN 1098-0121 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101201; Murata Science Foundation(JP) Project n. 00295 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron silicide * LEED I-V * DFT * STM * surface reconstruction * surface states Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  10. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  11. Electronic-structure theory of plutonium chalcogenides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shick, Alexander; Havela, L.; Gouder, T.; Rebizant, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 385, č. 1 (2009), 21-24 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0644; GA MŠk OC 144 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : electronic structure * electron correlations * photoemission Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.933, year: 2009

  12. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  13. Orbital approach to the electronic structure of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Canadell, Enric; Iung, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an intuitive yet sound understanding of how structure and properties of solids may be related. The natural link is provided by the band theory approach to the electronic structure of solids. The chemically insightful concept of orbital interaction and the essential machinery of band theory are used throughout the book to build links between the crystal and electronic structure of periodic systems. In such a way, it is shown how important tools for understandingproperties of solids like the density of states, the Fermi surface etc. can be qualitatively sketched and used to ei

  14. Surface structure of AU3Cu(001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, G.A.; Maupai, S.; Dakkouri, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The surface morphology, composition, and structure of Au3Cu(001) as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and surface x-ray diffraction are presented. Atomic resolution STM images reveal distinctive geometric features. The analysis of the surface x-ray diffraction data provides clear evidence...... for the surface structure. [S0163-1829(99)04535-X]....

  15. Internal electronic structure of adatoms on Fe(110) and Fe(100) surfaces: A low-energy Li.sup.+./sup. scattering study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, Y.; Šroubek, Zdeněk; Yarmoff, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 4 (2004), 0454201-0454209 ISSN 1098-0121 Grant - others:Kontakt National Science Foundation(XE) CHE-0091328 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : molecular electronic states Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.075, year: 2004

  16. Changes in Charge Distribution, Molecular Volume, Accessible Surface Area and Electronic Structure along the Reaction Coordinate for a Carbocationic Triple Shift Rearrangement of Relevance to Diterpene Biosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hong, Y.J.; Ponec, Robert; Tantillo, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 35 (2012), s. 8902-8909 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0118 Grant - others:NSF(US) CHE-0957416; NSF(US) CHE-030089 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : carbocationic rearraangements * electron reorganization * multicenter bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.771, year: 2012

  17. Electronic Structure of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental photoelectron spectroscopic results for the actinide metals are reviewed and compared with the theoretical picture of the basic electronic structure that has been developed for the actinides during the last decade. In particular the experimental data confirm the change from...... itinerant to localized 5f electron behaviour calculated to take place between plutonium and americium. From experimental data it is shown that the screening of deep core-holes is due to 5f electrons for the lighter actinide elements and 6d electrons for the heavier elements. A simplified model for the full...

  18. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, J.-M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of the actinide series shows the change between transition metal behavior and lanthanide behavior, between constant weak paramagnetism for thorium and strong Curie-Weiss paramagnetism for curium. Curium is shown to be the first metal of the actinide series to be magnetically ordered, its Neel temperature being 52K. The magnetic properties of the actinides depending on all the peripheral electrons, their electronic structure was studied and an attempt was made to determine it by means of a phenomenological model. Attempts were also made to interrelate the different physical properties which depend on the outer electronic structure [fr

  19. Electronic-Structure-Based Design of Ordered Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bligaard, Thomas; Andersson, M.P.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We describe some recent advances in the methodology of using electronic structure calculations for materials design. The methods have been developed for the design of ordered metallic alloys and metal alloy catalysts, but the considerations we present are relevant for the atomic-scale computational...... discovery of a promising catalytic metal alloy surface with high reactivity and low cost....

  20. Electronic-state control of amino acids on semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masato; Nakayama, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Electronic structures of amino acids on the Si(1 1 1) surfaces are investigated by using ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations. It is shown that among various polar amino acids, a histidine is the only one that can be positively ionized when hole carriers are supplied in the Si substrate, by transferring the hole charge from Si substrate to an amino acid. This result indicates that the ionization of a histidine, which will activate the protein functions, can be controlled electrically by producing amino acid/Si junctions

  1. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  2. Surface excitations in electron backscattering from silicon surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr; Lesiak, B.; Jablonski, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 562, - (2004), s. 92-100 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0237 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : electron-solid interactions * electron-solid scattering and transmission-elastic * electron-solid scattering and transmission-inelastic * Monte Carlo simulation * electron bombardment * silicon Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2004

  3. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  4. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  5. Surface and volume photoemission of hot electrons from plasmonic nanoantennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Ikhsanov, Renat S.

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically compare surface- and volume-based photoelectron emission from spherical nanoparticles, obtaining analytical expressions for the emission rate in both mechanisms. We show that the surface mechanism prevails, being unaffected by detrimental hot electron collisions....

  6. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ''Nonlinear Materials'' seminar series and international conferences including ''Fracture, Friction and Deformation,'' ''Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,'' and ''Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology''; invited talks at international conference on ''Synthetic Metals,'' ''Quantum Phase Transitions,'' ''1996 CECAM Euroconference,'' and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors

  7. Electron stimulated desorption of gases at technological surfaces of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, M.Q.; Williams, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    The release of gas by electron bombardment at aluminium alloy surfaces in vacuum -9 torr has been investigated for a range of treatments including bakeout and glow discharge cleaning. Particular attention has been given to the role of continuous electron bombardment, with current densities and electron energies of up to 1.5 mA cm -2 and 2.0 keV, respectively, over the 10 cm 2 of surface area under irradiation. The observations of desorption efficiency, defined as the number of desorbed molecules per incident electron, conform to a model involving a dynamic balance between adsorption and desorption, with contributions to adsorption from both surface and sub-surface gas. Continuous electron bombardment promotes a surface with low desorption efficiency, -5 mol/electron, however, the conditioning cycle is accelerated significantly by glow discharge treatment. There is evidence of some short-term memory when the samples are exposed to air. (author)

  8. Positron annihilation study of the electronic structure of URu.sub.2./sub.Si.sub.2./sub.: Fermi surface and hidden order parameter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biasini, M.; Rusz, Ján; Mills, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 8 (2009), 085115/1-085115/10 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : positron annihilation * 2D-ACAR * URu 2 Si 2 * density functional theory * hidden order * Fermi surface Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009 http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v79/i8/e085115

  9. The role of substrate electrons in the wetting of a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, Klas Jerker

    2010-01-01

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution...... of charge that enables surface wetting. On open d-shell Pt(111), the ligand field of water alters the distribution of metal d-electrons to reduce the repulsion. The closed-shell Cu d(10) configuration of isostructural Cu(111), however, does not afford this mechanism, resulting in a hydrophobic surface...

  10. Full-potential self-consistent linearized-augmented-plane-wave method for calculating the electronic structure of molecules and surfaces: O2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, E.; Krakauer, H.; Weinert, M.; Freeman, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The linearized-augmented-plane-wave (LAPW) method for thin films is generalized by removing the remaining shape approximation to the potential inside the atomic spheres. A new technique for solving Poisson's equation for a general charge density and potential is described and implemented in the film LAPW method. In the resulting full-potential LAPW method (FLAPW), all contributions to the potential are completely taken into account in the Hamiltonian matrix elements. The accuracy of the method: already well known for clean metal surfaces: is demonstrated for the case of a nearly free (noninteracting) O 2 molecule which is a severe test case of the method because of its large anisotropic charge distribution. Detailed comparisons show that the accuracy of the FLAPW results for O 2 exceeds that of existing state-of-the-art local-density linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals (LCAO)-type calculations, and that taking the full potential LAPW results as a reference, the LCAO basis can be improved by adding off-site functions. Thus the full-potential LAPW is a unified method which is ideally suited to test not only molecular adsorption on surfaces, but also the components of the same system separately, i.e., the extreme limits of the molecule and the clean surface

  11. Surface electron states on the quasi-two-dimensional excess-electron compounds Ca2N and Y2C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Takeshi; Takemoto, Seiji; Tada, Tomofumi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    Compounds having excess electrons from the formal valence viewpoint (electrides) are a new class of materials, which often take low-dimensional structures. We studied the (001) surface electronic structures of quasi-two-dimensional electrides Ca2N and Y2C by density functional theory using a slab model. Both materials were found to have a clean surface state well separated in energy from the bulk states. Furthermore, this state virtually floats above the surface and may be considered to be a hallmark of two-dimensional electrides. For Ca2N , a tight-binding model in the Wannier representation was derived and analyzed, from which we concluded that the surface state, described by extra-surface s -like orbitals, is a Tamm state originating from an abrupt increase in potential energy at the surface.

  12. Polymeric Thin Films for Organic Electronics: Properties and Adaptive Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pignataro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the correlation between morphology, structure and performance of organic electronic devices including thin film transistors and solar cells. In particular, we report on solution processed devices going into the role of the 3D supramolecular organization in determining their electronic properties. A selection of case studies from recent literature are reviewed, relying on solution methods for organic thin-film deposition which allow fine control of the supramolecular aggregation of polymers confined at surfaces in nanoscopic layers. A special focus is given to issues exploiting morphological structures stemming from the intrinsic polymeric dynamic adaptation under non-equilibrium conditions.

  13. Comparison of electronic structure between monolayer silicenes on Ag (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Liang, Lin; Ryuichi, Arafune; Maki, Kawai; Noriaki, Takagi

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structures of monolayer silicenes (4 × 4 and ) grown on Ag (111) surface are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While both phases have similar electronic structures around the Fermi level, significant differences are observed in the higher energy unoccupied states. The DFT calculations show that the contributions of Si 3pz orbitals to the unoccupied states are different because of their different buckled configurations. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 24241040 and 25110008) and the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, Japan.

  14. Electronic structure of ordered and disordered Fe3Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Zs; Dugdale, S. B.; Jarlborg, T.; Bruno, E.; Ginatempo, B.; Staunton, J. B.; Poulter, J.

    2003-06-01

    The electronic structure of invar alloys (i.e. materials in which the near absence of thermal expansion is observed) has been the focus of much study, owing both to the technological applications of these materials and interest in the fundamental mechanism that is responsible for the effect. Here, calculations of the magnetic Compton profiles are presented for ordered and disordered Fe3Pt alloys. Using linear muffin-tin orbital and KKR methods, the latter incorporating the coherent potential approximation to describe the substitutional disorder, the electronic band structure and measurable quantities such as the Fermi surface topology are presented.

  15. Electronic structure of ordered and disordered Fe sub 3 Pt

    CERN Document Server

    Major, Z; Jarlborg, T; Bruno, E; Ginatempo, B; Staunton, J B; Poulter, J

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of invar alloys (i.e. materials in which the near absence of thermal expansion is observed) has been the focus of much study, owing both to the technological applications of these materials and interest in the fundamental mechanism that is responsible for the effect. Here, calculations of the magnetic Compton profiles are presented for ordered and disordered Fe sub 3 Pt alloys. Using linear muffin-tin orbital and KKR methods, the latter incorporating the coherent potential approximation to describe the substitutional disorder, the electronic band structure and measurable quantities such as the Fermi surface topology are presented.

  16. Electronic structure and transport properties of intermetallics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, A.J.; Ellis, D.E.; Welsh, L.B.

    1975-12-01

    The electronic interactions responsible for the unusual properties of several important classes of materials (including the highly anisotropic layered dichalcogenides, and network and cage structure materials and pseudobinary alloys) have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The unique ability of NMR to probe the local electronic properties of the various constituents of an intermetallic compound or alloy has provided important new information including correlations with observed changes in superconducting transition temperatures. Novel theoretical models (including relativistic effects) are found to yield energy band structures, Fermi surfaces, transport properties, charge and spin densities, generalized magnetic susceptibilities, and optical properties in very good agreement with experimental determinations of these observable phenomena. (Author) (GRA)

  17. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  18. Stereoscopic and photometric surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.

    2000-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is one of the most important devices to examine microscopic structures as it offers images of a high contrast range with a large depth of focus. Nevertheless, three-dimensional measurements, as desired in fracture mechanics, have previously not been accomplished. This work presents a system for automatic, robust and dense surface reconstruction in scanning electron microscopy combining new approaches in shape from stereo and shape from photometric stereo. The basic theoretical assumption for a known adaptive window algorithm is shown not to hold in scanning electron microscopy. A constraint derived from this observation yields a new, simplified, hence faster calculation of the adaptive window. The correlation measure itself is obtained by a new ordinal measure coefficient. Shape from photometric stereo in the SEM is formulated by relating the image formation process with conventional photography. An iterative photometric ratio reconstruction is invented based on photometric ratios of backscatter electron images. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated using ground truth data obtained by three alternative shape recovery devices. Most experiments showed relative height accuracy within the tolerances of the alternative devices. (author)

  19. Morphology and electronic properties of silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shu

    2007-12-01

    monitored using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy, and the morphology of the graphitized surface is studied using AFM and STM. Use of H-etched SiC substrates enables a relatively flat surface morphology, although residual steps remain due to unintentional miscut of the wafers. Additionally, some surface roughness in the form of small pits is observed, possibly due to the fact that the surface treatments (H-etching and UHV annealing) having been performed in separate vacuum chambers with an intervening transfer through air. Field-effect transistors have been fabricated with our graphene layers; they show a relatively strong held effect at room temperature, with an electron mobility of 535 cm 2/Vs. This value is somewhat lower than that believed to be theoretically possible for this material, and one possible reason may be the nonideal morphology of the surface (i.e. because of the observed steps and pits). Tunneling spectra of the graphene reveal semi-metallic behavior, consistent with that theoretically expected for an isolated layer of graphene. However, additional discrete states are observed in the spectra, possibly arising from bonding at the graphene/SiC interface. The observation of these states provides important input towards an eventual determination of the complete interface structure, and additionally, such states may be relevant in determining the electron mobility of the graphene. Stepped vicinal SIC{0001} substrates are useful templates for epitaxial growth of various types of layers: thick layers of compound semiconductor (in which the steps help preserving the stacking arrangement in the overlayer), monolayers of graphene, or submonolayer semiconductor layers that form quantum wires along the step edges. Step array produced by H-etching of vicinal SiC (0001) and (0001¯) with various miscut angles have been studied by AFM. H-etching is found to produce full unit-cell-high steps on the (0001) Si-face surfaces, but half

  20. Surface influence on convoy electron emission at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is studied the dependence of the production of convoy electrons induced by H + - 60 KeV with surface conditions of Al targets by in situ deposition of Na and O. The conclusion is that convoy electron production increases with the work function of the surface. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  1. Electronic structure of the actinide dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.J.

    1980-03-01

    The electronic properties of the fluorite structured actinide dioxides have been investigated using the linear muffin tin orbital method in the atomic sphere approximation. CaF 2 with the same structure was also studied because of the relative simplicity of its electronic structure and the greater amount of experimental data available. Band structures were calculated both non self consistently and self consistently. In the non self consistent calculations the effect of changing the approximation to the exchange-correlation potential and the starting atomic configurations was examined. Using the concepts of canonical bands the effects of hybridization were investigated. In particular the 5f electrons included in the band picture were found to mix more strongly into the valence band than indicated by experiment. On this basis the 5f electrons were not included in self consistent calculations which in the density functional formalism are capable of yielding ground state properties. Because of the non participation of the f electrons in the bonding UO 2 only was considered as representative of the actinide dioxides. For comparison CaF 2 was also examined. Using Pettifor's pressure formula to determine the equilibrium condition the lattice constants were calculated to be 0.5% and 5% respectively below the experimental values. (author)

  2. Hydrogen collisions with transition metal surfaces: Universal electronically nonadiabatic adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Yvonne; Jiang, Hongyan; Köckert, Hansjochen; Hertl, Nils; Kammler, Marvin; Janke, Svenja M.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.; Bünermann, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence—consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗i n. S =(S0+a ṡEi n+b ṡM ) *(1 -h (𝜗i n-c ) (1 -cos(𝜗 i n-c ) d ṡh (Ei n-e ) (Ei n-e ) ) ) , where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b =-8.40 ṡ1 0-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b =-1.20 ṡ1 0-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

  3. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  4. Surface magnetic structures in amorphous ferromagnetic microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usov, N.A.; Serebryakova, O.N.; Gudoshnikov, S.A.; Tarasov, V.P.

    2017-01-01

    The spatial period of magnetization perturbations that occur near the surface of magnetic nanotube or nanowire under the influence of surface magnetic anisotropy is determined by means of numerical simulation as a function of the sample geometry and material parameters. The surface magnetization distribution obtained is then used to estimate the period of the surface magnetic texture in amorphous microwire of several micrometers in diameter by means of appropriate variational procedure. The period of the surface magnetic texture in amorphous microwire is found to be significantly smaller than the wire diameter. - Highlights: • Magnetic structure may arise near the magnetic nanotube surface under the influence of surface magnetic anisotropy. • The period of the surface magnetization pattern is calculated as a function of the sample geometry. • Similar magnetic structure may exist in amorphous microwire of several micrometers in diameter. • The period of the surface magnetic structure in amorphous wire is found to be significantly smaller than the wire diameter.

  5. Surface magnetic structures in amorphous ferromagnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usov, N.A., E-mail: usov@obninsk.ru [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, IZMIRAN, 108840 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Serebryakova, O.N.; Gudoshnikov, S.A. [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, IZMIRAN, 108840 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tarasov, V.P. [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-01

    The spatial period of magnetization perturbations that occur near the surface of magnetic nanotube or nanowire under the influence of surface magnetic anisotropy is determined by means of numerical simulation as a function of the sample geometry and material parameters. The surface magnetization distribution obtained is then used to estimate the period of the surface magnetic texture in amorphous microwire of several micrometers in diameter by means of appropriate variational procedure. The period of the surface magnetic texture in amorphous microwire is found to be significantly smaller than the wire diameter. - Highlights: • Magnetic structure may arise near the magnetic nanotube surface under the influence of surface magnetic anisotropy. • The period of the surface magnetization pattern is calculated as a function of the sample geometry. • Similar magnetic structure may exist in amorphous microwire of several micrometers in diameter. • The period of the surface magnetic structure in amorphous wire is found to be significantly smaller than the wire diameter.

  6. The effect of hot electrons and surface plasmons on heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Si Woo; Moon, Song Yi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-01-01

    Hot electrons and surface-plasmon-driven chemistry are amongst the most actively studied research subjects because they are deeply associated with energy dissipation and the conversion processes at the surface and interfaces, which are still open questions and key issues in the surface science community. In this topical review, we give an overview of the concept of hot electrons or surface-plasmon-mediated hot electrons generated under various structural schemes (i.e. metals, metal–semiconductor, and metal–insulator–metal) and their role affecting catalytic activity in chemical reactions. We highlight recent studies on the relation between hot electrons and catalytic activity on metallic surfaces. We discuss possible mechanisms for how hot electrons participate in chemical reactions. We also introduce controlled chemistry to describe specific pathways for selectivity control in catalysis on metal nanoparticles. (topical review)

  7. Surface morphological, mechanical and thermal characterization of electron beam irradiated fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hae Young; Han, Seong Ok; Lee, Jung Soon

    2008-01-01

    The surface morphology of henequen irradiated by electron beam has been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, the extents to which electron beam irradiation affected the tensile and thermal properties of henequen fiber were investigated with Instron tensile tests and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The AFM studies showed that the pectin, waxy and primary layers (P) of henequen fiber, which have heterogeneous structures, were removed from the fiber surface by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength and thermal stability of henequen fiber decreased with increasing dose of electron beam. At the irradiation of 10 kGy, the surface roughness increased because of the removal of the pectin, waxy and P layer, but the tensile strength of henequen irradiated with 10 kGy were maintained. It has been suggested that the use of a 10 kGy dose of electron beam to modify the henequen fiber surface can improve the surface properties and preserve the fibers' mechanical and thermal properties.

  8. Structural stability and electronic structure of YCu ductile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigate the structural, elastic and electronic properties of cubic YCu intermetallic compound. Which crystallize in the CsCl- B2 type structure, the investigated using the first principle full potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within density functional Theory (DFT). We used generalized ...

  9. Surface properties and microporosity of polyhydroxybutyrate under scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raouf, A.A.; Samsudin, A.R.; Samian, R.; Akool, K.; Abdullah, N.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the surface properties especially surface porosity of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) using scanning electron microscopy. PHB granules were sprinkled on the double-sided sticky tape attached on a SEM aluminium stub and sputtered with gold (10nm thickness) in a Polaron SC515 Coater, following which the samples were placed into the SEM specimen chamber for viewing and recording. Scanning electron micrographs with different magnification of PHB surface revealed multiple pores with different sizes. (Author)

  10. Electronic structure and properties of hydroxyalkyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosobutskij, V.S.; Majboroda, V.D.; Petryaev, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Quantum-chemical calculation using the MNDo method of hydroxymethyl and hydroxyethyl radicals and corresponding anion-radicals is made. Electron structure of radical particles differs considerably from the structure of initial alcohols. From the viewpoint of perturbation theory of molecular orbitals it is shown that noncoupled electron in hydroxyalkyl radicals and radical-anions occupies the loosening orbital. For this reason the above-mentioned particles easily enter the reactions of electron transfer on the acceptor and are not active in reactions of break-off and addition via binary bond. Theoretical concepts are confirmed by experimental data, obtained when studying gamma-radiolysis of methanol solution in water and in 5M NaOH aqueous solution (dose rate is 0.478 Gy/s, dose range is 0.796-4.293 kGy)

  11. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two.

  12. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  13. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-29

    May 29, 2015 ... Fe-based superconductors have drawn much attention during the last decade due to the presence of superconductivity in materials containing the magnetic element, Fe, and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism. Extensive study of the electronic structure of these systems suggested the ...

  14. Electronic structure of MgB 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound MgB2 using the FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange-correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, / ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent agreement with ...

  15. Electron conductance in curved quantum structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    A differential-geometry analysis is employed to investigate the transmission of electrons through a curved quantum-wire structure. Although the problem is a three-dimensional spatial problem, the Schrodinger equation can be separated into three general coordinates. Hence, the proposed method...

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and electronic structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Copper(I) carbene complex; carbene complex synthesis; Cu(I)–carbene electronic structure. 1. Introduction. Metal carbene complexes are arguably the most ver- satile organometallic reagents that have been devel- oped for organic synthesis.1 Different reactions of these complexes have been reported since their dis-.

  17. Electronic structure of MgB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron isotope effect [2] has been observed in MgB2 re- vealing that the pairing mechanism leading to superconductivity is of phononic origin. The electronic band structure combined with strong coupling superconductivity theory can therefore be expected to give a good quantitative description of this compound. Motivated.

  18. Electronic structures of ruthenium complexes encircling non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electronic structural forms of selected mononuclear and dinuclear ruthenium complexes encompassing redox non-innocent terminal as well as bridging ligands have been addressed. The sensitive valence and spin situations of the complexes have been established in the native and accessible redox states via detailed ...

  19. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Fe-based superconductors have drawn much attention during the last decade due to the presence of superconductivity in materials containing the magnetic element, Fe, and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism. Extensive study of the electronic structure of these systems suggested the dominant ...

  20. Electronic structure of MgB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound MgB2 using the. FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange-correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, c/a ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent ...

  1. THEORETICAL STUDY ON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THEORETICAL STUDY ON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRIARYLBORANE SUBSTITUTED BY THIOPHENE. ... Also, the 13C chemical shifts of the carbon atoms on the phenyl rings in these compounds are upfield relative to those of the same carbon atoms in the parent compound.

  2. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  3. Some unusual electronic patterns on graphite surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gives rise to one-dimensional fringe-like pattern as seen with the STM. We are also reporting here observation of such large-scale linear fringes near defects. 2. Experimental details. Experiments were done with a home-built compact STM similar to the one de- scribed in [10]. This STM uses commercial electronics and ...

  4. Water channel structures analysed by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kazutoshi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying water transport through aquaporin (AQP) have been debated for two decades. The water permeation phenomenon of AQP seems inexplicable because the Grotthuss mechanism does not allow for simultaneous fast water permeability and inhibition of proton transfer through the hydrogen bonds of water molecules. The AQP1 structure determined by electron crystallography provided the first insights into the proton exclusion mechanism despite fast water permeation. Although several studies have provided clues about the mechanism based on the AQP structure, each proposed mechanism remains incomplete. The present review is focused on AQP function and structure solved by electron crystallography in an attempt to fill the gaps between the findings in the absence and presence of lipids. Many AQP structures can be superimposed regardless of the determination method. The AQP fold is preserved even under conditions lacking lipids, but the water arrangement in the channel pore differs. The differences might be explained by dipole moments formed by the two short helices in the lipid bilayer. In addition, structure analyses of double-layered two-dimensional crystals of AQP suggest an array formation and cell adhesive function. Electron crystallography findings not only have contributed to resolve some of the water permeation mechanisms, but have also elucidated the multiple functions of AQPs in the membrane. The roles of AQPs in the brain remain obscure, but their multiple activities might be important in the regulation of brain and other biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Aquaporins. © 2013.

  5. Recent advances in ion and electron spectroscopy of polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardella, Joseph A.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of microdomains and bonding at multicomponent polymer material interfaces has been studied using a variety of surface sensitive spectroscopic techniques. In our laboratory, low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) serve to complement results from angular dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sampling and SEM techniques to provide a quantitative picture of the relationships between structure, bonding, morphology and microdomain formation in near surface regions of polymeric systems. The added surface sensitivity of ISS can yield quantitative information at a sampling depth of 3-5 Å, which, with ESCA and FTIR analysis yields a "non-destructive" depth profile of domain formation in copolymer and blend systems. These studies will be illustrated with results from siloxane and siloxane/polycarbonate copolymer systems, where a complete picture of surface domain formation and morphology as a function of composition and polymer crystallinity has been developed. ISS can also yield information regarding the orientation of surface functional groups which ESCA and FTIR do not have either sensitivity and/or sufficient detection limits to analyze. These studies will be illustrated by the analysis of plasma hydrolysis/oxidation of stereoregular poly(methyl-methacrylate). The effects of functional group orientation on reactivity will be explored using results from ISS, ESCA and FTIR for stereoregular (isotatic, syndiotactic) and random (atactic) PMMA. Electron energy loss spectroscopy at high resolution (HREELS) has recently been extended to the examination of polymer and organic surfaces. Vibrational information from this experiment can yield very precise results about surface functional groups (1-20 Å) but at much lower resolution than is typical from IR and Raman techniques. However, the promise of evaluating surface

  6. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  7. Microstructure evolution during surface alloying of ductile iron and austempered ductile iron by electron beam melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulzar, A. [Materials Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Akhter, J.I. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, M., E-mail: maqomer@yahoo.com [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, G. [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ajmal, M. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2009-07-30

    Alloying and microstructural modification of surfaces by electron beam has become popular to tailor the surface properties of materials. Surface modification of as-received ductile iron, Ni-plated ductile iron and Ni-plated austempered ductile iron was carried out by electron beam melting to improve the surface properties. Martensitic structure evolved in the heat affected zone and ledeburite structure was produced in the molten zone of the ductile iron. Microhardness of the melted specimens enhanced considerably as compared to the as-received samples. However the microhardness of melted Ni-plated samples is lower than that of the unplated specimens. X-ray diffraction clearly revealed the formation of an austenite and Fe{sub 3}C phases in the electron beam molten zone. The broadening of peaks suggests refinement of the microstructure as well as internal stresses generated during electron beam melting.

  8. Moulding of Sub-micrometer Surface Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pranov, Henrik; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2006-01-01

    The experiments strongly suggest that the possibility to injection mould sub-micrometer surface structures in polymers mainly relates to the forces originating from the adhesive energy between polymer and shim.......The experiments strongly suggest that the possibility to injection mould sub-micrometer surface structures in polymers mainly relates to the forces originating from the adhesive energy between polymer and shim....

  9. Contact area measurements on structured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kücükyildiz, Ömer Can; Jensen, Sebastian Hoppe Nesgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    In connection with the use of brass specimens featuring structured surfaces in a tribology test, an algorithm was developed for automatic measurement of the contact area by optical means.......In connection with the use of brass specimens featuring structured surfaces in a tribology test, an algorithm was developed for automatic measurement of the contact area by optical means....

  10. Nuclear Dynamics and Electronic Effects of Hydrogen on Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, K; Wilde, M; Ogura, S

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen is involved in a variety of chemical processes on surfaces. While hydrogen exhibits vibrational and rotational dynamics in its adsorption state, it in some cases undergoes diffusion into the substrate as well as on the surface, and participates in chemical reactions. Furthermore, hydrogen exchanges an electron with surfaces having a significant effect on the surface electronic structure. In this personal account, we review our recent studies on surface nuclear dynamics of hydrogen, hydrogen transport across surfaces, catalytic hydrogenation/isotope exchange reactions, and charge transfer between the surface and hydrogen by using a depth-resolved technique of nuclear reaction analysis and a quantum-state-selective detection of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in combination with surface science techniques. As a future prospect, we refer to ultraslow μ spin rotation spectroscopy for a direct probe of the hydrogen charge state at surfaces. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The role of electron scattering in electron-induced surface chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Electron-induced chemistry on surfaces plays a key role in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), a single-step lithography technique that has increasingly gained interest in the past decade. It is crucial for the understanding and modelling of this process to know the role of the surface

  12. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaramwong, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andonian, G. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab

    2017-03-07

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have open new possibilities such as enhancing quantum eciency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated to this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes.We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  13. Hot-electron nanoscopy using adiabatic compression of surface plasmons

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2013-10-20

    Surface plasmon polaritons are a central concept in nanoplasmonics and have been exploited to develop ultrasensitive chemical detection platforms, as well as imaging and spectroscopic techniques at the nanoscale. Surface plasmons can decay to form highly energetic (or hot) electrons in a process that is usually thought to be parasitic for applications, because it limits the lifetime and propagation length of surface plasmons and therefore has an adverse influence on the functionality of nanoplasmonic devices. Recently, however, it has been shown that hot electrons produced by surface plasmon decay can be harnessed to produce useful work in photodetection, catalysis and solar energy conversion. Nevertheless, the surface-plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency has been below 1% in all cases. Here we show that adiabatic focusing of surface plasmons on a Schottky diode-terminated tapered tip of nanoscale dimensions allows for a plasmon-to-hot-electron conversion efficiency of ∼30%. We further demonstrate that, with such high efficiency, hot electrons can be used for a new nanoscopy technique based on an atomic force microscopy set-up. We show that this hot-electron nanoscopy preserves the chemical sensitivity of the scanned surface and has a spatial resolution below 50 nm, with margins for improvement.

  14. An automatic chip structure optical inspection system for electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhichao; Xue, Bindang; Liang, Jiyuan; Wang, Ke; Chen, Junzhang; Liu, Yunhe

    2018-01-01

    An automatic chip structure inspection system based on machine vision is presented to ensure the reliability of electronic components. It consists of four major modules, including a metallographic microscope, a Gigabit Ethernet high-resolution camera, a control system and a high performance computer. An auto-focusing technique is presented to solve the problem that the chip surface is not on the same focusing surface under the high magnification of the microscope. A panoramic high-resolution image stitching algorithm is adopted to deal with the contradiction between resolution and field of view, caused by different sizes of electronic components. In addition, we establish a database to storage and callback appropriate parameters to ensure the consistency of chip images of electronic components with the same model. We use image change detection technology to realize the detection of chip images of electronic components. The system can achieve high-resolution imaging for chips of electronic components with various sizes, and clearly imaging for the surface of chip with different horizontal and standardized imaging for ones with the same model, and can recognize chip defects.

  15. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    and without thin epitaxial TiN(001) wetting layers and are studied for structure, crystalline quality, surface morphology, density and composition by a combination of x-ray diffraction theta-2theta scans, o-rocking curves, pole figures, reciprocal space mapping, Rutherford backscattering, x-ray reflectometry and transmission electron microscopy. The TiN(001) surface suppresses Cu and Ag dewetting, yielding lower defect density, no twinning, and smaller surface roughness than if grown on MgO(001). Textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers 25-50-nm-thick are deposited on a stack of 7.5-nm-Ta on SiO2/Si(001), and subsequent in situ annealing at 350°C followed by sputter etching in Ar plasma yields Cu layers with independently variable thickness and grain size. Cu nanowires, 75 to 350 nm wide, are fabricated from Cu layers with different average grain size using a subtractive patterning process. In situ electron transport measurements at room temperature in vacuum and at 77 K in liquid nitrogen for single-crystal Cu and Ag layers is consistent with the Fuchs-Sondheimer (FS) model and indicates specular scattering at the metal-vacuum boundary with an average specularity parameter p = 0.8 and 0.6, respectively. In contrast, layers measured ex situ show diffuse surface scattering due to sub-monolayer oxidation. Also, addition of Ta atoms on Cu(001) surface perturbs the smooth interface potential and results in completely diffuse scattering at the Cu-Ta interface, and in turn, a higher resistivity of single-crystal Cu layers. In situ exposure of Cu(001) layers to O2 between 10 -3 and 105 Pa-s results in a sequential increase, decrease and increase of the electrical resistance which is attributed to specular surface scattering for clean Cu(001) and for surfaces with a complete adsorbed monolayer, but diffuse scattering at partial coverage and after chemical oxidation. Electron transport measurements for polycrystalline Cu layers and wires show a 10-15% and 7-9% decrease in

  16. Electrons and photons in periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    This thesis concerns various theoretical proposals for engineering dispersion relations of photons and electrons for particular applications. The common concept is the use of a periodic modulation to induce new phenomena on length scales comparable with the periodicity of the modulation...... periodic modulation of an electron gas leads to the emergence of localized defect states with energies within the band gap, where no propagating modes exist. Secondly, the divergence of the photonic density of states near a photonic band gap leads to strongly modified light-matter interactions, which has...... applications both in terms of spontaneous emission control and for slow light propagation. We first consider antidot lattices, periodic modulations of the potential of an electron gas. We demonstrate that such structures may serve as an interesting platform for quantum information processing. In particular, we...

  17. Electronic Structure of Strongly Correlated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and physical properties of strongly correlated materials containing elements with partially filled 3d, 4d, 4f and 5f electronic shells is analyzed by Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). DMFT is the most universal and effective tool used for the theoretical investigation of electronic states with strong correlation effects. In the present book the basics of the method are given and its application to various material classes is shown. The book is aimed at a broad readership: theoretical physicists and experimentalists studying strongly correlated systems. It also serves as a handbook for students and all those who want to be acquainted with fast developing filed of condensed matter physics.

  18. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  19. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Banaras [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saifullah [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan (UI), 81744 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khan, Imad [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan)

    2015-10-25

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX{sub 3} (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures.

  20. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Banaras; Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye; Saifullah; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Khan, Imad; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX 3 (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures

  1. EVOLUTION OF IONS AFTER MULTIPLE ELECTRON-CAPTURE FROM SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, R; DAS, J

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the electronic processes which occur when a multiply charged ion is approaching an atomic target on the one hand or a metal surface on the other hand. In both caws three collision phases can be identified: those of attraction, of electron capture and of decay in the vacuum;

  2. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homoge- neously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with ...

  3. Relaxation between electrons and surface phonons of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy relaxation between the hot degenerate electrons of a homogeneously photoexcited metal film and the surface phonons (phonon wave vectors in two dimensions) is considered under Debye approximation. The state of electrons and phonons is described by equilibrium Fermi and Bose functions with different ...

  4. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Neetu, E-mail: neetumanish@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AISECT University Bhopal, 464993 (India); Srivastava, Vipul [Department of Engineering Physics, NRI Institute of Research & Technology, Raisen Road, Bhopal, 462021 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  6. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  7. Some unusual electronic patterns on graphite surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    two carbon fibers. We attribute this spatially varying super-lattice structure to the shear strain generated in the top layer due to the restraining fibers. We have also developed a model with the Moir`e rotation hypothesis that gives us a better insight into such large- scale spatially varying patterns. We have been able to model ...

  8. Electronic structure effects in catalysis probed by X-ray and electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Sarp; Friebel, Daniel [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Ogasawara, Hirohito [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Anniyev, Toyli [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Nilsson, Anders, E-mail: nilsson@slac.stanford.edu [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Strain, ligand and uncoordinated sites allow for fine-tuning the electronic structure of catalyst material. •XES and XAS provide means to project out the electronic structure in an atom specific way. •HERFD XAS allows for detail probing of the electronic structure of platinum catalyst during the oxygen reduction reaction. -- Abstract: Here we review some recent developments in using electron and X-ray spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the chemical bond formation on catalyst surfaces used in chemical energy transformations. The d-band model allows a simple understanding of the bond strength of oxygen atom interacting with transition metals in terms of the energy position of the d-band. It is in particular the population of the antibonding states appearing through the interaction of the d-band with the O 2p orbitals that determines the bond strength. We demonstrate how we can fine tune the d-band position and population of antibonding states for strained Pt films on Cu(1 1 1) and Ag(1 1 1) and ligand affected Pt surfaces due to either Ni, Co or Fe in the subsurface layer. We show the effect of nanostructuring in Pt monolayer model electrocatalysts on a Rh(1 1 1) single-crystal substrate on the adsorption strength of chemisorbed species using In situ high energy resolution fluorescence detection X-ray absorption spectroscopy (HERFD XAS) at the Pt L{sub 3} edge.

  9. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  10. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Mills, J. E; Boatz, J. A

    2006-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  11. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Hinde, R. J; Mills, J. D; Boatz, J. A

    2007-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  12. Correlated electronic structure of CeN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, S.K., E-mail: swarup.panda@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Di Marco, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delin, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, Electrum 229, SE-164 40 Kista (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, O., E-mail: olle.eriksson@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The electronic structure of CeN is studied within the GGA+DMFT approach using SPTF and Hubbard I approximation. • 4f spectral functions from SPTF and Hubbard I are coupled to explain the various spectroscopic manifestations of CeN. • The calculated XPS and BIS spectra show good agreement with the corresponding experimental spectra. • The contribution of the various l-states and the importance of cross-sections for the photoemission process are analyzed. - Abstract: We have studied in detail the electronic structure of CeN including spin orbit coupling (SOC) and electron–electron interaction, within the dynamical mean-field theory combined with density-functional theory in generalized gradient approximation (GGA+DMFT). The effective impurity problem has been solved through the spin-polarized T-matrix fluctuation-exchange (SPTF) solver and the Hubbard I approximation (HIA). The calculated l-projected atomic partial densities of states and the converged potential were used to obtain the X-ray-photoemission-spectra (XPS) and Bremstrahlung Isochromat spectra (BIS). Following the spirit of Gunnarsson–Schonhammer model, we have coupled the SPTF and HIA 4f spectral functions to explain the various spectroscopic manifestations of CeN. Our computed spectra in such a coupled scheme explain the experimental data remarkably well, establishing the validity of our theoretical model in analyzing the electronic structure of CeN. The contribution of the various l-states in the total spectra and the importance of cross sections are also analyzed in detail.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of Ag-Pd superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Matthieu J.; Dumont, Jacques; Sporken, Robert; Johnson, R. L.; Wiame, Frédéric; Temst, Kristiaan; Swerts, Johan; Mirabella, Frédéric; Ghijsen, Jacques; Gonze, Xavier

    2004-11-01

    The electronic structure of silver-palladium heterostructures is investigated, both experimentally and through ab initio calculations. Synchrotron-radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations of the work function and the valence band structure are compared to and explained by calculations of slab and bulk heterostructures. Work functions and equilibrium geometries are shown to be in agreement with synchrotron-radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. Further insight into the differing behavior of the two terminating metal surfaces is extracted from the calculations.

  14. Surface sensitization mechanism on negative electron affinity p-GaN nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Feng, Shu; Lu, Feifei

    2018-03-01

    The surface sensitization is the key to prepare negative electron affinity photocathode. The thesis emphasizes on the study of surface sensitization mechanism of p-type doping GaN nanowires utilizing first principles based on density function theory. The adsorption energy, work function, dipole moment, geometry structure, electronic structure and optical properties of Mg-doped GaN nanowires surfaces with various coverages of Cs atoms are investigated. The GaN nanowire with Mg doped in core position is taken as the sensitization base. At the initial stage of sensitization, the best adsorption site for Cs atom on GaN nanowire surface is BN, the bridge site of two adjacent N atoms. Surface sensitization generates a p-type internal surface with an n-type surface state, introducing a band bending region which can help reduce surface barrier and work function. With increasing Cs coverage, work functions decrease monotonously and the "Cs-kill" phenomenon disappears. For Cs coverage of 0.75 ML and 1 ML, the corresponding sensitization systems reach negative electron affinity state. Through surface sensitization, the absorption curves are red shifted and the absorption coefficient is cut down. All theoretical calculations can guide the design of negative electron affinity Mg doped GaN nanowires photocathode.

  15. Sub-µ structured Lotus Surfaces Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worgull, Matthias; Heckele, Mathias; Mappes, Timo

    2008-01-01

    Sub-micro structured surfaces allow modifying the behavior of polymer films or components. Especially in micro fluidics a lotus-like characteristic is requested for many applications. Structure details with a high aspect ratio are necessary to decouple the bottom and the top of the functional layer....... Unlike to stochastic methods, patternin¬g with a LIGA-mold insert it is possible to structure surfaces very uniformly or even with controlled variations (e.g. with gradients). In this paper we present the process chain to realize polymer sub-micro structures with minimum lateral feature size of 400 nm...

  16. Designing visual appearance using a structured surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Villads Egede; Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Smitrup, Christian

    2015-01-01

    followed by numerical and experimental verification. The approach comprises verifying all design and fabrication steps required to produce a desired appearance. We expect that the procedure in the future will yield structurally colored surfaces with appealing prescribed visual appearances....

  17. Electromagnetic Radiation of Electrons in Periodic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich

    2011-01-01

    Periodic magnetic structures (undulators) are widely used in accelerators to generate monochromatic undulator radiation (UR) in the range from far infrared to the hard X-ray region. Another periodic crystalline structure is used to produce quasimonochromatic polarized photon beams via the coherent bremsstrahlung mechanism (CBS). Due to such characteristics as monochromaticity, polarization and adjustability, these types of radiation is of large interest for applied and basic research of accelerator-emitted radiation. The book provides a detailed overview of the fundamental principles behind electromagnetic radiation emitted from accelerated charged particles (e.g. UR, CBS, radiation of fast electrons in Laser flash fields) as well as a unified description of relatively new radiation mechanisms which attracted great interest in recent years. This are the so-called polarization radiation excited by the Coulomb field of incident particles in periodic structures, parametric X-rays, resonant transition radiation a...

  18. Electronic structure and superconductivity of europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, Lane W.; Papaconstantopoulos, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure of Eu for the bcc, hcp, and fcc crystal structures for volumes near equilibrium up to a calculated 90 GPa pressure using the augmented-plane-wave method in the local-density approximation. The frozen-core approximation was used with a semi-empirical shift of the f-states energies in the radial Schroedinger equation to move the occupied 4f valence states below the Γ 1 energy and into the core. This shift of the highly localized f-states yields the correct europium phase ordering with lattice parameters and bulk moduli in good agreement with experimental data. The calculated superconductivity properties under pressure for the bcc and hcp structures are also found to agree with and follow a T c trend similar to recent measurement by Debessai et al.

  19. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Mohan; Guo, G-C; He Lixin, E-mail: helx@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China)

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  20. Influence of surface topography on the secondary electron yield of clean copper samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Chuan; Cao, Meng; Cui, Wan-Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Secondary electron yield (SEY) due to electron impact depends strongly on surface topography. The SEY of copper samples after Ar-ion bombardment is measured in situ in a multifunctional ultrahigh vacuum system. Increasing the ion energy or duration of ion bombardment can even enlarge the SEY, though it is relatively low under moderate bombardment intensity. The results obtained with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that many valley structures of original sample surfaces can be smoothed due to ion bombardment, but more hill structures are generated with stronger bombardment intensity. With increasing the surface roughness in the observed range, the maximum SEY decreases from 1.2 to 1.07 at a surface characterized by valleys, while it again increases to 1.33 at a surface spread with hills. This phenomenon indicates that hill and valley structures are respectively effective in increasing and decreasing the SEY. These obtained results thus provide a comprehensive insight into the surface topography influence on the secondary electron emission characteristics in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronic Noses for Composites Surface Contamination Detection in Aerospace Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vito, Saverio De; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Massera, Ettore; Fattoruso, Grazia; Formisano, Fabrizio; Polichetti, Tiziana; Salvato, Maria; Alfano, Brigida; Esposito, Elena; Francia, Girolamo Di

    2017-04-02

    The full exploitation of Composite Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) in so-called green aircrafts design is still limited by the lack of adequate quality assurance procedures for checking the adhesive bonding assembly, especially in load-critical primary structures. In this respect, contamination of the CFRP panel surface is of significant concern since it may severely affect the bonding and the mechanical properties of the joint. During the last years, the authors have developed and tested an electronic nose as a non-destructive tool for pre-bonding surface inspection for contaminants detection, identification and quantification. Several sensors and sampling architectures have been screened in view of the high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scenarios requirements. Ad-hoc pattern recognition systems have also been devised to ensure a fast and reliable assessment of the contamination status, by combining real time classifiers and the implementation of a suitable rejection option. Results show that e-noses could be used as first line low cost Non Destructive Test (NDT) tool in aerospace CFRP assembly and maintenance scenarios.

  2. Electronic collective modes and instabilities on semiconductor surfaces. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, A.; Hanke, W.

    1984-01-01

    A Green's-function theory of electronic collective modes is presented which leads to a practical scheme for a microscopic determination of surface elementary excitations in conducting as well as nonconducting solids. Particular emphasis is placed on semiconductor surfaces where the jellium approximation is not valid, due to the importance of density fluctuations on a microscopic scale (reflected in the local-field effects). Starting from the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green's function of the surface system, an equation of motion for the electron-hole pair is obtained. Its solutions determine the energy spectra, lifetimes, and amplitudes of the surface elementary excitations, i.e., surface plasmons, excitons, polaritons, and magnons. Exchange and correlation effects are taken into account through the random-phase and time-dependent Hartree-Fock (screened electron-hole attraction) approximations. The formalism is applied to the study of electronic (charge- and spin-density) instabilities at covalent semiconductor surfaces. Quantitative calculations for an eight-layer Si(111) slab display an instability of the ideal paramagnetic surface with respect to spin-density waves with wavelength nearly corresponding to (2 x 1) and (7 x 7) superstructures

  3. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swarts, Coenraad Albert [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The results of various theories for the angular distribution of electrons photoemitted from the outermost p-shell of rare gas atoms are compared. The theories compared are the local density theories of Slater (Xα)( Kohn and Sham, the pseudopotential method, Hartree-Fock theory as evaluated by Kennedy and Manson, and Amusia's random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). Extended Huekel theory is applied to GaAs, GaP, and to the nitrogen isoelectronic trap in GaAs and GaP. The computer perfect crystal band structures are found to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical pseudopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levels in GaAs and GaP are calculated using a cluster model. By means of model calculations for an independent electron metal, exact lineshapes are obtained for the photon absorption, emission and photoemission spectra of deep core states.

  4. Electronic structure of rare earth bismuthides

    CERN Document Server

    Drzyzga, M; Deniszczyk, J; Michalczewski, T

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of rare earth bismuthides - Gd sub 4 Bi sub 3 , Tb sub 4 Bi sub 3 and R sub 5 Bi sub 3 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) - has been investigated with use of x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies and calculated with the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. The spectra simulated on the basis of ab initio results reproduce correctly the experimental ones. This enabled analysis of the character of the electronic states, their hybridization and influence on magnetic properties. The temperature dependence of the valence band photoemission of ferromagnetic Gd sub 4 Bi sub 3 and Tb sub 4 Bi sub 3 has been studied and compared to the results obtained with the spin-polarized, non-polarized and open core methods of calculation.

  5. Block Tridiagonal Matrices in Electronic Structure Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Dan Erik

    in the Landauer–Büttiker ballistic transport regime. These calculations concentrate on determining the so– called Green’s function matrix, or portions thereof, which is the inverse of a block tridiagonal general complex matrix. To this end, a sequential algorithm based on Gaussian elimination named Sweeps......This thesis focuses on some of the numerical aspects of the treatment of the electronic structure problem, in particular that of determining the ground state electronic density for the non–equilibrium Green’s function formulation of two–probe systems and the calculation of transmission...... is developed and compared to standard Gaussian elimination, where it is shown to be qualitatively quicker for the task of determining the block tridiagonal portion of the Green’s function matrix. The Sweep algorithm is then parallelized via a straightforward approach in order to enable moderate speedup...

  6. Electronic equipment for atomic nucleus structure studying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Vasilev, D.; Vylov, Ts.; Zhuravlev, N.I.; Salamatin, A.V.; Sidorov, V.T.; Sinaev, A.N.; Churin, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The CAMAC electronic equipment used in data acquisition systems for spectrometers intended for investigation of the structure of an atomic nucleus is considered. Specific features of electronic units forming a part of spectrometers for determination of neutrino helicity and three-dimensional amplitude-time measurements as well as electrostatic beta-spectrometer are discussed. Parameters of the MAK-1, the MAK-2 and the MAK-3 multichannel amplitude analyzers developed specially for these spectrometers are given. Accumulation of data coming from analog-to-digital converters and output of recorded spectra on the screens of displays is realized without use of the crate dataway that permits to avoid time losses and to place several analyzers in a crate. Observation of spectra is realized simultaneously with their registration

  7. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of various theories for the angular distribution of electrons photoemitted from the outermost p-shell of rare gas atoms are compared. The theories compared are the local density theories of Slater (X/sub α/) and of Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham, the pseudopotential method, Hartree-Fock theory as evaluated by Kennedy and Manson, and Amusia's random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). Extended Huekel theory is applied to GaAs, GaP, and to the nitrogen isoelectronic trap in GaAs and GaP. The computer perfect crystal band structures are found to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical pseudopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levels in GaAs and GaP are calculated using a cluster model. By means of model calculations for an independent electron metal, exact lineshapes are obtained for the photon absorption, emission and photoemission spectra of deep core states. 97 references

  8. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-06-07

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  9. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Zachary [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  10. The structure of reconstructed chalcopyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinius, Sascha; Islam, Mazharul M.; Bredow, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) surfaces are of major interest for copper exploitation in aqueous solution, called leaching. Since leaching is a surface process knowledge of the surface structure, bonding pattern and oxidation states is important for improving the efficiency. At present such information is not available from experimental studies. Therefore a detailed computational study of chalcopyrite surfaces is performed. The structures of low-index stoichiometric chalcopyrite surfaces {hkl} h, k, l ∈ {0, 1, 2} have been studied with density functional theory (DFT) and global optimization strategies. We have applied ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) in combination with simulated annealing (SA) in order to explore possible reconstructions via a minima hopping (MH) algorithm. In almost all cases reconstruction involving substantial rearrangement has occurred accompanied by reduction of the surface energy. The analysis of the change in the coordination sphere and migration during reconstruction reveals that S-S dimers are formed on the surface. Further it was observed that metal atoms near the surface move toward the bulk forming metal alloys passivated by sulfur. The obtained surface energies of reconstructed surfaces are in the range of 0.53-0.95 J/m2.

  11. Subwavelength topological structures resulting from surface two-plasmon resonance by femtosecond laser exposure solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai-Ying; Liu, Shi-Bing; Liu, H Y; Wang, Yang; Chen, Tao; Dong, Xiang-Ming

    2016-05-30

    We present that surface two-plasmon resonance (STPR) in electron plasma sheet produced by a femtosecond laser irradiating a solid surface is the self-formation mechanism of periodic subwavelength ripple structures. Peaks of overdense electrons, formed by resonant two-plasmon wave mode, pull bound ions out of the metal surface. Thus, the wave pattern of STPR is "carved" on the surface by Coulomb ablation (removal) due to periodic distributed strong electrostatic field produced by charge separation. To confirm the STPR model, we have performed analogical carving experiments by two femtosecond laser beams with perpendicular polarizations and time delay. The results explicitly show that two wave patterns of STPR generated by each beam are independently created in the pulse exposure area of a target surface, which is like the traditional "layer-carving" technique by comparison with the structured topological features. The time-scale of ablation dynamics and the electron temperature in ultrafast interaction are also verified by a time-resolved spectroscopy experiment and numerical simulation, respectively. The present model can self-consistently explain the formation of subwavelength ripple structures even with spatial periods shorter than half of the laser wavelength, shedding light on the understanding of ultrafast laser-solid interaction.

  12. Electronic structure of defects in semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussy, Bernard; Ganghoffer, Jean Francois

    2002-01-01

    Full text.heterojunctions and semiconductors and superlattices are well known and well used by people interested in optoelectronics communications. Components based on the use of heterojunctions are interesting for confinement of light and increase of quantum efficiency. An heterojunction is the contact zone between two different semiconductors, for example GaAs and Ga 1-x Al x As. Superlattices are a succession of heterojunctions (up to 10 or 20). These systems have been the subjects of many experiments ao analyse the contact between semiconductors. They also have been theoretically studied by different types of approach. The main result of those studies is the prediciton of band discontinuities. Defects in heterojunctions are real traps for charge carriers; they can affect the efficiency of the component decreasing the currents and the fluxes in it. the knowledge of their electronic structure is important, a great density of defects deeply modifies the electronic structure of the whole material creating real new bands of energy in the band structure of the component. in the first part of this work, we will describe the heterostructure and the defect in terms of quantum wells and discrete levels. This approach allows us to show the role of the width of the quantum well describing the structure but induces specific behaviours due to the one dimensional modelling. Then a perturbative treatment is proposed using the Green's functions formalism. We build atomic chains with different types of atoms featuring the heterostructure and the defect. Densities of states of a structure with a defect and levels associated to the defect are obtained. Results are comparable with the free electrons work, but the modelling do not induce problems due to a one dimensional approach. To extend our modelling, a three dimensions approach, based on a cavity model, is investigated. The influence of the defect, - of hydrogenoid type - introduced in the structure, is described by a cavity

  13. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, L., E-mail: ludek@isibrno.cz [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikmeková, E. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the CAS, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); FEI Company, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5651 GG Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lejeune, M. [LPMC – Faculte des Sciences d’Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Using proper irradiation parameters, adsorbed hydrocarbons are released from surfaces. • Slow electrons remove hydrocarbons instead of depositing carbon. • Prolonged irradiation with very slow electrons does not create defects in graphene. - Abstract: Electron-beam-induced deposition of various materials from suitable precursors has represented an established branch of nanotechnology for more than a decade. A specific alternative is carbon deposition on the basis of hydrocarbons as precursors that has been applied to grow various nanostructures including masks for subsequent technological steps. Our area of study was unintentional electron-beam-induced carbon deposition from spontaneously adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. This process traditionally constitutes a challenge for scanning electron microscopy practice preventing one from performing any true surface studies outside an ultrahigh vacuum and without in-situ cleaning of samples, and also jeopardising other electron-optical devices such as electron beam lithographs. Here we show that when reducing the energy of irradiating electrons sufficiently, the e-beam-induced deposition can be converted to e-beam-induced release causing desorption of hydrocarbons and ultimate cleaning of surfaces in both an ultrahigh and a standard high vacuum. Using series of experiments with graphene samples, we demonstrate fundamental features of e-beam-induced desorption and present results of checks for possible radiation damage using Raman spectroscopy that led to optimisation of the electron energy for damage-free cleaning. The method of preventing carbon contamination described here paves the way for greatly enhanced surface sensitivity of imaging and substantially reduced demands on vacuum systems for nanotechnological applications.

  14. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  15. Electronic golden structure of the periodic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Leonard J.

    2009-01-01

    The golden ratio has been studied since the ancient Greeks due to its inherent symmetry and aesthetic beauty, especially in the five Platonic Solids. The golden mean is now established as a pillar of El Naschie's E infinity where it achieves the physical manifestation of 0.618 034 MeV. The largest atomic electron orbital total energies average to the golden mean energy. This paper examines the golden ratio in order to expand upon a century old attempt to produce a relatively static, visual, geometric model of atomic structure.

  16. Atomic Reference Data for Electronic Structure Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, S; Shirley, E L

    We have generated data for atomic electronic structure calculations, to provide a standard reference for results of specified accuracy under commonly used approximations. Results are presented here for total energies and orbital energy eigenvalues for all atoms from H to U, at microHartree accuracy in the total energy, as computed in the local-density approximation (LDA) the local-spin-density approximation (LSD); the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA); and scalar-relativistic local-density approximation (ScRLDA).

  17. A surface diffuse scattering model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices is studied on the basis of the results previously obtained, considering a surface diffuse scattering; the importance of the results obtained for a better understanding of the influence of the fringing field in surface charge coupled devices is discussed. (author)

  18. Electronic structure of point defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    This 'Habilitation a diriger des Recherches' memoir presents most of my scientific activities during the past 7 years, in the field of electronic structure calculations of defects in solids. Point defects (vacancies, interstitials, impurities) in functional materials are a key parameter to determine if these materials will actually fill the role they have been assigned or not. Indeed, the presence of defects cannot be avoided when the temperature is increased or when the material is subjected to external stresses, such as irradiation in the nuclear reactors and in artificial satellites with solar radiations. However, in many cases, defects are introduced in the materials on purpose to tune the electronic transport, optical or even magnetic properties. This procedure is called the doping of semiconductors, which is the foundation technique for transistors, diodes, or photovoltaic cells. However, doping is not always straightforward and unexpected features may occur, such as doping asymmetry or Fermi level pinning, which can only be explained by complex phenomena involving different types of defects or complexes of defects. In this context, the calculations of electronic structure ab initio is an ideal tool to complement the experimental observations, to gain the understanding of phenomena at the atomic level, and even to predict the properties of defects. The power of the ab initio calculations comes from their ability to describe any system of electrons and nuclei without any specific adjustment. But although there is a strong need for numerical simulations in this field, the ab initio calculations for defects are still under development as of today. The work presented in this memoir summarizes my contributions to methodological developments on this subject. These developments have followed two main tracks. The first topic is the better understanding of the unavoidable finite size effects. Indeed, defects in semiconductors or insulators are generally present in

  19. Reduction of secondary electron yield for E-cloud mitigation by laser ablation surface engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valizadeh, R., E-mail: reza.valizadeh@stfc.ac.uk [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Malyshev, O.B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wang, S. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sian, T. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cropper, M.D. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Sykes, N. [Micronanics Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • SEY below 1 can be achieved with Laser ablation surface engineering. • SEY <1 surface can be produced with different types of nanosecond lasers. • Both microstructure (groves) and nano-structures are playing a role in reducing SEY. - Abstract: Developing a surface with low Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) is one of the main ways of mitigating electron cloud and beam-induced electron multipacting in high-energy charged particle accelerators. In our previous publications, a low SEY < 0.9 for as-received metal surfaces modified by a nanosecond pulsed laser was reported. In this paper, the SEY of laser-treated blackened copper has been investigated as a function of different laser irradiation parameters. We explore and study the influence of micro- and nano-structures induced by laser surface treatment in air of copper samples as a function of various laser irradiation parameters such as peak power, laser wavelength (λ = 355 nm and 1064 nm), number of pulses per point (scan speed and repetition rate) and fluence, on the SEY. The surface chemical composition was determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) which revealed that heating resulted in diffusion of oxygen into the bulk and induced the transformation of CuO to sub-stoichiometric oxide. The surface topography was examined with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) which showed that the laser-treated surfaces are dominated by microstructure grooves and nanostructure features.

  20. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  1. Ionic liquids influence on the surface properties of electron beam irradiated wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Patachia, Silvia; Doroftei, Florica; Parparita, Elena; Vasile, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Wood veneers impregnated with three imidazolium-based ionic liquids and irradiated with electron beam were studied by FTIR-ATR, SEM/EDX, AFM, contact angle and image analysis. • ILs preserve the surface properties of the wood (surface energy, roughness, color) upon irradiation, in comparison with the reference wood, but the surface composition is changed by treatment with IL-s, mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. • Under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of three imidazolium-based ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) on the structure and surface properties of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) veneers submitted to electron beam irradiation with a dose of 50 kGy has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as image, scanning electron microscopy/SEM/EDX, atomic force microscopy and contact angle analysis. The experimental results have proven that the studied ionic liquids determine a better preservation of the structural features of wood (cellulose crystallinity index and lignin concentration on the surface) as well as some of surface properties such as surface energy, roughness, color upon irradiation with electron beam, in comparison with the reference wood, but surface composition is changed by treatment with imidazolium-based ionic liquids mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. Also, under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface

  2. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO2 were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO2 was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO2 in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  3. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, P; Lohani, H; Sekhar, B R; Kundu, A K; Menon, Krishnakumar S R; Patel, R; Solanki, G K

    2015-01-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ–Z, Γ–Y and Γ–T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ–Z direction, at a binding energy of −0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4p z orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ–T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation–anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV–VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis. (paper)

  4. Electroreflectance spectroscopy as a probe of the electronic structure at the metal-electronic interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.M.; Liu, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a surface is influenced by the surface electronic structure. In particular, the existence of surface states in band gaps can lead to optical absorption below the bulk interband threshold. However, such effects are usually too small to be observed because while surface states are localized within several atomic layers near the surface, light waves can penetrate at least hundreds of layers into the metal. One way to enhance the surface effect for a metallic surface is to make use of electromodulation techniques. When a metal is placed in an electrolyte, an intense electric field (approx. 10/sup 7/ volts/cm) can be induced at the metal-electrolyte boundary with the application of a bias voltage of less than a volt. Electroreflectance (ER) experiments modulate the bias voltage and measure the resultant modulations in the optical reflectivity. Since the static electric field is highly localized at the interface (the Fermi-Thomas screening length for typical metals is of the order of Angstroms) we expect the ER effect to be highly surface sensitive. Sensitivities in ..delta..R/R up to 10/sup -6/ can be achieved in such experiments. 12 references.

  5. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  6. Deep learning and the electronic structure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kyle; Spanner, Michael; Tamblyn, Isaac

    In the past decade, the fields of artificial intelligence and computer vision have progressed remarkably. Supported by the enthusiasm of large tech companies, as well as significant hardware advances and the utilization of graphical processing units to accelerate computations, deep neural networks (DNN) are gaining momentum as a robust choice for many diverse machine learning applications. We have demonstrated the ability of a DNN to solve a quantum mechanical eigenvalue equation directly, without the need to compute a wavefunction, and without knowledge of the underlying physics. We have trained a convolutional neural network to predict the total energy of an electron in a confining, 2-dimensional electrostatic potential. We numerically solved the one-electron Schrödinger equation for millions of electrostatic potentials, and used this as training data for our neural network. Four classes of potentials were assessed: the canonical cases of the harmonic oscillator and infinite well, and two types of randomly generated potentials for which no analytic solution is known. We compare the performance of the neural network and consider how these results could lead to future advances in electronic structure theory.

  7. Structure, electronic properties and electron energy loss spectra of transition metal nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsokeras, L.E.; Matenoglou, G.M.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.gr

    2013-01-01

    We present a thorough and critical study of the electronic properties of the mononitrides of the group IV–V–VI metals (TiN, ZrN, HfN, NbN, TaN, MoN, and WN) grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The microstructure and density of the films have been studied by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), while their optical properties were investigated by spectral reflectivity at vertical incidence and in-situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (R-EELS). We report the R-EELS spectra for all the binary TMN and we identify their features (metal-d plasmon and N-p + metal-d loss) based on previous ab-initio band structure calculations. The spectral positions of p + d loss peak are rationally grouped according to the electron configuration (i.e. of the respective quantum numbers) of the constituent metal. The assigned and reported R-EELS spectra can be used as a reference database for the colloquial in-situ surface analysis performed in most laboratories. - Highlights: ► Identification of the effect of ionization potential to the structure of PLD nitride films. ► Report of low energy electron loss spectra of NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, WN. ► Correlation of the Np+Med loss peak with the metal’s valence electron configuration.

  8. Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The {\\it Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials} research program provided conceptual understanding of and theoretical methodologies for understanding the properties of surfaces and interfaces involving materials exhibiting strong electronic correlations. The issues addressed in this research program are important for basic science, because the behavior of correlated electron superlattices is a crucial challenge to and crucial test of our understanding of the grand-challenge problem of correlated electron physics and are important for our nation's energy future because correlated interfaces offer opportunities for the control of phenomena needed for energy and device applications. Results include new physics insights, development of new methods, and new predictions for materials properties.

  9. Thermodynamics and structure of liquid surfaces investigated directly with surface analytical tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Gunther [Flinders Univ., Adelaide, SA (Australia). Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology; Morgner, Harald [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Wilhelm Ostwald Inst. for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

    2017-06-15

    Measuring directly the composition, the distribution of constituents as function of the depth and the orientation of molecules at liquid surfaces is essential for determining physicochemical properties of liquid surfaces. While the experimental tools that have been developed for analyzing solid surfaces can in principal be applied to liquid surfaces, it turned out that they had to be adjusted to the particular challenges imposed by liquid samples, e.g. by the unavoidable vapor pressure and by the mobility of the constituting atoms/molecules. In the present work it is shown, how electron spectroscopy and ion scattering spectroscopy have been used for analyzing liquid surfaces. The emphasis of this review is on using the structural information gained for determining the physicochemical properties of liquid surfaces. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. New electron-ion-plasma equipment for modification of materials and products surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval', N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Electron-ion-plasma treatment of materials and products, including surface clearing and activation, formation surface layers with changed chemical and phase structure, increased hardness and corrosion resistance; deposition of various functional coatings, has received a wide distribution in a science and industry. Widespread methods of ion-plasma modification of material and product surfaces are ion etching and activation, ion-plasma nitriding, arc or magnetron deposition of functional coatings, including nanostructured. The combination of above methods of surface modification allows essentially to improve exploitation properties of treated products and to optimize the characteristics of modified surfaces for concrete final requirements. For the purpose of a combination of various methods of ion-plasma treatment in a single work cycle at Institute of High Current Electronics of SB RAS (IHCE SB RAS) specialized technological equipment 'DUET', 'TRIO' and 'QUADRO' and 'KVINTA' have been developed. This equipment allow generating uniform low-temperature gas plasma at pressures of (0.1-1) Pa with concentration of (10 9 -10 11 ) cm -3 in volume of (0.1-1) m 3 . In the installations consistent realization of several various operations of materials and products treatment in a single work cycle is possible. The operations are preliminary heating and degassing, ion clearing, etching and activation of materials and products surface by plasma of arc discharges; chemicothermal treatment (nitriding) for formation of diffusion layer on a surface of treated sample using plasma of nonself-sustained low-pressure arc discharge; deposition of single- or multilayered superhard (≥40 GPa) nanocrystalline coatings on the basis of pure metals or their compounds (nitrides, carbides, carbonitrides) by the arc plasma-assisted method. For realization of the modes all installations are equipped by original sources of gas and metal plasma. Besides, in

  11. ELECTRON AVALANCHE MODEL OF DIELECTRIC-VACUUM SURFACE BREAKDOWN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, E J

    2007-02-21

    The model assumes that an 'initiating event' results in positive ions on the surface near the anode and reverses the direction of the normal component of electric field so that electrons in vacuum are attracted to the dielectric locally. A sequence of surface electron avalanches progresses in steps from the anode to the cathode. For 200 kV across 1 cm, the spacing of avalanches is predicted to be about 13 microns. The time for avalanches to step from the anode to the cathode is predicted to be about a ns.

  12. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  13. Electron Stimulated Desorption of Condensed Gases on Cryogenic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tratnik, H; Hilleret, Noël

    2005-01-01

    In ultra-high vacuum systems outgassing from vacuum chamber walls and desorption from surface adsorbates are usually the factors which in°uence pressure and residual gas composition. In particular in beam vacuum systems of accelerators like the LHC, where surfaces are exposed to intense synchro- tron radiation and bombardment by energetic ions and electrons, properties like the molecular desorption yield or secondary electron yield can strongly in°uence the performance of the accelerator. In high-energy particle accelerators operating at liquid helium temperature, cold surfaces are exposed to the bombardment of energetic photons, electrons and ions. The gases released by the subsequent desorption are re-condensed on the cold surfaces and can be re-desorbed by the impinging electrons and ions. The equilibrium coverage reached on the surfaces exposed to the impact of energetic particles depends on the desorption yield of the condensed gases and can a®ect the operation of the accelerator by modifying th...

  14. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Lejeune, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, JUN 15 (2017), s. 105-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Low-energy electrons * Electron beam induced release * Graphene * Ultimate cleaning of surfaces Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Nano-processes (applications on nano-scale) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  15. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Aeschlimann, M. [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  16. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Ian M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Lab., Iowa

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  17. Surface Relaxation and Electronic States of Pt(111) Surface with Varying Slab Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Ashok K.; Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    Surface relaxation and electronic DOS's of Pt(111) surface have been studied with varying slab thickness using ab-initio SIESTA method. We found the expansion in the top layer and contraction in the subsurface layers of Pt(111) surface. Our results match with the experimental results. Also observing electronic density of states we found that as we increase the thickness of slab, the PDOS of Pt(111) surface goes towards the bulk density of states and Fermi energy shifts towards the bulk fermi energy.

  18. Observation of melt surface depressions during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    Depths of depressed surface of liquid gadolinium, cerium and copper during electron beam evaporation were measured by triangulation method using a CCD camera. The depression depths estimated from the balance of the vapor pressure and the hydrostatic pressure at the evaporation surface agreed with the measured values. The periodic fluctuation of atomic beam was observed when the depression of 3∼4 mm in depth was formed at the evaporation spot. (author)

  19. Ion induced millimetre-scale structures growth on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girka, O.; Bizyukov, O.; Balkova, Y.; Myroshnyk, M.; Bizyukov, I.; Bogatyrenko, S.

    2018-04-01

    Polished polycrystalline Plansee tungsten (W) sample with purity 99.99 wt% and 0.75 mm thickness has been exposed to intense argon (Ar) ion beam with average energy of 2 keV and etched through in the centre. As a result, castle-like structures with strong asymmetry and with the height of >200 μm have been formed. Structures can be observed by naked eyes and with scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). It has been revealed, that the structures have been formed not immediately, but at the later stages of irradiation. Primary factors favouring the formation for the structures are relaxation of the surface stresses and activated surface mobility of atoms.

  20. Temperature profiles on the gadolinium surface during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    The distributions of surface temperature of gadolinium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured by optical pyrometry. The surface temperatures were obtained from the radiation intensity ratio of the evaporating surface and a reference light source using Planck's law of radiation. The emitted radiation from the evaporating surface and a reference source was detected by a CCD sensor through a band pass filter of 650 nm. The measured surface temperature generally agreed with those estimated from the deposition rate and the data of the saturated vapor pressure. At high input powers, it was found that the measured value had small difference with the estimated one due to variation of the surface condition. (author)

  1. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...... a direct measurement of the surface electronic transport on a bulk topological insulator. The surface state conductivity and mobility are obtained. Apart from transport properties, we also investigate the atomic structure of the Bi2Se3(111) surface via surface x-ray diraction and low-energy electron...

  2. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-03-03

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.

  3. Surface hardening of 30CrMnSiA steel using continuous electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yulei; Hu, Jing; Shen, Xianfeng; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Wansheng

    2017-11-01

    30CrMnSiA high strength low alloy (HSLA) carbon structural steel is typically applied in equipment manufacturing and aerospace industries. In this work, the effects of continuous electron beam treatment on the surface hardening and microstructure modifications of 30CrMnSiA are investigated experimentally via a multi-purpose electron beam machine Pro-beam system. Micro hardness value in the electron beam treated area shows a double to triple increase, from 208 HV0.2 on the base metal to 520 HV0.2 on the irradiated area, while the surface roughness is relatively unchanged. Surface hardening parameters and mechanisms are clarified by investigation of the microstructural modification and the phase transformation both pre and post irradiation. The base metal is composed of ferrite and troostite. After continuous electron beam irradiation, the micro structure of the electron beam hardened area is composed of acicular lower bainite, feathered upper bainite and part of lath martensite. The optimal input energy density for 30CrMnSiA steel in this study is of 2.5 kJ/cm2 to attain the proper hardened depth and peak hardness without the surface quality deterioration. When the input irradiation energy exceeds 2.5 kJ/cm2 the convective mixing of the melted zone will become dominant. In the area with convective mixing, the cooling rate is relatively lower, thus the micro hardness is lower. The surface quality will deteriorate. Chemical composition and surface roughness pre and post electron beam treatment are also compared. The technology discussed give a picture of the potential of electron beam surface treatment for improving service life and reliability of the 30CrMnSiA steel.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation of electrons in periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich

    2011-01-01

    Periodic magnetic structures (undulators) are widely used in accelerators to generate monochromatic undulator radiation (UR) in the range from far infrared to the hard X-ray region. Another periodic crystalline structure is used to produce quasimonochromatic polarized photon beams via the coherent bremsstrahlung mechanism (CBS). Due to such characteristics as monochromaticity, polarization and adjustability, these types of radiation is of large interest for applied and basic research of accelerator-emitted radiation. The book provides a detailed overview of the fundamental principles behind electromagnetic radiation emitted from accelerated charged particles (e.g. UR, CBS, radiation of fast electrons in Laser flash fields) as well as a unified description of relatively new radiation mechanisms which attracted great interest in recent years. This are the so-called polarization radiation excited by the Coulomb field of incident particles in periodic structures, parametric X-rays, resonant transition radiation and the Smith-Purcell effect. Characteristics of such radiation sources and perspectives of their usage are discussed. The recent experimental results as well as their interpretation are presented. (orig.)

  5. Projective and superconformal structures on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Much attention has recently been given to the study of super Riemann surfaces. Detailed accounts of these objects and their infinitesimal deformation theory are referenced where they are fitted into the framework of complex supermanifolds, superconformal structures and graded sheaves. One difficulty, which seems even more of a barrier than in the case of classical deformations of Riemann surface structure, is the lack of a good global description of super-moduli spaces. In this note, we outline an approach which places the theory in the classical setting of projective structures on variable Riemann surfaces. We explain how to construct a distribution (family of vector subspaces) inside the holomorphic cotangent space to the moduli space M g of Riemann surfaces with genus g and furnished with a level-4 homology structure, such that the corresponding rank-(2g-2) complex vector bundle models the soul deformations of a family of super-Riemann surfaces. The keystone in this construction is the existence of holomorphic sections for the space of non-singular odd theta characteristics on C g the universal curve over M g . (author)

  6. Surface band structures on Nb(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, B.; Lo, W.; Chien, T.; Leung, T.C.; Lue, C.Y.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    We report the joint studies of experimental and theoretical surface band structures of Nb(001). Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine surface-state dispersions along three high-symmetry axes bar Γ bar M, bar Γ bar X, and bar M bar X in the surface Brillouin zone. Ten surface bands have been identified. The experimental data are compared to self-consistent pseudopotential calculations for the 11-layer Nb(001) slabs that are either bulk terminated or fully relaxed (with a 12% contraction for the first interlayer spacing). The band calculations for a 12% surface-contracted slab are in better agreement with the experimental results than those for a bulk-terminated slab, except for a surface resonance near the Fermi level, which is related to the spin-orbit interaction. The charge profiles for all surface states or resonances have been calculated. Surface contraction effects on the charge-density distribution and the energy position of surface states and resonances will also be discussed

  7. Nonlinear Tamm states and surface effects in periodic photonic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivshar, Yu S

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the basic concepts and important experimental observations of the effect of light localization near the surfaces of truncated periodic photonic structures. In particular, we discuss the formation of nonlinear localized modes and discrete surface solitons near the edges of nonlinear optical waveguide arrays and two-dimensional photonic lattices. We draw an analogy between the nonlinear surface optical modes and the surface Tamm states known in the electronic theory. We discuss the crossover between discrete solitons in the array and surface solitons at the edge of the array by analyzing the families of even and odd nonlinear localized modes located at finite distances from the edge of a waveguide array. We discuss various generalization of this concept including surface solitons in chirped lattices, multi-gap vector surface solitons, polychromatic surface states generated by a supercontinuum source, surface modes in two-dimensional photonic lattices, and spatiotemporal surface solitons. Finally, we discuss briefly several other related concepts including the enhanced beaming of light from subwavelength waveguides in photonic crystals

  8. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinczuk, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  9. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  10. Electron at the Surface of Water: Dehydrated or Not?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlig, Frank; Maršálek, Ondřej; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2013), s. 338-343 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrated electron * surface solvation * ab initio molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.687, year: 2013

  11. Assessment of root surfaces of apicected teeth: A scanning electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the apical surface characteristics and presence of dental cracks in single‑rooted premolars, resected 3.0 mm from the root apex, using the Er: YAG laser, tungsten carbide bur, and diamond‑coated tip, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Experimental design: Thirty ...

  12. Modification of C60/C70+Pd film structure under electric field influence during electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwosz, E.; Dluzewski, P.; Kozlowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the modification of structure of C 60 /C 70 +Pd films during cold electron emission from these films. Films were obtained by vacuum thermal deposition from two sources and were characterised before and after electron emission measurements by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Films were composed of nanocrystalline Pd objects dispersed in carbon/fullerenes matrix. I-V characteristics for electron emission were obtained in diode geometry with additionally applied voltage along the film surface. The modification of film structure occurred under applied electric field and the grouping of Pd nano crystals into bigger objects was observed

  13. Electron capture by highly charged ions from surfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.

    2008-01-11

    In this study highly charged ions produced in Electron Beam Ion Traps are used to investigate electron capture from surfaces and gases. The experiments with gas targets focus on spectroscopic measurements of the K-shell x-rays emitted at the end of radiative cascades following electron capture into Rydberg states of Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions as a function of collision energy. The ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at an energy of 2 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and then decelerated down to 5 eVu{sup -1} for interaction with an argon gas target. For decreasing collision energies a shift to electron capture into low orbital angular momentum capture states is observed. Comparative measurements of the K-shell x-ray emission following electron capture by Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions from background gas in the trap are made and a discrepancy in the results compared with those from the extraction experiments is found. Possible explanations are discussed. For the investigation of electron capture from surfaces, highly charged ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at energies of 2 to 3 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and directed onto targets comprising arrays of nanoscale apertures in silicon nitride membranes. The highly charged ions implemented are Ar{sup 16+} and Xe{sup 44+} and the aperture targets are formed by focused ion beam drilling in combination with ion beam assisted thin film deposition, achieving hole diameters of 50 to 300 nm and aspect ratios of 1:5 to 3:2. After transport through the nanoscale apertures the ions pass through an electrostatic charge state analyzer and are detected. The percentage of electron capture from the aperture walls is found to be much lower than model predictions and the results are discussed in terms of a capillary guiding mechanism. (orig.)

  14. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Falkenberg, Jesper Toft

    2016-01-01

    morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity....... Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic......ecent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline...

  15. Near-surface electron acceleration during intense laser-solid interaction in the grazing incidence regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    When a relativistically intense p-polarized laser pulse is grazingly incident onto a planar solid-state target, a slightly superluminal field structure is formed near the target surface due to the incident and reflected waves superposition. This field structure can both extract the electrons from the target and accelerate them. It is theoretically shown that the acceleration is possible and stable for a wide range of electron initial conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm that this mechanism can actually take place for realistic parameters. As a result, the electron bunches with a charge of tens of nC and GeV-level energy can be produced using a laser intensity 1021-1022 W/cm2. It is also shown that the presence of a preplasma can improve acceleration, which becomes possible because of more efficient electron injection into the accelerating field structure.

  16. Surface hardening of AISI 4340 steel by electron beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chienchun; Hwang Jiunren

    1994-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of electron beam (EB) surface hardening on the abrasive wear property of AISI 4340 steel. The heat treatment conditions were varied so that the influence of microstructures on the wear resistance could be evaluated. A dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion test was selected to evaluate the high stress wear properties. The results show that the weight loss decreases with increasing hardness of surface layer or base material. The EB surface hardening can improve the abrasive wear resistance by about 10%. The best heat treatment process for AISI 4340 steel against abrasive wear is oil quenching from 840 C, tempering at 370 C, the EB surface hardening under heat input of 135-150 J mm -1 . The width and depth of the wear tracks are reduced after the EB surface hardening treatment. (orig.)

  17. Electronic structure of 11H-dibenz(b,f)azepines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); McGlynn, Sean P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Electronic structures of benzazepines and their relation to biological activity. • Molecular structures of benzazepines and the relationship to electronic structures. • “Aza effect” and its influence on photoelectron spectra. - Abstract: The electronic structures and conformers of several 11H-Dibenz(b,f)azepines (DBA) have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemistry calculations. The main features of the electronic structure of DBA derivatives are discussed. The molecular structures of all the molecules studied are nonplanar with the central aza-cycloheptene ring in boat conformation. The keto derivative has the smallest deviation from planarity experienced of the aza-cycloheptene ring.

  18. Surface and mineral structure of ferrihydrite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.

    2013-01-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is an yet enigmatic nano Fe(III)-oxide material, omnipresent in nature that can bind ions in large quantities, regulating bioavailability and ion mobility. Although extensively studied, to date no proper view exists on the surface structure and composition, while it is of vital

  19. Melamine structures on the Au(111) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silly, Fabien; Shaw, Adam Q.; Castell, Martin R.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Mura, Manuela; Martsinovich, Natalia; Kantorovich, Lev

    2008-01-01

    We report on a joint experimental and theoretical study of the ordered structures of melamine molecules formed on the Au(111)-(22 x root 3) surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images taken under UHV conditions reveal two distinct monolayers one of which has never been reported before on

  20. Growth and Electronic Structure of Heusler Compounds for Use in Electron Spin Based Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sahil Jaykumar

    Spintronic devices, where information is carried by the quantum spin state of the electron instead of purely its charge, have gained considerable interest for their use in future computing technologies. For optimal performance, a pure spin current, where all electrons have aligned spins, must be generated and transmitted across many interfaces and through many types of materials. While conventional spin sources have historically been elemental ferromagnets, like Fe or Co, these materials pro duce only partially spin polarized currents. To increase the spin polarization of the current, materials like half-metallic ferromagnets, where there is a gap in the minority spin density of states around the Fermi level, or topological insulators, where the current transport is dominated by spin-locked surface states, show promise. A class of materials called Heusler compounds, with electronic structures that range from normal metals, to half metallic ferromagnets, semiconductors, superconductors and even topological insulators, interfaces well with existing device technologies, and through the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) high quality heterostructures and films can be grown. This dissertation examines the electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces of both topological insulator (PtLuSb-- and PtLuBi--) and half-metallic ferromagnet (Co2MnSi-- and Co2FeSi--) III-V semiconductor heterostructures. PtLuSb and PtLuBi growth by MBE was demonstrated on Alx In1--xSb (001) ternaries. PtLuSb (001) surfaces were observed to reconstruct with either (1x3) or c(2x2) unit cells depending on Sb overpressure and substrate temperature. viii The electronic structure of these films was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and photoemission spectroscopy. STS measurements as well as angle resolved photoemission spectropscopy (ARPES) suggest that PtLuSb has a zero-gap or semimetallic band structure. Additionally, the observation of linearly dispersing surface

  1. Structural and vibrational studies of clean and chemisorbed metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qing-Tang.

    1992-01-01

    Using Medium Energy Ion Scattering, we have studied the structural and vibrational properties of a number of clean and chemisorbed metal surfaces. The work presented in this thesis is mainly of a fundamental nature. However, it is believed that an atomistic understanding of the forces that affect surface structural and vibrational properties can have a beneficial impact on a large number of areas of applied nature. We find that the surface structure of Cu(001) follows the common trend for metal surfaces, where a small oscillatory relaxation exists beginning with a slight contraction in the top layer. In addition, the surface vibrational amplitude is enhanced (as s usually the case) by ∼80%. A detailed analysis of our data shows an unexpected anisotropy of the vibrational amplitude, such that the out-of-plane vibrational amplitude is 30% smaller than the in-plane vibrational amplitude. The unexpected results may imply a large tensile stress on Cu(001). Upon adsorption of 1/4 of a monolayer of S, a p(2 x 2)-S/Cu(001) surface is created. This submonolayer amount of S atoms makes the surface bulk-like, in which the anisotropy of the surface vibrations is removed and the first interlayer contraction is lifted. By comparing our model to earlier contradictory results on this controversial system. We find excellent agreement with a recent LEED study. The presence of 0.1 monolayer of Ca atoms on the Au(113) surface induces a drastic atomic rearrangements, in which half of the top layer Au atoms are missing and a (1 x 2) symmetry results. In addition, the first interlayer spacing of Au(113) is significantly reduced. Our results are discussed in terms of the energy balance between competing surface electronic charge densities

  2. The structural and electronic properties of metal atoms adsorbed on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjiang; Zhang, Cheng; Deng, Mingsen; Cai, Shaohong

    2017-09-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT), we studied the structural and electronic properties of seven different metal atoms adsorbed on graphene (M + graphene). The geometries, adsorption energies, density of states (DOS), band structures, electronic dipole moment, magnetic moment and work function (WF) of M + graphene were calculated. The adsorption energies ΔE indicated that Li, Na, K, Ca and Fe adsorbed on graphene were tending to form stable structures. However, diffusion would occur on Cu and Ag adsorbed on graphene. In addition, the electronic structure near the Fermi level of graphene was significantly affected by Fe (Cu and Ag), compared with Li (Na, K and Ca). The electronic dipole moment and magnetic moment of M + graphene were sensitive to the adsorbed metal atoms. Moreover, we found electropositive (electronegative) adsorption can decrease (increase) the WF of the surface. Specially, the WF of Ag + graphene and Fe + graphene would increase because surface dipole moment make a contribution to electron.

  3. Electronic structure of bulk AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np, Pu) and water adsorption on the (111) and (110) surfaces of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} from hybrid density functional theory within the periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellington, Joseph P.W. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Kerridge, Andrew [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YP (United Kingdom); Austin, Jonathan [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas, E-mail: nikolas.kaltsoyannis@manchester.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Generalised gradient approximation (PBE) and hybrid (PBE0) density functional theory (DFT) within the periodic electrostatic embedded cluster method have been used to study AnO{sub 2} bulk and surfaces (An = U, Np, Pu). The electronic structure has been investigated by examining the projected density of states (PDOS). While PBE incorrectly predicts these systems to be metallic, PBE0 finds them to be insulators, with the composition of the valence and conduction levels agreeing well with experiment. Molecular and dissociative water adsorption on the (111) and (110) surfaces of UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} has been investigated, with that on the (110) surface being stronger than on the (111). Similar energies are found for molecular and dissociative adsorption on the (111) surfaces, while on the (110) there is a clear preference for dissociative adsorption. Adsorption energies and geometries on the (111) surface of UO{sub 2} are in good agreement with recent periodic DFT studies using the GGA+U approach, and our data for dissociative adsorption on the (110) surface of PuO{sub 2} match experiment rather well, especially when dispersion corrections are included. - Graphical abstract: The electronic structures of AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np, Pu) are studied computationally with hybrid density functional theory, and the geometries and energetics of water adsorption on the low index surfaces are presented.

  4. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Oyama, A B; Silva-Molina, R A; Ruíz-García, J; Gámez-Corrales, R; Guirado-López, R A

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ~2 nm, lengths of approximately 100-300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ~0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH-MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH-MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  5. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuerlein, C; Hilleret, Noël; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis resu...

  6. Positron study of electron momentum density and Fermi surface in titanium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Osawa, Makoto; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Matsumoto, Makoto; Shiotani, Nobuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    The three dimensional electron-positron momentum densities have been obtained on Ti and Zr from measurements of two dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation followed by an image reconstruction technique based on direct Fourier transformation. Augmented-plane wave band structure calculations have been carried out and the results are compared with the experiments. Agreement between the experiment and the theory leads to a conclusion that both Ti and Zr have electron surface sheets which are centered at H and hole surface sheets which are running along the Γ-A axis. (author)

  7. Electronic parameters and top surface chemical stability of RbPb2Br5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Isaenko, L.I.; Kesler, V.G.; Pokrovsky, L.D.; Tarasova, A.Yu.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bridgman growth of RbPb 2 Br 5 crystal. ► Electronic structure measurements with XPS. ► Optical crystalline surface fabrication. - Abstract: The RbPb 2 Br 5 crystal has been grown by Bridgman method. The electronic structure of RbPb 2 Br 5 has been measured with XPS for a powder sample. High chemical stability of RbPb 2 Br 5 surface is verified by weak intensity of O 1s core level recorded by XPS and structural RHEED measurements. Chemical bonding effects have been observed by the comparative analysis of element core levels and crystal structure of RbPb 2 Br 5 and several rubidium- and lead-containing bromides using binding energy difference parameters Δ Rb = (BE Rb 3d − BE Br 3d) and Δ Pb = (BE Pb 4f 7/2 − BE Br 3d).

  8. Dissociative electron attachment on surfaces and in bulk media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2007-01-01

    A theory of dissociative electron attachment to molecules condensed at surfaces and embedded within bulk media is developed. The theory of low-energy electron diffraction is used to obtain the width for electron-molecule resonance scattering in the condensed phase from the width for the gas phase. It is then employed for the calculation of dissociative attachment in the framework of the nonlocal complex potential theory. Specific calculations using the effective mass approximation are carried out for electron attachment to CH 3 Cl and CF 3 Cl molecules physisorbed on the surface of a Kr film. The role of image states and image-potential resonances is analyzed. The results show an increase by several orders of magnitude in the cross section for physisorbed molecules as compared with gas-phase molecules. This is in general agreement with the measured cross sections. However, the position of the peak in the cross section for CH 3 Cl is significantly shifted towards higher energies as compared to experiment [K. Nagesha et al., J. Chem. Phys. 114, 4934 (2001)], and the magnitude of the calculated cross section for CF 3 Cl at the surface is significantly higher than the measured value. Possible reasons for disagreements are analyzed

  9. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Chapter I: Here the results of various theories for the angular distribution of electrons photoemitted from the outermost p-shell of rare gas atoms are compared. The theories compared are (I) the local density theories of Slater (X/sub α/) and of Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham, (II) the pseudopotential method, (III) Hartree-Fock theory as evaluated by Kennedy and Manson, and (IV) Amusia's Random Phase Approximation with Exchange (RPAE). It is shown that the local density theories, although simple, generally fail to produce reliable cross section; the more complicated Hartree-Fock method is no more reliable; the a priori RPAE method is most reliable, but tedious; and the phenomenological pseudopotential method offers a good combination of reliability and simplicity. The muffin-tin approximation, widely used in molecular and condensed matter physics, is examined and found to be adequate. Chapter II: Extended Hueckel theory is applied to GaAs, GaP and to the nitrogen isoelectronic trap in GaAs and GaP. The computed perfect crystal band structures are found to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical pseudopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levels in GaAs and GaP are calculated using a cluster model. Chapter III: By means of model calculations for an independent electron metal, we obtain exact lineshapes for the photon absorption, emission and photoemission spectra of deep core states. We find in each case an X-ray edge anomaly as pedicted by Nozieres and De Dominicis. Sumrules are used as a general check on the calculations and to explain the deviations of the exact theory from the exciton theory away from threshold

  10. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Kuan-Wei [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The pattern design provides a new structure of surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED). Delta-star shaped vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20o tips can simultaneously provide three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT, which produces numerous secondary electrons and enhance the SED efficiency. - Highlights: • The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. • The vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20° tips of the delta-star arrangement are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons. The cathode pattern simultaneously provides three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT. • The VACNT arrays were covered with magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). • The η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications. - Abstract: The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for

  11. Electronic Structure Investigation of Doping C60 with Metal Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggong; Gao, Yongli

    2014-03-01

    Fullerene (C60) has been used extensively as an acceptor material in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Other applications including n-channel organic thin film transistors (OTFT) and C60 based organic superconductors have been reported more than a decade ago. We have investigated p-doping of C60 with molybdenum oxide (MoOx) with ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS), inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both surface doping and bulk doping by MoOx are studied. It was found that the thermally evaporated MoOx inter-layer substantially increased the surface workfunction. This increased surface workfunction strongly attract electrons towards the MoOx layer at the C60/MoOx interface, resulting in strong inversion of C60. Energy levels of C60 relax gradually as the thickness of C60 increases. An exceptionally long (greater than 400 Angstrom) band bending is observed during this relaxation in C60. Such a long band bending has not been observed for other organic/MoOx interface. For the bulk doping, MoOx doping ratios from 1% to over 100% were investigated. The saturation occurs at approximately 20 %, when the highest occupied molecular level (HOMO) of C60 starts to be pinned at the Fermi level. These studies demonstrate effective ways to manipulate the electronic structures of the fullerene. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR-1303742.

  12. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  13. Surface structure of oriented PET films

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, K

    2001-01-01

    crystallinity and the level of molecular orientation of the polymer are highest at the film surface and gradually decrease away from it. The same trend for an increase in structural order nearer the film surface was observed in a series of PET films drawn uniaxially in laboratory conditions. The observed strong dependence of stratification in the oriented films on drawing ratio, lead to the conclusion, that the structural gradients arise as a result of viscous flow. The molecular mechanism of stratification is discussed and leads to the idea of enhanced chain mobility at the PET film surface. The idea is in line with recent studies showing a depression of the glass transition temperature of free polymer surfaces. In addition, the results on structure formation in PET films during drawing, give support to the existing view that polymer crystallisation is assisted by a spinodal-decomposition nucleation process. Polymer films are widely used as substrates in nano-composite materials and therefore have to possess...

  14. Structurally tuned iridescent surfaces inspired by nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deparis, Olivier; Rassart, Marie; Vandenbem, Cedric; Welch, Victoria; Vigneron, Jean Pol; Lucas, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Iridescent surfaces exhibit vivid colours which change with the angle of incidence or viewing due to optical wave interference in the multilayer structure present at the wavelength scale underneath the surface. In nature, one can find examples of iridescent Coleoptera for which the hue changes either greatly or slightly with the angle. Because these species typically make these structures from a single biological material (usually chitin) and air or water as the low refractive index component, they have evolved by adjusting the layer thicknesses in order to display quite different iridescent aspects. Taking inspiration from this proven strategy, we have designed and fabricated periodic TiO 2 /SiO 2 multilayer films in order to demonstrate the concept of structurally tuned iridescent surfaces. Titanium or silicon oxide layers were deposited on a glass substrate using dc reactive or RF magnetron sputtering techniques, respectively. Two structures were designed for which the period and the TiO 2 /SiO 2 layer thickness ratio were varied in such a way that the films displayed radically different iridescent aspects: a reddish-to-greenish changing hue and a stable bluish hue. The fabricated samples were characterized through specular reflectance/transmittance measurements. Modelling of transmittance spectra using standard multilayer film theory confirmed the high quality of the twelve-period Bragg reflectors. The chromaticity coordinates, which were calculated from measured reflectance spectra taken at different angles, were in accordance with theoretical predictions

  15. Reflection of the energy structure of a tungsten monocrystal nearsurface area in the secondary electron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Smirnov, O.M.; Terekhov, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    Formation of secondary electron energy spectrum during emission from the crystal layer near the surface has been considered, at that layer energy structure can be different from volumetric energy structure. Its thickness depends on the predominant mechanism of electron scattering and is determined by corresponding phenomenological parameters. It is shown that the structure in the secondary electron spectrum appears in the case when energy structure of emitting monocrystal layer can not be described in the approximation of almost free electron gas and, as experimental investigations show, approaches energy zone structure of its volume. It is also show that in the case when the energy structure of the emitting layer is satisfactorily described with the model of almost free electron gas, the SE spectrum is characterized with traditional cascade minimum. Experimental investigation of SE energy distribution was carried out for the W monocrystalline face (110). It was established that distinct structure in the SE spectrum appears only after electrochemical polishing of the specimen surface. It is related to the appearance of ''far'' order in the monocrystal emission layer on initially disturbed tungsten surface during such treatment. Disturbance of tungsten monocrystal surface structure on its oxidation in O 2 atmosphere results in the appearance of the cascade maximum and disappearance of distinct peculiarities in the SE spectrum

  16. IrPd nanoalloys: simulations, from surface segregation to local electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamiharintsoa, T. H. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France); Rakotomahevitra, A. [Institut pour la Maîtrise de l’Énergie, Faculté des sciences d’Antananarivo (Madagascar); Piccolo, L. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement de Lyon IRCELYON, UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1 (France); Goyhenex, C., E-mail: christine.goyhenex@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Using semi-empirical modeling, namely tight-binding at different levels of accuracy, the chemical, crystallographic, and electronic structures of bimetallic IrPd nanoparticles are characterized. For the purpose, model cuboctahedral particles containing 561 atoms are considered. Atomistic simulations show that core–shell nanoparticles are highly stable, with a strong surface segregation of Pd, at least for one atomic shell thickness. Within self-consistent tight-binding calculations founded on the density functional theory, an accurate insight is given into the electronic structure of these materials which have a high potential as catalysts.

  17. Exchange energy of inhomogenous electron gas near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglio, L.; Tosi, M.P.; March, N.H.

    1980-12-01

    Using the first-order density matrix of an infinite-barrier model of a metal surface, the exchange energy density can be evaluated exactly as a function of distance z from the barrier. This result is compared with the local approximation -3/4e 2 (3/π)sup(1/3) rhosup(4/3)(z) where rho is the electron density in the model. The local approximation is demonstrated to be quantitatively accurate at all z. The integrated surface exchange energy is given to within 3% by the local theory. (author)

  18. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjorchmar; Johansson, Martin; Hansen, Ole; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO 2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm 2 have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS) and work function measurements. Energy spectra of electron emission from the devices under an applied bias voltage have been recorded for the clean Au surface and for two Cs coverages and simultaneous work function curves have been obtained. The electron emission onset is seen to appear at the surface work function. A method for cleaning the ex situ deposited Au top electrodes to a degree satisfactory to surface science studies has been developed, and a threshold for oxide damage by low-energy ion exposure between 0.5 and 1 keV has been determined.

  19. Low-energy electron scattering at surfaces using STM tips as a field emission gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, S.; Iwanaga, M.; Tochihara, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The field emission from scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) tips has the potential to probe small surface areas with electron beams. Several groups have demonstrated their capabilities. Intensity mapping of the secondary electrons and projection of the transmitted electrons have been shown to have high lateral resolution. Spin-polarized secondary electron microscopy, energy loss spectroscopy and scanning Auger electron microscopy have been also reported. We examined low-energy electron scattering at surfaces. Our final target is a development of a low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) technique using field emission from STM tips to determine structures of surface small regions. Our apparatus was designed based on a commercial STM system (UNISOKU USM-1100). The STM part was suspended by four springs to remove vibrations. The sample holder was mounted on a tube-type piezo scanner, while the tip was fixed rigidly on the holder. The bias voltages were applied to the sample up to +100 V. The tunnel current and the emission current were monitored on the tip. The emission current was fixed at 0.1 nA in the field emission mode. The apparatus was designed to detect backscattered electrons toward surface normal direction. The scattered electrons were guided by the electric field of the tip shield and an extractor, passed through a three-grid electron energy filter, and detected by a microchannel plate equipped with a phosphor screen. Tips were made of tungsten single crystal wire with a diameter of 0.25 mm. They have orientation of direction, and were sharpened by electrochemical etching with a NaOH solution of 2 N. The tips were welded on a tantalum wire for annealing in a preparation chamber. Field emission patterns and field ion microscopy images of them were obtained before and after experiments. The sensitivity and stability of the apparatus were sufficient to observe scattering patterns on the screen. We measured the kinetic energies of the scattered

  20. Investigations of the Band Structure and Morphology of Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kevin R.

    2011-12-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the electronic structure of two very different types of two-dimensional systems: valence band electrons in single layer graphene and electronic states created at the vacuum interface of single crystal copper surfaces. The characteristics of both electronic systems depend intimately on the morphology of the surfaces they inhabit. Thus, in addition to discussing the respective band structures of these systems, a significant portion of this dissertation will be devoted to measurements of the surface morphology of these systems. Free-standing exfoliated monolayer graphene is an ultra-thin flexible membrane and, as such, is known to exhibit large out-of-plane deformation due to substrate and adsorbate interaction as well as thermal vibrations and, possibly, intrinsic buckling. Such crystal deformation is known to limit mobility and increase local chemical reactivity. Additionally, deformations present a measurement challenge to researchers wishing to determine the band structure by angle-resolved photoemission since they limit electron coherence in such measurements. In this dissertation, I present low energy electron microscopy and micro probe diffraction measurements, which are used to image and characterize corrugation in SiO2-supported and suspended exfoliated graphene at nanometer length scales. Diffraction line-shape analysis reveals quantitative differences in surface roughness on length scales below 20 nm which depend on film thickness and interaction with the substrate. Corrugation decreases with increasing film thickness, reflecting the increased stiffness of multilayer films. Specifically, single-layer graphene shows a markedly larger short range roughness than multilayer graphene. Due to the absence of interactions with the substrate, suspended graphene displays a smoother morphology and texture than supported graphene. A specific feature of suspended single-layer films is the dependence of corrugation on both adsorbate load

  1. Dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the electron-extraction scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iñarrea, Manuel [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Lanchares, Víctor [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Palacián, Jesús [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Pascual, Ana I. [Departamento de Matemáticas y Computación, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja (Spain); Salas, J. Pablo, E-mail: josepablo.salas@unirioja.es [Área de Física Aplicada, Universidad de La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Yanguas, Patricia [Departamento de Ingeniería Matemática e Informática, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-01-23

    We study the classical dynamics of a Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface in the presence of a constant electric field in the electron-extraction situation [1], e.g., when the field attracts the electron to the vacuum. From a dynamical point of view, this field configuration provides a dynamics richer than in the usual ion-extraction scheme, because, depending on the values of field and the atom–surface distance, the atom can be ionized only towards the metal surface, only to the vacuum or to the both sides. The evolution of the phase space structure as a function of the atom–surface distance is explored in the bound regime of the atom. In the high energy regime, the ionization mechanism is also investigated. We find that the classical results of this work are in good agreement with the results obtained in the wave-packet propagation study carried out by So et al. [1]. - Highlights: • We study a classical hydrogen atom near a metal surface plus a electric field. • We explore the phase space structure as a function of the field strength. • We find most of the electronic orbits are oriented along the field direction. • We study the ionization of the atom for several atom–surface distances. • This classical study is in good agreement with the quantum results.

  2. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  3. Condensation and Wetting Dynamics on Micro/Nano-Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olceroglu, Emre

    -condensable gases (NCGs), a novel characterization technique has been developed based on image tracking of droplet growth rates. The full-field dynamic characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation has been achieved using high-speed microscopy coupled with image-processing algorithms. This method is able to resolve heat fluxes as low as 20 W/m 2 and heat transfer coefficients of up to 1000 kW/m2, across an array of 1000's of microscale droplets simultaneously. Nanostructured surfaces with mixed wettability have been used to demonstrate delayed flooding during superhydrophobic condensation. These surfaces have been optimized and characterized using optical and electron microscopy, leading to the observation of self-organizing microscale droplets. The self-organization of small droplets effectively delays the onset of surface flooding, allowing the superhydrophobic surfaces to operate at higher supersaturations. Additionally, hierarchical surfaces have been fabricated and characterized showing enhanced droplet growth rates as compared to existing models. This enhancement has been shown to be derived from the presence of small feeder droplets nucleating within the microscale unit cells of the hierarchical surfaces. Based on the experimental observations, a mechanistic model for growth rates has been developed for superhydrophobic hierarchical surfaces. While superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit high heat transfer rates they are inherently unstable due to the necessity to maintain a non-wetted state in a condensing environment. As an alternative condensation surface, a novel design is introduced here using ambiphilic structures to promote the formation of a thin continuous liquid film across the surface which can still provide the benefits of superhydrophobic condensation. Preliminary results show that the ambiphilic structures restrain the film thickness, thus maintaining a low thermal resistance while simultaneously maximizing the liquid-vapor interface available for

  4. Electron emission from MOS electron emitters with clean and cesium covered gold surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunver; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar; Johansson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) electron emitters consisting of a Si substrate, a SiO2 tunnel barrier and a Ti (1 nm)/Au(7 nm) top-electrode, with an active area of 1 cm(2) have been produced and studied with surface science techniques under UHV (ultra high vacuum) conditions and their emission...... characteristics have been investigated. It is known, that deposition of an alkali metal on the emitting surface lowers the work function and increases the emission efficiency. For increasing Cs coverages the surface has been characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (ISS...

  5. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF/sub 2/ as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states. (GHT)

  6. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF 2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  7. Surface hardening alloy VT6 of electric explosion and by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Kobzareva, T. Yu.; Gromov, V. E.; Soskova, N. A.; Budovskikh, E. A.; Raikov, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to study the phase composition, structure and properties of the surface layer of the VT6 titanium alloy, subjected to combined treatment, consisting of alloying by the plasma of an electric explosion of a graphite fiber with a charge of the SiC powder and subsequent exposure by a high-intense electron beam. As a result of such treatment, a multiphase surface layer with a submicron and nanosize structure forms with the microhardness manifold exceeding its value in the sample volume are presented

  8. Electronic Band Structure of BaCo_{2}As_{2}: A Fully Doped Ferropnictide Analog with Reduced Electronic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an investigation with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the Fermi surface and electronic band structure of BaCo_{2}As_{2}. Although its quasinesting-free Fermi surface differs drastically from that of its Fe-pnictide cousins, we show that the BaCo_{2}As_{2} system can be used as an approximation to the bare unoccupied band structure of the related BaFe_{2-x}Co_{x}As_{2} and Ba_{1-x}K_{x}Fe_{2}As_{2} compounds. However, our experimental results, in agreement with dynamical-mean-field-theory calculations, indicate that electronic correlations are much less important in BaCo_{2}As_{2} than in the ferropnictides. Our findings suggest that this effect is due to the increased filling of the electronic 3d shell in the presence of significant Hund’s exchange coupling.

  9. High-Resolution Structural and Electronic Properties of Epitaxial Topological Crystalline Insulator Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur; Zhou, Chao; Zou, Ke; Simon, Georg; Albright, Stephen; Mandal, Subhasish; Morales-Acosta, Mayra; Zhu, Xiaodong; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick; Ahn, Charles; Schwarz, Udo; Altman, Eric

    Revealing the local electronic properties of surfaces and their link to structural properties is an important problem for topological crystalline insulators (TCI) in which metallic surface states are protected by crystal symmetry. The microstructure and electronic properties of TCI SnTe film surfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy were characterized using scanning probe microscopy. These results reveal the influence of various defects on the electronic properties: tilt boundaries leading to dislocation arrays that serve as periodic nucleation sites for pit growth; screw dislocations, and point defects. These features have varying length scale and display variations in the electronic structure of the surface, which are mapped with scanning tunneling microscopy images as standing waves superimposed on atomic scale images of the surface topography that consequently shape the wave patterns. Since the growth process results in symmetry breaking defects that patterns the topological states, we propose that the scanning probe tip can pattern the surface and electronic structure and enable the fabrication of topological devices on the SnTe surface. Financial support from the National Science Foundation through the Yale Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (Grant No. MRSEC DMR-1119826) and FAME.

  10. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  11. Unoccupied electronic band structure effects in low-energy SEES and TCS of some d-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panchenko, O.F.

    2002-01-01

    The fine structure of the experimental secondary electron emission spectra (SEES) along the normal to a Ir(111) surface and the target (total) current spectra (TCS) along the normal to a Cu(111) surface are interpreted theoretically. It is shown that the fine structure of SEES and TCS is mainly due to the electronic structure of unoccupied high-level electronic states (above the vacuum level E vac ) to which the electrons come or from which they emit. The predominant role of the effects of bulk energy-band structure in the formation of spectra is shown. Comparison to existing experimental data is given

  12. Nanoscale surface topographies for structural colors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik

    The thesis describes and demonstrates the possibilities for utilization of structural colors in mass fabricated plastic products as replacement for or in combination with pigments and inks. The motivation is the possible advantages related to re-cycling and re-use of plastic by limiting the number......-polymer interface is suppressed. This improves the ability to see through a clear plastic in the presence of specular reflection. The tapered nanostructures are also utilized to enhance the chroma of pigmented polymers. Larger tapered structures fabricated in a similar manor are shown to work as color filters....... Through an experimental study is the color of the transmitted light linked directly to the random topography of the surface by use of diffraction theory. The color effects from periodic structures and how these might be employed to create bright colors are investigated. This is done both for opaque...

  13. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  14. Structure of ion-plated amorphous hydrogenated carbon films investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehling, I.; Bewilogua, K.; Breuer, K. (Sektion Physik/Elektronische Bauelemente, Technische Univ., Karl-Marx-Stadt (German Democratic Republic))

    1990-05-15

    Thin ion-plated amorphous hydrogenated carbon films were investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy. From an analysis of the dielectric function, information on the film structure could be obtained. The results will be compared with those of electron diffraction studies. Differences between insulating and conducting substrates could be verified in the film structure and are related to surface charging effects. From an analysis of the oscillator strength sum rule the content of C sp{sup 2} atoms was estimated. (orig.).

  15. Structured free-water clusters near lubricating surfaces are essential in water-based lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiapeng; Veeregowda, Deepak H; de Vries, Joop; Van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2016-10-01

    Water-based lubrication provides cheap and environmentally friendly lubrication and, although hydrophilic surfaces are preferred in water-based lubrication, often lubricating surfaces do not retain water molecules during shear. We show here that hydrophilic (42° water contact angle) quartz surfaces facilitate water-based lubrication to the same extent as more hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces (61°), while lubrication by hydrophilic Ge crystal surfaces (44°) is best. Thus surface hydrophilicity is not sufficient for water-based lubrication. Surface-thermodynamic analyses demonstrated that all surfaces, regardless of their water-based lubrication, were predominantly electron donating, implying water binding with their hydrogen groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ge crystal surfaces providing optimal lubrication consisted of a mixture of -O and =O functionalities, while Si crystal and quartz surfaces solely possessed -O functionalities. Comparison of infrared absorption bands of the crystals in water indicated fewer bound-water layers on hydrophilic Ge than on hydrophobic Si crystal surfaces, while absorption bands for free water on the Ge crystal surface indicated a much more pronounced presence of structured, free-water clusters near the Ge crystal than near Si crystal surfaces. Accordingly, we conclude that the presence of structured, free-water clusters is essential for water-based lubrication. The prevalence of structured water clusters can be regulated by adjusting the ratio between surface electron-donating and electron-accepting groups and between -O and =O functionalities. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Architectural Surfaces and Structures from Circular Arcs

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Ling

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades, the popularity of freeform shapes in contemporary architecture poses new challenges to digital design. One of them is the process of rationalization, i.e. to make freeform skins or structures affordable to manufacture, which draws the most attention from geometry researchers. In this thesis, we aim to realize this process with simple geometric primitives, circular arcs. We investigate architectural surfaces and structures consisting of circular arcs. Our focus is lying on how to employ them nicely and repetitively in architectural design, in order to decrease the cost in manufacturing. Firstly, we study Darboux cyclides, which are algebraic surfaces of order ≤ 4. We provide a computational tool to identify all families of circles on a given cyclide based on the spherical model of M ̈obius geometry. Practical ways to design cyclide patches that pass through certain inputs are presented. In particular, certain triples of circle families on Darboux cyclides may be suitably arranged as 3-webs. We provide a complete classification of all possible 3-webs of circles on Darboux cyclides. We then investigate the circular arc snakes, which are smooth sequences of circu- lar arcs. We evolve the snakes such that their curvature, as a function of arc length, remains unchanged. The evolution of snakes is utilized to approximate given surfaces by circular arcs or to generated freeform shapes, and it is realized by a 2-step pro- cess. More interestingly, certain 6-arc snake with boundary constraints can produce a smooth self motion, which can be employed to build flexible structures. Another challenging topic is approximating smooth freeform skins with simple panels. We contribute to this problem area by approximating a negatively-curved 5 surface with a smooth union of rational bilinear patches. We provide a proof for vertex consistency of hyperbolic nets using the CAGD approach of the rational B ́ezier form. Moreover, we use Darboux transformations for the

  17. Bioinspired, dynamic, structured surfaces for biofilm prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alexander K.

    Bacteria primarily exist in robust, surface-associated communities known as biofilms, ubiquitous in both natural and anthropogenic environments. Mature biofilms resist a wide range of biocidal treatments and pose persistent pathogenic threats. Treatment of adherent biofilm is difficult, costly, and, in medical systems such as catheters, frequently impossible. Adding to the challenge, we have discovered that biofilm can be both impenetrable to vapors and extremely nonwetting, repelling even low surface tension commercial antimicrobials. Our study shows multiple contributing factors, including biochemical components and multiscale reentrant topography. Reliant on surface chemistry, conventional strategies for preventing biofilm only transiently affect attachment and/or are environmentally toxic. In this work, we look to Nature's antifouling solutions, such as the dynamic spiny skin of the echinoderm, and we develop a versatile surface nanofabrication platform. Our benchtop approach unites soft lithography, electrodeposition, mold deformation, and material selection to enable many degrees of freedom—material, geometric, mechanical, dynamic—that can be programmed starting from a single master structure. The mechanical properties of the bio-inspired nanostructures, verified by AFM, are precisely and rationally tunable. We examine how synthetic dynamic nanostructured surfaces control the attachment of pathogenic biofilms. The parameters governing long-range patterning of bacteria on high-aspect-ratio (HAR) nanoarrays are combinatorially elucidated, and we discover that sufficiently low effective stiffness of these HAR arrays mechanoselectively inhibits ˜40% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm attachment. Inspired by the active echinoderm skin, we design and fabricate externally actuated dynamic elastomer surfaces with active surface microtopography. We extract from a large parameter space the critical topographic length scales and actuation time scales for achieving

  18. Electronic conductance of quantum wire with serial periodic potential structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Hisham M.; Shabat, Mohammed M.; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste

    2000-08-01

    A theory based on the total transfer matrix is presented to investigate the electronic conductance in a quantum wire with serial periodic potentials. We apply the formalism in computation of the electronic conductance in a wire with different physical parameters of the wire structure. The numerical results could be used in designing some future quantum electronic devices. (author)

  19. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical

  20. A molecular surface science study of the structure of adsorbates on surfaces: Importance to lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mate, C.M.

    1986-09-01

    The interaction and bonding of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces is explored under ultra-high vacuum conditions using a variety of surface science techniques: high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), work function measurements, and second harmonic generation (SHG). 164 refs., 51 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Frequency Selective Surface for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlyana Azemi, Saidatul; Mustaffa, Farzana Hazira Wan; Faizal Jamlos, Mohd; Abdullah Al-Hadi, Azremi; Soh, Ping Jack

    2018-03-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies have attained attention to monitor civil structures. SHM sensor systems have been used in various civil structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels and so on. However the previous sensor for SHM is wired and encounter with problem to cover large areas. Therefore, wireless sensor was introduced for SHM to reduce network connecting problem. Wireless sensors for Structural Health monitoring are new technology and have many advantages to overcome the drawback of conventional and wired sensor. This project proposed passive wireless SHM sensor using frequency selective surface (FSS) as an alternative to conventional sensors. The electromagnetic wave characteristic of FSS will change by geometrical changes of FSS due to mechanical strain or structural failure. The changes feature is used as a sensing function without any connecting wires. Two type of design which are circular ring and square loop along with the transmission and reflection characteristics of SHM using FSS were discussed in this project. A simulation process has shown that incident angle characteristics can be use as a data for SHM application.

  2. Structure and thermodynamics of surface recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, G.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Interactions of the surface glycoprotein, gp120, with the receptors of host cells define the pathogenesis of HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. gp120 is made of several disulfide-bridged loops--the amino acid sequences of some of these loops are fairly conserved whereas the rest are variable. The third variable (V3) loop has been the target of vaccine design for quite some time since this loop is involved in various steps of viral pathogenesis. However, this loop also happens to be the most variable one. The authors have carried out structural and immunological studies to determine the sequence-structure-antigenicity correlations of the HIV-1 V3 loops. This resulted in the identification of a secondary structure at the tip of the V3 loop that remains invariant in spite of the sequence variation. The authors designed a multi-valent V3-based antigen that presents multiple copies of the same tip element several times in the same structure. During the course of this project, they realized that the protective epitopes of gp120 should be judged in the context of the native structure. Therefore, the authors developed a method to obtain a model of gp120 that is consistent with all the immunology and virology data. This model is useful in choosing or designing gp120 subdomains for vaccine development.

  3. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of thickness on the electronic structure of e-beam evaporated thin titanium films were studied using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium 2,3 edge in total electron yield (TEY) mode and transmission yield mode. Thickness dependence of 2,3 branching ratio (BR) of titanium was ...

  4. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 31; Issue 3. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure of semiconducting quantum dots. Anjali Kshirsagar Neelesh ... Theoretical investigations of electronic structure of quantum dots is of current interest in nanophase materials. Empirical theories such ...

  5. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of thickness on the electronic structure of e-beam evaporated thin titanium films were studied using near-edge X-ray absorption ... become a powerful experimental technique to get electronic structural information of elements or .... the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The beamline 8·2 is a bending ...

  6. The crystal structure of a coxsackievirus B3-RD variant and a refined 9-angstrom cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the virus complexed with decay-accelerating factor (DAF) provide a new footprint of DAF on the virus surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Joshua D; Cifuente, Javier O; Pan, Jieyan; Bergelson, Jeffrey M; Hafenstein, Susan

    2012-12-01

    The coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) have been identified as cellular receptors for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). The first described DAF-binding isolate was obtained during passage of the prototype strain, Nancy, on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, which express DAF but very little CAR. Here, the structure of the resulting variant, CVB3-RD, has been solved by X-ray crystallography to 2.74 Å, and a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of CVB3-RD complexed with DAF has been refined to 9.0 Å. This new high-resolution structure permits us to correct an error in our previous view of DAF-virus interactions, providing a new footprint of DAF that bridges two adjacent protomers. The contact sites between the virus and DAF clearly encompass CVB3-RD residues recently shown to be required for binding to DAF; these residues interact with DAF short consensus repeat 2 (SCR2), which is known to be essential for virus binding. Based on the new structure, the mode of the DAF interaction with CVB3 differs significantly from the mode reported previously for DAF binding to echoviruses.

  7. Electronic structures of elements according to ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Dariush H

    2017-11-28

    The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were analyzed using available experimental ionization energies. Two new parameters were defined to carry out the study. The first parameter-apparent nuclear charge (ANC)-quantified the overall charge of the nucleus and inner electrons observed by an outer electron during the ionization process. This parameter was utilized to define a second parameter, which presented the shielding ability of an electron against the nuclear charge. This second parameter-electron shielding effect (ESE)-provided an insight into the electronic structure of atoms. This article avoids any sort of approximation, interpolation or extrapolation. First experimental ionization energies were used to obtain the two aforementioned parameters. The second parameter (ESE) was then graphed against the electron number of each element, and was used to read the corresponding electronic structure. The ESE showed spikes/peaks at the end of each electronic shell, providing insight into when an electronic shell closes and a new one starts. The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were mapped using this methodology. These graphs did not show complete agreement with the previously known "Aufbau" filling rule. A new filling rule was suggested based on the present observations. Finally, a new way to organize elements in the periodic table is suggested. Two earlier topics of effective nuclear charge, and shielding factor were also briefly discussed and compared numerically to demonstrate the capability of the new approach.

  8. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus

    2014-01-01

    EELS to ultra-sharp convex grooves in gold, we directly probe extremely confined gap surface-plasmon (GSP) modes excited by swift electrons in nanometre-wide gaps. We reveal the resonance behaviour associated with the excitation of the antisymmetric GSP mode for extremely small gap widths, down to ~5...... nm. We argue that excitation of this mode, featuring very strong absorption, has a crucial role in experimental realizations of non-resonant light absorption by ultra-sharp convex grooves with fabrication-induced asymmetry. The occurrence of the antisymmetric GSP mode along with the fundamental GSP...

  9. Metals: Phonon states, electron states and Fermi surfaces. Subvolume a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dederichs, P.H.; Schober, H.; Sellmyer, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    This collection of tables and diagrams is the first contribution to a larger programme aiming at a complete and critical tabulation of reliable data relevant to metal physics. No such complete collection exists at present, and these tables should fill a long felt need of both experimentalists and theoreticians. Group III in the New Series of the Landolt-Boernstein tables deals with Crystal and Solid State Physics. Volume III/13 to which this subvolume 13a belongs will cover all data published up to 1980 on phonon and electron states and Fermi surfaces in metals. Both experimental and theoretical results are included. (orig./WL)

  10. Lewis Structures Are Models for Predicting Molecular Structure, Not Electronic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1999-07-01

    This article argues against a close relationship between Lewis dot structures and electron structure obtained from quantum mechanical calculations. Lewis structures are a powerful tool for structure prediction, though they are classical models of bonding and do not predict electronic structure. The "best" Lewis structures are those that, when combined with the VSEPR model, allow the accurate prediction of molecular properties, such as polarity, bond length, bond angle, and bond strength. These structures are achieved by minimizing formal charges within the molecule, even if it requires an expanded octet on atoms beyond the second period. Lewis structures that show an expanded octet do not imply full d-orbital involvement in the bonding. They suggest that the presence of low-lying d-orbitals is important in producing observed molecular structures. Based on this work, the presence of electron density, not a large separation in charge, is responsible for the short bond lengths and large angles in species containing nonmetal atoms from beyond the second period. This result contradicts results obtained from natural population analysis, a method that attempts to derive Lewis structures from molecular orbital calculations.

  11. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  12. Operation of a novel hot-electron vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, Naci; O'Brien-Davies, Angela; Thoms, A. B.; Potter, Richard J.; Poolton, Nigel; Adams, Michael J.; Masum, J.; Bek, Alpan; Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Roberts, John S.

    1998-07-01

    The hot Electron Light Emission and Lasing in Semiconductor Heterostructures devices (HELLISH-1) is novel surface emitter consisting of a GaAs quantum well, within the depletion region, on the n side of Ga1-xAlxAs p- n junction. It utilizes hot electron transport parallel to the layers and injection of hot electron hole pairs into the quantum well through a combination of mechanisms including tunnelling, thermionic emission and diffusion of `lucky' carriers. Super Radiant HELLISH-1 is an advanced structure incorporating a lower distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Combined with the finite reflectivity of the upper semiconductor-air interface reflectivity it defines a quasi- resonant cavity enabling emission output from the top surface with a higher spectral purity. The output power has increased by two orders of magnitude and reduced the full width at half maximum (FWHM) to 20 nm. An upper DBR added to the structure defines HELLISH-VCSEL which is currently the first operational hot electron surface emitting laser and lases at room temperature with a 1.5 nm FWHM. In this work we demonstrate and compare the operation of UB-HELLISH-1 and HELLISH-VCSEL using experimental and theoretical reflectivity spectra over an extensive temperature range.

  13. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmanganocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.L.; Edelstein, N.M.; Cooper, S.R.; Smart, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The syntheses of [(C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) 2 Mn]PF 6 , (C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) 2 Mn, and Na[(C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) 2 Mn] are described. Magnetic susceptibility, infrared, electrochemical, NMR, and reactivity studies suggest the formulation of these complexes as low-spin 16-, 17-, and 18-electron planar metallocenes. EPR spectra of the neutral complex are consistent with the 2 E/sub 2g/ configuration determined for other low-spin 17-electron metallocenes. 1 figure, 3 tables

  14. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  15. Comparative investigation of surface transfer doping of hydrogen terminated diamond by high electron affinity insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Ciccognani, W.; Colangeli, S.; Limiti, E. [Dip. di Ingegneria Elettronica, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2016-07-14

    We report on a comparative study of transfer doping of hydrogenated single crystal diamond surface by insulators featured by high electron affinity, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, WO{sub 3}, V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and MoO{sub 3}. The low electron affinity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also investigated for comparison. Hole transport properties were evaluated in the passivated hydrogenated diamond films by Hall effect measurements, and were compared to un-passivated diamond films (air-induced doping). A drastic improvement was observed in passivated samples in terms of conductivity, stability with time, and resistance to high temperatures. The efficiency of the investigated insulators, as electron accepting materials in hydrogenated diamond surface, is consistent with their electronic structure. These surface acceptor materials generate a higher hole sheet concentration, up to 6.5 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}, and a lower sheet resistance, down to 2.6 kΩ/sq, in comparison to the atmosphere-induced values of about 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} and 10 kΩ/sq, respectively. On the other hand, hole mobilities were reduced by using high electron affinity insulator dopants. Hole mobility as a function of hole concentration in a hydrogenated diamond layer was also investigated, showing a well-defined monotonically decreasing trend.

  16. Electromagnetic surface waves at the interface of a relativistic electron beam with vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.M.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The dispersion relation for electromagnetic surface waves propagating at the interface between a relativistic electron beam and vacuum is derived. The excitation of surface modes in a plasma at rest by a relativistic electron beam is discussed

  17. Electronic Structures of LNA Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik G.; Shim, Irene; Stein, Cy

    2017-01-01

    Important oligonucleotides in anti-sense research have been investigated in silico and experimentally. This involves quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and chromatography experiments on locked nucleic acid (LNA) phosphorothioate (PS) oligonucleotides. iso-potential electrostatic surfaces are es...

  18. Structural analysis of nano structured carbon by transmission electron microscopy and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshida, K., E-mail: oshida@nagano-nct.ac.jp [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Murata, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Itaya, T. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Yanagisawa, T.; Kimura, K. [GSI Creos Corporation, Kanagawa 210-0855 (Japan); Nakazawa, T.; Kim, Y.A.; Endo, M. [Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Kim, B.-H.; Yang, K.S. [Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is one of the highest resolution analysis methods of materials. The three dimensional recognition of the materials is difficult by TEM because the observation data is projection images through the materials. In this study, space structure of carbon nanotubes loaded with metal particles was analyzed by three dimensional TEM (3D-TEM) [1,2]. The nano structured carbons are also observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with Cs corrector. Cup-stack type carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) loaded with Pt particles (2–3 nm in diameter) prepared by GSI Creos Corporation were analyzed by these methods. Pt particles are bound selectively to the edges of hexagonal carbon layers of inside and outer surface of CSCNTs efficiently and can be expected to work well as catalysts of electrodes of fuel cell. It is sometimes difficult that the nano sized area is analyzed by selected area electron diffraction (SAD) because the selected area aperture cannot be so small. The HRTEM and image processing technique give similar results of SAD when it works and revealed to be useful to analyze nano structured carbons.

  19. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shutthanandan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power free electron lasers (FEL. Photocathode quantum efficiency degradation is due to residual gases in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include helium ion microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, atomic force microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS. In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but show evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements, the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  20. Surface science analysis of GaAs photocathodes following sustained electron beam delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Hernandez-Garcia, Fay Hannon, Marcy Stutzman, V. Shutthanandan, Z. Zhu, M. Nandasri, S. V. Kuchibhatla, S. Thevuthasan, W. P. Hess

    2012-06-01

    Degradation of the photocathode materials employed in photoinjectors represents a challenge for sustained operation of nuclear physics accelerators and high power Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Photocathode quantum efficiency (QE) degradation is due to residual gasses in the electron source vacuum system being ionized and accelerated back to the photocathode. These investigations are a first attempt to characterize the nature of the photocathode degradation, and employ multiple surface and bulk analysis techniques to investigate damage mechanisms including sputtering of the Cs-oxidant surface monolayer, other surface chemistry effects, and ion implantation. Surface and bulk analysis studies were conducted on two GaAs photocathodes, which were removed from the JLab FEL DC photoemission gun after delivering electron beam, and two control samples. The analysis techniques include Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). In addition, two high-polarization strained superlattice GaAs photocathode samples, one removed from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector and one unused, were also analyzed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and SIMS. It was found that heat cleaning the FEL GaAs wafer introduces surface roughness, which seems to be reduced by prolonged use. The bulk GaAs samples retained a fairly well organized crystalline structure after delivering beam but shows evidence of Cs depletion on the surface. Within the precision of the SIMS and RBS measurements the data showed no indication of hydrogen implantation or lattice damage from ion back bombardment in the bulk GaAs wafers. In contrast, SIMS and TEM measurements of the strained superlattice photocathode show clear crystal damage in the wafer from ion back bombardment.

  1. Orbital Models and Electronic Structure Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderberg, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This tribute to the work by Carl Johan Ballhausen focuses on the emergence of quantitative means for the study of the electronic properties of complexes and molecules. Development, refinement and application of the orbital picture elucidated electric and magnetic features of ranges of molecules w...

  2. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pounds [2,3] renewed great interest in the study of high-temperature superconductivity. Fe-based systems are significantly different from the cuprates. The parent compounds in cuprates are antiferromagnetic Mott insulators, where the insulating property arises due to strong electron correlation compared to the width of their ...

  3. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L. A.; Angelucci, M.; Larciprete, R.; Cimino, R.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary electron yield (SEY) curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  4. The secondary electron yield of noble metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gonzalez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Secondary electron yield (SEY curves in the 0-1000 eV range were measured on polycrystalline Ag, Au and Cu samples. The metals were examined as introduced in the ultra-high vacuum chamber and after having been cleaned by Ar+ ion sputtering. The comparison between the curves measured on the clean samples and in the presence of contaminants, due to the permanence in atmosphere, confirmed that the SEY behavior is strongly influenced by the chemical state of the metal surface. We show that when using very slow primary electrons the sample work function can be determined with high accuracy from the SEY curves. Moreover we prove that SEY is highly sensitive to the presence of adsorbates even at submonolayer coverage. Results showing the effect of small quantities of CO adsorbed on copper are presented. Our findings demonstrate that SEY, besides being an indispensable mean to qualify technical materials in many technological fields, can be also used as a flexible and advantageous diagnostics to probe surfaces and interfaces.

  5. Electronic structure analyses of BN network materials using high energy-resolution spectroscopy methods based on transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, M

    2006-07-01

    Electronic structures of boron-nitride (BN) nanotubes and a BN cone-structure material were studied by using a high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) microscope. A trial of the whole electronic structure study of hexagonal BN (h-BN), which consists of flat BN honeycomb layers, was conducted by a combination of EELS and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (TEM-EELS/XES). The pi and pi+sigma plasmon energies of BN nanotubes (BNT) were smaller than those of h-BN. The pi+sigma energy was explained by the surface plasmon excitation. The spectrum of a two-wall BNT of 2.7 nm in diameter showed a new spectral onset at 4 eV. The valence electron excitation spectra obtained from the tip region of the BN cone with an apex angle of 20 degrees showed similar intensity distribution with those of BNTs. The B K-shell electron excitation spectra obtained from the bottom edge region of the BN cone showed additional peak intensity when compared with those of h-BN and BNT. The B K-shell electron excitation spectra and B K-emission spectra of h-BN were compared with a result of a LDA band calculation. It showed that high symmetry points in the band diagram appear as peak and/or shoulder structures in the EELS and XES spectra. Interband transitions appeared in the imaginary part of the dielectric function of h-BN experimentally obtained were assigned in the band diagram. The analysis also presented that the LDA calculation estimated the bandgap energy smaller than the real material by an amount of 2 eV. Those results of TEM-EELS/XES analysis presented that high energy-resolution spectroscopy methods combined with TEM is a promising method to analyze whole electronic structures of nanometer scale materials. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Electronic structure of the Si/GaP(110) interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, David W.; Höchst, Hartmut

    1989-04-01

    We present the results of an angle-resolved photoemission study of the Si/GaP(110) heterostructure. Band mapping of sputtered and annealed GaP(110) unambiguously determines the position of the valence-band maximum at Γ15 to be 1.2 eV below the Fermi level. The Fermi-level pinning position for the sputtered and annealed surface is different from that of cleaved GaP(110) and suggests the introduction of defect levels by the cleaning process. However, deposition of one monolayer (ML) Si onto GaP(110) changes the pinning position despite the defect levels. The electronic structure of the interface evolves slowly as a function of the Si-overlayer thickness, but appears to be fully developed at 20 ML. We discuss the electronic structure of the heterojunction in light of the midgap energy rule for band alignments and try to clarify why it appears to fail for this particular system. Specifically, a comparison of theoretical and experimental band structures shows that a linear extrapolation of the leading edge of an angle-resolved valence-band spectrum does not determine the GaP Γ15 valence-band maximum with the accuracy (~0.1 eV) desired for band-alignment measurements. This shortcoming conjures up questions about the validity of using the leading edge of angle-integrated spectra to determine the Γ15 valence-band maximum in GaP and about the previously reported band alignment for the Si/GaP(110) heterostructure.

  7. Probing Ultrafast Electron Dynamics at Surfaces Using Soft X-Ray Transient Reflectivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. Robert; Husek, Jakub; Biswas, Somnath; Cirri, Anthony

    The ability to probe electron dynamics with surface sensitivity on the ultrafast time scale is critical for understanding processes such as charge separation, injection, and surface trapping that mediate efficiency in catalytic and energy conversion materials. Toward this goal, we have developed a high harmonic generation (HHG) light source for femtosecond soft x-ray reflectivity. Using this light source we investigated the ultrafast carrier dynamics at the surface of single crystalline α-Fe2O3, polycrystalline α-Fe2O3, and the mixed metal oxide, CuFeO2. We have recently demonstrated that CuFeO2 in particular is a selective catalyst for photo-electrochemical CO2 reduction to acetate; however, the role of electronic structure and charge carrier dynamics in mediating catalytic selectivity has not been well understood. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements probe the M2,3, edges of the 3d transition metals, which provide oxidation and spin state resolution with element specificity. In addition to chemical state specificity, these measurements are also surface sensitive, and by independently simulating the contributions of the real and imaginary components of the complex refractive index, we can differentiate between surface and sub-surface contributions to the excited state spectrum. Accordingly, this work demonstrates the ability to probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in catalytic materials with element and chemical state specificity and with surface sensitivity.

  8. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene [(eta-C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) 2 Mn or (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn)] is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, 2 E/sub 2g/ [e/sub 2g/ 3 a/sub 1g/ 2 ] ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me 5 Cp) 2 M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and [(Me 5 Cp) 2 M]PF 6 (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, [(Me 5 Cp) 2 Ni](PF 6 ) 2 is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me 5 Cp) 2 M → [(Me 5 Cp) 2 M] + (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), [(Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn] - → (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn and [(Me 5 Cp) 2 Ni] + → [Me 5 Cp) 2 Ni] 2+ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for [(Me 5 Cp) 2 V(CO) 2 ] + . The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported

  9. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene ((eta-C/sub 5/(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mn or (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)) is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, /sup 2/E/sub 2g/ (e/sub 2g//sup 3/ a/sub 1g//sup 2/) ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)PF/sub 6/ (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/ is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M ..-->.. ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)/sup +/ (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)/sup -/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup +/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup 2 +/ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/V(CO)/sub 2/)/sup +/. The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported.

  10. Surface state of Y3(Al,Ga)5O12:Tb phosphor under electron beam bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, A.; Swart, H.C.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    The surface state of Y 3 (Al,Ga) 5 O 12 :Tb phosphor was determined before and after 27 h of prolonged electron beam exposure. The electron irradiation was carried out at a base pressure of 2.3 × 10 -8 Torr and an oxygen pressure of 1.0 × 10 -6 Torr. New surface layers were formed after the chemisorbed species were removed as a result of electron stimulated surface chemical reactions. The rate of the removal of the chemisorbed species from the phosphor's surface during prolonged electron irradiation was affected by the background working atmosphere as measured with Auger electron spectroscopy combined with cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. The CL intensity of the Y 3 (Al,Ga) 5 O 12 :Tb stabilized after removal of the chemisorbed species and stayed constant during further electron irradiation, indicating that this phosphor is good for the technology used in field emission displays. There was an increase in the Al, Y, O and Tb Auger peak intensities pointing to the formation of a complicated surface structure that was probably a combination of more than one chemical compound. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results suggested electron-beam induced formation of new interleave oxide layers, such as AlO x , YO x and Y(Al,Ga)O 3 on the surface. These oxide layers acted as a protective layer inhibiting further CL intensity degradation during prolonged electron irradiation.

  11. Parallel Assisted Assembly of Multilayer DNA and Protein Nanoparticle Structures Using a CMOS Electronic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Michael J.; Dehlinger, Dietrich A.; Sullivan, Benjamin D.

    2006-09-01

    A CMOS electronic microarray device was used to carry out the rapid parallel assembly of functionalized nanoparticles into multilayer structures. Electronic microarrays produce reconfigurable DC electric fields that allow DNA, proteins as well as charged molecules to be rapidly transported from the bulk solution and addressed to specifically activated sites on the array surface. Such a device was used to carry out the assisted self-assembly DNA, biotin and streptavidin derivatized fluorescent nanoparticles into multilayer structures. Nanoparticle addressing could be carried out in about 15 seconds, and forty depositions of nanoparticles were completed in less than one hour. The final multilayered 3D nanostructures were verified by scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict...

  13. Atom diffraction reveals the impact of atomic core electrons on atom-surface potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2010-12-03

    We measured ratios of van der Waals potential coefficients (C3) for different atoms (Li, Na, K, and Rb) interacting with the same surface by studying atom diffraction from a nanograting. These measurements are a sensitive test of atomic structure calculations because C3 ratios are strongly influenced by core electrons and only weakly influenced by the permittivity and geometry of the surface. Our measurement uncertainty of 2% in the ratio C(3)(K)/C(3)(Na) is close to the uncertainty of the best theoretical predictions, and some of these predictions are inconsistent with our measurement.

  14. Laser-induced generation of surface periodic structures in media with nonlinear diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. M.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Morozov, V. M.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Yavtushenko, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    A model of fast formation of high-contrast periodic structure appearing on a semiconductor surface under action of laser radiation is proposed. The process of growing a surface structure due to the interaction surface plasmon- polaritons excited on nonequilibrium electrons with incident laser radiation are considered in the framework of a medium with nonlinear diffusion of nonequilibrium carriers (defects). A resonance effect of superfast pico- and subpicosecond amplification of the plasmon-polariton structure generated on the surface, the realization of which can result in a high-contrast defect lattice.

  15. Effect of Alkali-Acid-Heat Chemical Surface Treatment on Electron Beam Melted Porous Titanium and Its Apatite Forming Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bsat, S.; Yavari, S.; Munsch, M.; Valstar, E.R.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced additive manufacturing techniques such as electron beam melting (EBM), can produce highly porous structures that resemble the mechanical properties and structure of native bone. However, for orthopaedic applications, such as joint prostheses or bone substitution, the surface must also be

  16. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, A S; Ford, J R

    2008-10-07

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy.

  17. Fabrication of surface micro- and nanostructures for superhydrophobic surfaces in electric and electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Yonghao

    In our study, the superhydrophobic surface based on biomimetic lotus leave is explored to maintain the desired properties for self-cleaning. Parameters in controlling bead-up and roll-off characteristics of water droplets were investigated on different model surfaces. The governing equations were proposed. Heuristic study is performed. First, the fundamental understanding of the effect of roughness on superhydrophobicity is performed. The effect of hierarchical roughness, i.e., two scale roughness effect on roughness is investigated using systems of (1) monodisperse colloidal silica sphere (submicron) arrays and Au nanoparticle on top and (2) Si micrometer pyramids and Si nanostructures on top from KOH etching and metal assisted etching of Si. The relation between the contact area fraction and water droplet contact angles are derived based on Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter equation for the systems and the two scale effect is explained regarding the synergistic combination of two scales. Previously the microscopic three-phase-contact line is thought to be the key factor in determining contact angles and hystereses. In our study, Laplace pressure was brought up and related to the three-phase-contact line and taken as a key figure of merit in determining superhydrophobicity. In addition, we are one of the first to study the effect of tapered structures (wall inclination). Combining with a second scale roughness on the tapered structures, stable Cassie state for both water and low surface energy oil may be achieved. This is of great significance for designing both superhydrophobicity and superoleophobicity. Regarding the origin of contact angle hysteresis, study of superhydrophobicity on micrometer Si pillars was performed. The relation between the interface work of function and contact angle hysteresis was proposed and derived mathematically based on the Young-Dupre equation. The three-phase-contact line was further related to a secondary scale roughness induced. Based on

  18. Electron microscopy studies of zirconia-alumina nanolaminates and nickel oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Marvin Allan

    microscopy and diffraction techniques were used to characterize surfaces of samples prepared under various annealing conditions. A preferential desorbtion of oxygen occurred under vacuum annealing conditions, while a reconstruction of the NiO(111) surface with either (1 x 1) or (√3 x √3)R30° surface periodicity, depending upon the annealing temperature, was observed under atmospheric conditions. Direct methods for surface structure determination were applied to transmission electron diffraction data from the (√3 x √3)R30° reconstruction in order to propose an atomic model for the observed reconstruction.

  19. The Electronic Structure Effect in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A.; Pettersson, L. G. M.; Hammer, Bjørk

    2005-01-01

    Using a combination of density functional theory calculations and X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy for nitrogen on Cu and Ni surfaces, a detailed picture is given of the chemisorption bond. It is suggested that the adsorption bond strength and hence the activity of transition metal surf...

  20. Electronic structure contributions to reactivity in xanthine oxidase family enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Benjamin W; Kirk, Martin L

    2015-03-01

    We review the xanthine oxidase (XO) family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes with a specific emphasis on electronic structure contributions to reactivity. In addition to xanthine and aldehyde oxidoreductases, which catalyze the two-electron oxidation of aromatic heterocycles and aldehyde substrates, this mini-review highlights recent work on the closely related carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) that catalyzes the oxidation of CO using a unique Mo-Cu heterobimetallic active site. A primary focus of this mini-review relates to how spectroscopy and computational methods have been used to develop an understanding of critical relationships between geometric structure, electronic structure, and catalytic function.

  1. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...... by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...

  2. The Dynamics and Structures of Adsorbed Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Ellenson, W. D.; McTague, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Reviews neutron scattering work performed on films of simple gas atoms and molecules adsorbed primarily on graphite surfaces. Exfoliated graphite substrates such as Grafoil were first used in this kind of measurements about five years ago and new results have been reported at an increasing pace....... Elastic neutron diffraction measurements, determining the two-dimensional structural ordering of the adsorbed films, have been performed on layers of N2, Ar, H2, D2, O2, Kr, and He. Measurements on layers of larger molecules such as CD4 and ND3 have also been reported. Inelastic neutron scattering...... of molecules such as NH3 or the internal modes of adsorbed molecules such as C4H10. Neutron scattering measurements where substrates other than graphite products are used as the adsorbents will not be reviewed here. However, the power of the technique will be demonstrated in an example of H2 physisorbed...

  3. Lunar surface structural concepts and construction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulas, Martin

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: lunar surface structures construction research areas; lunar crane related disciplines; shortcomings of typical mobile crane in lunar base applications; candidate crane cable suspension systems; NIST six-cable suspension crane; numerical example of natural frequency; the incorporation of two new features for improved performance of the counter-balanced actively-controlled lunar crane; lunar crane pendulum mechanics; simulation results; 1/6 scale lunar crane testbed using GE robot for global manipulation; basic deployable truss approaches; bi-pantograph elevator platform; comparison of elevator platforms; perspective of bi-pantograph beam; bi-pantograph synchronously deployable tower/beam; lunar module off-loading concept; module off-loader concept packaged; starburst deployable precision reflector; 3-ring reflector deployment scheme; cross-section of packaged starburst reflector; and focal point and thickness packaging considerations.

  4. THERMAL TOMOGRAPHY OF ASTEROID SURFACE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Alan W.; Drube, Line, E-mail: alan.harris@dlr.de [German Aerospace Center (DLR) Institute of Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into its surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. We develop a means to estimate thermal inertia values of asteroids and use it to show that thermal inertia appears to increase with spin period in the case of main-belt asteroids (MBAs). Similar behavior is found on the basis of thermophysical modeling for near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. Our results are consistent with a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids and have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles (“kinetic impactors”) in planetary defense.

  5. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  6. Synthesis of nanoscale copper nitride thin film and modification of the surface under high electronic excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Tripathi, A; Ganesan, V; Avasthi, D K

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale (approximately 90 nm) Copper nitride (Cu3N) films are deposited on borosilicate glass and Si substrates by RF sputtering technique in the reactive environment of nitrogen gas. These films are irradiated with 200 MeV Au15+ ions from Pelletron accelerator in order to modify the surface by high electronic energy deposition of heavy ions. Due to irradiation (i) at incident ion fluence of 1 x 10(12) ions/cm2 enhancement of grains, (ii) at 5 x 10912) ions/cm2 mass transport on the films surface, (iii) at 2 x 10(13) ions/cm2 line-like features on Cu3N/glass and nanometallic structures on Cu3N/Si surface are observed. The surface morphology is examined by atomic force microscope (AFM). All results are explained on the basis of a thermal spike model of ion-solid interaction.

  7. Electronic structure, excitation properties, and chemical transformations of extreme ultra-violet resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert A.; Narasimhan, Amrit; Brainard, Robert L.

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of extreme ultra violet resist materials and of their individual components, two polymers and two photoacid generators (PAGs), is studied using a combination of x-ray and UV photoemission spectroscopies, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and ab-initio techniques. It is shown that simple molecular models can be used to understand the electronic structure of each sample and describe the experimental data. Additionally, effects directly relevant to the photochemical processes are observed: low energy loss processes are observed for the phenolic polymer containing samples that should favor thermalization of electrons; PAG segregation is measured at the surface of the resist films that could lead to surface inhomogeneities; both PAGs are found to be stable upon irradiation in the absence of the polymer, contrasting with a high reactivity that can be followed upon x-ray irradiation of the full resist.

  8. Nodal Structure of the Electronic Wigner Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmider, Hartmut; Dahl, Jens Peder

    1996-01-01

    On the example of several atomic and small molecular systems, the regular behavior of nodal patterns in the electronic one-particle reduced Wigner function is demonstrated. An expression found earlier relates the nodal pattern solely to the dot-product of the position and the momentum vector......, if both arguments are large. An argument analogous to the ``bond-oscillatory principle'' for momentum densities links the nuclear framework in a molecule to an additional oscillatory term in momenta parallel to bonds. It is shown that these are visible in the Wigner function in terms of characteristic...

  9. Structural disorder and electron transport in graphene at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobenko, N. G.; Egorushkin, V. E.; Melnikova, N. V.; Ponomarev, A. N.; Belosludtseva, A. A.; Barkalov, L. D.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical study of electron transport characteristics of metalized epitaxial graphene with impurities and structural inhomogeneous of the short-range order type was performed. The electron relaxation time, mean free path, and diffusion coefficient were calculated and shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding values for phonon characteristics. It means that electron scattering on the short-range ordered domains has to be taken into account, especially at low temperatures when it may dominate phonon scattering.

  10. Surface alloying of aluminum with molybdenum by high-current pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Han; Zhang, Conglin; Lv, Peng; Cai, Jie; Jin, Yunxue; Guan, Qingfeng

    2018-02-01

    The surface alloying of pre-coated molybdenum (Mo) film on aluminum (Al) substrate by high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) was investigated. The microstructure and phase analysis were conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that Mo particles were dissolved into Al matrix to form alloying layer, which was composed of Mo, Al and acicular or equiaxed Al5Mo phases after surface alloying. Meanwhile, various structure defects such as dislocation loops, high-density dislocations and dislocation walls were observed in the alloying surface. The corrosion resistance was tested by using potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). Electrochemical results indicate that all the alloying samples had better corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution compared to initial sample. The excellent corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to the combined effect of the structure defects and the addition of Mo element to form a more stable passive film.

  11. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlan, M.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  12. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium L2,3 edge in total electron yield. (TEY) mode and transmission ... suring the total electron number per incident photon emi- tted from the material as a ..... hand, data points above this critical thickness at 4–10 nm in figure 4(b) reveals that BR is ...

  13. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic structures of hexagonal-close-packed divalent titanium (3-d) and zirconium (4-d) transition metals are studied by using a non-local model potential method. From the present calculation of energy bands, Fermi energy, density of states and the electronic heat capacity of these two metals are determined and ...

  14. Weiss oscillations in the electronic structure of modulated graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M; Sabeeh, K; MacKinnon, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of modulated graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. The density of states and the bandwidth for the Dirac electrons in this system are determined. The appearance of unusual Weiss oscillations in the bandwidth and density of states is the main focus of this work

  15. Electronic structure analysis and vertical ionization energies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Electronic structure analysis and vertical ionization energies of thiophene and ethynylthiophenes. RAMAN K SINGH and MANOJ K MISHRA*. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai 400 076 e-mail: mmishra@iitb.ac.in. Abstract. Results from different decouplings of the electron propagator ...

  16. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic structures of hexagonal-close-packed divalent titanium (3-d) and zirconium (4-d) transition metals are studied by using a non-local model potential method. From the present calculation of energy bands, Fermi energy, density of states and the electronic heat capacity of these two metals are determined and ...

  17. NMR Probe for Electrons in Semiconductor Mesoscopic Structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-11-14

    Nov 14, 2009 ... Strongly correlated electron systems: Overview. Problem: How to detect the electronic state in nanoscale structures. Two examples where the usual methods don't work. Solution: We showed NMR techniques can be very useful in such circumstances. Outline ...

  18. Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparative study of the electronic structure of natural and synthetic rubies using XAFS and EDAX analyses ... Electronics and Engineering Research Institute, Pilani 333 031, India; Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma, “La Sapienza”, 00185 P,le A.Moro, Roma, Italy; Gem Testing Laboratory, Jaipur 302 003, India ...

  19. Electronic Structure of Au25 Clusters: Between Discrete and Continuous

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2016-07-15

    Here, an approach based on synchrotron resonant photoemission is emplyed to explore the transition between quantization and hybridization of the electronic structure in atomically precise ligand-stabilized nanoparticles. While the presence of ligands maintains quantization in Au25 clusters, their removal renders increased hybridization of the electronic states at the vicinity of the Fermi level. These observations are supported by DFT studies.

  20. Short-range surface plasmonics: Localized electron emission dynamics from a 60-nm spot on an atomically flat single-crystalline gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Bettina; Kahl, Philip; Podbiel, Daniel; Spektor, Grisha; Orenstein, Meir; Fu, Liwei; Weiss, Thomas; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael; Davis, Timothy J; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Frank-J; Giessen, Harald

    2017-07-01

    We experimentally and theoretically visualize the propagation of short-range surface plasmon polaritons using atomically flat single-crystalline gold platelets on silicon substrates. We study their excitation and subfemtosecond dynamics via normal-incidence two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. By milling a plasmonic disk and grating structure into a single-crystalline gold platelet, we observe nanofocusing of the short-range surface plasmon polariton. Localized two-photon ultrafast electron emission from a spot with a smallest dimension of 60 nm is observed. Our novel approach opens the door toward reproducible plasmonic nanofocusing devices, which do not degrade upon high light intensity or heating due to the atomically flat surface without any tips, protrusions, or holes. Our nanofoci could also be used as local emitters for ultrafast electron bunches in time-resolved electron microscopes.

  1. Low Temperature Active Joining of Structural and Electronic Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    ... for space platform structures and electronics, where Al-MMC's are finding application. S-Bond joining has joint capability from 190 - 350 C, depending on which S-Bond filler, Alloy 220 or Alloy 400 is used...

  2. Mechanobiological Assessment of TMJ Disc Surfaces: Nanoindentation and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra M. Juran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Temporomandibular disc is a mechanically robust fibrocartilage tissue exhibiting highly elastic compressive, shear, and tensile moduli with structurally dense extracellular matrix that supports functional loading of the joint. The aim of this study was to illustrate structural complexities of the superior and inferior disc surfaces, to demonstrate the robust mechanical ability of the disc as a whole may be due to depth-dependent regional/layered variation, and also to provide characterization data imperative for future tissue engineering efforts focused on restoring function to the joint. Material and Methods: Nanoindentation was used to assess tissue zones in conjunction with detailed Transmission Electron Microscopy to define structural attributes that influence the temporomandibular disc function. Results: The disc architecture adjacent to the superior surface was shown to have three distinct regional segments within the interface layer: 1-a surface peripheral layer; 2-subsurface region; and 3-a layer of helical matrix bundles. The inferior surface displayed an interface layer (20 µm that showed limited cell populations with little depth-dependent structural variation, a stiffer elastic modulus and reduced energy dissipation compared to the superior surface. These data indicate that the primary function of the inferior surface is resistance to compression rather than load distribution during joint motion. Conclusions: These are the first works that demonstrate that the superior central surface of the he temporomandibular disc is structured in depth-dependent isometric layers, each of which provides different mechanical function supporting the bulk tissue’s properties. From a clinical perspective these data have potential to define regions susceptible to fatigue that may translate to diagnostic criteria to better define the stages of dysfunction.

  3. Crystal structure from one-electron theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    by the theory, the predicted crystal structures are in accord with experiment in all cases except 79Au. In addition, they have investigated the effect of pressure upon the alkali metals (3Li, 11Na, 37Rb, 55Cs) and selected lanthanide metals (57La, 58Ce, 71Lu) and actinide metals (90Th, 91Pa). In these cases...

  4. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  5. Electronic structure of carbon-boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginés-Mendoza, Raúl; Martinez, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Structures of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs, BNNTs) are quite similar, conversely, electronic properties are radically different from each other. Carbon nanotubes, whose electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending on their chiral structure, boron nitride nanotubes are always semiconductors with bandgaps over 4 eV. We have looked to hybrid systems, to predict a new kind of nanostructures with novel electronic properties. In this way, we explore the electronic properties of C-BN nanotubes. In particular, we studied the electronic structure of armchair C-BN nanotubes. The calculations were performed using the pseudopotential LCAO method with a Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The band structure of most of these systems have semiconductor character with an indirect gap smaller than its analogous BNNTs. In addition, the most prominent feature of these systems is the existence of flat bands both at the valence band top and at the conduction band minimum. Such flat bands results in sharp and narrow peaks on the total density of states. The behavior of these flat bands mainly indicates that electrons are largely localized. Thus, a detailed analysis on the electronic band structure shows that hybridization between those orbitals on the interfaces is responsible to exhibit localization effects on the hybrid systems.This research was supported by Conacyt under Grant No. 133022.

  6. Electronic structure of thiolate-covered gold nanoparticles: Au102(MBA)44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Galli, Giulia; Gygi, François

    2008-09-23

    We present first principles, density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the structural and electronic properties of thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles [Au(102)(MBA)(44) ] that have been recently crystallized and measured by X-ray diffraction. Our calculations yield structural properties in very good agreement with experiment and reveal the impact of thiolate adsorption on both the surface geometry and the electronic structure of the gold core; in particular, within DFT we observe the emergence of an energy gap of about 0.5 eV, upon MBA adsorption. Using a localized orbital analysis, we characterize the electron distribution in the nanoparticle and provide insight into the bonding of thiolates on curved gold surfaces.

  7. Crystallographic analysis of thin film surfaces using micro-probe reflexion high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Masakazu; Doi, Takahisa; Hayakawa, Kazunobu

    1984-01-01

    Micro-probe reflexion high-energy electron diffraction using an electron beam having a 20nm beam diameter at a beam current of 8 nA, has been developed for performing crystallographic analyses of thin film and bulk crystal surfaces. High spatial resolution and high brightness have made it possible to perform analyses of thin films on substrates having fine structures without such sample preparation as thinning. A dark field imaging method using part of the diffraction spot intensity has also been developed. Using this method, it was found that atomic steps and dislocations on bulk and material-deposited Si surfaces can be observed. This shows the usefulness of the technique for studying crystal growth of thin films with mono-layer depth resolution. (author)

  8. Electron microscopy of an aluminum layer grown on the vicinal surface of a gallium arsenide substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovygin, M. V., E-mail: lemi@miee.ru; Borgardt, N. I. [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation); Kazakov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Seibt, M. [Universität Göttingen, IV. Physikalisches Institut (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    A thin Al layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a misoriented GaAs (100) substrate is studied by transmission electron microscopy. Electron diffraction data and bright-field, dark-field, and high-resolution images show that, in the layer, there are Al grains of three types of crystallographic orientation: Al (100), Al (110), and Al (110)R. The specific structural features of the interfaces between the differently oriented grains and substrate are studied by digital processing of the high-resolution images. From quantitative analysis of the dark-field images, the relative content and sizes of the differently oriented grains are determined. It is found that atomic steps at the substrate surface cause an increase in the fraction and sizes of Al (110)R grains and a decrease in the fraction of Al (100) grains, compared to the corresponding fractions and sizes in the layer grown on a singular substrate surface.

  9. ARPES measurements of SnAs electronic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezotosnyi, P. I.; Dmitrieva, K. A.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.; Pervakov, K. S.; Tsvetkov, A. Yu.; Martovitski, V. P.; Rybkin, A. G.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    We report experimental study of the electronic band structure of SnAs superconductor with the NaCl type lattice structure by angular resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The determined band structure, in general, is in a good agreement with the calculated one. However, at odd with the calculated band structure, the experimental data reveals splitting of one of the upper valence bands into three branches along the \\bar K - \\bar Γ - \\bar K and \\bar M - \\bar Γ - \\bar M' symmetry directions. We assume this splitting can be caused by the spin orbit coupling of electrons or a mixed valence of Sn atoms in the compound.

  10. Structural and tribological responses of phenolphthalein poly(ether sulfone) on electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xianqiang; Wang, Qihua; Chen, Jianmin

    2006-03-01

    The blocks of phenolphthalein poly(ether sulfone) (PES-C) were prepared by hot pressing. Then the blocks were irradiated with electron beams under N 2 atmosphere at room temperature. The structural and tribological responses of PES-C on electron irradiation were investigated. Results showed that partial degradation took place on the surface of PES-C after electron irradiation. Even so, the infrared spectra (FTIR) of PES-C after electron irradiation maintained much memory of the pristine sample, the reason for this might be due to the radiation-resistant property of PES-C and the less damage caused by the lower liner energy transfer of electron with respect to other ions. In addition, amorphous carbon and carbides formed on the surface of PES-C after electron irradiation. Friction and wear tests revealed that with increasing irradiation dose, it took more time for the friction coefficient to decrease from a higher value to a lower one and level off. And the wear rate decreased with the increase of irradiation dose. It was concluded that the variation of the tribological behavior of PES-C resulted from its structural responses on electron irradiation on the surface.

  11. First accelerator test of vacuum components with laser-engineered surfaces for electron-cloud mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calatroni, Sergio; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Elisa; Neupert, Holger; Nistor, Valentin; Perez Fontenla, Ana Teresa; Taborelli, Mauro; Chiggiato, Paolo; Malyshev, Oleg; Valizadeh, Reza; Wackerow, Stefan; Zolotovskaya, Svetlana A.; Gillespie, W. Allan; Abdolvand, Amin

    2017-11-01

    Electron cloud mitigation is an essential requirement for high-intensity proton circular accelerators. Among other solutions, laser engineered surface structures (LESS) present the advantages of having potentially a very low secondary electron yield (SEY) and allowing simple scalability for mass production. Two copper liners with LESS have been manufactured and successfully tested by monitoring the electron cloud current in a dipole magnet in the SPS accelerator at CERN during the 2016 run. In this paper we report on these results as well as the detailed experiments carried out on samples—such as the SEY and topography studies—which led to an optimized treatment in view of the SPS test and future possible use in the HL-LHC.

  12. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-03-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  13. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy imaging of surface plasmons at the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colliex, Christian; Kociak, Mathieu; Stéphan, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Since their first realization, electron microscopes have demonstrated their unique ability to map with highest spatial resolution (sub-atomic in most recent instruments) the position of atoms as a consequence of the strong scattering of the incident high energy electrons by the nuclei of the material under investigation. When interacting with the electron clouds either on atomic orbitals or delocalized over the specimen, the associated energy transfer, measured and analyzed as an energy loss (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) gives access to analytical properties (atom identification, electron states symmetry and localization). In the moderate energy-loss domain (corresponding to an optical spectral domain from the infrared (IR) to the rather far ultra violet (UV), EELS spectra exhibit characteristic collective excitations of the rather-free electron gas, known as plasmons. Boundary conditions, such as surfaces and/or interfaces between metallic and dielectric media, generate localized surface charge oscillations, surface plasmons (SP), which are associated with confined electric fields. This domain of research has been extraordinarily revived over the past few years as a consequence of the burst of interest for structures and devices guiding, enhancing and controlling light at the sub-wavelength scale. The present review focuses on the study of these surface plasmons with an electron microscopy-based approach which associates spectroscopy and mapping at the level of a single and well-defined nano-object, typically at the nanometer scale i.e. much improved with respect to standard, and even near-field, optical techniques. After calling to mind some early studies, we will briefly mention a few basic aspects of the required instrumentation and associated theoretical tools to interpret the very rich data sets recorded with the latest generation of (Scanning)TEM microscopes. The following paragraphs will review in more detail the results obtained on simple planar and

  14. Crystal structure, electrical properties and electronic band structure of tantalum ditelluride

    CERN Document Server

    Vernes, A; Bensch, W; Heid, W; Naether, C

    1998-01-01

    Motivated by the unexpectedly strong influence of the Te atoms on the structural and bonding properties of the transition metal tellurides, we have performed a detailed study of TaTe sub 2. Experimentally, this comprises a crystal structure determination as well as electrical resistivity measurements. The former analysis leads to an accurate update of the structural data reported in the 1960s, while the latter provides evidence for the mainly electronic character of scattering processes leading to the electrical conductivity. In addition, the electronic properties of TaTe sub 2 have been calculated using the TB-LMTO method. The partial density of states reflects the close connection of the Ta zigzag chains and the Te-Te network. This finding explains the charge transfer in the system in a rather simple way. The orthogonal-orbital character of the bands proved the existence of pi-bonds. The Fermi-surface study supports the interpretation of the experimental resistivity measurements. (author)

  15. Femtosecond laser surface structuring of molybdenum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Biophotonics Lab: National Laser Centre Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano, Itala (Italy); Sechoghela, P.; Mongwaketsi, N. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies (IFN)–CNR, Piazza Leanardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Color change of the molybdenum thin film from shinny to violet–yellowish color after laser irradiation at various laser powers. • Formation of the molybdenum dioxide coating after laser exposure, as confirmed by the X-ray diffraction spectrometry. • Selective solar absorbing nature of the laser exposed films. • Study of the binding energies is presented in this contribution using the XPS spectrometry. - Abstract: This contribution reports on the femtosecond surface structuring of molybdenum thin coatings deposited by electron beam evaporation onto Corning glass substrates. The 1-D type periodic grating lines created by such an ablation showed that the widths of the shallow grooves followed a logarithmic dependence with the laser energy incident on the molybdenum film. The electronic valence “x” of the created oxide surface layer MoO{sub x} was found to be incident laser power dependent via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction investigations. Such a photo-induced MoO{sub x}–Mo nanocomposite exhibited effective selective solar absorption in the UV–vis–IR spectral range.

  16. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-01-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C

  17. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvation and solute electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Hynes, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    When a molecular solute is immersed in a polar and polarizable solvent, the electronic wave function of the solute system is altered compared to its vacuum value; the solute electronic structure is thus solvent-dependent. Further, the wave function will be altered depending upon whether the polarization of the solvent is or is not in equilibrium with the solute charge distribution. More precisely, while the solvent electronic polarization should be in equilibrium with the solute electronic wave function, the much more sluggish solvent orientational polarization need not be. We call this last situation non-equilibrium solvation. We outline a nonlinear Schroedinger equation approach to these issues

  18. Structures and electronic properties of WmCun(n+m≤7) clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    46

    Keywords: WmCun(m+n≤7)clusters, structure and stability, electronic property, density functional theory. 1. Introduction ... studied physically and chemically on their unique properties for the characters like large specific surface and catalytic activity which are ..... No matter whether the average atomic binding energies of ...

  19. Direct Measurement of the Band Structure of a Buried Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miwa, Jill; Hofmann, Philip; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2013-01-01

    We directly measure the band structure of a buried two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The buried 2DEG forms 2 nm beneath the surface of p-type silicon, because of a dense delta-type layer of phosphorus n-type dopants which have been placed there...

  20. Bonding and structure of a reconstructed (001) surface of SrTiO3 from TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-zhen; Radtke, Guillaume; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2012-10-18

    The determination of the atomic structure and the retrieval of information about reconstruction and bonding of metal oxide surfaces is challenging owing to the highly defective structure and insulating properties of these surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers extremely high spatial resolution (less than one ångström) and the ability to provide systematic information from both real and reciprocal space. However, very few TEM studies have been carried out on surfaces because the information from the bulk dominates the very weak signals originating from surfaces. Here we report an experimental approach to extract surface information effectively from a thickness series of electron energy-loss spectra containing different weights of surface signals, using a wedge-shaped sample. Using the (001) surface of the technologically important compound strontium titanate, SrTiO(3) (refs 4-6), as a model system for validation, our method shows that surface spectra are sensitive to the atomic reconstruction and indicate bonding and crystal-field changes surrounding the surface Ti cations. Very good agreement can be achieved between the experimental surface spectra and crystal-field multiplet calculations based on the proposed atomic surface structure optimized by density functional calculations. The distorted TiO(6-x) units indicated by the proposed model can be viewed directly in our high-resolution scanning TEM images. We suggest that this approach be used as a general method to extract valuable spectroscopic information from surface atoms in parallel with high-resolution images in TEM.