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Sample records for surface drag coefficient

  1. Determination of the surface drag coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Sun, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the dependence of the surface drag coefficient on stability, wind speed, mesoscale modulation of the turbulent flux and method of calculation of the drag coefficient. Data sets over grassland, sparse grass, heather and two forest sites are analyzed. For significantly unstable ...

  2. Measurement of Turbulent Skin Friction Drag Coefficients Produced by Distributed Surface Roughness of Pristine Marine Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zafiryadis, Frederik; Meyer, Knud Erik; Gökhan Ergin, F.

    Skin friction drag coefficients are determined for marine antifouling coatings in pristine condition by use of Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) with uni-directionalhot-wires. Mean flow behaviour for varying surface roughness is analysed in zero pressure gradient, flat plate, turbulentboundary...... drag coefficients as well as roughness Reynolds numbers for the various marine coatings across the range of Rex by fitting of the van Driest profile. The results demonstrate sound agreement with the present ITTC method for determining skin friction coefficients for practically smooth surfaces at low...... layers for Reynolds numbers from Rex =1:91x105 to Rex = 9:54x105. The measurements were conducted at the Technical University of Denmark in a closed-loop wind tunnel redesigned for investigations as this. Ensemble averages of the boundary layer velocity profiles allowed for determination of skin friction...

  3. Influence of the surface drag coefficient (young waves) on the current structure of the Berre lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Roux, Bernard; Kharif, Christian; Sukhinov, Alexander; Kotarba, Richard; Fougere, Dominique; Chen, Paul Gang

    2013-04-01

    Due to the shallowness, currents and hydrodynamics of Berre lagoon (South of France) are closely conditioned by the bottom topography, and wind affects the entire water column, as for many other Mediterranean lagoons (Perez-Ruzafa, 2011). Wind stress, which is caused by moving atmospheric disturbance, is known to have a major influence in lagoon water circulation. According to the numerical simulation for the main directions of the wind: N-NW, S-SE and W (wind speed of 80 km/h) it is observed that the current is maximal alongshore in the wind direction; the bottom nearshore current being larger in shallower area. This fact is coherent with fundamental principle of wind-driven flows in closed or partially closed basins which states that in shallow water the dominant force balance is between surface wind stress and bottom friction, yielding a current in the direction of the wind (Mathieu et al, 2002, Hunter and Hearn, 1987; Hearn and Hunter,1990). A uniform wind stress applied at the surface of a basin of variable depth sets up a circulation pattern characterized by relatively strong barotropic coastal currents in the direction of the wind, with return flow occurring over the deeper regions (Csanady, 1967; Csanady, 1971). One of the key parameters characterizing the wind stress formulation is a surface drag coefficient (Cds). Thus, an effect of a surface drag coefficient, in the range 0.0016 - 0.0032, will be analyzed in this work. The value of surface drag coefficient Cds = 0.0016 used in our previous studies (Alekseenko et al., 2012), would correspond to mature waves (open sea). But, in the case of semi-closed lagoonal ecosystem, it would be more appropriate to consider "young waves" mechanism. A dependency of this coefficient in terms of the wind speed is given by Young (1999) in both cases of mature waves and young waves. For "young waves" generated at a wind speed of 80 km/h, Cds = 0.0032. So, the influence of Cds on the vertical profile of the velocity in the

  4. Air Flows in Gravity Sewers - Determination of Wastewater Drag Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Østertoft, Kristian; Vollertsen, Jes

    2016-01-01

    Several experiments have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of the wastewater drag and the wall frictional force acting on the headspace air in gravity sewers. The aim of the study is to improve the data basis for a numerical model of natural sewer ventilation. The results...... of the study shows that by integrating the top/side wall shear stresses the log-law models for the air velocity distribution along the unwetted perimeter resulted in a good agreement with the friction forces calculated by use of the Colebrook-White formula for hydraulic smooth pipes. Secondly, the water...... surface drags were found by log-law models of the velocity distribution in turbulent flows to fit velocity profiles measured from the water surface and by integrating the water surface drags along the wetted perimeter, mean water surface drags were found and a measure of the water surface drag coefficient...

  5. Wave drag coefficient of a model `Busemann biplane' catamaran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, L.; Bunt, E. A.

    1990-09-01

    Tests conducted on a model ‘Busemann biplane’ catamaran in a towing basin qualitatively showed that the form of the wave drag coefficient curve followed the typical drag curve for a single unswept supersonic wing, but on this was superimposed that of the Busemann wave drag curve (giving a local minimum near the design Froude number).

  6. Estimated Drag Coefficients and Wind Structure of Hurricane Frances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Niiler, P. P.; Stammer, D.; Terrill, E.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Coupled Boundary Layers Air Sea Transfer (CBLAST) experiment, an array of drifters and floats was deployed from an aircraft just ahead of Hurricane Frances during it's passage to the northwest side of the Caribbean Island chain in August, 2004. The ocean and surface air conditions prior to, during, and after Hurricane Frances were documented by multiple sensors. Two independent estimates of the surface wind field suggest different storm structures. NOAA H*WINDS, an objectively analyzed product using a combination of data collected at the reconnaissance flight level, GPS profilers (dropwindsondes), satellites, and other data, suggest a 40km radius of maximum wind. A product based on the radial momentum equation balance using \\ital{in-situ} surface pressure data and wind direction measurements from the CBLAST drifter array suggests that the radius of maximum winds was 15km. We used a regional version of the MITGCM model with closed boundaries and realistic temperature and salinity fields which was forced with these wind field products to determine which wind field leads to circulation and SST structures that are most consistent with observed sea surface temperature fields and float profile data. Best estimates of the surface wind structure are then used to estimate the appropriate drag coefficient corresponding to the maximum velocity. Our results are compared with those obtained previously.

  7. Measurements of the Drag Coefficient of Simulated Micrometeoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, M.; Munsat, T.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The dust accelerator facility operated at the University of Colorado is used to simulate meteoric ablation, including measuring the ionization efficiency over a wide range of velocities (e.g., DeLuca et al., Planet. Space Sci., submitted, 2017). This presentation reports on the most recent experimental measurements of the drag coefficient that determines the particles' slowdown from their frictional interaction with the atmosphere. The measurements indicate that meteors experience considerably more slowdown than usually assumed. The simulated meteors consisted of submicron sized aluminum particles shot into an air chamber held at 200 mTorr pressure at velocities between 1 - 10 km/s using the dust accelerator and meteor ablation facility. The slowdown is calculated from precise timing measurements made using pickup tube detectors placed upstream and near the entrance to the air chamber, and an impact detector inside the air chamber at the downstream end of the chamber. Supporting modeling calculations show that the particles have little or no mass loss during their interaction with air and thus constant radius can be assumed. Preliminary results for the drag coefficient calculated from these timing measurements reveal that the aluminum particles have a drag coefficient of 1.51 ± 0.24 in air, which is higher than typically assumed in meteoric ablation models (usually 0.5 to 1), indicating that meteors may experience more air drag than previously assumed. More detailed measurements over a wider parameter range are underway.

  8. The influence of numerical models on determining the drag coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Josef

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with numerical modelling of body aerodynamic drag coefficient in the transition from laminar to turbulent flow regimes, where the selection of a suitable numerical model is problematic. On the basic problem of flow around a simple body – sphere selected computational models are tested. The values obtained by numerical simulations of drag coefficients of each model are compared with the graph of dependency of the drag coefficient vs. Reynolds number for a sphere. Next the dependency of Strouhal number vs. Reynolds number is evaluated, where the vortex shedding frequency values for given speed are obtained numerically and experimentally and then the values are compared for each numerical model and experiment. The aim is to specify trends for the selection of appropriate numerical model for flow around bodies problem in which the precise description of the flow field around the obstacle is used to define the acoustic noise source. Numerical modelling is performed by finite volume method using CFD code.

  9. Variation of the drag coefficient and its dependence on sea state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geernaert, Gerald L.; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Richter, Karl

    1986-06-01

    Using a Gill propeller vane anemometer and resistance wave wires over a water column depth of 15 m, simultaneous measurements of the momentum flux and sea surface wave spectra were acquired from the Pisa mast, 28 km offshore in the German Bight during autumn and winter 1979. These data were analyzed to identify the relationship between wind stress and surface waves. It was found that wind stresses for wind speeds above 15 m/s were regularly higher than open ocean wind stresses as reported by Smith (1980) and by Large and Pond (1981) for the same mean wind speed. These results, when described in terms of the drag coefficient, compared closely with the results of Sheppard et al. (1972), who collected surface layer statistics over Lough Neagh, Northern Ireland. After modeling the surface waves of the North Sea as a function of wave saturation (or wave age), it became evident that variations in the magnitude of the drag coefficient could be explained by coincident variations in the surface wave energy spectrum. By applying the wave dependent roughness length model described by Kitaigorodskii (1973), the North Sea drag coefficient was predicted to be larger than drag coefficients reported from the open sea.

  10. Ocean's response to Hurricane Frances and its implications for drag coefficient parameterization at high wind speeds

    KAUST Repository

    Zedler, S. E.

    2009-04-25

    The drag coefficient parameterization of wind stress is investigated for tropical storm conditions using model sensitivity studies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Ocean General Circulation Model was run in a regional setting with realistic stratification and forcing fields representing Hurricane Frances, which in early September 2004 passed east of the Caribbean Leeward Island chain. The model was forced with a NOAA-HWIND wind speed product after converting it to wind stress using four different drag coefficient parameterizations. Respective model results were tested against in situ measurements of temperature profiles and velocity, available from an array of 22 surface drifters and 12 subsurface floats. Changing the drag coefficient parameterization from one that saturated at a value of 2.3 × 10 -3 to a constant drag coefficient of 1.2 × 10-3 reduced the standard deviation difference between the simulated minus the measured sea surface temperature change from 0.8°C to 0.3°C. Additionally, the standard deviation in the difference between simulated minus measured high pass filtered 15-m current speed reduced from 15 cm/s to 5 cm/s. The maximum difference in sea surface temperature response when two different turbulent mixing parameterizations were implemented was 0.3°C, i.e., only 11% of the maximum change of sea surface temperature caused by the storm. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Ocean's response to Hurricane Frances and its implications for drag coefficient parameterization at high wind speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedler, S. E.; Niiler, P. P.; Stammer, D.; Terrill, E.; Morzel, J.

    2009-04-01

    The drag coefficient parameterization of wind stress is investigated for tropical storm conditions using model sensitivity studies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Ocean General Circulation Model was run in a regional setting with realistic stratification and forcing fields representing Hurricane Frances, which in early September 2004 passed east of the Caribbean Leeward Island chain. The model was forced with a NOAA-HWIND wind speed product after converting it to wind stress using four different drag coefficient parameterizations. Respective model results were tested against in situ measurements of temperature profiles and velocity, available from an array of 22 surface drifters and 12 subsurface floats. Changing the drag coefficient parameterization from one that saturated at a value of 2.3 × 10-3 to a constant drag coefficient of 1.2 × 10-3 reduced the standard deviation difference between the simulated minus the measured sea surface temperature change from 0.8°C to 0.3°C. Additionally, the standard deviation in the difference between simulated minus measured high pass filtered 15-m current speed reduced from 15 cm/s to 5 cm/s. The maximum difference in sea surface temperature response when two different turbulent mixing parameterizations were implemented was 0.3°C, i.e., only 11% of the maximum change of sea surface temperature caused by the storm.

  12. Instability analysis and drag coefficient prediction on a swept RAE2822 wing with constant lift coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenrong JING

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swept wing is widely used in civil aircraft, whose airfoil is chosen, designed and optimized to increase the cruise speed and decrease the drag coefficient. The parameters of swept wing, such as sweep angle and angle of attack, are determined according to the cruise lift coefficient requirement, and the drag coefficient is expected to be predicted accurately, which involves the instability characteristics and transition position of the flow. The pressure coefficient of the RAE2822 wing with given constant lift coefficient is obtained by solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation numerically, and then the mean flow is calculated by solving the boundary layer (BL equation with spectral method. The cross-flow instability characteristic of boundary layer of swept wing in the windward and leeward is analyzed by linear stability theory (LST, and the transition position is predicted by eN method. The drag coefficient is numerically predicted by introducing a laminar/turbulent indicator. A simple approach to calculate the lift coefficient of swept wing is proposed. It is found that there is a quantitative relationship between the angle of attack and sweep angle when the lift coefficient keeps constant; when the angle of attack is small, the flow on the leeward of the wing is stable. when the angle of attack is larger than 3°, the flow becomes unstable quickly; with the increase of sweep angle or angle of attack the disturbance on the windward becomes more unstable, leading to the moving forward of the transition position to the leading edge of the wing; the drag coefficient has two significant jumping growth due to the successive occurrence of transition in the windward and the leeward; the optimal range of sweep angle for civil aircraft is suggested.

  13. Drag reduction using slippery liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, Marcus; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang

    2013-11-01

    A new method for passive drag reduction is introduced. A surface treatment inspired by the Nepenthes pitcher plant, previously developed by Wong et al. (2011), is utilized and its design parameters are studied for increased drag reduction and durability. Nano- and micro-structured surfaces infused with a lubricant allow for mobility within the lubricant itself when the surface is exposed to flow. The mobility causes slip at the fluid-fluid interface, which drastically reduces the viscous friction. These new surfaces are fundamentally different from the more conventional superhydrophobic surfaces previously used in drag reduction studies, which rely on a gas-liquid interface. The main advantage of the liquid infused surfaces over the conventional surfaces is that the lubricant adheres more strongly to the surface, decreasing the risk of failure when exposed to turbulence and other high-shear flows. We have shown that these surfaces can reduce viscous drag up to 20% in both Taylor-Couette flow and in a parallel plate rheometer. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  14. Wind-Tunnel Investigations of Blunt-Body Drag Reduction Using Forebody Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Sprague, Stephanie; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Curry, Robert E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents results of wind-tunnel tests that demonstrate a novel drag reduction technique for blunt-based vehicles. For these tests, the forebody roughness of a blunt-based model was modified using micomachined surface overlays. As forebody roughness increases, boundary layer at the model aft thickens and reduces the shearing effect of external flow on the separated flow behind the base region, resulting in reduced base drag. For vehicle configurations with large base drag, existing data predict that a small increment in forebody friction drag will result in a relatively large decrease in base drag. If the added increment in forebody skin drag is optimized with respect to base drag, reducing the total drag of the configuration is possible. The wind-tunnel tests results conclusively demonstrate the existence of a forebody dragbase drag optimal point. The data demonstrate that the base drag coefficient corresponding to the drag minimum lies between 0.225 and 0.275, referenced to the base area. Most importantly, the data show a drag reduction of approximately 15% when the drag optimum is reached. When this drag reduction is scaled to the X-33 base area, drag savings approaching 45,000 N (10,000 lbf) can be realized.

  15. On the Decrease of the Oceanic Drag Coefficient in High Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Mark A.

    2018-02-01

    The sheltering coefficient - prefixing Jeffreys' concept of the exponential wave growth rate at a gas-liquid interface - is shown to be Reynolds number dependent from laboratory measurements of waves and Reynolds stresses. There are two turbulent flow regimes: wind speed range of 2.5 to 30 m/s where the drag coefficients increase with wind speed, and wind speed range of 30 to 50 m/s where sheltering/drag coefficients decrease/saturate with wind speed. By comparing model calculations of drag coefficients - using a fixed sheltering coefficient - with ocean observations over a wind speed range of 1 to 50 m/s a similar Reynolds number dependence of the oceanic sheltering coefficient is revealed. In consequence the drag coefficient is a function of Reynolds number and wave age, and not just wind speed as frequently assumed. The resulting decreasing drag coefficient above 30 m/s is shown to be critical in explaining the rapid intensification so prominent in the climatology of Atlantic hurricanes. The Reynolds number dependence of the sheltering coefficient, when employed in coupled models, should lead to significant improvements in the prediction of intensification and decay of tropical cyclones. A calculation of curvature at the wave crest suggests that at wind speeds above 56.15 m/s all waves-breaking or not-induce steady flow separation leading to a minimum in the drag coefficient. This is further evidence of the veracity of the observations of the oceanic drag coefficient at high winds.

  16. Drag Coefficient Comparisons Between Observed and Model Simulated Directional Wave Spectra Under Hurricane Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Ocean Modelling 102 (2016) 1–13 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Ocean Modelling journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ocemod Drag ...2015 Revised 3 February 2016 Accepted 16 April 2016 Available online 19 April 2016 Keywords: Wind waves WAVEWATCH III, Drag coefficient Wave...1688 source function is used to calculate drag coefficients from both the scanning radar altimeter (SRA) measured two dimensional wave spectra

  17. On the Fetch Dependent Drag Coefficient over Coastal and Inland Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geernaert, G. L.; Smith, J. A.

    a maximum when the phase speed of the dominant wind wave has a value near 7 u*, where u* is the friction velocity. This corresponds to a maximum near 2 km fetch during moderate windspeed, and the maximum value of the drag coefficient corresponds to an increased fetch of 13 km for windspeeds of 20 m/sec. We......The drag coefficient has been postulated by many investigators to depend on fetch. For constant windspeed and stability, laboratory data generally show an increasing drag coefficient with fetch while field observations show a decreasing dependence. In this study, we show that if one combines...... the spectral form of the roughness length proposed by Kitaigorodskii with the JONSWAP wave spectrum and extrapolate to very short fetch, then the predicted drag coefficient exhibits a behaviour which coarsely reproduces field and laboratory observations. The results indicate that the drag coefficient exhibits...

  18. Mechanism of drag reduction for circular cylinders with patterned surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U.; Jehring, L.; Egbers, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Reduced drag of patterned cylinders over a wide range of Re numbers. • Hexagonal patterns cannot be characterized as roughness structures. • Hexagonal bumps affect the flow like spherical dimples of smaller k/d ratio do. • Main separation is delayed caused by a partial separation. • Angle of a separation line is not constant over the length of cylinder. -- Abstract: In this paper, the flow over cylinders with a patterned surface (k/d = 1.98 × 10 −2 ) is investigated in a subsonic wind tunnel over Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.14 × 10 4 to 2.77 × 10 5 by measuring drag, flow visualization and measuring velocity profiles above the surface of the cylinders, to observe the effect of hexagonal patterns on the flow of air. These patterns can also be referred as hexagonal dimples or bumps depending on their configuration. The investigations revealed that a patterned cylinder with patterns pressed outwards has a drag coefficient of about 0.65 times of a smooth one. Flow visualization techniques including surface oil-film technique and velocity profile measurement were employed to elucidate this effect, and hence present the mechanism of drag reduction. The measurement of velocity profiles using hot-wire anemometry above the surface reveal that a hexagonal bump cause local separation generating large turbulence intensity along the separating shear layer. Due to this increased turbulence, the flow reattaches to the surface with higher momentum and become able to withstand the pressure gradient delaying the main separation significantly. Besides that, the separation does not appear to occur in a straight line along the length of the cylinder as in case of most passive drag control methods, but follow exactly the hexagonal patterns forming a wave with its crest at 115° and trough at 110°, in contrast to the laminar separation line at 85° for a smooth cylinder

  19. Estimation of the drag coefficient from the upper ocean response to a hurricane: A variational data assimilation approach

    KAUST Repository

    Zedler, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    We seek to determine whether a small number of measurements of upper ocean temperature and currents can be used to make estimates of the drag coefficient that have a smaller range of uncertainty than previously found. We adopt a numerical approach in an inverse problem setup using an ocean model and its adjoint, to assimilate data and to adjust the drag coefficient parameterization (here the free parameter) with wind speed that corresponds to the minimum of a model minus data misfit or cost function. Pseudo data are generated from a reference forward simulation, and are perturbed with different levels of Gaussian distributed noise. It is found that it is necessary to assimilate both surface current speed and temperature data to obtain improvement over previous estimates of the drag coefficient. When data is assimilated without any smoothing or constraints on the solution, the drag coefficient is overestimated at low wind speeds and there are unrealistic, high frequency oscillations in the adjusted drag coefficient curve. When second derivatives of the drag coefficient curve are penalized and the solution is constrained to experimental values at low wind speeds, the adjusted drag coefficient is within 10% of its target value. This result is robust to the addition of realistic random noise meant to represent turbulence due to the presence of mesoscale background features in the assimilated data, or to the wind speed time series to model its unsteady and gusty character. When an eddy is added to the background flow field in both the initial condition and the assimilated data time series, the target and adjusted drag coefficient are within 10% of one another, regardless of whether random noise is added to the assimilated data. However, when the eddy is present in the assimilated data but is not in the initial conditions, the drag coefficient is overestimated by as much as 30%. This carries the implication that when real data is assimilated, care needs to be taken in

  20. Drag force, drag torque, and Magnus force coefficients of rotating spherical particle moving in fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Kvurt, Y.; Keita, Ibrahima; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2012), s. 55-67 ISSN 0272-6351 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600603; GA ČR GA103/09/1718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : drag force * drag torque * Magnus force * Reynolds number * rotational Reynolds number Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2012

  1. Determining the drag coefficient of rotational symmetric objects falling through liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    I will propose here a kinematic approach for measuring the drag coefficient of rotational symmetric objects falling through liquids. For this, I will show that one can obtain a measurement of the drag coefficient of a rotational symmetric object by numerically solving the equation of motion describing its fall through a known liquid contained in a vertical tube. The experimental value of the drag coefficient of an object with a particular shape is obtained by measuring the fall distance of the object at any recorded time along its entire falling path. (paper)

  2. In-situ measurement of electroosmotic drag coefficient in Nafion membrane for the PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe; Morin, Arnaud; Huguet, Patrice; Schott, Pascal; Pauchet, Joël

    2011-11-10

    A new method based on hydrogen pump has been developed to measure the electroosmotic drag coefficient in representative PEMFC operating conditions. It allows eliminating the back-flow of water which leads to some errors in the calculation of this coefficient with previously reported electrochemical methods. Measurements have been performed on 50 μm thick Nafion membranes both extruded and recast. Contrary to what has been described in most of previous published works, the electroosmotic drag coefficient decreases as the membrane water content increases. The same trend is observed for temperatures between 25 and 80 °C. For the same membrane water content, the electroosmotic drag coefficient increases with temperature. In the same condition, there is no difference in drag coefficient for extruded Nafion N112 and recast Nafion NRE212. These results are discussed on the basis of the two commonly accepted proton transport mechanisms, namely, Grotthus and vehicular.

  3. Drag coefficients of lattice masts from full-scale wind-tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos; Støttrup-Andersen, Ulrik; Johnsen, Marie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the drag coefficients obtained from a series of full-scale section model wind-tunnel tests of several lattice mast configurations are presented and compared to those provided in Eurocode 3 and ESDU. The drag coefficients provided in Eurocode are conservative interpretations of 1......:5 scale section model tests performed at the National Physics Laboratory and the National Maritime Institute in the UK in the 1970´s. ESDU provides velocity-dependent drag coefficients equivalent to those obtained from the same series of tests. In all cases, the mast legs and diagonals are comprised...... primarily of circular hollow sections, putting into question the validity of the scaled tests from the 70’s. The results of the full-scale tests show that the drag coefficients of the masts have lower values than those obtained from the scaled tests for turbulent wind and higher for winds with low...

  4. Marine drag reduction of shark skin inspired riblet surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Y.F.; Yuan, C.Q.; Bai, X.Q.

    2017-01-01

    Shark skin inspired riblet surfaces have been known to have drag reduction effect for the over past 40 years. It first drew the attention from the aircraft industry. With the property of low drag and self-cleaning (antifouling), shark skin inspired riblet surfaces can also be used on navigation objects. In this paper, different marine drag reduction technologies are discussed, and a review of riblet performance studies is also given. Experimental parameters include riblet geometry, continuous...

  5. Experimental Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient of Water Rockets by a Simple Free-Fall Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E. Arguelles-Diaz, K.; Fernandez-Oro, J.

    2009-01-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag…

  6. Method to estimate drag coefficient at the air/ice interface over drifting open pack ice from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.

    1984-01-01

    A knowledge in near real time, of the surface drag coefficient for drifting pack ice is vital for predicting its motions. And since this is not routinely available from measurements it must be replaced by estimates. Hence, a method for estimating this variable, as well as the drag coefficient at the water/ice interface and the ice thickness, for drifting open pack ice was developed. These estimates were derived from three-day sequences of LANDSAT-1 MSS images and surface weather charts and from the observed minima and maxima of these variables. The method was tested with four data sets in the southeastern Beaufort sea. Acceptable results were obtained for three data sets. Routine application of the method depends on the availability of data from an all-weather air or spaceborne remote sensing system, producing images with high geometric fidelity and high resolution.

  7. Influence of Particle Shape on Drag Coefficient for Commonly Occuring Sandy Particles in Coastal Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Arora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A well defined relationship connecting settling velocity with sediment geometry and ambient properties is an essential pre-requisite for coastal and hydraulic engineering studies. An established relationship for settling velocity of sandy particles assuming spherical shape geometry is available in the literature. In reality, the sediment particles need not be spherical at all times, which influences settling velocity that is strongly biased to the drag coefficient. Based on quantitative comparison with measured data collected at Oahu Islands located in the Hawaiian archipelago, USA this work provides a relationship between drag coefficient and particle shape factor for sand grains viz; sand, sandy loam and fine sandy loam typically found in coastal environment (typical size ranges from 0.05 to 2.0 mm. The particle Reynolds number and shape factor are evaluated for each grain. The drag coefficient evaluated as function of nominal diameter and Reynolds number show a positive correlation over a wide range of shape factors used in this study. A comprehensive correlation has been developed of the drag coefficient for non-spherical particles as a function of Reynolds number and particle shape. Further a regression analysis was performed on the functional dependence of drag coefficient on particle shape. Based on this study, it could be advocated the validity of Krumbien shape factor holds well for the above characterized grain size and various particle shapes considered. Hence, the settling velocity of particles has a functional dependence on estimated drag coefficient with important implications for modeling sediment transport and swash zone hydrodynamics.

  8. Development of a New Drag Coefficient Model for Oil and Gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a New Drag Coefficient Model for Oil and Gas Multiphase Fluid Systems. ... a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link above.

  9. development of a new drag coefficient model for oil and gas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    In order to transport solid entrained multiphase fluids, especially through a pipeline, ... and design of multiphase processes especially when ... flow in pipeline. One challenge is that the drag coefficient cannot be expressed in an analytical form for a wide range of particle Reynolds numbers, because the flow condition during ...

  10. On the determination of the neutral drag coefficient in the convective boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grachev, A.A.; Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1998-01-01

    Based on the idea that free convection can be considered as a particular case of forced convection, where the gusts driven by the large-scale eddies are scaled with the Deardorff convective velocity scale, a new formulation for the neutral drag coefficient, C-Dn, in the convective boundary layer ...

  11. Studies of drag on the nanocomposite superhydrophobic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brassard, Jean-Denis [Anti-icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL), Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l‘Université, Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Centre Universitaire de Recherche sur l’Aluminium (CURAL), Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l‘Université, Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Sarkar, D.K., E-mail: dsarkar@uqac.ca [Centre Universitaire de Recherche sur l’Aluminium (CURAL), Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l‘Université, Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Perron, Jean [Anti-icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL), Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l‘Université, Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The nanocomposite thin films of stearic acid (SA)-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in epoxy polymer matrix have been achieved. • SA-functionalization of ZnO nanoparticles in the thin films was confirmed by XRD and FTIR. • The measured rms roughness of the thin film is found to be 12 ± 1 μm with the adhesion of 5B on glass. • The wetting property shows that the surface of the film is superhydrophobic with the CA of 156 ± 4° and CAH of 4 ± 2°. • The drag reduction on the surface of superhydrophobic glass sphere is 16% lower than as-received glass sphere. - Abstract: The nanocomposite thin films of stearic acid (SA)-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in epoxy polymer matrix have been achieved. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show the formation of zinc stearate on ZnO nanoparticles as the confirmation of SA-functionalization of ZnO nanoparticles in the thin films. Morphological analyses reveal the presence of micro-holes with the presence of irregular nanoparticles. The measured root mean square (rms) roughness of the thin film is found to be 12 ± 1 μm with the adhesion of 5B on both glass and aluminum substrates. The wetting property shows that the surface of the film is superhydrophobic with the contact angle of water of 156 ± 4° having contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of 4 ± 2°. The average terminal velocity in the water of the as-received glass spheres and superhydrophobic spheres were found to be 0.66 ± 0.01 m/s and 0.72 ± 0.01 m/s respectively. Consequently, the calculated average coefficients of the surface drag of the as-received glass sphere and superhydrophobic glass sphere were 2.30 ± 0.01 and 1.93 ± 0.03, respectively. Hence, the drag reduction on the surface of superhydrophobic glass sphere is found to be approximately 16% lower than as-received glass sphere.

  12. Studies of drag on the nanocomposite superhydrophobic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassard, Jean-Denis; Sarkar, D.K.; Perron, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The nanocomposite thin films of stearic acid (SA)-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in epoxy polymer matrix have been achieved. • SA-functionalization of ZnO nanoparticles in the thin films was confirmed by XRD and FTIR. • The measured rms roughness of the thin film is found to be 12 ± 1 μm with the adhesion of 5B on glass. • The wetting property shows that the surface of the film is superhydrophobic with the CA of 156 ± 4° and CAH of 4 ± 2°. • The drag reduction on the surface of superhydrophobic glass sphere is 16% lower than as-received glass sphere. - Abstract: The nanocomposite thin films of stearic acid (SA)-functionalized ZnO nanoparticles incorporated in epoxy polymer matrix have been achieved. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show the formation of zinc stearate on ZnO nanoparticles as the confirmation of SA-functionalization of ZnO nanoparticles in the thin films. Morphological analyses reveal the presence of micro-holes with the presence of irregular nanoparticles. The measured root mean square (rms) roughness of the thin film is found to be 12 ± 1 μm with the adhesion of 5B on both glass and aluminum substrates. The wetting property shows that the surface of the film is superhydrophobic with the contact angle of water of 156 ± 4° having contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of 4 ± 2°. The average terminal velocity in the water of the as-received glass spheres and superhydrophobic spheres were found to be 0.66 ± 0.01 m/s and 0.72 ± 0.01 m/s respectively. Consequently, the calculated average coefficients of the surface drag of the as-received glass sphere and superhydrophobic glass sphere were 2.30 ± 0.01 and 1.93 ± 0.03, respectively. Hence, the drag reduction on the surface of superhydrophobic glass sphere is found to be approximately 16% lower than as-received glass sphere

  13. Experiment Evaluation of Skin Friction Drag by Surface Tailoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigandan, S.; Gopal krishna, K.; Gagan Kumar, K.; Gunasekar, P.; Nithya, S.

    2017-08-01

    Reduction of drag is an important role of aerodynamic specialist in real time world. The performance of forward moving object improved when the drag is reduced. Skin friction drag caused when the fluid tending to shear along the surface of the body and it is dependent on energy expenditure. Initial research concluded that nearly 20 to 40% of total drag is skin friction drag, based on flight forward velocity. This means a lot of fuel burned. In this paper we investigate a methodology to reduce the skin friction drag by implementing different kinds of exterior treatments. The ideology inspired from the world fastest moving oceanic creature. Structures are fabricated based on the replica of scales of the oceanic creature. The outer skin of the aerofoil NACA0012 is modified like shark scales. Then it is tested using open type sub sonic wind tunnel. In addition to that, the leading edge thickness effect also studied. The turbulent flow phenomenon is validated at different velocities and compared with numerical results using STAR CCM+. From the plots and graphical results, it is found that the skin friction drag is generated less due to reduction of transverse shear stress present in turbulent flow and skin friction drag depends on boundary layer thickness and on the percentage of chord of flow separation. In addition to this, the result delivers that the ordinary polished surface produces more drag than the modified scales. The outlook of this technology is excrescence for different applications. This open section wind tunnel testing produces 10-15% reduction in drag and can be turn to high values when the experiment is conducted in closed section wind tunnel with real time atmospheric conditions, which can be done as a future work.

  14. Average Skin-Friction Drag Coefficients from Tank Tests of a Parabolic Body of Revolution (NACA RM-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottard, Elmo J; Loposer, J Dan

    1954-01-01

    Average skin-friction drag coefficients were obtained from boundary-layer total-pressure measurements on a parabolic body of revolution (NACA rm-10, basic fineness ratio 15) in water at Reynolds numbers from 4.4 x 10(6) to 70 x 10(6). The tests were made in the Langley tank no. 1 with the body sting-mounted at a depth of two maximum body diameters. The arithmetic mean of three drag measurements taken around the body was in good agreement with flat-plate results, but, apparently because of the slight surface wave caused by the body, the distribution of the boundary layer around the body was not uniform over part of the Reynolds number range.

  15. Laminar flow drag reduction on a soft porous media surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenxing; Tambasco, Michael; Mirbod, Parisa

    2017-11-01

    The ability to control flow reduction in microchannels could significantly advance microfluidic-based devices in a wide range of industrial applications including biomedical fields. The aim of this work is to understand the fundamental physics of the laminar skin friction coefficient and the related drag reduction due to the existence of porous media in the pressure-driven flow. We conducted an analytical framework to predict a laminar Newtonian fluid flow and corresponding drag reduction in a rectangular microchannel which coated with various soft random porous media. Specifically, we present predictions of the laminar skin friction coefficient, and drag reduction for pressure-driven flows. We found the laminar drag reduction is strongly depended on the Darcy permeability of porous medium, the thickness of the permeable layer, and the height of the microchannel. To verify the accuracy of our analytical predictions, several pressure-drop experiments were conducted. We chose various combinations of porous material and the morphology of the fibers to achieve a unique height ratio, between the height of two domains, and permeability parameter of porous media for each experiment. We found a good agreement between the experiments and analytical predictions of laminar drag reduction. Supported by NSF Grant CBET#1706766.

  16. Drag Coefficient of Water Droplets Approaching the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Sor, Suthyvann; Magarino, Adelaida Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model was placed at the end of the rotating arm and a monosize droplet generator produced droplets that fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The interaction between the droplets and the airfoil was captured with high speed imaging and allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. Image processing software was used to measure the position of the droplet centroid, equivalent diameter, perimeter, area, and the major and minor axes of an ellipse superimposed over the deforming droplet. The horizontal and vertical displacement of each droplet against time was also measured, and the velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of the droplet to the beginning of breakup. Results are presented and discussed for drag coefficients of droplets with diameters in the range of 300 to 1800 micrometers, and airfoil velocities of 50, 70 and 90 meters/second. The effect of droplet oscillation on the drag coefficient is discussed.

  17. Using wind setdown and storm surge on Lake Erie to calibrate the air-sea drag coefficient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Drews

    Full Text Available The air-sea drag coefficient controls the transfer of momentum from wind to water. In modeling storm surge, this coefficient is a crucial parameter for estimating the surge height. This study uses two strong wind events on Lake Erie to calibrate the drag coefficient using the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST modeling system and the the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS. Simulated waves are generated on the lake with Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN. Wind setdown provides the opportunity to eliminate wave setup as a contributing factor, since waves are minimal at the upwind shore. The study finds that model results significantly underestimate wind setdown and storm surge when a typical open-ocean formulation without waves is used for the drag coefficient. The contribution of waves to wind setdown and storm surge is 34.7%. Scattered lake ice also increases the effective drag coefficient by a factor of 1.1.

  18. Bag-breakup control of surface drag in hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kozlov, Dmitry; Sergeev, Daniil

    2016-04-01

    consequent breaking of short-lived, sail-like pieces of the water-surface film - "bags". On the base of general principles of statistical physics (model of a canonical ensemble) we developed statistics of the "bag-breakup" events: their number and statistical distribution of geometrical parameters depending on wind speed. Basing on the developed statistics, we estimated the surface stress caused by bags as the average sum of stresses caused by individual bags depending on their eometrical parameters. The resulting stress is subjected to counteracting impacts of the increasing wind speed: the increasing number of bags, and their decreasing sizes and life times and the balance yields a peaking dependence of the bag resistance on the wind speed: the share of bag-stress peaks at U10  35 m/s and then reduces. Peaking of surface stress associated with the "bag-breakup" explains seemingly paradoxical non-monotonous wind-dependence of surface drag coefficient peaking at winds about 35 m/s. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation of Basic Research (14-05-91767, 13-05-12093, 16-05-00839, 14-05-91767, 16-55-52025, 15-35-20953) and experiment and equipment was supported by Russian Science Foundation (Agreements 14-17-00667 and 15-17-20009 respectively), Yu.Troitskaya, A.Kandaurov and D.Sergeev were partially supported by FP7 Collaborative Project No. 612610.

  19. Gliding flight: drag and torque of a hawk and a falcon with straight and turned heads, and a lower value for the parasite drag coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, V A

    2000-12-01

    Raptors - falcons, hawks and eagles in this study - such as peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) that attack distant prey from high-speed dives face a paradox. Anatomical and behavioral measurements show that raptors of many species must turn their heads approximately 40 degrees to one side to see the prey straight ahead with maximum visual acuity, yet turning the head would presumably slow their diving speed by increasing aerodynamic drag. This paper investigates the aerodynamic drag part of this paradox by measuring the drag and torque on wingless model bodies of a peregrine falcon and a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with straight and turned heads in a wind tunnel at a speed of 11.7 m s(-)(1). With a turned head, drag increased more than 50 %, and torque developed that tended to yaw the model towards the direction in which the head pointed. Mathematical models for the drag required to prevent yawing showed that the total drag could plausibly more than double with head-turning. Thus, the presumption about increased drag in the paradox is correct. The relationships between drag, head angle and torque developed here are prerequisites to the explanation of how a raptor could avoid the paradox by holding its head straight and flying along a spiral path that keeps its line of sight for maximum acuity pointed sideways at the prey. Although the spiral path to the prey is longer than the straight path, the raptor's higher speed can theoretically compensate for the difference in distances; and wild peregrines do indeed approach prey by flying along curved paths that resemble spirals. In addition to providing data that explain the paradox, this paper reports the lowest drag coefficients yet measured for raptor bodies (0.11 for the peregrine and 0.12 for the red-tailed hawk) when the body models with straight heads were set to pitch and yaw angles for minimum drag. These values are markedly lower than value of the parasite drag coefficient (C(D,par)) of 0.18 previously

  20. A new technique for investigating the induced and profile drag coefficients of a smooth wing and a tubercled wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolzon Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The induced and profile drag coefficients of a wing are typically determined through a complex experimental technique, such as wake surveying. Such a technique requires measurement of all three orthogonal components of the downstream velocity to find the components of drag, which results in the necessary usage of a sophisticated and costly measurement device, such as multi-hole pressure probe. However, in this paper data is presented which demonstrate that the relative changes in the induced and profile drag coefficients can largely be determined through the sole measurement of the downstream, streamwise velocity. To demonstrate this, the induced and profile drags of two NACA 0021 wings, one with a smooth leading edge and the other wing a tubercled leading edge for comparison, are determined through the measurement of the three orthogonal velocities. The downstream, streamwise velocity distribution of each wing is then constructed and relationships can be determined. The wings were surveyed at 3°, 9°, and 12°. It has been found that the relative magnitude of the profile drag coefficient can be found for all considered angles of attack, while the relative magnitude of the induced drag coefficient can be found at 9° and 12°. These findings produce an innovative, simpler, and more cost effective experimental technique in determining the components of drag of a wing, and reduces the burdensome requirement of a sophisticated measurement device for such an experiment. Further investigation is required to determine the induced drag at 3°.

  1. Marine drag reduction of shark skin inspired riblet surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.F. Fu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin inspired riblet surfaces have been known to have drag reduction effect for the over past 40 years. It first drew the attention from the aircraft industry. With the property of low drag and self-cleaning (antifouling, shark skin inspired riblet surfaces can also be used on navigation objects. In this paper, different marine drag reduction technologies are discussed, and a review of riblet performance studies is also given. Experimental parameters include riblet geometry, continuous and segmented configurations, fluid velocity (laminar and turbulent flow, fluid viscosity (water, oil and gas, and wettability are analyzed. However, force is obtained by area-weighted integral of shear stress distributions. So area of riblet surfaces is a crucial factor which has not been considered in many previous studies. An experiment is given to discuss the impact of area. This paper aims not only to contribute to a better understanding of marine drag reduction, but also to offer new perspectives to improve the current evaluation criteria of riblet drag reduction.

  2. Diagnostic-Photographic Determination of Drag/Lift/Torque Coefficients of High Speed Rigid Body in Water Column

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Peter C; Fan, Chenwu; Gefken, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of rigid body falling through water column with a high speed (such as Mk-84 bomb) needs formulas for drag/lift and torque coefficients, which depend on various physical processes such as supercavitation and bubbles...

  3. A new method for flight test determination of propulsive efficiency and drag coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, G.; Bridges, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    A flight test method is described from which propulsive efficiency as well as parasite and induced drag coefficients can be directly determined using relatively simple instrumentation and analysis techniques. The method uses information contained in the transient response in airspeed for a small power change in level flight in addition to the usual measurement of power required for level flight. Measurements of pitch angle and longitudinal and normal acceleration are eliminated. The theoretical basis for the method, the analytical techniques used, and the results of application of the method to flight test data are presented.

  4. Experimental evaluation of the drag coefficient for smooth spheres by free fall experiments in old mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, J. A.; Dueñas-Molina, J.; de Dios, J.

    2005-05-01

    Mines of Linares, Jaén, Spain, have been exploited from the age of the Phoenicians, Carthaginians and Romans. These silver and lead mines reached their maximum splendour at the end of the 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. Nevertheless, all the mining works finished in the 1970s and the diverse machinery was sold. Only the shafts remain since then which has now permitted carrying out interesting free fall experiments using smooth spheres of both cork and cast iron. The experiments were facilitated by the fact that the tubular shape of the shafts provides excellent transmission of sound, which made feasible the recording of the impact sound of the spheres with water at the bottom of the shafts at distances of up to 200 m. By using these experimental data, we have carried out an evaluation of the drag coefficient for the movement of smooth spheres through the air in the laminar regime with Reynolds number in the interval 103 to 2 × 105. This evaluation was in excellent agreement with the literature data. From the theoretical point of view, the analysis of the free fall movement includes a variety of concepts such as Newton's second law, the drag force, Archimedes principle and the velocity of sound, which makes these experiments very attractive for both physics teachers and physics students at university level. Finally, an easy experiment is proposed in this paper which has permitted an approximate evaluation of the drag coefficient for smooth spheres to be carried out in a laboratory environment.

  5. Bioinspired superhydrophobic, self-cleaning and low drag surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-09-01

    Nature has evolved objects with desired functionality using commonly found materials. Nature capitalizes on hierarchical structures to achieve functionality. The understanding of the functions provided by objects and processes found in nature can guide us to produce nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes with desirable functionality. This article provides an overview of four topics: (1) Lotus Effect used to develop superhydrophobic and self-cleaning/antifouling surfaces with low adhesion, (2) Shark Skin Effect to develop surfaces with low fluid drag and anti-fouling characteristics, and (3-4) Rice Leaf and Butterfly Wing Effect to develop superhydrophobic and self-cleaning surfaces with low drag. Rice Leaf and Butterfly Wings combine the Shark Skin and Lotus Effects.

  6. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.

  7. Drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Roberta; Mollicone, Jean-Paul; Battista, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated in a turbulent pipe flow. Wetted superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to trap gas bubbles in their asperities. This stops the liquid from coming in direct contact with the wall in that location, allowing the flow to slip over the air bubbles. We consider a well-defined texture with streamwise grooves at the walls in which the gas is expected to be entrapped. This configuration is modeled with alternating no-slip and shear-free boundary conditions at the wall. With respect to the classical turbulent pipe flow, a substantial drag reduction is observed which strongly depends on the grooves' dimension and on the solid fraction, i.e., the ratio between the solid wall surface and the total surface of the pipe's circumference. The drag reduction is due to the mean slip velocity at the wall which increases the flow rate at a fixed pressure drop. The enforced boundary conditions also produce peculiar turbulent structures which on the contrary decrease the flow rate. The two concurrent effects provide an overall flow rate increase as demonstrated by means of the mean axial momentum balance. This equation provides the balance between the mean pressure gradient, the Reynolds stress, the mean flow rate, and the mean slip velocity contributions.

  8. Effective Medium Theory for Drag Reducing Micro-patterned Surfaces in Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiato, I.

    2013-12-01

    Inspired by the lotus effect, many studies in the last decade have focused on micro- and nano-patterned surfaces. They revealed that patterns at the micro-scale combined with high contact angles can significantly reduce skin drag. However, the mechanisms and parameters that control drag reduction, e.g. Reynolds number and pattern geometry, are still unclear. We propose an effective medium representation of the micro-features, that treats the latter as a porous medium, and provides a framework to model flow over patterned surfaces in both Cassie and Wenzel states. Our key result is a closed-form expression for the skin friction coefficient in terms of frictional Reynolds (or Karman) number in turbulent regime, the viscosity ratio between the fluid in and above the features, and their geometrical properties. We apply the proposed model to turbulent flows over superhydrophobic ridged surfaces. The model predictions agree with laboratory experiments for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3000 to 10000.

  9. Measurements of Drag Coefficients and Rotation Rates of Free-Falling Helixes

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Omari, Abdulrhaman A.

    2016-05-01

    The motion of bacteria in the environment is relevant to several fields. At very small scales and with simple helical shapes, we are able to describe experimentally and mathematically the motion of solid spirals falling freely within a liquid pool. Using these shapes we intend to mimic the motion of bacteria called Spirochetes. We seek to experimentally investigate the linear and the rotational motion of such shapes. A better understanding of the dynamics of this process will be practical not only on engineering and physics, but the bioscience and environmental as well. In the following pages, we explore the role of the shape on the motion of passive solid helixes in different liquids. We fabricate three solid helical shapes and drop them under gravity in water, glycerol and a mixture of 30% glycerol in water. That generated rotation due to helical angle in water. However, we observe the rotation disappear in glycerol. The movement of the solid helical shapes is imaged using a high-speed video camera. Then, the images are analyzed using the supplied software and a computer. Using these simultaneous measurements, we examine the terminal velocity of solid helical shapes. Using this information we computed the drag coefficient and the drag force. We obtain the helical angular velocity and the torque applied to the solid. The results of this study will allow us to more accurately predict the motion of solid helical shape. This analysis will also shed light onto biological questions of bacteria movement.

  10. Drag Moderation by the Melting of an Ice Surface in Contact with Water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2015-07-24

    We report measurements of the effects of a melting ice surface on the hydrodynamic drag of ice-shell-metal-core spheres free falling in water at a Reynolds of number Re∼2×104–3×105 and demonstrate that the melting surface induces the early onset of the drag crisis, thus reducing the hydrodynamic drag by more than 50%. Direct visualization of the flow pattern demonstrates the key role of surface melting. Our observations support the hypothesis that the drag reduction is due to the disturbance of the viscous boundary layer by the mass transfer from the melting ice surface.

  11. Impact of the bottom drag coefficient on saltwater intrusion in the extremely shallow estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hanghang; Zhu, Jianrong

    2018-02-01

    The interactions between the extremely shallow, funnel-shaped topography and dynamic processes in the North Branch (NB) of the Changjiang Estuary produce a particular type of saltwater intrusion, saltwater spillover (SSO), from the NB into the South Branch (SB). This dominant type of saltwater intrusion threatens the winter water supplies of reservoirs located in the estuary. Simulated SSO was weaker than actual SSO in previous studies, and this problem has not been solved until now. The improved ECOM-si model with the advection scheme HSIMT-TVD was applied in this study. Logarithmic and Chézy-Manning formulas of the bottom drag coefficient (BDC) were established in the model to investigate the associated effect on saltwater intrusion in the NB. Modeled data and data collected at eight measurement stations located in the NB from February 19 to March 1, 2017, were compared, and three skill assessment indicators, the correlation coefficient (CC), root-mean-square error (RMSE), and skill score (SS), of water velocity and salinity were used to quantitatively validate the model. The results indicated that the water velocities modeled using the Chézy-Manning formula of BDC were slightly more accurate than those based on the logarithmic BDC formula, but the salinities produced by the latter formula were more accurate than those of the former. The results showed that the BDC increases when water depth decreases during ebb tide, and the results based on the Chézy-Manning formula were smaller than those based on the logarithmic formula. Additionally, the landward net water flux in the upper reaches of the NB during spring tide increases based on the Chézy-Manning formula, and saltwater intrusion in the NB was enhanced, especially in the upper reaches of the NB. At a transect in the upper reaches of the NB, the net transect water flux (NTWF) is upstream in spring tide and downstream in neap tide, and the values produced by the Chézy-Manning formula are much larger than

  12. Determination of increased mean drag coefficients for a cylinder vibrating at low values of Keulegan-Carpenter number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Riveros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for the development of a reliable technology for wind turbines in deepwaters.Therefore, offshore wind turbine technology is receiving great amount of attention by the research community. Nevertheless, the dynamic response prediction of the support system for offshore wind turbines is still challenging due to the nonlinear and self-regulated nature of the Vortex Induced Vibration (VIV process. In this paper, the numerical implementation of a computational fluid dynamics-based approach for determination of increased mean drag coefficient is presented. The numerical study is conducted at low values of Keulegan-Carpenter number in order to predict the increment of drag force due to cross-flow motion. The simulation results are then compared with previously developed empirical formulations. Good agreement is observed in these comparisons.

  13. Influence of Surface Roughness on Polymer Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ceccio, Steven L; Dowling, David R; Perlin, Marc; Solomon, Michael

    2007-01-01

    .... The details of that effort can be found in the final technical report for that project. The purpose of the additional investigation was to examine the physics and engineering of friction drag reduction methods for turbulent boundary layers (TBL...

  14. Lubricant-impregnated surfaces for drag reduction in viscous laminar flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Brian; Khalil, Karim; Varanasi, Kripa; MIT Team

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, we explore the potential of lubricant impregnated surfaces (LIS) in reducing drag. LIS, inspired by the surface of the Nepenthes pitcher plant, have been introduced as a novel way of functionalizing a surface. LIS are characterized by extremely low contact angle hysteresis and have been show to effectively repel various liquids including water, oils, ketchup and blood. Motivated by the slippery nature of such surfaces, we explore the potential of LIS to reduce drag in internal flows. We observe a reduction in drag for LIS surfaces in a viscous laminar drag flow and model the impact of relevant system parameters (lubricant viscosity, working fluid viscosity, solid fraction, depth of texture, etc.).

  15. Atomistic study of drag, surface and inertial effects on edge dislocations in face-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitzek, Erik; Gumbsch, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of an accelerating edge dislocation were carried out to study the effects of drag and inertia. Using an embedded atom potential for nickel, the Peierls stress, the effective mass and the drag coefficient of an edge dislocation were determined for different temperatures and stresses in a simple slab geometry. The effect of {1 1 1} surfaces on an intersecting edge dislocation were studied by appropriately cutting the slab. A dislocation intersecting a surface step was used as a model system to demonstrate the importance of inertial effects for dynamically overcoming short range obstacles. Significant effects were found even at room temperature. A simple model based on the dislocation-obstacle interaction energies was used to describe the findings

  16. Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. II. Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Hai

    2003-12-01

    We propose a generalized treatment of the drag force of a spherical particle due to its motion in a laminar fluid media. The theory is equally applicable to analysis of particle diffusion and electric mobility. The focus of the current analysis is on the motion of spherical particles in low-density gases with Knudsen number Kn>1. The treatment is based on the gas-kinetic theory analysis of drag force in the specular and diffuse scattering limits obtained in a preceding paper [Z. Li and H. Wang, Phys. Rev. E., 68, 061206 (2003)]. Our analysis considers the influence of van der Waals interactions on the momentum transfer upon collision of a gas molecule with the particle and expresses this influence in terms of an effective, reduced collision integral. This influence is shown to be significant for nanosized particles. In the present paper, the reduced collision integral values are obtained for specular and diffuse scattering, using a Lennard-Jones-type potential energy function suitable for the interactions of a gas molecule with a particle. An empirical formula for the momentum accommodation function, used to determine the effective, reduced collision integral, is obtained from available experimental data. The resulting treatment is shown to be accurate for interpreting the mobility experiments for particles as small as approximately 1 nm in radius. The treatment is subsequently extended to the entire range of the Knudsen number, following a semiempirical, gas-kinetic theory analysis. We demonstrate that the proposed formula predicts very well Millikan's oil-droplet experiments [R. A. Millikan, Philos. Mag. 34, 1 (1917); Phys. Rev. 22, 1 (1923)]. The rigorous theoretical foundation of the proposed formula in the Kn>1 limit makes the current theory far more general than the semiempirical Stokes-Cunningham formula in terms of the particle size and condition of the fluid and, therefore, more attractive than the Stokes-Cunningham formula.

  17. A new approach for the determination of the drag coefficient from the upper ocean response to a tropical cyclone: A feasibility study

    KAUST Repository

    Zedler, Sarah

    2011-12-30

    We seek to determine if a small number of measurements of upper ocean temperature and currents can be used to make estimates of the drag coefficient that have a smaller range of uncertainty than previously found. We adopt a numerical approach using forward models of the ocean\\'s response to a tropical cyclone, whereby the probability density function of drag coefficient values as a function of wind speed that results from adding realistic levels of noise to the simulated ocean response variables is sought. Allowing the drag coefficient two parameters of freedom, namely the values at 35 and at 45 m/s, we found that the uncertainty in the optimal value is about 20% for levels of instrument noise up to 1 K for a misfit function based on temperature, or 1.0 m/s for a misfit function based on 15 m velocity components. This is within tolerable limits considering the spread of measurement-based drag coefficient estimates. The results are robust for several different instrument arrays; the noise levels do not decrease by much for arrays with more than 40 sensors when the sensor positions are random. Our results suggest that for an ideal case, having a small number of sensors (20-40) in a data assimilation problem would provide sufficient accuracy in the estimated drag coefficient. © 2011 The Oceanographic Society of Japan and Springer.

  18. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xia; Li, Guangji; Huang, Hanlu

    2016-04-15

    Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Pu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface.

  20. Fluid drag reduction and efficient self-cleaning with rice leaf and butterfly wing bioinspired surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregory D.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-08-01

    Researchers are continually inspired by living nature to solve complex challenges. For example, unique surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (anisotropic flow leading to low drag) and lotus leaf (superhydrophobic and self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we present an overview of rice leaf and butterfly wing fluid drag and self-cleaning studies. In addition, we examine two other promising aquatic surfaces in nature known for such properties, including fish scales and shark skin. Morphology, drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of wettability, viscosity, and velocity. Liquid repellent coatings are utilized to recreate or combine various effects. Discussion is provided along with conceptual models describing the role of surface structures related to low drag, self-cleaning, and antifouling properties. Modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag and self-cleaning surfaces for applications in the medical, marine, and industrial fields.

  1. Sustained drag reduction in a turbulent flow using a low-temperature Leidenfrost surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranadhi, Dhananjai; Chen, Dayong; Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-10-01

    Skin friction drag contributes a major portion of the total drag for small and large water vehicles at high Reynolds number ( Re ). One emerging approach to reducing drag is to use superhydrophobic surfaces to promote slip boundary conditions. However, the air layer or "plastron" trapped on submerged superhydrophobic surfaces often diminishes quickly under hydrostatic pressure and/or turbulent pressure fluctuations. We use active heating on a superhydrophobic surface to establish a stable vapor layer or "Leidenfrost" state at a relatively low superheat temperature. The continuous film of water vapor lubricates the interface, and the resulting slip boundary condition leads to skin friction drag reduction on the inner rotor of a custom Taylor-Couette apparatus. We find that skin friction can be reduced by 80 to 90% relative to an unheated superhydrophobic surface for Re in the range 26,100 ≤ Re ≤ 52,000. We derive a boundary layer and slip theory to describe the hydrodynamics in the system and show that the plastron thickness is h = 44 ± 11 μm, in agreement with expectations for a Leidenfrost surface.

  2. Design of a High Viscosity Couette Flow Facility for Patterned Surface Drag Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler; Lang, Amy

    2009-11-01

    Direct drag measurements can be difficult to obtain with low viscosity fluids such as air or water. In this facility, mineral oil is used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of experimental models. A mounted conveyor creates a flow within a plexiglass tank. The experimental model of a flat or patterned surface is suspended above a moving belt. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile is created. PIV measurements are used to determine the exact velocities and the Reynolds numbers for each experiment. The model is suspended by bars that connect to the pillow block housing of each bearing. Drag is measured by a force gauge connected to linear roller bearings that slide along steel rods. The patterned surfaces, initially consisting of 2-D cavities, are embedded in a plexiglass plate so as to keep the total surface area constant for each experiment. First, the drag across a flat plate is measured and compared to theoretical values for laminar Couette flow. The drag for patterned surfaces is then measured and compared to a flat plate.

  3. Drag reduction in reservoir rock surface: Hydrophobic modification by SiO{sub 2} nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yong-Li, E-mail: yylhill@163.com [College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Shiyou University, Xi’an 710065 (China); Cui, Ming-Yue; Jiang, Wei-Dong; He, An-Le; Liang, Chong [Langfang Branch of Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development, Langfang 065007 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The micro-nanoscale hierarchical structures at the sandstone core surface are constructed by adsorption of the modified silica nanoparticles, which leads to the effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate in ultra-low permeability reservoirs. - Highlights: • A micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure is formed at the reservoir rock surface. • An inversion has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic modified by nanofluids. • The effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate is realized. • The mechanism of drag reduction induced from the modified core surface was unclosed. - Abstract: Based on the adsorption behavior of modified silica nanoparticles in the sandstone core surface, the hydrophobic surface was constructed, which consists of micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure. This modified core surface presents a property of drag reduction and meets the challenge of high injection pressure and low injection rate in low or ultra-low permeability reservoir. The modification effects on the surface of silica nanoparticles and reservoir cores, mainly concerning hydrophobicity and fine structure, were determined by measurements of contact angle and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results indicate that after successful modification, the contact angle of silica nanoparticles varies from 19.5° to 141.7°, exhibiting remarkable hydrophobic properties. These modified hydrophobic silica nanoparticles display a good adsorption behavior at the core surface to form micro-nanobinary structure. As for the wettability of these modified core surfaces, a reversal has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic and its contact angle increases from 59.1° to 105.9°. The core displacement experiments show that the relative permeability for water has significantly increased by an average of 40.3% via core surface modification, with the effects of reducing injection pressure and improving injection performance of water

  4. Drag reduction in reservoir rock surface: Hydrophobic modification by SiO2 nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yong-Li; Cui, Ming-Yue; Jiang, Wei-Dong; He, An-Le; Liang, Chong

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The micro-nanoscale hierarchical structures at the sandstone core surface are constructed by adsorption of the modified silica nanoparticles, which leads to the effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate in ultra-low permeability reservoirs. - Highlights: • A micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure is formed at the reservoir rock surface. • An inversion has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic modified by nanofluids. • The effect of drag reduction to improve the low injection rate is realized. • The mechanism of drag reduction induced from the modified core surface was unclosed. - Abstract: Based on the adsorption behavior of modified silica nanoparticles in the sandstone core surface, the hydrophobic surface was constructed, which consists of micro-nanoscale hierarchical structure. This modified core surface presents a property of drag reduction and meets the challenge of high injection pressure and low injection rate in low or ultra-low permeability reservoir. The modification effects on the surface of silica nanoparticles and reservoir cores, mainly concerning hydrophobicity and fine structure, were determined by measurements of contact angle and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental results indicate that after successful modification, the contact angle of silica nanoparticles varies from 19.5° to 141.7°, exhibiting remarkable hydrophobic properties. These modified hydrophobic silica nanoparticles display a good adsorption behavior at the core surface to form micro-nanobinary structure. As for the wettability of these modified core surfaces, a reversal has happened from hydrophilic into hydrophobic and its contact angle increases from 59.1° to 105.9°. The core displacement experiments show that the relative permeability for water has significantly increased by an average of 40.3% via core surface modification, with the effects of reducing injection pressure and improving injection performance of water

  5. Drag resistance measurements for newly applied antifouling coatings and welding seams on ship hull surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xueting; Olsen, S. M.; Andres, E.

    in their newly applied conditions. The effects of water absorption of newly applied antifouling coatings on frictional resistance were measured. A flexible rotor with artificial welding seams on its periphery has been designed and constructed to estimate the influence of welding seams on drag resistance. Both......Drag resistances of newly applied antifouling coatings and welding seams on ship hull surface have been investigated using a pilot-scale rotary setup. Both conventional biocide-based antifouling (AF) coatings and silicone-based fouling release (FR) coatings have been studied and compared...... the density of welding seams (number per 5 m ship side) and the height of welding seams had a significant effect on drag resistance....

  6. Common Envelope Wind Tunnel: Coefficients of Drag and Accretion in a Simplified Context for Studying Flows around Objects Embedded within Stellar Envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Antoni, Andrea; Murguia-Berthier, Ariadna; Macias, Phillip; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    This paper examines the properties of flows around objects embedded within common envelopes in the simplified context of a “wind tunnel.” We establish characteristic relationships between key common envelope flow parameters like the Mach number and density scale height. Our wind tunnel is a three-dimensional, Cartesian geometry hydrodynamic simulation setup that includes the gravity of the primary and secondary stars and allows us to study the coefficients of drag and accretion experienced by the embedded object. Accretion and drag lead to a transformation of an embedded object and its orbit during a common envelope phase. We present two suites of simulations spanning a range of density gradients and Mach numbers—relevant for flow near the limb of a stellar envelope to the deep interior. In one suite, we adopt an ideal gas adiabatic exponent of γ =5/3, in the other, γ =4/3. We find that coefficients of drag rise in flows with steeper density gradients and that coefficients of drag and accretion are consistently higher in the more compressible, γ =4/3 flow. We illustrate the impact of these newly derived coefficients by integrating the inspiral of a secondary object through the envelopes of 3{M}⊙ (γ ≈ 5/3) and 80{M}⊙ (γ ≈ 4/3) giants. In these examples, we find a relatively rapid initial inspiral because, near the stellar limb, dynamical friction drag is generated mainly from dense gas focused from deeper within the primary-star’s envelope. This rapid initial inspiral timescale carries potential implications for the timescale of transients from early common envelope interaction.

  7. Drag reduction using wrinkled surfaces in high Reynolds number laminar boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raayai-Ardakani, Shabnam; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2017-09-01

    Inspired by the design of the ribbed structure of shark skin, passive drag reduction methods using stream-wise riblet surfaces have previously been developed and tested over a wide range of flow conditions. Such textures aligned in the flow direction have been shown to be able to reduce skin friction drag by 4%-8%. Here, we explore the effects of periodic sinusoidal riblet surfaces aligned in the flow direction (also known as a "wrinkled" texture) on the evolution of a laminar boundary layer flow. Using numerical analysis with the open source Computational Fluid Dynamics solver OpenFOAM, boundary layer flow over sinusoidal wrinkled plates with a range of wavelength to plate length ratios ( λ / L ), aspect ratios ( 2 A / λ ), and inlet velocities are examined. It is shown that in the laminar boundary layer regime, the riblets are able to retard the viscous flow inside the grooves creating a cushion of stagnant fluid that the high-speed fluid above can partially slide over, thus reducing the shear stress inside the grooves and the total integrated viscous drag force on the plate. Additionally, we explore how the boundary layer thickness, local average shear stress distribution, and total drag force on the wrinkled plate vary with the aspect ratio of the riblets as well as the length of the plate. We show that riblets with an aspect ratio of close to unity lead to the highest reduction in the total drag, and that because of the interplay between the local stress distribution on the plate and stream-wise evolution of the boundary layer the plate has to exceed a critical length to give a net decrease in the total drag force.

  8. Turbulent friction drag reduction using electroactive polymer and electromagnetically driven surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouder, Kevin; Potter, Mark; Morrison, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports aerodynamic testing of two spanwise-oscillating surfaces fabricated out of electroactive polymers (EAPs) in the dielectric form of actuation, and of an electromagnetic-driven linear motor. Hot-wire and PIV measurements of velocity and direct measurement of friction drag using a drag balance are presented. A maximum of 16 % surface friction reduction, as calculated by the diminution of the wall-normal streamwise velocity gradient, was obtained. Among other quantities, the spatial dependence of the drag reduction was investigated. When this spatial transient and portions which are static are accounted for, the direct drag measurements complement the hot-wire data. PIV measurements, where the laser beam was parallel to the oscillating surface at y + ≈ 15, support the hot-wire data. The two actuators are original in design, and significant contributions have been made to the development of EAPs. This experiment is the first to aerodynamically test EAP actuators at such a large scale and at a relatively moderate Re.

  9. Near-Zero-Drag Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Vakarelski, I. U.; Klaseboer, E.; Jetly, A.; Mansoor, M. M.; Aguirre-Pablo, A. A.; Chan, D. Y. C.

    2017-11-01

    The quest to reduce aerodynamic drag on blunt objects is driven by the need to reduce propulsive energy. Solid objects moving in an ideal fluid experience no drag. This prediction, known as the D'Alembert's paradox, is resolved by the no-slip boundary condition on the solid surface, which promotes boundary-layer separation and form drag. Here we report objects which minimizes both the form and viscous drag within a liquid, by encasing a free-falling solid sphere inside a streamlined gas cavity. The cavity-shape self-adjusts to the streamlined potential-flow solution satisfying the Bernoulli equation on the free surface, when taking into account the hydrostatic pressure gradient. The tear-drop-shaped gas cavity is originally formed around the sphere as it impacts a pool surface in a deep tank, providing that the sphere is heated above the Leidenfrost temperature. By assuming zero form-drag we can predict the separation point of the free surface from the solid. This sphere-in-cavity structure typically has a drag coefficient less than 10% that of a solid object with the same shape. This should represent the smallest possible drag. The fall velocity is uniquely predicted by sphere density and cavity volume, with larger cavities fall faster.

  10. Modeling drag reduction and meniscus stability of superhydrophobic surfaces comprised of random roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaha, Mohamed A.; Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies dedicated to modeling drag reduction and stability of the air-water interface on superhydrophobic surfaces were conducted for microfabricated coatings produced by placing hydrophobic microposts/microridges arranged on a flat surface in aligned or staggered configurations. In this paper, we model the performance of superhydrophobic surfaces comprised of randomly distributed roughness (e.g., particles or microposts) that resembles natural superhydrophobic surfaces, or those produced via random deposition of hydrophobic particles. Such fabrication method is far less expensive than microfabrication, making the technology more practical for large submerged bodies such as submarines and ships. The present numerical simulations are aimed at improving our understanding of the drag reduction effect and the stability of the air-water interface in terms of the microstructure parameters. For comparison and validation, we have also simulated the flow over superhydrophobic surfaces made up of aligned or staggered microposts for channel flows as well as streamwise or spanwise ridges configurations for pipe flows. The present results are compared with theoretical and experimental studies reported in the literature. In particular, our simulation results are compared with work of Sbragaglia and Prosperetti, and good agreement has been observed for gas fractions up to about 0.9. The numerical simulations indicate that the random distribution of surface roughness has a favorable effect on drag reduction, as long as the gas fraction is kept the same. This effect peaks at about 30% as the gas fraction increases to 0.98. The stability of the meniscus, however, is strongly influenced by the average spacing between the roughness peaks, which needs to be carefully examined before a surface can be recommended for fabrication. It was found that at a given maximum allowable pressure, surfaces with random post distribution produce less drag reduction than those made up of

  11. Measurement of Dynamic Friction Coefficient on the Irregular Free Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, S. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. H.

    2007-01-01

    A spent fuel storage cask must be estimated for a structural integrity when an earthquake occurs because it freely stands on ground surface without a restriction condition. Usually the integrity estimation for a seismic load is performed by a FEM analysis, the friction coefficient for a standing surface is an important parameter in seismic analysis when a sliding happens. When a storage cask is placed on an irregular ground surface, measuring a friction coefficient of an irregular surface is very difficult because the friction coefficient is affected by the surface condition. In this research, dynamic friction coefficients on the irregular surfaces between a concrete cylinder block and a flat concrete slab are measured with two methods by one direction actuator

  12. Toward understanding whether superhydrophobic surfaces can really decrease fluidic friction drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin; Li, Mei; Lu, Qinghua

    2010-04-20

    Superhydrophobic surfaces in nature such as legs of water striders can get an extra supporting force from the deformed water surface they contact, leading to an anticipation of using water-repellent surfaces on ship and even submarine hulls to reduce friction drag. Here, we first fabricate superhydrophobic coatings with microstructures on glass balls by introducing hydrophobic silica nanoparticles into a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Then, the movement of a superhydrophobic ball on and below water surface is investigated and compared with that of a highly hydrophilic normal glass ball. The results reveal that a superhydrophobic ball can fall more slowly under water compared with a normal glass ball, because the dense microbubbles trapped at the solid/water interface around the superhydrophobic ball act not as a reducer, but as an enhancer for the friction drag. In contrast, the faster movement of a superhydrophobic ball on the water surface can be mainly attributed to the great reduction of skin friction owing to the increased area of the solid/atmosphere interface.

  13. Retrieving complex surface impedances from statistical absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondet, Boris Jean-Francois; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    coefficients, prior information about the absorber of interest can be used as constraints, which is shown to help determine the correct impedance from absorption coefficient. Further stability and sensitivity investigations indicate that the method presented constitutes an efficient solution to convert sound......In room acoustic simulations the surface materials are commonly represented with energy parameters, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which do not carry phase information. This paper presents a method to transform statistical absorption coefficients into complex surface impedances...... that the impedance found has a physical meaning and respects causality in the time domain. Known material models, such as Miki’s and Maa’s models, are taken as references to assess the validity of the suggested model. Due to the non-uniqueness of retrieving complex-valued impedances from real-valued absorption...

  14. Effect of wearing a swimsuit on hydrodynamic drag of swimmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Almeida Marinho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of wearing a swimsuit on swimmer's passive drag. A computational fluid dynamics analysis was carried out to determine the hydrodynamic drag of a female swimmer's model (i wearing a standard swimsuit; (ii wearing a last generation swimsuit and; (iii with no swimsuit, wearing light underwear. The three-dimensional surface geometry of a female swimmer's model with different swimsuit/underwear was acquired through standard commercial laser scanner. Passive drag force and drag coefficient were computed with the swimmer in a prone position. Higher hydrodynamic drag values were determined when the swimmer was with no swimsuit in comparison with the situation when the swimmer was wearing a swimsuit. The last generation swimsuit presented lower hydrodynamic drag values, although very similar to standard swimsuit. In conclusion, wearing a swimsuit could positively influence the swimmer's hydrodynamics, especially reducing the pressure drag component.

  15. Bioinspired Surface for Low Drag, Self-Cleaning, and Antifouling: Shark Skin, Butterfly and Rice Leaf Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregroy D.

    In this thesis, first presented is an overview of inorganic-fouling and biofouling which is generally undesirable for many medical, marine, and industrial applications. A survey of nature's flora and fauna are studied in order to discover new antifouling methods that could be mimicked for engineering applications. New antifouling methods will presumably incorporate a combination of physical and chemical controls. Presented are mechanisms and experimental results focusing on laminar and turbulent drag reducing shark skin inspired riblet surfaces. This includes new laser etched and riblet film samples for closed channel drag using water, oil, and air as well as in wind tunnel. Also presented are mechanisms and experimental results focusing on the newly discovered rice and butterfly wing effect surfaces. Morphology, drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of sample geometrical dimensions, wettability, viscosity, and velocity. Hierarchical liquid repellent coatings combining nano- and micro-sized features and particles are utilized to recreate or combine various effects. Such surfaces have been fabricated with photolithography, soft lithography, hot embossing, and coating techniques. Discussion is provided along with new conceptual models describing the role of surface structures related to low drag, self-cleaning, and antifouling properties. Modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag and self-cleaning surfaces for medical, marine, and industrial applications.

  16. Traces of surfactants can severely limit the drag reduction of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaudecerf, François J; Landel, Julien R; Goldstein, Raymond E; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2017-07-11

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) have the potential to achieve large drag reduction for internal and external flow applications. However, experiments have shown inconsistent results, with many studies reporting significantly reduced performance. Recently, it has been proposed that surfactants, ubiquitous in flow applications, could be responsible by creating adverse Marangoni stresses. However, testing this hypothesis is challenging. Careful experiments with purified water already show large interfacial stresses and, paradoxically, adding surfactants yields barely measurable drag increases. To test the surfactant hypothesis while controlling surfactant concentrations with precision higher than can be achieved experimentally, we perform simulations inclusive of surfactant kinetics. These reveal that surfactant-induced stresses are significant at extremely low concentrations, potentially yielding a no-slip boundary condition on the air-water interface (the "plastron") for surfactant concentrations below typical environmental values. These stresses decrease as the stream-wise distance between plastron stagnation points increases. We perform microchannel experiments with SHSs consisting of stream-wise parallel gratings, which confirm this numerical prediction, while showing near-plastron velocities significantly slower than standard surfactant-free predictions. In addition, we introduce an unsteady test of surfactant effects. When we rapidly remove the driving pressure following a loading phase, a backflow develops at the plastron, which can only be explained by surfactant gradients formed in the loading phase. This demonstrates the significance of surfactants in deteriorating drag reduction and thus the importance of including surfactant stresses in SHS models. Our time-dependent protocol can assess the impact of surfactants in SHS testing and guide future mitigating designs.

  17. Improvement of water-repellent and hydrodynamic drag reduction properties on bio-inspired surface and exploring sharkskin effect mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuehao; Liu, Yufei; Anderson, James; Li, Xiang; Li, Yuanyue

    2015-07-01

    Bio-inspired/biomimetic surface technologies focusing on sharkskin, lotus leaf, gecko feet, and others have attracted so lots of attentions from all over the world; meanwhile, they have also brought great advantages and profits for mankind. Sharkskin drag-reducing/low-resistance surface is the imperative consequence of nature selection and self-evolution in the long history, which can enable itself accommodate the living environments perfectly. Generally speaking, sharkskin effect can become transparent only in some certain velocity scope. How to expand its application range and enhance the drag reduction function further has developed into the urgent issue. In this article, the water-repellent and hydrodynamic drag-reducing effects are improved by adjusting sharkskin texture. The experimental results show that contact angle of more than 150° is achieved, and drag-reducing property is improved to some extent. In addition, the drag-reducing mechanism is explored and generalized from different aspects adopting the numerical simulation, which has important significance to comprehend sharkskin effect.

  18. New strategies for optimization of compliant tensegrity surfaces for drag reduction in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H.; Bewley, T. R.

    2002-11-01

    The present project is inspired by two observations from nature: 1) the incredible strength of spider fibers (derived essentially from a tensegrity-based configuration of proteins), and 2) the efficient swimming motion of dolphins (perhaps derived in part from the compliant nature of their skin). Motivated by such observations, we are exploring a new design for a tensegrity-based ``fabric'' consisting of a weave of both members in tension and members designed to support compressive loads. In particular, we are attempting to optimize the surface compliance of such a fabric, that is, the response of the surface of the fabric to externally-applied friction and pressure forces, in order to reduce the drag induced by an overlying turbulent flow at the flow/structure interface. As the first stage of the research, we developed the software simulating the interaction of the two-part system. Direct numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of the flow part. To account for the moving walls, we use an immersed-boundary technique which simulates the presence of a moving boundary. In collaboration with another research group, we developed object-oriented software for computation of the dynamics of the tensegrity fabric part. The two codes written in two different languages run in parallel and communicate data at each time step. In this presentation, we will outline the numerical method used, present recent simulation results demonstrating the flow/surface interaction, and outline our ongoing efforts to optimize the compliance properties of the tensegrity fabric.

  19. Lift and Drag Measurements of Superhydrophobic Hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Samrat; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    For several years, superhydrophobic surfaces which are chemically hydrophobic with micron or nanometer scale surface features have been considered for their ability to reduce drag and produce slip in microfluidic devices. More recently it has been demonstrated that superhydrophobic surfaces reduce friction coefficient in turbulent flows as well. In this talk, we will consider that modifying a hydrofoil's surface to make it superhydrophobic has on the resulting lift and drag measurements over a wide range of angles of attack. Experiments are conducted over the range of Reynolds numbers between 10,000hydrofoil is made superhydrophobic. The hydrofoils are coated Teflon that has been hot embossed with a 325grit stainless steel woven mesh to produce a regular pattern of microposts. In addition to fully superhydrophobic hydrofoils, selectively coated symmetrical hydrofoils will also be examined to study the effect that asymmetries in the surface properties can have on lift and drag. Partially funded by NSF CBET-1334962.

  20. Surface drag effects on simulated wind fields in high-resolution atmospheric forecast model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyo Sun; Lim, Jong Myoung; Ji, Young Yong [Environmental Radioactivity Assessment Team,Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hye Yum [NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Hong, Jin Kyu [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    It has been reported that the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model generally shows a substantial over prediction bias at low to moderate wind speeds and winds are too geostrophic (Cheng and Steenburgh 2005), which limits the application of WRF model in the area that requires the accurate surface wind estimation such as wind-energy application, air-quality studies, and radioactive-pollutants dispersion studies. The surface drag generated by the subgrid-scale orography is represented by introducing a sink term in the momentum equation in their studies. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the simulated meteorological fields in the high-resolution WRF framework, that includes the parameterization of subgrid-scale orography developed by Mass and Ovens (2010), and enhance the forecast skill of low-level wind fields, which plays an important role in transport and dispersion of air pollutants including radioactive pollutants. The positive bias in 10-m wind speed is significantly alleviated by implementing the subgrid-scale orography parameterization, while other meteorological fields including 10-m wind direction are not changed. Increased variance of subgrid- scale orography enhances the sink of momentum and further reduces the bias in 10-m wind speed.

  1. The impact of variable building height on drag, flow and turbulence over a realistic suburban surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giometto, M. G.; Christen, A.; Calaf, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    In urban environments, where buildings have variable configurations and heights, the tallest structures have a disproportional impact on drag, mean flow and turbulence. Although wind-engineering studies document well the effects of individual high-rise buildings on the immediate surrounding, the impact of varying building heights on the larger horizontally averaged flow has not been quantified systematically for realistic urban configurations. We use Large Eddy Simulation (LES) as a means to study the fully developed turbulent flow over and within a 512 x 512 m2 subset of the true urban geometry in the city of Basel, Switzerland. A periodic LES domain is centered on the location of a tower, where measurements of turbulence were performed in 2001/02, which allows a direct validation of the LES at a specific location in the domain. The Lagrangian scale-dependent LES model is adopted to parametrize the subgrid stresses in the bulk of the flow and buildings are taken into account adopting a discrete-forcing-approach immersed boundary method (IBM), with the geometry taken from a highly accurate digital building model. A series of high-resolution LES runs are performed for various directions of the approaching flow, and with all buildings included and then buildings above a certain height threshold progressively removed, to isolate the impact of tall structures. Results show how the presence of isolated tall buildings strongly modifies the roughness properties of the entire urban roughness sublayer, causing an increase in resolved pressure forces, which contributes to the overall surface induced drag. In the presence of tall buildings the local structure of the roughness sublayer is partitioned into two regimes: fine scale wake turbulence and elongated, high speed streak-like motions, locked between the position of isolated structures, with their axis aligned in the stream wise direction. For arrays with differing building heights statistics significantly differ from

  2. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Berry, Joseph D.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-09-01

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re ˜3 ×1 05 . A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ˜600 to 1 05. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  3. Evaluation of Skin Friction Drag for Liner Applications in Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Brown, Martha C.; Jasinski, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    A parameter that is gaining significance in the evaluation of acoustic liner performance is the skin friction drag induced by air flow over the liner surface. Estimates vary widely regarding the amount of drag the liner induces relative to a smooth wall, from less than a 20% increase to nearly 100%, and parameters such as face sheet perforate hole diameter, percent open area, and sheet thickness are expected to figure prominently in the skin friction drag. Even a small increase in liner drag can impose an economic penalty, and current research is focused on developing 'low drag' liner concepts, with the goal being to approach the skin friction drag of a smooth wall. The issue of skin friction drag takes on greater significance as airframe designers investigate the feasibility of putting sound absorbing liners on the non-lifting surfaces of the wings and fuselage, for the purpose of reducing engine noise reflected and scattered toward observers on the ground. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have embarked on investigations of liner skin friction drag with the aims of: developing a systematic drag measurement capability, establishing the drag of current liners, and developing liners that produce reduced drag without compromising acoustic performance. This paper discusses the experimental procedures that have been developed to calculate the drag coefficient based on the change in momentum thickness and the companion research program being carried out to measure the drag directly using a force balance. Liner samples that are evaluated include a solid wall with known roughness and conventional liners with perforated facesheets of varying hole diameter and percent open area.

  4. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D scanner as an alternative to current methods. For this study, the surfaces of ten samples oftuff were digitized by means of a 3D scanner, and the results were compared with the corresponding Rock JointCoefficient (JRC values. Up until now such 3D scanner have been mostly used in the automotive industry, whereastheir use for comparison with obtained JRC coefficient values in rock mechanics is presented here for the first time.The proposed new method is a faster, more precise and more accurate than other existing test methods, and is apromising technique for use in this area of study in the future.

  5. Drag penalty due to the asperities in the substrate of super-hydrophobic and liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo J.; Arenas, Isnardo; Leonardi, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of two superposed fluids in a turbulent channel with a textured surface made of pinnacles of random height have been performed. The viscosity ratio between the two fluids are N =μo /μi = 50 (μo and μi are the viscosities of outer and inner fluid respectively) mimicking a super-hydrophobic surface (water over air) and N=2.5 (water over heptane) resembling a liquid infused surface. Two set of simulations have been performed varying the Reynolds number, Reτ = 180 and Reτ = 390 . The interface between the two fluids is flat simulating infinite surface tension. The position of the interface between the two fluids has been varied in the vertical direction from the base of the substrate (what would be a rough wall) to the highest point of the roughness. Drag reduction is very sensitive to the position of the interface between the two fluids. Asperities above the interface induce a large form drag and diminish considerably the drag reduction. When the mean height of the surface measured from the interface in the outer fluid is greater than one wall unit, k+ > 1 , the drag increases with respect to a smooth wall. Present results provide a guideline to the accuracy required in manufacturing super-hydrophobic and liquid infused surfaces. This work was supported under ONR MURI Grants N00014-12-0875 and N00014-12- 1-0962, Program Manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim. Numerical simulations were performed on the Texas Advanced Computer Center.

  6. Positioning and tail rotor of a small horizontal axis wind turbine of due to the influence of drag coefficient and lift affecting vane cola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinnas Wong, E. Y.; Jauregui Rigo, S.; Betancourt Mena, J.

    2009-01-01

    In the present investigation was carried out an assessment on the state of technology on guidance systems and tail protection when used in small horizontal axis wind turbines, work was improved methodological approach for the development of guidance systems queue by time of these machines, to incorporate the use of coefficients of lift and drag behavior varies according to the aspect ratio, using the principles of continuum mechanics and CFD methods. Two versions are analyzed , original and updated, the wind turbine CEET-01, on which the author would have been granted a Certificate of Patent of Invention and one of Industrial Model, the updated version was derived from the procedure proposed by the author, this presents a holder for the longest vane and a larger area in the vane. In addition to analyzing the amount and cost of power generated and the capacity factor at three locations in the province of Villa Clara it was concluded that the updated variant of the turbine CEET-01 is superior to the original

  7. Shark-skin surfaces for fluid-drag reduction in turbulent flow: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-10-28

    The skin of fast-swimming sharks exhibits riblet structures aligned in the direction of flow that are known to reduce skin friction drag in the turbulent-flow regime. Structures have been fabricated for study and application that replicate and improve upon the natural shape of the shark-skin riblets, providing a maximum drag reduction of nearly 10 per cent. Mechanisms of fluid drag in turbulent flow and riblet-drag reduction theories from experiment and simulation are discussed. A review of riblet-performance studies is given, and optimal riblet geometries are defined. A survey of studies experimenting with riblet-topped shark-scale replicas is also given. A method for selecting optimal riblet dimensions based on fluid-flow characteristics is detailed, and current manufacturing techniques are outlined. Due to the presence of small amounts of mucus on the skin of a shark, it is expected that the localized application of hydrophobic materials will alter the flow field around the riblets in some way beneficial to the goals of increased drag reduction.

  8. Drag reduction by the introduction of shear-free surfaces in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a novel technique for drag reduction in turbulent flows is presented. The technique involves the modification of the large scales of turbulent flows and is a passive approach. The lateral transport of momentum, which is a dominant mechanism in turbulence, is attenuated by the introduction of moving shearfree ...

  9. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  10. Turbulent drag reduction by nonplanar surfaces - A survey on the research at TU/DLR Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.; Bartenwerfer, M.; Hoppe, G.

    The use of riblets for drag reduction is examined theoretically. For various riblet shapes, the anisotropic properties of the viscous flow over the riblets are determined. The results obtained can be used for riblet optimization and as input data for computer simulations of the complete turbulent flow field. Attention is also given to other concepts, such as hypothetical mechanisms derived from observations of the shark skin. The experimental facilities that would be required to test these new concepts are discussed.

  11. Temperature coefficient for modeling denitrification in surface water sediments using the mass transfer coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.W. Appelboom; G.M. Chescheir; F. Birgand; R.W. Skaggs; J.W. Gilliam; D. Amatya

    2010-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers. Modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks requires quantifying the denitrification within the sediments in canals and streams. In a previous study, several of the authors developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment denitrification....

  12. Temperature Coefficient for Modeling Denitrification in Surface Water Sediments Using the Mass Transfer Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. W. Appelboom; G. M. Chescheir; R. W. Skaggs; J. W. Gilliam; Devendra M. Amatya

    2006-01-01

    Watershed modeling has become an important tool for researchers with the high costs of water quality monitoring. When modeling nitrate transport within drainage networks, denitrification within the sediments needs to be accounted for. Birgand et. al. developed an equation using a term called a mass transfer coefficient to mathematically describe sediment...

  13. Rice- and butterfly-wing effect inspired self-cleaning and low drag micro/nanopatterned surfaces in water, oil, and air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregory D.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-12-01

    In search of new solutions to complex challenges, researchers are turning to living nature for inspiration. For example, special surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (anisotropic flow leading to low drag) and lotus leaf (superhydrophobic and self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we study four microstructured surfaces inspired by rice leaves and fabricated with photolithography techniques. We also present a method of creating such surfaces using a hot embossing procedure for scaled-up manufacturing. Fluid drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of sample geometrical dimensions. Conceptual modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag, self-cleaning, and potentially antifouling surfaces for medical, marine, and industrial applications.

  14. Turbine Blade Surface Roughness Effects on Shear Drag and Heat Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drab, Jess

    2001-01-01

    ... which affect an engine's efficiency and the blade's lifes an. For erosion/deposits, friction coefficients up to 250 times higher and convective heat transfer coefficients of up to 150 times higher were found when to compared to a flat plate baseline...

  15. Numerical Study of Natural Supercavitation Influenced by Rheological Properties of Turbulent Drag-Reducing Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Xing Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural supercavitations in water and turbulent drag-reducing solution were numerically simulated using unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS scheme with mixture-multiphase model. The Cross viscosity equation was adopted to represent the fluid property of aqueous solution of drag-reducing additives. The characteristics of natural supercavity configuration and overall resistance of the navigating body were presented, respectively. The numerical simulation results indicated that, at the same cavitation number, the length and diameter of supercavity in drag-reducing solution are larger than those in water, and the drag coefficient of navigating body in solution is smaller than that in water; the surface tension plays an important role in incepting and maintaining the cavity. Turbulent drag-reducing additives have the potential in enhancement of supercavitation, drag reduction, and decrease of turbulent vortex structures. Numerical simulation results are consistent with the available experimental data.

  16. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid’s different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin. The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid’s mantle cavity.

  17. Ultra fast laser machined hydrophobic stainless ateel surface for drag reduction in laminar flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagdheesh, R.; Pathiraj, B.; Martin, A.G.; Del Cerro, D.A.; Lammertink, R.G.H.; Lohse, D.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Römer, G.R.B.E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their potential in microfluidics, lab on chip devices and as functional surfaces for the automotive and aerospace industry. The combination of a dual scale roughness with an inherent low-surface-energy coating material is the pre-requisite

  18. Ultra fast laser machined hydrophobic stainless steel surface for drag reduction in laminar flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radhakrishnan, J.; Pathiraj, B.; Gomez Marin, Alvaro; Arnaldo del Cerro, D.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Lohse, Detlef; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina

    2010-01-01

    Hydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their potential in microfluidics, lab on chip devices and as functional surfaces for the automotive and aerospace industry. The combination of a dual scale roughness with an inherent low-surface-energy coating material is the pre-requisite

  19. Tire-to-Surface Friction-Coefficient Measurements with a C-123B Airplane on Various Runway Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Richard H.; Kolnick, Joseph J.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain information on the tire-to-surface friction coefficients available in aircraft braking during the landing run. The tests were made with a C-123B airplane on both wet and dry concrete and bituminous pavements and on snow-covered and ice surfaces at speeds from 12 to 115 knots. Measurements were made of the maximum (incipient skidding) friction coefficient, the full-skidding (locked wheel) friction coefficient, and the wheel slip ratio during braking.

  20. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    OpenAIRE

    Pu, Xia; Li, Guangji; Huang, Hanlu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark s...

  1. Gastronomiske drags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    (1990, 1993). Disse tekster og to andre tv-programmer, The Naked Chef (1999-2001) og Nigella Bites (1999-2001) vil blive brugt til at understrege og diskutere det ambivalente i sådanne gastronomiske drag-performances. De udfordringer af kønskonventioner i madprogrammer, som artiklen præsenterer...

  2. Friction Drag Reduction Using Superhydrophobic Surface in High Reynolds Number Turbulent Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-25

    at Princeton using the water channel. SLIPS-coated bodies (prepared according to the instructions provided by Aizenberg) were tested...ASME), 2016 (Smits). 3. Technology Transfer A Switchable Liquid Repellent and Active Fog Harvesting Surface (2016). US Patent Pending

  3. Thermospheric density and satellite drag modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Piyush Mukesh

    The United States depends heavily on its space infrastructure for a vast number of commercial and military applications. Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Threat Assessment require maintaining accurate knowledge of the orbits of resident space objects (RSOs) and the associated uncertainties. Atmospheric drag is the largest source of uncertainty for low-perigee RSOs. The uncertainty stems from inaccurate modeling of neutral atmospheric mass density and inaccurate modeling of the interaction between the atmosphere and the RSO. In order to reduce the uncertainty in drag modeling, both atmospheric density and drag coefficient (CD) models need to be improved. Early atmospheric density models were developed from orbital drag data or observations of a few early compact satellites. To simplify calculations, densities derived from orbit data used a fixed CD value of 2.2 measured in a laboratory using clean surfaces. Measurements from pressure gauges obtained in the early 1990s have confirmed the adsorption of atomic oxygen on satellite surfaces. The varying levels of adsorbed oxygen along with the constantly changing atmospheric conditions cause large variations in CD with altitude and along the orbit of the satellite. Therefore, the use of a fixed CD in early development has resulted in large biases in atmospheric density models. A technique for generating corrections to empirical density models using precision orbit ephemerides (POE) as measurements in an optimal orbit determination process was recently developed. The process generates simultaneous corrections to the atmospheric density and ballistic coefficient (BC) by modeling the corrections as statistical exponentially decaying Gauss-Markov processes. The technique has been successfully implemented in generating density corrections using the CHAMP and GRACE satellites. This work examines the effectiveness, specifically the transfer of density models errors into BC estimates, of the technique using the CHAMP and

  4. Simulation of Effective Slip and Drag in Pressure-Driven Flow on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanding Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow on superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated using finite element modeling (FEM. Surfaces with different textures like grooves, square pillars, and cylinders immersed in liquid forming Cassie state were modeled. Nonslip boundary condition was assumed at solid-liquid interface while slip boundary condition was supposed at gas-liquid interface. It was found that the flow rate can be affected by the shape of the texture, the fraction of the gas-liquid area, the height of the channel, and the driving pressure gradient. By extracting the effective boundary slip from the flow rate based on a model, it was found that the shape of the textures and the fraction of the gas-liquid area affect the effective slip significantly while the height of the channel and the driving pressure gradient have no obvious effect on effective slip.

  5. Leidenfrost Vapor Layers Reduce Drag without the Crisis in High Viscosity Liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2016-09-08

    The drag coefficient CD of a solid smooth sphere moving in a fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re∼3×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at a lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as ∼600 to 105. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length can fit the observed drag reduction and wake shape. © 2016 American Physical Society.

  6. Aerodynamic drag of a staggered flat-oval finning tube banks at the small reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Максим Михайлович Вознюк

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations of aerodynamic drag of staggered bundles of flat-oval tubes with incomplete transversal fins in the range of Reynolds numbers 600 <  < 20000 are performed. New calculation correlations for determining of drag coefficients for 1<3000 are suggested, the impact of basic geometric and regime parameters on aerodynamic drag of bundles are determined. The received calculation depending is possible to use in developing of heat transfer surfaces for “dry” cooling towers and air cooling apparatus and economizers

  7. Drag on a slip spherical particle moving in a couple stress fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Ashmawy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The creeping motion of a rigid slip sphere in an unbounded couple stress fluid is investigated. The linear slip boundary condition and the vanishing couple stress condition are applied on the surface of the sphere. A simple formula for the drag force acting on a slip sphere translating in an unbounded couple stress fluid is obtained. Special cases of the deduced drag formula are concluded and compared with analogous results in the literature. The normalized drag force experienced by the fluid on the slip sphere is represented graphically and the effects of slip parameter and viscosity coefficients are discussed.

  8. The heat transfer coefficients of the heating surface of 300 MWe CFB boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haibo; Zhang, Man; Lu, Qinggang; Sun, Yunkai

    2012-08-01

    A study of the heat transfer about the heating surface of three commercial 300 MWe CFB boilers was conducted in this work. The heat transfer coefficients of the platen heating surface, the external heat exchanger (EHE) and cyclone separator were calculated according to the relative operation data at different boiler loads. Moreover, the heat transfer coefficient of the waterwall was calculated by heat balance of the hot circuit of the CFB boiler. With the boiler capacity increasing, the heat transfer coefficients of these heating surface increases, and the heat transfer coefficient of the water wall is higher than that of the platen heating surface. The heat transfer coefficient of the EHE is the highest in high boiler load, the heat transfer coefficient of the cyclone separator is the lowest. Because the fired coal is different from the design coal in No.1 boiler, the ash content of the fired coal is much lower than that of the design coal. The heat transfer coefficients which calculated with the operation data are lower than the previous design value and that is the reason why the bed temperature is rather high during the boiler operation in No.1 boiler.

  9. Sensitivity of Tropical-Cyclone Models to the Surface Drag Coefficient in Different Boundary-Layer Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    primarily latent heat) must feed back to affect the spatial distribution of diabatic heating and the aggregate effects of buoyancy associated with...as a result, the maximum tangential wind speed occurs within, but near the top of, the boundary layer. The diabatic heating rate associated with deep...this equation is primarily the radial gradient of diabatic heating. However, there is an additional forcing at the lower boundary (i.e. the top of the

  10. Experimental Study on the Tensile Strength and Linear Expansion Coefficient of Air Tunnel Terrazzo Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boping Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, studies on the surface tension of air tunnel terrazzo under wind load and how regularly it is affected by temperature are relatively less, and the measured results of the thermal expansion coefficient of terrazzo have not yet been given. In this paper, based on the top terrazzo surface structure of the inner wall of the wind tunnel, the tensile performance tests of terrazzo surface layer are conducted, while the thermal expansion coefficient of the six terrazzo test blocks were tested. The tests and analysis show that the construction of terrazzo surface, based on the proposed construction process, can effectively guarantee the reliable cement performance for the binding layer between mortar and concrete base layer, terrazzo surface layer and the cement mortar layer. And the thermal expansion coefficient of terrazzo can be valued at 1.06e-5/ºC.

  11. On the variability of sea drag in finite water depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, A.; Loffredo, L.; Le Roy, P.; LefèVre, J.-M.; Babanin, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    The coupling between the atmospheric boundary layer and the ocean surface in large-scale models is usually parameterized in terms of the sea drag coefficient, which is routinely estimated as a function of mean wind speed. The scatter of data around such parametric dependencies, however, is very significant and imposes a serious limitation on the forecasts and predictions that make use of sea surface drag parameterizations. The analysis of an atmospheric and wave data set collected in finite water depth at the Lake George measurement site (Australia) suggests that this variability relates to a number of parameters at the air-sea interface other than wind speed alone. In particular, results indicate that the sea drag depends on water depth and wave steepness, which make the wave profile more vertically asymmetric, and the concentration of water vapor in the air, which modifies air density and friction velocity. These dependencies are used to derive parametric functions based on the combined contribution of wind, waves and relative humidity. A standard statistical analysis confirms a substantial improvement in the prediction of the drag coefficient and sea surface roughness when additional parameters are taken into account.

  12. Extracting surface diffusion coefficients from batch adsorption measurement data: application of the classic Langmuir kinetics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Khim Hoong

    2017-11-09

    Surface diffusion coefficients may be estimated by fitting solutions of a diffusion model to batch kinetic data. For non-linear systems, a numerical solution of the diffusion model's governing equations is generally required. We report here the application of the classic Langmuir kinetics model to extract surface diffusion coefficients from batch kinetic data. The use of the Langmuir kinetics model in lieu of the conventional surface diffusion model allows derivation of an analytical expression. The parameter estimation procedure requires determining the Langmuir rate coefficient from which the pertinent surface diffusion coefficient is calculated. Surface diffusion coefficients within the 10 -9 to 10 -6  cm 2 /s range obtained by fitting the Langmuir kinetics model to experimental kinetic data taken from the literature are found to be consistent with the corresponding values obtained from the traditional surface diffusion model. The virtue of this simplified parameter estimation method is that it reduces the computational complexity as the analytical expression involves only an algebraic equation in closed form which is easily evaluated by spreadsheet computation.

  13. Gastronomiske drags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    TV-cooking shows can be considered as a social space in which the codes for “doing food” and “doing gender” in the post-traditional culture are being negotiated. In this article, I will explore a case in which the “gendering” of food culture is challenged, namely the show Two Fat Ladies with Jenn......TV-cooking shows can be considered as a social space in which the codes for “doing food” and “doing gender” in the post-traditional culture are being negotiated. In this article, I will explore a case in which the “gendering” of food culture is challenged, namely the show Two Fat Ladies...... with Jennifer Parson and Clarissa Dickson Wright (1996-1999). I will argue that the two self-declared fat women can be read as “gastronomic drags” by their transgression of a “recognizable” feminine way of “doing food”. The article is theoretically informed by the reflections on drag as subversive practice...... in Søndergaard (1994, 1996) and Butler (1990, 1993). These texts and two TV-shows, The Naked Chef (1999-2001) and Nigella Bites (1999-2001), are used to underline and discuss the ambivalence of such gastronomic drag performances. The challenges of gender conventions presented in the article are all in danger...

  14. Tuning apparent friction coefficient by controlled patterning bulk metallic glasses surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Xu, Erjiang; Liu, Ze; Wang, Xinyun; Liu, Lin

    2016-12-01

    Micro-honeycomb structures with various pitches between adjacent cells were hot-embossed on Zr35Ti30Cu8.25Be26.75 bulk metallic glass surface. The effect of pitch geometry on the frictional behavior of metallic glass surface was systematically investigated. The results revealed that all textured metallic glass surfaces show a reduction in friction coefficient compared to smooth surface. More intriguingly, the friction coefficient first decreased and then increased gradually with increasing pitches. Such unique behavior can be understood fundamentally from the perspective of competing effects between contact area and local stress level with increasing pitches. This finding not only enhance the in-depth understanding of the mechanism of the significant role of surface topography on the frictional behavior of metallic glass surface, but also opens a new route towards other functional applications for bulk metallic glasses.

  15. Experimental heat transfer coefficients between a surface and fixed and fluidized beds with PCM

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo-Barrientos, María Asunción; Sobrino, Celia; Almendros-Ibáñez, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study to determine the capacity of a phase change material (PCM) in granular form to be used in fixed and bubbling fluidized beds for thermal energy storage. The experimental measurements are focused on determination of the heat transfer coefficient between a heated surface immersed in the bed and the granular PCM. The flow rate is varied to quantify its influence on the heat transfer coefficient. The PCM used is Rubitherm GR50 with a phase change tem...

  16. Sustained frictional instabilities on nanodomed surfaces: Stick-slip amplitude coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quignon, Benoit; Pilkington, Georgia A.; Thormann, Esben

    2013-01-01

    properties and their measured friction coefficients was identified. Furthermore, all the nanodomed textures exhibited pronounced oscillations in the shear traces, similar to the classic stick-slip behavior, under all the shear velocities and load regimes studied. That is, the nanotextured topography led...... to sustained frictional instabilities, effectively with no contact frictional sliding. The amplitude of the stick-slip oscillations, σf, was found to correlate with the topographic properties of the surfaces and scale linearly with the applied load. In line with the friction coefficient, we define the slope...... of this linear plot as the stick-slip amplitude coefficient (SSAC). We suggest that such stick-slip behaviors are characteristics of surfaces with nanotextures and that such local frictional instabilities have important implications to surface damage and wear. We thus propose that the shear characteristics...

  17. Vapor layers reduce drag without the crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan; Berry, Joseph; Chan, Derek; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2016-11-01

    The drag of a solid sphere moving in fluid is known to be only a function of the Reynolds number, Re and diminishes rapidly at the drag crisis around Re 3 ×105. A Leidenfrost vapor layer on a hot sphere surface can trigger the onset of the drag crisis at lower Re. By using a range of high viscosity perfluorocarbon liquids, we show that the drag reduction effect, can occur over a wide range of Re, from as low as 600. The Navier slip model with a viscosity dependent slip length captures the observed drag reduction and wake shape.

  18. Influence of surface modification on friction coefficient of the titanium-elastomer couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chladek, Wiesław; Hadasik, Eugeniusz; Chladek, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the friction coefficient of titanium-elastomer couple. The study was carried out with a view to potential future utilization of its results for constructing retentive elements of implanted prostheses. Changes in the friction force were recorded while removing titanium specimens placed between two silicone counter specimens made of Ufi Gel. The influence of the titanium specimen movement speed in relation that of to the counter specimens and the influence of clamping force on the friction force were assessed. Additionally, the surface roughness of titanium specimens differed; in one case, titanium was coated with polyethylene. The effect of introducing artificial saliva between the cooperating surfaces on the friction force and friction coefficient was analyzed as well. Based on the characteristics recorded, the possibilities of shaping the friction coefficient have been assessed, since it is the friction coefficient that determines effective operation of a friction couple through increasing the titanium specimen roughness. The artificial saliva being introduced between the specimens reduces considerably the friction coefficient through a change of the phenomenon model. An increase in the pressure force for the specimens of high roughness entails a reduction of the friction coefficient. The study carried out allows us to identify the roughness parameters, which in turn will enable obtaining the prescribed retention force for friction/membrane couplings.

  19. Estimation of the friction coefficient between wheel and rail surface using traction motor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y; Liang, B; Iwnicki, S

    2012-01-01

    The friction coefficient between a railway wheel and rail surface is a crucial factor in maintaining high acceleration and braking performance of railway vehicles thus monitoring this friction coefficient is important. Restricted by the difficulty in directly measuring the friction coefficient, the creep force or creepage, indirect methods using state observers are used more frequently. This paper presents an approach using a Kalman filter to estimate the creep force and creepage between the wheel and rail and then to identify the friction coefficient using the estimated creep force-creepage relationship. A mathematic model including an AC motor, wheel and roller is built to simulate the driving system. The parameters are based on a test rig at Manchester Metropolitan University. The Kalman filter is designed to estimate the friction coefficient based on the measurements of the simulation model. Series of residuals are calculated through the comparison between the estimated creep force and theoretical values of different friction coefficient. Root mean square values of the residuals are used in the friction coefficient identification.

  20. Experimental rig to estimate the coefficient of friction between tire and surface in airplane touchdown simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwei; Zhan, Liwei

    2015-08-01

    To estimate the coefficient of friction between tire and runway surface during airplane touchdowns, we designed an experimental rig to simulate such events and to record the impact and friction forces being executed. Because of noise in the measured signals, we developed a filtering method that is based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition and the bandwidth of probability density function of each intrinsic mode function to extract friction and impact force signals. We can quantify the coefficient of friction by calculating the maximum values of the filtered force signals. Signal measurements are recorded for different drop heights and tire rotational speeds, and the corresponding coefficient of friction is calculated. The result shows that the values of the coefficient of friction change only slightly. The random noise and experimental artifact are the major reason of the change.

  1. Influence of the convective surface transfer coefficients on the Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) building performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steskens, Paul Wilhelmus Maria Hermanus; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Current models to predict heat, air and moisture (HAM) conditions in buildings assume constant boundary conditions for the temperature and relative humidity of the neighbouring air and for the surface heat and moisture transfer coefficients. These assumptions may introduce errors in the predicted...... influence on the predicted hygrothermal conditions at the surface of a building component and on the heat and vapour exchange with the indoor environment....

  2. Quality-factor and reflection-coefficient estimation using reflected surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganov, D.S.; Ruigrok, E.N.; Ghose, R.; Mikesell, D.; Van Wijk, K.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for estimating the reflection coefficient of a subvertical boundary and the the quality factor of the medium between a receiver and the subvertical boundary. The method uses surface waves from transient deterministic sources and is inspired by the occurrence of non-physical

  3. Effects of bridge cable surface roughness and cross-sectional distortion on aerodynamic force coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, G.; Georgakis, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    of their inherent surface roughness and shape, which might present a significant disturbance for the surrounding wind flow. The present study focuses on the experimental determination, based on static wind tunnel tests, of the aerodynamic coefficients of full-scale bridge cable section models both perpendicular...

  4. Impact of overall and particle surface heat transfer coefficients on thermal process optimization in rotary retorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R; Abakarov, A; Almonacid, S; Teixeira, A

    2008-10-01

    This study attempts to examine the significance of recent research that has focused on efforts to estimate values for global and surface heat transfer coefficients under forced convection heating induced by end-over-end rotation in retorting of canned peas in brine. The study confirms the accuracy of regression analysis used to predict values for heat transfer coefficients as a function of rotating speed and headspace, and uses them to predict values over a range of process conditions, which make up the search domain for process optimization. These coefficients were used in a convective heat transfer model to establish a range of lethality-equivalent retort temperature-time processes for various conditions of retort temperature, rotating speed, and headspace. Then, they were coupled with quality factor kinetics to predict the final volume average and surface quality retention resulting from each process and to find the optimal thermal process conditions for canned fresh green peas. Results showed that maximum quality retention (surface and volume average retention) was achieved with the shortest possible process time (made possible with highest retort temperature), and reached the similar level in all cases with small difference between surface and volume average quality retention. The highest heat transfer coefficients (associated with maximum rotating speed and headspace) showed a 10% reduction in process time over that required with minimum rotating speed and headspace. The study concludes with a discussion of the significance of these findings and degree to which they were expected.

  5. Self-affine roughness influence on the friction coefficient for rubbers onto solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of self-affine roughness on the friction coefficient mu(f) of a rubber body under incomplete contact onto a solid surface. The roughness is characterized by the rms amplitude w, the correlation length xi, and the roughness exponent H. It is shown that with

  6. A universal empirical expression for the isotope surface exchange coefficients (k*) of acceptor-doped perovskite and fluorite oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, R A

    2006-02-21

    The isotope surface exchange coefficient k* determined in an 18O/16O exchange experiment characterises the exchange flux of the dynamic equilibrium between oxygen in the gas phase and oxygen in a solid oxide. At present there is no atomistic expression that relates measured exchange coefficients to materials' parameters. In this study an empirical, atomistic expression is developed that describes the exchange kinetics of gaseous oxygen with diverse acceptor-doped perovskite and fluorite oxides at temperatures above T approximately 900 K. The expression is used to explain the observed correlations between surface exchange coefficients k* and oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients D* and to identify compounds that exhibit high surface exchange coefficients.

  7. Lift and Drag on Cylinder of Octagonal Cross-Section in a Turbulent Stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Jomir Hossain

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of surface static pressure distributions on octagonal cylinder in uniform and turbulent flows was carried out. The study was performed on both the single cylinder and the group of two cylinders, two cylinders were used, one was at the upstream side, and the other was at the downstream side of the flow. They were placed centrally along the flow direction. The inter-spacing space between the two cylinders was varied at 1D, 2D, 3D, 4D, 5D, 6D, 7D and 8D, where D is the width of the cylinder across the flow direction. The pressure coefficients were calculated from the measured values of the surface static pressure distribution on the cylinder. Then the drag and lift coefficients were obtained from the pressure coefficients by the numerical integration method. It was observed that at various angles of attack, the values of the lift coefficients and drag coefficients were insignificant compared to those for a sharp-edged square cylinder. The strength of the vortex shedding was shown to be reduced as the intensity of the incident turbulence was increased. Measurements of drag at various angles of attack (0° to 40° showed that with increase in turbulence level the minimum drag occurred at smaller values of angle of attack.

  8. Real-Time Adaptive Least-Squares Drag Minimization for Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Yvonne L.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ting, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper contains a simulation study of a real-time adaptive least-squares drag minimization algorithm for an aeroelastic model of a flexible wing aircraft. The aircraft model is based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The wing structures incorporate a novel aerodynamic control surface known as the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF). The drag minimization algorithm uses the Newton-Raphson method to find the optimal VCCTEF deflections for minimum drag in the context of an altitude-hold flight control mode at cruise conditions. The aerodynamic coefficient parameters used in this optimization method are identified in real-time using Recursive Least Squares (RLS). The results demonstrate the potential of the VCCTEF to improve aerodynamic efficiency for drag minimization for transport aircraft.

  9. Drag Forces in a Coupled Wave-Ice Model: Implementation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Veeramony, J.

    2017-12-01

    We are developing a system for modeling the interactions between ocean surface waves and polar ice floes, which consists of a nonhydrostatic, finite-volume wave model (NHWAVE) coupled to a discrete element, particle-tracking ice model (LIGGGHTS). The effects of drag forces between fluid and ice were recently implemented in the coupled system. The drag formulations assume that the fluid velocity profile at the interface is logarithmic, leading to a drag coefficient that is a function of both grid size and a configurable roughness height. Net forcing vectors acting on the ice in each fluid cell are computed in the wave model and passed to the ice model at each time step. The vectors combine forces due to drag with additional forces due to dynamic pressure (buoyancy effects are computed separately in LIGGGHTS). This presentation will provide further details on these new features and summarize the results of several tests conducted to validate them.

  10. Determination of the potential energy surfaces of refrigerant mixtures and their gas transport coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Bo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the inversion scheme was used to determine the potential energy surfaces of five polar refrigerant mixtures. The systems studied here are R123-R134a, R123-R142b, R123-R152a, R142b-R134a, and R142b-R152a. The low density transport coefficients of the refrigerant mixtures were calculated from the new invert potentials by the classical kinetic theory. The viscosity coefficient, binary diffusion coefficient, and thermal diffusion factor were computed for the temperature range from 313.15-973.15 K. The agreement with the NIST viscosity data demonstrates that the present calculated values are accurate enough to supplement experimental data over an extended temperature range. Correlations of the transport properties were also provided for the refrigerant mixtures at equimolar ratios.

  11. Collisional Dissociation of CO: ab initio Potential Energy Surfaces and Quasiclassical Trajectory Rate Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David W.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Chaban, Galina M.

    2016-01-01

    We have generated accurate global potential energy surfaces for CO+Ar and CO+O that correlate with atom-diatom pairs in their ground electronic states based on extensive ab initio electronic structure calculations and used these potentials in quasi-classical trajectory nuclear dynamics calculations to predict the thermal dissociation rate coefficients over 5000- 35000 K. Our results are not compatible with the 20-45 year old experimental results. For CO + Ar we obtain fairly good agreement with the experimental rate coefficients of Appleton et al. (1970) and Mick and Roth (1993), but our computed rate coefficients exhibit a stronger temperature dependence. For CO + O our dissociation rate coefficient is in close agreement with the value from the Park model, which is an empirical adjustment of older experimental results. However, we find the rate coefficient for CO + O is only 1.5 to 3.3 times larger than CO + Ar over the temperature range of the shock tube experiments (8000-15,000 K). The previously accepted value for this rate coefficient ratio is 15, independent of temperature. We also computed the rate coefficient for the CO + O ex- change reaction which forms C + O2. We find this reaction is much faster than previously believed and is the dominant process in the removal of CO at temperatures up to 16,000 K. As a result, the dissociation of CO is accomplished in two steps (react to form C+O2 and then O2 dissociates) that are endothermic by 6.1 and 5.1 eV, instead of one step that requires 11.2 eV to break the CO bond.

  12. The surface diffusion coefficient for an arbitrarily curved fluidfluid interface.(II). Coefficient for plane-parallel diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we developed an expression for the coefficient for plane-parallel diffusion for an arbitrarily curved fluid–fluid interface. The expression is valid for ordinary diffusion in binary mixtures, with isotropic bulk phases and an interfacial region that is isotropic in the plane parallel

  13. DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Pointer, D; Browand, F; Ross, J; Storms, B

    2007-01-04

    Class 8 tractor-trailers consume 11-12% of the total US petroleum use. At highway speeds, 65% of the energy expenditure for a Class 8 truck is in overcoming aerodynamic drag. The project objective is to improve fuel economy of Class 8 tractor-trailers by providing guidance on methods of reducing drag by at least 25%. A 25% reduction in drag would present a 12% improvement in fuel economy at highway speeds, equivalent to about 130 midsize tanker ships per year. Specific goals include: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; (2) Develop innovative drag reducing concepts that are operationally and economically sound; and (3) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate the potential of new drag-reduction devices. The studies described herein provide a demonstration of the applicability of the experience developed in the analysis of the standard configuration of the Generic Conventional Model. The modeling practices and procedures developed in prior efforts have been applied directly to the assessment of new configurations including a variety of geometric modifications and add-on devices. Application to the low-drag 'GTS' configuration of the GCM has confirmed that the error in predicted drag coefficients increases as the relative contribution of the base drag resulting from the vehicle wake to the total drag increases and it is recommended that more advanced turbulence modeling strategies be applied under those circumstances. Application to a commercially-developed boat tail device has confirmed that this restriction does not apply to geometries where the relative contribution of the base drag to the total drag is reduced by modifying the geometry in that region. Application to a modified GCM geometry with an open grille and radiator has confirmed that the underbody flow, while important for underhood cooling, has little impact on the drag

  14. Some experimental data on accommodation coefficients for the noble ions on metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, K.I.; Rijov, Y.A.; Shkarban, I.I.

    1974-01-01

    Methods and results of experimental measurements of energy accommodation for Ar + , Kr + , and Xe + ions with initial energy E 0 - 100-500eV bombarding Cu, Mo, Ag and other (including Mo - monocrystal) foil target are presented. The angular dependencies for the energy accommodation coefficient are obtained within the range of angle phi=0+70 deg (phi is the angle between the target surface normal and the beam direction)

  15. Friction and drag forces on spheres propagating down inclined planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Yi Hui; Longmire, Ellen

    2017-11-01

    When a submerged sphere propagates along an inclined wall at terminal velocity, it experiences gravity, drag, lift, and friction forces. In the related equations of motion, the drag, lift and friction coefficients are unknown. Experiments are conducted to determine the friction and drag coefficients of the sphere over a range of Reynolds numbers. Through high speed imaging, translational and rotational velocities of spheres propagating along a glass plate are determined in liquids with several viscosities. The onset of sliding motion is identified by computing the dimensionless rotation rate of the sphere. Using drag and lift coefficients for Re friction coefficients are calculated for several materials. The friction coefficients are then employed to estimate the drag coefficient for 350 frictional force over this Re range. Supported by NSF (CBET-1510154).

  16. Experimental investigation of thermal conductivity coefficient and heat exchange between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental research of thermal conductivity coefficients of the siliceous sand bed fluidized by air and an experimental investigation of the particle size influence on the heat transfer coefficient between fluidized bed and inclined exchange surfaces. The measurements were performed for the specific fluidization velocity and sand particle diameters d p=0.3, 0.5, 0.9 mm. The industrial use of fluidized beds has been increasing rapidly in the past 20 years owing to their useful characteristics. One of the outstanding characteristics of a fluidized bed is that it tends to maintain a uniform temperature even with nonuniform heat release. On the basis of experimental research, the influence of the process's operational parameters on the obtained values of the bed's thermal conductivity has been analyzed. The results show direct dependence of thermal conductivity on the intensity of mixing, the degree of fluidization, and the size of particles. In the axial direction, the coefficients that have been treated have values a whole order higher than in the radial direction. Comparison of experimental research results with experimental results of other authors shows good agreement and the same tendency of thermal conductivity change. It is well known in the literature that the value of the heat transfer coefficient is the highest in the horizontal and the smallest in the vertical position of the heat exchange surface. Variation of heat transfer, depending on inclination angle is not examined in detail. The difference between the values of the relative heat transfer coefficient between vertical and horizontal heater position for all particle sizes reduces by approximately 15% with the increase of fluidization rate.

  17. The stochastic distribution of available coefficient of friction for human locomotion of five different floor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Matz, Simon; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2014-05-01

    The maximum coefficient of friction that can be supported at the shoe and floor interface without a slip is usually called the available coefficient of friction (ACOF) for human locomotion. The probability of a slip could be estimated using a statistical model by comparing the ACOF with the required coefficient of friction (RCOF), assuming that both coefficients have stochastic distributions. An investigation of the stochastic distributions of the ACOF of five different floor surfaces under dry, water and glycerol conditions is presented in this paper. One hundred friction measurements were performed on each floor surface under each surface condition. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test was used to determine if the distribution of the ACOF was a good fit with the normal, log-normal and Weibull distributions. The results indicated that the ACOF distributions had a slightly better match with the normal and log-normal distributions than with the Weibull in only three out of 15 cases with a statistical significance. The results are far more complex than what had heretofore been published and different scenarios could emerge. Since the ACOF is compared with the RCOF for the estimate of slip probability, the distribution of the ACOF in seven cases could be considered a constant for this purpose when the ACOF is much lower or higher than the RCOF. A few cases could be represented by a normal distribution for practical reasons based on their skewness and kurtosis values without a statistical significance. No representation could be found in three cases out of 15. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Empirical mapping of the convective heat transfer coefficients with local hot spots on highly conductive surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekelioğlu Murat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental method was proposed to assess the natural and forced convective heat transfer coefficients on highly conductive bodies. Experiments were performed at air velocities of 0m/s, 4.0m/s, and 5.4m/s, and comparisons were made between the current results and available literature. These experiments were extended to arbitrary-shape bodies. External flow conditions were maintained throughout. In the proposed method, in determination of the surface convective heat transfer coefficients, flow condition is immaterial, i.e., either laminar or turbulent. With the present method, it was aimed to acquire the local heat transfer coefficients on any arbitrary conductive shape. This method was intended to be implemented by the heat transfer engineer to identify the local heat transfer rates with local hot spots. Finally, after analyzing the proposed experimental results, appropriate decisions can be made to control the amount of the convective heat transfer off the surface. Limited mass transport was quantified on the cooled plate.

  19. Simulation calculations of physical sputtering and reflection coefficient of plasma-irradiated carbon surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, T.; Ono, T.; Yamamura, Y.

    1994-08-01

    Physical sputtering yields from the carbon surface irradiated by the boundary plasma are obtained with the use of a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The yields are calculated for many random initial energy and angle values of incident protons or deuterons with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, and then averaged. Here the temperature of the boundary plasma, the sheath potential and the angle δ between the magnetic field line and the surface normal are taken into account. A new fitting formula for an arrangement of the numerical data of sputtering yield is introduced, in which six fitting parameters are determined from the numerical results and listed. These results provide a way to estimate the erosion of carbon materials irradiated by boundary plasma. The particle reflection coefficients for deuterons and their neutrals from a carbon surface are also calculated by the same code and presented together with, for comparison, that for the case of monoenergetic normal incidence. (author)

  20. Measurement of thermal accommodation coefficients of inert gas mixtures on a surface of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Byung Soon

    Heat transfer in the fuel-clad gap in a nuclear reactor impacts the overall temperature distribution, stored energy and the mechanical properties of a nuclear fuel rod. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the gap conductance between the UO2 fuel and the clad is critically important for reactor design and operations. To obtain the requisite accuracy in the gap conductance estimation, the thermal accommodation coefficients of the various gases present on the fuel outer surface and the cladding inner surface are very important. In present work, we studied the stainless steel that is the most favored cladding material for advanced gas-cooled reactors. Our goal was to obtain the thermal accommodation coefficients of select inert gases and mixtures of the same on this stainless steel. It has been found for pure helium, pure argon and select He-Ar mixtures that the thermal accommodation coefficient values with stainless steel are very close to constant over the range of pressures studied. The values obtained in this work are in good agreement with similar values reported previously in the literature. As far as we aware, these measurements are the first made of the thermal accommodation coefficients of inert gas mixtures on stainless steel. To aid in the verification of the kinetic theory, additional experiments were done using a two-sphere system and were analyzed using the equivalent sphere approximation. It is found that this theory can be applicable to spherical geometry problems and can be used for a wide range of values of the Knudsen number (Kn). Some sensitivity studies were performed to delineate some key parameter effect in terms of cooling rate, DeltaT difference, and Knudsen number.

  1. Drag Reduction Technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Truong, V

    2001-01-01

    ...% drag reduction with only a few parts per million of polymer. Ionic and non-ionic surfactants can also offer similar drag reduction as polymer solutions but at a high concentration of few percent...

  2. The influence of the surface composition of mixed monolayer films on the evaporation coefficient of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rachael E H; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-07-20

    We explore the dependence of the evaporation coefficient of water from aqueous droplets on the composition of a surface film, considering in particular the influence of monolayer mixed component films on the evaporative mass flux. Measurements with binary component films formed from long chain alcohols, specifically tridecanol (C13H27OH) and pentadecanol (C15H31OH), and tetradecanol (C14H29OH) and hexadecanol (C16H33OH), show that the evaporation coefficient is dependent on the mole fractions of the two components forming the monolayer film. Immediately at the point of film formation and commensurate reduction in droplet evaporation rate, the evaporation coefficient is equal to a mole fraction weighted average of the evaporation coefficients through the equivalent single component films. As a droplet continues to diminish in surface area with continued loss of water, the more-soluble, shorter alkyl chain component preferentially partitions into the droplet bulk with the evaporation coefficient tending towards that through a single component film formed simply from the less-soluble, longer chain alcohol. We also show that the addition of a long chain alcohol to an aqueous-sucrose droplet can facilitate control over the degree of dehydration achieved during evaporation. After undergoing rapid gas-phase diffusion limited water evaporation, binary aqueous-sucrose droplets show a continued slow evaporative flux that is limited by slow diffusional mass transport within the particle bulk due to the rapidly increasing particle viscosity and strong concentration gradients that are established. The addition of a long chain alcohol to the droplet is shown to slow the initial rate of water loss, leading to a droplet composition that remains more homogeneous for a longer period of time. When the sucrose concentration has achieved a sufficiently high value, and the diffusion constant of water has decreased accordingly so that bulk phase diffusion arrest occurs in the monolayer

  3. Low-order aberration coefficients applied to design of telescopes with freeform surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Bryan D.; Howard, Joseph M.

    2017-09-01

    As the number of smallsats and cubesats continues to increase [1], so does the interest in the space optics community to miniaturize reflective optical instrumentation for these smaller platforms. Applications of smallsats are typically for the Earth observing community, but recently opportunities for them are being made available for planetary science, heliophysics and astrophysics concepts [2]. With the smaller satellite platforms come reduced instrument sizes that they accommodate, but the specifications such as field of view and working f/# imposed on the smaller optical systems are often the same, or even more challenging. To meet them, and to "fit in the box", it is necessary to employ additional degrees of freedom to the optical design. An effective strategy to reduce package size is to remove rotational symmetry constraints on the system layout, allowing it to minimize the unused volume by applying rigid body tilts and decenters to mirrors. Requirements for faster systems and wider fields of view can be addressed by allowing optical surfaces to become "freeform" in shape, essentially removing rotational symmetry constraints on the mirrors themselves. This dual approach not only can reduce package size, but also can allow for increased fields of view with improved image quality. Tools were developed in the 1990s to compute low-order coefficients of the imaging properties of asymmetric tilted and decentered systems [3][4]. That approach was then applied to reflective systems with plane symmetry, where the coefficients were used to create closed-form constraints to reduce the number of degrees of freedom of the design space confronting the designer [5][6]. In this paper we describe the geometric interpretation of these coefficients for systems with a plane of symmetry, and discuss some insights that follow for the design of systems without closed-form constraints. We use a common three-mirror design form example to help illustrate these concepts, and

  4. Changes in the surface roughness and friction coefficient of orthodontic bracket slots before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomo; Lin, Jiuxiang; Ding, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the surface roughness of bracket slots and the friction coefficient between the bracket and the stainless steel archwire before and after orthodontic treatment. There were four experimental groups: groups 1 and 2 were 3M new and retrieved brackets, respectively, and groups 3 and 4 were BioQuick new and retrieved brackets, respectively. All retrieved brackets were taken from patients with the first premolar extraction and using sliding mechanics to close the extraction space. The surface roughness of specimens was evaluated using an optical interferometry profilometer, which is faster and nondestructive compared with a stylus profilometer, and provided a larger field, needing no sample preparation, compared with atomic force microscopy. Orthodontic treatment resulted in significant increases in surface roughness and coefficient of friction for both brands of brackets. However, there was no significant difference by brand for new or retrieved brackets. These retrieval analysis results highlight the necessity of reevaluating the properties and clinical behavior of brackets during treatment to make appropriate treatment decisions. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Vorticity confinement technique for drag prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povitsky, Alex; Snyder, Troy

    2011-11-01

    This work couples wake-integral drag prediction and vorticity confinement technique (VC) for the improved prediction of drag from CFD simulations. Induced drag computations of a thin wing are shown to be more accurate than the more widespread method of surface pressure integration when compared to theoretical lifting-line value. Furthermore, the VC method improves trailing vortex preservation and counteracts the shift from induced drag to numerical entropy drag with increasing distance of Trefftz plane downstream of the wing. Accurate induced drag prediction via the surface integration of pressure barring a sufficiently refined surface grid and increased computation time. Furthermore, the alternative wake-integral technique for drag prediction suffers from numerical dissipation. VC is shown to control the numerical dissipation with very modest computational overhead. The 2-D research code is used to test specific formulations of the VC body force terms and illustrate the computational efficiency of the method compared to a ``brute force'' reduction in spatial step size. For the 3-D wing simulation, ANSYS FLUENT is employed with the VC body force terms added to the solver with user-defined functions (UDFs). VC is successfully implemented to highly unsteady flows typical for Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) producing oscillative drag force either by natural vortex shedding at high angles of attack or by flapping wing motion.

  6. EPMA-EDS surface measurements of interdiffusion coefficients between miscible metals in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christien, F.; Pierson, J.F.; Hassini, A.; Capon, F.; Le Gall, R.; Brousse, T.

    2010-01-01

    A new technique is developed to study interdiffusion between two miscible metals. The technique is applied to the Ni-Pd system. It consists in measuring the change of apparent surface composition of a Pd substrate coated with an 800 nm Ni thin film during annealing at a given temperature. The measurement is carried out in-situ inside the chamber of a SEM (scanning electron microscope) by EPMA-EDS (electron probe microanalysis-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). The experimental data are processed using a model that mixes the Fick's diffusion equations and the electron probe microanalysis equation. This process allows the determination of the mean interdiffusion coefficient at a given annealing temperature. The main advantages of the technique are the possible determination of interdiffusion coefficients in thin films and at very low temperature (down to 430 deg. C, i.e. ∼0.4 T m ), which is not achievable with other techniques conventionally used for the study of interdiffusion. The Ni-Pd mean interdiffusion coefficient is shown to follow an Arrhenius law (D-tilde c =6.32x10 -3 exp((178.8kJmol -1 )/(RT) )cm 2 s -1 ) between 430 deg. C and 900 deg. C, in relatively good agreement with previous interdiffusion measurements made on the Ni-Pd system at higher temperature.

  7. [Pedestrian dragged under a truck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaba, Czesław; Lewandowski, Andrzej; Kołowski, Janusz; Tezyk, Artur

    2011-01-01

    A traffic accident is described, involving a pedestrian who was at first hit and subsequently hooked up by his clothing by a suspension element of a low-floor truck trailer and dragged along a road for the distance of 3500 m. Autopsy demonstrated that the pedestrian died of cerebro-cranial injuries, inflicted while he had been hit by the truck. Additionally, the frontal surface of his body demonstrated external injuries typical for dragging of the body along the roadway. Before being dragged, the pedestrian was hit by the front of the vehicle, when he was in a sitting position, or was rising or else was in a recumbent position with an elevated head and trunk. Traffic accidents of the type were seldom described in the national and foreign literature.

  8. Sliding motion modulates stiffness and friction coefficient at the surface of tissue engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, S; Loparic, M; Peter, R; Stolz, M; Aebi, U; Alini, M

    2012-04-01

    Functional cartilage tissue engineering aims to generate grafts with a functional surface, similar to that of authentic cartilage. Bioreactors that stimulate cell-scaffold constructs by simulating natural joint movements hold great potential to generate cartilage with adequate surface properties. In this study two methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) were applied to obtain information about the quality of engineered graft surfaces. For better understanding of the molecule-function relationships, AFM was complemented with immunohistochemistry. Bovine chondrocytes were seeded into polyurethane scaffolds and subjected to dynamic compression, applied by a ceramic ball, for 1h daily [loading group 1 (LG1)]. In loading group 2 (LG2), the ball additionally oscillated over the scaffold, generating sliding surface motion. After 3 weeks, the surfaces of the engineered constructs were analyzed by friction force and indentation-type AFM (IT-AFM). Results were complemented and compared to immunohistochemical analyses. The loading type significantly influenced the mechanical and histological outcomes. Constructs of LG2 exhibited lowest friction coefficient and highest micro- and nanostiffness. Collagen type II and aggrecan staining were readily observed in all constructs and appeared to reach deeper areas in loaded (LG1, LG2) compared to unloaded scaffolds. Lubricin was specifically detected at the top surface of LG2. This study proposes a quantitative AFM-based functional analysis at the micrometer- and nanometer scale to evaluate the quality of cartilage surfaces. Mechanical testing (load-bearing) combined with friction analysis (gliding) can provide important information. Notably, sliding-type biomechanical stimuli may favor (re-)generation and maintenance of functional articular surfaces and support the development of mechanically competent engineered cartilage. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  9. Drag resistance of ship hulls: Effects of surface roughness of newly applied fouling control coatings, coating water absorption, and welding seams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xueting; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Andrés, Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    to the effects of coating water absorption on skin friction. Furthermore, to investigate the effects of welding seam height and density (number of welding seams per five meters of ship side) on drag resistance, a new flexible rotor was designed and used for experimentation. It was found, under the conditions...... selected, that a so-called fouling release (FR) coating caused approximately 5.6 % less skin friction (torque) over time than traditional biocide-based antifouling (AF) coatings at a tangential speed of 12 knots. Furthermore, results of immersion experiments and supporting “standard” water absorption...... experiments showed that water absorption of the FR coating did not result in any significant impacts on skin friction. On the other hand, water absorption was found to actually lower the skin friction of AF coatings. This may be attributed to a smoothening of the coating surface. The effects of welding seam...

  10. Analytical expressions of the imaging and aberration coefficients of a general form surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Qi, Jin Wei; Bin, Zhu

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical development is presented in this paper for describing and understanding the imaging and aberrations of a general form surface. The development is based on the Taylor expansion of an arbitrary ray trace from the object reference plane to the image reference plane, which is called the base mapping of the general form surface in this paper. The base mapping is expressed as two Taylor series of the object and pupil coordinates and the imaging and aberration coefficients in the third-order scope are derived and presented as analytical expressions relevant to the optic parameters, invoking no approximations. The situation with tilted object and observing plane is also considered, and the mapping from a tilted object to a tilted observing plane is derived via simple mathematical manipulations based on the base mapping.

  11. Slip safety risk analysis of surface properties using the coefficients of friction of rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çoşkun, Gültekin; Sarıışık, Gencay; Sarıışık, Ali

    2017-12-19

    This study was conducted to determine the most appropriate surface processing techniques (SPT), environmental conditions (EC) and surface roughness (SR) to minimize the risk of slipping when pedestrians walk on a floor covering of rocks barefoot and with shoes. Coefficients of friction (COFs) and values of SR were found using five different types of rocks, four SPT and two (ramp and pendulum) tests. Results indicate that the parameters which affect the COF values of rocks include SR, EC and SPT. Simple linear regression was performed to examine the relationship between the values of the COF and the SR. The value of the COF was identified as R 2  ≥ 0.864. Statistical results, which are based on experimental measurements, show that rocks are classified according to their safe use areas depending on their COF and SR values.

  12. Active aerodynamic drag reduction on morphable cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttag, M.; Reis, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    We study a mechanism for active aerodynamic drag reduction on morphable grooved cylinders, whose topography can be modified pneumatically. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the Saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea), which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. Our analog experimental samples comprise a spoked rigid skeleton with axial cavities, covered by a stretched elastomeric film. Decreasing the inner pressure of the sample produces axial grooves, whose depth can be accurately varied, on demand. First, we characterize the relation between groove depth and pneumatic loading through a combination of precision mechanical experiments and finite element simulations. Second, wind tunnel tests are used to measure the aerodynamic drag coefficient (as a function of Reynolds number) of the grooved samples, with different levels of periodicity and groove depths. We focus specifically on the drag crisis and systematically measure the associated minimum drag coefficient and the critical Reynolds number at which it occurs. The results are in agreement with the classic literature of rough cylinders, albeit with an unprecedented level of precision and resolution in varying topography using a single sample. Finally, we leverage the morphable nature of our system to dynamically reduce drag for varying aerodynamic loading conditions. We demonstrate that actively controlling the groove depth yields a drag coefficient that decreases monotonically with Reynolds number and is significantly lower than the fixed sample counterparts. These findings open the possibility for the drag reduction of grooved cylinders to be operated over a wide range of flow conditions.

  13. On the Drag Effect of a Refuelling Pellet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Michelsen, Poul

    1981-01-01

    A refueling pellet is subjected mainly to two kinds of drags: (1) inertial drag caused by the motion of the pellet relative to the surrounding plasma, and (2) ablation drag caused by an uneven ablation rate of the front and the rear surface of the pellet in an inhomogeneous plasma. Computational...... results showed that for reasonable combinations of pellet size and injection speed, the drag effect is hardly detectable for plasma conditions prevailing in current large tokamaks....

  14. Effect of the coefficient of friction of a running surface on sprint time in a sled-towing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linthorne, Nicholas P; Cooper, James E

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of the coefficient of friction of a running surface on an athlete's sprint time in a sled-towing exercise. The coefficients of friction of four common sports surfaces (a synthetic athletics track, a natural grass rugby pitch, a 3G football pitch, and an artificial grass hockey pitch) were determined from the force required to tow a weighted sled across the surface. Timing gates were then used to measure the 30-m sprint time for six rugby players when towing a sled of varied weight across the surfaces. There were substantial differences between the coefficients of friction for the four surfaces (micro = 0.21-0.58), and in the sled-towing exercise the athlete's 30-m sprint time increased linearly with increasing sled weight. The hockey pitch (which had the lowest coefficient of friction) produced a substantially lower rate of increase in 30-m sprint time, but there were no significant differences between the other surfaces. The results indicate that although an athlete's sprint time in a sled-towing exercise is affected by the coefficient offriction of the surface, the relationship relationship between the athlete's rate of increase in 30-m sprint time and the coefficient of friction is more complex than expected.

  15. Effects of self-affine surface roughness on the friction coefficient of rubbers in the presence of a liquid interlayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, JTM

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we investigate how the friction coefficient is affected by the presence of a liquid layer in between a self-affine rough surface and a sliding rubber surface. The liquid layer will reduce energy dissipation from the small surface asperities and cavities of lateral sizes smaller than

  16. Uptake Coefficients of NO3 Radicals on Solid Surfaces of Sea-Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratpanche, F.; Sawerysyn, J.-P.

    1999-02-01

    Uptake coefficients of nitrate radicals (γ NO_3) have been measured by a technique involving a coated-wall flow tube with radical detection by E.P.R. spectrometry. The variation of NO3 concentration in the gas phase was followed indirectly by monitoring OH radicals produced by the titration reaction H + NO_3. The mean initial value of γ NO3 measured on solid NaCl surfaces was (1.7± 1.2)× 10-2) in the temperature range 258-301 K, while for solid NaBr surfaces the value was (0.11 ± 0.06) at 293 K. In each case, errors limits correspond to one standard deviation. For NaBr, a slight negative temperature dependence was observed over the investigated range, 243-293 K, which can be represented by γ_NO_3^NaBr = 1.6 ≤ft(begin{array}{l}+1.8 -0.9) × 10-3exp [(1210± 200)/T]. An analysis of the results shows that under some conditions the heterogeneous loss of nitrate radicals on sea-salt aerosol particles at ambient temperature could be competitive with their loss by homogeneous reaction in the marine troposphere at night. Les coefficients de capture des radicaux nitrate (γ NO_3) sur des surfaces de sels marins (NaCl et NaBr) ont été mesurés aux températures troposphériques en utilisant la technique du réacteur à écoulement à paroi recouverte couplée à un spectromètre de résonance paramagnétique électronique (R.P.E). La variation de la concentration en phase gazeuse des radicaux nitrate en présence des surfaces étudiées est suivie en mesurant le signal R.P.E des radicaux OH produits par la réaction de titrage H + NO3. Pour des températures comprises entre 258 et 301 K, la valeur moyenne du coefficient de capture initial (γ NO_3) sur des surfaces solides de NaCl est égal à (1.7± 1.2)× 10-2). Sur des surfaces solides de NaBr, (γ NO_3) est égal à (0.11 ± 0.06) à 293 K. L'incertitude correspond à une déviation standard. Par ailleurs, pour ce type de surfaces, une légère dépendance négative avec la température est observée dans la

  17. Coefficient of Friction Between Carboxymethylated Hyaluronic Acid-Based Polymer Films and the Ocular Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, Jourdan; Wirostko, Barbara; Coats, Brittany

    2017-12-01

    Hyaluronic acid-based polymer films are emerging as drug-delivery vehicles for local and continuous drug administration to the eye. The highly lubricating hyaluronic acid increases comfort, but displaces films from the eye, reducing drug exposure and efficacy. Previous studies have shown that careful control of the surface interaction of the film with the eye is critical for improved retention. In this study, the frictional interaction of a carboxymethylated, hyaluronic acid-based polymer (CMHA-S) with and without methylcellulose was quantified against ovine and human sclera at three axial loads (0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 N) and four sliding velocities (0.3, 1.0, 10, and 30 mm/s). Static coefficients of friction significantly increased with rate (P Friction became more rate-dependent when methylcellulose was added to CMHA-S. Kinetic coefficient of friction was not affected by rate, and averaged 0.15 ± 0.1. Methylcellulose increased CMHA-S static and kinetic friction by 60% and 80%, respectively, but was also prone to wear during testing. These data suggest that methylcellulose can be used to create a friction differential on the film, but a potentially increased degradation rate with the methylcellulose must be considered in the design.

  18. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Tung, S.; Ho, C.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  19. Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (SSDBD) Device for Turbulent Skin Friction Drag Reduction and Flow Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research effort explores the use of a nanosecond pulse driven offset semiconducting surface dielectric barrier discharge (SSDBD) device for the control...

  20. The 3D CFD study of gliding swimmer on passive hydrodynamics drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishveshwar Rajendra Mantha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of depth on the hydrodynamic drag coefficient during the passive underwater gliding after the starts and turns. The swimmer hydrodynamics performance was studied by the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD method. The steady-state CFD simulations were performed by the application of k - omega turbulent model and volume of fluid method to obtain two-phase flow around a three-dimensional swimmer model when gliding near water surface and at different depths from the water surface. The simulations were conducted for four different swimming pool size, each with different depth, i.e., 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 3.0 m for three different velocities, i.e., 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 m/s, with swimmer gliding at different depths with intervals of 0.25 m, each starting from the water surface, respectively. The numerical results of pressure drag and total coefficients at individual average race velocities were obtained. The results showed that the drag coefficient decreased as depth increased, with a trend toward reduced fluctuation after 0.5m depth from the water surface. The selection of the appropriate depth during the gliding phase should be a main concern of swimmers and coaches.

  1. An Experimental Investigation of Helicopter Rotor Hub Fairing Drag Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, D. Y.; Lance, M. B.; Young, L. A.; Stroub, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A study was done in the NASA 14- by 22-Foot Wind Tunnel at Langley Research Center on the parasite drag of different helicopter rotor hub fairings and pylons. Parametric studies of hub-fairing camber and diameter were conducted. The effect of hub fairing/pylon clearance on hub fairing/pylon mutual interference drag was examined in detail. Force and moment data are presented in tabular and graphical forms. The results indicate that hub fairings with a circular-arc upper surface and a flat lower surface yield maximum hub drag reduction; and clearance between the hub fairing and pylon induces high mutual-interference drag and diminishes the drag-reduction benefit obtained using a hub fairing with a flat lower surface. Test data show that symmetrical hub fairings with circular-arc surfaces generate 74 percent more interference drag than do cambered hub fairings with flat lower surfaces, at moderate negative angle of attack.

  2. The impact of changes in parameterizations of surface drag and vertical diffusion on the large-scale circulation in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvall, Jenny; Svensson, Gunilla; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2017-06-01

    Simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) are used to analyze the sensitivity of the large-scale circulation to changes in parameterizations of orographic surface drag and vertical diffusion. Many GCMs and NWP models use enhanced turbulent mixing in stable conditions to improve simulations, while CAM5 cuts off all turbulence at high stabilities and instead employs a strong orographic surface stress parameterization, known as turbulent mountain stress (TMS). TMS completely dominates the surface stress over land and reduces the near-surface wind speeds compared to simulations without TMS. It is found that TMS is generally beneficial for the large-scale circulation as it improves zonal wind speeds, Arctic sea level pressure and zonal anomalies of the 500-hPa stream function, compared to ERA-Interim. It also alleviates atmospheric blocking frequency biases in the Northern Hemisphere. Using a scheme that instead allows for a modest increase of turbulent diffusion at higher stabilities only in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) appears to in some aspects have a similar, although much smaller, beneficial effect as TMS. Enhanced mixing throughout the atmospheric column, however, degrades the CAM5 simulation. Evaluating the simulations in comparison with detailed measurements at two locations reveals that TMS is detrimental for the PBL at the flat grassland ARM Southern Great Plains site, giving too strong wind turning and too deep PBLs. At the Sodankylä forest site, the effect of TMS is smaller due to the larger local vegetation roughness. At both sites, all simulations substantially overestimate the boundary layer ageostrophic flow.

  3. Intelligent tires for identifying coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces using three-axis accelerometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Kamai, Kazuto; Seki, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent tires equipped with sensors as well as the monitoring of the tire/road contact conditions are in demand for improving vehicle control and safety. With the aim of identifying the coefficient of friction of tire/road contact surfaces during driving, including during cornering, we develop an identification scheme for the coefficient of friction that involves estimation of the slip angle and applied force by using a single lightweight three-axis accelerometer attached on the inner surface of the tire. To validate the developed scheme, we conduct tire-rolling tests using an accelerometer-equipped tire with various slip angles on various types of road surfaces, including dry and wet surfaces. The results of these tests confirm that the estimated slip angle and applied force are reasonable. Furthermore, the identified coefficient of friction by the developed scheme agreed with that measured by standardized tests. (paper)

  4. A bio-inspired device for drag reduction on a three-dimensional model vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongri; Lee, Hoon; Yi, Wook; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, we introduce a bio-mimetic device for the reduction of the drag force on a three-dimensional model vehicle, the Ahmed body (Ahmed et al 1984 SAE Technical Paper 840300). The device, called automatic moving deflector (AMD), is designed inspired by the movement of secondary feathers on bird's wing suction surface: i.e., secondary feathers pop up when massive separation occurs on bird's wing suction surface at high angles of attack, which increases the lift force at landing. The AMD is applied to the rear slanted surface of the Ahmed body to control the flow separation there. The angle of the slanted surface considered is 25° at which the drag coefficient on the Ahmed body is highest. The wind tunnel experiment is conducted at Re H  = 1.0 × 10(5)-3.8 × 10(5), based on the height of the Ahmed body (H) and the free-stream velocity (U ∞). Several AMDs of different sizes and materials are tested by measuring the drag force on the Ahmed body, and showed drag reductions up to 19%. The velocity and surface-pressure measurements show that AMD starts to pop up when the pressure in the thin gap between the slanted surface and AMD is much larger than that on the upper surface of AMD. We also derive an empirical formula that predicts the critical free-stream velocity at which AMD starts to operate. Finally, it is shown that the drag reduction by AMD is mainly attributed to a pressure recovery on the slanted surface by delaying the flow separation and suppressing the strength of the longitudinal vortices emanating from the lateral edges of the slanted surface.

  5. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  6. Drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2011-05-27

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies. © 2011 American Physical Society

  7. A computational study of drag reduction and vortex shedding suppression of flow past a square cylinder in presence of small control cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shams-Ul.; Manzoor, Raheela; Islam, Zia-Ul.; Kalsoom, Shazia; Ying, Zhou Chao

    2017-04-01

    This article presents a two-dimensional numerical study of the unsteady laminar flow from a square cylinder in presence of multiple small control cylinders. The cylinders are placed in an unconfined medium at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 100 and 160). Different flow phenomena are captured for the gap spacings (g = s/D, where s is the surface-to-surface distance between the main cylinder and small control cylinders and D is the size of the main cylinder) between 0.25 - 3 and angle of attack (θ) ranging from 300 to 1800. Numerical calculations are performed by using a lattice Boltzmann method. In this paper, the important flow physics of different observed flow patterns in terms of instantaneous vorticity contours visualization, time-trace analysis of drag and lift coefficients and power spectra analysis of lift coefficient are presented and discussed. Drag reduction and suppression of vortex shedding is also discussed in detail and compared with the available experimental and numerical results qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In addition, the mean drag coefficient, Strouhal number, root-mean-square values of the drag and lift coefficients are determined and compared with a single square cylinder without small control cylinders. We found that the drag is reduced 99.8% and 97.6% for (θ, g) = (300, 3) at Re = 100 and 160, respectively.

  8. Thermal lift generation and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekardan, Cem; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of the new technologies in low pressure environments such as Hyperloop and helicopters designed for Martian applications, understanding the aerodynamic behavior of airfoils in rarefied environments are becoming more crucial. In this paper, verification of rarefied ES-BGK solver and ideas such as prediction of the thermally induced lift and drag reduction in rarefied aerodynamics are investigated. Validation of the rarefied ES-BGK solver with Runge-Kutta discontinous Galerkin method with experiments in transonic regime with a Reynolds number of 73 showed that ES-BGK solver is the most suitable solver in near slip transonic regime. For the quantification of lift generation, A NACA 0012 airfoil is studied with a high temperature surface on the bottom for the lift creation for different Knudsen numbers. It was seen that for lower velocities, continuum solver under predicts the lift generation when the Knudsen number is 0.00129 due to local velocity gradients reaching slip regime although lift coefficient is higher with the Boltzmann ES-BGK solutions. In the second part, the feasibility of using thermal transpiration for drag reduction is studied. Initial study in drag reduction includes an application of a thermal gradient at the upper surface of a NACA 0012 airfoil near trailing edge at a 12-degree angle of attack and 5 Pa pressure. It was seen that drag is reduced by 4 percent and vortex shedding frequency is reduced due to asymmetry introduced in the flow due to temperature gradient causing reverse flow due to thermal transpiration phenomena.

  9. REMOTE SENSING AND SURFACE ENERGY FLUX MODELS TO DERIVE EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND CROP COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Barbagallo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing techniques using high resolution satellite images provide opportunities to evaluate daily crop water use and its spatial and temporal distribution on a field by field basis. Mapping this indicator with pixels of few meters of size on extend areas allows to characterize different processes and parameters. Satellite data on vegetation reflectance, integrated with in field measurements of canopy coverage features and the monitoring of energy fluxes through the soil-plant-atmosphere system, allow to estimate conventional irrigation components (ET, Kc thus improving irrigation strategies. In the study, satellite potential evapotranspiration (ETp and crop coefficient (Kc maps of orange orchards are derived using semi-empirical approaches between reflectance data from IKONOS imagery and ground measurements of vegetation features. The monitoring of energy fluxes through the orchard allows to estimate actual crop evapotranspiration (ETa using energy balance and the Surface Renewal theory. The approach indicates substantial promise as an efficient, accurate and relatively inexpensive procedure to predict actual ET fluxes and Kc from irrigated lands.

  10. Parasite-Drag Measurements of Five Helicopter Rotor Hubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Gary B.; Harrington, Robert D.

    1959-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the parasite drag of five production-type helicopter rotor hubs. Some simple fairing arrangements were attempted in an effort to reduce the hub drag. The results indicate that, within the range of the tests, changes in angle of attack, hub rotational speed, and forward speed generally had only a small effect on the equivalent flat-plate area representing parasite drag. The drag coefficients of the basic hubs, based on projected hub frontal area, increased with hub area and varied from 0.5 to 0.76 for the hubs tested.

  11. On the origin of the drag force on golf balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaras, Elias; Beratlis, Nikolaos; Squires, Kyle

    2017-11-01

    It is well establised that dimples accelerate the drag-crisis on a sphere. The result of the early drag-crisis is a reduction of the drag coefficient by more than a factor of two when compared to a smooth sphere at the same Reynolds number. However, when the drag coefficients for smooth and dimpled spheres in the supercritical regime are compared, the latter is higher by a factor of two to three. To understand the origin of this behavior we conducted direct numerical simulations of the flow around a dimpled sphere, which is similar to commercially available golf balls, in the supercritical regime. By comparing the results to those for a smooth sphere it is found that dimples, although effective in accelerating the drag crisis, impose a local drag-penalty, which contributes significantly to the overall drag force. This finding challenges the broadly accepted view, that the dimples only indirectly affect the drag force on a golf ball by manipulating the structure of the turbulent boundary layer near the wall and consequently affect global separation. Within this view, typically the penalty on the drag force imposed by the dimples is assumed to be small and coming primarily from skin friction. The direct numerical simulations we will report reveal a very different picture.

  12. Storm surge and wave simulations in the Gulf of Mexico using a consistent drag relation for atmospheric and storm surge models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vatvani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To simulate winds and water levels, numerical weather prediction (NWP and storm surge models generally use the traditional bulk relation for wind stress, which is characterized by a wind drag coefficient. A still commonly used drag coefficient in those models, some of them were developed in the past, is based on a relation, according to which the magnitude of the coefficient is either constant or increases monotonically with increasing surface wind speed (Bender, 2007; Kim et al., 2008; Kohno and Higaki, 2006. The NWP and surge models are often tuned independently from each other in order to obtain good results. Observations have indicated that the magnitude of the drag coefficient levels off at a wind speed of about 30 m s−1, and then decreases with further increase of the wind speed. Above a wind speed of approximately 30 m s−1, the stress above the air-sea interface starts to saturate. To represent the reducing and levelling off of the drag coefficient, the original Charnock drag formulation has been extended with a correction term.

    In line with the above, the Delft3D storm surge model is tested using both Charnock's and improved Makin's wind drag parameterization to evaluate the improvements on the storm surge model results, with and without inclusion of the wave effects. The effect of waves on storm surge is included by simultaneously simulating waves with the SWAN model on identical model grids in a coupled mode. However, the results presented here will focus on the storm surge results that include the wave effects.

    The runs were carried out in the Gulf of Mexico for Katrina and Ivan hurricane events. The storm surge model was initially forced with H*wind data (Powell et al., 2010 to test the effect of the Makin's wind drag parameterization on the storm surge model separately. The computed wind, water levels and waves are subsequently compared with observation data. Based on the good

  13. Role of skin friction drag during flow-induced reconfiguration of a flexible thin plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, Awan; Sawanni, Rajat; Kulkarni, Kaushik; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh

    2018-02-01

    We investigate drag reduction due to the flow-induced reconfiguration of a flexible thin plate in presence of skin friction drag at low Reynolds Number. The plate is subjected to a uniform free stream and is tethered at one end. We extend existing models in the literature to account for the skin friction drag. The total drag on the plate with respect to a rigid upright plate decreases due to flow-induced reconfiguration and further reconfiguration increases the total drag due to increase in skin friction drag. A critical value of Cauchy number ($Ca$) exists at which the total drag on the plate with respect to a rigid upright plate is minimum at a given Reynolds number. The reconfigured shape of the plate for this condition is unique, beyond which the total drag increases on the plate even with reconfiguration. The ratio of the form drag coefficient for an upright rigid plate and skin drag coefficient for a horizontal rigid plate ($\\lambda$) determines the critical Cauchy number ($Ca_{cr}$). We propose modification in the drag scaling with free stream velocity ($F_{x}$ ${\\propto}$ $U^{n}$) in presence of the skin friction drag. The following expressions of $n$ are found for $0.01 \\leq Re \\leq 1$, $n = 4/5 + {\\lambda}/5$ for 1 $\\leq$ $Ca$ $drag and buoyancy on the drag reduction. An assessment of the feasibility of experiments is presented in order to translate the present model to physical systems.

  14. Experimental determination of surface heat transfer coefficient in a dry ice-ethanol cooling bath using a numerical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    BACKGROUND: Dry ice-ethanol bath (-78 degree C) have been widely used in low temperature biological research to attain rapid cooling of samples below freezing temperature. The prediction of cooling rates of biological samples immersed in dry ice-ethanol bath is of practical interest in cryopreservation. The cooling rate can be obtained using mathematical models representing the heat conduction equation in transient state. Additionally, at the solid cryogenic-fluid interface, the knowledge of the surface heat transfer coefficient (h) is necessary for the convective boundary condition in order to correctly establish the mathematical problem. The study was to apply numerical modeling to obtain the surface heat transfer coefficient of a dry ice-ethanol bath. A numerical finite element solution of heat conduction equation was used to obtain surface heat transfer coefficients from measured temperatures at the center of polytetrafluoroethylene and polymethylmetacrylate cylinders immersed in a dry ice-ethanol cooling bath. The numerical model considered the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties of plastic materials used. A negative linear relationship is observed between cylinder diameter and heat transfer coefficient in the liquid bath, the calculated h values were 308, 135 and 62.5 W/(m 2 K) for PMMA 1.3, PTFE 2.59 and 3.14 cm in diameter, respectively. The calculated heat transfer coefficients were consistent among several replicates; h in dry ice-ethanol showed an inverse relationship with cylinder diameter.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of the Surface Runoff Coefficient of HiPIMS in Simulating Flood Processes in a Large Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueling Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To simulate flood processes at the basin level, the GPU-based High-Performance Integrated Hydrodynamic Modelling System (HiPIMS is gaining interest as computational capability increases. However, the difficulty of coping with rainfall input to HiPIMS reduces the possibility of acquiring a satisfactory simulation accuracy. The objective of this study is to test the sensitivity of the surface runoff coefficient in the HiPIMS source term in the Misai basin with an area of 797 km2 in south China. To achieve this, the basin was divided into 909,824 grid cells, to each of which a Manning coefficient was assigned based on its land use type interpreted from remote sensing data. A sensitivity analysis was conducted for three typical flood processes under four types of surface runoff coefficients, assumed a priori, upon three error functions. The results demonstrate the crucial role of the surface runoff coefficient in achieving better simulation accuracy and reveal that this coefficient varies with flood scale and is unevenly distributed over the basin.

  16. Cosmological Accretion Disks via External Radiation Drag

    OpenAIRE

    FUKUE, Jun; UMEMURA, Masayuki

    1994-01-01

    Accretion disks as well as disk accretion driven by external radiation drag are presented under a steady approximation in the cases of the point-mass potential and of the dark-matter potential. We assume that the external drag force can be expressed as -beta_v, where (beta) is a constant coefficient and v the velocity vector. When the gravitational potential is given by a central point-mass M, we find, in a cold regime where the pressure force is neglected, steady solutions such that the infa...

  17. Drag of a growing bubble at rectilinear accelerated ascension in pure liquids and binary solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ašković Radomir

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of predicting the drag coefficient of a growing bubble at rectilinear accelerated ascension in uniformly super­heated pure liquids and in binary solutions with a non-volatile solute at large Reynolds and Peclet numbers is discussed. In the case of pure liquids, the general solution for the drag coefficient of an accelerated growing bubble from its inception at the critical radius and through the surface-tension-, inertia-, and heat-diffusion-controlled regimes is established, as well as some necessary adaptations in the case of binary solutions with a non-volatile solute. Two particular limiting regimes in the case of pure liquids, inertia-controlled and heat-diffusion-controlled regimes, respectively, are analyzed in details, with satisfactory results. .

  18. Self-determined shapes and velocities of giant near-zero drag gas cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2017-09-09

    Minimizing the retarding force on a solid moving in liquid is the canonical problem in the quest for energy saving by friction and drag reduction. For an ideal object that cannot sustain any shear stress on its surface, theory predicts that drag force will fall to zero as its speed becomes large. However, experimental verification of this prediction has been challenging. We report the construction of a class of self-determined streamlined structures with this free-slip surface, made up of a teardrop-shaped giant gas cavity that completely encloses a metal sphere. This stable gas cavity is formed around the sphere as it plunges at a sufficiently high speed into the liquid in a deep tank, provided that the sphere is either heated initially to above the Leidenfrost temperature of the liquid or rendered superhydrophobic in water at room temperature. These sphere-in-cavity structures have residual drag coefficients that are typically less than Embedded Image those of solid objects of the same dimensions, which indicates that they experienced very small drag forces. The self-determined shapes of the gas cavities are shown to be consistent with the Bernoulli equation of potential flow applied on the cavity surface. The cavity fall velocity is not arbitrary but is uniquely predicted by the sphere density and cavity volume, so larger cavities have higher characteristic velocities.

  19. The collective diffusion coefficient as a shape detector of the surface energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mińkowski, Marcin; Załuska–Kotur, Magdalena A.

    2018-01-01

    The general expression for the diffusion coefficient for a dense, interacting particle system moving through a one-dimensional non-homogeneous energy potential is derived. Based on this expression, it is shown that the diffusion coefficient as a function of density depends to a great extent on the shape of the energy landscape. The presence of other particles affects the diffusion coefficient in another way as they pass through the same energy barriers, but set in a different order. The obtained result comes from a variational approach to diffusion and the interactions are taken into account using the transfer-matrix method. Interactions impact on the dynamics of the system, both by changing the equilibrium probabilities of the occupied states and by changing the barriers for the particle jumps. Several examples of diffusion in different energy potentials are presented and the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on potential and interactions is discussed.

  20. Aerodynamic Drag Scoping Work.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voskuilen, Tyler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erickson, Lindsay Crowl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knaus, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    This memo summarizes the aerodynamic drag scoping work done for Goodyear in early FY18. The work is to evaluate the feasibility of using Sierra/Low-Mach (Fuego) for drag predictions of rolling tires, particularly focused on the effects of tire features such as lettering, sidewall geometry, rim geometry, and interaction with the vehicle body. The work is broken into two parts. Part 1 consisted of investigation of a canonical validation problem (turbulent flow over a cylinder) using existing tools with different meshes and turbulence models. Part 2 involved calculating drag differences over plate geometries with simple features (ridges and grooves) defined by Goodyear of approximately the size of interest for a tire. The results of part 1 show the level of noise to be expected in a drag calculation and highlight the sensitivity of absolute predictions to model parameters such as mesh size and turbulence model. There is 20-30% noise in the experimental measurements on the canonical cylinder problem, and a similar level of variation between different meshes and turbulence models. Part 2 shows that there is a notable difference in the predicted drag on the sample plate geometries, however, the computational cost of extending the LES model to a full tire would be significant. This cost could be reduced by implementation of more sophisticated wall and turbulence models (e.g. detached eddy simulations - DES) and by focusing the mesh refinement on feature subsets with the goal of comparing configurations rather than absolute predictivity for the whole tire.

  1. Drag reduction in wave-swept macroalgae: alternative strategies and new predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Patrick T; Kost, Laurie; Boller, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Intertidal macroalgae must resist extreme hydrodynamic forces imposed by crashing waves. How does frond flexibility mitigate drag, and how does flexibility affect predictions of drag and dislodgement in the field? We characterized flexible reconfiguration of six seaweed species in a recirculating water flume, documenting both shape change and area reduction as fronds reorient. We then used a high-speed gravity-accelerated water flume to test our ability to predict drag under waves based on extrapolations of drag recorded at slower speeds. We compared dislodgement forces to drag forces predicted from slow- and high-speed data to generate new predictions of survivorship and maximum sustainable frond size along wave-swept shores. Bladed algae were generally "shape changers", limiting drag by reducing drag coefficients, whereas the branched alga Calliarthron was an "area reducer", limiting drag by reducing projected area in flow. Drag predictions often underestimated actual drag measurements at high speeds, suggesting that slow-speed data may not reflect the performance of flexible seaweeds under breaking waves. Several seaweeds were predicted to dislodge at similar combinations of velocity and frond size, suggesting common scaling factors of dislodgement strength and drag. Changing shape and reducing projected area in flow are two distinct strategies employed by flexible seaweeds to resist drag. Flexible reconfiguration contributes to the uncertainty of drag extrapolation, and researchers should use caution when predicting drag and dislodgement of seaweeds in the field.

  2. Analysis of Drag Reduction Methods and Mechanisms of Turbulent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yunqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent flow is a difficult issue in fluid dynamics, the rules of which have not been totally revealed up to now. Fluid in turbulent state will result in a greater frictional force, which must consume great energy. Therefore, it is not only an important influence in saving energy and improving energy utilization rate but also an extensive application prospect in many fields, such as ship domain and aerospace. Firstly, bionic drag reduction technology is reviewed and is a hot research issue now, the drag reduction mechanism of body surface structure is analyzed, such as sharks, earthworms, and dolphins. Besides, we make a thorough study of drag reduction characteristics and mechanisms of microgrooved surface and compliant wall. Then, the relevant drag reduction technologies and mechanisms are discussed, focusing on the microbubbles, the vibrant flexible wall, the coating, the polymer drag reduction additives, superhydrophobic surface, jet surface, traveling wave surface drag reduction, and the composite drag reduction methods. Finally, applications and advancements of the drag reduction technology in turbulence are prospected.

  3. Diffusion coefficients-surface and interfacial tensions - Particular study of some lauryl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Jean-Emile

    1969-01-01

    Two important results of the double lipophilic and hydrophilic character of some heavy organic compounds with a polar group at the end of the chain, were studied: - In a first part, molecular diffusion coefficients were measured in order to prove the micellar aggregation of tri-laurylammonium nitrate in some organic solutions; - In a second part, the tensioactivity of some lauryl compounds (lauric acid, lauric alcohol, mono-laurylamine, etc.), was studied. (author) [fr

  4. Octanol Water Partition Coefficients of Surface and Ground Water Contaminants Found at Military Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    34 method. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 8(6):499-512. 23. Geyer, H., G. Politzki, and Freitag, D. 1984. Prediction of ecotoxicological behavior of chemicals...relationship between N-octanol/water partition coefficient and bloaccunulation of organic chemicals by Alga Chlorella. Chemosphere 13(2):269-284. 24...Branch Preventive Medicine Division (HSHA-IPM) * Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234-5000 17 .1 *1 - I Iii L - U.S. Army Engineers Division, Huntsville 106 Wynn

  5. CFD simulation of direct contact condensation with ANSYS CFX using surface renewal theory based heat transfer coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanninger, Andreas; Ceuca, Sabin Cristian; Macian-Juan, Rafael [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Different approaches for the calculation of Direct Contact Condensation (DCC) using Heat Transfer Coefficients (HTC) based on the Surface Renewal Theory (SRT) are tested using the CFD simulation tool ANSYS CFX. The present work constitutes a preliminary study of the flow patterns and conditions observed using different HTC models. A complex 3D flow pattern will be observed in the CFD simulations as well as a strong coupling between the condensation rate and the two-phase flow dynamics. (orig.)

  6. Equations for calculating interfacial drag and shear from void fraction correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putney, J.M.

    1988-12-01

    Equations are developed for calculating interfacial drag and shear coefficients for dispersed vapour flows from void fraction correlations. The equations have a sound physical basis and lead to physically correct coefficients in all flow situations. (author)

  7. Drag prediction method of powered-on civil aircraft based on thrust drag bookkeeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yufei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A drag prediction method based on thrust drag bookkeeping (TDB is introduced for civil jet propulsion/airframe integration performance analysis. The method is derived from the control volume theory of a powered-on nacelle. Key problem of the TDB is identified to be accurate prediction of velocity coefficient of the powered-on nacelle. Accuracy of CFD solver is validated by test cases of the first AIAA Propulsion Aerodynamics Workshop. Then the TDB method is applied to thrust and drag decomposing of a realistic aircraft. A linear relation between the computations assumed free stream Mach number and the velocity coefficient result is revealed. The thrust losses caused by nozzle internal drag and pylon scrubbing are obtained by the isolated nacelle and mapped on to the in-flight whole configuration analysis. Effects of the powered-on condition are investigated by comparing through-flow configuration with powered-on configuration. The variance on aerodynamic coefficients and pressure distribution is numerically studied.

  8. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  9. The impact of surface and geometry on coefficient of friction of artificial hip joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Dipankar; Vrbka, Martin; Mamat, Azuddin Bin; Stavness, Ian; Roy, Chanchal K; Mootanah, Rajshree; Krupka, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    Coefficient of friction (COF) tests were conducted on 28-mm and 36-mm-diameter hip joint prostheses for four different material combinations, with or without the presence of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles using a novel pendulum hip simulator. The effects of three micro dimpled arrays on femoral head against a polyethylene and a metallic cup were also investigated. Clearance played a vital role in the COF of ceramic on polyethylene and ceramic on ceramic artificial hip joints. Micro dimpled metallic femoral heads yielded higher COF against a polyethylene cup; however, with metal on metal prostheses the dimpled arrays significantly reduced the COF. In situ images revealed evidence that the dimple arrays enhanced film formation, which was the main mechanism that contributed to reduced friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A characteristic function to estimate the longitudinal dispersion coefficient in surface water flows over porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofuentes, M.; Polo, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    One-dimensional modelling of solute transport in shallow water flows relies on an accurate approximation of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient, E, especially under transient conditions of the water flow during the solute residence time. Previous approaches have used expressions (e.g., the Rutherford equation) that allow the inclusion of spatiotemporal variability of E during the transport process, but their accuracy is reduced in marked transient regimes since the data were obtained from experimental work in rivers. This work proposes a different approach from experimental work with slow, shallow flows over porous media in fertigation essays, and provides us with a simple, parametric sigmoid function to estimate a priori effective values of E from simple measurements of flow characteristics and variables. The results have been successfully validated and compared to the Rutherford equation approach. Furthermore, the methodology to develop this characteristic function can be easily adapted for application in other practical cases.

  11. Mapping Surface Water DOC in the Northern Gulf of Mexico Using CDOM Absorption Coefficients and Remote Sensing Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B.; Chelsky, A.; Bulygina, E.; Roberts, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing techniques have become valuable tools to researchers, providing the capability to measure and visualize important parameters without the need for time or resource intensive sampling trips. Relationships between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and spectral data have been used to remotely sense DOC concentrations in riverine systems, however, this approach has not been applied to the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and needs to be tested to determine how accurate these relationships are in riverine-dominated shelf systems. In April, July, and October 2017 we sampled surface water from 80+ sites over an area of 100,000 km2 along the Louisiana-Texas shelf in the northern GoM. DOC concentrations were measured on filtered water samples using a Shimadzu TOC-VCSH analyzer using standard techniques. Additionally, DOC concentrations were estimated from CDOM absorption coefficients of filtered water samples on a UV-Vis spectrophotometer using a modification of the methods of Fichot and Benner (2011). These values were regressed against Landsat visible band spectral data for those same locations to establish a relationship between the spectral data, CDOM absorption coefficients. This allowed us to spatially map CDOM absorption coefficients in the Gulf of Mexico using the Landsat spectral data in GIS. We then used a multiple linear regressions model to derive DOC concentrations from the CDOM absorption coefficients and applied those to our map. This study provides an evaluation of the viability of scaling up CDOM absorption coefficient and remote-sensing derived estimates of DOC concentrations to the scale of the LA-TX shelf ecosystem.

  12. The effect of surface tension on the contraction coefficient of a jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasmi, A; Mekias, H

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional free surface potential flow issued from an opening of a container is considered. The flow is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible. The mathematical problem, which is characterized by the nonlinear boundary condition on the free surface of an unknown equation, is solved via a series truncation. We computed solutions for all Weber numbers. Our problem is an extension of the work done by Ackerberg and Liu (1987 Phys. Fluids 30 289-96), the results confirm and extend their results

  13. Incorporation of velocity-dependent restitution coefficient and particle surface friction into kinetic theory for modeling granular flow cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yifei; Feng, Zhi-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Kinetic theory (KT) has been successfully used to model rapid granular flows in which particle interactions are frictionless and near elastic. However, it fails when particle interactions become frictional and inelastic. For example, the KT is not able to accurately predict the free cooling process of a vibrated granular medium that consists of inelastic frictional particles under microgravity. The main reason that the classical KT fails to model these flows is due to its inability to account for the particle surface friction and its inelastic behavior, which are the two most important factors that need be considered in modeling collisional granular flows. In this study, we have modified the KT model that is able to incorporate these two factors. The inelasticity of a particle is considered by establishing a velocity-dependent expression for the restitution coefficient based on many experimental studies found in the literature, and the particle friction effect is included by using a tangential restitution coefficient that is related to the particle friction coefficient. Theoretical predictions of the free cooling process by the classical KT and the improved KT are compared with the experimental results from a study conducted on an airplane undergoing parabolic flights without the influence of gravity [Y. Grasselli, G. Bossis, and G. Goutallier, Europhys. Lett. 86, 60007 (2009)10.1209/0295-5075/86/60007]. Our results show that both the velocity-dependent restitution coefficient and the particle surface friction are important in predicting the free cooling process of granular flows; the modified KT model that integrates these two factors is able to improve the simulation results and leads to better agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Incorporation of velocity-dependent restitution coefficient and particle surface friction into kinetic theory for modeling granular flow cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yifei; Feng, Zhi-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Kinetic theory (KT) has been successfully used to model rapid granular flows in which particle interactions are frictionless and near elastic. However, it fails when particle interactions become frictional and inelastic. For example, the KT is not able to accurately predict the free cooling process of a vibrated granular medium that consists of inelastic frictional particles under microgravity. The main reason that the classical KT fails to model these flows is due to its inability to account for the particle surface friction and its inelastic behavior, which are the two most important factors that need be considered in modeling collisional granular flows. In this study, we have modified the KT model that is able to incorporate these two factors. The inelasticity of a particle is considered by establishing a velocity-dependent expression for the restitution coefficient based on many experimental studies found in the literature, and the particle friction effect is included by using a tangential restitution coefficient that is related to the particle friction coefficient. Theoretical predictions of the free cooling process by the classical KT and the improved KT are compared with the experimental results from a study conducted on an airplane undergoing parabolic flights without the influence of gravity [Y. Grasselli, G. Bossis, and G. Goutallier, Europhys. Lett. 86, 60007 (2009), 10.1209/0295-5075/86/60007]. Our results show that both the velocity-dependent restitution coefficient and the particle surface friction are important in predicting the free cooling process of granular flows; the modified KT model that integrates these two factors is able to improve the simulation results and leads to better agreement with the experimental results.

  15. New sensitive micro-measurements of dynamic surface tension and diffusion coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinoshita, Koji; Ortiz, Elisa Parra; Needham, David

    2017-01-01

    Currently available dynamic surface tension (DST) measurement methods, such as Wilhelmy plate, droplet- or bubble-based methods, still have various experimental limitations such as the large size of the interface, convection in the solution, or a certain “dead time” at initial measurement. These ...

  16. The coefficient of restitution of ice particles in glancing collisions: Experimental results for unfrosted surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supulver, Kimberley D.; Bridges, Frank G.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1995-01-01

    Both Saturn's rings and planetesimal disks are made up of particles in Keplerian orbits. Inelastic collisions between these particles regulate their dynamical evolution and possible aggregation. We present an experiment to simulate glancing collisions in Saturn's rings and in planetesimal disks and thus measure contributions to the energy loss for both normal and tangential velocity components. In this experiment, a spherical iceball mounted on a long-period, two dimensional pendulum is made to impact a flat ice surface in a low-temperature environment. This paper describes the experimental apparatus in detail and presents results for smooth unfrosted surfaces. The energy loss for tangential motion is suprisingly low, indicating that very little friction is present at low impact speeds for relatively smooth ice surfaces and temperatures near 100 K. We have also investigated room-temperature collisions of a rubber ball on a rough surface to understand the energy loss in situations where the tangential friction force is not small. In this analogous case, the energy loss is maximum for impact angles in the range 45 deg-60 deg.

  17. Distinct positive temperature coefficient effect of polymer-carbon fiber composites evaluated in terms of polymer absorption on fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Shaodi; Zheng, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhengying; Yang, Wei; Yang, Mingbo

    2016-03-21

    In this article, the positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was studied for high-density polyethylene (HDPE)/carbon fiber (CF) composites. All of the samples showed a significant PTC effect during the heating processes without a negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect, even at a temperature much higher than the melting point of the polymer matrix. An ever-increasing PTC intensity with increasing thermal cycles was observed in our study that had never been reported in previous research. The absence of a NTC effect resulted from the increased binding force between the matrix and fillers that contributed to the very special structure of CF surface. We incorporated thermal expansion theory and quantum tunneling effects to explain PTC effect. From the SEM micrographs for the HDPE/CF composites before and after the different thermal cycles, we found that the surface of CF was covered with a layer of polymer which resulted in a change in the gap length between CF and HDPE and its distribution. We believed that the gap change induced by polymer absorption on the fiber surface had a great effect on the PTC effect.

  18. Effect of surface tension and coefficient of thermal expansion in 30 nm scale nanoimprinting with two flexible polymer molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Kwan; Cho, Hye Sung; Jung, Ho-Sup; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Lim, Kipil; Kim, Ki-Bum; Choi, Dae-Geun; Jeong, Jun-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We report on nanoimprinting of polymer thin films at 30 nm scale resolution using two types of ultraviolet (UV)-curable, flexible polymer molds: perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and polyurethane acrylate (PUA). It was found that the quality of nanopatterning at the 30 nm scale is largely determined by the combined effects of surface tension and the coefficient of thermal expansion of the polymer mold. In particular, the polar component of surface tension may play a critical role in clean release of the mold, as evidenced by much reduced delamination or broken structures for the less polarized PFPE mold when patterning a relatively hydrophilic PMMA film. In contrast, such problems were not notably observed with a relatively hydrophobic PS film for both polymer molds. In addition, the demolding characteristic was also influenced by the coefficient of thermal expansion so that no delamination or uniformity problems were observed when patterning a UV-curable polymer film at room temperature. These results suggest that a proper polymeric mold material needs to be chosen for patterning polymer films under different surface properties and processing conditions, providing insights into how a clean demolding characteristic can be obtained at 30 nm scale nanopatterning. (paper)

  19. Asymmetric spatial soliton dragging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, S; Wagner, K; McLeod, R

    1994-12-01

    A new low-latency, cascadable optical logic gate with gain, high contrast, and three-terminal input-output isolation is introduced. The interaction between two orthogonally polarized spatial solitons brought into coincidence at the boundary of a saturating nonlinear medium and propagating in different directions results in the phase-insensitive spatial dragging of a strong pump soliton by a weaker signal. As a result, the strong pump is transmitted through an aperture when the weak signal is not present, and it is dragged to the side by more than a beam width and blocked in the presence of the weak signal, thus implementing an inverter with gain. A multi-input, logically complete NOR gate also can be implemented in a cascaded system.

  20. The effect of surface roughness on the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.M.

    1963-02-01

    The effect of various types of roughness on the wall of an axial tube in an annular space of 15-25 mm cooled by an air-flow has been studied in the case of steady turbulence. Roughness of the type 'disrupter of the boundary layer' was set up using triangular threads of 0.2 to 0.4 mm thickness machined in the tube itself, or brass or glass wire wound on a smooth tube. Tests were also carried out using the roughness provided by regularly spaced pyramids 0.4 mm high. The results obtained showed that the heat exchange increased because of the presence of this roughness. A maximum in the heat exchange and pressure-drop coefficients was observed when the pitch equals about eight times the height of the thread. An analytical method has been developed and experiments have been carried out in which the two walls of the annular space were heated in such a way as to transmit unequal heat flows. The region considered is limited to Reynolds's numbers of between 5 X 10 3 and 5 x 10 4 and wall temperatures of under 250 deg C. (author) [fr

  1. Studies of Aerodynamic Drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    t is the thickness of the perspex (6 mm) and N is the refractive index (N = 1.495). For x., 6xo ^ 0.7 mm which is just significant. Snail errors...S.C. & 1974 "Anomalous Drag Reducing Phenor-ena at Ling, T.Y. a Water/Fish Mucus or Polymer Interface" J. Fluid Mech. 65 pp 499-512. Ludwieg, 11. 1950

  2. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  3. Poloidal density variation of impurities in a rotating tokamak plasma - flux surface coordinates and effect on transport coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, M.

    1999-09-01

    The poloidal variation of impurity densities over magnetic surfaces brings about an enhancement of neoclassical transport coefficients, as shown by Romanelli and Ottaviani for impurities in the Pfirsch Schlueter regime and by Helander for particles in the banana-plateau regime, both in a large aspect ratio tokamak. The same effect will occur in a finite aspect ratio tokamak and therefore it is considered to be relevant for inclusion in transport codes for comparison with the experimental measurements of impurity transport. Here an expression for the impurity-density poloidal-variation generated by the fast toroidal rotation of the plasma column is presented in general coordinates. (author)

  4. Numerical Study of the Generic Sports Utility Vehicle Design with a Drag Reduction Add-On Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CFD simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 6.3.26 have been performed on a generic SUV design and the settings are validated using the experimental results investigated by Khalighi. Moreover, an add-on inspired by the concept presented by Englar at GTRI for drag reduction has been designed and added to the generic SUV design. CFD results of add-on model and the basic SUV model have been compared for a number of aerodynamic parameters. Also drag coefficient, drag force, mean surface pressure, mean velocities, and Cp values at different locations in the wake have been compared for both models. The main objective of the study is to present a new add-on device which may be used on SUVs for increasing the fuel efficiency of the vehicle. Mean pressure results show an increase in the total base pressure on the SUV after using the device. An overall reduction of 8% in the aerodynamic drag coefficient on the add-on SUV has been investigated analytically in this study.

  5. Aerodynamic drag modeling of alpine skiers performing giant slalom turns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Frédéric; Le Pelley, David; Borrani, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Aerodynamic drag plays an important role in performance for athletes practicing sports that involve high-velocity motions. In giant slalom, the skier is continuously changing his/her body posture, and this affects the energy dissipated in aerodynamic drag. It is therefore important to quantify this energy to understand the dynamic behavior of the skier. The aims of this study were to model the aerodynamic drag of alpine skiers in giant slalom simulated conditions and to apply these models in a field experiment to estimate energy dissipated through aerodynamic drag. The aerodynamic characteristics of 15 recreational male and female skiers were measured in a wind tunnel while holding nine different skiing-specific postures. The drag and the frontal area were recorded simultaneously for each posture. Four generalized and two individualized models of the drag coefficient were built, using different sets of parameters. These models were subsequently applied in a field study designed to compare the aerodynamic energy losses between a dynamic and a compact skiing technique. The generalized models estimated aerodynamic drag with an accuracy of between 11.00% and 14.28%, and the individualized models estimated aerodynamic drag with an accuracy between 4.52% and 5.30%. The individualized model used for the field study showed that using a dynamic technique led to 10% more aerodynamic drag energy loss than using a compact technique. The individualized models were capable of discriminating different techniques performed by advanced skiers and seemed more accurate than the generalized models. The models presented here offer a simple yet accurate method to estimate the aerodynamic drag acting upon alpine skiers while rapidly moving through the range of positions typical to turning technique.

  6. Synthetic Effect of Vivid Shark Skin and Polymer Additive on Drag Reduction Reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Huawei Chen; Xin Zhang; Da Che; Deyuan Zhang; Xiang Li; Yuanyue Li

    2014-01-01

    Natural shark skin has a well-demonstrated drag reduction function, which is mainly owing to its microscopic structure and mucus on the body surface. In order to improve drag reduction, it is necessary to integrate microscopic drag reduction structure and drag reduction agent. In this study, two hybrid approaches to synthetically combine vivid shark skin and polymer additive, namely, long-chain grafting and controllable polymer diffusion, were proposed and attempted to mimic such hierarchical...

  7. Measurements of drag and flow over biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenberger, Joel; Gose, James W.; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Microbial `slime' biofilms detrimentally affect the performance of every day systems from medical devices to large ocean-going vessels. In flow applications, the presence of biofilm typically results in a drag increase and may alter the turbulence in the adjacent boundary layer. Recent studies emphasize the severity of the drag penalty associated with soft biofouling and suggest potential mechanisms underlying the increase; yet, fundamental questions remain-such as the role played by compliance and the contribution of form drag to the overall resistance experienced by a fouled system. Experiments conducted on live biofilm and 3D printed rigid replicas in the Skin-Friction Flow Facility at the University of Michigan seek to examine these factors. The hydrodynamic performance of the biofilms grown on test panels was evaluated through pressure drop measurements as well as conventional and microscale PIV. High-resolution, 3D rigid replicas of select cases were generated via additive manufacturing using surface profiles obtained from a laser scanning system. Drag and flow measurements will be presented along with details of the growth process and the surface profile characterization method.

  8. London 2012 Paralympic swimming: passive drag and the classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yim-Taek; Burkett, Brendan; Osborough, Conor; Formosa, Danielle; Payton, Carl

    2013-09-01

    The key difference between the Olympic and Paralympic Games is the use of classification systems within Paralympic sports to provide a fair competition for athletes with a range of physical disabilities. In 2009, the International Paralympic Committee mandated the development of new, evidence-based classification systems. This study aims to assess objectively the swimming classification system by determining the relationship between passive drag and level of swimming-specific impairment, as defined by the current swimming class. Data were collected on participants at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. The passive drag force of 113 swimmers (classes 3-14) was measured using an electro-mechanical towing device and load cell. Swimmers were towed on the surface of a swimming pool at 1.5 m/s while holding their most streamlined position. Passive drag ranged from 24.9 to 82.8 N; the normalised drag (drag/mass) ranged from 0.45 to 1.86 N/kg. Significant negative associations were found between drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.41, p < 0.01) and normalised drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.60, p < 0.01). The mean difference in drag between adjacent classes was inconsistent, ranging from 0 N (6 vs 7) to 11.9 N (5 vs 6). Reciprocal Ponderal Index (a measure of slenderness) correlated moderately with normalised drag (r(P) = -0.40, p < 0.01). Although swimmers with the lowest swimming class experienced the highest passive drag and vice versa, the inconsistent difference in mean passive drag between adjacent classes indicates that the current classification system does not always differentiate clearly between swimming groups.

  9. Variability of Bed Drag on Cohesive Beds under Wave Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgar Safak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law, a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 - 4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  10. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10 -4">−4 m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  11. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.

    2017-10-17

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  12. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Joseph D.; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (1 02≤Re≤4 ×1 04) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  13. Experimental assessment of blade tip immersion depth from free surface on average power and thrust coefficients of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Flack, Karen; Luznik, Luksa

    2014-11-01

    Results from an experimental study on the effects of marine current turbine immersion depth from the free surface are presented. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D = 0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy. Thrust and torque are measured using a dynamometer, mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using a shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Two optical wave height sensors are used to measure the free surface elevation. The turbine is towed at 1.68 m/s, resulting in a 70% chord based Rec = 4 × 105. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is installed one turbine diameter upstream of the turbine rotation plane to characterize the inflow turbulence. Measurements are obtained at four relative blade tip immersion depths of z/D = 0.5, 0.4, 0.3, and 0.2 at a TSR value of 7 to identify the depth where free surface effects impact overall turbine performance. The overall average power and thrust coefficient are presented and compared to previously conducted baseline tests. The influence of wake expansion blockage on the turbine performance due to presence of the free surface at these immersion depths will also be discussed.

  14. Shell selection of hermit crabs is influenced by fluid drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Barbara; Ledesma, Rene; Alcaraz, Guillermina; Zenit, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    The flow around gastropod shells used by hermit crabs (Calcinus californiensis) was visualized experimentally. These crabs choose their shells according to many factors; we found that the choice of shell (shape and weight) is directly related to the drag caused over them by the exposure to wave action. Tests were conducted in a wind tunnel to investigate flow differences for shells of various shapes. A particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to visualize the flow field. The images above show the flow field around two types of shells (Thais speciosa and Nerita scabircosta) for Reynolds numbers of O(10^5). Using a control volume analysis, the drag coefficient was inferred. Several shell geometries, orientations and mean flow velocities were tested. In this talk, the flow and drag force will be shown for the different arrangements. A discussion of the relation between drag and shape will be presented.

  15. Drag reduction through self-texturing compliant bionic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Eryong; Li, Longyang; Wang, Gang; Zeng, Zhixiang; Zhao, Wenjie; Xue, Qunji

    2017-01-01

    Compliant fish skin is effectively in reducing drag, thus the design and application of compliant bionic materials may be a good choice for drag reduction. Here we consider the drag reduction of compliant bionic materials. First, ZnO and PDMS mesh modified with n-octadecane were prepared, the drag reduction of self-texturing compliant n-octadecane were studied. The results show that the mesh modified by ZnO and PDMS possess excellent lipophilic and hydrophobic, thus n-octadecane at solid, semisolid and liquid state all have good adhesion with modified mesh. The states of n-octadecane changed with temperature, thus, the surface contact angle and adhesive force all varies obviously at different state. The contact angle decreases with temperature, the adhesive force shows a lower value at semisolid state. Furthermore, the drag testing results show that the compliant n-octadecane film is more effectively in drag reduction than superhydrophobic ZnO/PDMS film, indicating that the drag reduction mechanism of n-octadecane is significantly different with superhydrophobic film. Further research shows that the water flow leads to self-texturing of semisolid state n-octadecane, which is similar with compliant fish skin. Therefore, the compliant bionic materials of semisolid state n-octadecane with regular bulge plays a major role in the drag reduction.

  16. Influence of inhomogeneous surface heat capacity on the estimation of radiative response coefficients in a two-zone energy balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungmin; Choi, Yong-Sang

    2018-04-01

    Observationally constrained values of the global radiative response coefficient are pivotal to assess the reliability of modeled climate feedbacks. A widely used approach is to measure transient global radiative imbalance related to surface temperature changes. However, in this approach, a potential error in the estimate of radiative response coefficients may arise from surface inhomogeneity in the climate system. We examined this issue theoretically using a simple two-zone energy balance model. Here, we dealt with the potential error by subtracting the prescribed radiative response coefficient from those calculated within the two-zone framework. Each zone was characterized by the different magnitude of the radiative response coefficient and the surface heat capacity, and the dynamical heat transport in the atmosphere between the zones was parameterized as a linear function of the temperature difference between the zones. Then, the model system was forced by randomly generated monthly varying forcing mimicking time-varying forcing like an observation. The repeated simulations showed that inhomogeneous surface heat capacity causes considerable miscalculation (down to -1.4 W m-2 K-1 equivalent to 31.3% of the prescribed value) in the global radiative response coefficient. Also, the dynamical heat transport reduced this miscalculation driven by inhomogeneity of surface heat capacity. Therefore, the estimation of radiative response coefficients using the surface temperature-radiation relation is appropriate for homogeneous surface areas least affected by the exterior.

  17. Creating drag and lift curves from soccer trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric; Kelley, John; Hobson, Chad M.; Seo, Kazuya; Asai, Takeshi; Choppin, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    Trajectory analysis is an alternative to using wind tunnels to measure a soccer ball’s aerodynamic properties. It has advantages over wind tunnel testing such as being more representative of game play. However, previous work has not presented a method that produces complete, speed-dependent drag and lift coefficients. Four high-speed cameras in stereo-calibrated pairs were used to measure the spatial co-ordinates for 29 separate soccer trajectories. Those trajectories span a range of launch speeds from 9.3 to 29.9 m s-1. That range encompasses low-speed laminar flow of air over a soccer ball, through the drag crises where air flow is both laminar and turbulent, and up to high-speed turbulent air flow. Results from trajectory analysis were combined to give speed-dependent drag and lift coefficient curves for the entire range of speeds found in the 29 trajectories. The average root mean square error between the measured and modelled trajectory was 0.028 m horizontally and 0.034 m vertically. The drag and lift crises can be observed in the plots of drag and lift coefficients respectively.

  18. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi, E-mail: yezhi@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi [Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University and Cyrus Tang Centre for Sensor Materials and Applications, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse, 7/2/366-MST, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Luo, J. K., E-mail: yezhi@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk [Institute of Renewable Energy Environmental Technology, University of Bolton, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom); Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University and Cyrus Tang Centre for Sensor Materials and Applications, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  19. Aerodynamic drag of modern soccer balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Takeshi; Seo, Kazuya

    2013-12-01

    Soccer balls such as the Adidas Roteiro that have been used in soccer tournaments thus far had 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, the Adidas Teamgeist II and Adidas Jabulani, respectively having 14 and 8 panels, have been used at tournaments; the aerodynamic characteristics of these balls have not yet been verified. Now, the Adidas Tango 12, having 32 panels, has been developed for use at tournaments; therefore, it is necessary to understand its aerodynamic characteristics. Through a wind tunnel test and ball trajectory simulations, this study shows that the aerodynamic resistance of the new 32-panel soccer ball is larger in the high-speed region and lower in the middle-speed region than that of the previous 14- and 8-panel balls. The critical Reynolds number of the Roteiro, Teamgeist II, Jabulani, and Tango 12 was ~2.2 × 10(5) (drag coefficient, C d  ≈ 0.12), ~2.8 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), ~3.3 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.13), and ~2.4 × 10(5) (C d  ≈ 0.15), respectively. The flight trajectory simulation suggested that the Tango 12, one of the newest soccer balls, has less air resistance in the medium-speed region than the Jabulani and can thus easily acquire large initial velocity in this region. It is considered that the critical Reynolds number of a soccer ball, as considered within the scope of this experiment, depends on the extended total distance of the panel bonds rather than the small designs on the panel surfaces.

  20. Drag Reducing and Cavitation Resistant Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, Leonard F.

    2016-12-28

    Client, Green Building Systems (GBS), presented PNNL a coating reported to reduce drag and prevent cavitation damage on marine vessels, turbines and pumps. The composition of the coating remains proprietary but has as constituents including silicon oxides, aliphatic carbon chains, and fluorine rich particles. The coating is spray applied to surfaces. Prior GBS testing and experiments suggest reduction of both drag and cavitation on industrial scale propellers, but the underlying mechanism for these effects remains unclear. Yet, the application is compelling because even modest reductions in drag to marine vessels and cavitation to propellers and turbines present a significant economic and environmental opportunity. To discern among possible mechanisms, PNNL considered possible mechanisms with the client, executed multiple experiments, and completed one theoretical analysis (see appendix). The remainder of this report first considers image analysis to gain insight into drag reduction mechanisms and then exposes the coating to cavitation to explore its response to an intensely cavitating environment. Although further efforts may be warranted to confirm mechanisms, this report presents a first investigation into these coatings within the scope and resources of the technology assistance program (TAP).

  1. Concentrated energy addition for active drag reduction in hypersonic flow regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin Ganesh, M.; John, Bibin

    2018-01-01

    Numerical optimization of hypersonic drag reduction technique based on concentrated energy addition is presented in this study. A reduction in wave drag is realized through concentrated energy addition in the hypersonic flowfield upstream of the blunt body. For the exhaustive optimization presented in this study, an in-house high precision inviscid flow solver has been developed. Studies focused on the identification of "optimum energy addition location" have revealed the existence of multiple minimum drag points. The wave drag coefficient is observed to drop from 0.85 to 0.45 when 50 Watts of energy is added to an energy bubble of 1 mm radius located at 74.7 mm upstream of the stagnation point. A direct proportionality has been identified between energy bubble size and wave drag coefficient. Dependence of drag coefficient on the upstream added energy magnitude is also revealed. Of the observed multiple minimum drag points, the energy deposition point (EDP) that offers minimum wave drag just after a sharp drop in drag is proposed as the most optimum energy addition location.

  2. First-order exchange coefficient coupling for simulating surface water-groundwater interactions: Parameter sensitivity and consistency with a physics-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, B.A.; Mirus, B.B.; Heppner, C.S.; VanderKwaak, J.E.; Loague, K.

    2009-01-01

    Distributed hydrologic models capable of simulating fully-coupled surface water and groundwater flow are increasingly used to examine problems in the hydrologic sciences. Several techniques are currently available to couple the surface and subsurface; the two most frequently employed approaches are first-order exchange coefficients (a.k.a., the surface conductance method) and enforced continuity of pressure and flux at the surface-subsurface boundary condition. The effort reported here examines the parameter sensitivity of simulated hydrologic response for the first-order exchange coefficients at a well-characterized field site using the fully coupled Integrated Hydrology Model (InHM). This investigation demonstrates that the first-order exchange coefficients can be selected such that the simulated hydrologic response is insensitive to the parameter choice, while simulation time is considerably reduced. Alternatively, the ability to choose a first-order exchange coefficient that intentionally decouples the surface and subsurface facilitates concept-development simulations to examine real-world situations where the surface-subsurface exchange is impaired. While the parameters comprising the first-order exchange coefficient cannot be directly estimated or measured, the insensitivity of the simulated flow system to these parameters (when chosen appropriately) combined with the ability to mimic actual physical processes suggests that the first-order exchange coefficient approach can be consistent with a physics-based framework. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Response Surface Modeling Tool Suite, Version 1.x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-07-05

    The Response Surface Modeling (RSM) Tool Suite is a collection of three codes used to generate an empirical interpolation function for a collection of drag coefficient calculations computed with Test Particle Monte Carlo (TPMC) simulations. The first code, "Automated RSM", automates the generation of a drag coefficient RSM for a particular object to a single command. "Automated RSM" first creates a Latin Hypercube Sample (LHS) of 1,000 ensemble members to explore the global parameter space. For each ensemble member, a TPMC simulation is performed and the object drag coefficient is computed. In the next step of the "Automated RSM" code, a Gaussian process is used to fit the TPMC simulations. In the final step, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) is used to evaluate the non-analytic probability distribution function from the Gaussian process. The second code, "RSM Area", creates a look-up table for the projected area of the object based on input limits on the minimum and maximum allowed pitch and yaw angles and pitch and yaw angle intervals. The projected area from the look-up table is used to compute the ballistic coefficient of the object based on its pitch and yaw angle. An accurate ballistic coefficient is crucial in accurately computing the drag on an object. The third code, "RSM Cd", uses the RSM generated by the "Automated RSM" code and the projected area look-up table generated by the "RSM Area" code to accurately compute the drag coefficient and ballistic coefficient of the object. The user can modify the object velocity, object surface temperature, the translational temperature of the gas, the species concentrations of the gas, and the pitch and yaw angles of the object. Together, these codes allow for the accurate derivation of an object's drag coefficient and ballistic coefficient under any conditions with only knowledge of the object's geometry and mass.

  4. Stokes drag on a disc with a Navier slip condition near a plane wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, J D

    2013-01-01

    The Stokes drag and couple acting on a disc moving through incompressible Newtonian fluid are investigated for the case when the fluid obeys a Navier slip condition, with slip length b, on the surface of the disc. The fluid is bounded by an infinite plane wall on which there is no slip. The disc, of zero thickness and radius a, is parallel to the wall and distance h from it. Analyses are presented for the limits h ≫ a and h ≪ a; results for intermediate values of the separation h are obtained numerically by means of Tranter's method. The resistance coefficients for translation normal to the disc surface, and for rotation about a diameter, are unaffected by slip when the disc lies in unbounded fluid, but all resistance coefficients depend upon the slip length b when the disc is close to the wall. Their dependence on h becomes weak when b ≫ a. (paper)

  5. Drag derived altitude aided navigation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua SONG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The navigation problem of the lifting reentry vehicles has attracted much research interest in the past decade. This paper researches the navigation in the blackout zone during the reentry phase of the aircraft, when the communication signals are attenuated and even interrupted by the blackout zone. However, when calculating altitude, a pure classic inertial navigation algorithm appears imprecise and divergent. In order to obtain a more precise aircraft altitude, this paper applies an integrated navigation method based on inertial navigation algorithms, which uses drag derived altitude to aid the inertial navigation during the blackout zone. This method can overcome the shortcomings of the inertial navigation system and improve the navigation accuracy. To further improve the navigation accuracy, the applicable condition and the main error factors, such as the atmospheric coefficient error and drag coefficient error are analyzed in detail. Then the damping circuit design of the navigation control system and the damping coefficients determination is introduced. The feasibility of the method is verified by the typical reentry trajectory simulation, and the influence of the iterative times on the accuracy is analyzed. Simulation results show that iterative three times achieves the best effect.

  6. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  7. Spanwise drag variation on low Re wings -- revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shanling; Spedding, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    Aerodynamic performance measurement and prediction of airfoils and wings at chord Reynolds numbers below 105 is both difficult and increasingly important in application to small-scale aircraft. Not only are the aerodynamics strongly affected by the dynamics of the unstable laminar boundary layer but the flow is decreasingly likely to be two-dimensional as Re decreases. The spanwise variation of the flow along a two-dimensional geometry is often held to be responsible for the large variations in measured profile drag coefficient. Here we measure local two-dimensional drag coefficients along a finite wing using non-intrusive PIV methods. Variations in Cd (y) can be related to local flow variations on the wing itself. Integrated values can be compared with force balance data, and the proper description of drag components at low Re will be discussed.

  8. Electron and phonon drag in thermoelectric transport through coherent molecular conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Hedegård, Per

    2016-01-01

    there are at least two phonon degrees of freedom. After deriving expressions for the linear drag coefficients, obeying the Onsager relation, we further investigate their effect on nonequilibrium transport. We show that the drag effect is closely related to two other phenomena: (1) adiabatic charge pumping through...

  9. Microscopic treatment of solute trapping and drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humadi, Harith; Hoyt, J. J.; Provatas, Nikolas

    2016-01-01

    The long wavelength limit of a recent microscopic phase-field crystal (PFC) theory of a binary alloy mixture is used to derive an analytical approximation for the segregation coefficient as a function of the interface velocity, and relate it to the two-point correlation function of the liquid and the thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid phases. Our results offer the first analytical derivation of solute segregation from a microscopic model, and support recent molecular dynamics and numerical PFC simulations. Our results also provide an independent framework, motivated from classical density functional theory, from which to elucidate the fundamental nature of solute drag, which is still highly contested in the literature.

  10. Effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the temperature coefficient of surface resistivity of two-dimensional island platinum films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishay, A.G. [Engineering Mathematics and Physics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Gamal, S., E-mail: samyelgamal@gmail.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-05-15

    Three sets (A, B and C) of two-dimensional island platinum films (2D-I(Pt)Fs) were prepared via the thermal evaporation technique, where the substrates are corning 7059 glass slides. The mass thickness (d{sub m}) of the films of different sets is 5, 10 and 20 A, respectively. The Pt films were exposed to {gamma}-rays from {sup 137}Cs (0.662 MeV) radiation source of dose rate 0.5 Gy/min. and the different doses are 100, 200, 300, 500 and 700 Gy. The dependence of the surface resistivity ({rho}) on temperature over the range of 100-300 K was undertaken at different d{sub m} and doses then the temperature coefficient of surface resistivity ({alpha}) was deduced. It was found that; (i) for particular d{sub m} and T, the absolute value of {alpha} decreases as the dose increases (ii) for particular dose and T, the absolute value of {alpha} decreases as d{sub m} increases (iii) for particular dose and d{sub m}, the absolute value of {alpha} decreases as T increases. Qualitative interpretation for the results was offered on the ground that the electrons transfer among islands takes place by the activated tunneling mechanism and the {gamma}-irradiation has changed the shape of islands from spherical to prolate spheroid.

  11. Rotating cylinder drag balance with application to riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, T.; Joseph, D.

    2000-12-01

    Experimental results are reported and discussed for a rotating cylinder drag balance designed to predict drag reduction by surfaces like riblets. The apparatus functions by measuring the torque applied to the inner cylinder by a fluid, such as water, that is set in motion by the controlled rotation of the outer cylinder. The instrument was validated by calibration for laminar flow and comparison of turbulent flow results to the those of G. I. Taylor. The ability to predict drag reduction was demonstrated by testing 114 m symmetric sawtooth riblets, which gave a maximum reduction of about 5% and an overall drag reduction range of 5surface and to use cylinders for which the curvature of the flow is minimized.

  12. Measurements of Heat-Transfer and Friction Coefficients for Helium Flowing in a Tube at Surface Temperatures up to 5900 Deg R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Maynard F.; Kirchgessner, Thomas A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of average heat transfer and friction coefficients and local heat transfer coefficients were made with helium flowing through electrically heated smooth tubes with length-diameter ratios of 60 and 92 for the following range of conditions: Average surface temperature from 1457 to 4533 R, Reynolds numbe r from 3230 to 60,000, heat flux up to 583,200 Btu per hr per ft2 of heat transfer area, and exit Mach numbe r up to 1.0. The results indicate that, in the turbulent range of Reynolds number, good correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is obtained when the physical properties and density of helium are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average heat transfer coefficients are best correlated on the basis that the coefficient varies with [1 + (L/D))(sup -0,7)] and that the physical properties and density are evaluated at the surface temperature. The average friction coefficients for the tests with no heat addition are in complete agreement with the Karman-Nikuradse line. The average friction coefficients for heat addition are in poor agreement with the accepted line.

  13. Innovative Flow Control Concepts for Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, John C.; Whalen, Edward A.; Eppink, Jenna L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Alexander, Michael G.; Andino, Marlyn Y.

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the technology development of two flow control concepts for aircraft drag reduction. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project worked with Boeing to demonstrate these two concepts on a specially outfitted Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator during the spring of 2015. The first flow control concept used Active Flow Control (AFC) to delay flow separation on a highly deflected rudder and increase the side force that it generates. This may enable a smaller vertical tail to provide the control authority needed in the event of an engine failure during takeoff and landing, while still operating in a conventional manner over the rest of the flight envelope. Thirty-one sweeping jet AFC actuators were installed and successfully flight-tested on the vertical tail of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. Pilot feedback, flow cone visualization, and analysis of the flight test data confirmed that the AFC is effective, as a smoother flight and enhanced rudder control authority were reported. The second flow control concept is the Insect Accretion Mitigation (IAM) innovation where surfaces were engineered to mitigate insect residue adhesion on a wing's leading edge. This is necessary because something as small as an insect residue on the leading edge of a laminar flow wing design can cause turbulent wedges that interrupt laminar flow, resulting in an increase in drag and fuel use. Several non-stick coatings were developed by NASA and applied to panels that were mounted on the leading edge of the wing of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. The performance of the coated surfaces was measured and validated by the reduction in the number of bug adhesions relative to uncoated control panels flown simultaneously. Both flow control concepts (i.e., sweeping jet actuators and non-stick coatings) for drag reduction were the culmination of several years of development, from wind tunnel tests to flight tests, and produced valuable data for the advancement of modern aircraft designs

  14. Further development of drag bodies for the measurement of mass flow rates during blowdown experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, E.; John, H.; Reimann, J.

    1983-01-01

    Drag bodies have already been used for sometime for the measurement of mass flow rates in blowdown experiments. Former research concerning the drag body behaviour in non-homogeneous two-phase flows frequently dealt with special effects by means of theoretical models only. For pipe flows most investigations were conducted for ratios of drag plate area to pipe cross section smaller 0.02. The present paper gives the results of experiments with drag bodies in a horizontal, non-homogeneous two-phase pipe flow with slip, which were carried through under the sponsorship of the German Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT). Special interest was layed on the behaviour of the drag coefficient in stationary flows and at various cross sectional ratios. Both design and response of various drag bodies, which were developed at the Battelle-Institut, were tested in stationary and instationary two-phase flows. The influences of density and velocity profiles as well as the drag body position were studied. The results demonstrate, that the drag body is capable of measuring mass flow rates in connection with a gamma densitometer also in non-homogeneous two-phase flows. Satisfying results could be obtained, using simply the drag coefficient which was determined from single-phase flow calibrations

  15. When superfluids are a drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The article considers the dramatic phenomenon of seemingly frictionless flow of slow-moving superfluids. Specifically the question of whether an object in a superfluid flow experiences any drag force is addressed. A brief account is given of the history of this problem and it is argued that recent advances in ultracold atomic physics can shed much new light on this problem. The article presents the commonly held notion that sufficiently slow-moving superfluids can flow without drag and also discusses research suggesting that scattering quantum fluctuations might cause drag in a superfluid moving at any speed.

  16. How does drag affect the underwater phase of a swimming start?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tor, Elaine; Pease, David L; Ball, Kevin A

    2015-02-01

    During the underwater phase of the swimming start drag forces are constantly acting to slow the swimmer down. The current study aimed to quantify total drag force as well as the specific contribution of wave drag during the underwater phase of the swimming start. Swimmers were towed at three different depths (surface, 0.5 m, 1.0 m) and four speeds (1.6, 1.9, 2.0, 2.5 m · s(-1)), totaling 12 conditions. Wave drag and total drag were measured for each trial. Mixed modeling and plots were then used to determine the relationships between each towing condition and the amount of drag acting on the swimmer. The results of this study show large decreases in total drag as depth increases, regardless of speed (-19.7% at 0.5 m and -23.8% at 1.0 m). This is largely due to the significant reduction in wave drag as the swimmers traveled at greater depth. It is recommended that swimmers travel at least 0.5 m below the surface to avoid excessive drag forces. Swimmers should also perform efficient breakouts when transitioning into free swimming to reduce the duration spent just below the surface where drag values are reported at their highest.

  17. Underwater drag-reducing effect of superhydrophobic submarine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songsong; Ouyang, Xiao; Li, Jie; Gao, Shan; Han, Shihui; Liu, Lianhe; Wei, Hao

    2015-01-01

    To address the debates on whether superhydrophobic coatings can reduce fluid drag for underwater motions, we have achieved an underwater drag-reducing effect of large superhydrophobic submarine models with a feature size of 3.5 cm × 3.7 cm × 33.0 cm through sailing experiments of submarine models, modified with and without superhydrophobic surface under similar power supply and experimental conditions. The drag reduction rate reached as high as 15%. The fabrication of superhydrophobic coatings on a large area of submarine model surfaces was realized by immobilizing hydrophobic copper particles onto a precross-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface. The pre-cross-linking time was optimized at 20 min to obtain good superhydrophobicity for the underwater drag reduction effect by investigating the effect of pre-cross-linking on surface wettability and water adhesive property. We do believe that superhydrophobic coatings may provide a promising application in the field of drag-reducing of vehicle motions on or under the water surface.

  18. Frictorq, a novel fabric surface tester: a progress report

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Mário Filipe Araújo Gonçalves; Hes, Lubos; Vasconcelos, Rosa; Martins, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    A new method to characterise the coefficient of friction of textile fabrics is proposed. The principle is based on the dry clutch, where an annular shaped flat upper body that is kept still, rubs against a lower flat surface, which rotates around a vertical axis at a constant angular velocity. Friction coefficient between the two contacting surfaces is then proportional to the level of the dragging torque between them, measured by means of a precision reaction torque sensor. Contact pressure ...

  19. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4 → H2O + CH3 on an ab Initio-Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-15

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  20. Different trends in extreme and median surface aerosol extinction coefficients over China inferred from quality-controlled visibility data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the temporal changes in aerosol properties have been widely investigated, the majority of studies has focused on average conditions without much emphasis on the extremes. However, the latter can be more important in terms of human health and climate change. This study uses a previously validated, quality-controlled visibility dataset to investigate the long-term trends (expressed in terms of relative changes in extreme surface aerosol extinction coefficient (AEC over China and compares them with the median trends. Two methods are used to independently evaluate the trends, which arrive at consistent results. The signs of extreme and median trends are generally coherent, whereas their magnitudes show distinct spatial and temporal differences. In the 1980s, an overall positive trend is found throughout China with the extreme trend exceeding the mean trend, except for northwest China and the North China Plain. In the 1990s, AEC over northeast and northwest China started to decline while the rest of the country still exhibited an increase. The extreme trends continued to dominate in the south while they yielded to the mean trend in the north. After the year 2000, the extreme trend became weaker than the mean trend overall in terms of both the magnitude and significance level. The annual trend can be primarily attributed to winter and fall trends. The results suggest that the decadal changes in pollution in China may be governed by different mechanisms. Synoptic conditions that often result in extreme air quality changes might have dominated in the 1980s, whereas emission increase might have been the main factor for the 2000s.

  1. Different trends in extreme and median surface aerosol extinction coefficients over China inferred from quality-controlled visibility data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Chengcai; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2018-03-01

    Although the temporal changes in aerosol properties have been widely investigated, the majority of studies has focused on average conditions without much emphasis on the extremes. However, the latter can be more important in terms of human health and climate change. This study uses a previously validated, quality-controlled visibility dataset to investigate the long-term trends (expressed in terms of relative changes) in extreme surface aerosol extinction coefficient (AEC) over China and compares them with the median trends. Two methods are used to independently evaluate the trends, which arrive at consistent results. The signs of extreme and median trends are generally coherent, whereas their magnitudes show distinct spatial and temporal differences. In the 1980s, an overall positive trend is found throughout China with the extreme trend exceeding the mean trend, except for northwest China and the North China Plain. In the 1990s, AEC over northeast and northwest China started to decline while the rest of the country still exhibited an increase. The extreme trends continued to dominate in the south while they yielded to the mean trend in the north. After the year 2000, the extreme trend became weaker than the mean trend overall in terms of both the magnitude and significance level. The annual trend can be primarily attributed to winter and fall trends. The results suggest that the decadal changes in pollution in China may be governed by different mechanisms. Synoptic conditions that often result in extreme air quality changes might have dominated in the 1980s, whereas emission increase might have been the main factor for the 2000s.

  2. Drag force on heavy quarks and spatial string tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Oleg

    2018-02-01

    Heavy quark transport coefficients in a strongly coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma can be evaluated using a gauge/string duality and lattice QCD. Via this duality, one can argue that for low momenta the drag coefficient for heavy quarks is proportional to the spatial string tension. Such a tension is well-studied on the lattice that allows one to straightforwardly make non-perturbative estimates of the heavy quark diffusion coefficients near the critical point. The obtained results are consistent with those in the literature.

  3. Normalized lift: an energy interpretation of the lift coefficient simplifies comparisons of the lifting ability of rotating and flapping surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Burgers

    Full Text Available For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient C(L to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv(2, where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders.This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S, compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v(2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran.The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings.

  4. Aerodynamic drag reduction tests on a box-shaped vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. L.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The intent of the present experiment is to define a near optimum value of drag coefficient for a high volume type of vehicle through the use of a boattail, on a vehicle already having rounded front corners and an underbody seal, or fairing. The results of these tests will constitute a baseline for later follow-on studies to evaluate candidate methods of obtaining afterbody drag coefficients approaching the boattail values, but without resorting to such impractical afterbody extensions. The current modifications to the box-shaped vehicle consisted of a full and truncated boattail in conjunction with the faired and sealed underbody. Drag results from these configurations are compared with corresponding wind tunnel results of a 1/10 scale model. Test velocities ranged up to 96.6 km/h (60 mph) and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged up to 1.3 x 10 to the 7th power based on the vehicles length which includes the boattail. A simple coast-down technique was used to define drag.

  5. Drag Force Anemometer Used in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1998-01-01

    To measure the drag on a flat cantilever beam exposed transversely to a flow field, the drag force anemometer (beam probe) uses strain gauges attached on opposite sides of the base of the beam. This is in contrast to the hot wire anemometer, which depends for its operation on the variation of the convective heat transfer coefficient with velocity. The beam probe retains the high-frequency response (up to 100 kHz) of the hot wire anemometer, but it is more rugged, uses simpler electronics, is relatively easy to calibrate, is inherently temperature compensated, and can be used in supersonic flow. The output of the probe is proportional to the velocity head of the flow, 1/2 rho u(exp 2) (where rho is the fluid density and u is the fluid velocity). By adding a static pressure tap and a thermocouple to measure total temperature, one can determine the Mach number, static temperature, density, and velocity of the flow.

  6. Low Reynolds number Couette flow facility for drag measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler J; Lang, Amy W; Wheelus, Jennifer N; Westcott, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    For this study a new low Reynolds number Couette facility was constructed to investigate surface drag. In this facility, mineral oil was used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of the experimental models. A mounted conveyor inside a tank creates a flow above which an experimental model of a flat plate was suspended. The experimental plate was attached to linear bearings on a slide system that connects to a force gauge used to measure the drag. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile was created. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to confirm the velocity profile. The drag measurements agreed within 5% of the theoretically predicted Couette flow value.

  7. Synthetic Effect of Vivid Shark Skin and Polymer Additive on Drag Reduction Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural shark skin has a well-demonstrated drag reduction function, which is mainly owing to its microscopic structure and mucus on the body surface. In order to improve drag reduction, it is necessary to integrate microscopic drag reduction structure and drag reduction agent. In this study, two hybrid approaches to synthetically combine vivid shark skin and polymer additive, namely, long-chain grafting and controllable polymer diffusion, were proposed and attempted to mimic such hierarchical topography of shark skin without waste of polymer additive. Grafting mechanism and optimization of diffusion port were investigated to improve the efficiency of the polymer additive. Superior drag reduction effects were validated, and the combined effect was also clarified through comparison between drag reduction experiments.

  8. A grid-independent EMMS/bubbling drag model for bubbling and turbulent fluidization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Lu, Bona; Zhang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    The EMMS/bubbling drag model takes the effects of meso-scale structures (i.e. bubbles) into modeling of drag coefficient and thus improves coarse-grid simulation of bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds. However, its dependence on grid size has not been fully investigated. In this article, we adopt...... a periodic domain show the new drag model is less sensitive to grid size because of the additional dependence on local slip velocity. When applying the new drag model to simulations of realistic bubbling and turbulent fluidized beds, we find grid-independent results are easier to obtain for high......-velocity turbulent fluidized bed cases. The simulation results indicate that the extended EMMS/bubbling drag model is a potential method for coarse-grid simulations of large-scale fluidized beds....

  9. Effect of local energy supply to a hypersonic flow on the drag of bodies with different nose bluntness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzov, V.Yu.; Rybka, I.V.; Yur'ev, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Parameters of the axisymmetric flow around bodies with different bluntness are compared in the case of constant energy supply to the main hypersonic flow. Flow structures, drag coefficients, and expenditure of energy on overcoming drag are analyzed with the effect of thermal energy on the flow taken into account for different bodies with equal volume

  10. Turbulent drag reduction by additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmatova, D.

    2013-01-01

    Drag reduction involves many subjects of interest such as polymer science, fluid mechanics and applied mathematics. The use of additives to enhance flow in petroleum pipelines has received the greatest attention due to a significant commercial success. In this study, we study the effect of the

  11. Hydrodynamic Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 30-April-2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final...approach has been extensively validated for steady free surface flows at medium Froude numbers for the submerged NACA 0012 foil, the Wigley hull...model scale) -J Leading edge of tractor channel Figure 3. UTC 2 geometry Baseline v- UTC1 UTC2 ^ Figure 4. Profile comparisons for ACV

  12. CAN 8-WEEKS OF TRAINING AFFECT ACTIVE DRAG IN YOUNG SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of 8-weeks of training on active drag in young swimmers of both genders. Eight girls and twelve boys' belonging to the same swimming team and with regular competitive participation in national and regional events for the previous two seasons participated in this study. Active drag measurements were conducted in two different evaluation moments: at the beginning of the season and after 8 weeks of training (6.0 ± 0.15 training units per week, 21.00 ± 3.23 km per week and 3.50 ± 0.23 km per training unit. The maximal swimming velocity at the distance of 13 m, active drag and drag coefficient were measured on both trials by the method of small perturbations with the help of an additional hydrodynamic body. After 8 weeks of training, mean active drag (drag force and drag coefficient decreased in girls and boys, although no significant differences were found between the two trials. It seems that 8 weeks of swimming training were not sufficient to allow significant improvements on swimming technique

  13. Gliding locomotion of manta rays, killer whales and swordfish near the water surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jie-Min; Gong, Ye-Jun; Li, Tian-Zeng

    2017-03-24

    The hydrodynamic performance of the locomotive near the water surface is impacted by its geometrical shape. For marine animals, their geometrical shape is naturally selective; thus, investigating gliding locomotion of marine animal under the water surface may be able to elucidate the influence of the geometrical shape. We investigate three marine animals with specific geometries: the killer whale is fusiform shaped; the manta ray is flat and broad-winged; and the swordfish is best streamlined. The numerical results are validated by the measured drag coefficients of the manta ray model in a towing tank. The friction drag of the three target models are very similar; the body shape affected form drag coefficient is order as swordfish killer whale killer whale and swordfish. These bio-inspired observations provide a new and in-depth understanding of the shape effects on the hydrodynamic performances near the free surface.

  14. 14 CFR 31.53 - Drag rope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drag rope. 31.53 Section 31.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Design Construction § 31.53 Drag rope. If a drag rope is used, the end that...

  15. Drag and diffusion of heavy quarks in a hot and anisotropic QCD medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P.K.; Patra, Binoy Krishna [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Department of Physics, Roorkee (India)

    2017-06-15

    The propagation of heavy quarks (HQs) in a medium was quite often modeled by the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation. Since the transport coefficients, related to drag and diffusion processes, are the main ingredients in the FP equation, the evolution of HQs is thus effectively controlled by them. At the initial stage of the relativistic heavy-ion collisions, asymptotic weak-coupling causes the free-streaming motions of partons in the beam direction and the expansions in transverse directions are almost frozen, hence an anisotropy in the momentum space sets in. Since HQs are too produced in the same time, the study of the effect of momentum anisotropy on the drag and diffusion coefficients becomes highly desirable. In this article we have thus studied the drag and diffusion of HQs in the anisotropic medium and found that the presence of the anisotropy reduces both drag and diffusion coefficients. In addition, the anisotropy introduces an angular dependence to both the drag and diffusion coefficients, as a result both coefficients get more inflated when the partons are moving transversely to the direction of anisotropy than when moving parallel to the direction of anisotropy. (orig.)

  16. Drag and diffusion of heavy quarks in a hot and anisotropic QCD medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Patra, Binoy Krishna

    2017-06-01

    The propagation of heavy quarks (HQs) in a medium was quite often modeled by the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation. Since the transport coefficients, related to drag and diffusion processes, are the main ingredients in the FP equation, the evolution of HQs is thus effectively controlled by them. At the initial stage of the relativistic heavy-ion collisions, asymptotic weak-coupling causes the free-streaming motions of partons in the beam direction and the expansions in transverse directions are almost frozen, hence an anisotropy in the momentum space sets in. Since HQs are too produced in the same time, the study of the effect of momentum anisotropy on the drag and diffusion coefficients becomes highly desirable. In this article we have thus studied the drag and diffusion of HQs in the anisotropic medium and found that the presence of the anisotropy reduces both drag and diffusion coefficients. In addition, the anisotropy introduces an angular dependence to both the drag and diffusion coefficients, as a result both coefficients get more inflated when the partons are moving transversely to the direction of anisotropy than when moving parallel to the direction of anisotropy.

  17. Hub and pylon fairing integration for helicopter drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. M.; Mort, R. W.; Squires, P. K.; Young, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of testing hub and pylon fairings mounted on a one-fifth scale helicopter with the goal of reducing parasite drag are presented. Lift, drag, and pitching moment, as well as side force and yawing moment, were measured. The primary objective of the test was to validate the drag reduction capability of integrated hub and pylon configurations in the aerodynamic environment produced by a rotating hub in forward flight. In addition to the baseline helicopter without fairings, three hub fairings and three pylon fairings were tested in various combinations. The three hub fairings tested reflect two different conceptual design approaches to implementing an integrated fairing configuration on an actual aircraft. The design philosophy is discussed in detail and comparisons are made between the wind tunnel models and potential full-scale prototypes. The data show that model drag can be reduced by as much as 20.8 percent by combining a small hub fairing with circular arc upper and flat lower surfaces and a nontapered 34-percent thick pylon fairing. Aerodynamic effects caused by the fairings, which may have a significant impact on static longitudinal and directional stability, were observed. The results support previous research which showed that the greatest reduction in model drag is achieved if the hub and pylon fairings are integrated with minimum gap between the two.

  18. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  19. Sound conversion phenomena at the free surface of liquid helium. I. Calculation of the coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of sound waves incident on the liquid--vapor interface of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechert, H.; Buchholz, F.I.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a set of boundary conditions describing quite generally mass and energy transport processes across the free surface of helium II, the acoustic coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of first sound, second sound, and the sound wave propagating in the vapor are calculated in the case of perpendicular incidence of sound waves against the liquid--vapor phase boundary. Considering rigoroulsy the influences of the Onsager surface coefficients, the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients, and the thermal conductivities of the liquid and the vapor, we derive sets of equations from which the acoustic coefficients are determined numerically. For estimations, simple explicit formulas of the acoustic coefficients are given. It is shown that the evaporation and energy transport processes occurring at the free surface of helium II due to the incidence of sound waves may be connected with appreciable energy dissipation. The surface absorption coefficients of first, second, and gas sound waves are deduced

  20. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means......, such as the random matrix theory, or by numerical simulations. We show that Coulomb drag is sensitive to localized states. which usual transport measurements do not probe. For chaotic 2D systems we find a vanishing average drag, with a nonzero variance. Disordered 1D wires show a finite drag, with a large variance...

  1. The Complete Solution of Fick's Second Law of Diffusion with Time-dependent Diffusion Coefficient and Surface Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlbro, Leif

    1996-01-01

    Fick's Second Law of Diffusion with time-dependent diffusioncoefficient and surface concentration is solved. Mimicking the classicalsolution, special time-dependent surface concentration functions areconsidered. These models are used in giving estimates of the lifetimeof the structure, when the c...... the concrete cover is given, as well as estimatesof the thickness of the concrete cover, when the expected lifetime is given.*Note: Book tilte: Durability of Concrete in Saline Environment...

  2. Surface excess elasticity of gold: Ab initio coefficients and impact on the effective elastic response of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, B.A.M.; Müller, S.; Bargmann, S.; Weissmüller, J.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the influence of the surface on the effective elastic properties of nanoscale structures and nanomaterials remains a challenge, which we here address on both levels, continuum and atomic. Density Functional Theory (DFT) computation at the atomic level yields the first reliable surface excess elastic parameters for the (111) and (001) surfaces of gold. At the continuum level, we derive closed-form expressions for the effective elastic behavior that can be combined with the DFT-derived excess elastic parameters to obtain the effective axial, torsion, and bending stiffness of circular nanowires with surface excess elasticity. The two approaches use different reference frames, and we emphasize the need for consistent stress definitions and for conversion between the separate stress measures when transferring results between the approaches. We present excess elastic parameters separately for Cauchy and 2 nd Piola-Kirchhoff stresses, demonstrating that the conversion substantially modifies their numerical value and may even invert their sign. The results afford an assessment of the contribution of the surface excess elastic parameters to the effective elastic response of nanoscale beams or wires. This assessment sheds doubt on earlier suggestions relating experimental observations of an effective stiffening or softening at small size to the excess elasticity of clean surfaces.

  3. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.A.; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... means such as perturbation theory or random matrix theory. The physics of Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime is very different from Coulomb drag between extended electron systems. In the mesoscopic regime we in general find fluctuations of the drag comparable to the mean value. Examples are vanishing...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  4. Multi-Staged NDVI Dependent Snow-Free Land-Surface Shortwave Albedo Narrowband-to-Broadband (NTB Coefficients and Their Sensitivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Narrowband-to-broadband conversion is a critical procedure for mapping land-surface broadband albedo using multi-spectral narrowband remote-sensing observations. Due to the significant difference in optical characteristics between soil and vegetation, NTB conversion is influenced by the variation in vegetation coverage on different surface types. To reduce this influence, this paper applies an approach that couples NTB coefficient with the NDVI. Multi-staged NDVI dependent NTB coefficient look-up tables (LUT for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Polarization and Directionality of Earth’s Reflectance (POLDER and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR were calculated using 6000 spectra samples collected from two typical spectral databases. Sensitivity analysis shows that NTB conversion is affected more by the NDVI for sensors with fewer band numbers, such as POLDER and AVHRR. Analysis of the validation results based on simulations, in situ measurements and global albedo products indicates that by using the multi-staged NDVI dependent NTB method, the conversion accuracies of these two sensors could be improved by 2%–13% on different NDVI classes compared with the general method. This improvement could be as high as 15%, on average, and 35% on dense vegetative surface compared with the global broadband albedo product of POLDER. This paper shows that it is necessary to consider surface reflectance characteristics associated with the NDVI on albedo-NTB conversion for remote sensors with fewer than five bands.

  5. Influence of texture coefficient on surface morphology and sensing properties of W-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manjeet; Kumar, Akshay; Abhyankar, A C

    2015-02-18

    For the first time, a new facile approach based on simple and inexpensive chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) technique is used to deposit Tungsten (W) doped nanocrystalline SnO2 thin films. The textural, optical, structural and sensing properties are investigated by GAXRD, UV spectroscopy, FESEM, AFM, and home-built sensing setup. The gas sensing results indicate that, as compared to pure SnO2, 1 wt % W-doping improves sensitivity along with better response (roughness values of 3.82 eV and 3.01 nm, respectively. Reduction in texture coefficient along highly dense (110) planes with concomitant increase along loosely packed (200) planes is found to have prominent effect on gas sensing properties of W-doped films.

  6. Development of a High Slip-resistant Footwear Outsole Using a Hybrid Rubber Surface Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAGUCHI, Takeshi; HOKKIRIGAWA, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The present study examined whether a new footwear outsole with tread blocks and a hybrid rubber surface pattern, composed of rough and smooth surfaces, could increase slip resistance and reduce the risk of fall while walking on a wet floor surface. A drag test was performed to measure static and dynamic coefficient of friction (SCOF and DCOF, respectively) values for the footwear with the hybrid rubber surface pattern outsole and two types of commercially available boots that are co...

  7. Assessments of Bubble Dynamics Model and Influential Parameters in Microbubble Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skudarnov, P. V; Lin, C. X

    2006-01-01

    .... The effects of mixture density variation, free stream turbulence intensity, free stream velocity, and surface roughness on the microbubble drag reduction were studied using a single phase model based...

  8. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir, E-mail: Levinson@wise.tau.ac.il [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  9. Whose drag is it anyway? Drag kings and monarchy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willox, Annabelle

    2002-01-01

    This chapter will show that the term "drag" in drag queen has a different meaning, history and value to the term "drag" in drag king. By exposing this basic, yet fundamental, difference this paper will expose the problems inherent in the assumption of parity between the two forms of drag. An exposition of how camp has been used to comprehend and theorise drag queens will facilitating an understanding of the parasitic interrelationship between camp and drag queen performances, while a critique of "Towards a Butch-Femme Aesthetic," by Sue Ellen Case, will point out the problematic assumptions made about camp when attributed to a cultural location different to the drag queen. By interrogating the historical, cultural and theoretical similarities and differences between drag kings, butches, drag queens and femmes this paper will expose the flawed assumption that camp can be attributed to all of the above without proviso, and hence expose why drag has a fundamentally different contextual meaning for kings and queens. This chapter will conclude by examining the work of both Judith Halberstam and Biddy Martin and the practical examples of drag king and queen performances provided at the UK drag contest held at The Fridge in Brixton, London on 23 June 1999.

  10. Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N. Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2002-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drug between two mesoscopic systems which expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions. The formalism can be applied to both ballistic and disordered systems and the consequences can be studied either by numerical simulations or analytic...... means such as perturbation theory or random matrix theory. The physics of Coulomb drag in the mesoscopic regime is very different from Coulomb drag between extended electron systems. In the mesoscopic regime we in general find fluctuations of the drag comparable to the mean value. Examples are vanishing...... average drag for chaotic 2D-systems and dominating fluctuations of drag between quasi-ballistic wires with almost ideal transmission....

  11. Drag and drop display & builder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  12. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, John Eric [Department of Physics, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Carre, Matt J, E-mail: goff@lynchburg.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  13. Simulation of torrential rain as a means for assessment of surface runoff coefficients and calculation of recurrent design events in alpine catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markart, Gerhard; Kohl, Bernhard; Sotier, Bernadette; Klebinder, Klaus; Schauer, Thomas; Bunza, Günther

    2010-05-01

    Simulation of heavy rain is an established method for studying infiltration characteristics, runoff and erosion behaviour in alpine catchments. Accordingly for characterization and differentiation of various runoff producing areas in alpine catchments transportable spray irrigation installations for large plots have been developed at the BFW, Department of Natural Hazards and Alpine Timberline, in Innsbruck, Austria. One installation has been designed for assessment of surface runoff coefficients under convective torrential rain with applicable precipitation intensities between 30 and 120 mm*h-1 and a plot size between 50 and 100 m2. The second device is used for simulation of persistent rain events (rain intensity about 10 mm*h-1, plot size: 400-1200 m2). Very reasonable results have been achieved during the comparison with spray irrigations from other institutions (e.g. Bavarian Environmental Agency in Munich) in the field. Rain simulations at BFW are mostly combined with comprehensive additional investigations on land-use, vegetation cover, soil physical characteristics, soil humidity, hydrogeology and other features of the test-sites. This allows proper interpretation of the achieved runoff data. At the moment results from more than 280 rain simulations are available from about 25 catchments / regions of the Eastern Alps at the BFW. Results show that the surface runoff coefficient, when runoff is constant at the test site (φconst) increases only slightly between rain intensities from 30 to 120 mm*h-1 (increment is 6%). Therefore φconst shall be used for assessment of runoff behaviour of runoff contributing areas, because it is less dependent form system conditions than φtot. BFW-data have been consolidated with results of the LfU (Bavarian Environmental Agency in Munich) in a data base and formed the basis for the development of a simple code of practice for assessment of surface runoff coefficients in torrential rain. The manual is freely available under

  14. Comparison of distributed vortex receptivity coefficients at excitation of 3D TS-waves in presence and absence of surface waviness and pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V. I.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Mischenko, D. A.; Fedenkova, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to quantitative experimental investigation of effective mechanisms of excitation of 3D TS instability waves due to distributed boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vortices. Experiments carried out in a self-similar boundary layer with Hartree parameter βH = -0.115 and concentrated on studying two receptivity mechanisms connected with distributed scattering of 3D unsteady free-stream vortices both on the natural boundary layer nonuniformity (smooth surface) and on 2D surface nonuniformity (waviness). Obtained quantitative characteristics (distributed receptivity coefficients) are compared directly with those obtained in Blasius boundary layer. It is found that the adverse pressure gradient leads to reduction of efficiency of the vortex-roughness receptivity mechanism.

  15. Force Field Benchmark of the TraPPE_UA for Polar Liquids: Density, Heat of Vaporization, Dielectric Constant, Surface Tension, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Isothermal Compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Rojas, Edgar; Aguilar-Pineda, Jorge Alberto; Pérez de la Luz, Alexander; de Jesús González, Edith Nadir; Alejandre, José

    2018-02-08

    The transferable potential for a phase equilibria force field in its united-atom version, TraPPE_UA, is evaluated for 41 polar liquids that include alcohols, thiols, ethers, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, and esters to determine its ability to reproduce experimental properties that were not included in the parametrization procedure. The intermolecular force field parameters for pure components were fit to reproduce experimental boiling temperature, vapor-liquid coexisting densities, and critical point (temperature, density, and pressure) using Monte Carlo simulations in different ensembles. The properties calculated in this work are liquid density, heat of vaporization, dielectric constant, surface tension, volumetric expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed in the gas and liquid phases, and also at the liquid-vapor interface. We found that relative error between calculated and experimental data is 1.2% for density, 6% for heat of vaporization, and 6.2% for surface tension, in good agreement with the experimental data. The dielectric constant is systematically underestimated, and the relative error is 37%. Evaluating the performance of the force field to reproduce the volumetric expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility requires more experimental data.

  16. Coulomb drag in coherent mesoscopic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Flensberg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2001-01-01

    We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means, such as th......We present a theory for Coulomb drag between two mesoscopic systems. Our formalism expresses the drag in terms of scattering matrices and wave functions, and its range of validity covers both ballistic and disordered systems. The consequences can be worked out either by analytic means...

  17. Nonequilibrium forces between dragged ultrasoft colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunil P; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard

    2011-10-07

    The dynamical deformation of ultrasoft colloids as well as their dynamic frictional forces are numerically investigated, when one colloid is dragged past another at constant velocity. Hydrodynamic interactions are captured by a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. At vanishing relative velocity, the equilibrium repulsive force-distance curve is obtained. At large drag velocities, in contrast, we find an apparent attractive force for departing colloids along the dragging direction. The deformation, in the close encounter of colloids, and the energy dissipation are examined as a function of the drag velocity and their separation.

  18. Transfer coefficient models for escherichia coli O157:H7 on contacts between beef tissue and high-density polyethylene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rolando A; Tamplin, Mark L; Marmer, Benne S; Phillips, John G; Cooke, Peter H

    2006-06-01

    Risk studies have identified cross-contamination during beef fabrication as a knowledge gap, particularly as to how and at what levels Escherichia coli O157:H7 transfers among meat and cutting board (or equipment) surfaces. The objectives of this study were to determine and model transfer coefficients (TCs) between E. coli O157:H7 on beef tissue and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cutting board surfaces. Four different transfer scenarios were evaluated: (i) HDPE board to agar, (ii) beef tissue to agar, (iii) HDPE board to beef tissue to agar, and (iv) beef tissue to HDPE board to agar. Also, the following factors were studied for each transfer scenario: two HDPE surface roughness levels (rough and smooth), two beef tissues (fat and fascia), and two conditions of the initial beef tissue inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (wet and dry surfaces), for a total of 24 treatments. The TCs were calculated as a function of the plated inoculum and of the cells recovered from the first contact. When the treatments were compared, all of the variables evaluated interacted significantly in determining the TC. An overall TC-per-treatment model did not adequately represent the reduction of the cells on the original surface after each contact and the interaction of the factors studied. However, an exponential model was developed that explained the experimental data for all treatments and represented the recontamination of the surfaces with E. coli O157:H7. The parameters for the exponential model for cross-contamination with E. coli O157:H7 between beef tissue and HDPE surfaces were determined, allowing for the use of the resulting model in quantitative microbial risk assessment.

  19. Soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of soil organic matter is a key factor for that of radioiodide in surface and subsurface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Yusuke; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takeda, Akira; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution of the soil-soil-solution distribution coefficients (K d ) of 125 I, 137 Cs, and 85 Sr in organic-rich surface soil and organic-poor subsurface soil of a pasture and an urban forest near a spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. K d of 137 Cs was highly correlated with water-extractable K + . K d of 85 Sr was highly correlated with water-extractable Ca 2+ and SOC. K d of 125 I - was low in organic-rich surface soil, high slightly below the surface, and lowest in the deepest soil. This kinked distribution pattern differed from the gradual decrease of the other radionuclides. The thickness of the high- 125 I - K d middle layer (i.e., with high radioiodide retention ability) differed between sites. K d of 125 I - was significantly correlated with K d of soil organic carbon. Our results also showed that the layer thickness is controlled by the ratio of K d -OC between surface and subsurface soils. This finding suggests that the addition of SOC might prevent further radioiodide migration down the soil profile. As far as we know, this is the first report to show a strong correlation of a soil characteristic with K d of 125 I - . Further study is needed to clarify how radioiodide is retained and migrates in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An 8.5 m long ammonite drag mark from the Upper Jurassic Solnhofen Lithographic Limestones, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean R Lomax

    Full Text Available Trackways and tracemakers preserved together in the fossil record are rare. However, the co-occurrence of a drag mark, together with the dead animal that produced it, is exceptional. Here, we describe an 8.5 m long ammonite drag mark complete with the preserved ammonite shell (Subplanites rueppellianus at its end. Previously recorded examples preserve ammonites with drag marks of < 1 m. The specimen was recovered from a quarry near Solnhofen, southern Germany. The drag mark consists of continuous parallel ridges and furrows produced by the ribs of the ammonite shell as it drifted just above the sediment surface, and does not reflect behaviour of the living animal.

  1. Gas-surface interactions using accommodation coefficients for a dilute and a dense gas in a micro- or nanochannel: heat flux predictions using combined molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedea, S V; van Steenhoven, A A; Markvoort, A J; Spijker, P; Giordano, D

    2014-05-01

    The influence of gas-surface interactions of a dilute gas confined between two parallel walls on the heat flux predictions is investigated using a combined Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The accommodation coefficients are computed from the temperature of incident and reflected molecules in molecular dynamics and used as effective coefficients in Maxwell-like boundary conditions in Monte Carlo simulations. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic wall interactions are studied, and the effect of the gas-surface interaction potential on the heat flux and other characteristic parameters like density and temperature is shown. The heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficient is shown for different fluid-wall mass ratios. We find that the accommodation coefficient is increasing considerably when the mass ratio is decreased. An effective map of the heat flux depending on the accommodation coefficient is given and we show that MC heat flux predictions using Maxwell boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficient give good results when compared to pure molecular dynamics heat predictions. The accommodation coefficients computed for a dilute gas for different gas-wall interaction parameters and mass ratios are transferred to compute the heat flux predictions for a dense gas. Comparison of the heat fluxes derived using explicit MD, MC with Maxwell-like boundary conditions based on the accommodation coefficients, and pure Maxwell boundary conditions are discussed. A map of the heat flux dependence on the accommodation coefficients for a dense gas, and the effective accommodation coefficients for different gas-wall interactions are given. In the end, this approach is applied to study the gas-surface interactions of argon and xenon molecules on a platinum surface. The derived accommodation coefficients are compared with values of experimental results.

  2. Measurements of drag and lift on smooth balls in flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2017-07-01

    Measurements are presented on the drag and lift coefficients for three relatively smooth balls launched in air and tracked with two cameras separated horizontally by 6.4 m. The ball spin was varied in order to investigate whether the Magnus force would increase or decrease when the ball spin was increased. For one ball, the Magnus force increased. For another ball, the Magnus force decreased almost to zero after reaching a maximum. For the third ball, the Magnus force was negative at low ball spins and positive at high ball spins. For one of the balls, the ball spin increased with time as it travelled through the air.

  3. Acceleration Noise Considerations for Drag-free Satellite Geodesy Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. H.; Conklin, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The GRACE mission, which launched in 2002, opened a new era of satellite geodesy by providing monthly mass variation solutions with spatial resolution of less than 200 km. GRACE proved the usefulness of a low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking formation. Analysis of the GRACE data showed that the K-Band ranging system, which is used to measure the range between the two satellites, is the limiting factor for the precision of the solution. Consequently, the GRACE-FO mission, schedule for launch in 2017, will continue the work of GRACE, but will also test a new, higher precision laser ranging interferometer compared with the K-Band ranging system. Beyond GRACE-FO, drag-free systems are being considered for satellite geodesy missions. GOCE tested a drag-free attitude control system with a gravity gradiometer and showed improvements in the acceleration noise compensation compared to the electrostatic accelerometers used in GRACE. However, a full drag-free control system with a gravitational reference sensor has not yet been applied to satellite geodesy missions. More recently, this type of drag-free system was used in LISA Pathfinder, launched in 2016, with an acceleration noise performance two orders of magnitude better than that of GOCE. We explore the effects of drag-free performance in satellite geodesy missions similar to GRACE-FO by applying three different residual acceleration noises from actual space missions: GRACE, GOCE and LISA Pathfinder. Our solutions are limited to degree 60 spherical harmonic coefficients with biweekly time resolution. Our analysis shows that a drag-free system with acceleration noise performance comparable to GOCE and LISA-Pathfinder would greatly improve the accuracy of gravity solutions. In addition to these results, we also present the covariance shaping process used in the estimation. In the future, we plan to use actual acceleration noise data measured using the UF torsion pendulum. This apparatus is a ground facility at

  4. Effects of surface roughness and cross-sectional distortion on the wind-induced response of bridge cables in dry conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteoni, G.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2015-01-01

    by local alterations of their inherent surface roughness and shape. Small deviations from ideal circularity result in significant changes in the static drag and lift coefficients with Reynolds number. The present study focuses on the wind-induced response of a full-scale yawed bridge cable section model......, for varying Reynolds numbers and wind angles-of-attack. Using passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests, it is shown that the in-plane aerodynamic damping of a bridge cable section, and the overall dynamic response, is strongly affected by changes in the wind angle-of-attack. Using the drag and lift coefficients...

  5. MAGNETIC DRAG ON HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERIC WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, Rosalba; Menou, Kristen; Rauscher, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Hot Jupiters, with atmospheric temperatures T ∼> 1000 K, have residual thermal ionization levels sufficient for the interaction of ions with the planetary magnetic field to result in a sizable magnetic drag on the (neutral) atmospheric winds. We evaluate the magnitude of magnetic drag in a representative three-dimensional atmospheric model of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b and find that it is a plausible mechanism to limit wind speeds in this class of atmospheres. Magnetic drag has a strong geometrical dependence, both meridionally and from the dayside to the nightside (in the upper atmosphere), which could have interesting consequences for the atmospheric flow pattern. By extension, close-in eccentric planets with transiently heated atmospheres will experience time-variable levels of magnetic drag. A robust treatment of magnetic drag in circulation models for hot atmospheres may require iterated solutions to the magnetic induction and Saha equations as the hydrodynamic flow is evolved.

  6. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y}: Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cyr-Choinière

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y} is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p=0.11 and p=0.12, for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S/T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in S_{b}, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S/T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  7. Direct numerical simulations of drag reduction in turbulent channel flow over bio-inspired herringbone riblet-texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benschop, H.O.G.; Westerweel, J.; Breugem, W.P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of drag reducing surface textures is a promising passive method to reduce fuel consumption. Probably most wellknown is the utilisation of shark-skin inspired ridges or riblets parallel to the mean flow. They can reduce drag up to 10%. Recently another bio-inspired texture based on bird

  8. Buoyancy increase and drag-reduction through a simple superhydrophobic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi Byoung; Patir, Adnan; Page, Kristopher; Lu, Yao; Allan, Elaine; Parkin, Ivan P

    2017-06-08

    A superhydrophobic paint was fabricated using 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES), TiO 2 nanoparticles and ethanol. The paint has potential for aquatic application of a superhydrophobic coating as it induces increased buoyancy and drag reduction. Buoyance testing showed that the reduction of surface energy by superhydrophobic coating made it feasible that glass, a high density material, was supported by the surface tension of water. In a miniature boat sailing test, it was shown that the low energy surface treatment decreased the adhesion of water molecules to the surface of the boat resulting in a reduction of the drag force. Additionally, a robust superhydrophobic surface was fabricated through layer-by-layer coating using adhesive double side tape and the paint, and after a 100 cm abrasion test with sand paper, the surface still retained its water repellency, enhanced buoyancy and drag reduction.

  9. A Lévy process whose jumps are dragged by a spherical dynamical system

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Brice

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the large scale behaviour of a Lévy process whose jump magnitude follows a stable law with spherically inhomogenous scaling coefficients. Furthermore, the jumps are dragged in the spherical direction by a dynamical system which has an attractor.

  10. Parameterizing Subgrid-Scale Orographic Drag in the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, M. D.; Olson, J.; Kenyon, J.; Smirnova, T. G.; Brown, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The accuracy of wind forecasts in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is improved when the drag forces imparted on atmospheric flow by subgrid-scale orography are included. Without such parameterizations, only the terrain resolved by the model grid, along with the small-scale obstacles parameterized by the roughness lengths can have an effect on the flow. This neglects the impacts of subgrid-scale terrain variations, which typically leads to wind speeds that are too strong. Using statistical information about the subgrid-scale orography, such as the mean and variance of the topographic height within a grid cell, the drag forces due to flow blocking, gravity wave drag, and turbulent form drag are estimated and distributed vertically throughout the grid cell column. We recently implemented the small-scale gravity wave drag paramterization of Steeneveld et al. (2008) and Tsiringakis et al. (2017) for stable planetary boundary layers, and the turbulent form drag parameterization of Beljaars et al. (2004) in the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) NWP model developed at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). As a result, a high surface wind speed bias in the model has been reduced and small improvement to the maintenance of stable layers has also been found. We present the results of experiments with the subgrid-scale orographic drag parameterization for the regional HRRR model, as well as for a global model in development at NOAA, showing the direct and indirect impacts.

  11. Velocity and Drag Evolution From the Leading Edge of a Model Mangrove Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Maria; Adler, Katherine; Ramos, Diogo; Garcia, Adrian Mikhail; Nepf, Heidi

    2017-11-01

    An experimental study of unidirectional flow through a model mangrove forest measured both velocity and forces on individual trees. The individual trees were 1/12th scale models of mature Rhizophora, including 24 prop roots distributed in a three-dimensional layout. Thirty-two model trees were distributed in a staggered array producing a 2.5 m long forest. The velocity evolved from a boundary layer profile at the forest leading edge to a vertical profile determined by the vertical distribution of frontal area, with significantly higher velocity above the prop roots. Fully developed conditions were reached at the fifth tree row from the leading edge. Within the root zone the velocity was reduced by up to 50% and the TKE was increased by as much as fivefold, relative to the upstream conditions. TKE in the root zone was mainly produced by root and trunk wakes, and it agreed in magnitude with the estimation obtained using the Tanino and Nepf (2008) formulation. Maximum TKE occurred at the top of the roots, where a strong shear region was associated with the change in frontal area. The drag measured on individual trees decreased from the leading edge and reached a constant value at the fifth row and beyond, i.e., in the fully developed region. The drag exhibited a quadratic dependence on velocity, which justified the definition of a quadratic drag coefficient. Once the correct drag length-scale was defined, the measured drag coefficients collapsed to a single function of Reynolds number.

  12. The drag and lift of different non-spherical particles from low to high Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjeevi, Sathish K. P.; Padding, Johan

    2017-11-01

    The present work investigates a simplified drag and lift model that can be used for different non-spherical particles. The flow around different non-spherical particles is studied using a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method. We compute the mean drag coefficient CD , ϕ at different incident angles ϕ for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (Re). We show that the sine-squared drag law CD , ϕ =CD , ϕ =0° +(CD , ϕ =90° -CD , ϕ =0°) sin2 ϕ holds up to large Reynolds numbers Re = 2000 . The sine-squared dependence of CD occurs at Stokes flow (very low Re) due to linearity of the flow fields. We explore the physical origin behind the sine-squared law at high Re , and reveal that surprisingly, this does not occur due to linearity of flow fields. Instead, it occurs due to an interesting pattern of pressure distribution contributing to the drag, at higher Re , for different incident angles. Similarly, we find that the equivalent theoretical equation of lift coefficient CL can provide a decent approximation, even at high Re , for elongated particles. Such a drag and lift law valid at high Re is very much useful for Euler-Lagrangian fluidization simulations of the non-spherical particles. European Research Council (ERC) consolidator Grant scheme, Contract No. 615096 (NonSphereFlow).

  13. Momentum and buoyancy transfer in atmospheric turbulent boundary layer over wavy water surface – Part 1: Harmonic wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Troitskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The surface-drag and mass-transfer coefficients are determined within a self-consistent problem of wave-induced perturbations and mean fields of velocity and density in the air, using a quasi-linear model based on the Reynolds equations with down-gradient turbulence closure. Investigation of a harmonic wave propagating along the wind has disclosed that the surface drag is generally larger for shorter waves. This effect is more pronounced in the unstable and neutral stratification. The stable stratification suppresses turbulence, which leads to weakening of the momentum and mass transfer.

  14. Investigation of Tractor Base Bleeding for Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J; Salari, K; Storms, B

    2007-10-25

    One of the main contributors to the aerodynamic drag of a heavy vehicle is tractor-trailer gap drag, which arises when the vehicle operates within a crosswind. Under this operating condition, freestream flow is entrained into the tractor-trailer gap, imparting a momentum exchange to the vehicle and subsequently increasing the aerodynamic drag. While a number of add-on devices, including side extenders, splitter plates, vortex stabilizers, and gap sealers, have been previously tested to alleviate this source of drag, side extenders remain the primary add-on device of choice for reducing tractor-trailer gap drag. However, side extenders are not without maintenance and operational issues. When a heavy vehicle pivots sharply with respect to the trailer, as can occur during loading or unloading operations, the side extenders can become crushed against the trailer. Consequently, fleet operators are forced to incur additional costs to cover the repair or replacement of the damaged side extenders. This issue can be overcome by either shortening the side extenders or by devising an alternative drag reduction concept that can perform just as effectively as side extenders. To explore such a concept, we investigate tractor base bleeding as a means of reducing gap drag. Wind tunnel measurements are made on a 1:20 scale heavy vehicle model at a vehicle width-based Reynolds number of 420,000. The tractor bleeding flow, which is delivered through a porous material embedded within the tractor base, is introduced into the tractor-trailer gap at bleeding coefficients ranging from 0.0-0.018. To determine the performance of tractor base bleeding under more realistic operating conditions, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a full-scale heavy vehicle within a crosswind for bleeding coefficients ranging from 0.0-0.13.

  15. Does flutter prevent drag reduction by reconfiguration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, T.; Peake, N.; de Langre, E.

    2018-01-01

    The static reconfiguration of flexible beams exposed to transverse flows is classically known to reduce the drag these structures have to withstand. But the more a structure bends, the more parallel to the flow it becomes, and flexible beams in axial flows are prone to a flutter instability that is responsible for large inertial forces that drastically increase their drag. It is, therefore, unclear whether flexibility would still alleviate, or on the contrary enhance, the drag when flapping occurs on a reconfiguring structure. In this article, we perform numerical simulations based on reduced-order models to demonstrate that the additional drag induced by the flapping motion is almost never significant enough to offset the drag reduction due to reconfiguration. Isolated and brief snapping events may transiently raise the drag above that of a rigid structure in the particular case of heavy, moderately slender beams. But apart from these short peak events, the drag force remains otherwise always significantly reduced in comparison with a rigid structure.

  16. 5th Drag Reduction in Engineering Flows Meeting

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    The European Drag Reduction Meeting has been held on 15th and 16th November 1990 in London. This was the fifth of the annual European meetings on drag reduction in engineering flows. The main objective of this meeting was to discuss up-to-date results of drag reduction research carried out in Europe. The organiser has adopted the philosophy of discussing the yesterday's results rather than the last year's results. No written material has therefore been requested for the meeting. It was only after the meeting the submission of papers was requested to the participants, from which 16 papers were selected for this proceedings volume. The meeting has attracted a record number of participants with a total of 52 researchers from seven European countries, U. K. , France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, Switzerland and U. S. S. R. as well as from Japan, Canada and Australia. The subjects covered in this proceedings volume include riblets, LEBUs (Large Eddy Break-Up device), surface roughness, compliant surfaces and p...

  17. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  18. Air Drag Effects on the Missile Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The equations of motion of a missile under the air drag effects are constructed. The modified TD88 is surveyed. Using Lagrange's planetary equations in Gauss form, the perturbations, due to the air drag in the orbital elements, are computed between the eccentric anomalies of the burn out and the reentry points [Ebo,2π−Ebo], respectively. The range equation is expressed as an infinite series in terms of the eccentricity e and the eccentric anomaly E. The different errors in the missile-free range due to the drag perturbations in the missile trajectory are obtained.

  19. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 104 and 106, spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies. © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  20. Leidenfrost vapour layer moderation of the drag crisis and trajectories of superhydrophobic and hydrophilic spheres falling in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-08-21

    We investigate the dynamic effects of a Leidenfrost vapour layer sustained on the surface of heated steel spheres during free fall in water. We find that a stable vapour layer sustained on the textured superhydrophobic surface of spheres falling through 95 °C water can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by up to 75% and stabilize the sphere trajectory for the Reynolds number between 10(4) and 10(6), spanning the drag crisis in the absence of the vapour layer. For hydrophilic spheres under the same conditions, the transition to drag reduction and trajectory stability occurs abruptly at a temperature different from the static Leidenfrost point. The observed drag reduction effects are attributed to the disruption of the viscous boundary layer by the vapour layer whose thickness depends on the water temperature. Both the drag reduction and the trajectory stabilization effects are expected to have significant implications for development of sustainable vapour layer based technologies.

  1. Sensitivity of coefficients for converting entrance surface dose and kerma-area product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.; Sandborg, M.; Persliden, J.; Alm Carlsson, G.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the conversions from entrance surface dose (ESD) or kerma-area product (KAP) to effective dose (E) or to energy imparted to the patient (ε) to the likely variations in tube potential, field size, patient size and sex which occur in clinical work. As part of a factorial design study for chest and lumbar spine examinations, the tube potentials were varied to be ±10% of the typical values for the examinations while field sizes and the positions of the field centres were varied to be representative of values drawn from measurements on patient images. Variation over sex and patient size was based on anthropomorphic phantoms representing males and females of ages 15 years (small adult) and 21 years (reference adult). All the conversion coefficients were estimated using a mathematical phantom programmed with the Monte Carlo code EGS4 for all factor combinations and analysed statistically to derive factor effects. In general, the factors studied behaved independently in the sense that interaction of the physical factors generally gave no more than a 5% variation in a conversion coefficient. Taken together, variation of patient size, sex, field size and field position can lead to significant variation of E/KAP by up to a factor of 2, of E/ESD by up to a factor of 3, of ε/KAP by a factor of 1.3 and of ε/ESD by up to a factor of 2. While KAP is preferred to determine ε, the results show no strong preference of KAP over ESD in determining E. The mean absorbed dose D-bar in the patient obtained by dividing ε (determined using KAP) by the patient's mass was found to be the most robust measure of E. (author)

  2. Drag reduction in a turbulent boundary layer on a flexible sheet undergoing a spanwise traveling wave motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Motoyuki; Tamano, Shinji; Yokota, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Shinya

    The effect of a spanwise traveling-wave motion on a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer over a flexible sheet was investigated at low Reynolds numbers using a single hot-wire anemometer for turbulence statistics and two laser displacement sensors for displacements of the flexible sheet. It was found that the log-law region of the mean velocity on the flexible sheet was slightly narrower compared with a rigid wall. The energy spectra of streamwise velocity fluctuations on the flexible sheet undergoing the spanwise traveling-wave motion were smaller in a region of frequency which corresponded to the bursting frequency in the canonical wall turbulence. This indicates that the bursting event near the flexible sheet was directly affected by the surface wave motion. It was revealed that a drag reduction of up to 7.5% could be obtained by the spanwise traveling-wave motion, estimating the friction coefficients through the growth rate of the momentum thickness.

  3. Atmospheric drag model for Cassini orbit determination during low altitude Titan flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, F. J.; Antreasian, P. G.; Bordi, J. J.; Criddle, K. E.; Ionasescu, R.; Jacobson, R. A.; Mackenzie, R. A.; Parcher, D. W.; Stauch, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    On April 16, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft performed its lowest altitude flyby of Titan to date, the Titan-5 flyby, flying 1027 km above the surface of Titan. This document discusses the development of a Titan atmospheric drag model for the purpose of the orbit determination of Cassini. Results will be presented for the Titan A flyby, the Titan-5 flyby as well as the most recent low altitude Titan flyby, Titan-7. Different solutions will be compared against OD performance in terms of the flyby B-plane parameters, spacecraft thrusting activity and drag estimates. These low altitude Titan flybys were an excellent opportunity to observe the effect of Titan's atmospheric drag on the orbit determination solution and results show that the drag was successfully modeled to provide accurate flyby solutions.

  4. Superhydrophobic Drag Reduction in Various Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) have been studied exhaustively in laminar flow applications while interest in SHS drag reduction in turbulent flow applications has been increasing steadily. In this discussion, we will highlight recent advances of SHS applications in various high-Reynolds number flows. We will address the application of mechanically robust and scalable spray SHSs in three cases: fully-developed internal flow; a near-zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer; and an axisymmetric DARPA SUBOFF model. The model will be towed in the University of Michigan's Physical Model Basin. Experimental measurements of streamwise pressure drop and the near-wall flow via Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry will be discussed where applicable. Moreover, integral measurement of the total resistance of the SUBOFF model, with and without SHS application, will be examined. The SUBOFF model extends 2.6 m and is 0.3 m in diameter, and will be tested at water depths of three to six model diameters. Previous investigation of these SHSs have proven that skin-friction savings of 20% or more can be attained for friction Reynolds numbers greater than of 1,000. This project was carried out as part of the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) MURI (Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives) program (Grant No. N00014-12-1-0874) managed by Dr. Ki-Han Kim and led by Dr. Steven L. Ceccio.

  5. Microblowing Technique for Drag Reduction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA seeks to develop technologies for aircraft drag reduction which contribute to improved aerodynamic efficiency in support of national goals for reducing fuel...

  6. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A C Teixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  7. Satellite Formation Control Using Atmospheric Drag

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hajovsky, Blake B

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the use of a linear quadratic terminal controller to reconfigure satellite formations using atmospheric drag actuated control while minimizing the loss of energy of the formation...

  8. Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2014-01-01

    into random incidence absorption coefficients for porous absorbers are investigated. Two optimization-based conversion methods are suggested: the surface impedance estimation for locally reacting absorbers and the flow resistivity estimation for extendedly reacting absorbers. The suggested conversion methods...

  9. Drag Performance of Twist Morphing MAV Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail N.I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphing wing is one of latest evolution found on MAV wing. However, due to few design problems such as limited MAV wing size and complicated morphing mechanism, the understanding of its aerodynamic behaviour was not fully explored. In fact, the basic drag distribution induced by a morphing MAV wing is still remained unknown. Thus, present work is carried out to compare the drag performance between a twist morphing wing with membrane and rigid MAV wing design. A quasi-static aeroelastic analysis by using the Ansys-Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI method is utilized in current works to predict the drag performance a twist morphing MAV wing design. Based on the drag pattern study, the results exhibits that the morphing wing has a partial similarities in overall drag pattern with the baseline (membrane and rigid wing. However, based CD analysis, it shows that TM wing induced higher CD magnitude (between 25% to 82% higher than to the baseline wing. In fact, TM wing also induced the largest CD increment (about 20% to 27% among the wings. The visualization on vortex structure revealed that TM wing also produce larger tip vortex structure (compared to baseline wings which presume to promote higher induce drag component and subsequently induce its higher CD performance.

  10. Measurement of drag and its cancellation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBra, D B; Conklin, J W, E-mail: johnwc@stanford.edu [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4035 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    The design of drag cancellation missions of the future will take advantage of the technology experience of the past. The importance of data for modeling of the atmosphere led to at least six types of measurement: (a) balloon flights, (b) missile-launched falling spheres, (c) the 'cannonball' satellites of Ken Champion with accelerometers for low-altitude drag measurement (late 1960s and early 1970s), (d) the Agena flight of LOGACS (1967), a Bell MESA accelerometer mounted on a rotating platform to spectrally shift low-frequency errors in the accelerometer, (e) a series of French low-level accelerometers (e.g. CACTUS, 1975), and (f) correction of differential accelerations for drag errors in measuring gravity gradient on a pair of satellites (GRACE, 2002). The independent invention of the drag-free satellite concept by Pugh and Lange (1964) to cancel external disturbance added implementation opportunities. Its first flight application was for ephemeris prediction improvement with the DISCOS flight (1972)-still the only extended free test mass flight. Then successful flights for reduced disturbance environment for science measurement with gyros on GP-B (2004) and for improved accuracy in geodesy and ocean studies (GOCE, 2009) each using accelerometer measurements to control the drag-canceling thrust. LISA, DECIGO, BBO and other gravity wave-measuring satellite systems will push the cancellation of drag to new levels.

  11. Measurement of drag and its cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBra, D. B.; Conklin, J. W.

    2011-05-01

    The design of drag cancellation missions of the future will take advantage of the technology experience of the past. The importance of data for modeling of the atmosphere led to at least six types of measurement: (a) balloon flights, (b) missile-launched falling spheres, (c) the 'cannonball' satellites of Ken Champion with accelerometers for low-altitude drag measurement (late 1960s and early 1970s), (d) the Agena flight of LOGACS (1967), a Bell MESA accelerometer mounted on a rotating platform to spectrally shift low-frequency errors in the accelerometer, (e) a series of French low-level accelerometers (e.g. CACTUS, 1975), and (f) correction of differential accelerations for drag errors in measuring gravity gradient on a pair of satellites (GRACE, 2002). The independent invention of the drag-free satellite concept by Pugh and Lange (1964) to cancel external disturbance added implementation opportunities. Its first flight application was for ephemeris prediction improvement with the DISCOS flight (1972)—still the only extended free test mass flight. Then successful flights for reduced disturbance environment for science measurement with gyros on GP-B (2004) and for improved accuracy in geodesy and ocean studies (GOCE, 2009) each using accelerometer measurements to control the drag-canceling thrust. LISA, DECIGO, BBO and other gravity wave-measuring satellite systems will push the cancellation of drag to new levels.

  12. 14 CFR 25.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 25...-drag limiting systems. Turbopropeller power airplane propeller-drag limiting systems must be designed... results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was designed under § 25.367. Failure of...

  13. 14 CFR 23.937 - Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. 23... General § 23.937 Turbopropeller-drag limiting systems. (a) Turbopropeller-powered airplane propeller-drag... normal or emergency operation results in propeller drag in excess of that for which the airplane was...

  14. Experimental Study of Drag Resistance using a Laboratory Scale Rotary Set-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Olsen, Kenneth N.; Christoffersen, Martin W.

    2003-01-01

    This work covers an experimental study of the drag resistance of different painted surfaces and simulated large-scale irregularities, viz. dry spraying, weld seams, barnacle fouling and paint remains. A laboratory scale rotary set-up was used to determine the drag resistance, and the surface...... roughness of the samples was determined by means of two different stylus-based methods, one having a 1.6 mm ball stylus (giving the macro-roughness) and the other having a needle type stylus (giving the micro-roughness). It is demonstrated that, in the case of ideal painted surfaces (low macro...

  15. Effect of phonon transport on the Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Jyothi Swaroop

    Thermoelectrics enable solid-state conversion of heat to electricity by the Seebeck effect, but must provide scalable and cost-effective technology for practical waste heat harvesting. This dissertation explores the thermoelectric properties of electrochemically etched silicon nanowires through experiments, complemented by charge and thermal transport theories. Electrolessly etched silicon nanowires show anomalously low thermal conductivity that has been attributed to the increased scattering of heat conducting phonons from the surface disorder introduced by etching. The reduction is below the incoherent limit for phonon scattering at the boundary, the so-called Casimir limit. A new model of partially coherent phonon transport shows that correlated multiple scattering of phonons off resonantly matched rough surfaces can indeed lead to thermal conductivity below the Casimir limit. Using design guidelines from the theory, silicon nanowires of controllable surface roughness are fabricated using metal-assisted chemical etching. Extensive characterization of the nanowire surfaces using transmission electron microscopy provides surface roughness parameters that are important in testing transport theories. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the implications of increased phonon scattering on the Seebeck coefficient, which is a cumulative effect of non-equilibrium amongst charge carriers and phonons. A novel frequency-domain technique enables simultaneous measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and the thermal conductivity of nanowire arrays. The frequency response measurements isolate the parasitic contributions thus improving upon existing techniques for cross-plane thermoelectric measurements. While the thermal conductivity of nanowires reduces significantly with increased roughness, there is also a significant reduction in the Seebeck coefficient over a wide range of doping. Theoretical fitting of the data reveals that such reduction results from the

  16. Evaluation of the use of partition coefficients and molecular surface properties as predictors of drug absorption: a provisional biopharmaceutical classification of the list of national essential medi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NU Rahman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Partition coefficients (log D and log P and molecular surface area (PSA are potential predictors of the intestinal permeability of drugs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate and compare these intestinal permeability indicators.   Methods: Aqueous solubility data were obtained from literature or calculated using ACD/Labs and ALOGPS. Permeability data were predicted based on log P, log D at pH 6.0 (log D6.0, and PSA.  Results: Metoprolol's log P, log D6.0 and a PSA of <65 Å correctly predicted 55.9%, 50.8% and 54.2% of permeability classes, respectively. Labetalol's log P, log D6.0, and PSA correctly predicted 54.2%, 64.4% and 61% of permeability classes, respectively. Log D6.0 correlated well (81% with Caco-2 permeability (Papp. Of the list of national essential medicines, 135 orally administered drugs were classified into biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS. Of these, 57 (42.2%, 28 (20.7%, 44 (32.6%, and 6 (4.4% were class I, II, III and IV respectively. Conclusion: Log D6.0 showed better prediction capability than log P. Metoprolol as permeability internal standard was more conservative than labetalol.

  17. A New Global Potential Energy Surface for the Hydroperoxyl Radical, HO2: Reaction Coefficients for H + O2 and Vibrational Splittings for H Atom Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A new analytic global potential energy surface describing the hydroperoxyl radical system H((sup 2)S) + O2(X (sup 3)Sigma((sup -)(sub g))) (reversible reaction) HO2 ((X-tilde) (sup 2)A'') (reversible reaction) O((sup 3)P) + O H (X (sup 2)Pi) has been fitted using the ab initio complete active space SCF (self-consistent-field)/externally contracted configuration interaction (CASSCF/CCI) energy calculations of Walch and Duchovic. Results of quasiclassical trajectory studies to determine the rate coefficients of the forward and reverse reactions at combustion temperatures will be presented. In addition, vibrational energy levels were calculated using the quantum DVR-DGB (discrete variable representation-distributed Gaussian basis) method and the splitting due to H atom migration is investigated. The material of the proposed presentation was reviewed and the technical content will not reveal any information not already in the public domain and will not give any foreign industry or government a competitive advantage.

  18. Numerical modeling of anisotropic drag for flow across a perforated plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y.; Kim, Y. I.; Moon, Y. J.

    2013-10-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the Darcy and non-Darcy flows through plates with circular holes are carried out at the pore scale. With a view to evaluating the linear (or Darcy drag) and non-linear drag (or Forchheimer drag) of perforated plates, the dependence of pressure drop on the transpiration velocity is first discussed for a porosity of 0.1˜0.4 and hole depth to diameter ratio of 1˜6 at pore-level Reynolds numbers of up to 25. The shear flow problems are then investigated, along with a discussion of the effects of the porosity and hole depth to diameter ratio on the slip velocity at the free-fluid/porous medium interface. Correlations of the permeability and Forchheimer coefficient are also proposed for a perforated plate.

  19. Aerodynamic drag of a transiting sphere by large-scale tomographic-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra, W.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2017-07-01

    A method is introduced to measure the aerodynamic drag of moving objects such as ground vehicles or athletes in speed sports. Experiments are conducted as proof-of-concept that yield the aerodynamic drag of a sphere towed through a square duct in stagnant air. The drag force is evaluated using large-scale tomographic PIV and invoking the time-average momentum equation within a control volume in a frame of reference moving with the object. The sphere with 0.1 m diameter moves at a velocity of 1.45 m/s, corresponding to a Reynolds number of 10,000. The measurements in the wake of the sphere are conducted at a rate of 500 Hz within a thin volume of approximately 3 × 40 × 40 cubic centimeters. Neutrally buoyant helium-filled soap bubbles are used as flow tracers. The terms composing the drag are related to the flow momentum, the pressure and the velocity fluctuations and they are separately evaluated. The momentum and pressure terms dominate the momentum budget in the near wake up to 1.3 diameters downstream of the model. The pressure term decays rapidly and vanishes within 5 diameters. The term due to velocity fluctuations contributes up to 10% to the drag. The measurements yield a relatively constant value of the drag coefficient starting from 2 diameters downstream of the sphere. At 7 diameters the measurement interval terminates due to the finite length of the duct. Error sources that need to be accounted for are the sphere support wake and blockage effects. The above findings can provide practical criteria for the drag evaluation of generic bluff objects with this measurement technique.

  20. Direct measurements of lift and drag on shallowly submerged cobbles in steep streams: Implications for flow resistance and sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Michael P.; Brun, Fanny; Fuller, Brian M.

    2017-09-01

    Steep mountain streams have higher resistance to flow and lower sediment transport rates than expected by comparison with low gradient rivers, and often these differences are attributed to reduced near-bed flow velocities and stresses associated with form drag on channel forms and immobile boulders. However, few studies have directly measured drag and lift forces acting on bed sediment for shallow flows over coarse sediment, which ultimately control sediment transport rates and grain-scale flow resistance. Here we report on particle lift and drag force measurements in flume experiments using a planar, fixed cobble bed over a wide range of channel slopes (0.004 < S < 0.3) and water discharges. Drag coefficients are similar to previous findings for submerged particles (CD ˜ 0.7) but increase significantly for partially submerged particles. In contrast, lift coefficients decrease from near unity to zero as the flow shallows and are strongly negative for partially submerged particles, indicating a downward force that pulls particles toward the bed. Fluctuating forces in lift and drag decrease with increasing relative roughness, and they scale with the depth-averaged velocity squared rather than the bed shear stress. We find that, even in the absence of complex bed topography, shallow flows over coarse sediment are characterized by high flow resistance because of grain drag within a roughness layer that occupies a significant fraction of the total flow depth, and by heightened critical Shields numbers and reduced sediment fluxes because of reduced lift forces and reduced turbulent fluctuations.

  1. Drag and heat flux reduction mechanism of blunted cone with aerodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Lang-quan; Yan, Li; Zhang, Tian-tian

    2017-09-01

    The major challenge among a number of design requirements for hypersonic vehicles is the reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating. Of all these techniques of drag and heat flux reduction, application of forward facing aerospike conceived in 1950s is an effective and simpler technique to reduce the drag as well as the heat transfer rate for blunt nosed bodies at hypersonic Mach numbers. In this paper, the flow fields around a blunt cone with and without aerodisk flying at hypersonic Mach numbers are computed numerically, and the numerical simulations are conducted by specifying the freestream velocity, static pressure and static temperatures at the inlet of the computational domain with a three-dimensional, steady, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. An aerodisk is attached to the tip of the rod to reduce the drag and heat flux further. The influences of the length of rod and the diameter of aerodisk on the drag and heat flux reduction mechanism are analyzed comprehensively, and eight configurations are taken into consideration in the current study. The obtained results show that for all aerodisks, the reduction in drag of the blunt body is proportional to the extent of the recirculation dead air region. For long rods, the aerodisk is found not that beneficial in reducing the drag, and an aerodisk is more effective than an aerospike. The spike produces a region of recirculation separated flow that shields the blunt-nosed body from the incoming flow, and the recirculation region is formed around the root of the spike up to the reattachment point of the flow at the shoulder of the blunt body. The dynamic pressure in the recirculation area is highly reduced and thus leads to the decrease in drag and heat load on the surface of the blunt body. Because of the reattachment of the shear layer on the shoulder of the blunt body, the pressure near that point becomes large.

  2. FUSELAGE SHAPE OPTIMIZATION AIMED AT WING-FUSELAGE CONFIGURATION DRAG REDUCTION AT SUPERSONIC SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of fuselage shape optimization of the wing-body configuration is considered in the following three formulations. In the first one, the angle of attack is fixed and equal to zero, the wing has a symmetric airfoil, and the fuse- lage is based on circular cross sections. In the second one, the fuselage cross sections are elliptical. In the third one, the angle of attack is varied, the lifting force coefficient is fixed, the wing is preliminary optimized, the fuselage is designed by the cross sections that consist of upper and lower half-ellipses with a possibility of a shift along vertical axis. The configu- ration volume, fuselage length, shape and position of the wing are fixed. The drag coefficient is the objective function. The optimization is carried out by the Indirect Optimization based on Self-Organization (IOSO technology. Aerodynamic coef- ficients are obtained from the solution of the RANS equations with SST turbulence model by the ANSYS CFX software on the structured multiblock meshes. The results obtained by the optimization are compared with the configuration that is de- signed by traditional means. The fuselage of this configuration has a cylindrical part in the area of the wing-fuselage con- nection and nose part of the von Karman’s ogive shape. The solution of the optimization problem in the first formulation reduces drag coefficient at zero angle of attack by approximately 3 %. The use of the fuselage with elliptical cross sections makes it possible to reduce drag coefficient at zero angle of attack by 9 %. The solution of the optimization problem in first two formulations reduces drag coefficient at the wide range of angles of attack. When the lifting coefficient is selected for the third problem formulation as constraint the drag reduction is about 7 %. Additional drag reduction of about 2,5 % is obtained by the use of the fuselage asymmetric relative to the horizontal plane. The optimal fuselage design has a

  3. Drag Reduction by Laminar Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Beck

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Energy System Transition in Aviation research project of the Aeronautics Research Center Niedersachsen (NFL searches for potentially game-changing technologies to reduce the carbon footprint of aviation by promoting and enabling new propulsion and drag reduction technologies. The greatest potential for aerodynamic drag reduction is seen in laminar flow control by boundary layer suction. While most of the research so far has been on partial laminarization by application of Natural Laminar Flow (NLF and Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC to wings, complete laminarization of wings, tails and fuselages promises much higher gains. The potential drag reduction and suction requirements, including the necessary compressor power, are calculated on component level using a flow solver with viscid/inviscid coupling and a 3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS solver. The effect on total aircraft drag is estimated for a state-of-the-art mid-range aircraft configuration using preliminary aircraft design methods, showing that total cruise drag can be halved compared to today’s turbulent aircraft.

  4. Exciton condensation and perfect Coulomb drag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, D; Finck, A D K; Eisenstein, J P; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2012-08-23

    Coulomb drag is a process whereby the repulsive interactions between electrons in spatially separated conductors enable a current flowing in one of the conductors to induce a voltage drop in the other. If the second conductor is part of a closed circuit, a net current will flow in that circuit. The drag current is typically much smaller than the drive current owing to the heavy screening of the Coulomb interaction. There are, however, rare situations in which strong electronic correlations exist between the two conductors. For example, double quantum well systems can support exciton condensates, which consist of electrons in one well tightly bound to holes in the other. 'Perfect' drag is therefore expected; a steady transport current of electrons driven through one quantum well should be accompanied by an equal current of holes in the other. Here we demonstrate this effect, taking care to ensure that the electron-hole pairs dominate the transport and that tunnelling of charge between the quantum wells, which can readily compromise drag measurements, is negligible. We note that, from an electrical engineering perspective, perfect Coulomb drag is analogous to an electrical transformer that functions at zero frequency.

  5. Force Field Benchmark of Organic Liquids: Density, Enthalpy of Vaporization, Heat Capacities, Surface Tension, Isothermal Compressibility, Volumetric Expansion Coefficient, and Dielectric Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleman, Carl; van Maaren, Paul J; Hong, Minyan; Hub, Jochen S; Costa, Luciano T; van der Spoel, David

    2012-01-10

    The chemical composition of small organic molecules is often very similar to amino acid side chains or the bases in nucleic acids, and hence there is no a priori reason why a molecular mechanics force field could not describe both organic liquids and biomolecules with a single parameter set. Here, we devise a benchmark for force fields in order to test the ability of existing force fields to reproduce some key properties of organic liquids, namely, the density, enthalpy of vaporization, the surface tension, the heat capacity at constant volume and pressure, the isothermal compressibility, the volumetric expansion coefficient, and the static dielectric constant. Well over 1200 experimental measurements were used for comparison to the simulations of 146 organic liquids. Novel polynomial interpolations of the dielectric constant (32 molecules), heat capacity at constant pressure (three molecules), and the isothermal compressibility (53 molecules) as a function of the temperature have been made, based on experimental data, in order to be able to compare simulation results to them. To compute the heat capacities, we applied the two phase thermodynamics method (Lin et al. J. Chem. Phys.2003, 119, 11792), which allows one to compute thermodynamic properties on the basis of the density of states as derived from the velocity autocorrelation function. The method is implemented in a new utility within the GROMACS molecular simulation package, named g_dos, and a detailed exposé of the underlying equations is presented. The purpose of this work is to establish the state of the art of two popular force fields, OPLS/AA (all-atom optimized potential for liquid simulation) and GAFF (generalized Amber force field), to find common bottlenecks, i.e., particularly difficult molecules, and to serve as a reference point for future force field development. To make for a fair playing field, all molecules were evaluated with the same parameter settings, such as thermostats and barostats

  6. A comprehensive plan for helicopter drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Montana, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    Current helicopters have parasite drag levels 6 to 10 times as great as fixed wing aircraft. The commensurate poor cruise efficiency results in a substantial degradation of potential mission capability. The paper traces the origins of helicopter drag and shows that the problem (primarily due to bluff body flow separation) can be solved by the adoption of a comprehensive research and development plan. This plan, known as the Fuselage Design Methodology, comprises both nonaerodynamic and aerodynamic aspects. The aerodynamics are discussed in detail and experimental and analytical programs are described which will lead to a solution of the bluff body problem. Some recent results of work conducted at the Naval Ship Research and Development Center (NSRDC) are presented to illustrate these programs. It is concluded that a 75-per cent reduction of helicopter drag is possible by the full implementation of the Fuselage Design Methodology.

  7. Tomography based determination of permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and interfacial heat transfer coefficient in reticulate porous ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasch, Joerg; Meier, Fabian; Friess, Hansmartin; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    A computer tomography based methodology is applied to determine the transport properties of fluid flow across porous media. A 3D digital representation of a 10-ppi reticulate porous ceramic (RPC) sample was generated by X-ray tomographic scans. Structural properties such as the porosity, specific interfacial surface area, pore-size distribution, mean survival time, two-point correlation function s 2 , and local geometry distribution of the RPC sample are directly extracted from the tomographic data. Reference solutions of the fluid flow governing equations are obtained for Re = 0.2-200 by applying finite volume direct pore-level numerical simulation (DPLS) using unstructured, body-fitted, tetrahedral mesh discretization. The permeability and the Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient are determined from the reference solutions by DPLS, and compared to the values predicted by selected porous media flow models, namely: conduit-flow, hydraulic radius theory, drag models, mean survival time bound, s 2 -bound, fibrous bed correlations, and local porosity theory-based models. DPLS is further employed to determine the interfacial heat transfer coefficient and to derive a corresponding Nu-correlation, which is compared to empirical correlations

  8. Experimental study of helicopter fuselage drag

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Robert; Zherekov, Vladimir; Pakhov, Vladimir; Mikhailov, Sergey; Garipov, Aleksey; Yakubov, Walter; Barakos, George N.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for the parasite drag of various helicopter fuselage components, such as skids, external fuel tanks, and tailplane. The experiments were conducted at the Kazan National Research Technical University (Kazan Aviation Institute) T-1K wind tunnel, investigating four versions of a fuselage similar to the Ansat helicopter. It was found that, for the range of pitch angles −10≤α≤10  deg−10≤α≤10  deg, the skids added 80% to the drag of the bare fuselage, whereas the tai...

  9. New drag laws for flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agre, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2014-11-01

    Classical aerodynamic theory predicts that a steadily-moving wing experiences fluid forces proportional to the square of its speed. For bird and insect flight, however, there is currently no model for how drag is affected by flapping motions of the wings. By considering simple wings driven to oscillate while progressing through the air, we discover that flapping significantly changes the magnitude of drag and fundamentally alters its scaling with speed. These measurements motivate a new aerodynamic force law that could help to understand the free-flight dynamics, control, and stability of insects and flapping-wing robots.

  10. The effect of sodium hydroxide on drag reduction using banana peel as a drag reduction agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, H.; Jaafar, A.

    2018-02-01

    Drag reduction is observed as reduced frictional pressure losses under turbulent flow conditions. Drag reduction agent such as polymers can be introduced to increase the flowrate of water flowing and reduce the water accumulation in the system. Currently used polymers are synthetic polymers, which will harm our environment in excessive use of accumulation. A more environmentally-friendly drag reduction agent such as the polymer derived from natural sources or biopolymer, is then required for such purpose. As opposed to the synthetic polymers, the potential of biopolymers as drag reduction agents, especially those derived from a local plant source are not extensively explored. The drag reduction of a polymer produced from a local plant source within the turbulent regime was explored and assessed in this study using a rheometer, where a reduced a torque produced was perceived as a reduction of drag. This method proposed is less time consuming and is more practical which is producing carboxymethylcellulose from the banana peel. The cellulose powder was converted to carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) by etherification process. The carboxymethylation reaction during the synthesizing process was then optimized against the reaction temperature, reaction time and solubility. The biopolymers were then rheologically characterized, where the viscoelastic effects and the normal stresses produced by these biopolymers were utilized to further relate and explain the drag reduction phenomena. The research was structured to focus on producing the biopolymer and to assess the drag reduction ability of the biopolymer produced. The rheological behavior of the biopolymers was then analyzed based on the ability of reducing drag. The results are intended to expand the currently extremely limited experimental database. Based on the results, the biopolymer works as a good DRA.

  11. Drag crisis moderation by thin air layers sustained on superhydrophobic spheres falling in water

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2018-01-22

    We investigate the effect of thin air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces on the terminal velocity and drag force of metallic spheres free falling in water. The surface of 20 mm to 60 mm steel or tungsten-carbide spheres is rendered superhydrophobic by a simple coating process that uses commercially available hydrophobic agent. By comparing the free fall of unmodified spheres and superhydrophobic spheres in a 2.5 meters tall water tank, It is demonstrated that even a very thin air layer (~ 1 – 2 μm) that covers the freshly dipped superhydrophobic sphere, can reduce the drag force on the spheres by up to 80 %, at Reynolds numbers 105 - 3×105 , owing to an early drag crisis transition. This study complements prior investigations on the drag reduction efficiency of model gas layers sustained on heated metal spheres falling in liquid by the Leidenfrost effect. The drag reduction effects are expected to have significant implication for the development of sustainable air-layer-based energy saving technologies.

  12. Drag crisis moderation by thin air layers sustained on superhydrophobic spheres falling in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetly, Aditya; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2018-02-28

    We investigate the effect of thin air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces on the terminal velocity and drag force of metallic spheres free falling in water. The surface of 20 mm to 60 mm steel or tungsten-carbide spheres is rendered superhydrophobic by a simple coating process that uses a commercially available hydrophobic agent. By comparing the free fall of unmodified spheres and superhydrophobic spheres in a 2.5 meter tall water tank, it is demonstrated that even a very thin air layer (∼1-2 μm) that covers the freshly dipped superhydrophobic sphere can reduce the drag force on the spheres by up to 80%, at Reynolds numbers from 10 5 to 3 × 10 5 , owing to an early drag crisis transition. This study complements prior investigations on the drag reduction efficiency of model gas layers sustained on heated metal spheres falling in liquid by the Leidenfrost effect. The drag reduction effects are expected to have significant implications for the development of sustainable air-layer-based energy saving technologies.

  13. Mechanism of drag reduction on a three-dimensional model vehicle using a passive control device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Wook; Sagong, Woong; Choi, Haecheon

    2007-11-01

    It has been well known that the boat-tail device reduces drag on a three-dimensional vehicle. However, its detailed mechanism is not clearly known yet. To understand this mechanism, we conduct an experiment for flow over a three-dimensional model vehicle in ground proximity. We consider various lengths (l/H = 0.1 ˜0.5) and slant angles (θ=0^o ˜40^o) of the boat tail, and conduct velocity measurements near the boat tail and oil visualizations on the boat-tail surface. We find that the slant angle is an important parameter for drag reduction. The maximum drag reduction occurs at θ=12.5^o, 15^o and 15^o for l/H = 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5, respectively, and the amounts of maximum drag reduction are 20, 41 and 45%. For the case of l/H = 0.3, separation starts to occur from θ= 6^o at the leading edge of the boat tail. This separated flow reattaches on the boat-tail surface and forms a small secondary separation bubble, which provides strong near-wall momentum and delays main separation down to the trailing edge of boat tail. The size of secondary separation bubble increases with increasing θ. At θ>16^o, main separation occurs at the leading edge of boat tail, and drag increases from the minimum value and reaches that of no control at large θ's.

  14. Backstroke swimming: exploring gender differences in passive drag and instantaneous net drag force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Danielle P; Sayers, Mark Gregory Leigh; Burkett, Brendan

    2013-12-01

    This study explored and quantified gender differences in passive drag and instantaneous net drag force profile for elite backstroke swimmers (FINA points 938 ± 71). Nine female and ten male backstroke swimmers completed eight maximum speed trials. During the passive drag condition participants were towed at the speed achieved within the maximum effort backstroke swimming trials, while holding a supine stationary streamline position. The remaining trials, swimmers performed their natural swimming stroke, while attached to an assisted towing device. Male participant's passive (P backstroke swimming provides further insight into stroke technique of this sport.

  15. The Influence of Impurities in a Water Solution with Drag Reducing Surfactants on the Flow Drag-Reduction and a Recovering Method of Its Decreased Drag Reduction Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toru; Sato, Kenji; Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto

    The drag reduction of a water flow with new drag reducing surfactants (amine oxide type nonionic surfactants, mixtures of amine oxide type nonionic surfactants and betaine type amphoteric surfactants) which were selected as environmentally acceptable drag reducing additives was investigated experimentally. Addition of amine oxide type nonionic surfactants to hot or cold water can reduce flow drag in a turbulent pipe flow. The present research investigated how various ionic components dissolved in water affected this drag reducing effect. It was found that ionic impurities contained in the water affected the pipe flow drag reducing effect by amine oxide type nonionic surfactants. Moreover, it was clarified that the decrease in the pipe flow drag reducing effect was recovered by adding a mixture of amine oxide type nonionic surfactants and betaine type amphoteric surfactant to the water with ionic impurities.

  16. Kinetic coefficients in isotopically disordered crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhernov, Arkadii P; Inyushkin, Alexander V

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the behavior of kinetic coefficients, like thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and thermoelectric power, in isotopically disordered materials are reviewed in detail. New experimental and theoretical results on the isotope effects in the thermal conductivity of diamond, Ge, and Si semiconductors are presented. The suppression effect of phonon-drag thermopower in the isotopically disordered Ge crystals is discussed. The influence of dynamic and static crystal lattice deformations on the electric conductivity of metals as well as on the ordinary phonon spectrum deformations is considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  17. Judicial civil procedure dragging out in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rrustem Qehaja

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article tends to deal with one of the most worrying issues in the judicial system of Kosovo the problem of judicial civil procedure dragging out. The article analyses the reasons of these dragging outs of the judicial civil procedure focusing on the context of one of the basic procedural principles in civil procedure-the principle of economy or efficiency in the courts. Dragging out of civil procedure in Kosovo has put in question not only the basic principles of civil procedure, but it also challenges the general principles related to human rights and freedoms sanctioned not only by the highest legal act of the country, but also with international treaties. The article tends to give a reflection to the most important reasons that effect and influence in these dragging outs of civil procedure, as well as, at the same time aims to give the necessary alternatives to pass through them by identifying dilemmas within the judicial practice. As a result, the motives of this scientific paper are exactly focused at the same time on identifying the dilemmas, as well as presenting ideas, to overstep them, including the judicial practice of the European Court of Human Rights on Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, by which it is given the possibility to offering people efficient and within a reasonable time legal protection of their rights before national courts. For these reasons, the paper elaborates this issue based on both, the legal theory and judicial practice.

  18. Durability of a drag reducing solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mík, Václav; Myška, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk; Štern, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2008), s. 12421-12429 ISSN 1430-6395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1478 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : drag reduction * surfactants * viscoelasticity * degradation of additives Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.184, year: 2008

  19. Identification of Thrust, Lift, and Drag for Deep-stall Flight Data of a Fixed-wing Unmanned Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunis, Torbjørn; Leth, Tobias; Totu, Luminita Cristiana

    2018-01-01

    approximations of the lift and drag coefficients, respectively, for low angles of attack. This overcomes the lack of propeller thrust measurements and the obtained models are successfully evaluated against CFD simulation. The identified thrust model proves applicable beyond low angles of attack, thus enabling...

  20. Reproducibility of The Random Incidence Absorption Coefficient Converted From the Sabine Absorption Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Chang, Ji-ho

    2015-01-01

    Absorption coefficients measured in reverberation chambers, Sabine absorption coefficients, suffer from two major problems. Firstly, they sometimes exceed unity. Secondly, the reproducibility of the Sabine absorption coefficients is quite poor, meaning that the Sabine absorption coefficients vary...... resistivity optimization outperforms the surface impedance optimization in terms of the reproducibility....

  1. Significance of relative velocity in drag force or drag power estimation for a tethered float

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vethamony, P.; Sastry, J.S.

    There is difference in opinion regarding the use of relative velocity instead of particle velocity alone in the estimation of drag force or power. In the present study, a tethered spherical float which undergoes oscillatory motion in regular waves...

  2. Ab initio optimization of phonon drag effect for lower-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liao, Bolin; Qiu, Bo; Huberman, Samuel; Esfarjani, Keivan; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermoelectric figure of merit zT above 300 K has seen significant improvement recently, the progress at lower temperatures has been slow, mainly limited by the relatively low Seebeck coefficient and high thermal conductivity. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, success in first-principles computation of the phonon drag effect—a coupling phenomenon between electrons and nonequilibrium phonons—in heavily doped region and its optimization to enhance the Seebeck coefficient while reducing the phonon thermal conductivity by nanostructuring. Our simulation quantitatively identifies the major phonons contributing to the phonon drag, which are spectrally distinct from those carrying heat, and further reveals that although the phonon drag is reduced in heavily doped samples, a significant contribution to Seebeck coefficient still exists. An ideal phonon filter is proposed to enhance zT of silicon at room temperature by a factor of 20 to ∼0.25, and the enhancement can reach 70 times at 100 K. This work opens up a new venue toward better thermoelectrics by harnessing nonequilibrium phonons. PMID:26627231

  3. A diagnostic model to estimate winds and small-scale drag from Mars Observer PMIRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical and modeling studies indicate that small-scale drag due to breaking gravity waves is likely to be of considerable importance for the circulation in the middle atmospheric region (approximately 40-100 km altitude) on Mars. Recent earth-based spectroscopic observations have provided evidence for the existence of circulation features, in particular, a warm winter polar region, associated with gravity wave drag. Since the Mars Observer PMIRR experiment will obtain temperature profiles extending from the surface up to about 80 km altitude, it will be extensively sampling middle atmospheric regions in which gravity wave drag may play a dominant role. Estimating the drag then becomes crucial to the estimation of the atmospheric winds from the PMIRR-observed temperatures. An interative diagnostic model based upon one previously developed and tested with earth satellite temperature data will be applied to the PMIRR measurements to produce estimates of the small-scale zonal drag and three-dimensional wind fields in the Mars middle atmosphere. This model is based on the primitive equations, and can allow for time dependence (the time tendencies used may be based upon those computed in a Fast Fourier Mapping procedure). The small-scale zonal drag is estimated as the residual in the zonal momentum equation; the horizontal winds having first been estimated from the meridional momentum equation and the continuity equation. The scheme estimates the vertical motions from the thermodynamic equation, and thus needs estimates of the diabatic heating based upon the observed temperatures. The latter will be generated using a radiative model. It is hoped that the diagnostic scheme will be able to produce good estimates of the zonal gravity wave drag in the Mars middle atmosphere, estimates that can then be used in other diagnostic or assimilation efforts, as well as more theoretical studies.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics vs. inverse dynamics methods to determine passive drag in two breaststroke glide positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Mantha, V R; Silva, A J; Fernandes, R J; Marinho, D A; Vilas-Boas, J P; Machado, L; Rouboa, A

    2015-07-16

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) plays an important role to quantify, understand and "observe" the water movements around the human body and its effects on drag (D). We aimed to investigate the flow effects around the swimmer and to compare the drag and drag coefficient (CD) values obtained from experiments (using cable velocimetry in a swimming pool) with those of CFD simulations for the two ventral gliding positions assumed during the breaststroke underwater cycle (with shoulders flexed and upper limbs extended above the head-GP1; with shoulders in neutral position and upper limbs extended along the trunk-GP2). Six well-trained breaststroke male swimmers (with reasonable homogeneity of body characteristics) participated in the experimental tests; afterwards a 3D swimmer model was created to fit within the limits of the sample body size profile. The standard k-ε turbulent model was used to simulate the fluid flow around the swimmer model. Velocity ranged from 1.30 to 1.70 m/s for GP1 and 1.10 to 1.50 m/s for GP2. Values found for GP1 and GP2 were lower for CFD than experimental ones. Nevertheless, both CFD and experimental drag/drag coefficient values displayed a tendency to jointly increase/decrease with velocity, except for GP2 CD where CFD and experimental values display opposite tendencies. Results suggest that CFD values obtained by single model approaches should be considered with caution due to small body shape and dimension differences to real swimmers. For better accuracy of CFD studies, realistic individual 3D models of swimmers are required, and specific kinematics respected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lift and drag in intruders moving through hydrostatic granular media at high speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potiguar, Fabricio Q; Ding, Yang

    2013-07-01

    Recently, experiments showed that forces on intruders dragged horizontally through dense, hydrostatic granular packings mainly depend on the local surface orientation and can be seen as the sum of the forces exerted on small surface elements. In order to understand such forces more deeply, we perform a two-dimensional soft-sphere molecular dynamics simulation, on a similar setup, of an intruder dragged through a 50-50 bi-disperse granular packing, with diameters 0.30 and 0.34 cm. We measure, for both circular and half-circle shapes, the forces parallel (drag) and perpendicular (lift) to the drag direction as functions of the drag speed, with V=10.3-309 cm/s, and intruder depths, with D=3.75-37.5 cm. The drag forces on an intruder monotonically increase with V and D, and are larger for the circle. However, the lift force does not depend monotonically on V and D, and this relationship is affected by the shape of the intruder. The vertical force was negative for the half-circle, but for a small range of V and D, we measure positive lift. We find no sign change for the lift on the circle, which is always positive. The explanation for the nonmonotonic dependence is related to the decrease in contacts on the intruder as V increases. This is qualitatively similar to supersonic flow detachment from an obstacle. The detachment picture is supported by simulation measurements of the velocity field around the intruder and force profiles measured on its surface.

  6. Wave drag on floating bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David; Raphaël, Élie; Chevy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    We measure the deceleration of liquid nitrogen drops floating at the surface of a liquid bath. On water, the friction force is found to be about 10 to 100 times larger than on a solid substrate, which is shown to arise from wave resistance. We investigate the influence of the bath viscosity and show that the dissipation decreases as the viscosity is increased, owing to wave damping. The measured resistance is well predicted by a model imposing a vertical force (i.e., the drop weight) on a finite area, as long as the wake can be considered stationary. PMID:21876186

  7. DETERMINATION OF PARASITE DRAG FOR COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE AT TRANSONIC SPEEDS

    OpenAIRE

    V. I. Shevyakov

    2014-01-01

    It considers the task of determination of parasite drag for subsonic commercial airplane on the base of theoretical calculation procedures. It contains the procedure for clarification of empirical approach to calculation of parasite drag at high speeds. It provides examples of calculation of parasite drag at transonic speeds as a result of step behind the slat on the wing of commercial airplane.

  8. The determination of drag in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toussaint, H.M.; Roos, P.E.; Kolmogorov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of drag while swimming (i.e. active drag) is a controversial issue. Therefore, in a group of six elite swimmers two active drag measurement methods were compared to assess whether both measure the same retarding force during swimming. In method 1 push-off forces are measured directly

  9. Drag Analysis from PIV Data in Speed Sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, W.; Sciacchitano, A.; Scarano, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic drag is computed from velocity measurements obtained with particle image velocimetry (PIV). This allows determining the drag force in combination with the visualization of the flow structures responsible for drag generation. Two experiments are conducted to illustrate the working

  10. 14 CFR 25.699 - Lift and drag device indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag device indicator. 25.699....699 Lift and drag device indicator. (a) There must be means to indicate to the pilots the position of each lift or drag device having a separate control in the cockpit to adjust its position. In addition...

  11. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by an...

  12. On a model for the prediction of the friction coefficient in mixed lubrication based on a load-sharing concapt with measured surface roughness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akchurin, Aydar; Bosman, Rob; Lugt, Pieter Martin; van Drogen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A new model was developed for the simulation of the friction coefficient in lubricated sliding line contacts. A half-space-based contact algorithm was linked with a numerical elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication solver using the load-sharing concept. The model was compared with an existing asperity-based

  13. Influence of Non-Perfect Step Input Concentration at the Feed Side of the Membrane Surface on the Diffusion Coefficient Evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, Jiřina; Fialová, Kateřina; Petričkovič, Roman; Kudrna, V.; Uchytil, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2006), s. 246-251 ISSN 1022-1344 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS401250509; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : diffusion coefficient * flux * dispersion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.073, year: 2006

  14. 78 FR 16205 - Special Local Regulations; Dragging on the Waccamaw, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Bucksport, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Intracoastal Waterway in Bucksport, South Carolina during the Outboard Drag Boat Association (ODBA) dragging on..., June 23, 2013 the Outboard Drag Boat Association (ODBA) will host ``Dragging on the Waccamaw,'' a...

  15. ISM-induced erosion and gas-dynamical drag in the Oort Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The model presently used to examine the physical interactions between the ISM and the Oort Cloud can account for sputtering, sticking, and grain-impact erosion, as well as gas drag, by envisioning the ISM as a multiphase medium with distinct atomic and molecular cloud-phase regimes and coronal and warm/ambient gas-phase regimes. Erosion, which reduces the effectiveness of the thermal and radiation-damage processes acting on cometary surfaces in the Oort cloud, is found to be the dominant ISM interaction; ISM drag effects were found to efficiently remove submicron particles from the Cloud. 67 refs

  16. ISM-induced erosion and gas-dynamical drag in the Oort Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1990-01-01

    The model presently used to examine the physical interactions between the ISM and the Oort Cloud can account for sputtering, sticking, and grain-impact erosion, as well as gas drag, by envisioning the ISM as a multiphase medium with distinct atomic and molecular cloud-phase regimes and coronal and warm/ambient gas-phase regimes. Erosion, which reduces the effectiveness of the thermal and radiation-damage processes acting on cometary surfaces in the Oort cloud, is found to be the dominant ISM interaction; ISM drag effects were found to efficiently remove submicron particles from the Cloud.

  17. Superhydrophobic and polymer drag reduction in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappan, Anoop; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2017-11-01

    We use a custom-built Taylor-Couette apparatus (radius ratio η = 0.75) to study frictional drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions and superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces in turbulent flows for 15000 performance of the coating and calculate the effective slip length in turbulent flow using a suitably modified Prandtl-von Kármán analysis. We also investigate drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions, and show that natural biopolymers from plant mucilage can be an inexpensive and effective alternative to synthetic polymers in drag reduction applications, approaching the same maximum drag reduction asymptote. Finally we explore combinations of the two methods - one arising from wall slip and the other due to changes in turbulence dynamics in the bulk flow - and find that the two effects are not additive; interestingly, the effectiveness of polymer drag reduction is drastically reduced in the presence of an SH coating on the wall. This study was financially supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through Contract No. 3002453814.

  18. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat, E-mail: Bhushan.2@osu.ed [Nanoprobe Laboratory for Bio- and Nanotechnology and Biomimetics (NLB2), Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2010-01-27

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  19. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  20. Spatially varying drag within a wave-exposed mangrove forest and on the adjacent tidal flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullarney, Julia C.; Henderson, Stephen M.; Reyns, Johan A. H.; Norris, Benjamin K.; Bryan, Karin R.

    2017-09-01

    Mangroves have been shown to protect shorelines against damage from the combined hydrodynamic forces of waves and tides, owing to the presence of roots (pneumatophores) and tree trunks that enhance vegetative drag. However, field measurements within these environments are limited. We present field observations of flows from the seaward coast of Cù Lao Dung Island (Sóc Trăng Province) in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Measurements were made in two different seasons along a transect that crosses from mudflats to mangrove forest. Flows are also explored using an idealised numerical model. Both the data and model capture the flow transitions from mudflat across the fringing region to the forest interior. We observe a rotation of the obliquely incident flows toward an orientation nearly perpendicular to the vegetated/unvegetated boundary. The momentum balances governing the large-scale flow are assessed and indicate the relative importance of friction, winds and depth-averaged pressure forces. In the forest, drag coefficients were 10-30 times greater than values usually observed for bottom friction, with particularly effective friction in the regions of dense pneumatophores at the fringe and when water depths were lower than the height of the pneumatophores. Pressure gradient balances suggest that the drag induced by bottom friction from pneumatophores was dominant relative to drag from the larger, but sparser, tree trunks.

  1. Regression Models for Predicting Force Coefficients of Aerofoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed ABDUL AKBAR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Renewable sources of energy are attractive and advantageous in a lot of different ways. Among the renewable energy sources, wind energy is the fastest growing type. Among wind energy converters, Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs have received renewed interest in the past decade due to some of the advantages they possess over their horizontal axis counterparts. VAWTs have evolved into complex 3-D shapes. A key component in predicting the output of VAWTs through analytical studies is obtaining the values of lift and drag coefficients which is a function of shape of the aerofoil, ‘angle of attack’ of wind and Reynolds’s number of flow. Sandia National Laboratories have carried out extensive experiments on aerofoils for the Reynolds number in the range of those experienced by VAWTs. The volume of experimental data thus obtained is huge. The current paper discusses three Regression analysis models developed wherein lift and drag coefficients can be found out using simple formula without having to deal with the bulk of the data. Drag coefficients and Lift coefficients were being successfully estimated by regression models with R2 values as high as 0.98.

  2. Drag reduction effects facilitated by microridges inside the mouthparts of honeybee workers and drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chu-Chu; Wu, Jia-Ning; Yang, Yun-Qiang; Zhu, Ren-Gao; Yan, Shao-Ze

    2016-01-21

    The mouthpart of a honeybee is a natural well-designed micropump that uses a reciprocating glossa through a temporary tube comprising a pair of galeae and labial palpi for loading nectar. The shapes and sizes of mouthparts differ among castes of honeybees, but the diversities of the functional microstructures inside the mouthparts of honeybee workers and drones remain poorly understood. Through scanning electron microscopy, we found the dimensional difference of uniformly distributed microridges on the inner galeae walls of Apis mellifera ligustica workers and drones. Subsequently, we recorded the feeding process of live honeybees by using a specially designed high-speed camera system. Considering the microridges and kinematics of the glossa, we constructed a hydrodynamic model to calculate the friction coefficient of the mouthpart. In addition, we test the drag reduction through the dimensional variations of the microridges on the inner walls of mouthparts. Theoretical estimations of the friction coefficient with respect to dipping frequency show that inner microridges can reduce friction during the feeding process of honeybees. The effects of drag reduction regulated by specific microridges were then compared. The friction coefficients of the workers and drones were found to be 0.011±0.007 (mean±s.d.) and 0.045±0.010, respectively. These results indicate that the mouthparts of workers are more capable of drag reduction compared with those of drones. The difference was analyzed by comparing the foraging behavior of the workers and drones. Workers are equipped with well-developed hypopharyngeal, and their dipping frequency is higher than that of drones. Our research establishes a critical link between microridge dimensions and drag reduction capability during the nectar feeding of honeybees. Our results reveal that microridges inside the mouthparts of honeybee workers and drones reflect the caste-related life cycles of honeybees. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  3. Evaluation and management of the impact of land use change on the nitrogen and phosphorus load delivered to surface waters: the export coefficient modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnes, P. J.

    1996-09-01

    A manageable, relatively inexpensive model was constructed to predict the loss of nitrogen and phosphorus from a complex catchment to its drainage system. The model used an export coefficient approach, calculating the total nitrogen (N) and total phosphorus (P) load delivered annually to a water body as the sum of the individual loads exported from each nutrient source in its catchment. The export coefficient modelling approach permits scaling up from plot-scale experiments to the catchment scale, allowing application of findings from field experimental studies at a suitable scale for catchment management. The catchment of the River Windrush, a tributary of the River Thames, UK, was selected as the initial study site. The Windrush model predicted nitrogen and phosphorus loading within 2% of observed total nitrogen load and 0.5% of observed total phosphorus load in 1989. The export coefficient modelling approach was then validated by application in a second research basin, the catchment of Slapton Ley, south Devon, which has markedly different catchment hydrology and land use. The Slapton model was calibrated within 2% of observed total nitrogen load and 2.5% of observed total phosphorus load in 1986. Both models proved sensitive to the impact of temporal changes in land use and management on water quality in both catchments, and were therefore used to evaluate the potential impact of proposed pollution control strategies on the nutrient loading delivered to the River Windrush and Slapton Ley.

  4. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1997-01-01

    A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21) is eval......A treatment of frictional Coulomb drag between two two-dimensional electron layers in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, within the independent electron picture, is presented. Assuming fully resolved Landau levels, the linear response theory expression for the transresistivity rho(21......) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well...

  5. Drag Measurements over Embedded Cavities in a Low Reynolds Number Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, Caleb; Lang, Amy; Jones, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Recent research has revealed that thin-walled, embedded cavities in low Reynolds number flow have the potential to reduce the net viscous drag force acting on the surface. This reduction is due to the formation of embedded vortices allowing the outer flow to pass over the surface via a roller bearing effect. It is also hypothesized that the scales found on butterfly wings may act in a similar manner to cause a net increase in flying efficiency. In this experimental study, rectangular embedded cavities were designed as a means of successfully reducing the net drag across surfaces in a low Reynolds number flow. A Couette flow was generated via a rotating conveyor belt immersed in a tank of high viscosity mineral oil above which the plates with embedded cavities were placed. Drag induced on the plate models was measured using a force gauge and compared directly to measurements acquired over a flat plate. Various cavity aspect ratios and gap heights were tested in order to determine the conditions under which the greatest drag reductions occurred.

  6. Drag and Drop API v HTML5

    OpenAIRE

    BARABÁŠ, Vít

    2013-01-01

    The work (the bachelor´s thesis) deals with a new way of web application management via the "drag and drop" technique in the HTML5 programming language. The work is divided into two parts. The first part consists of DND API description in HTML5. The support analysis within common web browsers is included as a part of this description. The second, practical part of the thesis focuses on a concept and the following realisation of a photogallery using DND API.

  7. Stokes’ and Lamb's viscous drag laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, I.; Klettner, C. A.

    2017-03-01

    Since Galileo used his pulse to measure the time period of a swinging chandelier in the 17th century, pendulums have fascinated scientists. It was not until Stokes' (1851 Camb. Phil. Soc. 9 8-106) (whose interest was spurred by the pendulur time pieces of the mid 19th century) treatise on viscous flow that a theoretical framework for the drag on a sphere at low Reynolds number was laid down. Stokes' famous drag law has been used to determine two fundamental physical constants—the charge on an electron and Avogadro's constant—and has been used in theories which have won three Nobel prizes. Considering its illustrious history it is then not surprising that the flow past a sphere and its two-dimensional analog, the flow past a cylinder, form the starting point of teaching flow past a rigid body in undergraduate level fluid mechanics courses. Usually starting with the two-dimensional potential flow past a cylinder, students progress to the three-dimensional potential flow past a sphere. However, when the viscous flow past rigid bodies is taught, the three-dimensional example of a sphere is first introduced, and followed by (but not often), the two-dimensional viscous flow past a cylinder. The reason why viscous flow past a cylinder is generally not taught is because it is usually explained from an asymptotic analysis perspective. In fact, this added mathematical complexity is why the drag on a cylinder was only solved in 1911, 60 years after the drag on a sphere. In this note, we show that the viscous flow past a cylinder can be explained without the need to introduce any asymptotic analysis while still capturing all the physical insight of this classic fluid mechanics problem.

  8. Simulating Electrophoresis with Discrete Charge and Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowitz, Aaron J.; Witten, Thomas A.

    A charged asymmetric rigid cluster of colloidal particles in saline solution can respond in exotic ways to an electric field: it may spin or move transversely. These distinctive motions arise from the drag force of the neutralizing countercharge surrounding the cluster. Because of this drag, calculating the motion of arbitrary asymmetric objects with nonuniform charge is impractical by conventional methods. Here we present a new method of simulating electrophoresis, in which we replace the continuous object and the surrounding countercharge with discrete point-draggers, called Stokeslets. The balance of forces imposes a linear, self-consistent relation among the drag and Coulomb forces on the Stokeslets, which allows us to easily determine the object's motion via matrix inversion. By explicitly enforcing charge+countercharge neutrality, the simulation recovers the distinctive features of electrophoretic motion to few-percent accuracy using as few as 1000 Stokeslets. In particular, for uniformly charged objects, we observe the characteristic Smoluchowski independence of mobility on object size and shape. We then discuss electrophoretic motion of asymmetric objects, where our simulation method is particularly advantageous. This work is supported by a Grant from the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  9. Drag-Free Control and Drag Force Recovery of Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh N.; Conklin, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Drag-free satellites provide autonomous precision orbit determination, accurately map the static and time varying components of Earth's mass distribution, aid in our understanding of the fundamental force of gravity, and will ultimately open up a new window to our universe through the detection and observation of gravitational waves. At the heart of this technology is a gravitational reference sensor, which (a) contains and shields a free-floating proof mass from all non-gravitational forces, and (b) precisely measures the position of the test mass inside the sensor. Thus, both test mass and spacecraft follow a pure geodesic in spacetime. By tracking the position of a low Earth orbiting drag-free satellite we can directly determine the detailed shape of geodesics and through analysis, the higher order harmonics of the Earths geopotential. This paper explores two different drag-free control systems on small satellites. The first drag-free control system is a continuously compensated single thruster 3-unit CubeSat with a suspension-free spherical proof-mass. A feedback control system commands the thruster and Attitude and Determination Control System to fly the tender spacecraft with respect to the test mass. The spheres position is sensed with a LED-based differential optical shadow sensor, its electric charge controlled by photoemission using UV LEDs, and the spacecraft position is maintained with respect to the sphere using an ion electrospray propulsion system. This configuration is the most fuel-efficient drag-free system possible today. The second drag-free control system is an electro-statically suspended cubical proof-mass that is operated with a low duty cycle, limiting suspension force noise over brief, known time intervals on a small GRACE-II -like satellite. The readout is performed using a laser interferometer, which is immune to the dynamic range limitations of voltage references. This system eliminates the need for a thruster, enabling drag

  10. Extinction Coefficient of Gold Nanostars

    OpenAIRE

    de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O.; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gehrke, Lee; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanostars (NStars) are highly attractive for biological applications due to their surface chemistry, facile synthesis and optical properties. Here, we synthesize NStars in HEPES buffer at different HEPES/Au ratios, producing NStars of different sizes and shapes, and therefore varying optical properties. We measure the extinction coefficient of the synthesized NStars at their maximum surface plasmon resonances (SPR), which range from 5.7 × 108 to 26.8 × 108 M−1cm−1. Measured values correl...

  11. The effect of finger spreading on drag of the hand in human swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis H J; Kunnen, Rudie P J; van Heijst, GertJan F; Grift, Ernst Jan; Breugem, Wim Paul; Delfos, Rene; Westerweel, Jerry; Clercx, Herman J H; van de Water, Willem

    2017-10-03

    The effect of finger spread on overall drag on a swimmer's hand is relatively small, but could be relevant for elite swimmers. There are many sensitivities in measuring this effect. A comparison between numerical simulations, experiments and theory is urgently required to observe whether the effect is significant. In this study, the beneficial effect of a small finger spread in swimming is confirmed using three different but complementary methods. For the first time numerical simulations and laboratory experiments are conducted on the exact same 3D model of the hand with attached forearm. The virtual version of the hand with forearm was implemented in a numerical code by means of an immersed boundary method and the 3D printed physical version was studied in a wind tunnel experiment. An enhancement of the drag coefficient of 2% and 5% compared to the case with closed fingers was found for the numerical simulation and experiment, respectively. A 5% and 8% favorable effect on the (dimensionless) force moment at an optimal finger spreading of 10° was found, which indicates that the difference is more outspoken in the force moment. Moreover, an analytical model is proposed, using scaling arguments similar to the Betz actuator disk model, to explain the drag coefficient as a function of finger spacing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Lees

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of wing morphologies in birds reflects their variety of flight styles and the associated aerodynamic and inertial requirements. Although the aerodynamics underlying wing morphology can be informed by aeronautical research, important differences exist between planes and birds. In particular, birds operate at lower, transitional Reynolds numbers than do most aircraft. To date, few quantitative studies have investigated the aerodynamic performance of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces and none have focused upon the differences between wings from different flight style groups. Dried wings from 10 bird species representing three distinct flight style groups were mounted on a force/torque sensor within a wind tunnel in order to test the hypothesis that wing morphologies associated with different flight styles exhibit different aerodynamic properties. Morphological differences manifested primarily as differences in drag rather than lift. Maximum lift coefficients did not differ between groups, whereas minimum drag coefficients were lowest in undulating flyers (Corvids. The lift to drag ratios were lower than in conventional aerofoils and data from free-flying soaring species; particularly in high frequency, flapping flyers (Anseriformes, which do not rely heavily on glide performance. The results illustrate important aerodynamic differences between the wings of different flight style groups that cannot be explained solely by simple wing-shape measures. Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver.

  13. The influence of flight style on the aerodynamic properties of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John J; Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Nudds, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of wing morphologies in birds reflects their variety of flight styles and the associated aerodynamic and inertial requirements. Although the aerodynamics underlying wing morphology can be informed by aeronautical research, important differences exist between planes and birds. In particular, birds operate at lower, transitional Reynolds numbers than do most aircraft. To date, few quantitative studies have investigated the aerodynamic performance of avian wings as fixed lifting surfaces and none have focused upon the differences between wings from different flight style groups. Dried wings from 10 bird species representing three distinct flight style groups were mounted on a force/torque sensor within a wind tunnel in order to test the hypothesis that wing morphologies associated with different flight styles exhibit different aerodynamic properties. Morphological differences manifested primarily as differences in drag rather than lift. Maximum lift coefficients did not differ between groups, whereas minimum drag coefficients were lowest in undulating flyers (Corvids). The lift to drag ratios were lower than in conventional aerofoils and data from free-flying soaring species; particularly in high frequency, flapping flyers (Anseriformes), which do not rely heavily on glide performance. The results illustrate important aerodynamic differences between the wings of different flight style groups that cannot be explained solely by simple wing-shape measures. Taken at face value, the results also suggest that wing-shape is linked principally to changes in aerodynamic drag, but, of course, it is aerodynamics during flapping and not gliding that is likely to be the primary driver.

  14. Assessment of passive drag in swimming by numerical simulation and analytical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Ramos, Rui; Silva, António J; Marinho, Daniel A

    2018-03-01

    The aim was to compare the passive drag-gliding underwater by a numerical simulation and an analytical procedure. An Olympic swimmer was scanned by computer tomography and modelled gliding at a 0.75-m depth in the streamlined position. Steady-state computer fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed on Fluent. A set of analytical procedures was selected concurrently. Friction drag (D f ), pressure drag (D pr ), total passive drag force (D f +pr ) and drag coefficient (C D ) were computed between 1.3 and 2.5 m · s -1 by both techniques. D f +pr ranged from 45.44 to 144.06 N with CFD, from 46.03 to 167.06 N with the analytical procedure (differences: from 1.28% to 13.77%). C D ranged between 0.698 and 0.622 by CFD, 0.657 and 0.644 by analytical procedures (differences: 0.40-6.30%). Linear regression models showed a very high association for D f +pr plotted in absolute values (R 2  = 0.98) and after log-log transformation (R 2  = 0.99). The C D also obtained a very high adjustment for both absolute (R 2  = 0.97) and log-log plots (R 2  = 0.97). The bias for the D f +pr was 8.37 N and 0.076 N after logarithmic transformation. D f represented between 15.97% and 18.82% of the D f +pr by the CFD, 14.66% and 16.21% by the analytical procedures. Therefore, despite the bias, analytical procedures offer a feasible way of gathering insight on one's hydrodynamics characteristics.

  15. Ocean Current and Wave Effects on Wind Stress Drag Coefficient Over the Global Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kara, A. B; Metzger, E. J; Bourassa, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    ...%), but the notable impact of the latter is only evident in the tropical Pacific Ocean; (2) the presence of waves generally makes winds weaker and C0 lower almost everywhere over the global ocean; (3...

  16. Development of a New Drag Coefficient Model for Oil and Gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    D. The developed CD model is an improvement on existing models, which can be applied to both the turbulent and laminar flow regions, thus, reasonably predicting CD over a wide range of Rep in multiphase fluid flow. It effectively accounts for ...

  17. Diagnosis of Wing Icing Through Lift and Drag Coefficient Change Detection for Small Unmanned Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim Lynge; Blanke, Mogens; Johansen, Tor Arne

    2015-01-01

    This paper address the issue of structural change, caused by ice accretion, on UAVs by utilising a Neyman Pearson (NP) based statistical change detection approach, for the identification of structural changes of fixed wing UAV airfoils. A structural analysis is performed on the nonlinear aircraft...

  18. An Experimental Study of Drag Reduction in a Pipe with Superhydrophobic Coating at Moderate Reynolds Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper experimentally investigates drag reduction, durability for operations and effects for preventing microorganism from adhering to the surface when the superhydrophobic coating is applied on a solid surface. The experiments are divided into two parts. In the first part, a pipe flow system was established to measure the drag and to test the durability of the micro-structure of superhydrophobic coating at average speeds varying from 1m/sec to 6m/sec. In the second part, we tested the effect for preventing microorganism from adhering to the surface by putting the coated steel plates into sea water. There are four different superhydrophobic coatings in the present study. The experimental results were compared to those applied by ship paint usually used at CSBC.

  19. Drag of a Supercritical Body of Revolution in Free Flight at Transonic Speeds and Comparison with Wind Tunnel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usry, J. W.; Wallace, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    The forebody drag of a supercritical body of revolution was measured in free flight over a Mach number range of 0.85 to 1.05 and a Reynolds number range of 11.5 x 10 to the 6th power to 19.4 x 10 to the 6th power and was compared with wind-tunnel data. The forebody drag coefficient for a Mach number less than 0.96 was 0.111 compared with the wind-tunnel value of 0.103. A gradual increase in the drag occurred in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel at a lower Mach number than in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel or in the free-flight test. The sharp drag rise occurred near Mach 0.98 in free flight whereas the rise occurred near Mach 0.99 in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. The sharp rise was not as pronounced in the Langley 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel and was probably affected by tunnel-wall-interference effects. The increase occurred more slowly and at a higher Mach number. These results indicate that the drag measurements made in the wind tunnels near Mach 1 were significantly affected by the relative size of the model and the wind tunnel.

  20. Gravitational Capture of Asteroids by Gas Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vieira Neto

    2009-01-01

    captured by the planet got its velocity reduced and could been trapped as an irregular satellite. It is well known that, depending on the time scale of the gas envelope, an asteroid will spiral and collide with the planet. So, we simulate the passage of the asteroid in the gas envelope with its density decreasing along the time. Using this approach, we found effective captures, and have a better understanding of the whole process. Finally, we conclude that the origin of the irregular satellites cannot be attributed to the gas drag capture mechanism alone.

  1. Two regimes in conductivity and the Hall coefficient of underdoped cuprates in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L P; Teitel'baum, G B

    2014-01-29

    We address recent experiments shedding light on the energy spectrum of under and optimally doped cuprates at temperatures above the superconducting transition. Angle resolved photoemission reveals coherent excitation only near nodal points on parts of the 'bare' Fermi surface known as the Fermi arcs. The question debated in the literature is whether the small normal pocket, seen via quantum oscillations, exists at higher temperatures or forms below a charge order transition in strong magnetic fields. Assuming the former case as a possibility, expressions are derived for the resistivity and the Hall coefficient (in weak and strong magnetic fields) with both types of carriers participating in the transport. There are two regimes. At higher temperatures (at a fixed field) electrons are dragged by the Fermi arcs' holes. The pocket being small, its contribution to conductivity and the Hall coefficient is negligible. At lower temperatures electrons decouple from holes behaving as a Fermi gas in the magnetic field. As the mobility of holes on the arcs decreases in strong fields with a decrease of temperature, below a crossover point the pocket electrons prevail, changing the sign of the Hall coefficient in the low temperature limit. Such behavior finds its confirmation in recent high-field experiments.

  2. DETERMINATION OF PARASITE DRAG FOR COMMERCIAL AIRPLANE AT TRANSONIC SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Shevyakov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It considers the task of determination of parasite drag for subsonic commercial airplane on the base of theoretical calculation procedures. It contains the procedure for clarification of empirical approach to calculation of parasite drag at high speeds. It provides examples of calculation of parasite drag at transonic speeds as a result of step behind the slat on the wing of commercial airplane.

  3. Deconstructing Hub Drag. Part 2. Computational Development and Anaysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    shanks), can constitute over ten percent of the total power required on typical helicopter designs, and over forty percent of parasite drag . On modern...Favre-averaged variable value .)T = Turbulent variable •)oo = Freestream value 12 3 Background 3.1 Problem Motivation Parasite drag on...the vehicle. Reduction in parasite drag can improve vehicle stability and control3 and significantly de- crease vibrational and blade loads to

  4. Air drag correction for satellite orbits of low eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, C. J.

    1992-04-01

    Eccentricity perturbations due to the effects of air drag on low-eccentricity satellite orbits, and especially for those satellites lying in planes inclined at angles that approximate the critical inclination angle of 63.4 percent, are presently removed by a method which extends the theory of Cook and King-Hele (1968). Attention is given to the geopotential, drag-free near-circular orbits, and variations due to air drag and gravity combined.

  5. Drag Reduction Using Polysaccharides in a Taylor–Couette Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Bhambri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Three different polysaccharides, aloe vera, Tamarind powder and pineapple fibers, are utilized as drag reducing agents in a turbulent flow. Using a Taylor–Couette setup, consisting of a rotating inner cylinder, for measuring the drag reduction, a range of Reynolds numbers from 4 × 104 to 3 × 105 has been explored in this study. The results are in good agreement with previous studies on polysaccharides conducted in a pipe/channel flow and a maximum drag reduction of 35% has been observed. Further, novel additives such as cellulose nanocrystals (CNC, surfactants and CNC grafted with surfactants are also examined in this study for drag reduction. CNC due to its rigid rod structure reduced the drag by 30%. Surfactant, due to its unique micelle formation showed maximum drag reduction of 80% at low Re. Further, surfactant was grafted on CNC and was examined for drag reduction. However, drag reduction property of surfactant was observed to be significantly reduced after grafting on CNC. The effect of Reynolds number on drag reduction is studied for all the additives investigated in this study.

  6. Experiences with optimizing airfoil shapes for maximum lift over drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal was to find airfoil shapes which maximize the ratio of lift over drag for given flow conditions. For a fixed Mach number, Reynolds number, and angle of attack, the lift and drag depend only on the airfoil shape. This then becomes a problem in optimization: find the shape which leads to a maximum value of lift over drag. The optimization was carried out using a self contained computer code for finding the minimum of a function subject to constraints. To find the lift and drag for each airfoil shape, a flow solution has to be obtained. This was done using a two dimensional Navier-Stokes code.

  7. Engineering drag currents in Coulomb coupled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jong Soo; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    The Coulomb drag phenomenon in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot system is revisited with a simple model that highlights the importance of simultaneous tunneling of electrons. Previously, cotunneling effects on the drag current in mesoscopic setups have been reported both theoretically and experimentally. However, in both cases the sequential tunneling contribution to the drag current was always present unless the drag level position were too far away from resonance. Here, we consider the case of very large Coulomb interaction between the dots, whereby the drag current needs to be assisted by cotunneling events. As a consequence, a quantum coherent drag effect takes place. Further, we demonstrate that by properly engineering the tunneling probabilities using band tailoring it is possible to control the sign of the drag and drive currents, allowing them to flow in parallel or antiparallel directions. We also show that the drag current can be manipulated by varying the drag gate potential and is thus governed by electron- or hole-like transport.

  8. Measurements of average heat-transfer and friction coefficients for subsonic flow of air in smooth tubes at high surface and fluid temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humble, Leroy V; Lowdermilk, Warren H; Desmon, Leland G

    1951-01-01

    An investigation of forced-convection heat transfer and associated pressure drops was conducted with air flowing through smooth tubes for an over-all range of surface temperature from 535 degrees to 3050 degrees r, inlet-air temperature from 535 degrees to 1500 degrees r, Reynolds number up to 500,000, exit Mach number up to 1, heat flux up to 150,000 btu per hour per square foot, length-diameter ratio from 30 to 120, and three entrance configurations. Most of the data are for heat addition to the air; a few results are included for cooling of the air. The over-all range of surface-to-air temperature ratio was from 0.46 to 3.5.

  9. RotCFD Analysis of the AH-56 Cheyenne Hub Drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Eduardo; Bass, Tal A.; Keith, Matthew D.; Oppenheim, Rebecca T.; Runyon, Bryan T.; Veras-Alba, Belen

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate (ADD) conducted tests in the U.S. Army 7- by 10- Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center of a nonrotating 2/5th-scale AH-56 rotor hub. The objective of the tests was to determine how removing the mechanical control gyro affected the drag. Data for the lift, drag, and pitching moment were recorded for the 4-bladed rotor hub in various hardware configurations, azimuth angles, and angles of attack. Numerical simulations of a selection of the configurations and orientations were then performed, and the results were compared with the test data. To generate the simulation results, the hardware configurations were modeled using Creo and Rhinoceros 5, three-dimensional surface modeling computer-aided design (CAD) programs. The CAD model was imported into Rotorcraft Computational Fluid Dynamics (RotCFD), a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool used for analyzing rotor flow fields. RotCFD simulation results were compared with the experimental results of three hardware configurations at two azimuth angles, two angles of attack, and with and without wind tunnel walls. The results help validate RotCFD as a tool for analyzing low-drag rotor hub designs for advanced high-speed rotorcraft concepts. Future work will involve simulating additional hub geometries to reduce drag or tailor to other desired performance levels.

  10. The Effects of Propulsive Jetting on Drag of a Streamlined body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Michael; Mohseni, Kamran

    2017-11-01

    Recently an abundance of bioinspired underwater vehicles have emerged to leverage eons of evolution. Our group has developed a propulsion technique inspired by jellyfish and squid. Propulsive jets are generated by ingesting and expelling water from a flexible internal cavity. We have demonstrated thruster capabilities for maneuvering on AUV platforms, where the internal thruster geometry minimized forward drag; however, such a setup cannot characterize propulsive efficiency. Therefore, we created a new streamlined vehicle platform that produces unsteady jets for forward propulsion rather than maneuvering. The streamlined jetting body is placed in a water tunnel and held stationary while jetting frequency and background flow velocity are varied. For each frequency/velocity pair the flow field is measured around the surface and in the wake using PIV. Using the zero jetting frequency as a baseline for each background velocity, the passive body drag is related to the velocity distribution. For cases with active jetting the drag and jetting forces are estimated from the velocity field and compared to the passive case. For this streamlined body, the entrainment of surrounding flow into the propulsive jet can reduce drag forces in addition to the momentum transfer of the jet itself. Office of Naval Research.

  11. Drag reduction and improvement of material transport in creeping films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M.; Rund, A.; Aksel, N. [University of Bayreuth, Department of Applied Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted that for bodies in turbulent flows a reduction of skin friction can be reached if the surface of the body is provided with small ridges aligned in the local flow direction. This surprising and counterintuitive phenomenon is called the shark-skin effect, motivated from the dermal surface morphology of sharks. In the present article we examine the possibility of resistance reduction due to a rippled surface topography in Stokes flow. We especially analyse the influence of wall riblets perpendicular to the flow direction on the mean transport velocity in gravity-driven creeping film flows following the idea that eddies generated in the valleys of the riblets act like fluid roller bearings and hence may reduce drag. Using a theoretical treatment of the Stokes equations with complex function theory, parameter studies with varying flow rate, bottom amplitude and bottom shape are presented. For the given bottom shapes the maximum enhancement of transport velocity is found by optimising the film thickness. (orig.)

  12. Anisotropic stokes drag and dynamic lift on cylindrical colloids in a nematic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Joel B; Lapointe, Clayton P; Reich, Daniel H; Leheny, Robert L

    2010-11-26

    We have measured the Stokes drag on magnetic nanowires suspended in the nematic liquid crystal 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB). The effective drag viscosity for wires moving perpendicular to the nematic director differs from that for motion parallel to the director by factors of 0.88 to 2.4, depending on the orientation of the wires and their surface anchoring. When the force on the wires is applied at an oblique angle to the director, the wires move at an angle to the force, demonstrating the existence of a lift force on particles moving in a nematic. This dynamic lift is significantly larger for wires with homeotropic anchoring than with longitudinal anchoring in the experiments, suggesting the lift force as a mechanism for sorting particles according to their surface properties.

  13. Enhancing Heat Transfer of Drag-Reducing Surfactant Solution by an HEV Static Mixer with Low Pressure Drop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel high-efficiency vortex (HEV static mixer was used to locally enhance the heat transfer coefficient of a drag-reducing fluid, Ethoquad O/12 (EO12 (3 mM with sodium salicylate (NaSal (5 mM. Significant enhancement of heat transfer coefficients was observed. The Nusselt numbers were three to five times those of normal drag-reducing flow without mixer and were close to those of water at high Reynolds number with only modest energy penalty. In contrast, a Helix static mixer increased Nusselt number slightly with very high pressure loss. A performance number was used for comparisons among the HEV static mixer, the Helix static mixer, and water without mixer. The HEV static mixer had a performance number comparable to that of water. The enhanced heat transfer by the HEV static mixer resulted from streamwise vortices generated by the inclined tabs, which increased the convective heat transfer in the radial direction.

  14. Calculation of illuminance distribution and its coefficient of variation in infinitely long interior with luminous surface ceiling by Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo simulation ni yoru tenjomen kogen wo motsu mugencho shitsunal no shodo bunpu to hendo keisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, M. (The University of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan))

    1991-01-15

    Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) was applied to the estimation of illuminance distribution in infinitely long interiors which had visual obstructions and luminous surface ceilings, and its coefficient of variation (percentage of standard deviation to average value) was studied. The illuminance distributions obtained by MCS were compared with those calculated by theoretical equations hased on teh contour integration method, and the conservation law of photon bundles was also investigated. As a result, it was concluded that MCS results of direct illuminance distributions agree with those obtained by contour integration method in infinitely long concave interiors which have luminous surface ceilings of various shapes and four visual obstructions. The coefficient of variation varies noteworthily when visual obstructions are located in asymmetrical positions. The uniformity in illuminance distributions is improved by transparent visual obstructions. The conservation law of photon bundles holds well in the concave interiors with transparent visual obstructions. Therefore, it seems that MCS technique for illuminance calculation is a very powerful tool in infinite long concave interior spaces. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Numerical investigation of the effect of sphere dimples on the drag crisis and the Magnus effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigates the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere around the critical Reynolds numbers under both stationary and self-spinning conditions by conducting Large-eddy simulations (LES) based on high resolution unstructured grids. For the stationary cases, the present calculation results validate the promotion of the drag crisis at a relatively lower Reynolds number due to the golf ball dimples. It also shows that the golf ball dimples have a limited effect on the time-dependent lateral force development in the subcritical regime, whereas the dimples are beneficial in suppressing the lateral force oscillations in the supercritical regimes. With spin parameter Γ = 0.1, the drag coefficients for the spinning smooth sphere increase slightly in all Reynolds number regimes when compared to the stationary cases, whereas for the spinning golf ball, the drag force decreases in the critical regime and increases in the supercritical regime. For both spinning models, the inverse Magnus effect was reproduced in the critical regime, whereas in the supercritical regime the ordinary Magnus force was generated. Relatively weaker lift forces were also observed in the cases of the spinning golf balls when compared to the spinning smooth spheres.

  16. Exodeviation compensated for by dragged macula: pseudo-exodeviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghadyan, A; Tamimi, E

    2009-01-01

    Dragged macula is a manifestation of several ophthalmic conditions. We present a 25-years-old male with dragged macula in the right eye, good vision in both eyes, and pseudo-exodeviation of 45 prism diopter without diplopia. We tried to correlate between the degree of pseudo-deviation and the distant of the fovea from its expected original position.

  17. Correlated Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum-dot structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum dots (CQDs) -- a biasdriven dot coupled to an unbiased dot where transport is due to Coulomb mediated energy transfer drag. To this end, we introduce a master-equation approach which accounts for higher-order tunneling (cotunneling...

  18. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  19. Elastic and viscous bond components in the adhesion of colloidal particles and fibrillated streptococci to QCM-D crystal surfaces with different hydrophobicities using Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westen, Rebecca; Sharma, Prashant K; De Raedt, Hans; Vermue, Ijsbrand; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2017-09-27

    A quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) can measure molecular mass adsorption as well as register adhesion of colloidal particles. However, analysis of the QCM-D output to quantitatively analyze adhesion of (bio)colloids to obtain viscoelastic bond properties is still a subject of debate. Here, we analyze the QCM-D output to analyze the bond between two hydrophilic streptococcal strains 91 nm long and without fibrillar surface appendages and micron-sized hydrophobic polystyrene particles on QCM-D crystal surfaces with different hydrophobicities, using the Kelvin-Voigt model and the Maxwell model. A Poisson distribution was implemented in order to determine the possible virtues of including polydispersity when fitting model parameters to the data. The quality of the fits did not indicate whether the Kelvin-Voigt or the Maxwell model is preferable and only polydispersity in spring-constants improved the fit for polystyrene particles. The Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell models both yielded higher spring-constants for the bald streptococcus than for the fibrillated one. In both models, the drag coefficients increased for the bald streptococcus with the ratio of electron-donating over electron-accepting parameters of the crystal surface, while for the fibrillated strain the drag coefficient was similar on all crystal surfaces. Combined with the propensity of fibrillated streptococci to bind to the sensor crystal as a coupled-resonator above the crystal surface, this suggests that the drag experienced by resonator-coupled, hydrophilic particles is more influenced by the viscosity of the bulk water than by interfacial water adjacent to the crystal surface. Hydrophilic particles that lack a surface tether are mass-coupled just above the crystal surface and accordingly probe the drag due to the thin layer of interfacial water that is differently structured on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. Hydrophobic particles without a surface tether are also mass

  20. Analytical Ballistic Trajectories with Approximately Linear Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giliam J. P. de Carpentier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a practical analytical approximation of projectile trajectories in 2D and 3D roughly based on a linear drag model and explores a variety of different planning algorithms for these trajectories. Although the trajectories are only approximate, they still capture many of the characteristics of a real projectile in free fall under the influence of an invariant wind, gravitational pull, and terminal velocity, while the required math for these trajectories and planners is still simple enough to efficiently run on almost all modern hardware devices. Together, these properties make the proposed approach particularly useful for real-time applications where accuracy and performance need to be carefully balanced, such as in computer games.

  1. Drag reducer boosts line capacity in Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, D.

    1984-06-01

    Shell Pipe Line personnel working on the Delta gathering system in S. Louisiana have put 145,000 bopd through a line designed to carry 130,000 bopd. They did it by using a highly sophisticated product known as a drag reducer or flow improver. Actually, it was a long-chain hydrocarbon polymer injected into the flowing oil stream of the pipeline. An increase in production at Shell Oil's Cognac platform in the Gulf of Mexico led to the need for more capacity. Building another pipeline would have been too expensive, too time consuming, and too long range to consider. The answer was to use the special polymer that, when injected into crude oil pipeline streams, reduces turbulent flow. As the long chain molecules stretch out, the oil flows smoothly in a straight line. Smooth, laminar flow means more oil through the line in a shorter time.

  2. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  3. Exceeding the Asymptotic Limit of Polymer Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, George H.; Lopez, Jose M.; Hof, Björn

    2018-03-01

    The drag of turbulent flows can be drastically decreased by adding small amounts of high molecular weight polymers. While drag reduction initially increases with polymer concentration, it eventually saturates to what is known as the maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote; this asymptote is generally attributed to the dynamics being reduced to a marginal yet persistent state of subdued turbulent motion. Contrary to this accepted view, we show that, for an appropriate choice of parameters, polymers can reduce the drag beyond the suggested asymptotic limit, eliminating turbulence and giving way to laminar flow. At higher polymer concentrations, however, the laminar state becomes unstable, resulting in a fluctuating flow with the characteristic drag of the MDR asymptote. Our findings indicate that the asymptotic state is hence dynamically disconnected from ordinary turbulence.

  4. Improved Orbit Determination and Forecasts with an Assimilative Tool for Atmospheric Density and Satellite Drag Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, G.; Pilinski, M.; Sutton, E. K.; Codrescu, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Matsuo, T.; Fedrizzi, M.; Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.; Thayer, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Much as aircraft are affected by the prevailing winds and weather conditions in which they fly, satellites are affected by the variability in density and motion of the near earth space environment. Drastic changes in the neutral density of the thermosphere, caused by geomagnetic storms or other phenomena, result in perturbations of LEO satellite motions through drag on the satellite surfaces. This can lead to difficulties in locating important satellites, temporarily losing track of satellites, and errors when predicting collisions in space. We describe ongoing work to build a comprehensive nowcast and forecast system for specifying the neutral atmospheric state related to orbital drag conditions. The system outputs include neutral density, winds, temperature, composition, and the satellite drag derived from these parameters. This modeling tool is based on several state-of-the-art coupled models of the thermosphere-ionosphere as well as several empirical models running in real-time and uses assimilative techniques to produce a thermospheric nowcast. This software will also produce 72 hour predictions of the global thermosphere-ionosphere system using the nowcast as the initial condition and using near real-time and predicted space weather data and indices as the inputs. Features of this technique include: • Satellite drag specifications with errors lower than current models • Altitude coverage up to 1000km • Background state representation using both first principles and empirical models • Assimilation of satellite drag and other datatypes • Real time capability • Ability to produce 72-hour forecasts of the atmospheric state In this paper, we will summarize the model design and assimilative architecture, and present preliminary validation results. Validation results will be presented in the context of satellite orbit errors and compared with several leading atmospheric models including the High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model, which is currently used

  5. Temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients for the reaction of C2H4 + HO2 on the C2H4O2H potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, JunJiang; Xu, JiaQi; Li, ZeRong; Tan, NingXin; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-04-02

    The potential energy surface (PES) for reaction C2H4 + HO2 was examined by using the quantum chemical methods. All rates were determined computationally using the CBS-QB3 composite method combined with conventional transition state theory(TST), variational transition-state theory (VTST) and Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation (RRKM/ME) theory. The geometries optimization and the vibrational frequency analysis of reactants, transition states, and products were performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level. The composite CBS-QB3 method was applied for energy calculations. The major product channel of reaction C2H4 + HO2 is the formation C2H4O2H via an OH(···)π complex with 3.7 kcal/mol binding energy which exhibits negative-temperature dependence. We further investigated the reactions related to this complex, which were ignored in previous studies. Thermochemical properties of the species involved in the reactions were determined using the CBS-QB3 method, and enthalpies of formation of species were compared with literature values. The calculated rate constants are in good agreement with those available from literature and given in modified Arrhenius equation form, which are serviceable in combustion modeling of hydrocarbons. Finally, in order to illustrate the effect for low-temperature ignition of our new rate constants, we have implemented them into the existing mechanisms, which can predict ethylene ignition in a shock tube with better performance.

  6. Experimental evaluation of the drag force and drag torque acting on a rotating spherical particle moving in fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukerchenko, Nikolay; Kvurt, Y.; Kharlamov, Alexander; Chára, Zdeněk; Vlasák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2008), s. 88-94 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600603 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : drag force * drag torque * spherical particle * rotational movement * translational movement Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  7. Indeterminacy of drag exerted on an arrow in free flight: arrow attitude and laminar-turbulent transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Ando, R.; Ortiz, J.; Sugiura, H.

    2017-11-01

    The aerodynamic properties of an arrow (A/C/E; Easton) were investigated in an extension of our previous work, in which the laminar-turbulent transition of the boundary layer on the arrow shaft was found to take place in the Re number range of 1.2 × 104 aligned with the flow, the boundary layer remains laminar for Re < 1.5 × 104, and the drag coefficient is approximately 1.5 for 1.0 × 104 < Re < 1.5 × 104. If the arrow has an angle of attack of 0.75 ° with the flow, the transition to turbulence takes place at approximately Re = 1.1 × 104, and the drag coefficient increases to approximately 3.1. In addition, free flight experiments are performed. The arrow’s velocity and angular velocity are recorded using five high-speed video cameras. By analysing the recorded images, we obtain the initial and final velocities from which the drag coefficient is determined. The trajectory and attitude of the arrow in free flight are computed numerically by integrating the equations of motion for a rigid body using the initial data obtained from the video images. The laminar-turbulent transition of the boundary layer is shown to take place, if the maximum angle of attack exceeds about 0.4° at Re = 1.75 × 104. The crucial influence of the initial angular velocity on the angle of attack is also examined.

  8. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  9. A numerical study on effect of corner radius and Reynolds number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prasenjit Dey

    6.4 Skin friction coefficient with Re and r. Figure 12 shows the value of the skin friction coefficient on the cylinder surface. Skin friction coefficient (Cf) is nothing. Figure 9. Variation of (a) drag coefficient with Re, (b) pressure drag coefficient and viscous drag coefficient with Re and (c) drag coefficient with corner radius. 1162.

  10. UO2 Grain Growth: Developing Phase Field Models for Pore Dragging, Solute Dragging and Anisotropic Grain Boundary Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, B. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-28

    A detailed phase field model for the effect of pore drag on grain growth kinetics was implemented in MARMOT. The model takes into consideration both the curvature-driven grain boundary motion and pore migration by surface diffusion. As such, the model accounts for the interaction between pore and grain boundary kinetics, which tends to retard the grain growth process. Our 2D and 3D simulations demonstrate that the model capture all possible pore-grain boundary interactions proposed in theoretical models. For high enough surface mobility, the pores move along with the migrating boundary as a quasi-rigid-body, albeit hindering its migration rate compared to the pore-free case. For less mobile pores, the migrating boundary can separate from the pores. For the pore-controlled grain growth kinetics, the model predicts a strong dependence of the growth rate on the number of pores, pore size, and surface diffusivity in agreement with theroretical models. An evolution equation for the grain size that includes these parameters was derived and showed to agree well with numerical solution. It shows a smooth transition from boundary-controlled kinetics to pore-controlled kinetics as the surface diffusivity decreases or the number of pores or their size increases. This equation can be utilized in BISON to give accurate estimate for the grain size evolution. This will be accomplished in the near future. The effect of solute drag and anisotropy of grain boundary on grain growth will be investigated in future studies.

  11. Wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles: Impact of aspect ratio, incident angle, and surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicolas; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2018-03-01

    The so-called wake-moment coefficient C˜h and lateral wake deflection of three-dimensional windbreaks are explored in the near and far wake. Wind-tunnel experiments were performed to study the functional dependence of C˜h with windbreak aspect ratio, incidence angle, and the ratio of the windbreak height and surface roughness (h /z0 ). Supported with the data, we also propose basic models for the wake deflection of the windbreak in the near and far fields. The near-wake model is based on momentum conservation considering the drag on the windbreak, whereas the far-wake counterpart is based on existing models for wakes behind surface-mounted obstacles. Results show that C˜h does not change with windbreak aspect ratios of 10 or greater; however, it may be lower for an aspect ratio of 5. C˜h is found to change roughly with the cosine of the incidence angle, and to depend strongly on h /z0 . The data broadly support the proposed wake-deflection models, though better predictions could be made with improved knowledge of the windbreak drag coefficient.

  12. Combined Effect of Surface Roughness and Wake Splitter Plate on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Circular Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisanthosh, Iyer; Arunkumar, K.; Ajithkumar, R.; Srikrishnan, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is focussed on numerical investigation of flow around a stationary circular cylinder (diameter, D) with selectively applied surface roughness (roughness strips with thickness ‘k’) in the presence of a wake splitter plate (length, L). The plate leading edge is at a distance of ‘G’ from the cylinder base. For this study, the commercial software ANSYS Fluent is used. Fluid considered is water. Study was conducted the following cases (a) plain cylinder (b) cylinder with surface roughness (without splitter plate) (c) Cylinder with splitter plate (without surface roughness) and (d) cylinder with both roughness and splitter plate employed. The study Reynolds number (based on D) is 17,000 and k/δ = 1.25 (in all cases). Results indicate that, for cylinder with splitter plate (no roughness), lift coefficient gradually drops till G/D=1.5 further to which it sharply increases. Whereas, drag coefficient and Strouhal number undergoes slight reduction till G/D=1.0 and thereafter, gradually increase. Circumferential location of strip (α) does not influence the aerodynamic parameters significantly. With roughness alone, drag is magnified by about 1.5 times and lift, by about 2.7 times that of the respective values of the smooth cylinder. With splitter plate, for roughness applied at all ‘α’ values, drag and lift undergoes substantial reduction with the lowest value attained at G/D=1.0.

  13. Resolvent-based feedback control for turbulent friction drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Aika; Nakashima, Satoshi; Luhar, Mitul; Fukagata, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Suboptimal control for turbulent friction drag reduction has been studied extensively. Nakashima et al. (accepted) extended resolvent analysis to suboptimal control, and for the control where the streamwise wall shear stress is used as an input (Case ST), they revealed the control effect across spectral space is mixed: there are regions of drag increase as well as reduction. This suggests that control performance may be improved if the control is applied for selective wavelengths, or if a new law is designed to suppress the spectral region leading to drag increase. In the present study, we first assess the effect of suboptimal control for selective wavelengths via DNS. The friction Reynolds number is set at 180. For Case ST, resolvent analysis predicts drag reduction at long streamwise wavelengths. DNS with control applied only for this spectral region, however, did not result in drag reduction. Then, we seek an effective control law using resolvent analysis and propose a new law. DNS results for this law are consistent with predictions from resolvent analysis, and about 10% drag reduction is attained. Further, we discuss how this law reduces the drag from a dynamical and theoretical point of view. This work was supported through Grant-in-Aid for Scientic Research (C) (No. 25420129) by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  14. Effects of Parameterized Orographic Drag on Weather Forecasting and Simulated Climatology Over East Asia During Boreal Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Suk-Jin; Koo, Myung-Seo; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kwon, Young Cheol; Hong, Song-You

    2017-10-01

    The impact of subgrid orographic drag on weather forecasting and simulated climatology over East Asia in boreal summer is examined using two parameterization schemes in a global forecast model. The schemes consider gravity wave drag (GWD) with and without lower-level wave breaking drag (LLWD) and flow-blocking drag (FBD). Simulation results from sensitivity experiments verify that the scheme with LLWD and FBD improves the intensity of a summertime continental high over the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, which is exaggerated with GWD only. This is because the enhanced lower tropospheric drag due to the effects of lower-level wave breaking and flow blocking slows down the wind flowing out of the high-pressure system in the lower troposphere. It is found that the decreased lower-level divergence induces a compensating weakening of middle- to upper-level convergence aloft. Extended experiments for medium-range forecasts for July 2013 and seasonal simulations for June to August of 2013-2015 are also conducted. Statistical skill scores for medium-range forecasting are improved not only in low-level winds but also in surface pressure when both LLWD and FBD are considered. A simulated climatology of summertime monsoon circulation in East Asia is also realistically reproduced.

  15. Drag reduction statistics in a channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Bernal, Jose A.; Hassan, Yassin A.; Gutierrez-Torres, Claudia del C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Methods to reduce the drag have been studied for many years because of the promising payoffs that can be attained. In this investigation, the evaluation of statistics such as skewness, flatness, spectra of the stream-wise velocity fluctuations is performed for single phase flow and for two phase flow. Micro-bubbles with an average diameter of 30 μm and a local void fraction of 4.8 % were produced by electrolysis and injected inside the boundary layer. This value of void fraction produced a 38.45 % decrease of the drag. The experiments were conducted in a channel flow at a Reynolds number Re 5128 (considering half height of the channel, the bulk velocity and the kinematics viscosity of the water). The channel was made of acrylic due to the optical properties of this material; its dimensions are 3.85 m long, 0.206 m wide and 0.056 m high. A pressure transducer that ranges from 0 to 35 Pa is located in the test station to measure the pressure drop in single phase flow; this pressure value is used to calculate the shear wall stress. The shear wall stress of two phase flow was measured from the velocity fields obtained from Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. PIV was utilized to measure instantaneous velocity fields in the stream-wise-normal (x-y) plane. The use of low-local values of void fraction caused a reduction of undesirable speckles effects and an absence of extreme brightness provoked by high bubble saturation. The measurements were carried out in the upper wall of the channel at 3.15 m downstream the inlet's channel. The PIV system is formed by a CCD camera with a resolution of 1008 x 1018 pixels and a double pulse laser with a maximum power 400 mJ and a wavelength of 532 nm (green light). The laser beam was transformed into a sheet of light by an array of cylindrical lenses. Two hundred frames with an area of 1.28 cm 2 were recorded to obtain one hundred velocity fields. The time separation between consecutive pulses

  16. Drag Reduction and Performance Improvement of Hydraulic Torque Converters with Multiple Biological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chunbao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish-like, dolphin-like, and bionic nonsmooth surfaces were employed in a hydraulic torque converter to achieve drag reduction and performance improvement, which were aimed at reducing profile loss, impacting loss and friction loss, respectively. YJSW335, a twin turbine torque converter, was bionically designed delicately. The biological characteristics consisted of fish-like blades in all four wheels, dolphin-like structure in the first turbine and the stator, and nonsmooth surfaces in the pump. The prediction performance of bionic YJSW335, obtained by computational fluid dynamics simulation, was improved compared with that of the original model, and then it could be proved that drag reduction had been achieved. The mechanism accounting for drag reduction of three factors was also investigated. After bionic design, the torque ratio and the highest efficiencies of YJSW335 were both advanced, which were very difficult to achieve through traditional design method. Moreover, the highest efficiency of the low speed area and high speed area is 85.65% and 86.32%, respectively. By economic matching analysis of the original and bionic powertrains, the latter can significantly reduce the fuel consumption and improve the operating economy of the loader.

  17. GRAVITATIONAL DRAG ON A POINT MASS IN HYPERSONIC MOTION WITHIN A GAUSSIAN DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantó, J.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    We develop an analytical model for the accretion and gravitational drag on a point mass that moves hypersonically in the midplane of a gaseous disk with a Gaussian vertical density stratification. Such a model is of interest for studying the interaction between a planet and a protoplanetary disk, as well as the dynamical decay of massive black holes in galactic nuclei. The model assumes that the flow is ballistic, and gives fully analytical expressions for both the accretion rate onto the point mass and the gravitational drag it suffers. The expressions are further simplified by taking the limits of a thick and of a thin disk. The results for the thick disk reduce correctly to those for a uniform density environment. We find that for a thin disk (small vertical scaleheight compared to the gravitational radius), the accretion rate is proportional to the mass of the moving object and to the surface density of the disk, while the drag force is independent of the velocity of the object. The gravitational deceleration of the hypersonic perturber in a thin disk was found to be independent of its parameters (i.e., mass or velocity) and depends only on the surface mass density of the disk. The predictions of the model are compared to the results of three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, with reasonable agreement.

  18. Biofilm community structure and the associated drag penalties of a groomed fouling release ship hull coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsucker, Kelli Z; Vora, Gary J; Hunsucker, J Travis; Gardner, Harrison; Leary, Dagmar H; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan; Swain, Geoffrey

    2018-02-01

    Grooming is a proactive method to keep a ship's hull free of fouling. This approach uses a frequent and gentle wiping of the hull surface to prevent the recruitment of fouling organisms. A study was designed to compare the community composition and the drag associated with biofilms formed on a groomed and ungroomed fouling release coating. The groomed biofilms were dominated by members of the Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria as well the diatoms Navicula, Gomphonemopsis, Cocconeis, and Amphora. Ungroomed biofilms were characterized by Phyllobacteriaceae, Xenococcaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, and the pennate diatoms Cyclophora, Cocconeis, and Amphora. The drag forces associated with a groomed biofilm (0.75 ± 0.09 N) were significantly less than the ungroomed biofilm (1.09 ± 0.06 N). Knowledge gained from this study has helped the design of additional testing which will improve grooming tool design, minimizing the growth of biofilms and thus lowering the frictional drag forces associated with groomed surfaces.

  19. The effect of drainage channels on the hydrodynamic drag of non-colloidal spheres down an inclined plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Brian; Dhong, Charles; Frechette, Joelle

    While it is well known that surface asperities and roughness alter the hydrodynamic drag of a non-colloidal sphere down an inclined plane, less is known about how the hydrodynamic drag is modified if the asperities and roughness are connected through a network of drainage channels, which allows the movement of fluid between asperities. We investigate the rotational and translation motion of spheres on several pairs of surfaces that have the same porosity and asperity size, but one surface has interconnected drainage channels whereas the other does not. These can have direct relevance to lubricated surfaces such as ball bearings in industrial settings, or biological relevance of leucocyte movement across rough surfaces. Provost's Undergraduate Research Awards, Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation.

  20. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  1. Accounting for Laminar Run & Trip Drag in Supersonic Cruise Performance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, Aga M.; Kennelly, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    An improved laminar run and trip drag correction methodology for supersonic cruise performance testing was derived. This method required more careful analysis of the flow visualization images which revealed delayed transition particularly on the inboard upper surface, even for the largest trip disks. In addition, a new code was developed to estimate the laminar run correction. Once the data were corrected for laminar run, the correct approach to the analysis of the trip drag became evident. Although the data originally appeared confusing, the corrected data are consistent with previous results. Furthermore, the modified approach, which was described in this presentation, extends prior historical work by taking into account the delayed transition caused by the blunt leading edges.

  2. Effect of system variables involved in packed column SFC of nevirapine as model analyte using response surface methodology: application to retention thermodynamics, solute transfer kinetic study and binary diffusion coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Neerej; Agrawal, Himani; Paradkar, A R; Mahadik, K R

    2005-08-31

    A multifactor optimization technique is successfully applied to study the effect of simultaneously varying the system variables on feasibility of nevirapine analysis by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (PC-SFC). The optimal conditions were determined with the aid of the response surface methodology using 3(3) factorial designs. The method is based on methanol-modified carbon dioxide as the mobile phase at flow rate of 3.0 ml/min with elution through a JASCO Finepak SIL-5, [C18 (5-micron, 25 cm x 4.6 mm, i.d.)] column using photodiode array detection. The method has been successfully used to analyze commercial solid dosage form to assess the chromatographic performance of SFC system. The present work briefs the thermodynamic applications of PC-SFC with an emphasis on the results of nevirapine. The foremost of such applications is the determination of solute diffusion coefficient in supercritical mobile phase by Taylor-Aris peak broadening technique.

  3. The application of rational approximation in the calculation of a temperature field with a non-linear surface heat-transfer coefficient during quenching for 42CrMo steel cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Heming; Huang, Xieqing; Fan, Jiang; Wang, Honggang

    1999-10-01

    The calculation of a temperature field has a great influence upon the analysis of thermal stresses and stains during quenching. In this paper, a 42CrMo steel cylinder was used an example for investigation. From the TTT diagram of the 42CrMo steel, the CCT diagram was simulated by mathematical transformation, and the volume fraction of phase constituents was calculated. The thermal physical properties were treated as functions of temperature and the volume fraction of phase constituents. The rational approximation was applied to the finite element method. The temperature field with phase transformation and non-linear surface heat-transfer coefficients was calculated using this technique, which can effectively avoid oscillationin the numerical solution for a small time step. The experimental results of the temperature field calculation coincide with the numerical solutions.

  4. Bilateral macular colobomata: Temporal dragging of optic disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old male presented with decreased vision and squint from childhood. He had bilateral large colobomata at the macula in each eye, the one on the right being larger than the left. The disc was dragged temporally with straightening of the temporal retinal vessels. This is a case report of bilateral large macular coloboma and serves to report its association with a temporally dragged disc and straightened temporal retinal vessels. A dragged disc if present with a colobomatous defect at the macula may strengthen the case for diagnosis of macular coloboma and help exclude other differentials.

  5. Effect of guideway discontinuities on magnetic levitation and drag forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Korte, R.; Hull, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Transients in the lift and drag forces on a NdFeB permanent magnet were observed as the magnet passed over various discontinuities in a rotating aluminum disk at velocities of 4 to 25 m/s. For full cuts in the disk, the amplitude of the lift and drag transients and the wave form of the drag transient depend on the width, and the amplitudes are much larger than for partial cuts. The use of a backing plate to join two cut segments is ineffective

  6. Bilateral macular colobomata: Temporal dragging of optic disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, David J

    2015-04-01

    A 13-year-old male presented with decreased vision and squint from childhood. He had bilateral large colobomata at the macula in each eye, the one on the right being larger than the left. The disc was dragged temporally with straightening of the temporal retinal vessels. This is a case report of bilateral large macular coloboma and serves to report its association with a temporally dragged disc and straightened temporal retinal vessels. A dragged disc if present with a colobomatous defect at the macula may strengthen the case for diagnosis of macular coloboma and help exclude other differentials.

  7. Single Gradientless Light Beam Drags Particles as Tractor Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Haifeng

    2011-01-01

    is the strong nonparaxiality of the light beam, which contributes to the pulling force owing to momentum conservation. The nonparaxiality of the Bessel beam can be manipulated to possess a dragging force along both the radial longitudinal directions, i.e., a "tractor beam" with stable trajectories is achieved......Usually a light beam pushes a particle when the photons act upon it. We investigate the optical forces by nonparaxial gradientless beams and find that the forces can drag suitable particles all the way towards the light source. The major criterion of realizing the backward dragging force...

  8. Colossal Seebeck effect enhanced by quasi-ballistic phonons dragging massive electrons in FeSb2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Okazaki, R.; Ishiwata, S.; Taniguchi, H.; Okutani, A.; Hagiwara, M.; Terasaki, I.

    2016-09-01

    Phonon transport is an essential property of thermoelectric materials. Although the phonon carries heat, which reduces the thermoelectric efficiency, it contributes positively to the Seebeck coefficient S through the phonon-drag effect, as typified by the high-purity semiconductors, which show fairly large S at cryogenic temperatures. Although such a large S is attractive in terms of Peltier cooling, a clear guiding principle for designing thermoelectric materials enriched by the phonon-drag effect remains to be established. Here we demonstrate that a correlated semiconductor, FeSb2, is a promising thermoelectric material featuring quasi-ballistic phonons dragging d electrons with large effective mass. By changing the sample size within the sub-millimetre order for high-purity single crystals, we succeed in substantially increasing S to as much as -27 mV K-1 at low temperatures. Our results exemplify a strategy for exploring phonon-drag-based thermoelectric materials, the performance of which can be maximized by combining heavy electrons with ballistic phonons.

  9. The influence of the hand's acceleration and the relative contribution of drag and lift forces in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Boli, Alexia; Aggeloussis, Nikolaos; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Toubekis, Argyris; Mavromatis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the hand's acceleration on the propulsive forces and the relative contribution of the drag and lift on their resultant force in the separate phases of the front crawl underwater arm stroke. Ten female swimmers swam one trial of all-out 25-m front crawl. The underwater motion of each swimmer's right hand was recorded using four camcorders and four periscope systems. Anatomical landmarks were digitised, and the propulsive forces generated by the swimmer's hand were estimated from the kinematic data in conjunction with hydrodynamic coefficients. When the hand's acceleration was taken into account, the magnitude of the propulsive forces was greater, with the exception of the mean drag force during the final part of the underwater arm stroke. The mean drag force was greater than the mean lift force in the middle part, while the mean lift force was greater than the mean drag force in the final part of the underwater arm stroke. Thus, swimmers should accelerate their hands from the beginning of their backward motion, press the water with large pitch angles during the middle part and sweep with small pitch angles during the final part of their underwater arm stroke.

  10. Improving Fermi Orbit Determination and Prediction in an Uncertain Atmospheric Drag Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrina, Matthew A.; Newman, Clark P.; Slojkowski, Steven E.; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2014-01-01

    Orbit determination and prediction of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope trajectory is strongly impacted by the unpredictability and variability of atmospheric density and the spacecraft's ballistic coefficient. Operationally, Global Positioning System point solutions are processed with an extended Kalman filter for orbit determination, and predictions are generated for conjunction assessment with secondary objects. When these predictions are compared to Joint Space Operations Center radar-based solutions, the close approach distance between the two predictions can greatly differ ahead of the conjunction. This work explores strategies for improving prediction accuracy and helps to explain the prediction disparities. Namely, a tuning analysis is performed to determine atmospheric drag modeling and filter parameters that can improve orbit determination as well as prediction accuracy. A 45% improvement in three-day prediction accuracy is realized by tuning the ballistic coefficient and atmospheric density stochastic models, measurement frequency, and other modeling and filter parameters.

  11. Experimental study on the reduction of skin frictional drag in pipe flow by using convex air bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Bong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Hoon; Jeon, Hyeong Jin; Kim, Moon Chan; Lee, Inwon; Chun, Sejong; Go, Jeung Sang

    2014-04-01

    In response to the ever increasing need for efficient management of energy consumption, there have been extensive studies on drag reduction in many types of transport systems. In this paper, we examine the reduction of skin frictional drag in a pipe with an internal surface fabricated with cavity array by using the slip obtained on a convex air bubble array. The bubble formation was observed in a microchannel by using a high-speed CCD camera with respect to time and a micro PIV characterized by measuring velocity distribution around the convex bubble. Also, to investigate the possibility of the drag reduction, the volumetric flow rate and momentum flux were compared with and without the convex air bubble array in the microchannel. The measured momentum flux was rapidly increased around the convex air bubbles, which expected the reduction of skin frictional drag. Also, the slip influence distance was determined for the different bubble heights along the microchannel. The convex air bubble with larger height provides longer slip influence distance. Finally, the cavity array was fabricated on the internal surface of a pipe. The size of the cavity array was designed 100 μm in a rectangle, and they were spaced with 150 μm. The pipe diameter was 28.4 mm, and its length was 500 mm. The pipe was installed into a test rig to evaluate the drag reduction and was experimented in the turbulent flow condition, in which Reynolds number was ranged from 40,000 to 220,000. Maximum drag reduction of 10 % was obtained in the cavity pipe, while that of the smooth pipe was shown <2 %.

  12. Effects of polymer stresses on analogy between momentum and heat transfer in drag-reduced turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2018-03-01

    The effects of polymer stresses on the analogy between momentum and heat transfer are examined by using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of viscoelastic turbulent channel flows using a constant heat flux boundary condition. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and channel half height is 125, and the Prandtl number is 5. The polymer stress is modeled using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model, and low (15%), intermediate (34%), and high drag reduction (DR) (52%) cases are examined. The Colburn analogy is found to be inapplicable for viscoelastic turbulent flows, suggesting dissimilarity between the momentum and heat transfer at the macroscopic coefficient level. The mean temperature profile also shows behaviour different from the mean velocity profile in drag-reduced flows. In contrast to the dissimilarity in the mean profiles, the turbulent Prandtl number Prt predicted by the DNS is near unity. This implies that turbulent heat transfer is still analogous to turbulent momentum transfer in drag-reduced flows, as in Newtonian flow. An increase in DR is accompanied by an increase in the correlation coefficient ρuθ between the instantaneous fluctuations in the streamwise velocity u and temperature θ. The correlation coefficient between u' and wall-normal velocity fluctuations v', ρ-u v, exhibits a profile similar to that of ρ-θ v in drag-reduced and Newtonian flows. Finally, the budget analysis of the transport equations of turbulent heat flux shows a strong similarity between the turbulent momentum and heat transfer, which is consistent with the predictions of Prt near unity.

  13. The Digital Drag and Drop Pillbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Bradi B.; Locke, Susan C.; Bowers, Margaret; Sawyer, Tenita; Shang, Howard; Abernethy, Amy P.; Bloomfield, Richard A.; Gilliss, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We present the design and feasibility testing for the “Digital Drag and Drop Pillbox” (D-3 Pillbox), a skill-based educational approach that engages patients and providers, measures performance, and generates reports of medication management skills. Methods: A single-cohort convenience sample of patients hospitalized with heart failure was taught pill management skills using a tablet-based D-3 Pillbox. Medication reconciliation was conducted, and aptitude, performance (% completed), accuracy (% correct), and feasibility were measured. Results: The mean age of the sample (n = 25) was 59 (36–89) years, 50% were women, 62% were black, 46% were uninsured, 46% had seventh-grade education or lower, and 31% scored very low for health literacy. However, most reported that the D-3 Pillbox was easy to read (78%), easy to repeat-demonstrate (78%), and comfortable to use (tablet weight) (75%). Accurate medication recognition was achieved by discharge in 98%, but only 25% reported having a “good understanding of my responsibilities.” Conclusions: The D-3 Pillbox is a feasible approach for teaching medication management skills and can be used across clinical settings to reinforce skills and medication list accuracy. PMID:28282304

  14. The 'W' prawn-trawl with emphasised drag-force transfer to its centre line to reduce overall system drag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheslav Balash

    Full Text Available For prawn trawling systems, drag reduction is a high priority as the trawling process is energy intensive. Large benefits have occurred through the use of multiple-net rigs and thin twine in the netting. An additional positive effect of these successful twine-area reduction strategies is the reduced amount of otter board area required to spread the trawl systems, which leads to further drag reduction. The present work investigated the potential of redirecting the drag-strain within a prawn trawl away from the wings and the otter boards to the centre line of the trawl, where top and bottom tongues have been installed, with an aim to minimise the loading/size of the otter boards required to spread the trawl. In the system containing the new 'W' trawl, the drag redirected to the centre-line tongues is transferred forward through a connected sled and towing wires to the trawler. To establish the extent of drag redirection to the centre-line tongues and the relative drag benefits of the new trawl system, conventional and 'W' trawls of 3.65 m headline length were tested firstly over a range of spread ratios in the flume tank, and subsequently at optimum spread ratio in the field. The developed 'W' trawl effectively directed 64% of netting-drag off the wings and onto the centre tongues, which resulted in drag savings in the field of ∼20% for the associated 'W' trawl/otter-board/sled system compared to the traditional trawl/otter-board arrangement in a single trawl or twin rig configuration. Furthermore, based on previously published data, the new trawl when used in a twin rig system is expected to provide approximately 12% drag reduction compared to quad rig. The twin 'W' trawl system also has benefits over quad rig in that a reduced number of cod-end/By-catch Reduction Device units need to be installed and attended each tow.

  15. ASOS Surface Extinction Coefficient by STI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — ASOS_STI represents a 250-station subset of the national ASOS SURF_MET dataset. The unique feature of this data is that the visibility sensor values are available in...

  16. Effects of spatially varying slip length on friction drag reduction in wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yosuke; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    2011-01-01

    A series of direct numerical simulation has been made of turbulent flow over hydrophobic surfaces, which are characterized by streamwise periodic micro-grooves. By assuming that the size of micro-grooves is much smaller than the typical length-scale of near-wall turbulent structures, the dynamical boundary condition is expressed by a mobility tensor, which relates the slip velocity and the surface shear stress. Based on the derived mathematical relationship between the friction drag and different dynamical contributions, it is shown how the turbulence contribution can be extracted and analyzed.

  17. Drag Reduction through Pulsed Plasma Actuators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Drag reduction is a fundamental necessity in all aerodynamic designs, as it directly affects aircraft fuel efficiency which in turn affects endurance, range, and...

  18. Frictional drag between quantum wells mediated by phonon exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, M.C.; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1998-01-01

    We use the Kubo formalism to evaluate the contribution of acoustic-phonon exchange to the frictional drag between nearby two-dimensional electron systems. In the case of free phonons, we find a divergent drag rate (tau(D)(-l)). However, tau(D)(-l) becomes finite when phonon scattering from either...... lattice imperfections or electronic excitations is accounted for. In the case of GaAs quantum wells, we find that for a phonon mean free path l(ph) smaller than a critical value, imperfection scattering dominates and the drag rate varies as ln(l(ph)/d) over many orders of magnitude of the layer separation...... d. When l(ph) exceeds the critical value, the drag rate is dominated by coupling through an electron-phonon collective mode localized in the vicinity of the electron layers. We argue that the coupled electron-phonon mode may be observable for realistic parameters. Our theory is in good agreement...

  19. Plasma Flow Control for Drag Reduction, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase II SBIR project deals with advancing the design, development, and testing of an innovative drag reduction concept named ?Smart Longitudinal Instability...

  20. Wall temperature control of low-speed body drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Ash, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of thermal means to control drag under turbulent boundary layer conditions is examined. Numerical calculations are presented for both skin friction and (unseparated) pressure drag for turbulent boundary-layer flows over a fuselage-like body with wall heat transfer. In addition, thermal control of separation on a bluff body is investigated. It is shown that a total drag reduction of up to 20 percent can be achieved for wall heating with a wall-to-total-freestream temperature ratio of 2. For streamlined slender bodies, partial wall heating of the forebody can produce almost the same order of total drag reduction as the full body heating case. For bluff bodies, the separation delay from partial wall cooling of the afterbody is approximately the same as for the fully cooled body.

  1. Adaptive lyapunov control and artificial neural networks for spacecraft relative maneuvering using atmospheric differential drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Chaparro, David Andres

    At low Earth orbits, a differential in the drag acceleration between spacecraft can be used to control their relative motion. This drag differential allows for a propellant-free alternative to thrusters for performing relative maneuvers in these orbits. The interest in autonomous propellant-less maneuvering comes from the desire to reduce the costs of spacecraft formations. Formation maneuvering opens up a wide variety of new applications for spacecraft missions, such as on-orbit maintenance and refueling. In this work atmospheric differential drag based nonlinear controllers are presented that can be used for virtually any planar relative maneuver of two spacecraft, provided that there is enough atmospheric density and that the spacecraft can change their ballistic coefficients by sufficient amounts to generate the necessary differential accelerations. The control techniques are successfully tested using high fidelity Satellite Tool Kit simulations for re-phase, fly-around, and rendezvous maneuvers, proving the feasibility of the proposed approach for a real flight. Furthermore, the atmospheric density varies in time and in space as the spacecraft travel along their orbits. The ability to accurately forecast the density allows for accurate onboard orbit propagation and for creating realistic guidance trajectories for maneuvers that rely on the differential drag. In this work a localized density predictor based on artificial neural networks is also presented. The predictor uses density measurements or estimates along the past orbits and can use a set of proxies for solar and geomagnetic activities to predict the value of the density along the future orbits of the spacecraft. The performance of the localized predictor is studied for different neural network structures, testing periods of high and low solar and geomagnetic activities and different prediction windows. Comparison with previously developed methods show substantial benefits in using neural networks, both

  2. Investigation of vegetation-induced drag parameterizations for natural and nature-based extreme events coastal protection in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, S.; Suckale, J.; Ferreira, C.; Arkema, K.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing intensity and frequency of extreme meteorological events around the world highlight the need for resilient coastal defenses. For more than a century, it has been recognized that coastal ecosystems such as marshes and mangroves may mitigate the damage caused by natural hazards such as storms. Aquatic vegetation can potentially attenuate waves and currents through drag forces, with strong implications for sediment transport processes and hence morphological evolution. However, although observations exist that support such a theory, an accurate quantification of the protective role of coastal ecosystems remains a standing challenge for the scientific community, which manifests itself in the large, diverse set of available empirical expressions for parameterizing the fluid-vegetation interaction. We propose a comparison of different state-of-the-art parameterizations for the effect of vegetation on hydrodynamics (particularly, the drag coefficient), with varying degrees of complexity and number of required input variables. The inter-comparison of such alternatives, when validated against field data, can lead to a modeling framework that optimizes the trade-offs between complexity, input requirements and uncertainty in the results. We focus our numerical study on storm events in the marshes and wetlands of Chesapeake Bay. We simulate the hydrodynamics via the Non-Linear Shallow Water Equations, which are in turn solved numerically through a Finite Volume scheme. The simulations are complemented by an ongoing 2-years field campaign, where we continuously collect hydrodynamic measurements such as free surface elevation and vertical velocity profiles, biophysical characteristics of the vegetation and high-resolution topo-bathymetric data of the site. Field measurements are used for calibration and validation purposes. We also investigate some implications on sediment transport processes. We expect that results from our study can support policy makers and

  3. Aerodynamic Design Optimisation for Utility Helicopter Drag Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Grawunder, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce helicopter’s fuel flow requirements and emissions, the aerodynamic design of Twin-Engine-Light (TEL) class utility helicopter is revised. A viable approach for achieving efficiency gains is reducing the helicopter’s parasite drag. This is achieved by the development of aerodynamic fairings for the skid-landing-gear and passive flow control devices at the rear fuselage. On aggregate, a parasite drag benefit of 22% is achieved, which corresponds to about 10% fuel flow reducti...

  4. Progress towards a Drag-free SmallSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Shailendhar

    The net force acting on a drag-free satellite is purely gravitational as all other forces, mainly atmospheric drag and solar radiation pressure, are canceled out. In order to achieve this, a free floating reference (test mass) inside the satellite is shielded against all forces but gravity and a system of thrusters is commanded by a control algorithm such that the relative displacement between the reference and the satellite stays constant. The main input to that control algorithm is the output of a sensor which measures the relative displacement between the satellite and the test mass. Internal disturbance forces such as electrostatic or magnetic forces cannot be canceled out his way and have to be minimized by a careful design of the satellite. A drag-free technology package is under development at Stanford since 2004. It includes an optical displacement sensor to measure the relative position of the test mass inside the satellite, a caging mechanism to lock the test mass during launch, a UV LED based charge management system to minimize the effect of electrostatic forces, a thermal enclosure, and the drag-free control algorithms. Possible applications of drag-free satellites in fundamental physics (Gravity Probe B, LISA), geodesy (GOCE), and navigation (TRIAD I). In this presentation we will highlight the progress of the technology development towards a drag-free mission. The planned mission on a SaudiSat bus will demonstrate drag-free technology on a small spacecraft at a fraction of the cost of previous drag-free missions. The target acceleration noise is 10-12 m/sec2. With multiple such satellites a GRACE-like mission with improved sensitivity and potentially improved spatial and temporal resolution can be achieved.

  5. Thermal Transport and Drag Force in Improved Holographic QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gürsoy, Umut; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios; Nitti, Francesco; 10.1088

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the bulk viscosity, drag force and jet quenching parameter in Improved Holographic QCD. We find that the bulk viscosity rises near the phase transition but does not exceed the shear viscosity. The drag force shows the effects of asymptotic freedom both as a function of velocity and temperature. It indicates diffusion times of heavy quarks in rough agreement with data. The jet quenching parameter values computed via the light-like Wilson loop are in the lower range suggested by data.

  6. Colloids dragged through a polymer solution: experiment, theory and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Krüger, Matthias; Rauscher, Markus; Weeber, Rudolf; Harting, Jens

    2007-01-01

    We present micro-rheological measurments of the drag force on colloids pulled through a solution of lambda-DNA (used here as a monodisperse model polymer) with an optical tweezer. The experiments show a violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation based on the independently measured viscosity of the DNA solution: the drag force is larger than expected. We attribute this to the accumulation of DNA infront of the colloid and the reduced DNA density behind the colloid. This hypothesis is corroborat...

  7. The Parameters Affect on Power Coefficient Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Y. Qasim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study describes the design of a special type of vertical axis rotor wind turbine with moveable vertically positioned vanes. The novel design increases the torque in the left side of the wind turbine by increasing the drag coefficient. It also reduces the negative torque of the frame which rotates contrary to the wind in the other side. Two different types of models, having different vane shapes (flat vane and cavity shaped vane, were fabricated. Each type consisted of two models with varying number of frames (three and four frames. The models were tested in a wind tunnel with variable wind speed in order to understand the effect of shape, weight, and number of frames on the power coefficient of the wind turbine. ABSTRAK: Di dalam kajian ini, rotor turbin angin berpaksi vertikel sebagai rangka khusus telah direkabentuk dengan lokasi vertikel mudahalih oleh bilah kipas. Rekabentuk ini meningkatkan tork di bahagian kiri turbin angin dengan meningkatkan pekali seretan dan mengurangkan tork negatif rangka yang berputar berlawanan dengan angin pada bahagian lain. Dua jenis model berbentuk berlainan telah difabrikasi (bilah kipas rata dan bilah kipas berbentuk kaviti, dengan setiap jenis mempunyai dua model dengan bilangan rangka yang berlainan (berangka tiga dan berangka empat. Model-model telah diuji di dalam terowong angin dengan kelajuan angin yang berbeza bagi mendapatkan kesan rekabentuk, berat dan bilangan rangka ke atas pekali kuasa.KEYWORDS: design; wind turbine; drag coefficient; vane

  8. 76 FR 34859 - Safety Zone; Augusta Southern Nationals Drag Boat Race, Savannah River, Augusta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Augusta Southern Nationals Drag Boat Race... during the Augusta Southern Nationals Drag Boat Race. The Augusta Southern Nationals Drag Boat Race will..., 2011 Augusta Southern Nationals, Inc. is hosting the Augusta Southern Nationals Drag Boat Race, a...

  9. Force and flow at the onset of drag in plowed granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-04-01

    We study the transient drag force FD on a localized intruder in a granular medium composed of spherical glass particles. A flat plate is translated horizontally from rest through the granular medium to observe how FD varies as a function of the medium's initial volume fraction, ϕ. The force response of the granular material differs above and below the granular critical state, ϕc, the volume fraction which corresponds to the onset of grain dilatancy. For ϕϕc, FD rapidly rises to a maximum and then decreases over further displacement. The maximum force for ϕ>ϕc increases with increasing drag velocity. In quasi-two-dimensional drag experiments, we use granular particle image velocimetry (PIV) to measure time resolved strain fields associated with the horizontal motion of a plate started from rest. PIV experiments show that the maxima in FD for ϕ>ϕc are associated with maxima in the spatially averaged shear strain field. For ϕ>ϕc the shear strain occurs in a narrow region in front of the plate, a shear band. For ϕϕc, surface particles move only during the formation of the shear band, coincident with the maxima in FD, after which the particles remain immobile until the sheared region reaches the measurement region.

  10. Reflection and absorption coefficients for use in room acoustic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Two ideas to improve the boundary conditions for room acoustic simulations are presented. First, all rooms have finite boundary surfaces, thereby a reflection coefficient for finite surfaces should be physically more suitable than that for infinitely large surfaces. Second, absorption coefficients...

  11. Extinction Coefficient of Gold Nanostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Puig, Helena; Tam, Justina O; Yen, Chun-Wan; Gehrke, Lee; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2015-07-30

    Gold nanostars (NStars) are highly attractive for biological applications due to their surface chemistry, facile synthesis and optical properties. Here, we synthesize NStars in HEPES buffer at different HEPES/Au ratios, producing NStars of different sizes and shapes, and therefore varying optical properties. We measure the extinction coefficient of the synthesized NStars at their maximum surface plasmon resonances (SPR), which range from 5.7 × 10 8 to 26.8 × 10 8 M -1 cm -1 . Measured values correlate with those obtained from theoretical models of the NStars using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA), which we use to simulate the extinction spectra of the nanostars. Finally, because NStars are typically used in biological applications, we conjugate DNA and antibodies to the NStars and calculate the footprint of the bound biomolecules.

  12. Numerical simulations and observations of surface wave fields under an extreme tropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Wright, C.W.; Walsh, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the wave model WAVEWATCH III under a very strong, category 5, tropical cyclone wind forcing is investigated with different drag coefficient parameterizations and ocean current inputs. The model results are compared with field observations of the surface wave spectra from an airborne scanning radar altimeter, National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) time series, and satellite altimeter measurements in Hurricane Ivan (2004). The results suggest that the model with the original drag coefficient parameterization tends to overestimate the significant wave height and the dominant wavelength and produces a wave spectrum with narrower directional spreading. When an improved drag parameterization is introduced and the wave-current interaction is included, the model yields an improved forecast of significant wave height, but underestimates the dominant wavelength. When the hurricane moves over a preexisting mesoscale ocean feature, such as the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico or a warm-and cold-core ring, the current associated with the feature can accelerate or decelerate the wave propagation and significantly modulate the wave spectrum. ?? 2009 American Meteorological Society.

  13. Dynamics of zodical dust particles in the region near the sonic surface of the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszkiewicz, M.; Fahr, H. J.; Mann, I.; Scherer, K.

    Besides by the electromagnetic Poynting-Robertson effect zodial dust particle motions are substantially influenced by plasma Poynting-Robertson drag forces induced by the solar wind passing over the dust particles. Calculations show that the associated plasma drag coefficient very much depends on whether or not the solar wind plasma is supersonic.Since this coefficient strongly increases with decreasing solar wind sonic Mach number it is interesting to study zodiacal dust dynamics in the region close to the sonic surface of the solar wind where the change from low Mach number to large Mach number flows occurs.This is likely to occur at different solar distances in region near the ecliptic compared to those at higher latitudes.On the basis of a parametrized 3-dimensional solar wind outflow model we study the zodical dust dynamics for particles at different inclinations and demonstrate inclination-dependent radial migration periods. In addition the plasma drag force in the subsonic solar wind region has components normal to the orbital plane of the particles connected with the solar wind ion temperature anisotropies and inducing inclination drifts of the dust particles. With our calculations we will point out that observational studies of the zodiacal dust cloud close to the corona provide a diagnostic of the solar wind in its acceleration region.

  14. Body lift, drag and power are relatively higher in large-eared than in small-eared bat species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Jonas; Jakobsen, Lasse; Hedenström, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Bats navigate the dark using echolocation. Echolocation is enhanced by external ears, but external ears increase the projected frontal area and reduce the streamlining of the animal. External ears are thus expected to compromise flight efficiency, but research suggests that very large ears may...... mitigate the cost by producing aerodynamic lift. Here we compare quantitative aerodynamic measures of flight efficiency of two bat species, one large-eared (Plecotus auritus) and one small-eared (Glossophaga soricina), flying freely in a wind tunnel. We find that the body drag of both species is higher...... than previously assumed and that the large-eared species has a higher body drag coefficient, but also produces relatively more ear/body lift than the small-eared species, in line with prior studies on model bats. The measured aerodynamic power of P. auritus was higher than predicted from...

  15. Modelling the effect of changing design fineness ratio of an airship on its aerodynamic lift and drag performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalasabri, J.; Romli, F. I.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    In developing successful airship designs, it is important to fully understand the effect of the design on the performance of the airship. The aim of this research work is to establish the trend for effects of design fineness ratio of an airship towards its aerodynamic performance. An approximate computer-aided design (CAD) model of the Atlant-100 airship is constructed using CATIA software and it is applied in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation analysis using Star-CCM+ software. In total, 36 simulation runs are executed with different combinations of values for design fineness ratio, altitude and velocity. The obtained simulation results are analyzed using MINITAB to capture the effects relationship on lift and drag coefficients. Based on the results, it is concluded that the design fineness ratio does have a significant impact on the generated aerodynamic lift and drag forces on the airship.

  16. Prestarlike functions with negative coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Silverman

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available The extreme points for prestarlike functions having negative coefficients are determined. Coefficient, distortion and radii of univalence, starlikeness, and convexity theorems are also obtained.

  17. Nation Drag: Uses of the Exotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Seigel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In Uneven Encounters, the forthcoming book from which this article is excerpted, Micol Seigel chronicles the exchange of popular culture between Brazil and the United States in the years between the World Wars, and she demonstrates how that exchange affected ideas of race and nation in both countries. From Americans interpreting advertisements for Brazilian coffee or dancing the Brazilian maxixe, to Rio musicians embracing the “foreign” qualities of jazz, Seigel traces a lively, cultural back-and-forth. Along the way, she shows how race and nation are constructed together, by both non-elites and elites, and gleaned from global cultural and intellectual currents as well as local, regional, and national ones. Seigel explores the circulation of images of Brazilian coffee and of maxixe in the United States during the period just after the imperial expansions of the early twentieth century. Exoticist interpretations structured North Americans’ paradoxical sense of self as productive “consumer citizens.” Some people, however, could not simply assume the privileges of citizenship. In their struggles against racism, Afro-descended citizens living in the cities of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, New York, and Chicago encountered images and notions of each other, and found them useful. Seigel introduces readers to cosmopolitan Afro-Brazilians and African Americans who rarely traveled far but who absorbed ideas from abroad nonetheless. African American vaudeville artists saw the utility of pretending to “be” Brazilian to cross the color line on stage. Putting on “nation drag,” they passed not from one race to another but out of familiar racial categories entirely. Afro-Brazilian journalists reported intensively on foreign, particularly North American, news and eventually entered into conversation with the U.S. black press in a collaborative but still conflictual dialogue. Seigel suggests that projects comparing U.S. and Brazilian racial

  18. On the Relationship between Aquatic Plant Stem Characteristics and Drag Force: Is a Modeling Application Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Łoboda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basic model that shows the relationship between the diameter of a stem and its flexural rigidity. The model was developed from experimental measurements of biomechanical traits (i.e., tensile and bending traits like maximum forces, stresses, moduli of elasticity, flexural rigidity, strain of three freshwater macrophyte species (Elodea canadensis Michx., Potamogeton pectinatus L., and P. crispus L., reflecting the seasonal changes in plant biomechanics throughout the vegetative season. These were obtained with the use of a bench-top testing machine in 2016 and 2017. The presented calculations are based on the ratio of drag-to-bending forces, in which the flexural rigidity plays a key role. The proposed model has the form EI = adb, and two approaches based on a regression analysis were applied to determine the parameters of the model—a and b. In the first method, the parameters were identified separately for each day of measurement, while in the second method, the coefficient b was calculated for all data from all days as a unified number for individual plants. The results suggest that coefficient b may provide information about the proportion of changes in drag forces depending on plant stiffness. The values of this coefficient were associated with the shape of the stem cross-section. The more circular the cross-section, the closer the value of the parameter was to 1. The parameter values were 1.60 for E. canadensis, 1.98 for P. pectinatus, and 2.46 for P. crispus. Moreover, this value also depended on the density of the cross-section structure. Most of the results showed that with an increase in stem diameter, the ratio between the drag and bending forces decreased, which led to fewer differences between these two forces. The model application may be introduced in many laboratory measurements of flow–biota interactions as well as in aquatic plant management applications. The implementation of these results in control

  19. The Overall Drag Losses For A Combination of Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabah Al-Janabi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to obtain better understanding of the flow over a combination of bluff bodies in close enough proximity to strongly interact with each other. This interaction is often beneficial in that the drag of the overall system is reduced. Proto-types for this problem come from tractor- trailer and missiles, and from various add-on devices designed to reduce their drag. Thus, an experimental investigation was carried out by placing  conical frontal bodies having a base diameter of 0.65 cylinder diameter with different vertex angles (30°, 50°, 70°, and 90°. It was found that, the bluffer cone with 90° vertex angle gives the best minimum drag, which is 31% lower than the drag of the isolated cylinder. Also an interesting phenomenon was observed in that, the minimum drags for all combinations are obtained at the same gap ratio (i.e.at g/d2= 0.365.

  20. Drag reduction in channel flow using nonlinear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Laurence R.

    1993-01-01

    Two nonlinear control schemes have been applied to the problem of drag reduction in channel flow. Both schemes have been tested using numerical simulations at a mass flux Reynolds numbers of 4408, utilizing 2D nonlinear neutral modes for goal dynamics. The OGY-method, which requires feedback, reduces drag to 60-80 percent of the turbulent value at the same Reynolds number, and employs forcing only within a thin region near the wall. The H-method, or model-based control, fails to achieve any drag reduction when starting from a fully turbulent initial condition, but shows potential for suppressing or retarding laminar-to-turbulent transition by imposing instead a transition to a low drag, nonlinear traveling wave solution to the Navier-Stokes equation. The drag in this state corresponds to that achieved by the OGY-method. Model-based control requires no feedback, but in experiments to date has required the forcing be imposed within a thicker layer than the OGY-method. Control energy expenditures in both methods are small, representing less than 0.1 percent of the uncontrolled flow's energy.

  1. Progress report on INEL full flow drag screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.; Colson, J.B.; Fincke, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The objective in developing a full flow drag screen is to obtain a total momentum flux measurement which when combined with a suitable independent velocity or density measurement will yield a total mass flux. The major design considerations are predicated by the fact that an accurate momentum flux measurement must be made over a wide range of flow conditions. The device should exhibit a constant calibration regardless of Reynolds number, void fraction, slip ratio, or flow regime. The dynamics of drag devices are well understood in single-phase flows. This is not true for two-phase flows. The present development program is directed toward gaining an understanding of the dynamics of drag devices which sample the total area of a pipe in two-phase flow and developing a method for deducing mass flow rate using such a device. Various geometric arrangements are to be investigated. Testing to date has shown excellent results using a round wire mesh screen in the Semiscale air/water loop. Future air/water testing will include perforated plates and wire meshes with both rectangular and diamond shaped cross sections. Analytical models of the hydrodynamics of the drag screen as well as the associated density or velocity measuring device are being used to select the optimum configuration. Alternate force sensing methods are also being considered. These include single and multiple transducer arrangements. Multistage springs and pressure drop across the body are to be evaluated for extending the dynamic range of the drag body

  2. Particle drag history in a subcritical post-shock flow - data analysis method and uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liuyang; Bordoloi, Ankur; Adrian, Ronald; Prestridge, Kathy; Arizona State University Team; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2017-11-01

    A novel data analysis method for measuring particle drag in an 8-pulse particle tracking velocimetry-accelerometry (PTVA) experiment is described. We represented the particle drag history, CD(t) , using polynomials up to the third order. An analytical model for continuous particle position history was derived by integrating an equation relating CD(t) with particle velocity and acceleration. The coefficients of CD(t) were then calculated by fitting the position history model to eight measured particle locations in the sense of least squares. A preliminary test with experimental data showed that the new method yielded physically more reasonable particle velocity and acceleration history compared to conventionally adopted polynomial fitting. To fully assess and optimize the performance of the new method, we performed a PTVA simulation by assuming a ground truth of particle motion based on an ensemble of experimental data. The results indicated a significant reduction in the RMS error of CD. We also found that for particle locating noise between 0.1 and 3 pixels, a range encountered in our experiment, the lowest RMS error was achieved by using the quadratic CD(t) model. Furthermore, we will also discuss the optimization of the pulse timing configuration.

  3. Modeling complex flow structures and drag around a submerged plant of varied posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard J.; Hardy, Richard J.; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy I.

    2017-04-01

    Although vegetation is present in many rivers, the bulk of past work concerned with modeling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple and has generally neglected the complexity of natural plants. Here we report on a combined flume and numerical model experiment which incorporates time-averaged plant posture, collected through terrestrial laser scanning, into a computational fluid dynamics model to predict flow around a submerged riparian plant. For three depth-limited flow conditions (Reynolds number = 65,000-110,000), plant dynamics were recorded through high-definition video imagery, and the numerical model was validated against flow velocities collected with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The plant morphology shows an 18% reduction in plant height and a 14% increase in plant length, compressing and reducing the volumetric canopy morphology as the Reynolds number increases. Plant shear layer turbulence is dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortices generated through shear instability, the frequency of which is estimated to be between 0.20 and 0.30 Hz, increasing with Reynolds number. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the complex morphology of natural plants has on in-stream drag, and allow a physically determined, species-dependent drag coefficient to be calculated. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, the approach developed here demonstrates the necessity to account for plant motion when calculating vegetative resistance.

  4. Differential Drag Analysis to Infer the Geometrical Configuration of a Cubesat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy-Virat, C.; Ridley, A. J.; Cutler, J.; Sharma, S.; Judd, E.

    2016-12-01

    On May 16th, 2016, the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) and the CubeSat investigating Atmospheric Density Response to Extreme driving (CADRE) were deployed from the International Space Station. While communication with MinXSS was quickly established, it has been impossible to interact with CADRE thus far. A likely reason could be that its solar panels did not open, preventing the antenna from fully functioning and eliminating communication with the ground stations. An orbit propagator that was developed for mission design and analysis was used to model the trajectories of the satellites. By comparing the drag accelerations on the two CubeSats, we are attempting to infer the number of solar panels that CADRE deployed. Ensemble simulations allow the modeling of uncertainties on its attitude, as it is likely to tumble if no solar panel was deployed. This technique introduces many challenges, as there are many unknowns, including the drag coefficient, the attitude, and the thermospheric density. We present results of this study, as well as these challenges that were encountered.

  5. Determination of viscosity through terminal velocity: use of the drag force with a quadratic term in velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vertchenko, Lev; Vertchenko, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    A correction to the term with quadratic dependency of the velocity in the Oseen´s drag force by a dimensionless factor is proposed in order to determine the viscosity of glycerin through the measurement of the terminal velocity of spheres falling inside the fluid. This factor incorporates...... relation between these factors, the viscosity coefficient turns into a linear coefficient in the relation between the parameter that corresponds to the viscosity that would be determined if only the Stokes’ force was considered and the product of the terminal velocity by the diameter of the spheres....... The experiment with steel spheres falling inside tubes of different diameters showed values for the viscosity coefficient of glycerin compatible with the expected, for the temperature range worked. This method might be applied to Reynolds number of order of ten of the sphere’s motion, relaxing the restriction...

  6. Soil transference patterns on bras: Image processing and laboratory dragging experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kathleen R; Fitzpatrick, Robert W; Bottrill, Ralph S; Berry, Ron; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-01-01

    In a recent Australian homicide, trace soil on the victim's clothing suggested she was initially attacked in her front yard and not the park where her body was buried. However the important issue that emerged during the trial was how soil was transferred to her clothing. This became the catalyst for designing a range of soil transference experiments (STEs) to study, recognise and classify soil patterns transferred onto fabric when a body is dragged across a soil surface. Soil deposits of interest in this murder were on the victim's bra and this paper reports the results of anthropogenic soil transfer to bra-cups and straps caused by dragging. Transfer patterns were recorded by digital photography and photomicroscopy. Eight soil transfer patterns on fabric, specific to dragging as the transfer method, appeared consistently throughout the STEs. The distinctive soil patterns were largely dependent on a wide range of soil features that were measured and identified for each soil tested using X-ray Diffraction and Non-Dispersive Infra-Red analysis. Digital photographs of soil transfer patterns on fabric were analysed using image processing software to provide a soil object-oriented classification of all soil objects with a diameter of 2 pixels and above transferred. Although soil transfer patterns were easily identifiable by naked-eye alone, image processing software provided objective numerical data to support this traditional (but subjective) interpretation. Image software soil colour analysis assigned a range of Munsell colours to identify and compare trace soil on fabric to other trace soil evidence from the same location; without requiring a spectrophotometer. Trace soil from the same location was identified by linking soils with similar dominant and sub-dominant Munsell colour peaks. Image processing numerical data on the quantity of soil transferred to fabric, enabled a relationship to be discovered between soil type, clay mineralogy (smectite), particle size and

  7. Comparison of the aerodynamics of bridge cables with helical fillets and a pattern-indented surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleissl, K.; Georgakis, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamics of bridge cables with helical fillets and a pattern-indented surface are examined. To this end, an extensive wind-tunnel test campaign was undertaken to measure the static force coefficients about the critical Reynolds number region, with varying relative cable...... cable was found to have a much slower flow transition for near normal flow and relatively large lift force components for the yawed positions. Flow visualizations confirmed the existence of specific flow structures which are often associated with the presence of lower drag or large lift forces...

  8. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Jiangtao; Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao

    2010-01-01

    Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...... behaviors, noise emission as well as wind turbine service life. To show the performance of the new design technique, a new airfoil with relative thickness of 18% is designed. Comparisons with a wind turbine airfoil (NACA 63418) at Re=2×106 and Re=6×106 for free and fixed transitions show that the new...... airfoil has a higher power efficiency, better designed lift at off-design condition, better stall behavior, less sensitivity to leading edge roughness and lower noise emission. © 2010 Journal of Mechanical Engineering....

  9. On the energy economics of air lubrication drag reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo A. Mäkiharju

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Air lubrication techniques for frictional drag reduction on ships have been proposed by numerous researchers since the 19th century. However, these techniques have not been widely adopted as questions persist about their drag reduction performance beyond the laboratory, as well as energy and economic cost-benefit. This paper draws on data from the literature to consider the suitability of air lubrication for large ocean going and U.S. Great Lakes ships, by establishing the basic energy economic calculations and presenting results for a hypothetical air lubricated ship. All the assumptions made in the course of the analysis are clearly stated so that they can be refined when considering application of air lubrication to a specific ship. The analysis suggests that, if successfully implemented, both air layer and partial cavity drag reduction could lead to net energy savings of 10 to 20%, with corresponding reductions in emissions.

  10. Compton-dragged Gamma-Ray Bursts Associated with Supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati; Ghisellini; Celotti; Rees

    2000-01-20

    It is proposed that the gamma-ray photons that characterize the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts are produced through the Compton-drag process, which is caused by the interaction of a relativistic fireball with a very dense soft photon bath. If gamma-ray bursts are indeed associated with supernovae, then the exploding star can provide enough soft photons for radiative drag to be effective. This model accounts for the basic properties of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the overall energetics, the peak frequency of the spectrum, and the fast variability, with an efficiency that can exceed 50%. In this scenario, there is no need for particle acceleration in relativistic collisionless shocks. Furthermore, although the Poynting flux may be important in accelerating the outflow, no magnetic field is required in the gamma-ray production. The drag also naturally limits the relativistic expansion of the fireball to Gamma less, similar104.

  11. Measuring the Coefficient of Restitution and More: A Simple Experiment to Promote Students' Critical Thinking and Autonomous Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.; Vegas, Jesús; Llamas, César

    2017-01-01

    A simple experiment on the determination of the coefficient of restitution of different materials is taken as the basis of an extendable work that can be done by students in an autonomous way. On the whole, the work described in this paper would involve concepts of kinematics, materials science, air drag and buoyancy, and would help students to…

  12. The contact drag of towed demersal fishing gear components

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, F. G.; Summerbell, K.; Ivanović, A.

    2018-01-01

    The contact demersal towed fishing gears make with the seabed can lead to penetration of the substrate, lateral displacement of the sediment and a pressure field transmitted through the sediment. It will also contribute to the overall drag of the fishing gear. Consequently, there can be environmental effects such as habitat alteration and benthic mortality, and impacts to the fuel efficiency of the fishing operation which will affect emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and greenhouse gases such as CO2. Here we present the results of experimental trials that measure the contact drag of a range of elements that represent some of the components of towed demersal gears that are in contact with the seabed. We show that the contact drag of the gear components depends on their weight, geometry, the type of sediment on which they are towed and whether they are rolling or not. As expected, the contact drag of each gear component increases as its weight increases and the drag of fixed elements is greater than that of the rolling ones. The dependence on aspect ratio is more complex and the drag (per unit area) of narrow cylinders is less than that of wider ones when they roll on the finer sediment or are fixed (not permitted to roll) on the coarser sediment. When they roll on the coarse sediment there is no dependence on aspect ratio. Our results also suggest that fixed components may penetrate the seabed to a lesser depth when they are towed at higher speeds but when they roll there is no such relationship.

  13. 76 FR 49666 - Safety Zone; East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport Blowout Boat Race, Waccamaw River, Bucksport, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport Blowout Boat... East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport Blowout in Bucksport, South Carolina. The East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport... September 18, 2011, the East Coast Drag Boat Association will host the East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport...

  14. Piezoelectric composite morphing control surfaces for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Osgar J., III; Karni, Etan D.; Olien, Chris C.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Kochersberger, Kevin B.; Gelhausen, Paul A.; Brown, Bridget L.

    2011-04-01

    The authors have explored the use of morphing control surfaces to replace traditional servo-actuated control surfaces in UAV applications. The morphing actuation is accomplished using Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators in a bimorph configuration to deflect the aft section of a control surface cross section. The resulting camber change produces forces and moments for vehicle control. The flexible piezoelectric actuators are damage tolerant and provide excellent bandwidth. The large amplitude morphing deflections attained in bench-top experiments demonstrate the potential for excellent control authority. Aerodynamic performance calculations using experimentally measured morphed geometries indicate changes in sectional lift coefficients that are superior to a servo-actuated hinged flap airfoil. This morphing flight control actuation technology could eliminate the need for servos and mechanical linkages in small UAVs and thereby increase reliability and reduce drag.

  15. Intershell resistance in multiwall carbon nanotubes: A Coulomb drag study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anders Mathias; Flensborg, Karsten; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the intershell resistance R-21 in a multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F) (e.g., a gate voltage), varying the chirality of the inner and outer tubes. This is done in a so-called Coulomb drag setup, where a current I-1 in one shell induces...... effects for the Coulomb drag between different tubes due to selection rules combined with mismatching of wave vector and crystal angular momentum conservation near the Fermi level. This gives rise to orders of magnitude changes in R-21 and even the sign of R-21 can change depending on the chirality...

  16. Locus of the apices of projectile trajectories under constant drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saldaña, H.

    2017-11-01

    Using the hodograph method, we present an analytical solution for projectile coplanar motion under constant drag, parametrised by the velocity angle. We find the locus formed by the apices of the projectile trajectories, and discuss its implementation for the motion of a particle on an inclined plane in presence of Coulomb friction. The range and time of flight are obtained numerically, and we find that the optimal launching angle is smaller than in the drag-free case. This is a good example of a problem with constant dissipation of energy that includes curvature; it is appropriate for intermediate courses of mechanics.

  17. Colloids dragged through a polymer solution: Experiment, theory, and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Krüger, Matthias; Rauscher, Markus; Weeber, Rudolf; Harting, Jens

    2008-08-28

    We present microrheological measurements of the drag force on colloids pulled through a solution of lambda-DNA (used here as a monodisperse model polymer) with an optical tweezer. The experiments show a drag force that is larger than expected from the Stokes formula and the independently measured viscosity of the DNA solution. We attribute this to the accumulation of DNA in front of the colloid and the reduced DNA density behind the colloid. This hypothesis is corroborated by a simple drift-diffusion model for the DNA molecules, which reproduces the experimental data surprisingly well, as well as by corresponding Brownian dynamics simulations.

  18. Drag Queens in Cinema and Television: The influence on Mainstream Media on a subversive art form

    OpenAIRE

    Ødegård, Vanja

    2016-01-01

    Oppgaven utforsker drag som kunstform og politisk virkemiddel og hvordan dette endrer seg når den kommer å en allmenn plattform. Ved å analysere realityserien RuPaul's Drag Race ser man på hvordan kjønn, seksualitet og drag blir fremstilt. This thesis aims to explore drag as an art form and political tool and how this changes when seen in a mainstream context. By analyzing the reality television show RuPaul's Drag Race, we see how gender, sexuality and drag is portrayed.

  19. Onset and universality of turbulent drag reduction in von Karman swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnishev, Yuri; Steinberg, Victor

    2012-10-01

    We report the results of experiments on turbulent drag reduction (TDR) in swirling flow of water and water-sucrose polymer solutions, where Re and Wi as well as polymer concentration ϕ are varied. The friction coefficients Cf and Cp defined through average torque \\bar {\\Gamma } and rms of pressure fluctuations prms for different elasticity El = Wi/Re and ϕ vs. Re/Rec collapse onto universal curves in accord with theory, where Rec is Re at TDR onset. The transition lines to the TDR state, Rec - El and Rec - ϕ, are measured and relevant physics is discussed. Power spectra for Γ and p at Re/Rec > 1 show a drastic reduction of low-frequency noise and the emergence of a peak corresponding to the main vortex frequency in accord with TDR.

  20. Coefficient estimates of negative powers and inverse coefficients for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    λ. Using this we shall determine the ... Univalent; starlike; meromorphic functions; subordination; coefficient bounds; inverse ...... [6] FitzGerald C H, Quadratic inequalities and coefficient estimates for Schlicht functions, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal.

  1. Patterns produced when soil is transferred to bras by placing and dragging actions: The application of digital photography and image processing to support visible observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kathleen R; Fitzpatrick, Robert W; Bottrill, Ralph; Kobus, Hilton

    2017-07-01

    A series of soil transference experiments (STEs) were undertaken to determine whether patterns identified in laboratory experiments could also be recognised at a simulated crime scene in the field. A clothed 55kg human rescue dummy dressed in a padded bra was either dragged or merely placed on a soil surface at sites with natural and anthropogenic soil types under both wet and dry soil conditions. Transfer patterns produced by dragging compared favourably with those of laboratory experiments. Twelve patterns were identified when a clothed human rescue dummy was dragged across the two soil types in the field. This expanded the original set of eight soil transfer patterns identified from dragging weighted fabric across soil samples in the laboratory. Soil transferred by placing the human rescue dummy resulted in a set of six transfer patterns that were different to those produced by dragging. By comparing trace soil patterns transferred to bras using each transfer method, it was revealed that certain transfer patterns on bras could indicate how the fabric had made contact with a soil surface. A photographic method was developed for crime scene examiners to capture this often subtle soil evidence before a body is transported or the clothing removed. This improved understanding of the dynamics of soil transference to bras and related clothing fabric may assist forensic investigators reconstruct the circumstances of a variety of forensic events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  3. An alternative coefficient for sound absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; Kuipers, E.R.; de Boer, Andries; Sas, P; Jonckheere, S.; Moens, D.

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic absorption coefficient is a number that indicates which fraction of the incident acoustic power impinging on a surface is being absorbed. The incident acoustic power is obtained by spatial integration of the incident intensity, which is (classically) defined as the time-averaged

  4. Determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, D.; Bosman, F.; Peters, T.; Plasschaert, F.

    The value of the convective heat transfer coefficient (htc) is determined under different loading conditions by using a computer aided method. The thermal load has been applied mathematically as well as experimentally to the coronal surface of an axisymmetric tooth model. To verify the assumptions

  5. Impact of the Microstructure of Polymer Drag Reducer on Slick-Water Fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have focused on the drag reduction performance of slick-water, but the microdrag reduction mechanism remains unclear since the microstructure of the drag reducer and its effect on this mechanism have not been well studied. In this study, the microstructure of the drag reducer in slick-water was effectively characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The viscoelasticity and drag reduction performance of the drag reducer with different microstructures were then investigated. Further, the effects of the microstructure of the drag reducer on the viscoelasticity and drag reduction performance of slick-water were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the viscoelasticity of slick-water is governed by the microstructure of the drag reducer, which exhibits a network structure. In addition, the drag reduction performance is related to the viscoelasticity. At low flow rates, the drag reduction performance is dominantly influenced by viscosity, whereas, at high flow rates, it is governed mainly by elasticity. Furthermore, the drag reducer with a uniformly distributed network structure exhibits the most stable drag reduction performance. This drag reducer was used in a field test and the obtained results were consistent with those of a laboratory experiment.

  6. Influence of surface roughness of a desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Smith, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical simulation study, using the current GLAS climate GCM, was carried out to examine the influence of low bulk aerodynamic drag parameter in the deserts. The results illustrate the importance of yet another feedback effect of a desert on itself, that is produced by the reduction in surface roughness height of land once the vegetation dies and desert forms. Apart from affecting the moisture convergence, low bulk transport coefficients of a desert lead to enhanced longwave cooling and sinking which together reduce precipitation by Charney's (1975) mechanism. Thus, this effect, together with albedo and soil moisture influence, perpetuate a desert condition through its geophysical feedback effect. The study further suggests that man made deserts is a viable hypothesis.

  7. Experimental investigation of drag reduction by forward facing high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALLA VENUKUMAR and K P J REDDY. Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science,. Bangalore 560 012 e-mail: laser@aero.iisc.ernet.in. Abstract. Substantial aerodynamic drag, while flying at hypersonic Mach number, due to the presence of strong standing shock wave ahead of a large-angle blunt-.

  8. Drag reduction of dense fine-grained slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk; Štern, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2010), s. 261-270 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/1574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : kaolin slurry * drag reduction * experimental investigation * peptization * slurry rheology Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.553, year: 2010

  9. Exploring the Aerodynamic Drag of a Moving Cyclist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilmann, Florian; Reinhard, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Although the physics of cycling itself is a complex mixture of aerodynamics, physiology, mechanics, and heuristics, using cycling as a context for teaching physics has a tradition of certainly more than 30 years. Here, a possible feature is the discussion of the noticeable resistant forces such as aerodynamic drag and the associated power…

  10. Dragging two-dimensional discrete solitons by moving linear defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhnyi, Valeriy A; Malomed, Boris A

    2011-07-01

    We study the mobility of small-amplitude solitons attached to moving defects which drag the solitons across a two-dimensional (2D) discrete nonlinear Schrödinger lattice. Findings are compared to the situation when a free small-amplitude 2D discrete soliton is kicked in a uniform lattice. In agreement with previously known results, after a period of transient motion the free soliton transforms into a localized mode pinned by the Peierls-Nabarro potential, irrespective of the initial velocity. However, the soliton attached to the moving defect can be dragged over an indefinitely long distance (including routes with abrupt turns and circular trajectories) virtually without losses, provided that the dragging velocity is smaller than a certain critical value. Collisions between solitons dragged by two defects in opposite directions are studied too. If the velocity is small enough, the collision leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking, featuring fusion of two solitons into a single one, which remains attached to either of the two defects.

  11. [Dragged disk syndrome. Review of etiologies. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreau, E; Cohen, S Y; Coscas, G

    1996-01-01

    A young woman presented with an elevated, retinal yellow-white lesion in mid-periphery of one eye, associated with a dragged disc. Different aetiologies were discussed including retinopathy of prematurity, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital retinal folds, incontinentia pigmenti, Eales' disease, toxocariasis, combined hamartoma of the retina and the pigment epithelium.

  12. Drag force in a cold or hot granular medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, A; Gondret, P

    2017-09-01

    We measure experimentally and analyze the resisting force exerted by a bidimensional packing of small disks on a larger intruder disk dragged horizontally at constant velocity V_{0}. Depending on the vibration level of the packing that leads to a granular "cold" or "hot" packing, two force regimes are observed. At low vibration level ("cold" granular medium), the drag force F does not depend on V_{0}, whereas for high vibrations ("hot" granular medium), the drag force increases linearly with V_{0}. Both regimes can be understood by the balance of two "granular temperatures" that can be defined in the system: a bulk temperature T_{b} imposed by the external vibration to the overall packing and a local temperature T_{0} induced by the own motion of the intruder disk in its vicinity. All experimental data obtained for different sizes and velocities of the intruder disk are shown to be governed by the temperature ratio T_{0}/T_{b}. A critical velocity V_{0c}, above which the system switches from "hot" to "cold," can be obtained in this frame. Finally, we discuss how these two "viscous" regimes should be followed by an inertial regime where the drag force F should increase as V_{0}^{2} at high enough velocity values, for V_{0} greater than a critical value V_{0i} corresponding to high enough Reynolds or Froude number.

  13. Plasmon-mediated Coulomb drag between graphene waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shylau, Artsem A.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    We analyze theoretically charge transport in Coulomb coupled graphene waveguides (GWGs). The GWGs are defined using antidot lattices, and the lateral geometry bypasses many technological challenges of earlier designs. The drag resistivity ρD, which is a measure of the many-particle interactions...

  14. Sensitivity test of parameterizations of subgrid-scale orographic form drag in the NCAR CESM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yishuang; Wang, Lanning; Zhang, Guang Jun; Wu, Qizhong

    2017-05-01

    Turbulent drag caused by subgrid orographic form drag has significant effects on the atmosphere. It is represented through parameterization in large-scale numerical prediction models. An indirect parameterization scheme, the Turbulent Mountain Stress scheme (TMS), is currently used in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Earth System Model v1.0.4. In this study we test a direct scheme referred to as BBW04 (Beljaars et al. in Q J R Meteorol Soc 130:1327-1347, 10.1256/qj.03.73), which has been used in several short-term weather forecast models and earth system models. Results indicate that both the indirect and direct schemes increase surface wind stress and improve the model's performance in simulating low-level wind speed over complex orography compared to the simulation without subgrid orographic effect. It is shown that the TMS scheme produces a more intense wind speed adjustment, leading to lower wind speed near the surface. The low-level wind speed by the BBW04 scheme agrees better with the ERA-Interim reanalysis and is more sensitive to complex orography as a direct method. Further, the TMS scheme increases the 2-m temperature and planetary boundary layer height over large areas of tropical and subtropical Northern Hemisphere land.

  15. Lift to Drag Ratio Analysis in Magnetic Levitation with an Electrodynamic Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Cordrey, Vincent; Majewski, Walerian

    Our experiments explored inductive magnetic levitation (MagLev) using simple permanent magnets and conductive tracks. Our investigations used a circular Halbach array with a 1 Tesla variable magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such a system is usually called an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above or below a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields, which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We constructed a four-inch diameter Electrodynamic Wheel using twelve Neodymium permanent magnets and demonstrated that the magnetic interactions produce both lift and drag forces on the EDW. These forces can be used for levitation and propulsion of the EDW to produce magnetic levitation without coils and complex control circuitry. We achieved full levitation of the non-magnetic aluminum and copper plates. Our results confirm the expected behavior of lift to drag ratio as proportional to (L/R) ω, with L and R being the inductance and resistance of the track plate, and ω being the angular velocity of the magnetic flux. Supported by grants from the Virginia Academy of Science, Society of Physics Students, Virginia Community College System, and the NVCC Educational Foundation.

  16. An Aerodynamic Database for the Mk 82 General Purpose Low Drag Bomb

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnamoorthy, L

    1997-01-01

    The drag database of the Mk 82 General Purpose Low Drag bomb, the primary gravity weapon in the RAAF inventory, has some shortcomings in the quality and traceability of data, and in the variations due...

  17. Mechanics of fluid flow over compliant wrinkled polymeric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raayai, Shabnam; McKinley, Gareth; Boyce, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Skin friction coefficients (based on frontal area) of sharks and dolphins are lower than birds, fish and swimming beetles. By either exploiting flow-induced changes in their flexible skin or microscale textures, dolphins and sharks can change the structure of the fluid flow around them and thus reduce viscous drag forces on their bodies. Inspired by this ability, investigators have tried using compliant walls and riblet-like textures as drag reduction methods in aircraft and marine industries and have been able to achieve reductions up to 19%. Here we investigate flow-structure interaction and wrinkling of soft polymer surfaces that can emulate shark riblets and dolphin's flexible skin. Wrinkling arises spontaneously as the result of mismatched deformation of a thin stiff coating bound to a thick soft elastic substrate. Wrinkles can be fabricated by controlling the ratio of the stiffness of the coating and substrate, the applied displacement and the thickness of the coating. In this work we will examine the evolution in the kinematic structures associated with steady viscous flow over the polymer wrinkled surfaces and in particular compare the skin friction with corresponding results for flow over non-textured and rigid surfaces.

  18. Comparison of field-measured radon diffusion coefficients with laboratory-measured coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Silker, W.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare radon diffusion coefficients determined for 0.1-m depths of soils by a steady-state method in the laboratory and diffusion coefficients evaluated from radon fluxes through several-fold greater depths of the same soils covering uranium-mill tailings. The coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore volume of the soils and are equivalent to values for the quantity, D/P, in the Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two soils were tested: a well-graded sand and an inorganic clay of low plasticity. For the flux evaluations, radon was collected by adsorption on charcoal following passive diffusion from the soil surface and also from air recirculating through an aluminum tent over the soil surface. An analysis of variance in the flux evaluations showed no significant difference between these two collection methods. Radon diffusion coefficients evaluated from field data were statistically indistinguishable, at the 95% confidence level, from those measured in the laboratory; however, the low precision of the field data prevented a sensitive validation of the laboratory measurements. From the field data, the coefficients were calculated to be 0.03 +- 0.03 cm 2 /s for the sand cover and 0.0036 +- 0.0004 cm 2 /s for the clay cover. The low precision in the coefficients evaluated from field data was attributed to high variation in radon flux with time and surface location at the field site

  19. Online Estimation of Clutch Drag Torque in Wet Dual Clutch Transmission Based on Recursive Least Squares

    OpenAIRE

    Hongkui Li; Tongli Lu; Jianwu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on developing an estimation method of clutch drag torque in wet DCT. The modelling of clutch drag torque is investigated. As the main factor affecting the clutch drag torque, dynamic viscosity of oil is discussed. The paper proposes an estimation method of clutch drag torque based on recursive least squares by utilizing the dynamic equations of gear shifting synchronization process. The results demonstrate that the estimation method has good accuracy and efficiency.

  20. Development of a high slip-resistant footwear outsole using a hybrid rubber surface pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Hokkirigawa, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether a new footwear outsole with tread blocks and a hybrid rubber surface pattern, composed of rough and smooth surfaces, could increase slip resistance and reduce the risk of fall while walking on a wet floor surface. A drag test was performed to measure static and dynamic coefficient of friction (SCOF and DCOF, respectively) values for the footwear with the hybrid rubber surface pattern outsole and two types of commercially available boots that are conventionally used in food factories and restaurant kitchens with respect to a stainless steel floor covered with glycerol solution. Gait trials were conducted with 14 participants who wore the footwear on the wet stainless steel floor. The drag test results indicated that the hybrid rubber surface pattern sole exhibited higher SCOF (≥0.44) and DCOF (≥0.39) values than the soles of the comparative footwear (prubber surface pattern outsole were significantly lower than those for the comparative footwear, which resulted in no falls during trials.