WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface critical nucleation

  1. Critical radius for nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiades, V.; Solomon, A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The free energy of formation and the critical radius for homogeneous nucleation of a spherical nucleus in supercooled liquid, at given temperature and ambient pressure, are determined, taking fully into account surface area, curvature, and pressure effects. The specific heats and densities of the two phases are allowed to be different and all thermophysical properties are temperature dependent. In the simple case in which classical nucleation theory is valid, the results predict a critical radius of about 40% larger than the classical value, and an activation energy barrier of almost three times larger than the classical value. 8 refs.

  2. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Xuehua; Lhuissier , Henri; Sun , Chao; Lohse , Detlef

    2014-01-01

    International audience; When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles (" superstability "). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pi...

  3. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-04-01

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles ("superstability"). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pinch-off, results in a microdroplet in which the nanobubbles continue to exist. Finally, the microdroplet evaporates and the nanobubble consequently bursts. Our results support that pinning plays a crucial role for nanobubble stability.

  4. Surface Nanobubbles Nucleate Microdroplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, H.E.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they

  5. Transformation kinetics for surface and bulk nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, Elena, E-mail: elena.villa@unimi.it [University of Milan, Department of Mathematics, via Saldini 50, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rios, Paulo R., E-mail: prrios@metal.eeimvr.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Escola de Engenharia Industrial Metalurgica de Volta Redonda, Av. dos Trabalhadores 420, 27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)] [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A rigorous mathematical approach based on the causal cone and stochastic geometry concepts is used to derive new exact expressions for transformation kinetics theory. General expressions for the mean volume density and the volume fraction are derived for both surface and bulk nucleation in a general Borel subset of R{sup 3}. In practice, probably any specimen shape of engineering interest is going to be a Borel set. An expression is also derived for the important case of polyhedral shape, in which surface nucleation may take place on the faces, edges and vertices of the polyhedron as well as within the bulk. Moreover, explicit expressions are given for surface and bulk nucleation for three specific shapes of engineering relevance: two parallel planes, an infinitely long cylinder and a sphere. Superposition is explained in detail and it permits the treatment of situations in which surface and bulk nucleation take place simultaneously. The new exact expressions presented here result in a significant increase in the number of exactly solvable cases available to formal kinetics.

  6. Surface nucleation in complex rheological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfurth, J.; Ulrich, J.

    2017-07-01

    Forced nucleation induced by suitable foreign seeds is an important tool to control the production of defined crystalline products. The quality of a surface provided by seed materials represents an important variable in the production of crystallizing layers that means for the nucleation process. Parameters like shape and surface structure, size and size distribution of the seed particles as well as the ability to hold up the moisture (the solvent), can have an influence on the nucleation process of different viscous supersaturated solutions. Here the properties of different starch powders as seeds obtained from corn, potato, rice, tapioca and wheat were tested. It could be found, that the best nucleation behavior of a sugar solution could be reached with the use of corn starch as seed material. Here the surface of the crystallized sugar layer is smooth, crystallization time is short (<3 h) and the shape of the product is easily reproducible. Beneficial properties of seed materials are therefore an edged, uneven surface, small particle sizes as well as low moisture content at ambient conditions within the seed materials.

  7. A nucleation theory of cell surface capping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Wester, M.J.; Perelson, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new theory of cell surface capping based on the principles of nucleation. When antibody interacts with cell surface molecules, the molecules initially form small aggregates called patches that later coalesce into a large aggregate called a cap. While a cap can form by patches being pulled together by action of the cell''s cytoskeleton, in the case of some molecules, disruption of the cytoskeleton does not prevent cap formation. Diffusion of large aggregates on a cell surface is slow, and thus we propose that a cap can form solely through the diffusion of small aggregates containing just one or a few cell surface molecules. Here we consider the extreme case in which single molecules are mobile, but aggregates of all larger sizes are immobile. We show that a set of patches in equilibrium with a open-quotes seaclose quotes of free cell surface molecules can undergo a nucleation-type phase transition in which the largest patch will bind free cell surface molecules, deplete the concentration of such molecules in the open-quotes seaclose quotes and thus cause the other patches to shrink in size. We therefore show that a cap can form without patches having to move, collide with each other, and aggregate

  8. Interactions between bubble formation and heating surface in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The heat transfer and bubble formation is investigated in pool boiling of propane. Size distributions of active nucleation sites on single horizontal copper and steel tubes with different diameter and surface finishes have been calculated from heat transfer measurements over wide ranges of heat flux and selected pressure. The model assumptions of Luke and Gorenflo for the heat transfer near growing and departing bubbles, which were applied in the calculations, have been slightly modified and the calculated results have been compared to experimental investigations by high speed video techniques. The calculated number of active sites shows a good coincidence for the tube with smaller diameter, while the results for the tube with larger diameter describe the same relative increase of the active sites. The comparison of the cumulative size distribution of the active and potential nucleation sites demonstrates the same slope of the curve and that the critical radius of a stable bubble nuclei is smaller than the average cavity size. (author)

  9. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  10. Nucleation of reaction-diffusion waves on curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneer, Frederike; Schöll, Eckehard; Dahlem, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    We study reaction-diffusion waves on curved two-dimensional surfaces, and determine the influence of curvature upon the nucleation and propagation of spatially localized waves in an excitable medium modelled by the generic FitzHugh–Nagumo model. We show that the stability of propagating wave segments depends crucially on the curvature of the surface. As they propagate, they may shrink to the uniform steady state, or expand, depending on whether they are smaller or larger, respectively, than a critical nucleus. This critical nucleus for wave propagation is modified by the curvature acting like an effective space-dependent local spatial coupling, similar to diffuson, thus extending the regime of propagating excitation waves beyond the excitation threshold of flat surfaces. In particular, a negative gradient of Gaussian curvature Γ, as on the outside of a torus surface (positive Γ), when the wave segment symmetrically extends into the inside (negative Γ), allows for stable propagation of localized wave segments remaining unchanged in size and shape, or oscillating periodically in size. (paper)

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation of ice on model carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, V.; Lupi, L.; Hudait, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonaceous particles account for 10% of the particulate matter in the atmosphere. The experimental investigation of heterogeneous freezing of water droplets by carbonaceous particles reveals widespread ice freezing temperatures. The origin of the soot and its oxidation and aging modulate its ice nucleation ability, however, it is not known which structural and chemical characteristics of soot account for the variability in ice nucleation efficiency. We find that atomically flat carbon surfaces promote heterogeneous nucleation of ice, while molecularly rough surfaces with the same hydrophobicity do not. We investigate a large set of graphitic surfaces of various dimensions and radii of curvature consistent with those of soot in experiments, and find that variations in nanostructures alone could account for the spread in the freezing temperatures of ice on soot in experiments. A characterization of the nanostructure of soot is needed to predict its ice nucleation efficiency. Atmospheric oxidation and aging of soot modulates its ice nucleation ability. It has been suggested that an increase in the ice nucleation ability of aged soot results from an increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces upon oxidation. Oxidation, however, also impacts the nanostructure of soot, making it difficult to assess the separate effects of soot nanostructure and hydrophilicity in experiments. We investigate the effect of changes in hydrophilicity of model graphitic surfaces on the freezing temperature of ice. Our results indicate that the hydrophilicity of the surface is not in general a good predictor of ice nucleation ability. We find a correlation between the ability of a surface to promote nucleation of ice and the layering of liquid water at the surface. The results of this work suggest that ordering of liquid water in contact with the surface plays an important role in the heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism. References: L. Lupi, A. Hudait and V. Molinero, J. Am. Chem. Soc

  12. Homogeneous bulk, surface, and edge nucleation in crystalline nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Jessica L.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2011-03-01

    We present a study on the homogeneous nucleation of dewetted poly(ethylene oxide) droplets on a substrate that is itself crystallisable. While the chemical properties of the substrate prepared in either the amorphous or crystalline state are identical, the surface landscape varies widely. We observe a large difference in the substrate's nucleating ability depending on how it is prepared. Furthermore, the scaling dependence of the nucleation rate on the size of the droplets depends on the substrate surface properties. The birth of the crystalline state can be directed to originate predominantly within the bulk, at the substrate surface or at the droplet's edge depending on how we tune the substrate. J.L. Carvalho and K. Dalnoki-Veress, Phys. Rev. Lett in press, 2010.

  13. Surface structure, crystallographic and ice-nucleating properties of cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kiselev, Alexei; Saathoff, Harald; Weidler, Peter; Shutthanandan, Shuttha; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Jantsch, Evelyn; Koop, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence of the high diversity and efficient freezing ability of biological ice-nucleating particles is driving a reevaluation of their impact upon climate. Despite their potential importance, little is known about their atmospheric abundance and ice nucleation efficiency, especially non-proteinaceous ones, in comparison to non-biological materials (e.g., mineral dust). Recently, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC; non-proteinaceous plant structural polymer) has been identified as a potential biological ice-nucleating particle. However, it is still uncertain if the ice-nucleating activity is specific to the MCC structure or generally relevant to all cellulose materials, such that the results of MCC can be representatively scaled up to the total cellulose content in the atmosphere to address its role in clouds and the climate system. Here we use the helium ion microscopy (HIM) imaging and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to characterize the nanoscale surface structure and crystalline properties of the two different types of cellulose (MCC and fibrous cellulose extracted from natural wood pulp) as model proxies for atmospheric cellulose particles and to assess their potential accessibility for water molecules. To complement these structural characterizations, we also present the results of immersion freezing experiments using the cold stage-based droplet freezing BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARaY) technique. The HIM results suggest that both cellulose types have a complex porous morphology with capillary spaces between the nanoscale fibrils over the microfiber surface. These surface structures may make cellulose accessible to water. The XRD results suggest that the structural properties of both cellulose materials are in agreement (i.e., P21 space group; a=7.96 Å, b=8.35 Å, c=10.28 Å) and comparable to the crystallographic properties of general monoclinic cellulose (i.e., Cellulose Iβ). The results obtained from the BINARY measurements suggest

  14. Toward a molecular theory of homogeneous bubble nucleation: II. Calculation of the number density of critical nuclei and the rate of nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Korosh; Corti, David S

    2013-10-17

    In the present paper, we develop a method to calculate the rate of homogeneous bubble nucleation within a superheated L-J liquid based on the (n,v) equilibrium embryo free energy surface introduced in the first paper (DOI: 10.1021/jp404149n). We express the nucleation rate as the product of the concentration of critical nuclei within the metastable liquid phase and the relevant forward rate coefficient. We calculate the forward rate coefficient of the critical nuclei from their average lifetime as determined from MD simulations of a large number of embryo trajectories initiated from the transitional region of the metastable liquid configuration space. Therefore, the proposed rate coefficient does not rely on any predefined reaction coordinate. In our model, the critical nuclei belong to the region of the configuration space where the committor probability is about one-half, guaranteeing the dynamical relevance of the proposed embryos. One novel characteristic of our approach is that we define a limit for the configuration space of the equilibrium metastable phase and do not include the configurations that have zero committor probability in the nucleation free energy surface. Furthermore, in order to take into account the transitional degrees of freedom of the critical nuclei, we develop a simulation-based approach for rigorously mapping the free energy of the (n,v) equilibrium embryos to the concentration of the critical nuclei within the bulk metastable liquid phase.

  15. Percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation: criticality in very small systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, A.J. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Chung, K.C.

    1994-12-01

    Different criteria for criticality in very small systems are discussed in the context of percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation. It is shown that the probability threshold in percolation and interaction radius threshold in nucleation are very strongly dependent upon the adopted criterion. By using Monte Carlo method, similarities and dissimilarities between nucleation and percolation pictures are also pointed out. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs.

  16. Percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation: criticality in very small systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, A.J.; Chung, K.C.

    1994-12-01

    Different criteria for criticality in very small systems are discussed in the context of percolation and nucleation approaches to nuclear fragmentation. It is shown that the probability threshold in percolation and interaction radius threshold in nucleation are very strongly dependent upon the adopted criterion. By using Monte Carlo method, similarities and dissimilarities between nucleation and percolation pictures are also pointed out. (author). 17 refs, 5 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Surface wettability and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suroto, Bambang Joko; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2018-02-01

    The effect of varying surface wettabilities and subcooling on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer at intermediate heat flux has been examined and investigated. The experiments were performed using pure water as the working fluid and subcooling ranging from 0, 5 and 10 K, respectively. The three types of heat transfer block were used that are bare surface/hydrophilic (polished copper), superhydrophilic/TiO2-coated on copper and hydrophobic/PTFE surface. The experimental results will be examined by the existing model. The results show that the heat transfer performance of surfaces with PTFE coating is better at low heat flux. While for an intermediate heat flux, superhydrophilic surface (TiO2) is superior compared to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. It is observed that the heat transfer performance is decreasing when the sub cooling degree is increased.

  18. The Ice Nucleation Activity of Surface Modified Soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Thomas; Witek, Lorenz; Felgitsch, Laura; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    The ice nucleation efficiency of many important atmospheric particles remains poorly understood. Since soot is ubiquitous in the Earth's troposphere, they might have the potential to significantly impact the Earth's climate (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 2000; Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998). Here we present the ice nucleation activity (INA) in immersion freezing mode of different types of soot. Therefor a CAST (combustion aerosol standard) generator was used to produce different kinds of soot samples. The CAST generator combusts a propane-air-mixture and deposits thereby produced soot on a polyvinyl fluoride filter. By varying the propane to air ratio, the amount of organic portion of the soot can be varied from black carbon (BC) with no organic content to brown carbon (BrC) with high organic content. To investigate the impact of functional sites of ice nuclei (IN), the soot samples were exposed to NO2 gas for a certain amount of time (30 to 360 minutes) to chemically modify the surface. Immersion freezing experiments were carried out in a unique reaction gadget. In this device a water-in-oil suspension (with the soot suspended in the aqueous phase) was cooled till the freezing point and was observed through a microscope (Pummer et al., 2012; Zolles et al., 2015) It was found that neither modified nor unmodified BC shows INA. On the contrary, unmodified BrC shows an INA at -32˚ C, which can be increased up to -20˚ C. The INA of BrC depends on the duration of NO2- exposure. To clarify the characteristics of the surface modifications, surface sensitive analysis like infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were carried out. Finlayson-Pitts, B. J. and Pitts, J. N. J.: Chemistry of the Upper and Lower Atmosphere, Elsevier, New York, 2000. Pummer, B. G., Bauer, H., Bernardi, J., Bleicher, S., and Grothe, H.: Suspendable macromolecules are responsible for ice nucleation activity of birch and conifer pollen, Atmos Chem Phys, 12, 2541-2550, 2012. Seinfeld, J

  19. Nucleate boiling performance on nano/microstructures with different wetting surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A study of nucleate boiling phenomena on nano/microstructures is a very basic and useful study with a view to the potential application of modified surfaces as heating surfaces in a number of fields. We present a detailed study of boiling experiments on fabricated nano/microstructured surfaces used as heating surfaces under atmospheric conditions, employing identical nanostructures with two different wettabilities (silicon-oxidized and Teflon-coated). Consequently, enhancements of both boiling heat transfer (BHT) and critical heat flux (CHF) are demonstrated in the nano/microstructures, independent of their wettability. However, the increment of BHT and CHF on each of the different wetting surfaces depended on the wetting characteristics of heating surfaces. The effect of water penetration in the surface structures by capillary phenomena is suggested as a plausible mechanism for the enhanced CHF on the nano/microstructures regardless of the wettability of the surfaces in atmospheric condition. This is supported by comparing bubble shapes generated in actual boiling experiments and dynamic contact angles under atmospheric conditions on Teflon-coated nano/microstructured surfaces. PMID:22559173

  20. Droplet nucleation on a well-defined hydrophilic-hydrophobic surface of 10 nm order resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yutaka; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Nishiyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-12-09

    Water condensation on a hybrid hydrophilic-hydrophobic surface was investigated to reveal nucleation mechanisms at the microscale. Focused ion beam (FIB) irradiation was used to change the wettability of the hydrophobic surface with 10 nm order spatial resolution. Condensation experiments were conducted using environmental scanning electron microscopy; droplets, with a minimum diameter of 800 nm, lined up on the FIB-irradiated hydrophilic lines. The heterogeneous nucleation theory was extended to consider the water molecules attracted to the hydrophilic area, thereby enabling explanation of the nucleation mechanism under unsaturated conditions. Our results showed that the effective surface coverage of the water molecules on the hydrophilic region was 0.1-1.1 at 0.0 °C and 560 Pa and was dependent on the width of the FIB-irradiated hydrophilic lines and hydrophobic area. The droplet nucleation mechanism unveiled in this work would enable the design of new surfaces with enhanced dropwise condensation heat transfer.

  1. Size dependence of volume and surface nucleation rates for homogeneous freezing of supercooled water droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kuhn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relative roles of volume and surface nucleation were investigated for the homogeneous freezing of pure water droplets. Experiments were carried out in a cryogenic laminar aerosol flow tube using supercooled water aerosols with maximum volume densities at radii between 1 and 3 μm. Temperature- and size-dependent values of volume- and surface-based homogeneous nucleation rates between 234.8 and 236.2 K were derived using a microphysical model and aerosol phase compositions and size distributions determined from infrared extinction measurements in the flow tube. The results show that the contribution from nucleation at the droplet surface increases with decreasing droplet radius and dominates over nucleation in the bulk droplet volume for droplets with radii smaller than approximately 5 μm. This is interpreted in terms of a lowered free energy of ice germ formation in the surface-based process. The implications of surface nucleation for the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation in numerical models are considered.

  2. Surface nucleation and growth in the system of interacting particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chvoj, Zdeněk; Chromcová, Zdeňka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 13 (2012), 1-8 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P331; GA MŠk ME09048; GA AV ČR IAA100100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : epitaxy * nucleation * island density * graphene * long-range interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2012

  3. Nucleation of carbon nanotubes and their bundles at the surface of catalyst melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, N. I.; Charykov, N. A.

    2008-12-01

    The kinetics of nanotube nucleation from a carbon-supersaturated nanodrop of a catalytic metal was considered. The problem of nucleation of the solid phase from a supersaturated melt was considered with allowance for the particular boundary conditions and the specificity of carbon structure. The solutions are obtained for the cases of extended and surface substrate nanopores, in which the carbon-supersaturated nanodrops are located. The threshold nucleation temperatures were determined for the single-and multiwall nanotubes and their bundles. The dependences of the nanotube size and the required supersaturation level on the temperature and nanodrop size are determined.

  4. Local-Scale Simulations of Nucleate Boiling on Micrometer-Featured Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dede, Ercan M. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Joshi, Shailesh N. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Zhou, Feng [Toyota Research Institute of North America

    2017-07-12

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model for bubble nucleation of the refrigerant HFE7100 on micrometer-featured surfaces is presented in this work. The single-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, along with energy transport and natural convection effects are solved on a featured surface resolved grid. An a priori cavity detection method is employed to convert raw profilometer data of a surface into well-defined cavities. The cavity information and surface morphology are represented in the CFD model by geometric mesh deformations. Surface morphology is observed to initiate buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid phase, which in turn results in faster nucleation of cavities. Simulations pertaining to a generic rough surface show a trend where smaller size cavities nucleate with higher wall superheat. This local-scale model will serve as a self-consistent connection to larger device scale continuum models where local feature representation is not possible.

  5. Local-Scale Simulations of Nucleate Boiling on Micrometer Featured Surfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dede, Ercan M. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Joshi, Shailesh N. [Toyota Research Institute of North America; Zhou, Feng [Toyota Research Institute of North America

    2017-08-03

    A high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model for bubble nucleation of the refrigerant HFE7100 on micrometer-featured surfaces is presented in this work. The single-fluid incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, along with energy transport and natural convection effects are solved on a featured surface resolved grid. An a priori cavity detection method is employed to convert raw profilometer data of a surface into well-defined cavities. The cavity information and surface morphology are represented in the CFD model by geometric mesh deformations. Surface morphology is observed to initiate buoyancy-driven convection in the liquid phase, which in turn results in faster nucleation of cavities. Simulations pertaining to a generic rough surface show a trend where smaller size cavities nucleate with higher wall superheat. This local-scale model will serve as a self-consistent connection to larger device scale continuum models where local feature representation is not possible.

  6. Enhancement of critical heat flux in nucleate boiling of nanofluids: a state-of-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluids (suspensions of nanometer-sized particles in base fluids) have recently been shown to have nucleate boiling critical heat flux (CHF) far superior to that of the pure base fluid. Over the past decade, numerous experimental and analytical studies on the nucleate boiling CHF of nanofluids have been conducted. The purpose of this article is to provide an exhaustive review of these studies. The characteristics of CHF enhancement in nanofluids are systemically presented according to the effects of the primary boiling parameters. Research efforts to identify the effects of nanoparticles underlying irregular enhancement phenomena of CHF in nanofluids are then presented. Also, attempts to explain the physical mechanism based on available CHF theories are described. Finally, future research needs are identified. PMID:21711949

  7. Nucleation rate of critical droplets on an elastic string in a φ6 potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, W.C.; Graham, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain the nucleation rate of critical droplets for an elastic string moving in a φ 6 local potential and subject to noise and damping forces. The critical droplet is a bound soliton-antisoliton pair that carries a section of the string out of the metastable central minimum into one of the stable side minima. The frequencies of small oscillations about the critical droplet are obtained from a Heun equation. We solve the Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space probability density by projecting it onto the eigenfunction basis obtained from the Heun equation. We employ Farkas' 'flux-overpopulation' method to obtain boundary conditions for solving the Fokker-Planck equation; these restrict the validity of our solution to the moderate to heavy damping regime. We present results for the rate as a function of temperature, well depth, and damping

  8. Tungsten surface evolution by helium bubble nucleation, growth and rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.; Hammond, Karl D.; Juslin, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal sub-surface mechanisms likely involved in the initial formation of nanometre-sized ‘fuzz’ in tungsten exposed to low-energy helium plasmas. Helium clusters grow to over-pressurized bubbles as a result of repeated cycles of helium absorption and Frenkel pair formation. The self-interstitials either reach the surface as isolated adatoms or trap at the bubble periphery before organizing into prismatic 〈1 1 1〉 dislocation loops. Surface roughening occurs as single adatoms migrate to the surface, prismatic loops glide to the surface to form adatom islands, and ultimately as over-pressurized gas bubbles burst. (paper)

  9. Effect of Surface Pollution on Homogeneous Ice Nucleation: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pluhařová, Eva; Vrbka, L.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 17 (2010), s. 7831-7838 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:NSF(US) CHE0909227 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ice nucleation * surface contamination * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.520, year: 2010

  10. Nucleation, aggregative growth and detachment of metal nanoparticles during electrodeposition at electrode surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Stanley; Lazenby, R.A.; Kirkman, P.M.; Unwin, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on surfaces is of considerable interest with regard to creating functional interfaces with myriad applications. Yet, key features of these processes remain elusive and are undergoing revision. Here, the mechanism of the electrodeposition of

  11. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek, Emma J; Lei, Huaping; Lii-Rosales, Ann; Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Evans, James W; Thiel, Patricia A

    2016-12-07

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison with the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. This island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.

  12. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Lii-Rosales, Ann; Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Evans, James W.; Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison with the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. This island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.

  13. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-01-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods

  14. Critical behavior of collapsing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kasper; Sourdis, C.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the mean curvature evolution of rotationally symmetric surfaces. Using numerical methods, we detect critical behavior at the threshold of singularity formation resembling that of gravitational collapse. In particular, the mean curvature simulation of a one-parameter family of initial...

  15. Influence of surface morphology on the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of hematite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiranuma, N.; Hoffmann, N.; Kiselev, A.; Dreyer, A.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Koop, T.; Möhler, O.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of the morphological modification of aerosol particles with respect to heterogeneous ice nucleation is comprehensively investigated for laboratory-generated hematite particles as a model substrate for atmospheric dust particles. The surface-area-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of monodisperse cubic hematite particles and milled hematite particles were measured with a series of expansion cooling experiments using the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud simulation chamber. Complementary offline characterization of physico-chemical properties of both hematite subsets were also carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and an electro-kinetic particle charge detector to further constrain droplet-freezing measurements of hematite particles. Additionally, an empirical parameterization derived from our laboratory measurements was implemented in the single-column version of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) to investigate the model sensitivity in simulated ice crystal number concentration on different ice nucleation efficiencies. From an experimental perspective, our results show that the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of milled hematite particles is almost an order of magnitude higher at -35.2 °C < T < -33.5 °C than that of the cubic hematite particles, indicating a substantial effect of morphological irregularities on immersion mode freezing. Our modeling results similarly show that the increased droplet-freezing rates of milled hematite particles lead to about one order magnitude higher ice crystal number in the upper troposphere than cubic hematite particles. Finally and overall, our results suggest that the surface irregularities and associated active sites lead to greater ice activation through droplet freezing.

  16. Surface-charge-induced orientation of interfacial water suppresses heterogeneous ice nucleation on α-alumina (0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Hoffmann, Nadine; Sánchez, M. Alejandra; Cyran, Jenée D.; Kiselev, Alexei; Bonn, Mischa

    2017-06-01

    Surface charge is one of the surface properties of atmospheric aerosols, which has been linked to heterogeneous ice nucleation and hence cloud formation, microphysics, and optical properties. Despite the importance of surface charge for ice nucleation, many questions remain on the molecular-level mechanisms at work. Here, we combine droplet-freezing assay studies with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to correlate interfacial water structure to surface nucleation strength. We study immersion freezing of aqueous solutions of various pHs on the atmospherically relevant aluminum oxide α-Al2O3 (0001) surface using an isolated droplet on the surface. The high-pH solutions freeze at temperatures higher than that of the low-pH solution, while the neutral pH has the highest freezing temperature. On the molecular level, the SFG spectrum of the interfacial water changes substantially upon freezing. At all pHs, crystallization leads to a reduction of intensity of the 3400 cm-1 water resonance, while the 3200 cm-1 intensity drops for low pH but increases for neutral and high pHs. We find that charge-induced surface templating suppresses nucleation, irrespective of the sign of the surface charge. Heterogeneous nucleation is most efficient for the nominally neutral surface.

  17. Early Onset of Nucleate Boiling on Gas-covered Biphilic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Biao; Yamada, Masayuki; Hidaka, Sumitomo; Liu, Jiewei; Shiomi, Junichiro; Amberg, Gustav; Do-Quang, Minh; Kohno, Masamichi; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2017-05-17

    For phase-change cooling schemes for electronics, quick activation of nucleate boiling helps safeguard the electronics components from thermal shocks associated with undesired surface superheating at boiling incipience, which is of great importance to the long-term system stability and reliability. Previous experimental studies show that bubble nucleation can occur surprisingly early on mixed-wettability surfaces. In this paper, we report unambiguous evidence that such unusual bubble generation at extremely low temperatures-even below the boiling point-is induced by a significant presence of incondensable gas retained by the hydrophobic surface, which exhibits exceptional stability even surviving extensive boiling deaeration. By means of high-speed imaging, it is revealed that the consequently gassy boiling leads to unique bubble behaviour that stands in sharp contrast with that of pure vapour bubbles. Such findings agree qualitatively well with numerical simulations based on a diffuse-interface method. Moreover, the simulations further demonstrate strong thermocapillary flows accompanying growing bubbles with considerable gas contents, which is associated with heat transfer enhancement on the biphilic surface in the low-superheat region.

  18. A study of the rates of heat transfer and bubble site density for nucleate boiling on an inclined heating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, S.E.; Symons, J.G.

    1974-08-01

    Nucleate pool boiling of distilled water from an electrically heated surface at atmospheric pressure is studied for varying heating surface inclinations. The constants of the accepted boiling equation phi = K Tsup(B) and the Rohsenow Correlation Coefficient are found to be dependent on surface orientation. Convection cooling is observed to play a major role in pool boiling phenomena and causes large changes in the heat transfer rates for a given excess of temperature of the heated surface. Active nucleation site density is studied and found to be independent of surface inclination. Empirical relations are presented to provide an understanding of the effects of inclination on other boiling parameters. (author)

  19. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Sabet, Javad, E-mail: j_karimi@alum.sharif.edu [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshariat@ut.ac.ir [Transport Phenomena & Nanotechnology Lab., School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Manipulation of the Cu surface morphology in a wide range by electropolishing treatment. • Comparison of the nucleation density of graphene at low pressure and atmospheric pressure CVD processes. • Controlling the evolution of the Cu surface morphology inside a novel confined space. • Growth of large-size graphene domains. - Abstract: In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  20. Nucleation and growth of microdroplets of ionic liquids deposited by physical vapor method onto different surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, José C. S.; Coelho, Ana F. S. M. G.; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.

    2018-01-01

    Nanoscience and technology has generated an important area of research in the field of properties and functionality of ionic liquids (ILs) based materials and their thin films. This work explores the deposition process of ILs droplets as precursors for the fabrication of thin films, by means of physical vapor deposition (PVD). It was found that the deposition (by PVD on glass, indium tin oxide, graphene/nickel and gold-coated quartz crystal surfaces) of imidazolium [C4mim][NTf2] and pyrrolidinium [C4C1Pyrr][NTf2] based ILs generates micro/nanodroplets with a shape, size distribution and surface coverage that could be controlled by the evaporation flow rate and deposition time. No indication of the formation of a wetting-layer prior to the island growth was found. Based on the time-dependent morphological analysis of the micro/nanodroplets, a simple model for the description of the nucleation process and growth of ILs droplets is presented. The proposed model is based on three main steps: minimum free area to promote nucleation; first order coalescence; second order coalescence.

  1. Controlled parallel crystallization of lithium disilicate and diopside using a combination of internal and surface nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rampf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-19th century, Dr. Donald Stookey identified the importance and usability of nucleating agents and mechanisms for the development of glass-ceramic materials. Today, a number of various internal and surface mechanisms as well as combinations thereof have been established in the production of glass-ceramic materials. In order to create new innovative material properties the present study focuses on the precipitation of CaMgSiO6 as a minor phase in Li2Si2O5 based glass-ceramics. In the base glass of the SiO2-Li2O-P2O5-Al2O3-K2O-MgO-CaO system P2O5 serves as nucleating agent for the internal precipitation of Li2Si2O5 crystals while a mechanical activation of the glass surface by means of ball milling is necessary to nucleate the minor CaMgSi2O6 crystal phase. For a successful precipitation of CaMgSi2O6 a minimum ratio of MgO and CaO in the range between 1.4 mol% and 2.9 mol% in the base glasses was determined. The nucleation and crystallization of both crystal phases takes place during sintering a powder compact. Dependent on the quality of the sintering process the dense Li2Si2O5-CaMgSi2O6 glass-ceramics show a mean biaxial strength of up to 392 ± 98 MPa. The microstructure of the glass-ceramics is formed by large (5-10 µm bar like CaMgSi2O6 crystals randomly embedded in a matrix of small (≤ 0.5 µm plate like Li2Si2O5 crystals arranged in an interlocking manner. While there is no significant influence of the minor CaMgSi2O6 phase on the strength of the material, the translucency of the material decreases upon precipitation of the minor phase.

  2. Mechanism of the nanoscale localization of Ge quantum dot nucleation on focused ion beam templated Si(001) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portavoce, A; Kammler, M; Hull, R; Reuter, M C; Ross, F M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the fundamental mechanism by which self-assembled Ge islands can be nucleated at specific sites on Si(001) using ultra-low-dose focused ion beam (FIB) pre-patterning. Island nucleation is controlled by a nanotopography that forms after the implantation of Ga ions during subsequent thermal annealing of the substrate. This nanotopography evolves during the annealing stage, changing from a nanoscale annular depression associated with each focused ion beam spot to a nanoscale pit, and eventually disappearing (planarizing). The correspondence of Ge quantum dot nucleation sites to the focused ion beam features requires a growth surface upon which the nanotopography is preserved. A further key observation is that the Ge wetting layer thickness is reduced in patterned regions, allowing the formation of islands on the templated regions without nucleation elsewhere. These results provide routes to the greatly enhanced design and control of quantum dot distributions and dimensions

  3. Surface analytical investigation of diamond coatings and nucleation processes by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1993-10-01

    Imaging SIMS for the investigation of substrate surfaces: the influence of the substrate surface on diamond nucleation is a major topic in the investigation of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond. It is well known that the nucleation density can be enhanced by scratching the substrate surface with abrasive powders. Diamond can nucleate at scratches or at residues of the polishing material. In the present work the surface of refractory metals (Mo, Nb, Ta, W) polished with silicon carbide and diamond powder is studied by imaging (2- or 3-D) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In first experiments the distribution of SiC and/or diamond residues after polishing was determined. The reaction of diamond with the substrate during heating to deposition temperatures was investigated. Investigation of WC/Co hardmetal substrates: it is well known that Co contained in the binder phase of the hard metal inhibits a strong adhesion between the diamond film and the substrate, which is need for an application as cutting tool. Several attempts to improve the adhesion have been reported up to now. In this work a pre-treatment procedure leading to the formation of Co compounds (borides and silicides) which are stable under diamond deposition conditions were investigated. Furthermore, the application of intermediate sputter layers consisting of chromium and titanium were studied. Investigation of P-doped diamond coatings: in the quaternary phase diagram C-P-B-N exist some phases with diamond structure and superhard phases (e.g BP, c-BN). Also a hypothetical superhard phase of the composition C 3 N 4 is predicted. A scientific objective is the synthesis of such phases by chemical vapour deposition. An increase of the phosphorus concentration effects a distinct change in the morphology of the deposited coatings. A major advantage of SIMS is that the concentration profiles can be measured through the whole film, due to the sputter removal of the sample, and the interface

  4. From Initial Nucleation to Cassie-Baxter State of Condensed Droplets on Nanotextured Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cunjing; Zhang, Xiwen; Niu, Fenglei; He, Feng; Hao, Pengfei

    2017-02-01

    Understanding how droplet condensation happens plays an essential role for our fundamental insights of wetting behaviors in nature and numerous applications. Since there is a lack of study of the initial formation and growing processes of condensed droplets down to nano-/submicroscale, relevant underlying mechanisms remain to be explored. We report an in situ observation of vapor condensation on nano-/microtextured superhydrophobic surfaces using optical microscopy. An interesting picture of the vapor condensation, from the initial appearance of individual small droplets (≤1 μm) to a Cassie-Baxter wetting state (>30 μm), are exhibited. It is found that individual droplets preferentially nucleate at the top and the edge of single micropillars with very high apparent contact angles on the nanotextures. Scenarios of two distinguished growing modes are reported statistically and the underlying mechanisms are discussed in the view of thermodynamics. We particularly reveal that the formation of the Cassie-Baxter wetting state is a result of a continuous coalescence of individual small droplets, in which the nanotexture-enhanced superhydrophobicity plays a crucial role. We envision that these fundamental findings can deepen our understanding of the nucleation and development of condensed droplets in nanoscale, so as to optimize design strategies of superhydrophobic materials for a broad range of water-harvesting and heat-transfer systems.

  5. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. Y. [Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060 Guangdong (China); Yang, G. W., E-mail: stsygw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  6. Nucleation of microcrystalline silicon: on the effect of the substrate surface nature and nano-imprint topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmans, J; Faraz, T; Verheijen, M A; Kessels, W M M; Creatore, M

    2016-01-01

    The nucleation of microcrystalline silicon thin-films has been investigated for various substrate natures and topographies. An earlier nucleation onset on aluminium-doped zinc oxide compared to glass substrates has been revealed, associated with a microstructure enhancement and reduced surface energy. Both aspects resulted in a larger crystallite density, following classical nucleation theory. Additionally, the nucleation onset was (plasma deposition) condition-dependent. Therefore, surface chemistry and its interplay with the plasma have been proposed as key factors affecting nucleation and growth. As such, preliminary proof of the substrate nature’s role in microcrystalline silicon growth has been provided. Subsequently, the impact of nano-imprint lithography prepared surfaces on the initial microcrystalline silicon growth has been explored. Strong topographies, with a 5-fold surface area enhancement, led to a reduction in crystalline volume fraction of ∼20%. However, no correlation between topography and microstructure has been found. Instead, the suppressed crystallization has been partially ascribed to a reduced growth flux, limited surface diffusion and increased incubation layer thickness, originating from the surface area enhancement when transiting from flat to nanostructured surfaces. Furthermore, fundamental plasma parameters have been reviewed in relation with surface topography. Strong topographies are not expected to affect the ion-to-growth flux ratio. However, the reduced ion flux (due to increasing surface area) further limited the already weak ion energy transfer to surface processes. Additionally, the atomic hydrogen flux, i.e. the driving force for microcrystalline growth, has been found to decrease by a factor of 10 when transiting from flat to nanostructured topography. This resulted in an almost 6-fold reduction of the hydrogen-to-growth flux ratio, a much stronger effect than the ion-to-growth flux ratio. Since previous studies regarding

  7. Evolution effects of the copper surface morphology on the nucleation density and growth of graphene domains at different growth pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Seyed Mahdi; Karimi-Sabet, Javad; Shariaty-Niassar, Mojtaba

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we study the influence of the surface morphology of the catalytic copper substrate on the nucleation density and the growth rate of graphene domains at low and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD and APCVD) processes. In order to obtain a wide range of initial surface morphology, precisely controlled electropolishing methods were developed to manipulate the roughntreess value of the as-received Cu substrate (RMS = 30 nm) to ultra-rough (RMS = 130 nm) and ultra-smooth (RMS = 2 nm) surfaces. The nucleation and growth of graphene domains show obviously different trends at LPCVD and APCVD conditions. In contrast to APCVD condition, the nucleation density of graphene domains is almost equal in substrates with different initial roughness values at LPCVD condition. We show that this is due to the evolution of the surface morphology of the Cu substrate during the graphene growth steps. By stopping the surface sublimation of copper substrate in a confined space saturated with Cu atoms, the evolution of the Cu surface was impeded. This results in the reduction of the nucleation density of graphene domains up to 24 times in the pre-smoothed Cu substrates at LPCVD condition.

  8. Ice formation via deposition nucleation on mineral dust and organics: dependence of onset relative humidity on total particulate surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanji, Zamin A; Florea, Octavian; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2008-01-01

    We present ice nucleation results for Arizona test dust, kaolinite, montmorillonite, silica, silica coated with a hydrophobic octyl chain, oxalic acid dihydrate, Gascoyne leonardite (a humic material), and Aldrich humic acid (sodium salt). The focus was on deposition mode nucleation below water saturation at 233 K. Particles were deposited onto a hydrophobic cold stage by atomization of a slurry/solution and exposed to a constant partial pressure of water vapor. By lowering the temperature of the stage, the relative humidity with respect to ice (RH i ) was gradually increased until ice nucleation was observed using digital photography. Different numbers of particles were deposited onto the cold stage by varying the atomization solution concentration and deposition time. For the same total particulate surface area, mineral dust particles nucleated ice at lower supersaturations than all other materials. The most hydrophobic materials, i.e. Gascoyne leonardite and octyl silica, were the least active. For our limit of detection of one ice crystal, the ice onset RH i values were dependent on the total surface area of the particulates, indicating that no unique threshold RH i for ice nucleation prevails

  9. Nucleation and growth of C60 overlayers on the Ag/Pt(111) dislocation network surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait-Mansour, K; Ruffieux, P; Xiao, W; Fasel, R; Groening, P; Groening, O

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the room temperature growth of C 60 overlayers on the strainrelief dislocation network formed by two monolayers of Ag on Pt(111) by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. Extended domains of highly ordered dislocation networks with a typical superlattice parameter of 6.8 nm have been prepared, serving as templates for subsequent C 60 depositions. For low C 60 coverages, the molecules decorate the step-edges, where also the first islands nucleate. This indicates that at room temperature the C 60 molecules are sufficiently mobile to cross the dislocation lines and to diffuse to the step-edges. For C 60 coverages of 0.4 monolayer, besides the islands nucleated at the step-edges, C 60 islands also grow in the middle of terraces. The C 60 islands typically extend over several unit cells of the dislocation network and show an unusual orientation of the hexagonally close-packed C 60 lattice as compared to that found on the bare Ag(111) surface. Whereas C 60 grows preferentially in a (2 √3 x 2 √3) R30 0 structure on Ag(111), on the Ag/Pt(111) dislocation network the C 60 lattice adopts an orientation rotated by 30 0 , with the close-packed C 60 rows aligned along the dislocations which themselves are aligned along the Ag(1-10) directions. For higher coverages in the range of 1-2 monolayers, the growth of C 60 continues in a layer-by-layer fashion

  10. Silica-Assisted Nucleation of Polymer Foam Cells with Nanoscopic Dimensions : Impact of Particle Size, Line Tension, and Surface Functionality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shanqiu; Eijkelenkamp, Rik; Duvigneau, Joost; Vancso, G. Julius

    2017-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles consisting of silica as core and surface-grafted poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as shell with different diameters were prepared and used as heterogeneous nucleation agents to obtain CO2-blown poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposite foams. PDMS was selected as the shell

  11. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  12. Vapour–to–liquid nucleation: Nucleation theorems for nonisothermal–nonideal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malila, J.; McGraw, R.; Napari, I.; Laaksonen, A.

    2010-08-29

    Homogeneous vapour-to-liquid nucleation, a basic process of aerosol formation, is often considered as a type example of nucleation phenomena, while most treatment of the subject introduce several simplifying assumptions (ideal gas phase, incompressible nucleus, isothermal kinetics, size-independent surface free energy...). During last decades, nucleation theorems have provided new insights into properties of critical nuclei facilitating direct comparison between laboratory experiments and molecular simulations. These theorems are, despite of their generality, often applied in forms where the aforementioned assumptions are made. Here we present forms of nucleation theorems that explicitly take into account these effects and allow direct estimation of their importance. Only assumptions are Arrhenius-type kinetics of nucleation process and exclusion carrier gas molecules from the critical nucleus.

  13. Surface Hold Advisor Using Critical Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Caleb Hoi Kei (Inventor); Hsiao, Thomas Kun-Lung (Inventor); Mittler, Nathan C. (Inventor); Couluris, George J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The Surface Hold Advisor Using Critical Sections is a system and method for providing hold advisories to surface controllers to prevent gridlock and resolve crossing and merging conflicts among vehicles traversing a vertex-edge graph representing a surface traffic network on an airport surface. The Advisor performs pair-wise comparisons of current position and projected path of each vehicle with other surface vehicles to detect conflicts, determine critical sections, and provide hold advisories to traffic controllers recommending vehicles stop at entry points to protected zones around identified critical sections. A critical section defines a segment of the vertex-edge graph where vehicles are in crossing or merging or opposite direction gridlock contention. The Advisor detects critical sections without reference to scheduled, projected or required times along assigned vehicle paths, and generates hold advisories to prevent conflicts without requiring network path direction-of-movement rules and without requiring rerouting, rescheduling or other network optimization solutions.

  14. New trends in the nucleation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, M. P.; Hopke, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    During the last half of century the most of efforts have been directed towards small molecule system modeling using intermolecular potentials. Summarizing the nucleation theory, it can be concluded that the nowadays theory is far from complete. The vapor-gas nucleation theory can produce values that deviate from the experimental results by several orders of magnitude currently. Experiments on the vapor-gas nucleation rate measurements using different devices show significant inconsistencies in the measured rates as well. Theoretical results generally are quite reasonable for sufficiently low vapor nucleation rates where the capillary approximation is applicable. In the present research the advantages and current problems of the vapor-gas nucleation experiments are discussed briefly and a view of the future studies is presented. Using the brake points of the first derivative for the nucleation rate surface as markers of the critical embryos phase change is fresh idea to show the gas-pressure effect for the nucleating vapor-gas systems. To test the accuracy of experimental techniques, it is important to have a standard system that can be measured over a range of nucleation conditions. Several results illustrate that high-pressure techniques are needed to study multi-channel nucleation. In practical applications, parametric theories can be used for the systems of interest. However, experimental measurements are still the best source of information on nucleation rates. Experiments are labor intensive and costly, and thus, it is useful to extend the value of limited experimental measurements to a broader range of nucleation conditions. Only limited experimental data one needs for use in normalizing the slopes of the linearized nucleation rate surfaces. The nucleation rate surface is described in terms of steady-state nucleation rates. It is supposed that several new measuring systems, such as High Pressure Flow Diffusion Chamber for pressure limit up to 150 bar will be

  15. DFT study on the atomic-scale nucleation path of graphene growth on the Cu(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingfeng; Li, Meicheng; Wang, Tai; Bai, Fan; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2014-03-21

    The nucleation path of graphene growth on the Cu(111) surface is investigated by importing carbon atoms step-by-step using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An overall path of graphene nucleation has been proposed based on configuration and energy analysis. At the very first stage, linear chains will be formed and dominate the copper surface. Then, Y-type (furcate) carbon species will be shaped when new carbon atoms are absorbed aside the linear chains. Finally, ring-containing carbon species and graphene islands will be formed stepwise, with energetic preference. We find that the Y-type and ring-containing carbon species are not likely formed directly at the initial stage of graphene nucleation, but should be formed starting from linear chains. The nucleation limiting step is the formation of the Y-type species, which must pass an energy barrier of about 0.25 eV. These underlying observations are instructive to stimulate future experimental efforts on graphene synthesis.

  16. Deconvoluting the effects of surface chemistry and nanoscale topography: Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm nucleation on Si-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Huang, Jinglin; Say, Carmen; Dorit, Robert L; Queeney, K T

    2018-06-01

    The nucleation of biofilms is known to be affected by both the chemistry and topography of the underlying substrate, particularly when topography includes nanoscale (topography vs. chemistry is complicated by concomitant variation in both as a result of typical surface modification techniques. Analyzing the behavior of biofilm-forming bacteria exposed to surfaces with systematic, independent variation of both topography and surface chemistry should allow differentiation of the two effects. Silicon surfaces with reproducible nanotopography were created by anisotropic etching in deoxygenated water. Surface chemistry was varied independently to create hydrophilic (OH-terminated) and hydrophobic (alkyl-terminated) surfaces. The attachment and proliferation of Psuedomonas aeruginosa to these surfaces was characterized over a period of 12 h using fluorescence and confocal microscopy. The number of attached bacteria as well as the structural characteristics of the nucleating biofilm were influenced by both surface nanotopography and surface chemistry. In general terms, the presence of both nanoscale features and hydrophobic surface chemistry enhance bacterial attachment and colonization. However, the structural details of the resulting biofilms suggest that surface chemistry and topography interact differently on each of the four surface types we studied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of Nucleate Boiling Heat Flux on Macro/Micro-Structured Surfaces Cooled by Multiple Impinging Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Scott Lee

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer from modified surfaces cooled by multiple in-line impinging circular jets is reported and found to agree with single jet results. A copper block is heated from the back by two electrical arcs, and cooled on the opposite side by three identical liquid jets of distilled water at subcoolings of 25 C 50 C and 77 C and Freon 113 at 24 C subcooling. Liquid flow rates are held constant at 5, 10, and 15 GPH for each of the three jets with jet velocities ranging from 1.4 m/s to 1 1.2 m/s and jet diameters from 0.95 mm to 2.2 mm. To increase the maximum heat flux (CHF) and heat removal rate, the boiling surface was modified by both macro and micro enhancements. Macro modification consists of machined radial grooves in the boiling surface arranged in an optimally designed pattern to allow better liquid distribution along the surface. These grooves also reduce splashing of liquid droplets, and provide 'channels' to sweep away bubbles. Micro modification was achieved by flame spraying metal powder on the boiling surface, creating a porous, sintered surface. With the addition of both micro and macro structured enhancements, maximum heat flux and nucleate boiling can be enhanced by more than 200%. Examination of each surface modification separately and together indicates that at lower superheats, the micro structure provides the enhanced heat transfer by providing more nucleation sites, while for higher superheats the macro structure allows better liquid distribution and bubble removal. A correlation is presented to account for liquid subcoolings and surface enhancements, in addition to the geometrical and fluid properties previously reported in the literature.

  18. The Dependence of CNT Aerogel Synthesis on Sulfur-driven Catalyst Nucleation Processes and a Critical Catalyst Particle Mass Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoecker, Christian; Smail, Fiona; Pick, Martin; Weller, Lee; Boies, Adam M

    2017-11-06

    The floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FC-CVD) process permits macro-scale assembly of nanoscale materials, enabling continuous production of carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels. Despite the intensive research in the field, fundamental uncertainties remain regarding how catalyst particle dynamics within the system influence the CNT aerogel formation, thus limiting effective scale-up. While aerogel formation in FC-CVD reactors requires a catalyst (typically iron, Fe) and a promotor (typically sulfur, S), their synergistic roles are not fully understood. This paper presents a paradigm shift in the understanding of the role of S in the process with new experimental studies identifying that S lowers the nucleation barrier of the catalyst nanoparticles. Furthermore, CNT aerogel formation requires a critical threshold of Fe x C y  > 160 mg/m 3 , but is surprisingly independent of the initial catalyst diameter or number concentration. The robustness of the critical catalyst mass concentration principle is proved further by producing CNTs using alternative catalyst systems; Fe nanoparticles from a plasma spark generator and cobaltocene and nickelocene precursors. This finding provides evidence that low-cost and high throughput CNT aerogel routes may be achieved by decoupled and enhanced catalyst production and control, opening up new possibilities for large-scale CNT synthesis.

  19. Experimental study of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of water on silicon oxide nanoparticle coated copper heating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sudev; Kumar, D.S.; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • EBPVD approach was employed for fabrication of well-ordered nanoparticle coated micro/nanostructure on metal surface. • Nucleate boiling heat transfer performance on nanoparticle coated micro/nanostructure surface was experimentally studied. • Stability of nanoparticle coated surface under boiling environment was systematically studied. • 58% enhancement of boiling heat transfer coefficient was found. • Present experimental results are validated with well known boiling correlations. - Abstract: Electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) coating approach was employed for fabrication of well-ordered of nanoparticle coated micronanostructures on metal surfaces. This paper reports the experimental study of augmentation of pool boiling heat transfer performance and stabilities of silicon oxide nanoparticle coated surfaces with water at atmospheric pressure. The surfaces were characterized with respect to dynamic contact angle, surface roughness, topography, and morphology. The results were found that there is a reduction of about 36% in the incipience superheat and 58% enhancement in heat transfer coefficient for silicon oxide coated surface over the untreated surface. This enhancement might be the reason of enhanced wettability, enhanced surface roughness and increased number of a small artificial cavity on a heating surface. The performance and stability of nanoparticle coated micro/nanostructure surfaces were examined and found that after three runs of experiment the heat transfer coefficient with heat flux almost remain constant.

  20. Effects of surface orientation on nucleate boiling heat transfer in a pool of water under atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Satbyoul; Kim, Hyungdae

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of surface inclination on pool boiling were experimentally examined. • Heat transfer and major bubble parameters were simultaneously measured. • A modified wall boiling model considering bubble merging was developed. • The presented model reasonably predicted pool boiling heat transfer on inclined surfaces. - Abstract: The basic wall boiling model widely used in computation fluid dynamics codes gives no regard to influences of surface orientation upon boiling mechanism. This study aims at examining the effects of surface orientation on wall heat flux and bubble parameters in pool nucleate boiling and incorporating those into the wall boiling model. Boiling experiments on a flat plate heater submerged in a pool of saturated water were conducted under atmospheric pressure. Relevant bubble parameters as well as boiling heat transfer characteristics were simultaneously measured using a unique optical setup integrating shadowgraph, total reflection and infrared thermometry techniques. It was observed that as an upward-facing heater surface with a constant wall superheat of 7.5 °C inclines from horizontal towards vertical, the heat flux significantly increased; nucleation site density increased intensively at the upper part of the heater surface where thermal boundary layer might become thickened; isolated boiling bubbles tend to slide up due to buoyancy and coalesce with each other, thus forming one single large bubble. Such observations on the wall heat flux and bubble parameters according to surface orientation could not be predicted by the present basic wall boiling model only centered with isolated bubbles. A modified wall boiling model incorporating the effects of merging of isolated bubbles on an inclined surface was proposed. The model reasonably predicted the experimental data on various orientation angles.

  1. Effects of surface orientation on nucleate boiling heat transfer in a pool of water under atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Satbyoul; Kim, Hyungdae, E-mail: hdkims@khu.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Effects of surface inclination on pool boiling were experimentally examined. • Heat transfer and major bubble parameters were simultaneously measured. • A modified wall boiling model considering bubble merging was developed. • The presented model reasonably predicted pool boiling heat transfer on inclined surfaces. - Abstract: The basic wall boiling model widely used in computation fluid dynamics codes gives no regard to influences of surface orientation upon boiling mechanism. This study aims at examining the effects of surface orientation on wall heat flux and bubble parameters in pool nucleate boiling and incorporating those into the wall boiling model. Boiling experiments on a flat plate heater submerged in a pool of saturated water were conducted under atmospheric pressure. Relevant bubble parameters as well as boiling heat transfer characteristics were simultaneously measured using a unique optical setup integrating shadowgraph, total reflection and infrared thermometry techniques. It was observed that as an upward-facing heater surface with a constant wall superheat of 7.5 °C inclines from horizontal towards vertical, the heat flux significantly increased; nucleation site density increased intensively at the upper part of the heater surface where thermal boundary layer might become thickened; isolated boiling bubbles tend to slide up due to buoyancy and coalesce with each other, thus forming one single large bubble. Such observations on the wall heat flux and bubble parameters according to surface orientation could not be predicted by the present basic wall boiling model only centered with isolated bubbles. A modified wall boiling model incorporating the effects of merging of isolated bubbles on an inclined surface was proposed. The model reasonably predicted the experimental data on various orientation angles.

  2. Influence of the nucleation surface inclination on heat transfers and on the growth dynamics of a steam bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthes, M.; Reynard, Ch.; Santini, R.; Tadrist, L.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the inclination of the nucleation surface on heat and mass transfers and on the growth dynamics of a single steam bubble is experimentally studied. The bubble is created beneath a wall with an imposed heating flux. The evolution of geometrical bubble parameters and of the frequency of emission with respect to the inclination angle are presented. The total heat flux measurements are compared to the evaporation fluxes determined by image processing. Contrary to the evaporation flux, the total flux is conditioned by the inclination and thus is correlated to the frequency of bubbles emission. (J.S.)

  3. Graphene nucleation and growth on the transition metal surfaces: the role of pentagon, metal step and magic carbon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junfeng; Zhao, Jijun; Ding, Feng

    2012-02-01

    The nucleation behavior of graphene on transition metal surfaces, either on a terrace or near a step edge, is systematically explored using density functional theory calculations. The supported carbon clusters, CN (N=1˜24), on the Ni(111) surface are carefully optimized [1,2]. A structural transformation from a C chain to a sp^2 C network at C12 and the most stable structures of sp^2 graphene islands contain one to three pentagons. In agreement with experimental observations, our calculations show that graphene nucleation near a metal step edge is superior to that on a terrace. Besides, ground state structures of supported CN (N = 16˜26), clusters on four selected transition metal surfaces: (Rh(111), Ru(0001), Ni(111) and Cu(111)) are explored [3]. A core-shell structured of C21 stands out as a magic cluster, which is one of the dominating carbon precursors in graphene CVD growth and has been observed in experimental STM images. The energy barrier of two C21 clusters' coalescence is computed to illustrate their influence on the kinetics of graphene CVD growth at different temperatures. [4pt] [1] J. Gao, et al,. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 5009 (2011). [0pt] [2] J. Gao, et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 17695 (2011). [0pt] [3] Q. Yuan, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. (accepted).

  4. A study on bubble detachment and the impact of heated surface structure in subcooled nucleate boiling flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wen; Chen Peipei; Jones, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the bubble detachment phenomena under subcooled nucleate boiling conditions, in order to obtain a better understanding of the bubble dynamics on horizontal flat heat exchangers. Refrigerant R134a is chosen as a simulant fluid due to its merits of having smaller surface tension, reduced latent heat, and lower boiling temperature than water. Experiments are run with varying experimental parameters, e.g. pressure, inlet subcooled level, flow rate, etc. Digital images are obtained at frame rates up to 4000 frames/s, showing the characteristics of bubble movements. Bubble departure and bubble lift-off, which are described as bubbles detaching from the original nucleation sites and bubbles detaching from the horizontal heated surface respectively, are both considered and measured. Results are compared against the model proposed by Klausner et al. for the prediction of bubble detachment sizes. While good overall agreement is shown, it is suggested that finite rather than zero bubble contact area should be assumed, which improves the model prediction at the pressure range of 300-500 kPa while playing no significant role at a lower pressure of 150 kPa where the model was originally benchmarked. The impact of heated surface structure is studied whose results provide support to the above assumption

  5. Enhancement of Co nucleation on the TaN(x) film surface in Co MOCVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Moon, Dae-Yong; Han, Dong-Suk; Shin, So-Ra; Park, Jong-Wan

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the Co film was deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on TaN(x)/SiO2/Si substrate at various NH3/H2 gas flow ratio (0, 0.08, 0.11, 0.17, 0.2) to form the continuous layer. It was found that Co film can achieve a low resistivity of 63 microomega-cm, high nucleation density, and a low root-mean-square roughness of 0.79 nm at 0.17 of NH3/H2 gas flow ratio. Moreover, by using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis, the effect of NH3 gas was confirmed as a reaction catalyst.

  6. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature.

  7. Zn Electrodeposition on Single-Crystal GaN(0001 Surface: Nucleation and Growth Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical deposition of zinc on single-crystal n-type GaN(0001 from a sulphate solution has been investigated on the basis of electrochemical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and Tafel plot. The morphology and crystal structure of zinc deposits have been characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The result has revealed that the deposition of Zn on GaN electrode commenced at a potential of −1.12 V versus Ag/AgCl. According to the Tafel plot, an exchange current density of ~0.132 mA cm−2 was calculated. In addition, the current transient measurements have shown that Zn deposition process followed the instantaneous nucleation in 10 mM ZnSO4 + 0.5 M Na2SO4 + 0.5 M H3BO3 (pH = 4.

  8. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation protein (INP is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1. Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1 by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg to L-Ornithine (L-Orn in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells.

  9. A dynamical theory of nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2013-05-01

    A dynamical theory of nucleation based on fluctuating hydrodynamics is described. It is developed in detail for the case of diffusion-limited nucleation appropriate to colloids and macro-molecules in solution. By incorporating fluctuations, realistic fluid-transport and realistic free energy models the theory is able to give a unified treatment of both the pre-critical development of fluctuations leading to a critical cluster as well as of post-critical growth. Standard results from classical nucleation theory are shown to follow in the weak noise limit while the generality of the theory allows for many extensions including the description of very high supersaturations (small clusters), multiple order parameters and strong-noise effects to name a few. The theory is applied to homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of a model globular protein in a confined volume and it is found that nucleation depends critically on the existence of long-wavelength, small-amplitude density fluctuations.

  10. Investigations on nucleation thermodynamical parameters of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ation thermodynamical parameters like interfacial energy between the solid Nd123 and its flux BaO–CuO, metastable zone-width, Gibbs free energy, critical energy barrier for nucleation and critical nucleation radius have been calculated from the knowledge of solubility data and by applying the classical nucleation theory.

  11. Role of nucleation in nanodiamond film growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, C.H.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S.T.

    2006-01-01

    Nanodiamond films were deposited using different microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition schemes following several nucleation pretreatment methods. The nucleation efficiency and the films structure were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. C 2 dimer growth (CH 4 and H 2 in 90% Ar) cannot nucleate diamond and works only on existing diamond surfaces. The methyl radical process (up to 20% CH 4 in H 2 ) allows some nucleation probability on appropriate substrates. Prolonged bias enhanced nucleation initiates both diamond nucleation and growth. C 2 dimer growth results in pure nanodiamond free of amorphous carbon, while prolonged bias enhanced nucleation forms an amorphous carbon/nanodiamond composite

  12. Nucleation and mesostrain influence on percolating critical currents of solution derived YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradors, X., E-mail: Xavier.obradors@icmab.es [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Martinez-Julian, F.; Zalamova, K.; Vlad, V.R.; Pomar, A.; Palau, A.; Llordes, A.; Chen, H.; Coll, M.; Ricart, S.; Mestres, N.; Granados, X.; Puig, T. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Rikel, M. [Nexans Superconductors, 50354 Huerth (Germany)

    2012-11-20

    After briefly reviewing the present understanding of the nucleation process of YBCO films, a new approach is presented to enhance the stability of c-axis nucleation in epitaxial chemical solution deposited YBCO thin films derived from TFA precursors. We show that with silver addition to the TFA precursor c-axis nucleation can be reached in a wide range of temperature thus keeping high percolating J{sub c}. We argue that silver reduces supersaturation and makes more stable the c-axis nuclei without modifying T{sub c}. Additional advantages of silver addition are an enhanced surface smootheness and a reduced porosity of the YBCO films. The second reported topic relates to the discovery of an adverse relationship between percolating J{sub c} and YBCO films mesostrain, as determined through X-ray diffraction line broadening. We show that mesostrain is enhanced in processes leading to inefficient strain healing at grain boundaries, for instance annealing times too short or growth temperatures too low. It is suggested that the strained regions at the low angle grain boundaries lead to a weak link behavior which can be microscopically understood on the basis of pair formation prevention, as proposed by the bond contraction pairing model.

  13. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, David C., E-mail: dccameron@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Krumpolec, Richard, E-mail: richard.krumpolec@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 4 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi [ASTRaL team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.homola@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko, E-mail: cernak@physics.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows initial nucleation and growth process in atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide. • Quantum confinement effects were used to measure evolution of crystallite size. • Crystallite surface density can be extracted from ellipsometric surface roughness data and crystallite size. • Pretreatment of silicon substrates by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge has only minor effects on titanium dioxide film nucleation and growth. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle{sup −1} which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle{sup −1} consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  14. In-situ observations of catalyst dynamics during surface-bound carbon nanotube nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Du, G

    2007-01-01

    We present atomic-scale, video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy and in situ time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of surface-bound catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. We observe that transition metal catalyst...

  15. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  16. Thermostability analysis of line-tension-associated nucleation at a gas-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sanat Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Maiti, Biswajit

    2017-01-01

    The influence of line tension on the thermostability of a droplet nucleated from an oversaturated vapor at the interface of the vapor and another immiscible liquid is investigated. Along with the condition of mechanical equilibrium, the notion of extremization of the reversible work of formation is considered to obtain the critical parameters related to heterogeneous nucleation. From the energetic formulation, the critical reversible work of formation is found to be greater than that of homogeneous nucleation for high value of the positive line tension. On the other hand, for high value of the negative line tension, the critical reversible work of formation becomes negative. Therefore, these thermodynamic instabilities under certain substrate wettability situations necessitate a free-energetics-based stability of the nucleated droplet, because the system energy is not minimized under these conditions. This thermostability is analogous to the transition-based stability proposed by Widom [B. Widom, J. Phys. Chem. 99, 2803 (1995)], 10.1021/j100009a041 in the case of partial wetting phenomena along with the positive line tension. The thermostability analysis limits the domain of the solution space of the present critical-value problem as the thermodynamic transformation in connection with homogeneous and workless nucleation is considered. Within the stability range of the geometry-based wetting parameters, three limiting modes of nucleation, i.e., total-dewetting-related homogeneous nucleation, and total-wetting-associated and total-submergence-associated workless nucleation scenarios, are identified. Either of the two related limiting wetting scenarios of workless nucleation, namely, total wetting and total submergence, is found to be favorable depending on the geometry-based wetting conditions. The line-tension-associated nucleation on a liquid surface can be differentiated from that on a rigid substrate, as in the former, the stability based on mechanical

  17. Critical phenomena at perfect and non-perfect surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleimling, M

    2004-01-01

    In the past, perfect surfaces have been shown to yield local critical behaviour that differs from bulk critical behaviour. On the other hand, surface defects, whether they are of natural origin or created artificially, are known to modify local quantities. It is therefore important to clarify whether these defects are relevant or irrelevant for the surface critical behaviour. The purpose of this review is two-fold. In the first part we summarize some of the important results on surface criticality at perfect surfaces. Special attention is thereby paid to new developments such as for example the study of the surface critical behaviour in systems with competing interactions or of surface critical dynamics. In the second part the effect of surface defects (presence of edges, steps, quenched randomness, lines of adatoms, regular geometric patterns) on local critical behaviour in semi-infinite systems and in thin films is discussed in detail. Whereas most of the defects commonly encountered are shown to be irrelevant, some notable exceptions are highlighted. It is shown furthermore that under certain circumstances non-universal local critical behaviour may be observed at surfaces. (topical review)

  18. Critical and noncritical roughening of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Franz S.

    1986-02-01

    The equilibrium roughening of perfect, clean, crystalline surfaces is described in terms of thermally created atomic steps in the frame of a lattice model (loop gas). If the bending energies for convex and concave step corners are different, the ``particle-hole'' symmetry is destroyed and the sharp infinite-order roughening transition disappears. Instead, a rather smooth crossover from a smooth to a rough surface occurs. A simple model illustrates this result, which is expected to be important for the crystal-growth process and for surface-catalytic reactions.

  19. Nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on arc-deposited TiO{sub 2} surfaces studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilja, Mirjam [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, Lerkrogsvägen 19, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden); Butt, Umer [Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, Lerkrogsvägen 19, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden); Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials and Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, 114 18 Stockholm (Sweden); Shen, Zhijian [Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials and Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, 114 18 Stockholm (Sweden); Bjöörn, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.bjoorn@sandvik.com [Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, Lerkrogsvägen 19, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of nucleation and growth kinetics of biomimetically deposited hydroxyapatite (HA) on crystalline TiO{sub 2} surfaces is important with respect to the application and performance of HA as functional implant coatings. Arc-evaporation was used to deposit TiO{sub 2} coatings dominated by anatase phase, rutile phase or their mixtures. Subsequent formation of HA from phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) was investigated in real-time using in situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique (QCM-D). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the presence, morphology and crystal structure of TiO{sub 2} coatings and the formed HA. Increasing temperature of the PBS, increasing flow rate and applying a higher ion concentration in solution were found to accelerate HA nucleation process and hence affect growth kinetics. Lower PBS temperature resulted in the formation of HA coatings with flake-like morphology and increasing HA porosity. All TiO{sub 2} coatings under study enabled HA formation at body temperature, while in contrast Ti reference surfaces only supported HA nucleation and growth at elevated temperatures. QCM-D technique is a powerful tool for studying the impact of process parameters during biomimetic coating deposition on coating structure evolution in real time and provides valuable information for understanding, optimizing as well as tailoring the biomimetic HA growth processes.

  20. Nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on arc-deposited TiO2 surfaces studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilja, Mirjam; Butt, Umer; Shen, Zhijian; Bjöörn, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of nucleation and growth kinetics of biomimetically deposited hydroxyapatite (HA) on crystalline TiO 2 surfaces is important with respect to the application and performance of HA as functional implant coatings. Arc-evaporation was used to deposit TiO 2 coatings dominated by anatase phase, rutile phase or their mixtures. Subsequent formation of HA from phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) was investigated in real-time using in situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique (QCM-D). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the presence, morphology and crystal structure of TiO 2 coatings and the formed HA. Increasing temperature of the PBS, increasing flow rate and applying a higher ion concentration in solution were found to accelerate HA nucleation process and hence affect growth kinetics. Lower PBS temperature resulted in the formation of HA coatings with flake-like morphology and increasing HA porosity. All TiO 2 coatings under study enabled HA formation at body temperature, while in contrast Ti reference surfaces only supported HA nucleation and growth at elevated temperatures. QCM-D technique is a powerful tool for studying the impact of process parameters during biomimetic coating deposition on coating structure evolution in real time and provides valuable information for understanding, optimizing as well as tailoring the biomimetic HA growth processes.

  1. Nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on arc-deposited TiO2 surfaces studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Mirjam; Butt, Umer; Shen, Zhijian; Bjöörn, Dorota

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of nucleation and growth kinetics of biomimetically deposited hydroxyapatite (HA) on crystalline TiO2 surfaces is important with respect to the application and performance of HA as functional implant coatings. Arc-evaporation was used to deposit TiO2 coatings dominated by anatase phase, rutile phase or their mixtures. Subsequent formation of HA from phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) was investigated in real-time using in situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique (QCM-D). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the presence, morphology and crystal structure of TiO2 coatings and the formed HA. Increasing temperature of the PBS, increasing flow rate and applying a higher ion concentration in solution were found to accelerate HA nucleation process and hence affect growth kinetics. Lower PBS temperature resulted in the formation of HA coatings with flake-like morphology and increasing HA porosity. All TiO2 coatings under study enabled HA formation at body temperature, while in contrast Ti reference surfaces only supported HA nucleation and growth at elevated temperatures. QCM-D technique is a powerful tool for studying the impact of process parameters during biomimetic coating deposition on coating structure evolution in real time and provides valuable information for understanding, optimizing as well as tailoring the biomimetic HA growth processes.

  2. Understanding homogeneous nucleation in solidification of aluminum by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Avik; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Baskes, Michael I.

    2018-02-01

    Homogeneous nucleation from aluminum (Al) melt was investigated by million-atom molecular dynamics simulations utilizing the second nearest neighbor modified embedded atom method potentials. The natural spontaneous homogenous nucleation from the Al melt was produced without any influence of pressure, free surface effects and impurities. Initially isothermal crystal nucleation from undercooled melt was studied at different constant temperatures, and later superheated Al melt was quenched with different cooling rates. The crystal structure of nuclei, critical nucleus size, critical temperature for homogenous nucleation, induction time, and nucleation rate were determined. The quenching simulations clearly revealed three temperature regimes: sub-critical nucleation, super-critical nucleation, and solid-state grain growth regimes. The main crystalline phase was identified as face-centered cubic, but a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and an amorphous solid phase were also detected. The hcp phase was created due to the formation of stacking faults during solidification of Al melt. By slowing down the cooling rate, the volume fraction of hcp and amorphous phases decreased. After the box was completely solid, grain growth was simulated and the grain growth exponent was determined for different annealing temperatures.

  3. Review: The nucleation of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.W.; Johnson, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four types of phase transformation that involve the conversion of crystalline phases into more disordered forms are reviewed: melting, disordering of superlattices, amorphization by diffusion between crystalline phases, and irradation amorphization. In the review emphasis is placed on evidence for the heterogeneous nucleation of the product phases; in this connection, the role of surfaces, antiphase domain boundaries, dislocations, vacancies, and grain boundaries is specifically discussed. All of these features have been either observed, or hypothesized, to play a role as heterogeneous nucleation sites in one or more of the four transformations. An attempt is made to draw parallels between nucleation mechanisms in the various processes

  4. Using Ice Nucleating Particles to Enable Desublimation on Chilled Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Julia; Failor, Kevin; Bisbano, Caitlin; Mulroe, Megan; Nath, Saurabh; Vinatzer, Boris; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    On a subfreezing surface, nucleating embryos usually form as supercooled condensate that later freeze into ice, as opposed to desublimation. Ice nucleating particles (INPs) have been widely used to freeze existing water; however, nobody has studied how they might affect the initial mode of nucleation. Here, we show that INPs deposited on a substrate can switch the mode of embryo nucleation to desublimation, rather than supercooled condensation. Deposition was achieved by evaporating a water droplet containing INPs on a hydrophobic silicon wafer. A Peltier stage was used to cool the wafer down inside of a controlled humidity chamber, such that the desired set point temperature correlated with the dew point and onset of nucleation. Beneath a critical surface temperature, microscopy indicated that desublimation occurred on the circular patch of deposited INPs, compared to supercooled condensation outside the circle. The hydrophobic surface was then patterned with hydrophilic stripe arrays, which facilitated the deposition of stripes of INPs via the same evaporation method. The resulting array of desublimating ice stripes created dry zones free of condensation or frost in the intermediate areas, as the hygroscopic ice stripes served as overlapping humidity sinks.

  5. Oriented Nucleation of both Ge-Fresnoite and Benitoite/BaGe4O9 during the Surface Crystallisation of Glass Studied by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Patschger, Marek; Murdzheva, Steliana; Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Two glasses of the compositions 2 BaO - TiO2 - 2.75 GeO2 and 2 BaO - TiO2 -3.67 GeO2 (also known as BTG55) are annealed at temperatures from 680 to 970 °C to induce surface crystallization. The resulting samples are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Ge-Fresnoite (Ba2TiGe2O8, BTG) is observed at the immediate surface of all samples and oriented nucleation is proven in both compositions. After a very fast kinetic selection, the crystal growth of BTG into the bulk occurs via highly oriented dendrites where the c-axes are oriented perpendicular to the surface. The growth of this oriented layer is finally blocked by dendritc BTG originating from bulk nucleation. The secondary phases BaTiGe3O9 (benitoite) and BaGe4O9 are also identified near the surface by XRD and localized by EBSD which additionally indicates orientation preferences for these phases. This behaviour is in contrast with previous reports from the Ba2TiSi2O8 as well as the Sr2TiSi2O8 systems.

  6. Nucleate boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz Jabardo, J.M. [Universidade da Coruna (Spain). Escola Politecnica Superior], e-mail: mjabardo@cdf.udc.es

    2009-07-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer has been intensely studied during the last 70 years. However boiling remains a science to be understood and equated. In other words, using the definition given by Boulding, it is an 'insecure science'. It would be pretentious of the part of the author to explore all the nuances that the title of the paper suggests in a single conference paper. Instead the paper will focus on one interesting aspect such as the effect of the surface microstructure on nucleate boiling heat transfer. A summary of a chronological literature survey is done followed by an analysis of the results of an experimental investigation of boiling on tubes of different materials and surface roughness. The effect of the surface roughness is performed through data from the boiling of refrigerants R-134a and R-123, medium and low pressure refrigerants, respectively. In order to investigate the extent to which the surface roughness affects boiling heat transfer, very rough surfaces (4.6 {mu}m and 10.5 {mu}m ) have been tested. Though most of the data confirm previous literature trends, the very rough surfaces present a peculiar behaviour with respect to that of the smoother surfaces (Ra<3.0 {mu}m). (author)

  7. Critical heat flux on micro-structured zircaloy surfaces for flow boiling of water at low pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, C.; Miassoedov, A.; Schulenberg, T.; Wetzel, T.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of surface structure on critical heat flux for flow boiling of water was investigated for Zircaloy tubes in a vertical annular test section. The objectives were to find suitable surface modification processes for Zircaloy tubes and to test their critical heat flux performance in comparison to the smooth tube. Surface structures with micro-channels, porous layer, oxidized layer, and elevations in micro- and nano-scale were produced on a section of a Zircaloy cladding tube. These modified tubes were tested in an internally heated vertical annulus with a heated length of 326 mm and an inner and outer diameter of 9.5 and 18 mm. The experiments were performed with mass fluxes of 250 and 400 kg/(m 2 s), outlet pressures between 120 and 300 kPa, and constant inlet subcooling enthalpy of 167 kJ/kg. Only a small influence of modified surface structures on critical heat flux was observed for the pressure of 120 kPa in the present test section geometry. However, with increasing pressure the critical heat flux could increase up to 29% using the surface structured tubes with micro-channels, porous and oxidized layers. Capillary effects and increased nucleation site density are assumed to improve the critical heat flux performance. (authors)

  8. Effects of Surface Modification of Nanodiamond Particles for Nucleation Enhancement during Its Film Growth by Microwave Plasma Jet Chemical Vapour Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chii-Ruey Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The seedings of the substrate with a suspension of nanodiamond particles (NDPs were widely used as nucleation seeds to enhance the growth of nanostructured diamond films. The formation of agglomerates in the suspension of NDPs, however, may have adverse impact on the initial growth period. Therefore, this paper was aimed at the surface modification of the NDPs to enhance the diamond nucleation for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond films which could be used in photovoltaic applications. Hydrogen plasma, thermal, and surfactant treatment techniques were employed to improve the dispersion characteristics of detonation nanodiamond particles in aqueous media. The seeding of silicon substrate was then carried out with an optimized spin-coating method. The results of both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated that plasma treated diamond nanoparticles possessed polar surface functional groups and attained high dispersion in methanol. The nanocrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma jet chemical vapour deposition exhibited extremely fine grain and high smooth surfaces (~6.4 nm rms on the whole film. These results indeed open up a prospect of nanocrystalline diamond films in solar cell applications.

  9. Dynamics of homogeneous nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The classical nucleation theory for homogeneous nucleation is formulated as a theory for a density fluctuation in a supersaturated gas at a given temperature. But molecular dynamics simulations reveal that it is small cold clusters which initiates the nucleation. The temperature in the nucleating...

  10. Effect of surface modification of nanofibres with glutamic acid peptide on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ozan; Kumar, Ankur; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Cui, Tong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-01

    Biomineralization is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with amino acid sequences rich in glutamic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate deposition on aligned nanofibres surface-modified with a glutamic acid peptide on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells. Blend of EEGGC peptide (GLU) conjugated low molecular weight polylactide (PLA) and high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was electrospun to form aligned nanofibres (GLU-NF). The GLU-NF microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid for nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibre surface. To achieve a high calcium phosphate to fibre ratio, a layer-by-layer approach was used to improve diffusion of calcium and phosphate ions inside the microsheets. Based on dissipative particle dynamics simulation of PLGA/PLA-GLU fibres, > 80% of GLU peptide was localized to the fibre surface. Calcium phosphate to fibre ratios as high as 200%, between those of cancellous (160%) and cortical (310%) bone, was obtained with the layer-by-layer approach. The extent of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of marrow stromal cells seeded on GLU-NF microsheets was directly related to the amount of calcium phosphate deposition on the fibres prior to cell seeding. Expression of osteogenic markers osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and type 1 collagen increased gradually with calcium phosphate deposition on GLU-NF microsheets. Results demonstrate that surface modification of aligned synthetic nanofibres with EEGGC peptide dramatically affects nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibres leading to increased osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells and mineralization. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Summations over equilaterally triangulated surfaces and the critical string measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Dirk-Jan

    1992-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the summation over dynamically triangulated Riemann surfaces which does not rely on properties of the potential in a matrix model. Instead, we formulate a purely algebraic discretization of critical string path integral. This is combined with a technique which assigns to each equilateral triangulation of a two-dimensional surface a Riemann surface defined over a certain finite extension of the field of rational numbers, i.e. an arthmetic surface. Thus we establish a new formulation in which the sum over randomly triangulated surfaces defines an invariant measure on the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces. It is shown that because of this it is far from obvious that this measure for large genera approximates the measure defined by the continuum theory, i.e. Liouville theory or critical string theory. In low genus this subtlety does not exist. In the case of critical string theory we explicity compute the volume of the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces in terms of the modular height function and show that for low genus it approximates correctly the continuum measure. We also discuss a continuum limit which bears some resemblance with a double scaling limit in matrix models.

  12. Summations over equilaterally triangulated surfaces and the critical string measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, D.J.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1992-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the summation over dynamically triangulated Riemann surfaces which does not rely on properties of the potential in a matrix model. Instead, we formulate a purely algebraic discretization of critical string path integral. This is combined with a technique which assigns to each equilateral triangulation of a two-dimensional surface a Riemann surface defined over a certain finite extension of the field of rational numbers, i.e. an arithmetic surface. Thus we establish a new formulated in which the sum over randomly triangulated surfaces defines an invariant measure on the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces. It is shown that because of this it is far from obvious that this measure for large genera approximates the measure defined by the continuum theory, i.e. Liouville theory or critical string theory. In low genus this subtlety does not exist. In the case of critical string theory we explicitly compute the volume of the moduli space of arithmetic surfaces in terms of the modular height function and show that for low genus it approximates correctly the continuum measure. We also discuss a continuum limit which bears some resemblance with a double scaling limit in matrix models. (orig.)

  13. Crystal nucleation of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ran; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2011-01-21

    Using computer simulations, we investigate the homogeneous crystal nucleation in suspensions of colloidal hard dumbbells. The free energy barriers are determined by Monte Carlo simulations using the umbrella sampling technique. We calculate the nucleation rates for the plastic crystal and the aperiodic crystal phase using the kinetic prefactor as determined from event driven molecular dynamics simulations. We find good agreement with the nucleation rates determined from spontaneous nucleation events observed in event driven molecular dynamics simulations within error bars of one order of magnitude. We study the effect of aspect ratio of the dumbbells on the nucleation of plastic and aperiodic crystal phases, and we also determine the structure of the critical nuclei. Moreover, we find that the nucleation of the aligned close-packed crystal structure is strongly suppressed by a high free energy barrier at low supersaturations and slow dynamics at high supersaturations.

  14. Nucleation of relativistic first-order phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csernai, L.P.; Kapusta, J.I.

    1992-01-01

    The authors apply the general formalism of Langer to compute the nucleation rate for systems of relativistic particles with zero or small baryon number density and which undergo first-order phase transitions. In particular, the pre-exponential factor is computed and it is proportional to the viscosity. The initial growth rate of a critical size bubble or droplet is limited by the ability of dissipative processes to transport latent heat away from the surface. 30 refs., 4 figs

  15. Evaluation of onset of nucleate boiling models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, LiDong [Heat Transfer Research, Inc., College Station, TX (United States)], e-mail: lh@htri.net

    2009-07-01

    This article discusses available models and correlations for predicting the required heat flux or wall superheat for the Onset of Nucleate Boiling (ONB) on plain surfaces. It reviews ONB data in the open literature and discusses the continuing efforts of Heat Transfer Research, Inc. in this area. Our ONB database contains ten individual sources for ten test fluids and a wide range of operating conditions for different geometries, e.g., tube side and shell side flow boiling and falling film evaporation. The article also evaluates literature models and correlations based on the data: no single model in the open literature predicts all data well. The prediction uncertainty is especially higher in vacuum conditions. Surface roughness is another critical criterion in determining which model should be used. However, most models do not directly account for surface roughness, and most investigators do not provide surface roughness information in their published findings. Additional experimental research is needed to improve confidence in predicting the required wall superheats for nucleation boiling for engineering design purposes. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic and Dynamic Aspects of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2018-01-01

    It is known that ice nucleating particles (INP) immersed within supercooled droplets promote the formation of ice. Common theoretical models used to represent this process assume that the immersed particle lowers the work of ice nucleation without significantly affecting the dynamics of water in the vicinity of the particle. This is contrary to evidence showing that immersed surfaces significantly affect the viscosity and diffusivity of vicinal water. To study how this may affect ice formation this work introduces a model linking the ice nucleation rate to the modification of the dynamics and thermodynamics of vicinal water by immersed particles. It is shown that INP that significantly reduce the work of ice nucleation also pose strong limitations to the growth of the nascent ice germs. This leads to the onset of a new ice nucleation regime, called spinodal ice nucleation, where the dynamics of ice germ growth instead of the ice germ size determines the nucleation rate. Nucleation in this regime is characterized by an enhanced sensitivity to particle area and cooling rate. Comparison of the predicted ice nucleation rate against experimental measurements for a diverse set of species relevant to cloud formation suggests that spinodal ice nucleation may be common in nature.

  17. Nucleation in Sheared Granular Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Radin, Charles; Swinney, Harry L.; Schröter, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    We present an experiment on crystallization of packings of macroscopic granular spheres. This system is often considered to be a model for thermally driven atomic or colloidal systems. Cyclically shearing a packing of frictional spheres, we observe a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed fcc and hcp symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition, initiated by homogeneous nucleation, overcomes a barrier at 64.5% volume fraction. Nucleation consists predominantly of the dissolving of small nuclei and the growth of nuclei that have reached a critical size of about ten spheres.

  18. Nucleation in Sheared Granular Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietz, Frank; Radin, Charles; Swinney, Harry L; Schröter, Matthias

    2018-02-02

    We present an experiment on crystallization of packings of macroscopic granular spheres. This system is often considered to be a model for thermally driven atomic or colloidal systems. Cyclically shearing a packing of frictional spheres, we observe a first order phase transition from a disordered to an ordered state. The ordered state consists of crystallites of mixed fcc and hcp symmetry that coexist with the amorphous bulk. The transition, initiated by homogeneous nucleation, overcomes a barrier at 64.5% volume fraction. Nucleation consists predominantly of the dissolving of small nuclei and the growth of nuclei that have reached a critical size of about ten spheres.

  19. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun; Song, Yanlin

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J 0 and Γ, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J 0 and Γ, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces

  20. Critical assessment of Pt surface energy - An atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Seol, Donghyuk; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2018-04-01

    Despite the fact that surface energy is a fundamental quantity in understanding surface structure of nanoparticle, the results of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for the surface energy of pure Pt show a wide range of scattering. It is necessary to further ensure the surface energy of Pt to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration in Pt bimetallic nanoparticles accurately. In this article, we critically assess and optimize the Pt surface energy using a semi-empirical atomistic approach based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential. That is, the interatomic potential of pure Pt was adjusted in a way that the surface segregation tendency in a wide range of Pt binary alloys is reproduced in accordance with experimental information. The final optimized Pt surface energy (mJ/m2) is 2036 for (100) surface, 2106 for (110) surface, and 1502 for (111) surface. The potential can be utilized to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration of Pt bimetallic nanoparticles more accurately.

  1. Earth's inner core nucleation paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Van Orman, James A.; Hauck, Steven A.; Willard, Matthew A.

    2018-04-01

    The conventional view of Earth's inner core is that it began to crystallize at Earth's center when the temperature dropped below the melting point of the iron alloy and has grown steadily since that time as the core continued to cool. However, this model neglects the energy barrier to the formation of the first stable crystal nucleus, which is commonly represented in terms of the critical supercooling required to overcome the barrier. Using constraints from experiments, simulations, and theory, we show that spontaneous crystallization in a homogeneous liquid iron alloy at Earth's core pressures requires a critical supercooling of order 1000 K, which is too large to be a plausible mechanism for the origin of Earth's inner core. We consider mechanisms that can lower the nucleation barrier substantially. Each has caveats, yet the inner core exists: this is the nucleation paradox. Heterogeneous nucleation on a solid metallic substrate tends to have a low energy barrier and offers the most straightforward solution to the paradox, but solid metal would probably have to be delivered from the mantle and such events are unlikely to have been common. A delay in nucleation, whether due to a substantial nucleation energy barrier, or late introduction of a low energy substrate, would lead to an initial phase of rapid inner core growth from a supercooled state. Such rapid growth may lead to distinctive crystallization texturing that might be observable seismically. It would also generate a spike in chemical and thermal buoyancy that could affect the geomagnetic field significantly. Solid metal introduced to Earth's center before it reached saturation could also provide a nucleation substrate, if large enough to escape complete dissolution. Inner core growth, in this case, could begin earlier and start more slowly than standard thermal models predict.

  2. Boiling nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, R.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results of flash evaporation of a pool of water subjected to sudden pressure drop are reported. The experiments were conducted with pure water at equilibrium temperatures between 40 to 80 0 C and with superheat in the range of about 3 to 5 0 C. Two distinct exponential decaying processes were identified for flash evaporation and the flashing time was found to decrease with an increase of equilibrium temperature and with the decrease of superheat. Basic experiments on flash evaporation of distilled water were conducted. However, the results may not be quantitatively applicable to seawater flash evaporators as the presence of salts in the seawater will considerably change the surface tension and in turn affect the nonequilibrium fraction

  3. Influence of the nucleation surface inclination on heat transfers and on the growth dynamics of a steam bubble; Influence de l'inclinaison de la surface de nucleation sur les transferts de chaleur et la dynamique de croissance d'une bulle de vapeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthes, M.; Reynard, Ch.; Santini, R.; Tadrist, L. [Institut Universitaire des Systemes Thermiques Industriels - CNRS UMR 6595, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    The influence of the inclination of the nucleation surface on heat and mass transfers and on the growth dynamics of a single steam bubble is experimentally studied. The bubble is created beneath a wall with an imposed heating flux. The evolution of geometrical bubble parameters and of the frequency of emission with respect to the inclination angle are presented. The total heat flux measurements are compared to the evaporation fluxes determined by image processing. Contrary to the evaporation flux, the total flux is conditioned by the inclination and thus is correlated to the frequency of bubbles emission. (J.S.)

  4. Free energy of cluster formation and a new scaling relation for the nucleation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Recent very large molecular dynamics simulations of homogeneous nucleation with (1 − 8) × 10 9 Lennard-Jones atoms [J. Diemand, R. Angélil, K. K. Tanaka, and H. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] allow us to accurately determine the formation free energy of clusters over a wide range of cluster sizes. This is now possible because such large simulations allow for very precise measurements of the cluster size distribution in the steady state nucleation regime. The peaks of the free energy curves give critical cluster sizes, which agree well with independent estimates based on the nucleation theorem. Using these results, we derive an analytical formula and a new scaling relation for nucleation rates: ln J ′ /η is scaled by ln S/η, where the supersaturation ratio is S, η is the dimensionless surface energy, and J ′ is a dimensionless nucleation rate. This relation can be derived using the free energy of cluster formation at equilibrium which corresponds to the surface energy required to form the vapor-liquid interface. At low temperatures (below the triple point), we find that the surface energy divided by that of the classical nucleation theory does not depend on temperature, which leads to the scaling relation and implies a constant, positive Tolman length equal to half of the mean inter-particle separation in the liquid phase

  5. Nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Navarro, Jesús; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have constructed a density functional (DF) for parahydrogen between 14 and 32 K. ► The experimental equation of state and the surface tension are well reproduced. ► We have investigated nucleation and cavitations processes in the metastable phase. ► We have obtained the electron bubble explosion within the capillary model. - Abstract: We have used a density functional approach to investigate thermal homogeneous nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen. The effect of electrons as seeds of heterogeneous cavitation in liquid parahydrogen is also discussed within the capillary model.

  6. Nucleation of two-dimensional islands on Si (111) during high-temperature epitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitnikov, S. V., E-mail: sitnikov@isp.nsc.ru; Kosolobov, S. S.; Latyshev, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The process of two-dimensional island nucleation at the surface of ultra large Si (111) during hightemperature epitaxial growth is studied by in situ ultrahigh-vacuum reflection electron microscopy. The critical terrace size D{sub crit}, at which a two-dimensional island is nucleated in the center, is measured in the temperature range 900–1180°C at different silicon fluxes onto the surface. It is found that the parameter D{sub crit}{sup 2} is a power function of the frequency of island nucleation, with the exponent χ = 0.9 ± 0.05 in the entire temperature range under study. It is established that the kinetics of nucleus formation is defined by the diffusion of adsorbed silicon atoms at temperatures of up to 1180°C and the minimum critical nucleus size corresponds to 12 silicon atoms.

  7. Functional display of triphenylmethane reductase for dye removal on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal domain of ice nucleation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fen; Ding, Haitao; Feng, Zhuo; Liu, Danfeng; Zhao, Yuhua

    2014-10-01

    Traditional biological treatment for triphenylmethane dye effluent is stuck with the inaccessibility of dye molecules to intracellular dye-degrading enzyme, thus a high-efficiency and low-cost method for dye decolorization is highly desirable. Here we established a bioremediation approach to display triphenylmethane reductase (TMR) on the surface of Escherichia coli (E. coli) using N-terminal of ice nucleation protein as anchoring motif for triphenylmethane dye decolorization for the first time. Approximately 85% of recombinant protein positioning on the surface of E. coil cells exhibited high activity and stability. The optimal temperature and pH of the surface-displayed TMR are 50 °C and 8.5, respectively. Comparing with other reported microorganisms, the decolorization rate for malachite green of this engineered strain is the highest so far, reaching 640 μmol min(-1) g(-1) dry weight cells. These results indicate that this engineered E. coli strain is a very promising candidate for synthetic dye removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced pool boiling critical heat flux induced by capillary wicking effect of a Cr-sputtered superhydrophilic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hong Hyun; Seo, Gwang Hyeok; Kim, Sung Joong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In light of boiling heat transfer, the smooth surface potentially reduces active nucleation of bubbles and rewetting of dry spots near the critical heat flux (CHF). This kind of process is highly likely to deteriorate the CHF. Thus, it is essential to produce appropriate microstructures on the surface for the enhancement of the CHF. In this study, to investigate the microstructural effect of thin film-fabricated surfaces on the pool boiling CHF, we controlled the surface roughness in a narrow range of 0.1-0.25 μm and its morphologies, in the form of micro-scratches using PVD sputtering technique. Specifically for DC magnetron sputtering, pure chromium (Cr) was selected as a target material owing to its high oxidation resistance. In order to analyze the CHF trend with changes in roughness, we introduced existing capillary wicking-based models because superhydrophilic characteristics of microstructures are highly related to the capillary wicking behaviors in micro-flow channels. After Cr sputtering under given conditions, the Cr-sputtered surfaces showed superhydrophilic characteristics and its capability became more enhanced with an increase of surface roughness. Judging from spreading behavior of a liquid droplet, the presence of micro-wicking channels, coupled with Cr nanostructures, effectively enhanced the advancing rate of drop base diameter. The CHF exhibited an increasing trend with increasing surface roughness. However, the enhancement ratio agreed poorly with the predictions of the roughness factor-based models, all of which originated from a conventional static force balance.

  9. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  10. Critical bifurcation surfaces of 3D discrete dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sonis

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analytical representation of bifurcations of each 3D discrete dynamics depending on the set of bifurcation parameters. The procedure of bifurcation analysis proposed in this paper represents the 3D elaboration and specification of the general algorithm of the n-dimensional linear bifurcation analysis proposed by the author earlier. It is proven that 3D domain of asymptotic stability (attraction of the fixed point for a given 3D discrete dynamics is bounded by three critical bifurcation surfaces: the divergence, flip and flutter surfaces. The analytical construction of these surfaces is achieved with the help of classical Routh–Hurvitz conditions of asymptotic stability. As an application the adjustment process proposed by T. Puu for the Cournot oligopoly model is considered in detail.

  11. Competitive heterogeneous nucleation onto a microscopic impurity in a Potts model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuquo, Cletus C.; McArthur, Danielle; Bowles, Richard K.

    2016-08-01

    Many metastable systems can nucleate to multiple competing stable or intermediate metastable states. In this work, a Potts model, subject to external fields, is used to study the competitive nucleation of two phases attempting to grow on a microscopic impurity. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the free energy surfaces for the system under different conditions, where the relative stability of the phases is adjusted by changing the interaction parameters, and the nucleation rates obtained using multicomponent transition state theory (TST) are compared with the rates measured using the survival probability method. We find that the two methods predict similar nucleation rates when the free energy barrier used in the transition state theory is defined as the work required to form a critical embryo from the metastable phase. An analysis of the free energy surfaces also reveals that the competition between the nucleating phases leads to an effective drying of the impurity which slows down the nucleation rate compared to the single phase case.

  12. Geometrical critical phenomena on a random surface of arbitrary genus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplantier, B.; Kostov, I.K.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of self-avoiding walks (SAW) or of the O(n)-loop model on a two-dimensional random surface are shown to be exactly solvable. The partition functions of SAW and surface configurations (possibly in the presence of vacuum loops) are calculated by planar diagram enumeration techniques. Two critical regimes are found: a dense phase where the infinite walks and loops fill the infinite surface, the non-filled part staying finite, and a dilute phase where the infinite surface singularity on the one hand, and walk and loop singularities on the other, merge together. The configuration critical exponents of self-avoiding networks of any fixed topology G, on a surface with arbitrary genus H, are calculated as universal functions of G and H. For self-avoiding walks, the exponents are built from an infinite set of basic conformal dimensions associated with central charges c = -2 (dense phase) and c = 0 (dilute phase). The conformal spectrum Δ L , L ≥ 1 associated with L-leg star polymers is calculated exactly, for c = -2 and c = 0. This is generalized to the set of L-line 'watermelon' exponents Δ L of the O(n) model on a random surface. The divergences of the partition functions of self-avoiding networks on the random surface, possibly in the presence of vacuum loops, are shown to satisfy a factorization theorem over the vertices of the network. This provides a proof, in the presence of a fluctuating metric, of a result conjectured earlier in the standard plane. From this, the value of the string susceptibility γ str (H,c) is extracted for a random surface of arbitrary genus H, bearing a field theory of central charge c, or equivalently, embedded in d=c dimensions. Lastly, by enumerating spanning trees on a random lattice, we solve the similar problem of hamiltonian walks on the (fluctuating) Manhattan covering lattice. We also obtain new results for dilute trees on a random surface. (orig./HSI)

  13. Modified Critical State Two-Surface Plasticity Model for Sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kris Wessel; Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Shajarati, Amir

    This article describes the outline of a numerical integration scheme for a critical state two-surface plasticity model for sands. The model is slightly modified by LeBlanc (2008) compared to the original formulation presented by Manzari and Dafalias (1997) and has the ability to correctly model...... the stress-strain response of sands. The model is versatile and can be used to simulate drained and undrained conditions, due to the fact that the model can efficiently calculate change in void ratio as well as pore pressure. The objective of the constitutive model is to investigate if the numerical...

  14. Principles of nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, C.F.; Wood, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The nucleation of small stable species is described in the problem of void growth by discrete rate equations. When gas is being produced the problem reduces to one of calculating the incubation dose for the gas bubble to void transition. A general expression for the steady state nucleation rate is derived for the case when voids are formed by vacancy fluctuations which enable an effective nucleation barrier to be crossed. (author)

  15. Nucleation controlled surface oxidation epitaxy of thermally grown NiO on (0 0 1) Ni for coated conductor applications assisted by Mo or Mn microalloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kursumovic, A.; Huehne, R.; Tomov, R.; Holzapfel, B.; Glowacki, B.A.; Evetts, J.E

    2004-06-15

    High temperature oxidation of cube textured (1 0 0)Ni and (1 0 0)Ni-0.1wt%(Mo or Mn) was carried out in a wide temperature regime between 900 and 1400 deg. C in air. Special attention was paid to avoid pre-oxidation at lower temperatures, thus favouring nucleation controlled surface oxidation epitaxy (SOE) as opposed to SOE achieved by competitive grain growth. Consequently, cube textured epitaxial NiO layers, under 1 {mu}m in thickness, have been grown on pure Ni in a much wider working window than previously published. Furthermore, thin cube textured NiO layers have been grown on Ni-0.1%Mo tape in a still wider working window of {approx}200 deg. C between 1150 and 1350 deg. C. Preliminary results on Ni-0.1wt%Mn show a similar trend. An in-plane orientation of <5 deg. and out of plane orientation approaching 2 deg. was obtained. Single crystal like transparent NiO films were grown under optimal conditions.

  16. RHEED studies of the nucleation, growth, and mobility of Ag atoms on the Si(111)7 x 7 surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Kelly Ryan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The low temperature and flux dependent growth of ultrathin Ag films on the Si(111)7x7 surface is studied with Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED). The grazing incidence geometry of RHEED allows for an incident molecular beam normal to the surface, and makes it an ideal surface probe for studying ultrathin film growth in real time. Short-lived oscillations in the diffracted intensity are observed during Ag deposition at 150 K, indicating quasi-layer-by-layer growth mediated by adatom mobility. When the 150 K growth is performed over a wide range of deposition rates F, the peak intensity is observed to scale, i.e. I(Ft) depends only on the total amount deposited, which implies thermally activated diffusion is absent at 150 K. Scaling is not obeyed at higher temperatures (T≥473 K) for the growth of the √3x√3 R30° (√3) superstructure. Testing for scaling of the diffracted intensity constitutes a new experimental method which can be applied generally to determine if thermal diffusion is active at a particular temperature. Scaling is consistent with a constant diffusion length R0, independent of substrate temperature and deposition rate. The presence of a non-thermal diffusion mechanism (responsible for the constant diffusion length R0) is confirmed by monitoring the flux dependence of the √3 superstructure growth during deposition at T≥473 K. At these temperatures the total diffusion length R is given by R=R0+(4Dt)1/2, where (4Dt)1/2 is the thermal component. A non-zero intercept R0 is found by plotting the peak intensity Ip1/2 (a measure of the average domain size) vs. deposition rate F-1/2 (F-1 is proportional to the available diffusion time.) From the FWHM of a low coverage (0.2 ML) √3 spot, an estimation of 50 Å is made for a lower bound of the magnitude of R0.

  17. RHEED studies of the nucleation, growth, and mobility of Ag atoms on the Si(111)7 x 7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, K.R.

    1993-07-01

    The low temperature and flux dependent growth of ultrathin Ag films on the Si(111)7x7 surface is studied with Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction (RHEED). The grazing incidence geometry of RHEED allows for an incident molecular beam normal to the surface, and makes it an ideal surface probe for studying ultrathin film growth in real time. Short-lived oscillations in the diffracted intensity are observed during Ag deposition at 150 K, indicating quasi-layer-by-layer growth mediated by adatom mobility. When the 150 K growth is performed over a wide range of deposition rates F, the peak intensity is observed to scale, i.e. I(Ft) depends only on the total amount deposited, which implies thermally activated diffusion is absent at 150 K. Scaling is not obeyed at higher temperatures (T≥473 K) for the growth of the √3x√3 R30 degrees (√3) superstructure. Testing for scaling of the diffracted intensity constitutes a new experimental method which can be applied generally to determine if thermal diffusion is active at a particular temperature. Scaling is consistent with a constant diffusion length R 0 , independent of substrate temperature and deposition rate. The presence of a non-thermal diffusion mechanism (responsible for the constant diffusion length R 0 ) is confirmed by monitoring the flux dependence of the √3 superstructure growth during deposition at T≥473 K. At these temperatures the total diffusion length R is given by R=R 0 +(4Dt) 1/2 , where (4Dt) 1/2 is the thermal component. A non-zero intercept R 0 is found by plotting the peak intensity I p 1/2 (a measure of the average domain size) vs. deposition rate F -1/2 (F -1 is proportional to the available diffusion time.) From the FWHM of a low coverage (0.2 ML) √3 spot, an estimation of 50 angstrom is made for a lower bound of the magnitude of R 0

  18. Chlorine-containing salts as water ice nucleating particles on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Materese, D. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Clapham, M. E.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Water ice cloud formation on Mars largely is expected to occur on the most efficient ice nucleating particle available. Salts have been observed on the Martian surface and have been known to facilitate water cloud formation on Earth. We examined heterogeneous ice nucleation onto sodium chloride and sodium perchlorate substrates under Martian atmospheric conditions, in the range of 150 to 180 K and 10-7 to 10-5 Torr water partial pressure. Sub-155 K data for the critical saturation ratio (Scrit) suggests an exponential model best describes the temperature-dependence of nucleation onset of water ice for all substrates tested. While sodium chloride does not facilitate water ice nucleation more easily than bare silicon, sodium perchlorate does support depositional nucleation at lower saturation levels than other substrates shown and is comparable to smectite-rich clay in its ability to support cloud initiation. Perchlorates could nucleate water ice at partial pressures up to 40% lower than other substrates examined to date under Martian atmospheric conditions. These findings suggest air masses on Mars containing uplifted salts such as perchlorates could form water ice clouds at lower saturation ratios than in air masses absent similar particles.

  19. Synthetic Hemozoin (β-Hematin) Crystals Nucleate at the Surface of Neutral Lipid Droplets that Control Their Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambele, Melvin A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Cummings, Franscious R.; Smith, Peter J.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Emulsions of monopalmitoylglycerol (MPG) and of a neutral lipid blend (NLB), consisting of MPG, monostearoylglycerol, dipalmitoylglycerol, dioleoylglycerol and dilineoylglycerol (4:2:1:1:1), the composition associated with hemozoin from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, have been used to mediate the formation of β-hematin microcrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and electron spectroscopic imaging/electron energy loss spectroscopy (ESI/EELS) have been used to characterize both the lipid emulsion and β-hematin crystals. The latter have been compared with β-hematin formed at a pentanol/aqueous interface and with hemozoin both within P. falciparum parasites and extracted from the parasites. When lipid and ferriprotoporphyrin IX solutions in 1:9 v/v acetone/methanol were thoroughly pre-mixed either using an extruder or ultrasound, β-hematin crystals were found formed in intimate association with the lipid droplets. These crystals resembled hemozoin crystals, with prominent {100} faces. Lattice fringes in TEM indicated that these faces made contact with the lipid surface. The average length of these crystals was 0.62 times the average diameter of NLB droplets and their size distributions were statistically equivalent after 10 min incubation, suggesting that the lipid droplets also controlled the sizes of the crystals. This most closely resembles hemozoin formation in the helminth worm Schistosoma mansoni, while in P. falciparum, crystal formation appears to be associated with the much more gently curved digestive vacuole membrane which apparently leads to formation of much larger hemozoin crystals, similar to those formed at the flat pentanol-water interface. PMID:24244110

  20. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-01

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  1. An improved model for nucleation-limited ice formation in living cells during freezing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingru Yi

    Full Text Available Ice formation in living cells is a lethal event during freezing and its characterization is important to the development of optimal protocols for not only cryopreservation but also cryotherapy applications. Although the model for probability of ice formation (PIF in cells developed by Toner et al. has been widely used to predict nucleation-limited intracellular ice formation (IIF, our data of freezing Hela cells suggest that this model could give misleading prediction of PIF when the maximum PIF in cells during freezing is less than 1 (PIF ranges from 0 to 1. We introduce a new model to overcome this problem by incorporating a critical cell volume to modify the Toner's original model. We further reveal that this critical cell volume is dependent on the mechanisms of ice nucleation in cells during freezing, i.e., surface-catalyzed nucleation (SCN and volume-catalyzed nucleation (VCN. Taken together, the improved PIF model may be valuable for better understanding of the mechanisms of ice nucleation in cells during freezing and more accurate prediction of PIF for cryopreservation and cryotherapy applications.

  2. Quantifying the spatial variability in critical zone architecture through surface mapping and near-surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, R.; Del Vecchio, J.; Mount, G.; Hayes, J. L.; Comas, X.; Guo, L.; Lin, H.; Zarif, F.; Forsythe, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The composition and structure of Earth's surface and shallow subsurface control the flux of water, solutes, and sediment from hillslopes into rivers. Additionally, bedrock weathering profiles and the stratigraphy of soil and colluvium preserve a record of past surface processes. However, landscapes often exhibit heterogeneity in critical zone architecture that is difficult to capture with remote sensing and costly to characterize through direct measurement in soil pits or drill cores. Here we present results from a multifaceted approach to quantifying spatial variability in critical zone architecture using airborne lidar topography, surface mapping, and a suite of geophysical surveys. We focus on Garner Run, a first order sandstone catchment in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory situated in the valley and ridge province of central Pennsylvania, 80 km southwest of the last glacial maximum ice limit. Results from lidar topographic analysis and detailed mapping of surface cover (e.g., soil versus boulder-mantled) reveal a pattern of relict periglacial landforms and deposits that vary depending on slope position and aspect. Additionally, a drill core taken from an unchanneled valley at the head of Garner Run indicates at least 9 meters of alternating sand- and boulder-rich colluvial fill sourced from adjacent hillslopes, indicating the potential preservation of multiple cycles of periglacial climate conditions. Through the use of shallow geophysical techniques, including cross-valley transects of seismic refraction, multiple frequency ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), we image spatial patterns in subsurface architecture at a range of scales (10-1,000 m), and high spatial resolution (cm). Notably, despite challenging environmental conditions, there is agreement among diverse subsurface methods in highlighting aspect-dependent controls on weathering zone thickness that furthermore can be directly connected to

  3. Experimental investigation of time and repeated cycles in nucleate pool boiling of alumina/water nanofluid on polished and machined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabzadeh Dareh, F.; Haghshenasfard, M.; Nasr Esfahany, M.; Salimi Jazi, H.

    2017-12-01

    Pool boiling heat transfer of pure water and nanofluids on a copper block has been studied experimentally. Nanofluids with various concentrations of 0.0025, 0.005 and 0.01 vol.% are employed and two simple surfaces (polished and machined copper surface) are used as the heating surfaces. The results indicated that the critical heat flux (CHF) in boiling of fluids on the polished surface is 7% higher than CHF on the machined surface. In the case of machined surface, the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of 0.01 vol.% nanofluid is about 37% higher than HTC of base fluid, while in the polished surface the average HTC of 0.01% nanofluid is about 19% lower than HTC of the pure water. The results also showed that the boiling time and boiling cycles on the polished surface changes the heat transfer performance. By increasing the boiling time from 5 to 10 min, the roughness enhances about 150%, but by increasing the boiling time to 15 min, the roughness enhancement is only 8%.

  4. Toward the Synthesis of Sub-15 nm Ag Nanocubes with Sharp Corners and Edges: The Roles of Heterogeneous Nucleation and Surface Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Xia, Younan

    2016-03-09

    We report a polyol method for the facile synthesis of Ag nanocubes having sharp corners and edges, together with edge lengths below 15 nm. The rapid nucleation of Ag atoms was facilitated through the addition of a trace amount of SH(-) to generate Ag2S clusters while the corners and edges of the nanocubes were sharpened through the introduction of Br(-) as a regulator of the growth kinetics and a capping agent for the Ag(100) surface. Because of their much smaller size relative to the more commonly used capping agent based on poly(vinylpyrrolidone), Br(-) ions are more effective in passivating the {100} facets on very small Ag nanocubes. The mechanistic roles of these additives, along with the effects of their interactions with other species present in the reaction solution, were all systematically investigated. The concentration of SH(-) was found to be a particularly effective parameter for tuning the edge length of the nanocubes. As a result of the understanding gained during the course of this study, Ag nanocubes with uniform edge lengths controllable in the range of 13-23 nm could be reliably produced. The nanocubes of 13.4 ± 0.4 nm in edge length constitute the smallest nanocrystals of this kind reported to date; they also possess sharper corners and edges relative to the limited examples of sub-20 nm Ag nanocubes reported in the literature. The availability of such small and sharp Ag nanocubes will open the door to an array of applications in plasmonics, catalysis, and biomedicine.

  5. Diffusion of two-dimensional epitaxial clusters on metal (100) surfaces: Facile versus nucleation-mediated behavior and their merging for larger sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, King C.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2017-01-01

    For diffusion of two-dimensional homoepitaxial clusters of N atoms on metal(100) surfaces mediated by edge atom hopping, macroscale continuum theory suggests that the diffusion coefficient scales like DN ~ N -β with β = 3/2. However, we find quite different and diverse behavior in multiple size regimes. These include: (i) facile diffusion for small sizes N < 9; (ii) slow nucleation-mediated diffusion with small β < 1 for “perfect” sizes N = N p = L 2 or L(L+1), for L = 3, 4,… having unique ground state shapes, for moderate sizes 9 ≤ N ≤ O(10 2 ); the same also applies for N = N p +3, N p + 4,… (iii) facile diffusion but with large β > 2 for N = Np + 1 and N p + 2 also for moderate sizes 9 ≤ N ≤ O(10 2 ); (iv) merging of the above distinct branches and subsequent anomalous scaling with 1 ≲ β < 3/2, reflecting the quasi-facetted structure of clusters, for larger N = O(10 2 ) to N = O(10 3 ); and (v) classic scaling with β = 3/2 for very large N = O(103) and above. The specified size ranges apply for typical model parameters. We focus on the moderate size regime where show that diffusivity cycles quasi-periodically from the slowest branch for N p + 3 (not Np) to the fastest branch for Np + 1. Behavior is quantified by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of an appropriate stochastic lattice-gas model. However, precise analysis must account for a strong enhancement of diffusivity for short time increments due to back-correlation in the cluster motion. Further understanding of this enhancement, of anomalous size scaling behavior, and of the merging of various branches, is facilitated by combinatorial analysis of the number of the ground state and low-lying excited state cluster configurations, and also of kink populations.

  6. Near Surface Seismic Reflection Imaging: Great Potential Under Critical Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. D.; Peterie, S.; Judy, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic-reflection imaging has long been a mainstay in the oil and gas exploration community with mind boggling advancements in just the last decade, but its application to engineering, environmental, and groundwater problems has not seen the same level of utilization. A great deal of the problem lies in the many assumptions that are valid for deep exploration that are violated in the very complex near surface. Large channel systems with acquisition geometries conducive for both deep and shallow targets are many times assumed to be capable of extending the imaging depth window. In reality, constraints of the source and sensor/recording systems must be considered, where large powerful sources are needed to image exploration depths while low-energy, high-frequency sources are required for the shallow and thin targets in the near surface. Attempts to make one size fit all will result in artifacts that result in bogus images and characterizations in the shallow subsurface.Narrow optimum offsets, highly attenuative materials, extreme velocity variability, wavefield interference, and low signal-to-noise ratios provide an ideal breeding ground for the generation of artifacts on near-surface seismic-reflection data. With the cost of shallow reflection data being so high relative to other geophysical methods and invasive sampling, sometimes a single failure can hinder the growth in the use of the method. The method is extremely powerful and has the potential to provide vast quantities of information critical to understand the distributed hydrogeological and biogeochemical processes that elude borehole investigations. It is imperative that data be acquired in its rawest possible form and be processed with an eye to each operation. Cost savings sometimes result in one-size-fits-all acquisition and automated processing flows. Attention to detail and following signal from origination to characterization is essential.

  7. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: bridging stochastic and singular freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized model that bridges these stochastic and singular descriptions of heterogeneous ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. We suggest that ice nucleation is fundamentally a stochastic process but that for realistic atmospheric particle populations this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties. Full evaluation of the model will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  8. Dumbbells and onions in ternary nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellas, Ricky B; Chen, Bin; Siepmann, J Ilja

    2007-06-14

    Molecular simulations for a ternary nucleation system (water/n-nonane/1-butanol) demonstrate a more complex nucleation mechanism than previously thought, where critical nuclei with different compositions are present even for a given vapour-phase composition; the spatial distribution in these critical nuclei is heterogeneous and dumbbell and onion motifs are found; in the former, water and nonane nano-droplets are connected through a butanol handle, while in the latter a water core is surrounded by a nonane corona with an interfacial butanol shell.

  9. Quantitative in Situ SEM High Cycle Fatigue: The Critical Role of Oxygen on Nanoscale-Void-Controlled Nucleation and Propagation of Small Cracks in Ni Microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Alejandro; Gupta, Saurabh; Castelluccio, Gustavo M; Pierron, Olivier N

    2018-03-07

    This Letter presents a quantitative in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) nanoscale high and very high cycle fatigue (HCF/VHCF) investigation of Ni microbeams under bending, using a MEMS microresonator as an integrated testing machine. The novel technique highlights ultraslow fatigue crack growth (average values down to ∼10 -14 m/cycle) that has heretofore not been reported and that indicates a discontinuous process; it also reveals strong environmental effects on fatigue lives that are 3 orders of magnitude longer in a vacuum than in air. This ultraslow fatigue regime does not follow the well documented fatigue mechanisms that rely on the common crack tip stress intensification, mediated by dislocation emission and associated with much larger crack growth rates. Instead, our study reveals fatigue nucleation and propagation mechanisms that mainly result from room temperature void formation based on vacancy condensation processes that are strongly affected by oxygen. This study therefore shows significant size effects governing the bending high/very high cycle fatigue behavior of metals at the micro- and nanoscales, whereby the stress concentration effect at the tip of a growing small fatigue crack is assumed to be greatly reduced by the effect of the bending-induced extreme stress gradients, which prevents any significant cyclic crack tip opening displacement. In this scenario, ultraslow processes relying on vacancy formation at the subsurface or in the vicinity of a crack tip and subsequent condensation into voids become the dominant fatigue mechanisms.

  10. Critical heat flux variations on CANDU calandria tube surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdadi, A.; Luxat, J.C., E-mail: behdada@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: luxatj@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Engineering Physics Dept., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Heavy water moderator surrounding each fuel channel is one of the important safety features in CANDU reactors since it provides an in-situ passive heat sink for the fuel in situations where other engineered means of heat removal from fuel channels have failed. In a critical break LOCA scenario, fuel cooling becomes severely degraded due to rapid flow reduction in the affected flow pass of the heat transport system. This can result in pressure tubes experiencing significant heat-up during early stages of the accident when coolant pressure is still high, thereby causing uniform thermal creep strain (ballooning) of the pressure tube (PT) into contact with its calandria tube (CT). The contact of the hot PT with the CT causes rapid redistribution of stored heat from the PT to CT and a large heat flux spike from the CT to the moderator fluid. For conditions where subcooling of the moderator fluid is low, this heat flux spike can cause dryout of the CT. This can detrimentally affect channel integrity if the CT post-dryout temperature becomes sufficiently high to result in continued thermal creep strain deformation of both the PT and the CT. The focus of this work is to develop a mechanistic model to predict Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on the CT surface following a contact with its pressure tube. A mechanistic CHF model is applied based on a concept of wall dry patch formation, prevention of rewetting and subsequent dry patch spreading. Results have been compared to an empirical correlation and a good agreement has been obtained. The model has been used to predict the spatial variation of CHF over a cylinder with dimensions of CANDU CT. (author)

  11. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  12. Effects of surface and bulk transverse fields on critical behaviour of ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, A.; Lo Russo, S.; Mattei, G.

    2002-02-01

    The influence of surface and bulk transverse fields on the critical behaviour of a ferromagnetic Ising film is studied using the effective field theory based on a single-site cluster method. Surface exchange enhancement is considered and a critical value is obtained. The dependence of the critical uniform transverse field on film thickness, phase diagrams in the fields, critical surface transverse field versus the bulk one, and exchange coupling ratio are presented. (author)

  13. Homogeneous nucleation with magic numbers: aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshick, Steven L; Agarwal, Pulkit; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-10-07

    Homogeneous nucleation of clusters that exhibit magic numbers is studied numerically, using as an example aluminum at 2000 K, based on recent calculations of free energies [Li et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 16227 (2007)] and condensation rate constants [Li and Truhlar, J. Phys. Chem. C 112, 11109 (2008)] that provide a database for Al(i) up to i=60. The nucleation behavior for saturation ratios greater than about 4.5 is found to be dominated by a peak in the free energy change associated with the reaction iAl-->Al(i) at i=55, making it the critical size over a wide range of saturation ratios. Calculated steady-state nucleation rates are many orders of magnitude lower than predicted by classical nucleation theory (CNT). The onset of nucleation is predicted to occur at a saturation ratio of about 13.3, compared to about 5.1 in CNT, while for saturation ratios greater than about 25 the abundance of magic-numbered clusters becomes high enough to invalidate the assumption that cluster growth occurs solely by monomer addition. Transient nucleation is also predicted to be substantially different than predicted by CNT, with a much longer time required to reach steady state: about 10(-4) s at a saturation ratio of 20, compared to about 10(-7) s from CNT. Magic numbers are seen to play an important role in transient nucleation, as the nucleation currents for clusters of adjacent sizes become equal to each other in temporally successive groups, where the largest cluster in each group is the magic-numbered one.

  14. Predictions of homogeneous nucleation rates for n-alkanes accounting for the diffuse phase interface and capillary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planková, Barbora; Vinš, Václav; Hrubý, Jan

    2017-10-28

    Homogeneous droplet nucleation has been studied for almost a century but has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we used the density gradient theory (DGT) and considered the influence of capillary waves (CWs) on the predicted size-dependent surface tensions and nucleation rates for selected n-alkanes. The DGT model was completed by an equation of state (EoS) based on the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory and compared to the classical nucleation theory and the Peng-Robinson EoS. It was found that the critical clusters are practically free of CWs because they are so small that even the smallest wavelengths of CWs do not fit into their finite dimensions. The CWs contribute to the entropy of the system and thus decrease the surface tension. A correction for the effect of CWs on the surface tension is presented. The effect of the different EoSs is relatively small because by a fortuitous coincidence their predictions are similar in the relevant range of critical cluster sizes. The difference of the DGT predictions to the classical nucleation theory computations is important but not decisive. Of the effects investigated, the most pronounced is the suppression of CWs which causes a sizable decrease of the predicted nucleation rates. The major difference between experimental nucleation rate data and theoretical predictions remains in the temperature dependence. For normal alkanes, this discrepancy is much stronger than observed, e.g., for water. Theoretical corrections developed here have a minor influence on the temperature dependency. We provide empirical equations correcting the predicted nucleation rates to values comparable with experiments.

  15. Homogeneous nucleation in liquid nitrogen at negative pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baidakov, V. G., E-mail: baidakov@itp.uran.ru; Vinogradov, V. E.; Pavlov, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Thermal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen at positive and negative pressures has been studied in a tension wave formed by a compression pulse reflected from the liquid–vapor interface on a thin platinum wire heated by a current pulse. The limiting tensile stresses (Δp = p{sub s}–p, where p{sub s} is the saturation pressure), the corresponding bubble nucleation frequencies J (10{sup 20}–10{sup 22} s{sup –1} m{sup –3}), and temperature induced nucleation frequency growth rate G{sub T} = dlnJ/dT have been experimentally determined. At T = 90 K, the limiting tensile stress was Δp = 8.3 MPa, which was 4.9 MPa lower than the value corresponding to the boundary of thermodynamic stability of the liquid phase (spinodal). The measurement results were compared to classical (homogeneous) nucleation theory (CNT) with and without neglect of the dependence of the surface tension of critical bubbles on their dimensions. In the latter case, the properties of new phase nuclei were described in terms of the Van der Waals theory of capillarity. The experimental data agree well with the CNT theory when it takes into account the “size effect.”.

  16. An effective field study of the magnetic properties and critical behaviour at the surface Ising film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengrine, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Mhirech, F.

    1998-09-01

    The influence of corrugation and disorder at the surface on the critical behaviour of a ferromagnetic spin-1/2 Ising film is investigated using mean-field theory and finite cluster approximation. It is found that the critical surface exponent β 1 follows closely the one of a perfect surface, in the two cases: corrugated surface and random equiprobable coupling surface. However, in the case of flat surface with random interactions the surface critical exponent β 1 depends on the concentration p of the strong interaction for p>p c =0,5, while for p≤p c , such critical exponent is independent on the value of p and is equal to the one of the perfect surface. Moreover, in the case of corrugated surface, the effective exponent for a layer z, β eff J(z,n), is calculated as a function of the number of steps at the surface. (author)

  17. Nucleation kinetics of the formation of low dimensional calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals in isopropyl alcohol medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhya, S.; Sureshbabu, S.; Varma, H.K.; Komath, Manoj [Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum 695 012 (India)

    2012-07-15

    Calcium sulfate dihydrate, constituted as uniform crystals of low dimensions, is a potential biomaterial for clinical applications like bone graft substitution and drug delivery. In this work, isopropyl alcohol has been used as a solvent to obtain low dimensional calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals from calcium nitrate - sulfuric acid system. Reactants in 0.5 molar concentration at ambient conditions generated uniform rod-shaped crystals of length 3-5 {mu}m. Analysis using X-ray Diffractometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry showed the material to be well crystallized, phase-pure calcium sulfate dihydrate. The nucleation kinetics has been studied by observing the induction time of phase formation in solutions of millimolar concentrations through turbidimetry at 300 K. The data have been analysed using classical nucleation theory to deduce parameters like interfacial tension (or surface free energy), nucleation rate and critical radius. The surface free energy obtained (5.6 mJ/m{sup 2}) is comparatively lower than that reported for aqueous precipitation, which could be attributed to the presence of isopropyl alcohol. On escalating the supersaturation ratio, the nucleation rate drastically increased and the critical radius decreased exponentially. Particles formed at supersaturation 1.39 showed a monomodal distribution centered at 8.2 nm in Dynamic Light Scattering analysis. Comparable particle sizes were obtained in Transmission Electron Microscopy. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Can Hail and Rain Nucleate Cloud Droplets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S.; Prabhakaran, P.; Krekhov, A.; Pumir, A.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from a laboratory scale moist convection experiment composed of a mixture of pressurized sulphur hexafluoride (SF6 - liquid and vapor phase) and helium (He - gas phase) to mimic the wet (saturated water vapor) and dry components (nitrogen, oxygen etc.) of the earth's atmosphere. We operate the experiments close to critical conditions to allow for homogeneous nucleation of sulphur hexafluoride droplets. The liquid SF6 pool is heated from below and the warm SF6 vapor from the liquid-vapor interface rise and condense underneath the cold top plate. We observe the nucleation of microdroplets in the wake of cold drops falling through the SF6-He atmosphere. Using classical nucleation theory, we show that the nucleation is caused by isobaric cooling of SF6 vapor in the wake of the cold drop. Furthermore, we argue that in an atmospheric cloud, falling hail and large cold raindrops may induce heterogeneous nucleation of microdroplets in their wake. We also observe that under appropriate conditions these microdroplets form a stable horizontal layer, thus separating regions of super and sub-critical saturation.

  19. Observations on the nucleation of ice VII in compressed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Chapman, David J.; Bland, Simon N.; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Water can freeze upon multiple shock compression, but the window material determines the pressure of the phase transition. Several plate impact experiments were conducted with liquid targets on a single-stage gas gun, diagnosed simultaneously using photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) and high speed imaging through the water. The experiments investigated why silica windows instigate freezing above 2.5 GPa whilst sapphire windows do not until 7 GPa. We find that the nucleation of ice occurs on the surfaces of windows and can be affected by the surface coating suggesting the surface energy of fused silica, likely due to hydroxyl groups, encourages nucleation of ice VII crystallites. Aluminium coatings prevent nucleation and sapphire surfaces do not nucleate until approximately 6.5 GPa. This is believed to be the threshold pressure for the homogeneous nucleation of water.

  20. Role of the surface in the critical behavior of finite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duflot, V.; Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Gulminelli, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, LPC-ISMRa, CNRS-IN2P3, 14 - Caen (France)

    2000-07-01

    The role of surfaces in a finite system undergoing a critical phenomenon is discussed in a canonical lattice-gas model. Surfaces are constrained by a mean volume defined via a La grange multiplier. We show that critical fragment size distributions are conserved even in very small systems with surfaces. This implies that critical signals are still relevant in the study of phase transitions in finite systems. (authors)

  1. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  2. Return to nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumway, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a collection of TMIN (temperature of return to nucleate boiling) correlations, evaluates them under several conditions, and compares them with a wide range of data. Purpose is to obtain the best one for use in a water reactor safety computer simulator known as TRAC-B. Return to nucleate boiling can occur in a reactor accident at either high or low pressure and flow rates. Most of the correlations yield unrealistic results under some conditions. A new correlation is proposed which overcomes many of the deficiencies

  3. Damage instability and Earthquake nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, I. R.; Gomez, Q.; Campillo, M.; Jia, X.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake nucleation (initiation) is usually associated to the loss of the stability of the geological structure under a slip-weakening friction acting on the fault. The key parameters involved in the stability of the fault are the stress drop, the critical slip distance but also the elastic stiffness of the surrounding materials (rocks). We want to explore here how the nucleation phenomena are correlated to the material softening during damage accumulation by dynamic and/or quasi-static processes. Since damage models are describing micro-cracks growth, which is generally an unstable phenomenon, it is natural to expect some loss of stability on the associated micro-mechanics based models. If the model accurately captures the material behavior, then this can be due to the unstable nature of the brittle material itself. We obtained stability criteria at the microscopic scale, which are related to a large class of damage models. We show that for a given continuous strain history the quasi-static or dynamic problems are instable or ill-posed (multiplicity of material responses) and whatever the selection rule is adopted, shocks (time discontinuities) will occur. We show that the quasi-static equilibria chosen by the "perfect delay convention" is always stable. These stability criteria are used to analyze how NIC (Non Interacting Crack) effective elasticity associated to "self similar growth" model work in some special configurations (one family of micro-cracks in mode I, II and III and in plane strain or plain stress). In each case we determine a critical crack density parameter and critical micro-crack radius (length) which distinguish between stable and unstable behaviors. This critical crack density depends only on the chosen configuration and on the Poisson ratio.

  4. Dislocation nucleation facilitated by atomic segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lianfeng; Yang, Chaoming; Lei, Yinkai; Zakharov, Dmitri; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Su, Dong; Yin, Qiyue; Li, Jonathan; Liu, Zhenyu; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Qi, Liang; Wang, Guofeng; Zhou, Guangwen

    2018-01-01

    Surface segregation--the enrichment of one element at the surface, relative to the bulk--is ubiquitous to multi-component materials. Using the example of a Cu-Au solid solution, we demonstrate that compositional variations induced by surface segregation are accompanied by misfit strain and the formation of dislocations in the subsurface region via a surface diffusion and trapping process. The resulting chemically ordered surface regions acts as an effective barrier that inhibits subsequent dislocation annihilation at free surfaces. Using dynamic, atomic-scale resolution electron microscopy observations and theory modelling, we show that the dislocations are highly active, and we delineate the specific atomic-scale mechanisms associated with their nucleation, glide, climb, and annihilation at elevated temperatures. These observations provide mechanistic detail of how dislocations nucleate and migrate at heterointerfaces in dissimilar-material systems.

  5. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    nucleation without the use of a thermostat. The simulations of homogeneous nucleation in a Lennard-Jones system from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below Ttr.p. reveals that the nucleation to a liquid-like critical nucleus is initiated by a small cold cluster [S. Toxvaerd, J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{143...

  6. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to nucleation processes based on the GENERIC framework (general equation for the nonequilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling). Solely based on the GENERIC structure of time-evolution equations and thermodynamic consistency arguments of exchange processes between a

  7. Influence of the hydrostatic stress component on critical surface expansion in forging compound products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorm, T; Bay, Niels; Wanheim, Tarras

    1974-01-01

    of a superimposed hydrostatic pressure on the critical surface expansion during a forging process. The critical surface expansion appears to decrease with increasing hydrostatic pressure. This may be due to the fact that the close contact between the materials necessary to obtain bonding is created by a micro...

  8. Critical examination of prewetting and surface melting on caprolactam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.; de Jeu, Wim H.; Böautgels, Gertjan; van den Berg, Erwin P. G.; Bennema, Piet

    1997-01-01

    In a previous study, surface melting on the (001) surface of caprolactam (C6 H11 ON) was reported to proceed in a series of layering transitions, followed by a prewetting transition. We have reproduced the original results and shown that they can be better explained by the wetting of hydrated caprolactam (with H2 O molecules at bridging sites between the caprolactam dimers) on caprolactam, and that such hydration is most likely caused by H2 O microinclusions in the crystals grown from solution. In agreement with this interpretation, we have also shown that the reported effects are absent on 'dry' surfaces.

  9. Molecular simulation of homogeneous nucleation of crystals of an ionic liquid from the melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaoxia; Shen, Yan [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hung, Francisco R., E-mail: frhung@lsu.edu [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Santiso, Erik E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    The homogeneous nucleation of crystals of the ionic liquid [dmim{sup +}][Cl{sup −}] from its supercooled liquid phase in the bulk (P = 1 bar, T = 340 K, representing a supercooling of 58 K) was studied using molecular simulations. The string method in collective variables [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 024106 (2006)] was used in combination with Markovian milestoning with Voronoi tessellations [Maragliano et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 2589–2594 (2009)] and order parameters for molecular crystals [E. E. Santiso and B. L. Trout, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064109 (2011)] to sketch a minimum free energy path connecting the supercooled liquid and the monoclinic crystal phases, and to determine the free energy and the rates involved in the homogeneous nucleation process. The physical significance of the configurations found along this minimum free energy path is discussed with the help of calculations based on classical nucleation theory and with additional simulation results obtained for a larger system. Our results indicate that, at a supercooling of 58 K, the liquid has to overcome a free energy barrier of the order of 60 kcal/mol and to form a critical nucleus with an average size of about 3.6 nm, before it reaches the thermodynamically stable crystal phase. A simulated homogeneous nucleation rate of 5.0 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} s{sup −1} was obtained for our system, which is in reasonable agreement with experimental and simulation rates for homogeneous nucleation of ice at similar degrees of supercooling. This study represents our first step in a series of studies aimed at understanding the nucleation and growth of crystals of organic salts near surfaces and inside nanopores.

  10. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  11. Surface Characterization of Nanoparticles: Critical Needs and Significant Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing recognition that nanoparticles and other nanostructured materials are sometimes inadequately characterized and that this may limit or even invalidate some of the conclusions regarding particle properties and behavior. A number of international organizations are working to establish the essential measurement requirements that enable adequate understanding of nanoparticle properties for both technological applications and for environmental health issues. Our research on the interaction of iron metal-core oxide-shell nanoparticles with environmental contaminants and studies of the behaviors of ceria nanoparticles, with a variety of medical, catalysis and energy applications, have highlighted a number of common nanoparticle characterization challenges that have not been fully recognized by parts of the research community. This short review outlines some of these characterization challenges based on our research observations and using other results reported in the literature. Issues highlighted include: (1) the importance of surfaces and surface characterization, (2) nanoparticles are often not created equal - subtle differences in synthesis and processing can have large impacts; (3) nanoparticles frequently change with time having lifetime implications for products and complicating understanding of health and safety impacts; (4) the high sensitivity of nanoparticles to their environment complicates characterization and applications in many ways; (5) nanoparticles are highly unstable and easily altered (damaged) during analysis.

  12. Pore Formation During Solidification of Aluminum: Reconciliation of Experimental Observations, Modeling Assumptions, and Classical Nucleation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefian, Pedram; Tiryakioğlu, Murat

    2018-02-01

    An in-depth discussion of pore formation is presented in this paper by first reinterpreting in situ observations reported in the literature as well as assumptions commonly made to model pore formation in aluminum castings. The physics of pore formation is reviewed through theoretical fracture pressure calculations based on classical nucleation theory for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, with and without dissolved gas, i.e., hydrogen. Based on the fracture pressure for aluminum, critical pore size and the corresponding probability of vacancies clustering to form that size have been calculated using thermodynamic data reported in the literature. Calculations show that it is impossible for a pore to nucleate either homogeneously or heterogeneously in aluminum, even with dissolved hydrogen. The formation of pores in aluminum castings can only be explained by inflation of entrained surface oxide films (bifilms) under reduced pressure and/or with dissolved gas, which involves only growth, avoiding any nucleation problem. This mechanism is consistent with the reinterpretations of in situ observations as well as the assumptions made in the literature to model pore formation.

  13. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling and Thermal Performance Evaluation of Porous Curd Layers in Sub-Cooled Boiling Region of PWRs and Effects of Sub-Cooled Nucleate Boiling on Anomalous Porous Crud Deposition on Fuel Pin Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barclay Jones

    2005-01-01

    A significant number of current PWRs around the world are experiencing anomalous crud deposition in the sub-cooled region of the core, resulting in an axial power shift or Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA), a condition that continues to elude prediction of occurrence and thermal/neutronic performance. This creates an operational difficulty of not being able to accurately determine power safety margin. In some cases this condition has required power ''down rating'' by as much as thirty percent and the concomitant considerable loss of revenue for the utility. This study examines two aspects of the issue: thermal performance of crud layer and effect of sub-cooled nucleate boiling on the solute concentration and its influence on initiation of crud deposition/formation on fuel pin surface

  15. CMOS-compatible dense arrays of Ge quantum dots on the Si(001) surface: hut cluster nucleation, atomic structure and array life cycle during UHV MBE growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapkina, Larisa V; Yuryev, Vladimir A

    2011-04-15

    We report a direct observation of Ge hut nucleation on Si(001) during UHV molecular beam epitaxy at 360°C. Nuclei of pyramids and wedges were observed on the wetting layer (WL) (M × N) patches starting from the coverage of 5.1 Å and found to have different structures. Atomic models of nuclei of both hut species have been built as well as models of the growing clusters. The growth of huts of each species has been demonstrated to follow generic scenarios. The formation of the second atomic layer of a wedge results in rearrangement of its first layer. Its ridge structure does not repeat the nucleus. A pyramid grows without phase transitions. A structure of its vertex copies the nucleus. Transitions between hut species turned out to be impossible. The wedges contain point defects in the upper corners of the triangular faces and have preferential growth directions along the ridges. The derived structure of the {105} facet follows the paired dimer model. Further growth of hut arrays results in domination of wedges, and the density of pyramids exponentially drops. The second generation of huts arises at coverages >10 Å; new huts occupy the whole WL at coverages ~14 Å. Nanocrystalline Ge 2D layer begins forming at coverages >14 Å.

  16. Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

    2007-05-30

    Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

  17. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  18. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Dominique, E-mail: dommaes@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Vorontsova, Maria A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sleutel, Mike [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Giglio, Marzio [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vekilov, Peter G. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  19. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  20. Theory and Simulation of Nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832049

    2009-01-01

    Nucleation is the process where a stable nucleus spontaneously emerges in a metastable environment. Examples of nucleation abound, for instance the formation of droplets in undercooled gasses and of crystals in undercooled liquids. The process is thermally activated and is key to understanding

  1. Study of homogeneous bubble nucleation in liquid carbon dioxide by a hybrid approach combining molecular dynamics simulation and density gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbach, K.; Heilig, M.; Horsch, M.; Hasse, H.

    2018-03-01

    A new method for predicting homogeneous bubble nucleation rates of pure compounds from vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data is presented. It combines molecular dynamics simulation on the one side with density gradient theory using an equation of state (EOS) on the other. The new method is applied here to predict bubble nucleation rates in metastable liquid carbon dioxide (CO2). The molecular model of CO2 is taken from previous work of our group. PC-SAFT is used as an EOS. The consistency between the molecular model and the EOS is achieved by adjusting the PC-SAFT parameters to VLE data obtained from the molecular model. The influence parameter of density gradient theory is fitted to the surface tension of the molecular model. Massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations are performed close to the spinodal to compute bubble nucleation rates. From these simulations, the kinetic prefactor of the hybrid nucleation theory is estimated, whereas the nucleation barrier is calculated from density gradient theory. This enables the extrapolation of molecular simulation data to the whole metastable range including technically relevant densities. The results are tested against available experimental data and found to be in good agreement. The new method does not suffer from typical deficiencies of classical nucleation theory concerning the thermodynamic barrier at the spinodal and the bubble size dependence of surface tension, which is typically neglected in classical nucleation theory. In addition, the density in the center of critical bubbles and their surface tension is determined as a function of their radius. The usual linear Tolman correction to the capillarity approximation is found to be invalid.

  2. Pre-activation of ice-nucleating particles by the pore condensation and freezing mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the resurgence in ice nucleation research a comparatively small number of studies deal with the phenomenon of pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation. Fifty years ago, it was shown that various mineral dust and volcanic ash particles can be pre-activated to become nuclei for ice crystal formation even at temperatures as high as 270–271 K. Pre-activation was achieved under ice-subsaturated conditions without any preceding macroscopic ice growth by just temporarily cooling the particles to temperatures below 228 K. A two-step mechanism involving capillary condensation of supercooled water and subsequent homogeneous freezing was proposed to account for the particles' enhanced ice nucleation ability at high temperatures. This work reinvestigates the efficiency of the proposed pre-activation mechanism in temperature-cycling experiments performed in a large cloud chamber with suspended particles. We find the efficiency to be highest for the clay mineral illite as well as for highly porous materials like zeolite and diatomaceous earth, whereas most aerosols generated from desert dust surface samples did not reveal a measurable pre-activation ability. The pre-activation efficiency is linked to particle pores in a certain size range. As estimated by model calculations, only pores with diameters between about 5 and 8 nm contribute to pre-activation under ice-subsaturated conditions. This range is set by a combination of requirements from the negative Kelvin effect for condensation and a critical size of ice embryos for ice nucleation and melting. In contrast to the early study, pre-activation is only observed for temperatures below 260 K. Above that threshold, the particles' improved ice nucleation ability disappears due to the melting of ice in the pores.

  3. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  4. Fermi-surface collapse and dynamical scaling near a quantum-critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedemann, Sven; Oeschler, Niels; Wirth, Steffen; Krellner, Cornelius; Geibel, Christoph; Steglich, Frank; Paschen, Silke; Kirchner, Stefan; Si, Qimiao

    2010-01-01

    Quantum criticality arises when a macroscopic phase of matter undergoes a continuous transformation at zero temperature. While the collective fluctuations at quantum-critical points are being increasingly recognized as playing an important role in a wide range of quantum materials, the nature of the underlying quantum-critical excitations remains poorly understood. Here we report in-depth measurements of the Hall effect in the heavy-fermion metal YbRh2Si2, a prototypical system for quantum criticality. We isolate a rapid crossover of the isothermal Hall coefficient clearly connected to the quantum-critical point from a smooth background contribution; the latter exists away from the quantum-critical point and is detectable through our studies only over a wide range of magnetic field. Importantly, the width of the critical crossover is proportional to temperature, which violates the predictions of conventional theory and is instead consistent with an energy over temperature, E/T, scaling of the quantum-critical single-electron fluctuation spectrum. Our results provide evidence that the quantum-dynamical scaling and a critical Kondo breakdown simultaneously operate in the same material. Correspondingly, we infer that macroscopic scale-invariant fluctuations emerge from the microscopic many-body excitations associated with a collapsing Fermi-surface. This insight is expected to be relevant to the unconventional finite-temperature behavior in a broad range of strongly correlated quantum systems. PMID:20668246

  5. Ice nucleation on mineral dust particles: Onset conditions, nucleation rates and contact angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Michael L.; Cremel, Sebastien; Gehrke, Clemens; Girard, Eric; Bertram, Allan K.

    2008-11-01

    An optical microscope coupled to a flow cell was used to investigate the onset conditions for ice nucleation on five atmospherically relevant minerals at temperatures ranging from 233 to 246 K. Here we define the onset conditions as the humidity and temperature at which the first ice nucleation event was observed. Kaolinite and muscovite were found to be efficient ice nuclei in the deposition mode, requiring relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi) below 112% in order to initiate ice crystal formation. Quartz and calcite, by contrast, were poor ice nuclei, requiring relative humidities close to water saturation before ice crystals would form. Montmorillonite particles were efficient ice nuclei at temperatures below 241 K but were poor ice nuclei at higher temperatures. In several cases, there was a lack of quantitative agreement between our data and previously published work. This can be explained by several factors including the mineral source, the particle sizes, the surface area available for nucleation, and observation time. Heterogeneous nucleation rates (Jhet) were calculated from the measurements of the onset conditions (temperature and RHi) required from ice nucleation. The Jhet values were then used to calculate contact angles (θ) between the mineral substrates and an ice embryo using classical nucleation theory. The contact angles measured for kaolinite and muscovite ranged from 6° to 12°, whereas for quartz and calcite, the contact angles ranged from 25° to 27°. The reported Jhet and θ values may allow for a more direct comparison between laboratory studies and can be used when modeling ice cloud formation in the atmosphere.

  6. A Modified Critical State Two-surface Plasticity Model for Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmar, Christian LeBlanc; Hededal, O.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This paper provides background information and documentation for the implementation of a robust plasticity model as a user-subroutine in the commercial finite difference code, FLAC3D by Itasca. The plasticity model presented is equal to the 3 dimensional critical state two-surface plasticity model...... for sands by Manzari et al., but uses a modified multi-axial surface formulation based on a versatile shape function prescribing a family of smooth and convex contours in the π-plane. The model is formulated within the framework of critical state soil mechanics and is capable of accurately simulating...

  7. The role of creep cavitation and ductile failure in mid-crustal deformation - a critical one in the formation of shear instabilities and the nucleation of deep slow slip events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusseis, Florian; Gilgannon, James; Burns, Thomas; Menegon, Luca

    2017-04-01

    domains, viscous grain boundary sliding (VGBS) becomes active and cavities form as superplastic voids. Quartz creep cavities are suggested to evolve in tandem with creep cavities present in the fine-grained polyphase domains (as described in Fusseis et al., 2009). The polymineralic domains in the samples show grain boundary alignments extending parallel to the shear plane for several grain diameters. These phenomena are hard to explain by conventional models for grain boundary sliding, and we interpret them as the remnants of former ductile failure events that emerged where a critical creep cavity density was reached, but stalled. Our study is among the first to identify specific mechanisms behind the formation of synkinematic creep cavities and anchors cavitation firmly in the microstructural evolution of the rock. We demonstrate that, during the deformation of the ultramylonite, fluid could not move freely through the rock, but was channelized into sheet-like conduits parallel to the shear plane provided by creep cavitation. Synkinematic fluid movements were likely driven by the granular fluid pump, following hydraulic potentials that arose dynamically on the grain scale. Our study provides an observational database for testing the hypothesis that creep cavitation could have led to ductile failure in these rocks, a process we consider relevant for the emergence of shear instabilities and the nucleation of slow slip events at the frictional-viscous transition.

  8. Increased critical current and improved magnetic field response of BSCCO material by surface diffusion of silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negm, Y.Z.; Zimmerman, G.O.; Powers, R.E.; Eckhardt, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have developed a procedure of increasing the critical current of BSCCO ceramic superconducting material, the value of the critical current is increased by 30%. Moreover the degradation of the critical current with the applied magnetic field had been decreased. The procedure consists of applying a thin layer of silver to the surface of the conductor. The details of the procedure and the improved performance are discussed. This procedure has great significance for any future application of HTSC materials where high current carrying capacity is necessary. It will therefore be important in the application of HTSC materials to SSC high current leads

  9. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giberti, Federico; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation. PMID:25866662

  10. Metadynamics studies of crystal nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Giberti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization processes are characterized by activated events and long timescales. These characteristics prevent standard molecular dynamics techniques from being efficiently used for the direct investigation of processes such as nucleation. This short review provides an overview on the use of metadynamics, a state-of-the-art enhanced sampling technique, for the simulation of phase transitions involving the production of a crystalline solid. In particular the principles of metadynamics are outlined, several order parameters are described that have been or could be used in conjunction with metadynamics to sample nucleation events and then an overview is given of recent metadynamics results in the field of crystal nucleation.

  11. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Clauss, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-08-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized, conceptual model to explore the transition between stochastic and singular ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. Even with ice nucleation treated fundamentally as a stochastic process this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties, as might be typical for realistic atmospheric particle populations. Full evaluation of the model findings will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  12. Acoustic vibration effects in classical nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Su, C.-H.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic vibration is often used to improve the yield of crystals and nanoparticles growing from solutions and melts. As there is still a debate on how acoustic vibration actually works, we have examined the possibility that acoustic pressure can affect the rate of nucleation. Our method is based on an expansion of the free energy of the nucleus in powers of the acoustic pressure. With the assumption that the period of the sound wave is short as compared to the time scale for nucleation, we replace the powers of the acoustic pressure by their time averages, retaining the average of the square of the acoustic pressure as the leading term. By assuming a nucleus having spherical shape, we use the Young-Laplace equation to relate the pressure inside the nucleus to the ambient pressure. Without making further approximations not already standard in classical nucleation theory, we find that the proximate effect of acoustic pressure is to reduce both the size of the critical nucleus as well as the work required to form it from monomers. As the work serves as the activation energy, the ultimate effect of acoustic pressure is to increase the rate of nucleation. If we assume that the atomic structure of the nucleus is the same as that of an ordinary solid, however, we find the compressibility is too small for acoustic vibration effects to be noticeable. If on the other hand, we assume that the structure is similar to that of a loosely bound colloidal particle, then the effects of acoustic vibration become potentially observable.

  13. The role of ammonia in sulfuric acid ion induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Ortega

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new multi-step strategy for quantum chemical calculations on atmospherically relevant cluster structures that makes calculation for large clusters affordable with a good accuracy-to-computational effort ratio. We have applied this strategy to evaluate the relevance of ternary ion induced nucleation; we have also performed calculations for neutral ternary nucleation for comparison. The results for neutral ternary nucleation agree with previous results, and confirm the important role of ammonia in enhancing the growth of sulfuric acid clusters. On the other hand, we have found that ammonia does not enhance the growth of ionic sulfuric acid clusters. The results also confirm that ion-induced nucleation is a barrierless process at high altitudes, but at ground level there exists a barrier due to the presence of a local minimum on the free energy surface.

  14. Dynamic damage nucleation and evolution in multiphase materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensin, S. J.; Escobedo, J. P.; Gray, G. T.; Patterson, B. M.; Trujillo, C. P.; Cerreta, E. K.

    2014-05-01

    For ductile metals, dynamic fracture occurs through void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Previous experimental works in high purity metals have shown that microstructural features such as grain boundaries, inclusions, vacancies, and heterogeneities can act as initial void nucleation sites. However, for materials of engineering significance, those with, second phase particles it is less clear what the role of a soft second phase will be on damage nucleation and evolution. To approach this problem in a systematic manner, two materials have been investigated: high purity copper and copper with 1% lead. These materials have been shock loaded at ˜1.5 GPa and soft recovered. In-situ free surface velocity information and post mortem metallography reveals the presence of a high number of small voids in CuPb in comparison to a lower number of large voids in Cu. This suggests that damage evolution is nucleation dominated in the CuPb and growth dominated in the pure Cu.

  15. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  16. Vapor nucleation paths in lyophobic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Antonio; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2018-04-19

    In recent years, technologies revolving around the use of lyophobic nanopores gained considerable attention in both fundamental and applied research. Owing to the enormous internal surface area, heterogeneous lyophobic systems (HLS), constituted by a nanoporous lyophobic material and a non-wetting liquid, are promising candidates for the efficient storage or dissipation of mechanical energy. These diverse applications both rely on the forced intrusion and extrusion of the non-wetting liquid inside the pores; the behavior of HLS for storage or dissipation depends on the hysteresis between these two processes, which, in turn, are determined by the microscopic details of the system. It is easy to understand that molecular simulations provide an unmatched tool for understanding phenomena at these scales. In this contribution we use advanced atomistic simulation techniques in order to study the nucleation of vapor bubbles inside lyophobic mesopores. The use of the string method in collective variables allows us to overcome the computational challenges associated with the activated nature of the phenomenon, rendering a detailed picture of nucleation in confinement. In particular, this rare event method efficiently searches for the most probable nucleation path(s) in otherwise intractable, high-dimensional free-energy landscapes. Results reveal the existence of several independent nucleation paths associated with different free-energy barriers. In particular, there is a family of asymmetric transition paths, in which a bubble forms at one of the walls; the other family involves the formation of axisymmetric bubbles with an annulus shape. The computed free-energy profiles reveal that the asymmetric path is significantly more probable than the symmetric one, while the exact position where the asymmetric bubble forms is less relevant for the free energetics of the process. A comparison of the atomistic results with continuum models is also presented, showing how, for simple

  17. Bubble nucleation in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; McKechnie, J. S.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    Bubble nucleation in weakly supersaturated solutions of carbon dioxide—such as champagne, sparkling wines, and carbonated beers—is well understood. Bubbles grow and detach from nucleation sites: gas pockets trapped within hollow cellulose fibers. This mechanism appears not to be active in stout beers that are supersaturated solutions of nitrogen and carbon dioxide. In their canned forms these beers require additional technology (widgets) to release the bubbles which will form the head of the beer. We extend the mathematical model of bubble nucleation in carbonated liquids to the case of two gases and show that this nucleation mechanism is active in stout beers, though substantially slower than in carbonated beers and confirm this by observation. A rough calculation suggests that despite the slowness of the process, applying a coating of hollow porous fibers to the inside of a can or bottle could be a potential replacement for widgets.

  18. Basement to surface expressions and critical factors in the genesis of unconformity-related deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Two subprojects: 1) Basement to surface expressions of deep mineralization and refinement of critical factors leading to the genesis of unconformity-related uranium deposits; and 2) Recognition of uranium ore system alteration signatures in complex terranes: IOCG vs albite-hosted uranium vs volcanic-hosted uranium.

  19. An approach to determine a critical size for rolling contact fatigue initiating from rail surface defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.; Zhao, X.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    A methodology for the determination of a critical size of surface defects, above which RCF can initiate, has been developed and demonstrated with its application to the passive type of squats under typical Dutch railway loading conditions. Such a methodology is based on stress evaluation of

  20. Surface critical magnetic field Hc3 (T) of a bulk superconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... surface critical magnetic field Hc3(). It is shown that c3() has the same temperature dependence with c2(), similar to the case of a single-band superconductor, c3()=1.66 c2(). We use an elimination procedure for the decoupling of G–L equations of two-band superconductivity, which eases the calculations.

  1. Gas hydrate nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall aim of the project was to gain more knowledge about the kinetics of gas hydrate formation especially the early growth phase. Knowledge of kinetics of gas hydrate formation is important and measurements of gas hydrate particle size and concentration can contribute to improve this knowledge. An experimental setup for carrying out experimental studies of the nucleation and growth of gas hydrates has been constructed and tested. Multi wavelength extinction (MWE) was the experimental technique selected for obtaining particle diameter and concentration. The principle behind MWE is described as well as turbidity spectrum analysis that in an initial stage of the project was considered as an alternative experimental technique. Details of the experimental setup and its operation are outlined. The measuring cell consists of a 1 litre horizontal tube sustaining pressures up to 200 bar. Laser light for particle size determination can be applied through sapphire windows. A description of the various auxiliary equipment and of another gas hydrate cell used in the study are given. A computer program for simulation and analysis of gas hydrate experiments is based on the gas hydrate kinetics model proposed by Skovborg and Rasmussen (1993). Initial measurements showed that knowledge of the refractive index of gas hydrates was important in order to use MWE. An experimental determination of the refractive index of methane and natural gas hydrate is described. The test experiments performed with MWE on collectives of gas hydrate particles and experiments with ethane, methane and natural gas hydrate are discussed. Gas hydrate particles initially seem to grow mainly in size and at latter stages in number. (EG) EFP-94; 41 refs.

  2. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Aeschlimann, M. [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  3. Critical heat flux for downward-facing pool boiling on CANDU calandria tube surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behdadi, Azin, E-mail: behdada@mcmaster.ca; Talebi, Farshad; Luxat, John

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Pressure tube-calandria tube contact may challenge fuel channel integrity in CANDU. • Critical heat flux variation is predicted on the outer surface of CANDU calandria tube. • A two-phase boundary layer flow driven by buoyancy is modeled on the surface. • Different slip ratios and flow regimes are considered inside the boundary layer. • Subcooling effects are added to the model using wall heat flux partitioning. - Abstract: One accident scenario in CANDU reactors that can challenge the integrity of the primary pressure boundary is a loss of coolant accident, referred to as critical break LOCA, in which the pressure tube (PT) can undergo thermal creep strain deformation and contact its calandria tube (CT). In such case, rapid redistribution of stored heat from PT to CT, leads to a large spike in heat flux to the moderator which can cause bubble accumulation and dryout on the CT surface. A challenge to fuel channel integrity is posed if critical heat flux occurs on the surface of the CT and results in sustained film boiling. If the post-dryout temperature becomes sufficiently high then continued creep strain of the PT and CT may lead to fuel channel failure. In this study, a mechanistic model is developed to predict the critical heat flux variations along the downward facing outer surface of CT. The hydrodynamic model considers a liquid macrolayer beneath an elongated vapor slug on the surface. Local dryout is postulated to occur whenever the fresh liquid supply to the macrolayer is not sufficient to compensate for the liquid depletion. A boundary layer analysis is performed, treating the two phase motion as an external buoyancy driven flow. The model shows good agreement with the available experimental data and has been modified to take into account the effect of subcooling.

  4. Nanocellular polymer foams nucleated by core-shell nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shanqiu; Zoetebier, Bram; Hulsman, Lars; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Duvigneau, Joost; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of low surface energy polymer grafted silica nanoparticles is reported for the utilization as highly efficient cell nucleation agents to obtain nanocellular, CO2 blown polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films in a batch process. For nanoparticle surface

  5. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Quantum critical fluctuations due to nested Fermi surface: The case of spinless fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2007-01-01

    A quantum critical point (QCP) can be obtained by tuning the critical temperature of a second-order phase transition to zero. A simple model of spinless fermions with nested Fermi surface leading to a charge density wave is considered. The QCP is obtained by tuning the nesting mismatch of the Fermi surface, which has the following consequences: (i) For the tuned QCP, the specific heat over T and the effective mass increase with the logarithm of the temperature as T is lowered. (ii) For the tuned QCP the linewidth of the quasi-particles is sublinear in T and ω. (iii) The specific heat and the linewidth display a crossover from non-Fermi liquid (∼T) to Fermi liquid (∼T 2 ) behavior with increasing nesting mismatch and decreasing temperature. (iv) For the tuned QCP, the dynamical charge susceptibility has a quasi-elastic peak with a linewidth proportional to T. (v) For non-critical Fermi vector mismatch the peak is inelastic. (vi) While the specific heat and the quasi-particle linewidth are only weakly dependent on the geometry of the nested Fermi surfaces, the momentum-dependent dynamical susceptibility is expected to be affected by the shape of the Fermi surface

  8. Effect of nucleating agents on crystallization kinetics of PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Effects of three nucleating agents concluding talc, sodium benzoate (SB and an ionomer (Ion., Na+ on crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and polarized optical microscope (POM, the parameters of crystallization kinetics were obtained through Avrami and Ozawa equations. The fold surface free energy σe of pure PET and PET/nucleating agent blends were calculated by Hoffman-Lauritzen theory. The results indicate that the three kinds of nucleating agents increase the crystallization rate constant through promoting their nucleating effect for PET crystallization, among which SB is the best one with the same content. The crystallization mode of PET might shift from three-dimensional growth to two-dimensional growth by the addition of the nucleating agents. The values of σe of PET/nucleating agent blends are much less than that of pure PET, and PET/SB (99:1 blend has the least value of σe (18.2 mJ/m2. The conclusion based on Hoffman theory is similar to the analysis by Avrami and Ozawa equations.

  9. Diffusion of two-dimensional epitaxial clusters on metal (100) surfaces: Facile versus nucleation-mediated behavior and their merging for larger sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, King C.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2017-12-01

    For diffusion of two-dimensional homoepitaxial clusters of N atoms on metal (100) surfaces mediated by edge atom hopping, macroscale continuum theory suggests that the diffusion coefficient scales like DN˜ N-β with β =3 /2 . However, we find quite different and diverse behavior in multiple size regimes. These include: (i) facile diffusion for small sizes N mediated diffusion with small β moderate sizes 9 ≤N ≤O (102) ; the same also applies for N =Np+3 , Np+ 4 , ... (iii) facile diffusion but with large β >2 for N =Np+1 and Np+2 also for moderate sizes 9 ≤N ≤O (102) ; (iv) merging of the above distinct branches and subsequent anomalous scaling with 1 ≲β moderate size regime where we show that diffusivity cycles quasiperiodically from the slowest branch for Np+3 (not Np) to the fastest branch for Np+1 . Behavior is quantified by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of an appropriate stochastic lattice-gas model. However, precise analysis must account for a strong enhancement of diffusivity for short time increments due to back correlation in the cluster motion. Further understanding of this enhancement, of anomalous size scaling behavior, and of the merging of various branches, is facilitated by combinatorial analysis of the number of the ground-state and low-lying excited state cluster configurations, and also of kink populations.

  10. Breakdown of classical nucleation theory near isostructural phase transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cacciuto, A.; Auer, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    We report simulations of crystal nucleation in binary mixtures of hard spherical colloids with a size ratio of 1:10. The stable crystal phase of this system can be either dense or expanded. We find that, in the vicinity of the solid-solid critical point where the crystallites are highly

  11. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.D.; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    Experimental studies of ultra-fine aerosol nucleation in clean atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour suggest that the production rate of critical clusters is sensitive to ionisation. To assess this sensitivity numerical simulations of the initial...

  12. Epitaxial nucleation and growth of molecular films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Daniel Edwin

    2000-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increased emphasis on the design and use of molecular-based materials, commonly in thin film form, as components in electronic devices, sensors, displays, and logic elements. The growing interest in films based on molecular components, rather than their more traditional inorganic counterparts, stems largely from the premise that collective optical and electronic properties can be systematically manipulated through molecular design. Many of these properties depend strongly upon film structure and orientation with respect to the substrate upon which they are deposited. This relationship mandates careful attention to the interface between the primary molecular overlayer and the substrate. Further advances in molecular films and multilayer composites based on molecular films require improved understanding of the role of epitaxy in molecular organization as well as the nucleation events that precede film formation. Determination of critical nucleus dimensions and elucidation of the factors that govern critical size are particularly important for fabricating nanoscale molecular features and controlling domain defects in contiguous molecular films. This thesis describes an examination of the role of epitaxy in the growth of molecular films, including a hierarchical classification and grammar of molecular epitaxy, an atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation of the intercalation of molecular components into multilayer organic-inorganic composites, and an AFM investigation of the nucleation of molecular films.

  13. Nucleation studies of ZTC doped with L-arginine in supersaturated aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balu, T. [Department of Physics, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628 216 (India); Rajasekaran, T.R., E-mail: trrajasekaran@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Tirunelveli 627 012 (India); Murugakoothan, P. [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Pachaiyappa' s College, Chennai 600 030 (India)

    2009-06-01

    The metastable zonewidth studies are carried out for various temperatures for supersaturated aqueous solutions of zinc thiourea chloride added with 1 mole % of L-arginine. The metastable zonewidth is increased with the addition of L-arginine. The induction period is experimentally determined and various critical nucleation parameters such as radius of critical nucleus, number of molecules in the critical nucleus, critical free energy of nucleus and interfacial tension are also calculated based on the classical theory for homogeneous crystal nucleation. The induction period is increased with the increase of L-arginine addition. The critical nucleation parameters vary with increase in doping concentration. It is also observed that the nucleation rate increases with the increase of supersaturation. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurements are carried out with different doping concentration of L-arginine reveal that nonlinear optical (NLO) property is enhanced by L-arginine dopant.

  14. Nucleation of wetting films on cylindrical and spherical substrates: A numerical study by the string method

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Chunyin

    2009-09-25

    Using the mean-field diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor system and employing the numerical string method, we study the critical nuclei involved in the prewetting transitions on curved substrates. We first introduce three distinct kinds of critical nuclei, namely, the disklike, bandlike, and layerlike ones, which respectively correspond to three possible growth modes of wettingfilms. We show the disklike growth mode to be the only mode for infinite planar substrates. We then turn to cylindrical and spherical substrates, the two simplest but most important geometries in the real world. We focus on the critical nuclei of finite size, through which the wettingfilms may be formed with finite thermodynamic probabilities. It is shown that the disklike growth mode is always the most probable for wettingfilmnucleation and growth as long as a disklike critical nucleus exists. It is also shown that on a cylindrical substrate, the disklike critical nucleus can no longer exist if the substrate radius is smaller than some critical value, comparable to the radius of the disklike critical nucleus on planar substrate. We find that on a cylindrical substrate whose radius is below the critical value, the nucleation and growth of a wettingfilm can only occur through the bandlike critical nucleus. It is worth emphasizing that the results concerning the bandlike and layerlike growth modes can only be obtained from the diffuse-interface model, beyond the macroscopic description based on the line and surface tensions.

  15. Water pollution abatement programme. The Czech Republic. Project 4.2. Assessing critical loads of acidity to surface waters in The Czech Republic. Critical loads of acidity to surface waters, Northern Moravia and Silesia, The Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, L.; Raclavsky, K.; Henriksen, A.; Raclavska, H.; Matysek, D.

    1994-12-31

    The governments of Norway and Czech and Slovak Federal Republic have signed a bilateral environmental protection agreement. This report describes Project 4.2 of the agreement: Assessing critical loads of acidity to surface waters in The Czech Republic. Critical load of acidity to surface waters and exceedance of critical load were estimated by using standard methods modified for the sampling area. Water samples were mainly taken from small forest streams, which were the only available surface waters with negligible pollution from local sources. High critical loads were calculated, averaging 20 times higher than the corresponding value for southern Norway. The deposition of acidifying components in the region was high, but did not exceed the critical load and so there is a reserve for additional acid deposition. Scattered water analyses from several other parts of The Czech Republic indicate both low critical loads and exceedance of critical load in various regions (e.g. Bohemia). 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Controlling the quantum dot nucleation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Nunzio; Sgarlata, Anna; Rosei, Federico; Szkutnik, P.D.; Nufris, S.; Scarselli, M.; Balzarotti, A.

    2003-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are actually easily produced by self-assembling during heteroepitaxial growth of semiconductors. In order to exploit the unique electronic properties of semiconductor QDs in novel quantum effect devices, the lateral dimensions of these structures have to be reduced to the order of tens of nanometers, which is the range of the De Broglie wavelength of electrons inside these materials. Moreover, millions of QDs must be arranged in dense ordered arrays to achieve the necessary active volume for optoelectronic applications. Nowadays it is possible to control size and shape of the nanocrystals, but it is still difficult to decide their nucleation site. Many approaches have been undertaken to overcome this problem, like using regular dislocation networks, lithographically and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) patterned substrates, naturally patterned surfaces. We present results obtained by some of these methods, visualized by Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) or AFM microscopy. STM measurements at high temperature during the epitaxial growth are of great help in these studies. Images and movies of the growth of Ge on Si help to identify the real nucleation sites of the islands and to follow their evolution. The influence of the 'step bunching' on the self-organization of Ge islands on Si(111) surfaces will be analysed, as an example of growth on self-nanostructured surfaces

  17. Surface critical magnetic field Hc3(T) of a bulk superconductor MgB2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Two-band Ginzburg–Landau (TB G–L) equations for a bulk MgB2 were solved analyti- cally to determine the temperature dependence of surface critical magnetic field Hc3(T). It is shown that Hc3(T) has the same temperature dependence with Hc2(T), similar to the case of a single-band superconductor, Hc3(T) ...

  18. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: Parallel and series nucleation

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is su...

  19. FOREWORD: Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, H.

    2009-11-01

    Scope and aim of this volume. Nucleation and initial microstructure formation play an important role in almost all aspects of materials science [1-5]. The relevance of the prediction and control of nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation is fully accepted across many areas of modern surface and materials science and technology. One reason is that a large range of material properties, from mechanical ones such as ductility and hardness to electrical and magnetic ones such as electric conductivity and magnetic hardness, depend largely on the specific crystalline structure that forms in nucleation and the subsequent initial microstructure growth. A very demonstrative example for the latter is the so called bamboo structure of an integrated circuit, for which resistance against electromigration [6] , a parallel alignment of grain boundaries vertical to the direction of electricity, is most favorable. Despite the large relevance of predicting and controlling nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation, and despite significant progress in the experimental analysis of the later stages of crystal growth in line with new theoretical computer simulation concepts [7], details about the initial stages of solidification are still far from being satisfactorily understood. This is in particular true when the nucleation event occurs as heterogenous nucleation. The Priority Program SPP 1296 'Heterogenous Nucleation and Microstructure Formation—a Scale- and System-Bridging Approach' [8] sponsored by the German Research Foundation, DFG, intends to contribute to this open issue via a six year research program that enables approximately twenty research groups in Germany to work interdisciplinarily together following this goal. Moreover, it enables the participants to embed themselves in the international community which focuses on this issue via internationally open joint workshops, conferences and summer schools. An outline of such activities can be found

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleation and phase transitions in molecular clusters of hexafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nucleation and phase transitions in TeF 6 and SeF 6 clusters containing 100-350 molecules were carried out. Simulations successfully reproduced the crystalline structures observed in electron diffraction studies of large clusters (containing about 10 4 molecules) of the same materials. When the clusters were cooled, they spontaneously underwent the same bcc the monoclinic phase transition in simulations as in experiment, despite the million-fold difference in the time scales involved. Other transitions observed included melting and freezing. Several new techniques based on molecular translation and orientation were introduced to identify different condensed phases, to study nucleation and phase transitions, and to define characteristic temperatures of transitions. The solid-state transition temperatures decreased with cluster size in the same way as did the melting temperature, in that the depression of transition temperature was inversely proportional to the cluster radius. Rotational melting temperatures, as inferred from the rotational diffusion of molecules, coincided with those of the solid-state transition. Nucleation in liquid-solid and bcc-monoclinic transitions started in the interior of clusters on cooling, and at the surface on heating. Transition temperatures on cooling were always lower than those on heating due to the barriers to nucleation. Linear growth rates of nuclei in freezing were an order of magnitude lower than those in the bcc-monoclinic transition. Revealing evidence about the molecular behavior associated with phase changes was found. Simulations showed the formation of the actual transition complexes along the transition pathway, i.e., the critical nuclei of the new phase. These nuclei, consisting of a few dozen molecules, were distinguishable in the midst of the surrounding matter

  1. Ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dust aerosols from Mongolia, Argentina, and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, I.; Funk, R.; Busse, J.; Iturri, A.; Kirchen, S.; Leue, M.; Möhler, O.; Schwartz, T.; Schnaiter, M.; Sierau, B.; Toprak, E.; Ullrich, R.; Ulrich, A.; Hoose, C.; Leisner, T.

    2016-11-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain considerable mass fractions of organic material. Also, soil dust particles may act as carriers for potentially ice-active biological particles. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. The results are expressed as ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) densities and presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode. For immersion freezing occurring at 254 K, samples from Argentina, China, and Germany show ice nucleation efficiencies which are by a factor of 10 higher than desert dusts. On average, the difference in ice nucleation efficiencies between agricultural and desert dusts becomes significantly smaller at temperatures below 247 K. In the deposition mode the soil dusts showed higher ice nucleation activity than Arizona Test Dust over a temperature range between 232 and 248 K and humidities RHice up to 125%. INAS densities varied between 109 and 1011 m-2 for these thermodynamic conditions. For one soil dust sample (Argentinian Soil), the effect of treatments with heat was investigated. Heat treatments (383 K) did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency observed at 249 K. This finding presumably excludes proteinaceous ice-nucleating entities as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency.

  2. Nano hydroxyapatite-blasted titanium surface affects pre-osteoblast morphology by modulating critical intracellular pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Fábio; Ferreira, Marcel R; Fontes, Giselle N; da Costa Fernandes, Célio Jr; Andia, Denise C; Cruz, Nilson C; da Silva, Rodrigo A; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2017-08-01

    Although, intracellular signaling pathways are proposed to predict the quality of cell-surface relationship, this study addressed pre-osteoblast behavior in response to nano hydroxyapatite (HA)-blasted titanium (Ti) surface by exploring critical intracellular pathways and pre-osteoblast morphological change. Physicochemical properties were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and wettability considering water contact angle of three differently texturized Ti surfaces: Machined (Mac), Dual acid-etching (DAE), and nano hydroxyapatite-blasted (nHA). The results revealed critical differences in surface topography, impacting the water contact angle and later the osteoblast performance. In order to evaluate the effect of those topographical characteristics on biological responses, we have seeded pre-osteoblast cells on the Ti discs for up to 4 h and subjected the cultures to biological analysis. First, we have observed pre-osteoblasts morphological changes resulting from the interaction with the Ti texturized surfaces whereas the cells cultured on nHA presented a more advanced spreading process when compared with the cells cultured on the other surfaces. These results argued us for analyzing the molecular machinery and thus, we have shown that nHA promoted a lower Bax/Bcl2 ratio, suggesting an interesting anti-apoptotic effect, maybe explained by the fact that HA is a natural element present in bone composition. Thereafter, we investigated the potential effect of those surfaces on promoting pre-osteoblast adhesion and survival signaling by performing crystal violet and immunoblotting approaches, respectively. Our results showed that nHA promoted a higher pre-osteoblast adhesion supported by up-modulating FAK and Src activations, both signaling transducers involved during eukaryotic cell adhesion. Also, we have shown Ras-Erk stimulation by the all evaluated surfaces. Finally, we showed that all Ti-texturing surfaces were able to promote osteoblast differentiation

  3. Crystal nucleation in lithium borate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gary L.; Neilson, George F.; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Crystal nucleation measurements were made on three lithium borate compositions in the vicinity of Li2O-2Br2O3. All nucleation measurements were performed at 500 C. Certain aspects of the nucleation behavior indicated (tentatively) that it proceeded by a homogeneous mechanism. The steady state nucleation rate was observed to have the largest value when the Li2O concentration was slightly in excess of the diborate composition. The change in nucleation rate with composition is controlled by the variation of viscosity as well as the change in free energy with composition. The variation of nucleation rate is explained qualitatively in these terms.

  4. Optimizing critical heat flux enhancement through nano-particle-based surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, B.; Hu, L. W.; Buongiorno, J.

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions of nano-particles, also known as nano-fluids, have shown to yield significant Critical Heat Flux (CHF) enhancement. The CHF enhancement mechanism in nano-fluids is due to the buildup of a porous layer of nano-particles upon boiling. Unlike microporous coatings that had been studied extensively, nano-particles have the advantages of forming a thin layer on the substrate with surface roughness ranges from the sub-micron to several microns. By tuning the chemical properties it is possible to coat the nano-particles in colloidal dispersions onto the desired surface, as has been demonstrated in engineering thin film industry. Building on recent work conducted at MIT, this paper illustrates the maximum CHF enhancement that can be achieved based on existing correlations. Optimization of the CHF enhancement by incorporation of key factors, such as the surface wettability and roughness, will also be discussed. (authors)

  5. Modulating Nucleation by Kosmotropes and Chaotropes: Testing the Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Rao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is a fundamental solvent sustaining life, key to the conformations and equilibria associated with solute species. Emerging studies on nucleation and crystallization phenomena reveal that the dynamics of hydration associated with mineral precursors are critical in determining material formation and growth. With certain small molecules affecting the hydration and conformational stability of co-solutes, this study systematically explores the effects of these chaotropes and kosmotropes as well as certain sugar enantiomers on the early stages of calcium carbonate formation. These small molecules appear to modulate mineral nucleation in a class-dependent manner. The observed effects are finite in comparison to the established, strong interactions between charged polymers and intermediate mineral forms. Thus, perturbations to hydration dynamics of ion clusters by co-solute species can affect nucleation phenomena in a discernable manner.

  6. A two-parameter extension of classical nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsko, James F.; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.

    2015-06-01

    A two-variable stochastic model for diffusion-limited nucleation is developed using a formalism derived from fluctuating hydrodynamics. The model is a direct generalization of the standard classical nucleation theory (CNT). The nucleation rate and pathway are calculated in the weak-noise approximation and are shown to be in good agreement with direct numerical simulations for the weak-solution/strong-solution transition in globular proteins. We find that CNT underestimates the time needed for the formation of a critical cluster by two orders of magnitude and that this discrepancy is due to the more complex dynamics of the two variable model and not, as often is assumed, a result of errors in the estimation of the free energy barrier.

  7. A two-parameter extension of classical nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutsko, James F; Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    A two-variable stochastic model for diffusion-limited nucleation is developed using a formalism derived from fluctuating hydrodynamics. The model is a direct generalization of the standard classical nucleation theory (CNT). The nucleation rate and pathway are calculated in the weak-noise approximation and are shown to be in good agreement with direct numerical simulations for the weak-solution/strong-solution transition in globular proteins. We find that CNT underestimates the time needed for the formation of a critical cluster by two orders of magnitude and that this discrepancy is due to the more complex dynamics of the two variable model and not, as often is assumed, a result of errors in the estimation of the free energy barrier. (paper)

  8. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoose

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A small subset of the atmospheric aerosol population has the ability to induce ice formation at conditions under which ice would not form without them (heterogeneous ice nucleation. While no closed theoretical description of this process and the requirements for good ice nuclei is available, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the ice nucleation ability of different particles empirically in laboratory experiments. In this article, an overview of these results is provided. Ice nucleation "onset" conditions for various mineral dust, soot, biological, organic and ammonium sulfate particles are summarized. Typical temperature-supersaturation regions can be identified for the "onset" of ice nucleation of these different particle types, but the various particle sizes and activated fractions reported in different studies have to be taken into account when comparing results obtained with different methodologies. When intercomparing only data obtained under the same conditions, it is found that dust mineralogy is not a consistent predictor of higher or lower ice nucleation ability. However, the broad majority of studies agrees on a reduction of deposition nucleation by various coatings on mineral dust. The ice nucleation active surface site (INAS density is discussed as a simple and empirical normalized measure for ice nucleation activity. For most immersion and condensation freezing measurements on mineral dust, estimates of the temperature-dependent INAS density agree within about two orders of magnitude. For deposition nucleation on dust, the spread is significantly larger, but a general trend of increasing INAS densities with increasing supersaturation is found. For soot, the presently available results are divergent. Estimated average INAS densities are high for ice-nucleation active bacteria at high subzero temperatures. At the same time, it is shown that INAS densities of some other biological aerosols, like certain pollen grains, fungal

  9. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartmann

    2013-06-01

    nucleation are attached to the outer membrane of intact bacteria or membrane fragments, (c the temperature range in which heterogeneous droplet freezing occurs, and the fraction of droplets being able to freeze, both depend on the actual number of INA protein complexes present in the droplet ensemble, and (d possible artifacts suspected to occur in connection with the drop freezing method, i.e., the method frequently used by biologist for quantifying ice nucleation behaviour, are of minor importance, at least for substances such as P. syringae, which induce freezing at comparably high temperatures. The last statement implies that for single ice nucleation entities such as INA protein complexes, it is the number of entities present in the droplet population, and the entities' nucleation rate, which control the freezing behaviour of the droplet population. Quantities such as ice active surface site density are not suitable in this context. The results obtained in this study allow a different perspective on the quantification of the immersion freezing behaviour of bacterial ice nucleation.

  10. Parametrization of the homogeneous ice nucleation rate for the numerical simulation of multiphase flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Tomáš; Eisenschmidt, K.; Rauschenberger, P.; Weigand, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 533-534 ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/10/1819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : ice nucleation * ice-water surface energy * classical nucleation theory Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201210255/abstract

  11. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  12. Nucleation and growth of a multicomponent metallic glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of modified Kissinger and Matusita equations for the non-isothermal crystallization. The results show enhanced bulk nucleation in general. At high heating rates added to it is surface induced abnormal grain growth resulting in fractal dimensionality. Keywords. Activation energy; isothermal annealing; abnormal grain growth; ...

  13. Interfacial surface investigation of super-critical water gasification of corn cob

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Super-critical water gasification of biomass is a promising technology for hydrogen production. In order to achieve high hydrogen yield and complete gasification, the operating parameters were investigated and the solid residual was analyzed to study the reaction bottleneck by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results showed that most organic functional groups in corn cob were consumed by super-critical water above 500°C, however, the aromatic substance and cyclic ketone were remained. The K2CO3 has the best catalytic effect due to the formation of pore structure in the residual particle surface. The carbon gasification efficiency of 97.97% and the hydrogen yield was 50.28 mol/kg.

  14. Correlation between the critical heat flux and the fractal surface roughness of zirconium alloy tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, R.W.L.; McRae, G.A.; Coleman, C.E.; Nitheanandan, T.; Sanderson, D.B.

    1999-10-01

    In CANDU fuel channels, Zircaloy calandria tubes isolate the hot pressure tubes from the cool heavy water moderator. The heavy-water moderator provides a backup heat sink during some postulated loss-of-coolant accidents. The decay heat from the fuel is transferred to the moderator to ensure fuel channel integrity during emergencies. Moderator temperature requirements are specified to ensure that the transfer of decay heat does not exceed the critical heat flux (CHF) on the outside surface of the calandria tube. An enhanced CHF provides increases in safety margin. Pool boiling experiments indicate the CHF is enhanced with glass-peening of the outside surface of the calandria tubes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the surface characteristics of glass-peened tubes and relate these characteristics to CHF. The micro-topologies of the tube surfaces were analysed using stereo-pair micrographs obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photogrammetry techniques. A linear relationship correlated the CHF as a function of the 'fractal' surface roughness of the tubes. (author)

  15. Effects of porous superhydrophilic surfaces on flow boiling critical heat flux in IVR accident scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Atkhen, Kresna; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Azizian, Mohammad Reza; McKrell, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Critical Heat Flux (CHF) plays a key role in nuclear reactor safety both during normal operation as well as in accident scenarios. In particular,when an in-vessel retention (IVR) strategy is used as a severe accident management strategy, the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cavity is flooded with water, to remove the decay heat from the corium relocated in the lower plenum by conduction through the RPV wall and flow boiling on the outer surface of the RPV. The CHF limit must not be ex...

  16. Nucleation of Salt Crystals in Clay Minerals: Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtian, Hassan; Wang, Haimeng; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-07-20

    Nucleation of salt crystals in confined media occurs in many processes of high importance, such as injection of CO 2 in geological formations for its sequestration. In particular, salt precipitation in clays, a main component of sedimentary rock, is an important phenomenon. The crystals precipitate on the pores' surface, modify the pore space morphology, and reduce its flow and transport properties. Despite numerous efforts to understand the mechanisms of nucleation of salt crystals in confined media, the effect of the clay's chemistry on the growth, distribution, and properties of the crystals is not well understood. We report the results of extensive molecular dynamics simulation of nucleation and growth of NaCl crystals in a clay pore using molecular models of two types of clay minerals, Na-montmorillonite and kaolinite. Clear evidence is presented for the nucleation of the salt crystals that indicates that the molecular structure of clay minerals affects their spatial distribution, although the nucleation mechanism is the same in both types of clays.

  17. Critical surface roughness for wall bounded flow of viscous fluids in an electric submersible pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Dhairyasheel; Siddique, Md Hamid; Kenyery, Frank; Samad, Abdus

    2017-11-01

    Surface roughness plays a vital role in the performance of an electric submersible pump (ESP). A 3-D numerical analysis has been carried out to find the roughness effect on ESP. The performance of pump for steady wall bounded turbulent flows is evaluated at different roughness values and compared with smooth surface considering a non-dimensional roughness factor K. The k- ω SST turbulence model with fine mesh at near wall region captures the rough wall effects accurately. Computational results are validated with experimental results of water (1 cP), at a design speed (3000 RPM). Maximum head is observed for a hydraulically smooth surface (K=0). When roughness factor is increased, the head decreases till critical roughness factor (K=0.1) due to frictional loss. Further increase in roughness factor (K>0.1) increases the head due to near wall turbulence. The performance of ESP is analyzed for turbulent kinetic energy and eddy viscosity at different roughness values. The wall disturbance over the rough surface affects the pressure distribution and velocity field. The roughness effect is predominant for high viscosity oil (43cP) as compared to water. Moreover, the study at off-design conditions showed that Reynolds number influences the overall roughness effect.

  18. External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems: Critical Parameters for Surface Hygrothermal Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Barreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External Thermal Insulation Composite Systems (ETICS are often used in Europe. Despite its thermal advantages, low cost, and ease of application, this system has serious problems of biological growth causing the cladding defacement. Recent studies pointed that biological growth is due to high values of surface moisture content, which mostly results from the combined effect of exterior surface condensation, wind-driven rain, and drying process. Based on numerical simulation, this paper points the most critical parameters involved in hygrothermal behaviour of ETICS, considering the influence of thermal and hygric properties of the external rendering, the effect of the characteristics of the façade, and the consequences of the exterior and interior climate on exterior surface condensation, wind-driven rain, and drying process. The model used was previously validated by comparison with the results of an “in situ” campaign. The results of the sensitivity analyses show that relative humidity and temperature of the exterior air, atmospheric radiation, and emissivity of the exterior rendering are the parameters that most influence exterior surface condensation. Wind-driven rain depends mostly on horizontal rain, building’s height, wind velocity, and orientation. The drying capacity is influenced by short-wave absorbance, incident solar radiation, and orientation.

  19. An analysis of critical heat flux on the external surface of the reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung

    1999-01-01

    CHF (Critical heat flux) on the external surface of the reactor vessel lower head is major key in the evaluation on the feasibility of IVR-EVC (In-Vessel Retention through External Vessel Cooling) concept. To identify the CHF on the external surface, considerable works have been performed. Through the review on the previous works related to the CHF on the external surface, liquid subcooling, induced flow along the external surface, ICI (In-Core Instrument) nozzle and minimum gap are identified as major parameters. According to the present analysis, the effects of the ICI nozzle and minimum gap on CHF are pronounced at the upstream of test vessel: on the other hand, the induced flow considerably affects the CHF at downstream of test vessel. In addition, the subcooling effect is shown at all of test vessel, and decreases with the increase in the elevation of test vessel. In the real application of the IVR-EVC concept, vertical position is known as a limiting position, at which thermal margin is the minimum. So, it is very important to precisely predict the CHF at vertical position in a viewpoint of gaining more thermal margins. However, the effects of the liquid subcooling and induced flow do not seem to be adequately included in the CHF correlations suggested by previous works, especially at the downstream positions

  20. Water pollution abatement programme. The Czech Republic. Project 4.2. Assessing critical loads of acidity to surface waters in the Czech Republic. Critical loads of acidity to surface waters, north-eastern Bohemia and northern Moravia, The Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, L.; Raclavsky, K.; Raclavska, H.; Matysek, D.; Hovind, H.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses estimates of critical loads of acidity to surface waters and their exceedances, for north-eastern Bohemia and Moravia in The Czech Republic. The survey covers 13 400 km{sup 2}, or 17% of the area of the country. Varying critical loads were observed within the examined region. 19% of the examined area showed exceedance of critical load and another 11% was close to exceedance. The survey should continue in Bohemia. 24 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Surface water acidification and critical loads: exploring the F-factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bishop

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available As acid deposition decreases, uncertainties in methods for calculating critical loads become more important when judgements have to be made about whether or not further emission reductions are needed. An important aspect of one type of model that has been used to calculate surface water critical loads is the empirical F-factor which estimates the degree to which acid deposition is neutralised before it reaches a lake at any particular point in time relative to the pre-industrial, steady-state water chemistry conditions.

    In this paper we will examine how well the empirical F-functions are able to estimate pre-industrial lake chemistry as lake chemistry changes during different phases of acidification and recovery. To accomplish this, we use the dynamic, process-oriented biogeochemical model SAFE to generate a plausible time series of annual runoff chemistry for ca. 140 Swedish catchments between 1800 and 2100. These annual hydrochemistry data are then used to generate empirical F-factors that are compared to the "actual" F-factor seen in the SAFE data for each lake and year in the time series. The dynamics of the F-factor as catchments acidify, and then recover are not widely recognised.

    Our results suggest that the F-factor approach worked best during the acidification phase when soil processes buffer incoming acidity. However, the empirical functions for estimating F from contemporary lake chemistry are not well suited to the recovery phase when the F-factor turns negative due to recovery processes in the soil. This happens when acid deposition has depleted the soil store of BC, and then acid deposition declines, reducing the leaching of base cations to levels below those in the pre-industrial era. An estimate of critical load from water chemistry during recovery and empirical F functions would therefore result in critical loads that are too low. Therefore, the empirical estimates of the F-factor are a significant source of

  2. Gas–liquid nucleation at large metastability: unusual features and a new formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Mantu; Singh, Rakesh S; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-01

    Nucleation at large metastability is still largely an unsolved problem, even though it is a problem of tremendous current interest, with wide-ranging practical value, from atmospheric research to materials science. It is now well accepted that the classical nucleation theory (CNT) fails to provide a qualitative picture and gives incorrect quantitative values for such quantities as activation-free energy barrier and supersaturation dependence of nucleation rate, especially at large metastability. In this paper, we present an alternative formalism to treat nucleation at large supersaturation by introducing an extended set of order parameters in terms of the kth largest liquid-like clusters, where k = 1 is the largest cluster in the system, k = 2 is the second largest cluster and so on. At low supersaturation, the size of the largest liquid-like cluster acts as a suitable order parameter. At large supersaturation, the free energy barrier for the largest liquid-like cluster disappears. We identify this supersaturation as the one at the onset of kinetic spinodal. The kinetic spinodal is system-size-dependent. Beyond kinetic spinodal many clusters grow simultaneously and competitively and hence the nucleation and growth become collective. In order to describe collective growth, we need to consider the full set of order parameters. We derive an analytic expression for the free energy of formation of the kth largest cluster. The expression predicts that, at large metastability (beyond kinetic spinodal), the barrier of growth for several largest liquid-like clusters disappears, and all these clusters grow simultaneously. The approach to the critical size occurs by barrierless diffusion in the cluster size space. The expression for the rate of barrier crossing predicts weaker supersaturation dependence than what is predicted by CNT at large metastability. Such a crossover behavior has indeed been observed in recent experiments (but eluded an explanation till now). In order

  3. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  4. Cumulative distribution functions associated with bubble-nucleation processes in cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2010-11-15

    Bubble-nucleation processes of a Lennard-Jones liquid are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Waiting time, which is the lifetime of a superheated liquid, is determined for several system sizes, and the apparent finite-size effect of the nucleation rate is observed. From the cumulative distribution function of the nucleation events, the bubble-nucleation process is found to be not a simple Poisson process but a Poisson process with an additional relaxation time. The parameters of the exponential distribution associated with the process are determined by taking the relaxation time into account, and the apparent finite-size effect is removed. These results imply that the use of the arithmetic mean of the waiting time until a bubble grows to the critical size leads to an incorrect estimation of the nucleation rate. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  5. Unifying the controlling mechanisms for the critical heat flux and quenching: The ability of liquid to contact the hot surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Nelson, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    In earlier work, we proposed a hypothesis for the occurrence of critical heat flux (CHF) during pool boiling of saturated liquids. According to this gypothesis, CHF occurs when some portion of the heater surface drives and a local point with this dry patch reaches a critical rewetting temperature, beyond which liquid an no longer contact that point. In this paper, the effects of dry-patch shape and multiple-patch interactions on the critical rewetting temperature have been investigated

  6. Characterization of neutron leakage probability, k /SUB eff/ , and critical core surface mass density of small reactor assemblies through the Trombay criticality formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Rao, K.S.; Srinivasan, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Trombay criticality formula (TCF) has been derived by incorporating a number of well-known concepts of criticality physics to enable prediction of changes in critical size or k /SUB eff/ following alterations in geometrical and physical parameters of uniformly reflected small reactor assemblies characterized by large neutron leakage from the core. The variant parameters considered are size, shape, density and diluent concentration of the core, and density and thickness of the reflector. The effect of these changes (except core size) manifests, through sigma /SUB c/ the critical surface mass density of the ''corresponding critical core,'' that sigma, the massto-surface-area ratio of the core,'' is essentially a measure of the product /rho/ extended to nonspherical systems and plays a dominant role in the TCF. The functional dependence of k /SUB eff/ on sigma/sigma /SUB c/ , the system size relative to critical, is expressed in the TCF through two alternative representations, namely the modified Wigner rational form and, an exponential form, which is given

  7. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The ultimate objective of basic studies of flow boiling in microgravity is to improve the understanding of the processes involved, as manifested by the ability to predict its behavior. This is not yet the case for boiling heat transfer even in earth gravity, despite the considerable research activity over the past 30 years. The elements that constitute the nucleate boiling process - nucleation, growth, motion, and collapse of the vapor bubbles (if the bulk liquid is subcooled) - are common to both pool and flow boiling. It is well known that the imposition of bulk liquid motion affects the vapor bubble behavior relative to pool boiling, but does not appear to significantly influence the heat transfer. Indeed, it has been recommended in the past that empirical correlations or experimental data of pool boiling be used for design purposes with forced convection nucleate boiling. It is anticipated that such will most certainly not be possible for boiling in microgravity, based on observations made with pool boiling in microgravity. In earth gravity buoyancy will act to remove the vapor bubbles from the vicinity of the heater surface regardless of how much the imposed bulk velocity is reduced, depending, of course, on the geometry of the system. Vapor bubbles have been observed to dramatically increase in size in pool boiling in microgravity, and the heat flux at which dryout took place was reduced considerably below what is generally termed the critical heat flux (CHF) in earth gravity, depending on the bulk liquid subcooling. However, at heat flux levels below dryout, the nucleate pool boiling process was enhanced considerably over that in earth gravity, in spite of the large vapor bubbles formed in microgravity and perhaps as a consequence. These large vapor bubbles tended to remain in the vicinity of the heater surface, and the enhanced heat transfer appeared to be associated with the presence of what variously has been referred to as a liquid microlayer between the

  8. Xenon-131 surface sensitive imaging of aerogels in liquid xenon near the critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaya, G; Blue, A K; Gibbs, S J; Haake, M; Cros, F; Malier, L; Meersmann, T

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, optically pumped xenon-129 has received a great deal of attention as a contrast agent in gas-phase imaging. This report is about the other NMR active xenon isotope (i.e., xenon-131, S = 32) which exhibits distinctive features for imaging applications in material sciences that are not obtainable from xenon-129 (S = (1/2)). The spin dynamics of xenon-131 in gas and liquid phases is largely determined by quadrupolar interactions which depend strongly on the surface of the surrounding materials. This leads to a surface dependent dispersion of relaxation rates, which can be substantial for this isotope. The dephasing of the coherence due to quadrupolar interactions may be used to yield surface specific contrast for imaging. Although optical pumping is not practical for this isotope because of its fast quadrupolar relaxation, a high spin density of liquid xenon close to the critical point (289 K) overcomes the sensitivity problems of xenon-131. We report the first xenon-131 magnetic resonance images and have tested this technique on various meso-porous aerogels as host structures. Aerogels of different densities and changing levels of hydration can clearly be distinguished from the images obtained. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Surface modification of the MoSiON phase shift mask to reduce critical dimension variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyeokseong; Seo, Dongwan; Lim, Sangwoo

    2013-10-01

    Phase shift masks (PSMs) were introduced to extend the limits of optical lithography. However, cleaning a MoSiON-based PSM pattern with an ammonium hydroxide/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), although efficient at cleaning the PSM pattern, etches the PSM layer, inducing changes in the phase angle and transmittance due to the introduction of variation of the critical dimension (CD). In this study, we investigated the effects of plasma treatment and furnace annealing on the etching of the MoSiON PSM in APM. In particular, we found that the etch behavior and surface chemical state after each treatment were correlated. We also compared variations in the CD between patterned PSM layers and blank masks. After O2 or N2 plasma treatment, the top surface of MoSiON had a thicker transition layer with an extreme increase in O, and a huge variation in CD was also observed after APM treatment. However, CD variation of the patterned MoSiON layer was minimal when the sample was first annealed in NH3 ambient gas and then subjected to APM treatment. This phenomenon may be related to an increase in the portion of the SiO2-like state at the top surface of the MoSiON PSM layer and its optimization without a change in the transition layer thickness.

  10. Enhancement of the droplet nucleation in a dense supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukhovitskii, D. I., E-mail: dmr@ihed.ras.ru [Joint Institute of High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13, Bd. 2, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-14

    The vapor–liquid nucleation in a dense Lennard-Jones system is studied analytically and numerically. A solution of the nucleation kinetic equations, which includes the elementary processes of condensation/evaporation involving the lightest clusters, is obtained, and the nucleation rate is calculated. Based on the equation of state for the cluster vapor, the pre-exponential factor is obtained. The latter diverges as a spinodal is reached, which results in the nucleation enhancement. The work of critical cluster formation is calculated using the previously developed two-parameter model (TPM) of small clusters. A simple expression for the nucleation rate is deduced and it is shown that the work of cluster formation is reduced for a dense vapor. This results in the nucleation enhancement as well. To verify the TPM, a simulation is performed that mimics a steady-state nucleation experiments in the thermal diffusion cloud chamber. The nucleating vapor with and without a carrier gas is simulated using two different thermostats for the monomers and clusters. The TPM proves to match the simulation results of this work and of other studies.

  11. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere–surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable quantification of air–surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0 is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc. in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere–surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air–surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.. However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann–Whitney U test. The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia. The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0

  12. Nucleation and Crystal Growth in the Formation of Hierarchical Three-Dimensional Nanoarchitecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-02-02

    project brings a new level of transformative knowledge on nucleation and crystal growth in the SPCVD NR growth processes. Specifically, quantification of the activation energy landscape guided by the OL law will allow us to establish a critical knowledge base of nucleation kinetics for SPCVD synthesis of NR branches on different material surfaces. Studying the OA kinetics will establish a transformative knowledge base to support this new crystal growth mechanism that can be applied to many functional material systems. This research will pave the road toward a capable and versatile synthesis technology for creating 3D hierarchical mesoscale structures.

  13. Physics of Three-Dimensional Bosonic Topological Insulators: Surface-Deconfined Criticality and Quantized Magnetoelectric Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin Vishwanath

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We discuss physical properties of “integer” topological phases of bosons in D=3+1 dimensions, protected by internal symmetries like time reversal and/or charge conservation. These phases invoke interactions in a fundamental way but do not possess topological order; they are bosonic analogs of free-fermion topological insulators and superconductors. While a formal cohomology-based classification of such states was recently discovered, their physical properties remain mysterious. Here, we develop a field-theoretic description of several of these states and show that they possess unusual surface states, which, if gapped, must either break the underlying symmetry or develop topological order. In the latter case, symmetries are implemented in a way that is forbidden in a strictly two-dimensional theory. While these phases are the usual fate of the surface states, exotic gapless states can also be realized. For example, tuning parameters can naturally lead to a deconfined quantum critical point or, in other situations, to a fully symmetric vortex metal phase. We discuss cases where the topological phases are characterized by a quantized magnetoelectric response θ, which, somewhat surprisingly, is an odd multiple of 2π. Two different surface theories are shown to capture these phenomena: The first is a nonlinear sigma model with a topological term. The second invokes vortices on the surface that transform under a projective representation of the symmetry group. We identify a bulk-field theory consistent with these properties, which is a multicomponent background-field theory supplemented, crucially, with a topological term. We also provide bulk sigma-model field theories of these phases and discuss a possible topological phase characterized by the thermal analog of the magnetoelectric effect.

  14. A note on the nucleation with multiple steps: parallel and series nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2012-01-28

    Parallel and series nucleation are the basic elements of the complex nucleation process when two saddle points exist on the free-energy landscape. It is pointed out that the nucleation rates follow formulas similar to those of parallel and series connection of resistors or conductors in an electric circuit. Necessary formulas to calculate individual nucleation rates at the saddle points and the total nucleation rate are summarized, and the extension to the more complex nucleation process is suggested. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  15. Ice nucleation at the nanoscale probes no man's land of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    At a given thermodynamic condition, nucleation events occur at a frequency that scales with the volume of the system. Therefore at the nanoscale, one may expect to obtain supercooled liquids below the bulk homogeneous nucleation temperature. Here we report direct computational evidence that in supercooled water nano-droplets ice nucleation rates are strongly size dependent and at the nanoscale they are several orders of magnitude smaller than in bulk water. Using a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory, we show that the Laplace pressure is partially responsible for the suppression of ice crystallization. Our simulations show that the nucleation rates found for droplets are similar to those of liquid water subject to a pressure of the order of the Laplace pressure within droplets. Our findings aid the interpretation of molecular beam experiments and support the hypothesis of surface crystallization of ice in microscopic water droplets in clouds.

  16. The TTT curves of the heterogeneous and homogeneous crystallization of lithium disilicate – A stochastic approach to crystal nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Krüger

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores the temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous crystal nucleation in a lithium disilicate glass using the stochastic approach. In particular a single lithium disilicate sample was repeatedly (284 runs undercooled to 1173 K in a PtRh-crucible and the crystallization onset time during an isothermal hold was detected in each run. The statistical distribution of the times elapsed before crystallization is described by a first order reaction with a heterogeneous crystal nucleation rate of (9.19 ± 0.04 × 10-4 s-1 while individually shaped crystallization exotherms of each run were recorded which indicate growth of a single or only few crystals during crystallization of the entire volume. The data were used together with results of previous stochastic experiments and those of double-stage heat treatments to calculate the crystallization time of a fraction of 10-4 percent for all temperatures between glass transition and melting. The derived TTT diagram shows a double nose of crystallization in the volume at large undercoolings (0.53–0.61 Tm and crystallization at the surface at small undercoolings (0.62–0.92 Tm initiated by homogeneous and heterogeneous crystal nucleation, respectively. The critical cooling rate at the heterogeneous nose is approximately 73 K s-1.

  17. Fracture Statistics: Universality vs. Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Ashivni

    2012-02-01

    We reexamine several common assumptions about fracture strength, utilizing large-scale simulations of a fuse network model and applying both renormalization-group and nucleation theory methods. Statistical distributions of fracture strengths are believed to be universal and material independent. The universal Weibull and Gumbel distributions emerge as a consequence of the ``weakest-link hypothesis'' and have been studied in the classical theory of extreme value statistics. These distributions are also the fixed points of a renormalization group (RG) flow. However, the engineering community often ignores the Gumbel distribution and uses the Weibull form almost exclusively to fit experimental data. Further, such fits are often extrapolated beyond the available data to estimate the probability of rare events in a variety of applications ranging from structural reliability to insurance pricing. Our recent studies of the random fuse network model raises doubts about most of these practices. We find that the emergent distribution of fracture strengths is the Gumbel distribution. However, the extremely slow convergence to the universal Gumbel form renders it unusable at least in this case. On the other hand, we show that a non-universal distribution derived by using a Griffiths type nucleation theory (due to Duxbury et al.) converges rapidly even for moderate system sizes. We find that while extrapolating the RG based universal Gumbel distribution is perilous and gives wildly incorrect predictions, the nucleation based non-universal results can be extrapolated with confidence. It is entertaining that fracture provides wonderful examples of the statistical mechanics tools developed to study both continuous as well as abrupt phase transitions.

  18. Study on nucleation kinetics of lysozyme crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Jing J.; Wang, Xue Z.

    2017-07-01

    The nucleation kinetics of hen egg-white lysozyme crystallization was investigated using a hot stage cooling crystallizer and a microscope to monitor the solution crystallization process in real time. Images of crystals were continuously recorded under varied precipitant and protein concentrations. The nucleation rate was found to be higher at higher precipitant concentration, and increase monotonically with protein concentration if the precipitant concentration was held constant. Attempt was made to interpret the experimental data using classical nucleation theory. It was found that the model predictions are lower than the experimental values at low supersaturations but agree well with experimental data at high supersaturations. The trends in the experimental data suggest that two nucleation mechanisms might co-exist: heterogeneous nucleation seems to be the dominant at low supersaturation while at higher supersaturation homogeneous nucleation seems to play the major role.

  19. Mapping the surface of MNKr2 and CopZ - identification of residues critical for metallotransfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Cobine, P.A.; Dameron, C.T.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Cells utilise a network of proteins that include CPx-type ATPases and metallochaperones to balance intracellular copper concentration. The Menkes ATPase has six N-terminal domains which bind Cu(I) and are critical for ATPase function. The NMR solution structure of the second domain (MNKr2) shows that the structure adopts an 'open-faced β-sandwich' fold, in which two α-helices lie over a single four stranded β-sheet. The global fold is identical to the bacterial copper chaperone CopZ MNKr2 is unable to substitute for CopZ in copper transfer to the cop operon represser, CopY. To investigate how structure affects function we have analysed the surface features of MNKr2 and CopZ Despite having the same global fold, MNKr2 and CopZ have contrasting electrostatic surfaces, which may partially explain the inability of MNKr2 to transfer copper to CopY

  20. Critical insight into the influence of the potential energy surface on fission dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, K.; Schmitt, C.; Wieleczko, J. P.; Ademard, G.; Nadtochy, P. N.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to a careful investigation of the influence of the potential energy surface on the fission process. The time evolution of nuclei at high excitation energy and angular momentum is studied by means of three-dimensional Langevin calculations performed for two different parametrizations of the macroscopic potential: the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model (FRLDM) and the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) prescription. Depending on the mass of the system, the topology of the potential throughout the deformation space of interest in fission is observed to noticeably differ within these two approaches, due to the treatment of curvature effects. When utilized in the dynamical calculation as the driving potential, the FRLDM and LSD models yield similar results in the heavy-mass region, whereas the predictions can be strongly dependent on the Potential Energy Surface (PES) for medium-mass nuclei. In particular, the mass, charge, and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be narrower with the LSD prescription. The influence of critical model parameters on our findings is carefully investigated. The present study sheds light on the experimental conditions and signatures well suited for constraining the parametrization of the macroscopic potential. Its implication regarding the interpretation of available experimental data is briefly discussed.

  1. Effect of Controlled Ice Nucleation on Stability of Lactate Dehydrogenase During Freeze-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mudhivarthi, Vamsi; Bogner, Robin H; Pikal, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Several controlled ice nucleation techniques have been developed to increase the efficiency of the freeze-drying process as well as to improve the quality of pharmaceutical products. Owing to the reduction in ice surface area, these techniques have the potential to reduce the degradation of proteins labile during freezing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ice nucleation temperature on the in-process stability of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH in potassium phosphate buffer was nucleated at -4°C, -8°C, and -12°C using ControLyo™ or allowed to nucleate spontaneously. Both the enzymatic activity and tetramer recovery after freeze-thawing linearly correlated with product ice nucleation temperature (n = 24). Controlled nucleation also significantly improved batch homogeneity as reflected by reduced inter-vial variation in activity and tetramer recovery. With the correlation established in the laboratory, the degradation of protein in manufacturing arising from ice nucleation temperature differences can be quantitatively predicted. The results show that controlled nucleation reduced the degradation of LDH during the freezing process, but this does not necessarily translate to vastly superior stability during the entire freeze-drying process. The capability of improving batch homogeneity provides potential advantages in scaling-up from lab to manufacturing scale. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Nucleation Site Density Models for CFD Simulations of Subcooled Flow Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, N. H.; Chu, I. C.; Euh, D. J.; Song, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    The framework of a CFD simulation of subcooled flow boiling basically includes a block of wall boiling models communicating with governing equations of a two-phase flow via parameters like temperature, rate of phasic change, etc. In the block of wall boiling models, a heat flux partitioning model, which describes how the heat is taken away from a heated surface, is combined with models quantifying boiling parameters, i.e. nucleation site density, and bubble departure diameter and frequency. It is realized that the nucleation site density is an important parameter for predicting the subcooled flow boiling. The number of nucleation sites per unit area decides the influence region of each heat transfer mechanism. The variation of the nucleation site density will mutually change the dynamics of vapor bubbles formed at these sites. In addition, the nucleation site density is needed as one initial and boundary condition to solve the interfacial area transport equation. A lot of effort has been devoted to mathematically formulate the nucleation site density. As a consequence, numerous correlations of the nucleation site density are available in the literature. These correlations are commonly quite different in their mathematical form as well as application range. Some correlations of the nucleation site density have been applied successfully to CFD simulations of several specific subcooled boiling flows, but in combination with different correlations of the bubble departure diameter and frequency. In addition, the values of the nucleation site density, and bubble departure diameter and frequency obtained from simulations for a same problem are relatively different, depending on which models are used, even when global characteristics, e.g., void fraction and mean bubble diameter, agree well with experimental values. It is realized that having a good CFD simulations of the subcooled flow boiling requires a detailed validations of all the models used. Owing to the importance

  3. Effects of clustered nucleation on recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Søren; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to study effects of an experimentally determined 3D distribution of nucleation sites on the recrystallization kinetics and on the evolution of the recrystallized microstructure as compared to simulations with random nucleation. It is found that although...... the experimentally observed clustering is not very strong, it changes the kinetics and the recrystallized microstructural morphology plus leads to a recrystallized grain size distribution, which is significantly broadened compared to that of random nucleation simulations. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd...

  4. An analytic model of pool boiling critical heat flux on an immerged downward facing curved surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hui; Pan, Liang-ming, E-mail: cneng@cqu.edu.cn; Wu, Yao; Chen, De-qi

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Thin liquid film and supplement of liquid contribute to the CHF. • CHF increases from the bottom to the upper of the lowerhead. • Evaporation of thin liquid film is dominant nearby bottom region. • The subcooling has significant effects on the CHF. - Abstract: In this paper, an analytical model of the critical heat flux (CHF) on the downward facing curved surface for pool boiling has been proposed, which hypothesizes that the CHF on the downward facing curved is composed of two parts, i.e. the evaporation of the thin liquid film underneath the elongated bubble adhering to the lower head outer surface and the depletion of supplement of liquid due to the relative motion of vapor bubbles along with the downward facing curved. The former adopts the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability analysis of vapor–liquid interface of the vapor jets which penetrating in the thin liquid film. When the heat flux closing to the CHF point, the vapor–liquid interface becomes highly distorted, which block liquid to feed the thin liquid film and the thin liquid film will dry out gradually. While the latter considers that the vapor bubbles move along with the downward facing curved surface, and the liquid in two-phase boundary layer enter the liquid film that will be exhausted when the CHF occurs. Based on the aforementioned mechanism and the energy balance between the thin liquid film evaporation and water feeding, and taking the subcooling of the bulk water into account, the mathematic model about the downward facing curved surface CHF has been proposed. The CHF of the downward facing curved surface for pool boiling increases along with the downward facing orientation except in the vicinity of bottom center region, because in this region the vapor bubble almost stagnates and the evaporation of the thin liquid film is dominant. In addition, the subcooling has significant effect on the CHF. Comparing the result of this model with the published experimental results show

  5. Critical analysis of the condensation of water vapor at external surface of the duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dileep; Memon, Rizwan Ahmed; Memon, Abdul Ghafoor; Ali, Intizar; Junejo, Awais

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of contraction of the insulation of the air duct of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is investigated. The compression of the insulation contracts it at joint, turn and other points of the duct. The energy loss and the condensation resulted from this contraction are also estimated. A mathematical model is developed to simulate the effects of this contraction on the heat gain, supply air temperature and external surface temperature of the duct. The simulation uses preliminary data obtained from an HVAC system installed in a pharmaceutical company while varying the operating conditions. The results reveal that insulation thickness should be kept greater than 30 mm and the volume flow rate of the selected air distribution system should be lower than 1.4m3/s to subside condensation on the external surface of the duct. Additionally, the optimum insulation thickness was determined by considering natural gas as an energy source and fiberglass as an insulation material. The optimum insulation thickness determined for different duct sizes varies from 28 to 45 mm, which is greater than the critical insulation thickness. Therefore, the chances of condensation on the external surface of the duct could be avoided at an optimum insulation thickness. Moreover, the effect of pressure loss coefficient of the duct fitting of air distribution system is estimated. The electricity consumption in air handling unit (AHU) decreases from 2.1 to 1.5 kW by decreasing the pressure loss coefficient from 1.5 to 0.5.

  6. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, E., E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it; Arciprete, F. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F. [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Magri, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche (FIM), Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, and Centro S3 CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213/A, 4100 Modena (Italy); Scuderi, M.; Nicotra, G. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  7. Structuring effects in binary nucleation : Molecular dynamics simulatons and coarse-grained nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, S.; Kraska, T.; Kalikmanov, V.I.

    2013-01-01

    Binary clusters formed by vapor-liquid nucleation are frequently nonhomogeneous objects in which components are not well mixed. The structure of a cluster plays an important role in nucleation and cluster growth. We demonstrate structuring effects by studying high-pressure nucleation and cluster

  8. Suppression of graphene nucleation on Cu(111) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannett, Will; Miller, David L.; Keller, Mark W.

    2014-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu substrates depends on a large number of factors and currently suffers from a lack of reproducibility, both within and between research groups. We used Cu(111) thin films with centimeter-sized grains to avoid variations in surface roughness, crystalline orientation, and impurity content that may affect growth on polycrystalline Cu foils. We found that exposing these films (or commercial foils) to a variety of surface treatments prior to CVD can dramatically reduce the nucleation density of graphene islands. This allowed us to select the resulting average domain size of the graphene film. In addition, this suppression of nucleation may enable seeding of graphene growth at particular locations.

  9. Ordered Nucleation Sites for the Growth of Zinc Oxide Nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Ginley, D.S.; Shaheen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) offer a promising route to low cost photovoltaic (PV) technology that can be inexpensively manufactured on a large scale for use in power generation and commercial products. Solar power conversion efficiencies of laboratory scale OPV devices have recently reached ~5%; however, projected efficiencies of at least 10% will be required for commercialization. An analogous approach that has arisen recently that can potentially increase efficiencies employs metal oxide semiconductors as the electron acceptor, creating a hybrid organic-inorganic device. This approach offers the advantage that the conduction band of the oxide can be tuned in a systematic way through doping, thus potentially achieving higher photovoltages in the device. Additionally, nanostructures of these materials can be easily grown from precursor solutions, providing a technique to precisely control the nanoscale geometry. This work focuses on using ZnO, which is known to have high electron mobility (>100 cm2/Vs), as the electron acceptor. Nanofibers of ZnO can be grown from precursors such as zinc acetate or zinc nitrate to form arrays of nanofibers into which a conjugated polymer can be intercalated to form a composite PV device. The morphology of the nanofiber array is critical to the performance of the device, but current methods of nanofiber growth from a flat, polycrystalline nucleation layer allow for little morphological control. To overcome this limitation, we have created ordered arrays of ZnO nucleation sites with controllable size and spacing. Toluene solutions of diblock copolymer micelles with ZnCl2 incorporated into the micellar cores were spin-coated onto glass substrates and etched with an O2 plasma to yield hexagonally ordered arrays of ZnO nanoparticles that functioned as nucleation sites. Changing the concentration of ZnCl2 and the molecular weight and ratio of the diblock copolymer resulted in systematic variation in the size and spacing of the

  10. Nucleation speed limit on remote fluid induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Akinci, Aybige; Malignini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes triggered by other remote seismic events are explained as a response to long-traveling seismic waves that temporarily stress the crust. However, delays of hours or days after seismic waves pass through are reported by several studies, which are difficult to reconcile with the transient stresses imparted by seismic waves. We show that these delays are proportional to magnitude and that nucleation times are best fit to a fluid diffusion process if the governing rupture process involves unlocking a magnitude-dependent critical nucleation zone. It is well established that distant earthquakes can strongly affect the pressure and distribution of crustal pore fluids. Earth’s crust contains hydraulically isolated, pressurized compartments in which fluids are contained within low-permeability walls. We know that strong shaking induced by seismic waves from large earthquakes can change the permeability of rocks. Thus, the boundary of a pressurized compartment may see its permeability rise. Previously confined, overpressurized pore fluids may then diffuse away, infiltrate faults, decrease their strength, and induce earthquakes. Magnitude-dependent delays and critical nucleation zone conclusions can also be applied to human-induced earthquakes.

  11. Nucleation speed limit on remote fluid-induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Malagnini, Luca; Akinci, Aybige

    2017-01-01

    Earthquakes triggered by other remote seismic events are explained as a response to long-traveling seismic waves that temporarily stress the crust. However, delays of hours or days after seismic waves pass through are reported by several studies, which are difficult to reconcile with the transient stresses imparted by seismic waves. We show that these delays are proportional to magnitude and that nucleation times are best fit to a fluid diffusion process if the governing rupture process involves unlocking a magnitude-dependent critical nucleation zone. It is well established that distant earthquakes can strongly affect the pressure and distribution of crustal pore fluids. Earth’s crust contains hydraulically isolated, pressurized compartments in which fluids are contained within low-permeability walls. We know that strong shaking induced by seismic waves from large earthquakes can change the permeability of rocks. Thus, the boundary of a pressurized compartment may see its permeability rise. Previously confined, overpressurized pore fluids may then diffuse away, infiltrate faults, decrease their strength, and induce earthquakes. Magnitude-dependent delays and critical nucleation zone conclusions can also be applied to human-induced earthquakes. PMID:28845448

  12. Effect of system compliance on crack nucleation in soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Shruti; Crosby, Alfred

    Puncture mechanics in soft materials is critical for the development of new surgical instruments, robot assisted-surgery as well as new materials used in personal protective equipment. However, analytical techniques to study this important deformation process are limited. We have previously described a simple experimental method to study the resistive forces and failure of a soft gel being indented with a small tip needle. We showed that puncture stresses can reach two orders of magnitude greater than the material modulus and that the force response is insensitive to the geometry of the indenter at large indentation depths. Currently, we are examining the influence of system compliance on crack nucleation (e.g. puncture) in soft gels. It is well known that system compliance influences the peak force in adhesion and traditional fracture experiments; however, its influence on crack nucleation is unresolved. We find that as the system becomes more compliant, lower peak forces required to puncture a gel of certain stiffness with the same indenter were measured. We are developing scaling relationships to relate the peak puncture force and system compliance. Our findings introduce new questions with regard to the possibility of intrinsic materials properties related to the critical stress and energy for crack nucleation in soft materials.

  13. Thermodynamic formulation of the barrier for heterogeneous pinned nucleation: Implication to the crossover scenarios associated with barrierless and homogeneous nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sanat K; Das, Prasanta K; Maiti, Biswajit

    2017-06-21

    The effect of contact line pinning on nucleation is reported using continuum thermodynamics. Based on the principle of the free-energy maximization, closed-form expressions in the dimensionless form for the free-energy of the three-phase metastable system and the thermodynamic barrier are formulated with respect to the system geometry and the substrate wettability. The condition of maximality limits the dynamic contact angle within the cluster-phase-phobic regime. The dimensionless nucleation barrier or the potency factor can be divided into two components related to the system geometry and the pinning effect. Depending on the relative value of the equilibrium and the critical dynamic contact angle, the contact line pinning can either have favorable or adverse effects. Associated pinning-depinning transition can also lead to the crossovers related to barrierless and homogeneous nucleation. Contact line tension is found to have a considerable effect during these transitional scenarios. Complete wetting transition associated with barrierless nucleation can take place due to the presence of tensile (negative) line tension. On the other hand, complete drying transition related to homogeneous nucleation can occur when line tension is compressive (positive) in nature. The pinning has a favorable effect only when the substrate wettability is within the cluster-phase-philic regime. There can be favorable, adverse, or no pinning effects when the substrate wettability is within the cluster-phase-phobic regime. Although the contact line is pinned, the minimum value of the potency factor is obtained when equilibrium and dynamic contact angles are equal.

  14. Investigation of a GaN Nucleation Layer on a Patterned Sapphire Substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Meng; Zeng Yi-Ping; Wang Jun-Xi; Hu Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A low-temperature GaN (LT-GaN) nucleation layer is grown on a patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The surface morphology of the LT-GaN is investigated and the selective nucleation phenomenon in the growth process of the LT-GaN nucleation layer is discovered. Meanwhile, effects of thickness of the LT-GaN and the annealing process on the phenomenon are also discussed. A pattern model is also proposed to analyze the possible mechanisms in atomic scale. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  15. Investigation of a GaN nucleation layer on a patterned sapphire substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Meng; Zeng Yiping; Wang Junxi; Hu Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A low-temperature GaN (LT-GaN) nucleation layer is grown on a patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The surface morphology of the LT-GaN is investigated and the selective nucleation phenomenon in the growth process of the LT-GaN nucleation layer is discovered. Meanwhile, effects of thickness of the LT-GaN and the annealing process on the phenomenon are also discussed. A pattern model is also proposed to analyze the possible mechanisms in atomic scale. (authors)

  16. Nucleation and growth kinetics of zirconium hydroxide by precipitation with ammonium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleson, T.E.; Chipman, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study of the nucleation and growth kinetics of the precipitation of zirconium hydroxide from the reaction of hexafluorozirconate solution with ammonium hydroxide are reported. The McCabe linear growth rate model was used to correlate the results. The growth rate decreased with residence time and supersaturation for studies with 7 residence times (3.5 - 90 minutes and two supersaturation ratios (0.03 - 0.04, and 0.4). The nucleation rate increased with residence time and supersaturation. A negative kinetic order of nucleation was observed that may be due to the inhibition of particle growth by adsorption of reacting species on the crystal surfaces

  17. Size-effects on the surface tension near the critical point: Monte Carlo simulations of the Lennard-Jones fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Florent; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2018-02-01

    We report Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid at the liquid-vapor interface in the critical region. A slab-based tail method is associated with the MC simulations to approach as close as possible the critical point (T∗ = 0.98 TC∗) . We investigate then the impact of system-sizes on the surface tension and coexisting densities by considering very large box dimensions for which the surface tension is independent of system-sizes at low temperatures.

  18. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem.

  19. Heterogeneous nucleation in hypermonotectic aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M.; Ratke, L.; Kaban, I.; Hoyer, W.

    2012-01-01

    Simple casting experiments were set up to solve the question, if heterogeneous nucleation of the liquid-liquid decomposition in monotectic systems is possible. Al-Pb alloys with different inoculants were solidified, and the resulting microstructure was analysed by SEM and X-ray microtomography. Pronounced changes in the distribution of the lead precipitations indicate that it is possible to trigger the nucleation.

  20. Tuning Ice Nucleation with Supercharged Polypeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Huige; Ma, Chao; Li, Kaiyong; Liu, Kai; Loznik, Mark; Teeuwen, Rosalie; van Hest, Jan C. M.; Zhou, Xin; Herrmann, Andreas; Wang, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Supercharged unfolded polypeptides (SUPs) are exploited for controlling ice nucleation via tuning the nature of charge and charge density of SUPs. The results show that positively charged SUPs facilitate ice nucleation, while negatively charged ones suppress it. Moreover, the charge density of the

  1. Crystal nucleation of colloidal hard dumbbells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, R.; Dijkstra, M.

    2011-01-01

    Using computer simulations, we investigate the homogeneous crystal nucleation in suspensions of colloidal hard dumbbells. The free energy barriers are determined by Monte Carlo simulations using the umbrella sampling technique. We calculate the nucleation rates for the plastic crystal and the

  2. Investigations on nucleation thermodynamical parameters of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Investigations on nucleation thermodynamical parameters are very essential for the successful growth of good quality single crystals from high temperature solution. A theoretical estimation of the nucleation thermodynamical parameters like interfacial energy between the solid Nd123 and its flux BaO–CuO, metastable ...

  3. Fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Laird, C. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ramamurty, U. [Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering; Suresh, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Campbell, G.H.; King, W.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for Materials Science

    1999-04-01

    The process of fatigue crack nucleation in metallic materials is reviewed placing emphasis in results derived for pure FCC metals with wavy slip behavior. The relationship between Persistent Slip Bands (PSB`s) and crack initiation will be examined for both single crystals and polycrystals, including the conditions for inter- and transgranular crack nucleation and their connection to type of loading, crystallography and slip geometry. The latter has been found to be an important parameter in the nucleation of intergranular cracks in polycrystals subjected to high strain fatigue, whereby primary slip bands with long slip lengths impinging on a grain boundary produce intergranular crack nucleation under the right conditions. Recent results related to intergranular crack nucleation in copper bicrystals and crack nucleation in Cu/Sapphire interfaces indicate that this mechanism controls crack nucleation in those simpler systems as well. Furthermore, it is found that under multiple slip conditions the crack nucleation location is controlled by the presence of local single slip conditions and long slip lengths for a particular Burgers vector that does not have to be in the primary slip system.

  4. Ice nucleation from aqueous NaCl droplets with and without marine diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Alpert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ice formation in the atmosphere by homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes in cloud microphysics and climate. Here we describe our investigation of the marine environment as a potential source of atmospheric IN by experimentally observing homogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous NaCl droplets and comparing against heterogeneous ice nucleation from aqueous NaCl droplets containing intact and fragmented diatoms. Homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation are studied as a function of temperature and water activity, aw. Additional analyses are presented on the dependence of diatom surface area and aqueous volume on heterogeneous freezing temperatures, ice nucleation rates, ωhet, ice nucleation rate coefficients, Jhet, and differential and cumulative ice nuclei spectra, k(T and K(T, respectively. Homogeneous freezing temperatures and corresponding nucleation rate coefficients are in agreement with the water activity based homogeneous ice nucleation theory within experimental and predictive uncertainties. Our results confirm, as predicted by classical nucleation theory, that a stochastic interpretation can be used to describe the homogeneous ice nucleation process. Heterogeneous ice nucleation initiated by intact and fragmented diatoms can be adequately represented by a modified water activity based ice nucleation theory. A horizontal shift in water activity, Δaw, het = 0.2303, of the ice melting curve can describe median heterogeneous freezing temperatures. Individual freezing temperatures showed no dependence on available diatom surface area and aqueous volume. Determined at median diatom freezing temperatures for aw from 0.8 to 0.99, ωhet~0.11+0.06−0.05 s−1, Jhet~1.0+1.16−0.61×104 cm−2

  5. Quantum nucleation of phase slips in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, H.P.; Blatter, G.; Geschkenbein, V.B.; Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of quantum fluctuations in a Bose-Einstein condensate confined within a thin cylindrical trap and perturbed by a moving impurity. We derive an effective action which maps the problem to that of a massive particle with damping in a periodic potential. Quantum fluctuations lead to a finite nucleation rate of phase slips and we make use of known results in our determination of the transport characteristic. Real Bose-Einstein condensate are finite systems and exhibit interesting effects depending on topology: in superfluid rings we obtain a critical velocity below which the nucleation rate is quenched. In a cigar shaped condensate the low-energy action is equivalent to that of a capacitively shunted Josephson junction. The state with a well defined phase difference across the impurity then is unstable towards a decoupled state with a fixed number of particles on either side of the impurity. (orig.)

  6. [Importance of cleaning and disinfection of critical surfaces in dental health services. Impact of an intervention program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Véliz, Elena; Vergara, Teresa; Pearcy, Mercedes; Dabanch, Jeannette

    Introduction Dental care has become a challenge for healthcare associated infection prevention programs, since the environment, within other factors, plays an important role in the transmission chain. Materials and Methods An intervention program was designed for the Dental Unit of Hospital Militar de Santiago, between years 2014 and 2015. The program contemplated 3 stages: diagnostic, intervention and evaluation stage. Objective To improve the safety of critical surfaces involved in dental healthcare. Results During the diagnostic stage, the cleaning and disinfection process was found to be deficient. The most contaminated critical surface was the instrument holder unit, then the clean area and lamp handle. The surfaces that significantly reduced their contamination, after the intervention, were the clean area and the instrument carrier unit. Conclusion Training in the processes of cleaning and disinfecting surfaces and dental equipment is one of the cost-effective strategies in preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAI), with simple and easy-to-apply methods.

  7. Theories of nucleation and growth of bubbles and voids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speight, M.V.

    1977-01-01

    The application of classical nucleation theory to the formation of voids from a supersaturated concentration of vacancies is reviewed. The effect of a dissolved concentration of barley soluble gas on the nucleation rate of voids is emphasized. Exposure to a damaging flux of irradiation is the most effective way of introducing a vacancy supersaturation, but interstitials are produced at an equal rate. The concentration of interstitials inhibits the nucleation of voids which can occur only in the presence of dislocations since they preferentially absorb interstitials. It is well known that a definite value of internal gas pressure is necessary to stabilize a bubble so that it shows no tendencies to either shrink or grow. The arguments are reviewed which conclude that this pressure is determined by the specific surface free energy of the solid rather than the surface tension. While the former property refers to the energy necessary to create new surface, the latter is a measure of the work done in elastically stretching a a given surface. The presence of an equilibrium gas bubble leaves the stresses in the surrounding solid unperturbed only when surface energy and surface tension are numerically equal. A bubble with internal pressure greater than the restraint offered by surface energy tends to grow to relieve the excess pressure. The mechanism of growth can involve the migration of vacancies from remote sources to the bubble surface or the plastic straining of the solid surrounding the bubble. The kinetics of both mechanisms are developed and compared. The theory of growth of grain-boundary voids by vacancy condensation under an applied stress is also considered. (author)

  8. Heterogeneous nucleation in multi-component vapor on a partially wettable charged conducting particle. II. The generalized Laplace, Gibbs-Kelvin, and Young equations and application to nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noppel, M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Winkler, P. M.; Kulmala, M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2013-10-01

    Based on the results of a previous paper [M. Noppel, H. Vehkamäki, P. M. Winkler, M. Kulmala, and P. E. Wagner, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134107 (2013)], we derive a thermodynamically consistent expression for reversible or minimal work needed to form a dielectric liquid nucleus of a new phase on a charged insoluble conducting sphere within a uniform macroscopic one- or multicomponent mother phase. The currently available model for ion-induced nucleation assumes complete spherical symmetry of the system, implying that the seed ion is immediately surrounded by the condensing liquid from all sides. We take a step further and treat more realistic geometries, where a cap-shaped liquid cluster forms on the surface of the seed particle. We derive the equilibrium conditions for such a cluster. The equalities of chemical potentials of each species between the nucleus and the vapor represent the conditions of chemical equilibrium. The generalized Young equation that relates contact angle with surface tensions, surface excess polarizations, and line tension, also containing the electrical contribution from triple line excess polarization, expresses the condition of thermodynamic equilibrium at three-phase contact line. The generalized Laplace equation gives the condition of mechanical equilibrium at vapor-liquid dividing surface: it relates generalized pressures in neighboring bulk phases at an interface with surface tension, excess surface polarization, and dielectric displacements in neighboring phases with two principal radii of surface curvature and curvatures of equipotential surfaces in neighboring phases at that point. We also re-express the generalized Laplace equation as a partial differential equation, which, along with electrostatic Laplace equations for bulk phases, determines the shape of a nucleus. We derive expressions that are suitable for calculations of the size and composition of a critical nucleus (generalized version of the classical Kelvin-Thomson equation).

  9. Using rheometry to determine nucleation density in a colored system containing a nucleating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhe; Steenbakkers, Rudi J.A.; Peters, Gerrit W.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Materials Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Giboz, Julien [Universite de Savoie, LMOPS, CNRS UMR5041, Le Bourget-du-Lac (France)

    2011-12-15

    A new suspension-based rheological method was applied to experimentally study the crystallization of a nucleating agent (NA) filled isotactic polypropylene. This method allows for determination of point nucleation densities where other methods fail. For example, optical microscopy can fail because nucleation densities become too high to be counted (materials with effective NA) or crystallites are not easily visible (colored materials), while differential scanning calorimetry does not allow the effect of flow to be studied. Both quiescent and mild-shear-induced crystallization were investigated. The results show that the addition of a nucleating agent increases the nucleation density by six decades for quiescent crystallization. The effect of shear on crystallization in the presence of a nucleating agent was assessed, and it is demonstrated that, at least for this system, the effect of shear is much smaller than the effect of the nucleating agent. (orig.)

  10. Saturation and nucleation in hot nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deangelis, A.R.

    1990-07-01

    We investigate nuclear fragmentation in a supersaturated system using classical nucleation theory. This allows us to go outside the normally applied constraint of chemical equilibrium. The system is governed by a virial equation of state, which we use to find an expression for the density as a function of pressure and temperature. The evolution of the system is discussed in terms of the phase diagram. Corrections are included to account for the droplet surface and all charges contained in the system. Using this model we investigate and discuss the effects of temperature and saturation, and compare the results to those of other models of fragmentation. We also discuss the limiting temperatures of the system for the cases with and without chemical equilibrium. We find that large nuclei will be formed in saturated systems, even above the limiting temperature as previously defined. We also find that saturation and temperature dominate surface and Coulomb effects. The effects are quite large, thus even a qualitative inspection of the yields may give an indication of the conditions during fragmentation

  11. Nucleation and growth of cadherin adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Mireille; Thoumine, Olivier; Brevier, Julien; Choquet, Daniel; Riveline, Daniel; Mege, Rene-Marc

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell contact formation relies on the recruitment of cadherin molecules and their anchoring to actin. However, the precise chronology of events from initial cadherin trans-interactions to adhesion strengthening is unclear, in part due to the lack of access to the distribution of cadherins within adhesion zones. Using N-cadherin expressing cells interacting with N-cadherin coated surfaces, we characterized the formation of cadherin adhesions at the ventral cell surface. TIRF and RIC microscopies revealed streak-like accumulations of cadherin along actin fibers. FRAP analysis indicated that engaged cadherins display a slow turnover at equilibrium, compatible with a continuous addition and removal of cadherin molecules within the adhesive contact. Association of cadherin cytoplasmic tail to actin as well as actin cables and myosin II activity are required for the formation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions. Using time lapse microscopy we deciphered how cadherin adhesions form and grow. As lamellipodia protrude, cadherin foci stochastically formed a few microns away from the cell margin. Neo-formed foci coalesced aligned and coalesced with preformed foci either by rearward sliding or gap filling to form cadherin adhesions. Foci experienced collapse at the rear of cadherin adhesions. Based on these results, we present a model for the nucleation, directional growth and shrinkage of cadherin adhesions

  12. Nucleation and growth kinetics of palladium nanoparticles on thin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1073 K and deposition time of 1000 s. The nucleation kinetics is interpreted according to the theory of random nucleation. The general scheme is consisting of three stages namely, nucleation, growth and coalescence. The saturation density of ...

  13. Atomic Scale Imaging of Nucleation and Growth Trajectories of an Interfacial Bismuth Nanodroplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxuan; Bunes, Benjamin R; Zang, Ling; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-02-23

    Because of the lack of experimental evidence, much confusion still exists on the nucleation and growth dynamics of a nanostructure, particularly of metal. The situation is even worse for nanodroplets because it is more difficult to induce the formation of a nanodroplet while imaging the dynamic process with atomic resolution. Here, taking advantage of an electron beam to induce the growth of Bi nanodroplets on a SrBi2Ta2O9 platelet under a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), we directly observed the detailed growth pathways of Bi nanodroplets from the earliest stage of nucleation that were previously inaccessible. Atomic scale imaging reveals that the dynamics of nucleation involves a much more complex trajectory than previously predicted based on classical nucleation theory (CNT). The monatomic Bi layer was first formed in the nucleation process, which induced the formation of the prenucleated clusters. Following that, critical nuclei for the nanodroplets formed both directly from the addition of atoms to the prenucleated clusters by the classical growth process and indirectly through transformation of an intermediate liquid film based on the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode, in which the liquid film was induced by the self-assembly of the prenucleated clusters. Finally, the growth of the Bi nanodroplets advanced through the classical pathway and sudden droplet coalescence. This study allows us to visualize the critical steps in the nucleation process of an interfacial nanodroplet, which suggests a revision of the perspective of CNT.

  14. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > -10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2013-04-01

    Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at temperatures > -10

  15. Nucleation kinetics of ɛ-caprolactam melts in the presence of water impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouropoulos, Nicolaos Ch.; Kontoyannis, Christos G.; Koutsoukos, Petros G.

    1997-02-01

    The nucleation of ɛ-caprolactam in melts containing water impurities between 3% and 7% w/w was investigated in a batch reactor monitoring melt temperature. The induction times preceding the formation of ɛ-caprolactam nuclei were inversely proportional to the melt supersaturation and a threshold in the supersaturation of about 6% was found for homogenous nucleation. The interfacial tensions calculated using the classical nucleation theory ranged between 0.8 and 1.5 mJ m -2 for water content of 3%-7%, respectively. The concomitant increase of the size of the critical nucleus suggested that water inhibits the process of nucleation of ɛ-caprolactam in melts containing water impurity. This conclusion was further confirmed for the rates of crystal growth of the ɛ-caprolactam in the melts measured from the rates of temperature increase with time.

  16. Nucleation in the presence of long-range interactions. [performed on ferroelectric barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, P.

    1989-01-01

    Unlike droplet nucleation near a liquid-gas critical point, the decay of metastable phases in crystalline materials is strongly affected by the presence of long-range forces. Field quench experiments performed on the ferroelectric barium titanate indicate that nucleation in this material is markedly different from that observed in liquids. In this paper, a theory for nucleation at a first-order phase transition in which the mediating forces are long range is presented. It is found that the long-range force induces cooperative nucleation and growth processes, and that this feedback mechanism produces a well-defined delay time with a sharp onset in the transformation to the stable phase. Closed-form expressions for the characteristic onset time and width of the transition are developed, in good agreement with numerical and experimental results.

  17. Comparing crystal-melt interfacial free energies through homogeneous nucleation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xianming; Li Mo

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we compared several available crystal-melt interfacial free energies via homogeneous nucleation rates in a pure Lennard-Jones model system using both model fitting and numerical methods. We examined the homogeneous nucleation temperature obtained from the classical nucleation theory using the available interfacial free energies from three different methods as inputs, i.e. the free energy integration method, the interface fluctuation method and the classical nucleation theory based method. We found that the critical temperature obtained by using the interfacial free energy calculated recently (Bai and Li 2006 J. Chem. Phys. 124 124707) is in better agreement with that obtained from spontaneous crystallization in an independent molecular dynamics simulation. The discrepancies among the interface energies are discussed in light of these results

  18. Energy dispersive-EXAFS of Pd nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.-Y.; Booth, S. G.; Uehara, A.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Cibin, G.; Pham, V.-T.; Nataf, L.; Dryfe, R. A. W.; Schroeder, S. L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Energy dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EDE) has been applied to Pd nanoparticle nucleation at a liquid/liquid interface under control over the interfacial potential and thereby the driving force for nucleation. Preliminary analysis focusing on Pd K edge-step height determination shows that under supersaturated conditions the concentration of Pd near the interface fluctuate over a period of several hours, likely due to the continuous formation and dissolution of sub-critical nuclei. Open circuit potential measurements conducted ex-situ in a liquid/liquid electrochemical cell support this view, showing that the fluctuations in Pd concentration are also visible as variations in potential across the liquid/liquid interface. By decreasing the interfacial potential through inclusion of a common ion (tetraethylammonium, TEA+) the Pd nanoparticle growth rate could be slowed down, resulting in a smooth nucleation process. Eventually, when the TEA+ ions reached an equilibrium potential, Pd nucleation and particle growth were inhibited.

  19. Direct observation of hierarchical nucleation of martensite and size-dependent superelasticity in shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifeng; Ding, Xiangdong; Li, Ju; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun

    2014-02-21

    Martensitic transformation usually creates hierarchical internal structures beyond mere change of the atomic crystal structure. Multi-stage nucleation is thus required, where nucleation (level-1) of the underlying atomic crystal lattice does not have to be immediately followed by the nucleation of higher-order superstructures (level-2 and above), such as polysynthetic laths. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we directly observe the nucleation of the level-2 superstructure in a Cu-Al-Ni single crystal under compression, with critical super-nuclei size L2c around 500 nm. When the sample size D decreases below L2c, the superelasticity behavior changes from a flat stress plateau to a continuously rising stress-strain curve. Such size dependence definitely would impact the application of shape memory alloys in miniaturized MEMS/NEMS devices.

  20. A critical review on the survival and elimination of norovirus in food and on food contact surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    This critical review covers the survival of human norovirus (NoV) in foods and on food contact surfaces as well as the state-of-the-art on the effectiveness of methods to eliminate these viruses. Virus survival studies are reviewed for water, soils and organic wastes, on fomites, hands, fruits and v...

  1. Interfacial energies for heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate on mica and quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyun; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Lee, Byeongdu; Waychunas, Glenn A; Jun, Young-Shin

    2014-05-20

    Interfacial free energies often control heterogeneous nucleation of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) on mineral surfaces. Here we report an in situ experimental study of CaCO3 nucleation on mica (muscovite) and quartz, which allows us to obtain the interfacial energies governing heterogeneous nucleation. In situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) was used to measure nucleation rates at different supersaturations. The rates were incorporated into classical nucleation theory to calculate the effective interfacial energies (α'). Ex situ Raman spectroscopy identified both calcite and vaterite as CaCO3 polymorphs; however, vaterite is the most probable heterogeneous nuclei mineral phase. The α' was 24 mJ/m(2) for the vaterite-mica system and 32 mJ/m(2) for the vaterite-quartz system. The smaller α' of the CaCO3-mica system led to smaller particles and often higher particle densities on mica. A contributing factor affecting α' in our system was the smaller structural mismatch between CaCO3 and mica compared to that between CaCO3 and quartz. The extent of hydrophilicity and the surface charge could not explain the observed CaCO3 nucleation trend on mica and quartz. The findings of this study provide new thermodynamic parameters for subsurface reactive transport modeling and contribute to our understanding of mechanisms where CaCO3 formation on surfaces is of concern.

  2. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Budke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to −40 °C (233 K and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min−1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL−1 to 1 mg mL−1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  3. Intermediate Nucleation State of GaN Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. X.; Xie, M. H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    Homoexpitaxial nucleation of GaN during molecular-beam epitaxy is followed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). We observe a metastable nucleation state, which manifests as “ghost” islands in STM images. These “ghost” islands can be irreversibly driven into normal islands by continuous STM imaging. It is further established that the “ghost” island formation is related to the presence of excess Ga atoms on the surface: Normal islands are only seen under the N-rich or stoichiometric flux condition, whereas “ghost” islands are observed under Ga-rich conditions. For intermediate excess-Ga coverages, both normal and “ghost” islands are present, however, they show distinctly different sizes, suggesting different nucleation states for the two. A growth model is proposed to account for the formation of metastable, “ghost” islands. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out and main features of the surface are reproduced. We acknowledge financial support from HK RGC under grant Nos. 7396/00P, 7142/99P, and 7121/00P.

  4. Suppressing Ice Nucleation of Supercooled Condensate with Biphilic Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Youmin; Yu, Miao; Shang, Yuhe; Zhou, Peng; Song, Ruyuan; Xu, Xiaonan; Chen, Xuemei; Wang, Zuankai; Yao, Shuhuai

    2018-02-01

    Preventing or minimizing ice formation in supercooled water is of prominent importance in many infrastructures, transportation, and cooling systems. The overall phase change heat transfer on icephobic surfaces, in general, is intentionally sacrificed to suppress the nucleation of water and ice. However, in a condensation frosting process, inhibiting freezing without compromising the water condensation has been an unsolved challenge. Here we show that this conflict between anti-icing and efficient condensation cooling can be resolved by utilizing biphilic topography with patterned high-contrast wettability. By creating a varying interfacial thermal barrier underneath the supercooled condensate, the biphilic structures tune the nucleation rates of water and ice in the sequential condensation-to-freezing process. Our experimental and theoretical investigation of condensate freezing dynamics further unravels the correlation between the onset of droplet freezing and its characteristic radius, offering a new insight for controlling the multiphase transitions among vapor, water, and ice in supercooled conditions.

  5. Relating Silica Scaling in Reverse Osmosis to Membrane Surface Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tiezheng; Zhao, Song; Boo, Chanhee; Hashmi, Sara M; Elimelech, Menachem

    2017-04-18

    We investigated the relationship between membrane surface properties and silica scaling in reverse osmosis (RO). The effects of membrane hydrophilicity, free energy for heterogeneous nucleation, and surface charge on silica scaling were examined by comparing thin-film composite polyamide membranes grafted with a variety of polymers. Results show that the rate of silica scaling was independent of both membrane hydrophilicity and free energy for heterogeneous nucleation. In contrast, membrane surface charge demonstrated a strong correlation with the extent of silica scaling (R 2 > 0.95, p scaling, whereas a more negative membrane surface charge led to reduced scaling. This observation suggests that deposition of negatively charged silica species on the membrane surface plays a critical role in silica scale formation. Our findings provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms governing silica scaling in reverse osmosis and highlight the potential of membrane surface modification as a strategy to reduce silica scaling.

  6. Damage nucleation in Si during ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; Fathy, D.; Narayan, J.

    1984-01-01

    Damage nucleation in single crystals of silicon during ion irradiation is investigated. Experimental results and mechanisms for damage nucleation during both room and liquid nitrogen temperature irradiation with different mass ions are discussed. It is shown that the accumulation of damage during room temperature irradiation depends on the rate of implantation. These dose rate effects are found to decrease in magnitude as the mass of the ions is increased. The significance of dose rate effects and their mass dependence on nucleation mechanisms is discussed

  7. Investigation of PLC band nucleation in AA5754

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X., E-mail: Xiaoqun.Feng@tu-dortmund.de [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Fischer, G., E-mail: Gottfried.Fischer@rif-ev.de [RIF e.V., Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Str. 20, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany); Zielke, R., E-mail: Reiner.Zielke@tu-dortmund.de [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Svendsen, B., E-mail: Bob.Svendsen@udo.edu [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Mechanik, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany); Tillmann, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Tillmann@udo.edu [Technische Universitaet Dortmund, Fakultaet Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous propagation of bands in transverse and longitudinal directions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PLC band nucleation at the back front of Lueders bands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic time of critical strain decreases with strain rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous existence of two type-B bands at specimen shoulder. - Abstract: The purpose of the present work is the experimental investigation of the nucleation of PLC deformation bands in the aluminium alloy AA5754. The PLC bands are investigated using both mechanical methods and infrared (IR) thermography. The latter employs a high-speed IR camera which captures local changes of radiated power resulting from mechanical dissipation and heating due to the nucleation of PLC bands. The resulting IR images are used to determine spatio-temporal power field variations via image subtraction. Furthermore, band trajectories obtained from the IR images are used to study possible correlations between the spatio-temporal evolution of stress and radiated power in the specimens and PLC band development.

  8. Optical Feather and Foil for Shape and Dynamic Load Sensing of Critical Flight Surfaces, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future flight vehicles may comprise complex flight surfaces requiring coordinated in-situ sensing and actuation. Inspired by the complexity of the flight surfaces on...

  9. Cross-Linking Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Tetragonal chicken egg white crystals consist of 4(sub 3) helices running in alternating directions, the helix rows having a two fold symmetry with each other. The unit cell consists of one complete tetrameric turn from each of two adjacent helices (an octamer). PBC analysis indicates that the helix intermolecular bonds are the strongest in the crystal, therefore likely formed first. AFM analysis of the (110) surface shows only complete helices, no half steps or bisected helices being found, while AFM line scans to measure the growth step increments show that they are multiples of the 4(sub 3) helix tetramer dimensions. This supports our thesis that the growth units are in fact multiples of the four molecule 4(sub 3) helix unit, the "average" growth unit size for the (110) face being an octamer (two turns about the helix) and the (101) growth unit averaging about the size of a hexamer. In an effort to better understand the species involved in the crystal nucleation and growth process, we have initiated an experimental program to study the species formed in solution compared to what is found in the crystal through covalent cross-linking studies. These experiments use the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent aminoethyl-4-azidonitroanaline (AEANA). An aliphatic amine at one end is covalently attached to the protein by a carbodiimide-mediated reaction, and a photo reactive group at the other can be used to initiate crosslinking. Modifications to the parent structure can be used to alter the distance between the two reactive groups and thus the cross-linking agents "reach". In practice, the cross-linking agent is first coupled to the asp101 side chain through the amine group. Asp101 lies within the active site cleft, and previous work with fluorescent probes had shown that derivatives at this site still crystallize in the tetragonal space group. This was also found to be the case with the AEANA derivative, which gave red tetragonal crystals. The protein now has a

  10. Immersion Freezing of Aluminas: The Effect of Crystallographic Properties on Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M.; Chong, E.; Freedman, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles serve as the nuclei for heterogeneous ice nucleation, a process that allows for ice to form at higher temperatures and lower supersaturations with respect to ice. This process is essential to the formation of ice in cirrus clouds. Heterogeneous ice nucleation is affected by many factors including the composition, crystal structure, porosity, and surface area of the particles. However, these factors are not well understood and, as such, are difficult to account for in climate models. To test the effects of crystal structure on ice nucleation, a system of transition aluminas (Al2O3) that differ only in their crystal structure, despite being compositionally similar, were tested using immersion freezing. Particles were immersed in water and placed into a temperature controlled chamber. Freezing events were then recorded as the chamber was cooled to negative 30 °. Alpha-alumina, which is a member of the hexagonal crystal system, showed a significantly higher temperature at which all particles froze in comparison to other samples. This supports the hypothesis that, since a hexagonal crystal structure is the lowest energy state for ice, hexagonal surface structures would best facilitate ice nucleation. However, a similar sample of hexagonal chi-alumina did not show the same results. Further analysis of the samples will be done to characterize surface structures and composition. These conflicting data sets raise interesting questions about the effect of other surface features, such as surface area and porosity, on ice nucleation.

  11. Wide Strip Backfill Mining for Surface Subsidence Control and Its Application in Critical Mining Conditions of a Coal Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Cao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical mining under buildings, railways, and water bodies (BRW brings the contradiction between high recovery rate and minor environmental hazards. To lessen this contradiction, an innovative mining method referred to as “wide strip backfill mining” (WSBM was proposed in this study. A Winkler beam model is applied to the primary key strata (PKS, and the study revealed a surface subsidence control mechanism and designed the technical parameters of the method. The respective numerical simulations suggested the feasibility of the proposed method and the main influencing factors on surface subsidence can be ranked in descending order as wide filling strip width (WFSW, filling ratio, and pillar width. Meanwhile, a drop in the WFSW from 96 m to 72 m brought out the surface subsidence reduction by 44.5%. By using the super-high water content filling material, the proposed method was applied in the Taoyi coal mine under critical mining conditions. The resulting surface subsidence and deformations met the safety requirements for building protection level 1, and the recovery rate reached 75.9%. Moreover, the application of the method achieved significant technical and economic benefits. The research can provide a theoretical and experimental substantiation for critical mining under BRW.

  12. Nucleation versus instability race in strained films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kailang; Berbezier, Isabelle; David, Thomas; Favre, Luc; Ronda, Antoine; Abbarchi, Marco; Voorhees, Peter; Aqua, Jean-Noël

    2017-10-01

    Under the generic term "Stranski-Krastanov" are grouped two different growth mechanisms of SiGe quantum dots. They result from the self-organized Asaro-Tiller-Grinfel'd (ATG) instability at low strain, while at high strain, from a stochastic nucleation. While these regimes are well known, we elucidate here the origin of the transition between these two pathways thanks to a joint theoretical and experimental work. Nucleation is described within the master equation framework. By comparing the time scales for ATG instability development and three-dimensional (3D) nucleation onset, we demonstrate that the transition between these two regimes is simply explained by the crossover between their divergent evolutions. Nucleation exhibits a strong exponential deviation at low strain while ATG behaves only algebraically. The associated time scale varies with exp(1 /x4) for nucleation, while it only behaves as 1 /x8 for the ATG instability. Consequently, at high (low) strain, nucleation (instability) occurs faster and inhibits the alternate evolution. It is then this different kinetic evolution which explains the transition from one regime to the other. Such a kinetic view of the transition between these two 3D growth regimes was not provided before. The crossover between nucleation and ATG instability is found to occur both experimentally and theoretically at a Ge composition around 50% in the experimental conditions used here. Varying the experimental conditions and/or the system parameters does not allow us to suppress the transition. This means that the SiGe quantum dots always grow via ATG instability at low strain and nucleation at high strain. This result is important for the self-organization of quantum dots.

  13. New mechanism for bubble nucleation: Classical transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easther, Richard; Giblin, John T. Jr; Hui Lam; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Given a scalar field with metastable minima, bubbles nucleate quantum mechanically. When bubbles collide, energy stored in the bubble walls is converted into kinetic energy of the field. This kinetic energy can facilitate the classical nucleation of new bubbles in minima that lie below those of the 'parent' bubbles. This process is efficient and classical, and changes the dynamics and statistics of bubble formation in models with multiple vacua, relative to that derived from quantum tunneling.

  14. The Critical Zone: A Necessary Framework for Understanding Surface Earth Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, W. E.

    2016-12-01

    One definition of the critical zone is: the thin veneer of Earth that extends from the top of the vegetation to the base of weathered bedrock. With this definition we can envision the critical zone as a distinct entity with a well-defined top and a fairly well-defined bottom that is distributed across terrestrial earth landscapes. It is a zone of co-evolving processes and, importantly, much of this zone is well below the soil mantle (and commonly more than 10 times thicker than the soil). Weathering advance into fresh bedrock creates a hydrologically-conductive skin that mediates runoff and solute chemistry, stores water used by vegetation, releases water as baseflow to streams, influences soil production and hillslope evolution, and feeds gasses to the atmosphere. Especially in seasonally dry environments, rock moisture in the critical zone, i.e. moisture that is exchangeable and potentially mobile in the matrix and fractures of the bedrock, can be a significant source of water to plants and is a previously unrecognized large component of the water budget that matters to climate models. First observations on the systematic variation of the critical zone across hillslopes have led to four distinct theories representing four distinct processes for what controls the depth to fresh bedrock (and thus the thickness of this zone across a hillslope). These theories are motivating geophysical surveys, deep drilling, and other actions to parameterize and explore the power of these models. Studies at the NSF-supported Critical Zone Observatories have taught us that the critical zone is an entity and that enduring field studies reveal key processes. A challenge we now face is how to include this emerging understanding of the critical zone into models of reactive transport, hydrologic processes and water supply, critical zone structure, landscape evolution, and climate.

  15. Fluorescence Studies of Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence is one of the most powerful tools available for the study of macromolecules. For example, fluorescence can be used to study self association through methods such as anisotropy (the rotational rate of the molecule in solution), quenching (the accessibility of a bound probe to the bulk solution), and resonance energy transfer (measurement of the distance between two species). Fluorescence can also be used to study the local environment of the probe molecules, and the changes in that environment which accompany crystal nucleation and growth. However fluorescent techniques have been very much underutilized in macromolecular growth studies. One major advantage is that the fluorescent species generally must be at low concentration, typically ca 10-5 to 10-6 M. Thus one can study a very wide range of solution conditions, ranging from very high to very low protein concentration, he latter of which are not readily accessible to scattering techniques. We have prepared a number of fluorescent derivatives of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL). Fluorescent probes have been attached to two different sites, ASP 101 and the N-terrninal amine, with a sought for use in different lines of study. Preliminary resonance energy transfer studies have been -carried out using pyrene acetic acid (Ex 340 mn, Em 376 nm) lysozyme as a donor and cascade blue (Ex 377 run, Em 423 nm) labeled lysozyme as an acceptor. The emission of both the pyrene and cascade blue probes was followed as a function of the salt protein concentrations. The data show an increase in cascade blue and a concomitant decrease in the pyrene fluorescence as either the salt or protein concentrations are increased, suggesting that the two species are approaching each other close enough for resonance energy transfer to occur. This data can be analyzed to measure the distance between the probe molecules and, knowing their locations on the protein molecule their distances from and orientations with respect to each

  16. Investigation of Nucleation Events in an Industry Zone in Nanjing China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, H.; Yang, D.; Ma, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation processes contribute substantial secondary aerosols in the atmosphere, which often lead to severe air pollution episodes in China, especially in heavily populated urban area. In this work, we conducted field observations of nucleation events in an industry zone of Nanjing, a megacity of China. The nucleation rates of 1.0 nm diameter aerosol (J1) were determined from direct measurements of particle size distribution of 1.4 - 3.0 nm by a particle size magnifier (PSM) with a value ranging from 70 to 300 cm-3 s-1. Meanwhile, gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) was measured with an atmospheric pressure ionization high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (API-HR-ToF-CIMS). H2SO4 and sub-3 nm aerosols showed excellent correlations during the nucleation events. Multivariate analysis indicated that two or three molecules of H2SO4 might be present in the critical nuclei. Several nocturnal nucleation events with concurring H2SO4 peaks were also observed while the site was within the industrial plumes. High level of alkenes and relative high concentration of O3 ( 30 ppbv) indicated that alkene ozonolysis might be responsible for the nighttime production of H2SO4. The impacts of the nocturnal nucleation processes on the local air quality need to be further investigated.

  17. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  18. Simulation studies of nucleation of ferroelectric polarization reversal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winchester, Benjamin Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Electric field-induced reversal of spontaneous polarization is the defining characteristic of a ferroelectric material, but the process(es) and mechanism(s) associated with the initial nucleation of reverse-polarity domains are poorly understood. This report describes studies carried out using phase field modeling of LiTaO3, a relatively simple prototype ferroelectric material, in order to explore the effects of either mechanical deformation or optically-induced free charges on nucleation and resulting domain configuration during field-induced polarization reversal. Conditions were selected to approximate as closely as feasible those of accompanying experimental work in order to provide not only support for the experimental work but also ensure that additional experimental validation of the simulations could be carried out in the future. Phase field simulations strongly support surface mechanical damage/deformation as effective for dramatically reducing the overall coercive field (Ec) via local field enhancements. Further, optically-nucleated polarization reversal appears to occur via stabilization of latent nuclei via the charge screening effects of free charges.

  19. Interface tracking computations of bubble dynamics in nucleate flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giustini, G.

    2015-01-01

    The boiling process is of utter importance for the design and operation of water-cooled nuclear reactors. Despite continuous effort over the past decades, a fully mechanistic model of boiling in the presence of a solid surface has not yet been achieved. Uncertainties exist at fundamental level, since the microscopic phenomena governing nucleate boiling are still not understood, and as regards 'component scale' modelling, which relies heavily on empirical representations of wall boiling. Accurate models of these phenomena at sub-milli-metric scale are capable of elucidating the various processes and to produce quantitative data needed for up-scaling. Within this context, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) represents a powerful tool for CFD analysis of boiling flows. In this contribution, DNS coupled with an Interface Tracking method (Y. Sato, B. Niceno, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 249, 15 September 2013, Pages 127-161) are used to analyse the hydrodynamics and heat transfer associated with heat diffusion controlled bubble growth at a solid substrate during nucleate flow boiling. The growth of successive bubbles from a single nucleation site is simulated with a computational model that includes heat conduction in the solid substrate and evaporation from the liquid film (micro-layer) present beneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is investigated and the additional (with respect to single phase convection) heat transfer mechanisms due to the ebullition cycle are quantified. The simulations show that latent heat exchange due to evaporation in the micro-layer and sensible heat exchange during the waiting time after bubble departure are the main heat transfer mechanisms. It is found that the presence of an imposed flow normal to the bubble rising path determines a complex velocity and temperature distribution near the nucleation site. This conditions can result in bubble sliding, and influence bubble shape, departure diameter and departure frequency

  20. Nucleation of bulk superconductivity close to critical magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Kachmar, Ayman

    2011-01-01

    threshold value of the applied magnetic field for which bulk superconductivity contributes to the leading order of the energy. Furthermore, the energy of the bulk is related to that of the Abrikosov problem in a periodic lattice. A key ingredient of the proof is a novel L∞ -bound which is of independent...

  1. A method for analyzing the non-stationary nucleation and overall transition kinetics: A case of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokshin, Anatolii V.; Galimzyanov, Bulat N.

    2014-01-01

    We present the statistical method as a direct extension of the mean first-passage time concept to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation data of a phase transformation. According to the method, the mean first-passage time trajectories for the first (i = 1) as well as for the subsequent (i = 2, 3, 4,…) nucleation events should be extracted that allows one to calculate the time-dependent nucleation rate, the critical value of the order parameter (the critical size), the waiting times for the nucleation events, and the growth law of the nuclei – i.e., all the terms, which are usually necessary to characterize the overall transition kinetics. There are no restrictions in the application of the method by the specific thermodynamic regions; and the nucleation rate parameters are extracted according to their basic definitions. The method differs from the Wedekind-Bartell scheme and its modification [A. V. Mokshin and B. N. Galimzyanov, J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 11959 (2012)], where the passage-times for the first (largest) nucleus are evaluated only and where the average waiting time for the first nucleation event is accessible instead of the true steady-state nucleation time scale. We demonstrate an efficiency of the method by its application to the analysis of the vapor-to-liquid transition kinetics in water at the different temperatures. The nucleation rate/time characteristics and the droplet growth parameters are computed on the basis of the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation data

  2. Modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering near the critical-density surface in the plasmas of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximov, A.V.; Myatt, J.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 The nonlinear propagation of laser beams, smoothed by spatial and temporal bandwidth, near the critical density surface of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been modeled. The interplay between filamentation and forward and backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is described in the presence of light reflected from the critical density surface and high absorption of light near the critical density. The spectrum of backscattered light develops a red shift due to SBS, which can be seeded by the reflection of light from the critical surface. The intensity of backscattered light decreases moderately as the bandwidth of smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is increased

  3. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-01-01

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments

  4. Surfacing the Assumptions: Pursuing Critical Literacy and Social Justice in Preservice Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Lorayne; Hughes, Janette

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a four-year study of a preservice education course based on a socio-constructivist research framework. The preservice English Language Arts course focuses on critical literacy and teaching for social justice while employing digital technologies. The research study examines two concepts across all aspects of the course: 1) new…

  5. Critical and creative reflective inquiry: surfacing narratives to enable learning and inform action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rn, MscN Shaun Cardiff

    2012-01-01

    Narratives are being increasingly used in nursing and action research. In this participatory action research study, nurse leaders of an acute care of the older person unit collectively, critically and creatively reflected on lived experiences in order to explore the concept of person-centred

  6. Parameterizing ice nucleation rates using contact angle and activation energy derived from laboratory data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of ice nucleation in clouds is not easily determined and large discrepancies exist between model predictions and actual ice crystal concentration measured in clouds. In an effort to improve the parameterization of ice nucleating in cloud models, we investigate the rate of heterogeneous ice nucleation under specific ambient conditions by knowing the sizes as well as two thermodynamic parameters of the ice nuclei – contact angle and activation energy. Laboratory data of freezing and deposition nucleation modes were analyzed to derive inversely the two thermodynamic parameters for a variety of ice nuclei, including mineral dusts, bacteria, pollens, and soot particles. The analysis considered the Zeldovich factor for the adjustment of ice germ formation, as well as the solute and curvature effects on surface tension; the latter effects have strong influence on the contact angle. Contact angle turns out to be a more important factor than the activation energy in discriminating the nucleation capabilities of various ice nuclei species. By extracting these thermodynamic parameters, laboratory results can be converted into a formulation that follows classical nucleation theory, which then has the flexibility of incorporating factors such as the solute effect and curvature effect that were not considered in the experiments. Due to various uncertainties, contact angle and activation energy derived in this study should be regarded as "apparent" thermodynamics parameters.

  7. Nucleation of microwave plasma CVD diamond on molybdenum (Mo) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inderjeet, K.; Ramesh, S.

    2000-01-01

    Molybdenum is a metal, which is gaining increasing significance in industrial applications. The main use of Mo is as all alloying element added in small amounts to steel, irons and non- ferrous alloys in order to enhance the strength, toughness and wear resistance. Mo is also vastly being employed in the automotive and aircraft industries, mainly due to its low coefficient of friction. Diamond, on be other hand, is a unique material for innumerable applications because of its usual combination of physical and chemical properties. Several potential applications can be anticipated for diamond in many sectors including electronics, optics, as protective corrosion resistant coatings, cutting tools, etc. With the enhancement in science and technology, diamond microcrystals and thin films are now being produced from the vapour phase by a variety of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques; such as microwave plasma CVD. With such technology being made available, it is envisage that diamond-coated molybdenum would further enhance the performance and to open up new avenue for Mo in various industries. Therefore, it is the aim of the present work to study the nucleation and growth of diamond particles on Mo surface by employing microwave plasma CVD (MAPCVD). In the present work, diamond deposition was carried out in several stages by varying the deposition distance. The nucleation and growth rate were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, the existence of diamond was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It has been found that the nucleation and growth rate of diamond particles were influenced by the deposition height between the substrate and plasma. Under the optimum condition, well defined diamond crystallites distributed homogeneously throughout the surface, could be obtained. Some of the important parameters controlling the deposition and growth of diamond particles on Mo surface are discussed. (author)

  8. Influence of GaAs Substrate Orientation on InAs Quantum Dots: Surface Morphology, Critical Thickness, and Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang BL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractInAs/GaAs heterostructures have been simultaneously grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs (100, GaAs (100 with a 2° misorientation angle towards [01−1], and GaAs (n11B (n = 9, 7, 5 substrates. While the substrate misorientation angle increased from 0° to 15.8°, a clear evolution from quantum dots to quantum well was evident by the surface morphology, the photoluminescence, and the time-resolved photoluminescence, respectively. This evolution revealed an increased critical thickness and a delayed formation of InAs quantum dots as the surface orientation departed from GaAs (100, which was explained by the thermal-equilibrium model due to the less efficient of strain relaxation on misoriented substrate surfaces.

  9. Modelling the stochastic behaviour of primary nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Giovanni Maria; Mazzotti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We study the stochastic nature of primary nucleation and how it manifests itself in a crystallisation process at different scales and under different operating conditions. Such characteristics of nucleation are evident in many experiments where detection times of crystals are not identical, despite identical experimental conditions, but instead are distributed around an average value. While abundant experimental evidence has been reported in the literature, a clear theoretical understanding and an appropriate modelling of this feature is still missing. In this contribution, we present two models describing a batch cooling crystallisation, where the interplay between stochastic nucleation and deterministic crystal growth is described differently in each. The nucleation and growth rates of the two models are estimated by a comprehensive set of measurements of paracetamol crystallisation from aqueous solution in a 1 mL vessel [Kadam et al., Chemical Engineering Science, 2012, 72, 10-19]. Both models are applied to the cooling crystallisation process above under different operating conditions, i.e. different volumes, initial concentrations, cooling rates. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches are illustrated and discussed, with particular reference to their use across scales of nucleation rate measured in very small crystallisers.

  10. Comprehensive theory for star-like polymer micelles: combining classical nucleation and polymer brush theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprakel, J.H.B.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Besseling, N.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive theory is proposed that combines classical nucleation and polymer brush theory to describe star-like polymer micelles. With a minimum of adjustable parameters, the model predicts properties such as critical micelle concentrations and micellar size distributions. The validity of the

  11. Nucleation and evaporation of domains due to electric field at room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    α) ~ 80 erg cm–2 as given in the litera- ture,19 the critical length was estimated to be ~ 1.7 μm. This implies that the domain wall nucleated by 5 kV cm–1 must have a length more than 1.7 μm to form a sustain- able domain structure. The length ...

  12. Critical speed for the dynamics of truck events on bridges with a smooth road surface

    OpenAIRE

    González, Arturo; O'Brien, Eugene J.; Cantero, Daniel; Li, Yingyan; Dowling, Jason; Znidaric, Ales

    2010-01-01

    Simple numerical models of point loads are used to represent single and multiple vehicle events on two-lane bridges with a good road profile. While such models are insufficiently complex to calculate dynamic amplification accurately, they are presented here to provide an understanding of the influence of speed and distance between vehicles on the bridge dynamic response. Critical combinations of speed as a function of main bridge natural frequency and meeting point of two vehicles travelling ...

  13. Colloid Surface Chemistry Critically Affects Multiple Particle Tracking Measurements of Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, M. T.; Perlman, Z. E.; Gardel, M. L.; Shin, J. H.; Matsudaira, P.; Mitchison, T. J.; Weitz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of the properties of complex biomaterials using microrheological techniques has the promise of providing fundamental insights into their biomechanical functions; however, precise interpretations of such measurements are hindered by inadequate characterization of the interactions between tracers and the networks they probe. We here show that colloid surface chemistry can profoundly affect multiple particle tracking measurements of networks of fibrin, entangled F-actin solutions, and networks of cross-linked F-actin. We present a simple protocol to render the surface of colloidal probe particles protein-resistant by grafting short amine-terminated methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) to the surface of carboxylated microspheres. We demonstrate that these poly(ethylene glycol)-coated tracers adsorb significantly less protein than particles coated with bovine serum albumin or unmodified probe particles. We establish that varying particle surface chemistry selectively tunes the sensitivity of the particles to different physical properties of their microenvironments. Specifically, particles that are weakly bound to a heterogeneous network are sensitive to changes in network stiffness, whereas protein-resistant tracers measure changes in the viscosity of the fluid and in the network microstructure. We demonstrate experimentally that two-particle microrheology analysis significantly reduces differences arising from tracer surface chemistry, indicating that modifications of network properties near the particle do not introduce large-scale heterogeneities. Our results establish that controlling colloid-protein interactions is crucial to the successful application of multiple particle tracking techniques to reconstituted protein networks, cytoplasm, and cells. PMID:15189896

  14. Understanding the ice nucleation characteristics of feldspars suspended in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Zobrist et al. (2008) Arizona test dust, silver iodide, nonadecanol and silicon dioxide suspensions in various solutes showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust particles at a microphysical scale. To improve our understanding how solute and mineral dust particle surface interaction, we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with microcline, sanidine, plagioclase, kaolinite and quartz particles suspended in pure water and solutions containing ammonia, ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium nitrate, potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid. Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (2 - 5 wt%) are prepared in water with varying solute concentrations (0 - 15 wt%). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich

  15. Critical coupling of surface plasmons in graphene attenuated total reflection geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas, Mauro, E-mail: cuevas@df.uba.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Facultad de Ingeniería y Tecnología Informática, Universidad de Belgrano, Villanueva 1324, C1426BMJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Física, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-12-09

    We study the optical response of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) structure in Otto configuration with graphene sheet, paying especial attention to the occurrence of total absorption. Our results show that due to excitation of surface plasmons on the graphene sheet, two different conditions of total absorption may occur. At these conditions, the energy loss of the surface plasmon by radiation is equal to its energy loss by absorption into the graphene sheet. We give necessary conditions on ATR parameters for the existence of total absorption. - Highlights: • Attenuated total reflection (ATR) structure with graphene sheet. • Surface plasmons and power matched condition. • Necessary conditions on ATR parameters for the existence of total absorption.

  16. A variational approach to nucleation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggi, Pablo M; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-12-22

    We study by computer simulation the nucleation of a supersaturated Lennard-Jones vapor into the liquid phase. The large free energy barriers to transition make the time scale of this process impossible to study by ordinary molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore we use a recently developed enhanced sampling method [Valsson and Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett.113, 090601 (2014)] based on the variational determination of a bias potential. We differ from previous applications of this method in that the bias is constructed on the basis of the physical model provided by the classical theory of nucleation. We examine the technical problems associated with this approach. Our results are very satisfactory and will pave the way for calculating the nucleation rates in many systems.

  17. ON THE PRECISION OF THE NUCLEATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier González-Villa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The nucleator is a design unbiased method of local stereology for estimating the volume of a bounded object. The only information required lies in the intersection of the object with an isotropic random ray emanating from a fixed point (called the pivotal point associated with the object. For instance, the volume of a neuron can be estimated from a random ray emanating from its nucleolus. The nucleator is extensively used in biosciences because it is efficient and easy to apply. The estimator variance can be reduced by increasing the number of rays. In an earlier paper a systematic sampling design was proposed, and theoretical variance predictors were derived, for the corresponding volume estimator. Being the only variance predictors hitherto available for the nucleator, our basic goal was to check their statistical performance by means of Monte Carlo resampling on computer reconstructions of real objects. As a plus, the empirical distribution of the volume estimator revealed statistical properties of practical relevance.

  18. Droplet and bubble nucleation modeled by density gradient theory – cubic equation of state versus saft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrubý Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some preliminary results of the density gradient theory (GT combined with two different equations of state (EoS: the classical cubic equation by van der Waals and a recent approach based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT, namely its perturbed-chain (PC modification. The results showed that the cubic EoS predicted for a given surface tension the density profile with a noticeable defect. Bulk densities predicted by the cubic EoS differed as much as by 100 % from the reference data. On the other hand, the PC-SAFT EoS provided accurate results for density profile and both bulk densities in the large range of temperatures. It has been shown that PC-SAFT is a promising tool for accurate modeling of nucleation using the GT. Besides the basic case of a planar phase interface, the spherical interface was analyzed to model a critical cluster occurring either for nucleation of droplets (condensation or bubbles (boiling, cavitation. However, the general solution for the spherical interface will require some more attention due to its numerical difficulty.

  19. Genetic Algorithms and Nucleation in VIH-AIDS transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranon, Armando

    2003-03-01

    VIH to AIDS transition has been modeled via a genetic algorithm that uses boom-boom principle and where population evolution is simulated with a cellular automaton based on SIR model. VIH to AIDS transition is signed by nucleation of infected cells and low probability of infection are obtained for different mutation rates in agreement with clinical results. A power law is obtained with a critical exponent close to the critical exponent of cubic, spherical percolation, colossal magnetic resonance, Ising Model and liquid-gas phase transition in heavy ion collisions. Computations were carried out at UAM-A Supercomputing Lab and author acknowledges financial support from Division of CBI at UAM-A.

  20. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  1. A critical assessment of the JULES land surface model hydrology for humid tropical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkafli, Z.; Buytaert, W.; Onof, C.; Lavado, W.; Guyot, J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Global land surface models (LSMs) such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) are originally developed to provide surface boundary conditions for climate models. They are increasingly used for hydrological simulation, for instance to simulate the impacts of land use changes and other perturbations on the water cycle. This study investigates how well such models represent the major hydrological fluxes at the relevant spatial and temporal scales - an important question for reliable model applications in poorly understood, data-scarce environments. The JULES-LSM is implemented in a 360 000 km2 humid tropical mountain basin of the Peruvian Andes-Amazon at 12-km grid resolution, forced with daily satellite and climate reanalysis data. The simulations are evaluated using conventional discharge-based evaluation methods, and by further comparing the magnitude and internal variability of the basin surface fluxes such as evapotranspiration, throughfall, and surface and subsurface runoff of the model with those observed in similar environments elsewhere. We find reasonably positive model efficiencies and high correlations between the simulated and observed streamflows, but high root-mean-square errors affecting the performance in smaller, upper sub-basins. We attribute this to errors in the water balance and JULES-LSM's inability to model baseflow. We also found a tendency to under-represent the high evapotranspiration rates of the region. We conclude that strategies to improve the representation of tropical systems to be (1) addressing errors in the forcing and (2) incorporating local wetland and regional floodplain in the subsurface representation.

  2. Critical review: Copper runoff from outdoor copper surfaces at atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Hedberg, Jonas F; Herting, Gunilla; Goidanich, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-01-01

    This review on copper runoff dispersed from unsheltered naturally patinated copper used for roofing and facades summarizes and discusses influencing factors, available literature, and predictive models, and the importance of fate and speciation for environmental risk assessment. Copper runoff from outdoor surfaces is predominantly governed by electrochemical and chemical reactions and is highly dependent on given exposure conditions (size, inclination, geometry, degree of sheltering, and orientation), surface parameters (age, patina composition, and thickness), and site-specific environmental conditions (gaseous pollutants, chlorides, rainfall characteristics (amount, intensity, pH), wind direction, temperature, time of wetness, season). The corrosion rate cannot be used to assess the runoff rate. The extent of released copper varies largely between different rain events and is related to dry and wet periods, dry deposition prior to the rain event and prevailing rain and patina characteristics. Interpretation and use of copper runoff data for environmental risk assessment and management need therefore to consider site-specific factors and focus on average data of long-term studies (several years). Risk assessments require furthermore that changes in copper speciation, bioavailability aspects, and potential irreversible retention on solid surfaces are considered, factors that determine the environmental fate of copper runoff from outdoor surfaces.

  3. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D; Lepkova, K; Becker, T

    2017-03-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The reviewed methods include time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods, particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry. Advantages and limitations of the analytical methods in thin-film surface investigations are discussed. Technical parameters of nominated analytical methods are provided to assist in the selection of suitable methods for analysis of metallic substrates deposited with surface films. The challenges associated with the applications of the emerging analytical methods in corrosion science are also addressed.

  4. Critical laboratory and field evaluation of selected surface prospecting techniques for locating oil and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heemstra, R.J.; Ray, R.M.; Wesson, T.C.; Abrams, J.R.; Moore, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical basis for the radiation HALO method in geochemical exploration for oil and gas is largely unproven but has been covered extensively in the literature. An evaluation of the method was conducted by direct field examination of some of the variables. The variables chosen were surface radiometry, magnetometry, gravity, and near-surface soil sampling. The radiometry included measurements of potassium-40, thallium-208, and bismuth-214. The near-surface soil samples were analyzed for light hydrocarbon gases through C-4, pH, conductivity, surface area, and moisture. Statistical evaluation and comparisons of these variables were made by computer from their data bases. High correlations between variables were confirmed by comparisons of contour maps on transparent overlays. The highest positive correlations were between the five normal gases over the entire eighteen-section map. A distinct relationship was found between conductivity, pH, and the five normal gases. The role of field topography was also found to be significant. No relationship between the hydrocarbon and radiometric anomalies could be found. Radiometric patterns were heavily influenced, however, by the topographic features.

  5. Characterization for DRX and FTIR of the surface of UWMWPE for critical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Keila M. de; Araujo, E.M.; Lira, H.L.; Patricio, Aline C.L.; Lima, Carlos A.P. de

    2009-01-01

    Biomaterials is the result of the application of the science of the materials to the medicine, understands a new and important spectrum of the knowledge - Science of Biomaterials. The principal aspects that determine the acting of a bio material in the human body are three: biocompatibility, mechanical properties and degradation. This work had the objective to modify and to oxidate the surface of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). It was utilized for this modification water sandpapers and for oxidation the hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The surface of UHMWPE it was modified with water sandpapers of numbers 180, 600 and 1200 mesh and oxidated with the H 2 O 2 in different concentrations of 35 and 60%. The samples already with its modified surfaces had been submitted to the characterization using itself the following techniques: diffraction de ray-X and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. The physical modification (sanded) and chemistry (H 2 O 2 ) of the surface of UHMWPE was important because it looks for improving the interaction techniques of the implants with the bone. (author)

  6. Emerging surface characterization techniques for carbon steel corrosion: a critical brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Lepkova, K.; Becker, T.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon steel is a preferred construction material in many industrial and domestic applications, including oil and gas pipelines, where corrosion mitigation using film-forming corrosion inhibitor formulations is a widely accepted method. This review identifies surface analytical techniques that are considered suitable for analysis of thin films at metallic substrates, but are yet to be applied to analysis of carbon steel surfaces in corrosive media or treated with corrosion inhibitors. The reviewed methods include time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods, particle-induced X-ray emission, Rutherford backscatter spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and neutron reflectometry, and conversion electron Moessbauer spectrometry. Advantages and limitations of the analytical methods in thin-film surface investigations are discussed. Technical parameters of nominated analytical methods are provided to assist in the selection of suitable methods for analysis of metallic substrates deposited with surface films. The challenges associated with the applications of the emerging analytical methods in corrosion science are also addressed.

  7. A unified kinetic approach to binary nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Physics, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road]|[E.O.H.S.I., Rutgers University]|[UMDNJ, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Lazaridis, M. [Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Instittutvein 18, P. O. Box 100, N-2007 Kjeller (Norway); Drossinos, Y. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Georgopoulos, P.G. [E.O.H.S.I., Rutgers University]|[UMDNJ, 170 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Two different methods to calculate the steady-state nucleation rate in heteromolecular systems proposed by Stauffer (1976) and Langer (1969) are analyzed. Their mathematical equivalence is explicitly demonstrated, thereby obtaining a generic expression for the rate of binary nucleation. Its numerical evaluation does not entail rotation of the coordinate system at the saddle point, but it only requires data in the natural coordinate system of number fluctuations, namely molecular impingement rates, the droplet free energy and its second order derivatives at the saddle point, and the total density of condensible vapors. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Crystal nucleation in simple and complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxtoby, David W

    2003-03-15

    The application of density-functional methods from statistical mechanics to the nucleation of crystals from the melt is described. Simple fluids such as metals, with sizes comparable with the range of their attractive forces, are compared with complex fluids such as colloidal suspensions and proteins dissolved in solution. A different mechanism for crystal nucleation is proposed in the latter case, in which density (concentration) changes before periodic crystalline order appears. This leads to a theoretical foundation for empirical observations on the 'crystallization window' in protein crystallization. Comparisons are made with the results of computer simulation via molecular dynamics.

  9. Nucleation mechanisms of refined alpha microstructure in beta titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Due to a great combination of physical and mechanical properties, beta titanium alloys have become promising candidates in the field of chemical industry, aerospace and biomedical materials. The microstructure of beta titanium alloys is the governing factor that determines their properties and performances, especially the size scale, distribution and volume fraction of precipitate phase in parent phase matrix. Therefore in order to enhance the performance of beta titanium alloys, it is critical to obtain a thorough understanding of microstructural evolution in beta titanium alloys upon various thermal and/or mechanical processes. The present work is focusing on the study of nucleation mechanisms of refined alpha microstructure and super-refined alpha microstructure in beta titanium alloys in order to study the influence of instabilities within parent phase matrix on precipitates nucleation, including compositional instabilities and/or structural instabilities. The current study is primarily conducted in Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (wt%, Ti-5553), a commercial material for aerospace application. Refined and super-refined precipitates microstructure in Ti-5553 are obtained under specific accurate temperature controlled heat treatments. The characteristics of either microstructure are investigated in details using various characterization techniques, such as SEM, TEM, STEM, HRSTEM and 3D atom probe to describe the features of microstructure in the aspect of morphology, distribution, structure and composition. Nucleation mechanisms of refined and super-refined precipitates are proposed in order to fully explain the features of different precipitates microstructure in Ti-5553. The necessary thermodynamic conditions and detailed process of phase transformations are introduced. In order to verify the reliability of proposed nucleation mechanisms, thermodynamic calculation and phase field modeling simulation are accomplished using the database of simple binary Ti-Mo system

  10. Mutagenesis of tGCN5 core region reveals two critical surface residues F90 and R140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kinjal Rajesh; Chan, Yan M.; Lee, Man X.; Yang, Ching Yao; Voloshchuk, Natalya [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Montclare, Jin Kim, E-mail: jmontcla@poly.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutagenesis of the tGCN5 core region reveals two residues important for function. {yields} Developed a fluorescent lysate-based activity assay to assess mutants. {yields} Surface-exposed residues F90 and R140 of tGCN5 are critical for H3 acetylation. -- Abstract: Tetrahymena General Control Non-Derepressor 5 (tGCN5) is a critical regulator of gene transcription via acetylation of histones. Since the acetylation ability has been attributed to the 'core region', we perform mutagenesis of residues within the tGCN5 'core region' in order to identify those critical for function and stability. Residues that do not participate in catalysis are identified, mutated and characterized for activity, structure and thermodynamic stability. Variants I107V, Q114L, A121T and A130S maintain the acetylation function relative to wild-type tGCN5, while variants F90Y, F112R and R140H completely abolish function. Of the three non-functional variants, since F112 is mutated into a non-homologous charged residue, a loss in function is expected. However, the remaining two variants are mutated into homologous residues, suggesting that F90 and R140 are critical for the activity of tGCN5. While mutation to homologous residue maintains acetylation of histone H3 for the majority of the variants, the two surface-exposed residues, F90 and R140, appear to be essential for tGCN5 function, structure or stability.

  11. Nucleation and diffusion-controlled growth of electroactive centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomar-Pardave, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Materiales, C.P. 02200 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: mepp@correo.azc.uam.mx; Scharifker, B.R. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Departamento de Quimica, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, Apartado 75-876, C.P. 07300 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Romero-Romo, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Materiales, C.P. 02200 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-08-30

    A theory is presented describing, for the first time, the temporal evolution of the fractional surface area, S(t), of 3D non-interacting nuclei growing at a rate limited by diffusion of electrodepositing ions onto substrates of a different nature. Likewise, an equation has been derived describing the potentiostatic current-time transients arising from the formation and growth of such nuclei with redox reactions occurring simultaneously on their surfaces. An equation is also proposed to describe the current due to redox reactions taking place on the surface of interacting growing nuclei. The latter is used to describe the experimental current transients recorded during nucleation and growth of cobalt at applied potentials where the proton reduction reaction occurs simultaneously with the electrocrystallization process.

  12. Critical capture distances for highly charged ions above dielectric covered metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, R.E., E-mail: russell.lake@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Pomeroy, J.M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Sosolik, C.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    We model the first stage of the electronic interaction between an ion and a metal surface covered with a thin dielectric layer. Specifically, we seek to answer two questions. (i) As an ion approaches the surface from far away, does the first electron that it captures originate from the exposed dielectric layer or the metal underneath it? (ii) What is the ion's distance from the metal when the first electron is captured? To answer these questions, the classical potential that an electron is subject to during the interaction is calculated. The dielectric film is treated as a continuum with simple band structure. We input the parameters from recent experiments (Co with 1.5 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film) and found that (i) the first capture proceeds from the metal, and (ii) the dielectric film extends the distance threshold for first capture compared to a metal with no film.

  13. Let’s not forget the critical role of surface tension in xylem water relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Christophe Domec

    2011-01-01

    The widely supported cohesion–tension theory of water transport explains the importance of a continuous water column and the mechanism of long-distance ascent of sap in plants (Dixon 1914, Tyree 2003, Angeles et al. 2004). The evaporation of water from the surfaces of mesophyll cells causes the air–water interface to retreat into the cellulose matrix of the plant cell...

  14. The surface energy, thermal vibrations of dislocation lines and the critical crack extension force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Chien.

    1979-09-01

    The connections between atomic structure and mechanical properties of metals are interested by many physicist and mechanists recently. The authors of this paper try to connect the fracture of materials with the surface energy and dislocation properties, which may be treated with lattice dynamics and electron theory of solids. It shows that to combine the knowledge of solid state physics and fracture mechanics is quite important. (author)

  15. Utilization of surface Plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles for determination of critical micelle concentration of cationic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jamil K.; El-Nahhal, Issa M.; Najri, Bassam A.; Hammad, Talaat M.

    2016-11-01

    We have utilized surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) band sensitivity to surfactant concentration to investigate the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of CTAB, HY and CPB. The process is based upon an in situ formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through the reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by diethylene triamine (DETA) at 25 °C. In the presence of cationic surfactants, Ag+ ions can be reduced to AgNPs in a few minutes, accompanied by changes in intensity and wavelength of the SPR band. The spectral shifts of SPR band and the change of color have been used to determine CMC values of cationic surfactants.

  16. Probabilistic risk assessment of insecticide concentrations in agricultural surface waters: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Sebastian; Knäbel, Anja; Schulz, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    Due to the specific modes of action and application patterns of agricultural insecticides, the insecticide exposure of agricultural surface waters is characterized by infrequent and short-term insecticide concentration peaks of high ecotoxicological relevance with implications for both monitoring and risk assessment. Here, we apply several fixed-interval strategies and an event-based sampling strategy to two generalized and two realistic insecticide exposure patterns for typical agricultural streams derived from FOCUS exposure modeling using Monte Carlo simulations. Sampling based on regular intervals was found to be inadequate for the detection of transient insecticide concentrations, whereas event-triggered sampling successfully detected all exposure incidences at substantially lower analytical costs. Our study proves that probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) concepts in their present forms are not appropriate for a thorough evaluation of insecticide exposure. Despite claims that the PRA approach uses all available data to assess exposure and enhances risk assessment realism, we demonstrate that this concept is severely biased by the amount of insecticide concentrations below detection limits and therefore by the sampling designs. Moreover, actual insecticide exposure is of almost no relevance for PRA threshold level exceedance frequencies and consequential risk assessment outcomes. Therefore, we propose a concept that features a field-relevant ecological risk analysis of agricultural insecticide surface water exposure. Our study quantifies for the first time the environmental and economic consequences of inappropriate monitoring and risk assessment concepts used for the evaluation of short-term peak surface water pollutants such as insecticides.

  17. Specification of Architecture and Function of Actin Structures by Actin Nucleation Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skau, Colleen T; Waterman, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for diverse processes in mammalian cells; these processes range from establishing cell polarity to powering cell migration to driving cytokinesis to positioning intracellular organelles. How these many functions are carried out in a spatiotemporally regulated manner in a single cytoplasm has been the subject of much study in the cytoskeleton field. Recent work has identified a host of actin nucleation factors that can build architecturally diverse actin structures. The biochemical properties of these factors, coupled with their cellular location, likely define the functional properties of actin structures. In this article, we describe how recent advances in cell biology and biochemistry have begun to elucidate the role of individual actin nucleation factors in generating distinct cellular structures. We also consider how the localization and orientation of actin nucleation factors, in addition to their kinetic properties, are critical to their ability to build a functional actin cytoskeleton.

  18. The nucleation of Ni on carbon microelectrodes and its electrocatalytic activity in hydrogen evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Z.; Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Grubac, Z.; Omanovic, S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses results on the nucleation (electrocrystallization) of nickel on an assembly of carbon microelectrodes and its electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen evolution reaction. It has been shown that within an appropriate potential range the nickel electrocrystallization follows a three-dimensional progressive nucleation and diffusion controlled stable cluster growth. Analysis of the experimental current transients has been carried out using a modified form of the Scharifker and Mostany equation that considers only the relevant part of the current density response. A set of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters has been determined: the nucleation rate, the number of atoms in the critical nucleus, the diffusion coefficient, and the Gibbs energy of nuclei formation. Ac and dc measurements on hydrogen evolution in an alkaline solution have demonstrated an increased electrocatalytic activity of the nanostructured Ni layer on carbon microelectrodes in the hydrogen evolution reaction in comparison to a bulk nickel electrode

  19. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism in rails. Nonlinear material properties, actual wheel-rail geometries and realistic loading conditions are considered in the modelling process. Using a 3D explicit finite element analysis the transient rolling contact behaviour of wheel on rail is simulated. Employing the critical plane concept, the material points with the largest possibility of crack initiation are determined; based on which, the 3D orientations/angles of the possible squat cracks are estimated. Numerical estimations are compared with sample results of experimental observations on a rail specimen with squat from the site. The findings suggest a proper agreement between results of modelling and experiment. It is observed that squat cracks initiate at an in-plane angle around 13°-22° relative to the rail surface. The initiation angle seen on surface plane is calculated around 29°-48°, while the crack tend to initiate in angles around 25°-31° in the rail cross-section.

  20. Critical assessment of suitable methods used for determination of antibacterial properties at photocatalytic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysa, Josef, E-mail: Josef.Krysa@vscht.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Musilova, Eva [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Zita, Jiri [Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Department of Inorganic Technology, Technicka 5, CZ-166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Methods for antibacterial activity of irradiated TiO{sub 2} films were critically assessed. {yields} As test bacteria gram negative E. coli and gram positive E. faecalis were employed. {yields} The ISO glass adhesion method is more appropriate than method with bacteria suspension. {yields} Some improvements of the ISO method were suggested. - Abstract: This work describes the development of methods necessary for antibacterial effect evaluation on irradiated TiO{sub 2} layers. Two methods using bacteria suspensions and the glass adhesion method (based on ISO 27447:2009(E)) were critically assessed and compared. As test bacteria gram negative Escherichia coli and gram positive Enterococcus faecalis were employed. The method using 50 cm{sup 3} of bacteria suspension is convenient for testing layers with strong antibacterial effect (prepared from powder photocatalysts). For the evaluation of the antibacterial effect of sol gel layers, the glass adhesion method based on the ISO is more appropriate than the method with 3 cm{sup 3} of bacteria suspension. The reason is that the later does not allow a distinction between the inhibition effect of TiO{sub 2} and UV light itself. Some improvements of the ISO method were suggested, namely the use of gelatinous pills (CCM) of bacteria, using saline solution instead of nutrient broth for bacteria suspension preparation and the application of selective media for bacteria cultivation. Decreasing the light intensity from 0.6 mW cm{sup -2} to 0.2 mW cm{sup -2} (fulfilling the requirements of the ISO) results in almost negligible effect of UV light itself, thus enabling proper testing of the antibacterial properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films.

  1. Critical assessment of suitable methods used for determination of antibacterial properties at photocatalytic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krysa, Josef; Musilova, Eva; Zita, Jiri

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Methods for antibacterial activity of irradiated TiO 2 films were critically assessed. → As test bacteria gram negative E. coli and gram positive E. faecalis were employed. → The ISO glass adhesion method is more appropriate than method with bacteria suspension. → Some improvements of the ISO method were suggested. - Abstract: This work describes the development of methods necessary for antibacterial effect evaluation on irradiated TiO 2 layers. Two methods using bacteria suspensions and the glass adhesion method (based on ISO 27447:2009(E)) were critically assessed and compared. As test bacteria gram negative Escherichia coli and gram positive Enterococcus faecalis were employed. The method using 50 cm 3 of bacteria suspension is convenient for testing layers with strong antibacterial effect (prepared from powder photocatalysts). For the evaluation of the antibacterial effect of sol gel layers, the glass adhesion method based on the ISO is more appropriate than the method with 3 cm 3 of bacteria suspension. The reason is that the later does not allow a distinction between the inhibition effect of TiO 2 and UV light itself. Some improvements of the ISO method were suggested, namely the use of gelatinous pills (CCM) of bacteria, using saline solution instead of nutrient broth for bacteria suspension preparation and the application of selective media for bacteria cultivation. Decreasing the light intensity from 0.6 mW cm -2 to 0.2 mW cm -2 (fulfilling the requirements of the ISO) results in almost negligible effect of UV light itself, thus enabling proper testing of the antibacterial properties of TiO 2 thin films.

  2. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Patankar, Neelesh A; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-09-13

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling--by heat transfer--the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating.

  3. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature Dependence in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Nucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw R. L.; Winkler, P. M.; Wagner, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation on stable (sub-2 nm) nuclei aids the formation of atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by circumventing or reducing vapor pressure barriers that would otherwise limit condensation and new particle growth. Aerosol and cloud formation depend largely on the interaction between a condensing liquid and the nucleating site. A new paper published this year reports the first direct experimental determination of contact angles as well as contact line curvature and other geometric properties of a spherical cap nucleus at nanometer scale using measurements from the Vienna Size Analyzing Nucleus Counter (SANC) (Winkler et al., 2016). For water nucleating heterogeneously on silver oxide nanoparticles we find contact angles around 15 degrees compared to around 90 degrees for the macroscopically measured equilibrium angle for water on bulk silver. The small microscopic contact angles can be attributed via the generalized Young equation to a negative line tension that becomes increasingly dominant with increasing curvature of the contact line. These results enable a consistent theoretical description of heterogeneous nucleation and provide firm insight to the wetting of nanosized objects.

  5. The ice nucleation activity of extremophilic algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana; Hájek, J.; Worland, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2013), s. 137-148 ISSN 0143-2044 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601630808; GA AV ČR KJB600050708 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Ice nucleation * snow algae * lichen photobionts Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.640, year: 2013

  6. Binary nucleation of water and sodium chloride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Tomáš; Maršík, František; Palmer, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 4 (2006), 0445091-0445096 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/2536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : binary nucleation * sodium chloride * water Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 3.166, year: 2006

  7. Effect of Air Injection on Nucleation Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capellades Mendez, Gerard; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    was reduced from 69 to 13 min, and the mean induction time decreased from 128 to 36 min. The effect on aqueous solutions of l-arginine was less apparent, with a detection delay reduction from 15 to 3 min, and no significant changes on the rate of primary nucleation. These results demonstrate the potential...

  8. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in Ni droplets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Demo, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 475, Oct (2017), s. 247-250 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD15004 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nucleation * crystallization * phase transition * nickel Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2016

  9. NUCLEATION STUDIES OF GOLD ON CARBON ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. SOBRI

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Interest has grown in developing non-toxic electrolytes for gold electrodeposition to replace the conventional cyanide-based bath for long term sustainability of gold electroplating. A solution containing thiosulphate and sulphite has been developed specially for microelectronics applications. However, at the end of the electrodeposition process, the spent electrolyte can contain a significant amount of gold in solution. This study has been initiated to investigate the feasibility of gold recovery from a spent thiosulphate-sulphite electrolyte. We have used flat-plate glassy carbon and graphite electrodes to study the mechanism of nucleation and crystal growth of gold deposition from the spent electrolyte. It was found that at the early stages of reduction process, the deposition of gold on glassy carbon exhibits an instantaneous nucleation of non-overlapping particles. At longer times, the particles begin to overlap and the deposition follows a classic progressive nucleation phenomenon. On the other hand, deposition of gold on graphite does not follow the classical nucleation phenomena.

  10. Crystal nucleation kinetics in confined systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2013), 2269-2274 ISSN 1466-8033 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0891 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nucleation * phase transtion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.858, year: 2013

  11. Critical points of the conformational potential energy surface of carbonic acid: H 2CO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoschek, Rudolf; Csizmadia, Imre G.

    1993-12-01

    The conformational potential energy surface E  E( T1, T2) of H 2CO 3, where T1 is the torsional angle for HO 1CO 2 and T2 is the torsional angle for O 1CO 2H, revealed that the anti—anti conformation is the global minimum. Additional local minima were also found. The next higher energy conformation was the syn—anti conformation, and a degenerate pair of right handed and left handed helical conformations were the highest on the energy scale. The syn—syn conformation turned out to be a transition structure sandwiched between the two helical conformation.

  12. Hybrid of Natural Element Method (NEM with Genetic Algorithm (GA to find critical slip surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Shahrokhabadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important issues in geotechnical engineering is the slope stability analysis for determination of the factor of safety and the probable slip surface. Finite Element Method (FEM is well suited for numerical study of advanced geotechnical problems. However, mesh requirements of FEM creates some difficulties for solution processing in certain problems. Recently, motivated by these limitations, several new Meshfree methods such as Natural Element Method (NEM have been used to analyze engineering problems. This paper presents advantages of using NEM in 2D slope stability analysis and Genetic Algorithm (GA optimization to determine the probable slip surface and the related factor of safety. The stress field is produced under plane strain condition using natural element formulation to simulate material behavior analysis utilized in conjunction with a conventional limit equilibrium method. In order to justify the preciseness and convergence of the proposed method, two kinds of examples, homogenous and non-homogenous, are conducted and results are compared with FEM and conventional limit equilibrium methods. The results show the robustness of the NEM in slope stability analysis.

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation in aqueous solutions: the role of water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobrist, B; Marcolli, C; Peter, T; Koop, T

    2008-05-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation experiments have been performed with four different ice nuclei (IN), namely nonadecanol, silica, silver iodide and Arizona test dust. All IN are either immersed in the droplets or located at the droplets surface. The IN were exposed to various aqueous solutions, which consist of (NH4)2SO4, H2SO4, MgCl2, NaCl, LiCl, Ca(NO3)2, K2CO3, CH3COONa, ethylene glycol, glycerol, malonic acid, PEG300 or a NaCl/malonic acid mixture. Freezing was studied using a differential scanning calorimeter and a cold finger cell. The results show that the heterogeneous ice freezing temperatures decrease with increasing solute concentration; however, the magnitude of this effect is solute dependent. In contrast, when the results are analyzed in terms of the solution water activity a very consistent behavior emerges: heterogeneous ice nucleation temperatures for all four IN converge each onto a single line, irrespective of the nature of the solute. We find that a constant offset with respect to the ice melting point curve, Deltaaw,het, can describe the observed freezing temperatures for each IN. Such a behavior is well-known for homogeneous ice nucleation from supercooled liquid droplets and has led to the development of water-activity-based ice nucleation theory. The large variety of investigated solutes together with different general types of ice nuclei studied (monolayers, ionic crystals, covalently bound network-forming compounds, and a mixture of chemically different crystallites) underlines the general applicability of water-activity-based ice nucleation theory also for heterogeneous ice nucleation in the immersion mode. Finally, the ice nucleation efficiencies of the various IN, as well as the atmospheric implication of the developed parametrization are discussed.

  14. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martin R.; Jamieson, William J.; Leckey, Claire A.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm-2) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm-2) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm-2). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  15. Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the atmosphere. Here we implement the IMN scheme into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on H2SO4-H2O binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN, the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~3, CCN burden by ~10% (at 0.2% supersaturation to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation, and cloud droplet number burden by ~18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF by 3.67 W m−2 (more negative and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W m−2 (more positive, with large spatial variations. The effect of ionization on SWCF derived from this study (3.67 W m−2 is a factor of ~3 higher that of a previous study (1.15 W m−2 based on a different ion nucleation scheme and climate model. Based on the present CAM5 simulation, the 5-yr mean impacts of solar cycle induced changes in ionization rates on CCN and cloud forcing are small (~−0.02 W m−2 but have larger inter-annual (from −0.18 to 0.17 W m−2 and spatial variations.

  16. Critical Surface Parameters for the Oxidative Coupling of Methane over the Mn-Na-W/SiO2 Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Naseem S; Lucas, Nishita S; Warwar Damouny, Christine; Gazit, Oz M

    2017-11-22

    The work here presents a thorough evaluation of the effect of Mn-Na-W/SiO 2 catalyst surface parameters on its performance in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM). To do so, we used microporous dealuminated β-zeolite (Zeo), or mesoporous SBA-15 (SBA), or macroporous fumed silica (Fum) as precursors for catalyst preparation, together with Mn nitrate, Mn acetate and Na 2 WO 4 . Characterizing the catalysts by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, N 2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and catalytic testing enabled us to identify critical surface parameters that govern the activity and C 2 selectivity of the Mn-Na-W/SiO 2 catalyst. Although the current paradigm views the phase transition of silica to α-cristobalite as the critical step in obtaining dispersed and stable metal sites, we show that the choice of precursors is equally or even more important with respect to tailoring the right surface properties. Specifically, the SBA-based catalyst, characterized by relatively closed surface porosity, demonstrated low activity and low C 2 selectivity. By contrast, for the same composition, the Zeo-based catalyst showed an open surface pore structure, which translated up to fourfold higher activity and enhanced selectivity. By varying the overall composition of the Zeo catalysts, we show that reducing the overall W concentration reduces the size of the Na 2 WO 4 species and increases the catalytic activity linearly as much as fivefold higher than the SBA catalyst. This linear dependence correlates well to the number of interfaces between the Na 2 WO 4 and Mn 2 O 3 species. Our results combined with prior studies lead us to single out the interface between Na 2 WO 4 and Mn 2 O 3 as the most probable active site for OCM using this catalyst. Synergistic interactions between the various precursors used and the phase transition are discussed in

  17. Contributions of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation, Large-Scale Circulation, and Shallow Cumulus Detrainment to Cloud Phase Transition in Mixed-Phase Clouds with NCAR CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds consisting of both liquid and ice water occur frequently at high-latitudes and in mid-latitude storm track regions. This type of clouds has been shown to play a critical role in the surface energy balance, surface air temperature, and sea ice melting in the Arctic. Cloud phase partitioning between liquid and ice water determines the cloud optical depth of mixed-phase clouds because of distinct optical properties of liquid and ice hydrometeors. The representation and simulation of cloud phase partitioning in state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) are associated with large biases. In this study, the cloud phase partition in mixed-phase clouds simulated from the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) is evaluated against satellite observations. Observation-based supercooled liquid fraction (SLF) is calculated from CloudSat, MODIS and CPR radar detected liquid and ice water paths for clouds with cloud-top temperatures between -40 and 0°C. Sensitivity tests with CAM5 are conducted for different heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations with respect to aerosol influence (Wang et al., 2014), different phase transition temperatures for detrained cloud water from shallow convection (Kay et al., 2016), and different CAM5 model configurations (free-run versus nudged winds and temperature, Zhang et al., 2015). A classical nucleation theory-based ice nucleation parameterization in mixed-phase clouds increases the SLF especially at temperatures colder than -20°C, and significantly improves the model agreement with observations in the Arctic. The change of transition temperature for detrained cloud water increases the SLF at higher temperatures and improves the SLF mostly over the Southern Ocean. Even with the improved SLF from the ice nucleation and shallow cumulus detrainment, the low SLF biases in some regions can only be improved through the improved circulation with the nudging technique. Our study highlights the challenges of

  18. Cu Isotopic Composition in Surface Environments and in Biological Systems: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuhong; Chen, Jiubin; Zhang, Ting

    2017-05-18

    Copper (Cu) is a transition metal and an essential micronutrient for organisms, but also one of the most widespread toxic inorganic contaminants at very high content. The research on Cu isotopes has grown rapidly in the last decade. Hitherto, a large number of studies have been published on the theoretical fractionation mechanisms, experimental data and natural variations of Cu isotopes in variable environments and ecosystems. These studies reported a large variation of δ 65 Cu (-16.49 to +20.04‰) in terrestrial samples and showed that Cu isotopes could be fractionated by various biogeochemical processes to different extent. Several papers have previously reviewed the coupling of Cu and Zn isotope systematics, and we give here a tentative review of the recent publications only on Cu isotopesin variable surface repositories, animals and human beings, with a goal to attract much attention to research on Cu (and other metals) behaviors in the environment and biological systems.

  19. Cu Isotopic Composition in Surface Environments and in Biological Systems: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuhong Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is a transition metal and an essential micronutrient for organisms, but also one of the most widespread toxic inorganic contaminants at very high content. The research on Cu isotopes has grown rapidly in the last decade. Hitherto, a large number of studies have been published on the theoretical fractionation mechanisms, experimental data and natural variations of Cu isotopes in variable environments and ecosystems. These studies reported a large variation of δ65Cu (−16.49 to +20.04‰ in terrestrial samples and showed that Cu isotopes could be fractionated by various biogeochemical processes to different extent. Several papers have previously reviewed the coupling of Cu and Zn isotope systematics, and we give here a tentative review of the recent publications only on Cu isotopesin variable surface repositories, animals and human beings, with a goal to attract much attention to research on Cu (and other metals behaviors in the environment and biological systems.

  20. Physical and chemical characterization of bioaerosols - Implications for nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariya, P. A.; Sun, J.; Eltouny, N. A.; Hudson, E. D.; Hayes, C. T.; Kos, G.

    The importance of organic compounds in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and as cloud condensation and ice-forming nuclei, has been recognized for several decades. Organic compounds comprise a significant fraction of the suspended matter mass, leading to local (e.g. toxicity, health hazards) and global (e.g. climate change) impacts. The state of knowledge of the physical chemistry of organic aerosols has increased during the last few decades. However, due to their complex chemistry and the multifaceted processes in which they are involved, the importance of organic aerosols, particularly bioaerosols, in driving physical and chemical atmospheric processes is still very uncertain and poorly understood. Factors such as solubility, surface tension, chemical impurities, volatility, morphology, contact angle, deliquescence, wettability, and the oxidation process are pivotal in the understanding of the activation processes of cloud droplets, and their chemical structures, solubilities and even the molecular configuration of the microbial outer membrane, all impact ice and cloud nucleation processes in the atmosphere. The aim of this review paper is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols with a focus on those properties important in nucleation processes. We herein discuss the potential importance (or lack thereof) of physical and chemical properties of bioaerosols and illustrate how the knowledge of these properties can be employed to study nucleation processes using a modeling exercise. We also outline a list of major uncertainties due to a lack of understanding of the processes involved or lack of available data. We will also discuss key issues of atmospheric significance deserving future physical chemistry research in the fields of bioaerosol characterization and microphysics, as well as bioaerosol modeling. These fundamental questions are to be addressed prior to any definite conclusions on the

  1. The impact of dissolved fluorine on bubble nucleation in hydrous rhyolite melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James E.; Hajimirza, Sahand; Webster, James D.; Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2018-04-01

    Surface tension of hydrous rhyolitic melt is high enough that large degrees of supersaturation are needed to homogeneously nucleate H2O bubbles during eruptive magma ascent. This study examines whether dissolved fluorine lowers surface tension of hydrous rhyolite, and thus lowers the supersaturation required for bubble nucleation. Fluorine was targeted because it, like H2O, changes melt properties and is highly soluble, unlike all other common magmatic volatiles. Rhyolite melts were saturated at Ps = 245 MPa with H2O fluid that contained F, generating rhyolite with 6.7 ± 0.4 wt.% H2O and 1.1-1.3 wt.% F. When these melts were decompressed rapidly to Pf = 149-202 MPa and quenched after 60 s, bubbles nucleated at supersaturations of ΔP = Ps - Pf ≥52 MPa, and reached bubble number densities of NB = 1012-13 m-3 at ΔP = 78-101 MPa. In comparison, rhyolite saturated with 6.34 ± 0.09 wt.% H2O, but only 0.25 wt.% F, did not nucleate bubbles until ΔP ≥ 100-116 MPa, and even then, at significantly lower NB (<1010 m-3). Numerical modeling of bubble nucleation and growth was used to estimate the values of surface tension required to generate the observed values of NB. Slight differences in melt compositions (i.e., alkalinity and H2O content), H2O diffusivity, or melt viscosity cannot explain the observed differences in NB. Instead, surface tension of F-rich rhyolite must be lower by approximately 4% than that of F-poor rhyolite. This difference in surface tension is significant and, for example, exceeds that found between hydrous basaltic andesite and hydrous rhyolite. These results suggest that is likely that surface tension for F-rich magmas, such as topaz rhyolite, is significantly lower than for F-poor magmas.

  2. Dynamic observations of vesiculation reveal the role of silicate crystals in bubble nucleation and growth in andesitic magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleše, P.; Higgins, M. D.; Mancini, L.; Lanzafame, G.; Brun, F.; Fife, J. L.; Casselman, J.; Baker, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    Bubble nucleation and growth control the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, and the kinetics of these processes are generally determined from examinations of natural samples and quenched experimental run products. These samples, however, only provide a view of the final state, from which the initial conditions of a time-evolving magmatic system are then inferred. The interpretations that follow are inexact due to the inability of determining the exact conditions of nucleation and the potential detachment of bubbles from their nucleation sites, an uncertainty that can obscure their nucleation location - either homogeneously within the melt or heterogeneously at the interface between crystals and melts. We present results of a series of dynamic, real-time 4D X-ray tomographic microscopy experiments where we observed the development of bubbles in crystal bearing silicate magmas. Experimentally synthesized andesitic glasses with 0.25-0.5 wt% H2O and seed silicate crystals were heated at 1 atm to induce bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. In contrast to previous studies on natural and experimentally produced samples, we found that bubbles readily nucleated on plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, that their contact angle changes during growth and that they can grow to sizes many times that of the silicate on whose surface they originated. The rapid heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles at low degrees of supersaturation in the presence of silicate crystals demonstrates that silicates can affect when vesiculation ensues, influencing subsequent permeability development and effusive vs. explosive transition in volcanic eruptions.

  3. Dynamic observations of vesiculation reveal the role of silicate crystals in bubble nucleation and growth in andesitic magmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleše, P.; Higgins, M. D.; Mancini, L.; Lanzafame, G.; Brun, F.; Fife, J. L.; Casselman, J.; Baker, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    Bubble nucleation and growth control the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, and the kinetics of these processes are generally determined from examinations of natural samples and quenched experimental run products. These samples, however, only provide a view of the final state, from which the initial conditions of a time-evolving magmatic system are then inferred. The interpretations that follow are inexact due to the inability of determining the exact conditions of nucleation and the potential detachment of bubbles from their nucleation sites, an uncertainty that can obscure their nucleation location – either homogeneously within the melt or heterogeneously at the interface between crystals and melts. We present results of a series of dynamic, real-time 4D X-ray tomographic microscopy experiments where we observed the development of bubbles in crystal bearing silicate magmas. Experimentally synthesized andesitic glasses with 0.25–0.5 wt% H2O and seed silicate crystals were heated at 1 atm to induce bubble nucleation and track bubble growth and movement. In contrast to previous studies on natural and experimentally produced samples, we found that bubbles readily nucleated on plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, that their contact angle changes during growth and that they can grow to sizes many times that of the silicate on whose surface they originated. The rapid heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles at low degrees of supersaturation in the presence of silicate crystals demonstrates that silicates can affect when vesiculation ensues, influencing subsequent permeability development and effusive vs. explosive transition in volcanic eruptions.

  4. Taking directions: the role of microtubule-bound nucleation in the self-organization of the plant cortical array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deinum, Eva E; Tindemans, Simon H; Mulder, Bela M

    2011-01-01

    The highly aligned cortical microtubule array of interphase plant cells is a key regulator of anisotropic cell expansion. Recent computational and analytical work has shown that the non-equilibrium self-organization of this structure can be understood on the basis of experimentally observed collisional interactions between dynamic microtubules attached to the plasma membrane. Most of these approaches assumed that new microtubules are homogeneously and isotropically nucleated on the cortical surface. Experimental evidence, however, shows that nucleation mostly occurs from other microtubules and under specific relative angles. Here, we investigate the impact of directed microtubule-bound nucleations on the alignment process using computer simulations. The results show that microtubule-bound nucleations can increase the degree of alignment achieved, decrease the timescale of the ordering process and widen the regime of dynamic parameters for which the system can self-organize. We establish that the major determinant of this effect is the degree of co-alignment of the nucleations with the parent microtubule. The specific role of sideways branching nucleations appears to allow stronger alignment while maintaining a measure of overall spatial homogeneity. Finally, we investigate the suggestion that observed persistent rotation of microtubule domains can be explained through a handedness bias in microtubule-bound nucleations, showing that this is possible only for an extreme bias and over a limited range of parameters

  5. Copper Oxidation through Nucleation Sites of Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Birong; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; Shivayogimath, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nucleation defect-triggered oxidation of Cu covered by CVD graphene during postannealing in air. The results reveal that different growth conditions may induce imperfect nucleation of graphene, and cause creation of defects near the nucleation point such as pin holes and amorph...

  6. Nucleation, Melting Behaviour and Mechanical Properties of Poly(L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anew category of nucleating agent for poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was developed. An organic nucleating agent; N,N'-bis(benzoyl) suberic acid dihydrazide (NA) was synthesized from benzoyl hydrazine and suberoyl chloride which was deprived from suberic acid via acylation. The nucleation, melting behaviour and ...

  7. Detection of bubble nucleation event in superheated drop detector ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... the low cost. The bubble nucleation event is detected by measuring the acoustic shock wave released dur- ing the nucleation process. The present work demonstrates the detection of bubble nucleation events by .... This noise level does not affect the characteristics or performance of the sensor–amplifier.

  8. Mechanism of cube grain nucleation during recrystallization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The subject of cube texture nucleation i.e. cube grain nucleation, from the deformed state of aluminium and copper is of scientific curiosity with concurrent technological implications. There are essentially two models currently in dispute over the mechanism of cube grain nucleation i.e. the differential stored energy model ...

  9. Nucleation of colloidal crystals on configurable seed structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, M; Vermolen, E.C.M.; Leunissen, M.E.; Vossen, D.L.J.; van Oostrum, P.D.J.; Dijkstra, M.; van Blaaderen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleation is an important stage in the growth of crystals. During this stage, the structure and orientation of a crystal are determined. However, short time- and length-scales make nucleation poorly understood. Micrometer-sized colloidal particles form an ideal model system to study nucleation due

  10. Locating Critical Circular and Unconstrained Failure Surface in Slope Stability Analysis with Tailored Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasik, Tomasz; van der Meij, Raymond

    2017-12-01

    This article presents an efficient search method for representative circular and unconstrained slip surfaces with the use of the tailored genetic algorithm. Searches for unconstrained slip planes with rigid equilibrium methods are yet uncommon in engineering practice, and little publications regarding truly free slip planes exist. The proposed method presents an effective procedure being the result of the right combination of initial population type, selection, crossover and mutation method. The procedure needs little computational effort to find the optimum, unconstrained slip plane. The methodology described in this paper is implemented using Mathematica. The implementation, along with further explanations, is fully presented so the results can be reproduced. Sample slope stability calculations are performed for four cases, along with a detailed result interpretation. Two cases are compared with analyses described in earlier publications. The remaining two are practical cases of slope stability analyses of dikes in Netherlands. These four cases show the benefits of analyzing slope stability with a rigid equilibrium method combined with a genetic algorithm. The paper concludes by describing possibilities and limitations of using the genetic algorithm in the context of the slope stability problem.

  11. Outer surface protein B is critical for Borrelia burgdorferi adherence and survival within Ixodes ticks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Neelakanta

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival of Borrelia burgdorferi in ticks and mammals is facilitated, at least in part, by the selective expression of lipoproteins. Outer surface protein (Osp A participates in spirochete adherence to the tick gut. As ospB is expressed on a bicistronic operon with ospA, we have now investigated the role of OspB by generating an OspB-deficient B. burgdorferi and examining its phenotype throughout the spirochete life cycle. Similar to wild-type isolates, the OspB-deficient B. burgdorferi were able to readily infect and persist in mice. OspB-deficient B. burgdorferi were capable of migrating to the feeding ticks but had an impaired ability to adhere to the tick gut and survive within the vector. Furthermore, the OspB-deficient B. burgdorferi bound poorly to tick gut extracts. The complementation of the OspB-deficient spirochete in trans, with a wild-type copy of ospB gene, restored its ability to bind tick gut. Taken together, these data suggest that OspB has an important role within Ixodes scapularis and that B. burgdorferi relies upon multiple genes to efficiently persist in ticks.

  12. Monocyte and lymphocyte surface molecules in severe sepsis and non-septic critically ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämsä, Joel; Syrjälä, Hannu; Huotari, Virva; Savolainen, Eeva-Riitta; Ala-Kokko, Tero

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether expression of monocyte and lymphocyte surface molecules differs between patients with severe sepsis and non-septic patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU). The expression of monocyte CD14, CD40, CD80 and HLA-DR, and lymphocyte CD69 were analyzed using quantitative flow cytometry on three consecutive days in 27 patients with severe sepsis and in 15 non-septic patients. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed and each corresponding area under the curve (AUC) was determined. The results showed that the expression levels of CD40 on monocytes and CD69 on CD4+ T cells and on natural killer (NK) cells were highest in patients with severe sepsis (p sepsis and positive blood culture compared with those with negative blood culture (p sepsis detection were 0.836 for CD40, 0.872 for CD69 on NK cells, and 0.795 for CD69 on CD4+ T cells. These findings suggest that monocyte CD40 and CD69 on NK cells and CD4+ T cells could prove useful for new approaches in the identification of severe sepsis in the ICU. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Strong control of Southern Ocean cloud reflectivity by ice-nucleating particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Miltenberger, Annette K; Furtado, Kalli; Grosvenor, Daniel P; Shipway, Ben J; Hill, Adrian A; Wilkinson, Jonathan M; Field, Paul R; Murray, Benjamin J; Carslaw, Ken S

    2018-02-28

    Large biases in climate model simulations of cloud radiative properties over the Southern Ocean cause large errors in modeled sea surface temperatures, atmospheric circulation, and climate sensitivity. Here, we combine cloud-resolving model simulations with estimates of the concentration of ice-nucleating particles in this region to show that our simulated Southern Ocean clouds reflect far more radiation than predicted by global models, in agreement with satellite observations. Specifically, we show that the clouds that are most sensitive to the concentration of ice-nucleating particles are low-level mixed-phase clouds in the cold sectors of extratropical cyclones, which have previously been identified as a main contributor to the Southern Ocean radiation bias. The very low ice-nucleating particle concentrations that prevail over the Southern Ocean strongly suppress cloud droplet freezing, reduce precipitation, and enhance cloud reflectivity. The results help explain why a strong radiation bias occurs mainly in this remote region away from major sources of ice-nucleating particles. The results present a substantial challenge to climate models to be able to simulate realistic ice-nucleating particle concentrations and their effects under specific meteorological conditions. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD at simulated stratospheric conditions – Part II: Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation energies ΔGact for the nucleation of nitric acid dihydrate (NAD in supercooled binary HNO3/H2O solution droplets were calculated from volume-based nucleation rate measurements using the AIDA (Aerosol, Interactions, and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The experimental conditions covered temperatures T between 192 and 197 K, NAD saturation ratios SNAD between 7 and 10, and nitric acid molar fractions of the nucleating sub-micron sized droplets between 0.26 and 0.28. Based on classical nucleation theory, a new parameterisation for ΔGact=A×(T ln SNAD−2+B is fitted to the experimental data with A=2.5×106 kcal K2 mol−1 and B=11.2−0.1(T−192 kcal mol−1. A and B were chosen to also achieve good agreement with literature data of ΔGact. The parameter A implies, for the temperature and composition range of our analysis, a mean interface tension σsl=51 cal mol−1 cm−2 between the growing NAD germ and the supercooled solution. A slight temperature dependence of the diffusion activation energy is represented by the parameter B. Investigations with a detailed microphysical process model showed that literature formulations of volume-based (Salcedo et al., 2001 and surface-based (Tabazadeh et al., 2002 nucleation rates significantly overestimate NAD formation rates when applied to the conditions of our experiments.

  15. Strong control of Southern Ocean cloud reflectivity by ice-nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Miltenberger, Annette K.; Furtado, Kalli; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Shipway, Ben J.; Hill, Adrian A.; Wilkinson, Jonathan M.; Field, Paul R.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2018-03-01

    Large biases in climate model simulations of cloud radiative properties over the Southern Ocean cause large errors in modeled sea surface temperatures, atmospheric circulation, and climate sensitivity. Here, we combine cloud-resolving model simulations with estimates of the concentration of ice-nucleating particles in this region to show that our simulated Southern Ocean clouds reflect far more radiation than predicted by global models, in agreement with satellite observations. Specifically, we show that the clouds that are most sensitive to the concentration of ice-nucleating particles are low-level mixed-phase clouds in the cold sectors of extratropical cyclones, which have previously been identified as a main contributor to the Southern Ocean radiation bias. The very low ice-nucleating particle concentrations that prevail over the Southern Ocean strongly suppress cloud droplet freezing, reduce precipitation, and enhance cloud reflectivity. The results help explain why a strong radiation bias occurs mainly in this remote region away from major sources of ice-nucleating particles. The results present a substantial challenge to climate models to be able to simulate realistic ice-nucleating particle concentrations and their effects under specific meteorological conditions.

  16. Effect of CaCO3(S) nucleation modes on algae removal from alkaline water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin Yong; Kinney, Kerry A; Katz, Lynn E

    2016-02-29

    The role of calcite heterogeneous nucleation was studied in a particle coagulation treatment process for removing microalgae from water. Batch experiments were conducted with Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp. in the presence and absence of carbonate and in the presence and absence of Mg to delineate the role of CaCO 3(S) nucleation on microalgae removal. The results indicate that effective algae coagulation (e.g., up to 81 % algae removal efficiency) can be achieved via heterogeneous nucleation with CaCO 3(S) ; however, supersaturation ratios between 120 and 200 are required to achieve at least 50% algae removal, depending on ion concentrations. Algae removal was attributed to adsorption of Ca 2+ onto the cell surface which provides nucleation sites for CaCO 3(S) precipitation. Bridging of calcite particles between the algal cells led to rapid aggregation and formation of larger flocs. However, at higher supersaturation conditions, algae removal was diminished due to the dominance of homogeneous nucleation of CaCO 3(S) . Removal of algae in the presence of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ required higher supersaturation values; however, the shift from heteronucleation to homonucleation with increasing supersaturation was still evident. The results suggest that water chemistry, pH, ionic strength, alkalinity and Ca 2+ concentration can be optimized for algae removal via coagulation-sedimentation.

  17. Heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite on protein: structural effect of silk sericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akari; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ogata, Shin-ichi; Yamazaki, Masao; Furutani, Yoshiaki; Kinoshita, Hisao; Tanihara, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Acidic proteins play an important role during mineral formation in biological systems, but the mechanism of mineral formation is far from understood. In this paper, we report on the relationship between the structure of a protein and hydroxyapatite deposition under biomimetic conditions. Sericin, a type of silk protein, was adopted as a suitable protein for studying structural effect on hydroxyapatite deposition, since it forms a hydroxyapatite layer on its surface in a metastable calcium phosphate solution, and its structure has been reported. Sericin effectively induced hydroxyapatite nucleation when it has high molecular weight and a β sheet structure. This indicates that the specific structure of a protein can effectively induce heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite in a biomimetic solution, i.e. a metastable calcium phosphate solution. This finding is useful in understanding biomineralization, as well as for the design of organic polymers that can effectively induce hydroxyapatite nucleation. PMID:16849195

  18. A Critical Evaluation of High TEX86-derived Sea Surface Temperatures from the Early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancost, R. D.; Taylor, K. W.; Handley, L.; Huber, M.; Hollis, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The application of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) based sea surface temperature proxies (eg TEX-86) has brought about major advances in our understanding of Cenozoic climate. However, TEX-86 approaches yield high temperatures at high latitudes during the EECO, and the resulting low latitudinal temperature gradients challenge our understanding of the physical climate system. We examine existing Paleogene TEX-86 data using three approaches. First, we have compared TEX-86 SST estimates to those derived from oxygen isotopes or Mg/Ca ratios of co-occurring well-preserved planktonic foraminifera. This reveals a strong correlation between foraminiferal SSTs and those obtained from linear TEX-86 calibrations, but the latter are systematically 4-6°C warmer. SSTs derived from non-linear TEX-86 calibrations are similar to inorganic SST estimates at high temperatures, but an offset still persists at lower temperatures. We have also compared TEX-86 SST estimates from marginal settings to associated continental mean air temperatures (MAT) derived from soil bacterial GDGTs (the MBT/CBT index). Again, the two approaches exhibit a strong correlation but with the former yielding 4-6°C warmer temperatures. Second, we have developed SST records from New Zealand, in order to place the EECO SSTs into a longer-term Paleogene context. Our temperature estimates indicate that sea floor and sea surface temperatures increased by ~10°C from late Paleocene to early Eocene times. Late Paleocene TEX-86-derived SSTs for the Canterbury Basin range from 18 to 23°C, consistent with coeval TEX-86 records from the Campbell Plateau and south Tasman Sea. During the EECO, TEX-86 derived SSTs from the Canterbury Basin and south Tasman Sea indicate tropical conditions, with temperatures peaking at 30-32°C at 50 Ma and then declining to 24-26°C into the Middle Eocene. MBT/CBT-derived MATs broadly parallel the SST trends, albeit with slightly lower values. These records suggest that

  19. Equivalence of chain conformations in the surface region of a polymer melt and a single Gaussian chain under critical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, A M; Leermakers, F A M; Fleer, G J

    2013-08-07

    In the melt polymer conformations are nearly ideal according to Flory's ideality hypothesis. Silberberg generalized this statement for chains in the interfacial region. We check the Silberberg argument by analyzing the conformations of a probe chain end-grafted at a solid surface in a sea of floating free chains of concentration φ by the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Apart from the grafting, probe chain and floating chains are identical. Most of the results were obtained for a standard SCF model with freely jointed chains on a six-choice lattice, where immediate step reversals are allowed. A few data were generated for a five-choice lattice, where such step reversals are forbidden. These coarse-grained models describe the equilibrium properties of flexible atactic polymer chains at the scale of the segment length. The concentration was varied over the whole range from φ = 0 (single grafted chain) to φ = 1 (probe chain in the melt). The number of contacts with the surface, average height of the free end and its dispersion, average loop and train length, tail size distribution, end-point and overall segment distributions were calculated for a grafted probe chain as a function of φ, for several chain lengths and substrate∕polymer interactions, which were varied from strong repulsion to strong adsorption. The computations show that the conformations of the probe chain in the melt do not depend on substrate∕polymer interactions and are very similar to the conformations of a single end-grafted chain under critical conditions, and can thus be described analytically. When the substrate∕polymer interaction is fixed at the value corresponding to critical conditions, all equilibrium properties of a probe chain are independent of φ, over the whole range from a dilute solution to the melt. We believe that the conformations of all flexible chains in the surface region of the melt are close to those of an appropriate single chain in critical conditions, provided

  20. Homogeneous nucleation: a problem in nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The master equation for cluster growth and evaporation is derived for many-body quantum mechanics and from a modified version of quantum damping theory used in laser physics. For application to nucleation theory, the quantum damping theory is generalized to include system and reservoir states that are not separate entities. Formulas for rate constants are obtained. Solutions of the master equation yield equations of state and system-averaged quantities recognized as thermodynamic variables. Formulas for Helmholtz free energies of clusters in a Debye approximation are derived. Coexistence-line equations for pressure, volume, and number of clusters are obtained from equations-of-state analysis. Coexistence-line and surface-tension data are used to obtain values of parameters for the Debye approximation. These data are employed in calculating both the nucleation current in diffusion cloud chamber experiments and the onset of condensation in expansion nozzle experiments. Theoretical and experimental results are similar for both cloud chamber and nozzle experiments, which measure water. Comparison with other theories reveals that classical theory only accidently agrees with experiment and that the Helmholtz free-energy formula used in the Lothe--Pound theory is incomplete. 27 figures, 3 tables, 149 references.

  1. Non-equilibrium phase stabilization versus bubble nucleation at a nanoscale-curved Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Luo, Tengfei

    Using continuum dynamic van der Waals theory in a radial 1D geometry with a Lennard-Jones fluid model, we investigate the nature of vapor bubble nucleation near a heated, nanoscale-curved convex interface. Vapor bubble nucleation and growth are observed for interfaces with sufficiently large radius of curvature while phase stabilization of a superheated fluid layer occurs at interfaces with smaller radius. The hypothesis that the high Laplace pressure required for stable equilibrium of very small bubbles is responsible for phase stability is tested by effectively varying the parameter which controls liquid-vapor surface tension. In doing so, the liquid-vapor surface tension- hence Laplace pressure-is shown to have limited effect on phase stabilization vs. bubble nucleation. However, the strong dependence of nucleation on leading-order momentum transport, i.e. viscous dissipation, near the heated inner surface is demonstrated. We gratefully acknowledge ND Energy for support through the ND Energy Postdoctoral Fellowship program and the Army Research Office, Grant No. W911NF-16-1-0267, managed by Dr. Chakrapani Venanasi.

  2. Screening of plant resources with anti-ice nucleation activity for frost damage prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Fukuda, Satoshi; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Arakawa, Keita

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that some polyphenols have anti-ice nucleation activity (anti-INA) against ice-nucleating bacteria that contribute to frost damage. In the present study, leaf disk freezing assay, a test of in vitro application to plant leaves, was performed for the screening of anti-INA, which inhibits the ice nucleation activity of an ice-nucleating bacterium Erwinia ananas in water droplets on the leaf surfaces. The application of polyphenols with anti-INA, kaempferol 7-O-β-glucoside and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, to the leaf disk freezing assay by cooling at -4--6 °C for 3 h, revealed that both the compounds showed anti-INAs against E. ananas in water droplets on the leaf surfaces. Further, this assay also revealed that the extracts of five plant leaves showed high anti-INA against E. ananas in water droplets on leaf surfaces, indicating that they are the candidate resources to protect crops from frost damage.

  3. Earthquake Nucleation on Faults With Heterogeneous Frictional Properties, Normal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sohom; Viesca, Robert C.

    2017-10-01

    We examine the development of an instability of fault slip rate. We consider a slip rate and state dependence of fault frictional strength, in which frictional properties and normal stress are functions of position. We pose the problem for a slip rate distribution that diverges quasi-statically within finite time in a self-similar fashion. Scenarios of property variations are considered and the corresponding self-similar solutions found. We focus on variations of coefficients, a and b, respectively, controlling the magnitude of a direct effect on strength due to instantaneous changes in slip rate and of strength evolution due to changes in a state variable. These results readily extend to variations in fault-normal stress, σ, or the characteristic slip distance for state evolution, Dc. We find that heterogeneous properties lead to a finite number of self-similar solutions, located about critical points of the distributions: maxima, minima, and between them. We examine the stability of these solutions and find that only a subset is asymptotically stable, occurring at just one of the critical point types. Such stability implies that during instability development, slip rate and state evolution can be attracted to develop in the manner of the self-similar solution, which is also confirmed by solutions to initial value problems for slip rate and state. A quasi-static slip rate divergence is ultimately limited by inertia, leading to the nucleation of an outward expanding dynamic rupture: asymptotic stability of self-similar solutions then implies preferential sites for earthquake nucleation, which are determined by distribution of frictional properties.

  4. A critical analysis of one standard and five methods to monitor surface wetness and time-of-wetness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Dario; della Valle, Antonio; Becherini, Francesca

    2018-05-01

    Surface wetness is a synergistic factor to determine atmospheric corrosion, monument weathering, mould growth, sick buildings, etc. However, its detection and monitoring are neither easy nor homogeneous, for a number of factors that may affect readings. Various types of methods and sensors, either commercial or prototypes built in the lab, have been investigated and compared, i.e. the international standard ISO 9223 to evaluate corrosivity after wetness and time-of-wetness; indirect evaluation of wetness, based on the dew point calculated after the output of temperature and relative humidity sensors and direct measurements by means of capacitive wetness sensors, safety sensors, rain sensors (also known as leaf wetness sensors), infrared reflection sensors and fibre optic sensors. A comparison between the different methods is presented, specifying physical principles, forms of wetting to which they are respondent (i.e. condensation, ice melting, splashing drops, percolation and capillary rise), critical factors, use and cost.

  5. The emergence of modern nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    A series of important papers by David Turnbull and his collaborators in the late 1940's and early 1950's laid the experimental and theoretical foundation of modern nucleation theory. The elegance, versatility, and generality of the phenomenological approach, coupled with brilliant and insightful experimental confirmation, sparked widespread application which continues today. Much of David Turnbull's subsequent work in other subjects grew directly or indirectly from this work

  6. Nucleation of (4)R brane universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Rojas, EfraIn

    2004-01-01

    The creation of brane universes induced by a totally antisymmetric tensor living in a fixed background spacetime is presented, where a term involving the intrinsic curvature of the brane is considered. A canonical quantum mechanical approach employing the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is used. The probability nucleation for the brane is calculated by means of the corresponding instanton and the WKB approximation. Some cosmological implications from the model are presented

  7. Nucleation of {sup (4)}R brane universes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de FIsica, Escuela Superior de FIsica y Matematicas del IPN, Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Rojas, EfraIn [Facultad de FIsica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, Sebastian Camacho 5, Xalapa, Veracruz, 91000 (Mexico)

    2004-09-07

    The creation of brane universes induced by a totally antisymmetric tensor living in a fixed background spacetime is presented, where a term involving the intrinsic curvature of the brane is considered. A canonical quantum mechanical approach employing the Wheeler-DeWitt equation is used. The probability nucleation for the brane is calculated by means of the corresponding instanton and the WKB approximation. Some cosmological implications from the model are presented.

  8. Nucleation and Epitaxy-Mediated Phase Transformation of a Precursor Cadmium Carbonate Phase at the Calcite/Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2017-02-24

    Mineral nucleation can be catalyzed by the presence of mineral substrates; however, the mechanisms of heterogeneous nucleation remain poorly understood. A combination of in situ time-sequenced measurements and nano-manipulation experiments were performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation of otavite (CdCO3) on calcite (CaCO3) single crystals that exposed the (10-14) surface. Otavite and calcite are isostructural carbonates that display a 4% lattice mismatch, based on their (10-14) surface areas. AFM observations revealed a two-stage process in the nucleation of cadmium carbonate surface precipitates. As evidenced by changes in height, shape, growth behavior, and friction signal of the precipitates, a precursor phase was observed to initially form on the surface and subsequently undergo an epitaxy-mediated phase transformation to otavite, which then grew epitaxially. Nano-manipulation experiments, in which the applied force was increased progressively until precipitates were removed from the surface, showed that adhesion of the precursor phase to the substrate was distinctively weaker than that of the epitaxial phase, consistent with that of an amorphous phase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that heterogeneous mineral nucleation can follow a non-classical pathway like that found in homogenous aqueous conditions.

  9. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M., E-mail: marco.schweizer@math.ethz.ch [Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Sagis, L. M. C., E-mail: leonard.sagis@wur.nl [Department of Materials, Polymer Physics, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Food Physics Group, Wageningen University, Bornse Weilanden 9, 6708 WG Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-21

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 − 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters.

  10. Systematic coarse-graining in nucleation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, M.; Sagis, L. M. C.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we show that the standard method to obtain nucleation rate-predictions with the aid of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations leads to nucleation rate predictions that deviate 3 - 5 orders of magnitude from the recent brute-force molecular dynamics simulations [Diemand et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 074309 (2013)] conducted in the experimental accessible supersaturation regime for Lennard-Jones argon. We argue that this is due to the truncated state space the literature mostly relies on, where the number of atoms in a nucleus is considered the only relevant order parameter. We here formulate the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of nucleation in an extended state space, where the internal energy and momentum of the nuclei are additionally incorporated. We show that the extended model explains the lack in agreement between the molecular dynamics simulations by Diemand et al. and the truncated state space. We demonstrate additional benefits of using the extended state space; in particular, the definition of a nucleus temperature arises very naturally and can be shown without further approximation to obey the fluctuation law of McGraw and LaViolette. In addition, we illustrate that our theory conveniently allows to extend existing theories to richer sets of order parameters.

  11. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds.

  12. Images and properties of individual nucleated particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Zoltán; Pósfai, Mihály; Nyirő-Kósa, Ilona; Aalto, Pasi; Kulmala, Markku; Salma, Imre

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles were collected in Budapest, Hungary in April-June onto lacey Formvar substrates by using an electrostatic precipitator during the beginning phase of the particle growth process in ten nucleation and growth events. Median contribution of the nucleated particles - expressed as the concentration of particles with a diameter between 6 and 25 nm to the total particle number concentration - was 55%, and the median electrical mobility diameter of the particles was approximately 20 nm. The sample was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Major types of individual particles such as soot, sulphate/organic and tar ball particles were identified in the sample. In addition, particles with an optical diameter range of 10-30 nm were also observed. They clearly differed from the other particle types, showed homogeneous contrast in the bright-field TEM images, and evaporated within tens of seconds when exposed to the electron beam. They were interpreted as representatives of freshly nucleated particles.

  13. Molecular-dynamics simulations of urea nucleation from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvalaglio, Matteo; Perego, Claudio; Giberti, Federico; Mazzotti, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Despite its ubiquitous character and relevance in many branches of science and engineering, nucleation from solution remains elusive. In this framework, molecular simulations represent a powerful tool to provide insight into nucleation at the molecular scale. In this work, we combine theory and molecular simulations to describe urea nucleation from aqueous solution. Taking advantage of well-tempered metadynamics, we compute the free-energy change associated to the phase transition. We find that such a free-energy profile is characterized by significant finite-size effects that can, however, be accounted for. The description of the nucleation process emerging from our analysis differs from classical nucleation theory. Nucleation of crystal-like clusters is in fact preceded by large concentration fluctuations, indicating a predominant two-step process, whereby embryonic crystal nuclei emerge from dense, disordered urea clusters. Furthermore, in the early stages of nucleation, two different polymorphs are seen to compete. PMID:25492932

  14. Critical sizes and critical characteristics of nanoclusters, nanostructures and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzdalev, I.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Critical sizes and characteristics of nanoclusters and nanostructures are introduced as the parameters of nanosystems and nanomaterials. The next critical characteristics are considered: atomic and electronic 'magic number', critical size of cluster nucleation, critical size of melting-freezing of cluster, critical size of quantum (laser) radiation, critical sizes for the single electron conductivity, critical energy and magnetic field for the magnetic tunneling, critical cluster sizes for the giant magnetic resistance, critical size of the first order magnetic phase transition. The critical characteristics are estimated by thermodynamic approaches, by Moessbauer spectroscopy, AFM, heat capacity, SQUID magnetometry and other technique, The influence of cluster-cluster interactions, cluster-matrix interactions and cluster defects on cluster atomic dynamics, cluster melting, cluster critical sizes, Curie or Neel points and the character of magnetic phase transitions were investigated. The applications of critical size and critical characteristic parameters for the nanomaterial characterization are considered

  15. Surface tension of different sized single-component droplets, according to macroscopic data obtained using the lattice gas model and the critical droplet size during phase formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.; Zaitseva, E. S.; Rabinovich, A. B.

    2017-10-01

    Size dependences of the surface tension of spherical single-component droplets are calculated using equations of the lattice gas model for 19 compounds. Parameters of the model are found from experimental data on the surface tension of these compounds for a macroscopic planar surface. The chosen low-molecular compounds satisfy the law of corresponding states. To improve agreement with the experimental data, Lennard-Jones potential parameters are varied within 10% deviations. The surface tensions of different sized equilibrium droplets are calculated at elevated and lowered temperatures. It is found that the surface tension of droplets grows monotonically as the droplet size increases from zero to its bulk value. The droplet size R 0 corresponding to zero surface tension corresponds to the critical size of the emergence of a new phase. The critical droplet sizes in the new phase of the considered compounds are estimated for the first time.

  16. Leipzig Ice Nucleation chamber Comparison (LINC): intercomparison of four online ice nucleation counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert-Kohn, Monika; Wex, Heike; Welti, André; Hartmann, Susan; Grawe, Sarah; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Atkinson, James D.; Stratmann, Frank; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-09-01

    Ice crystal formation in atmospheric clouds has a strong effect on precipitation, cloud lifetime, cloud radiative properties, and thus the global energy budget. Primary ice formation above 235 K is initiated by nucleation on seed aerosol particles called ice-nucleating particles (INPs). Instruments that measure the ice-nucleating potential of aerosol particles in the atmosphere need to be able to accurately quantify ambient INP concentrations. In the last decade several instruments have been developed to investigate the ice-nucleating properties of aerosol particles and to measure ambient INP concentrations. Therefore, there is a need for intercomparisons to ensure instrument differences are not interpreted as scientific findings.In this study, we intercompare the results from parallel measurements using four online ice nucleation chambers. Seven different aerosol types are tested including untreated and acid-treated mineral dusts (microcline, which is a K-feldspar, and kaolinite), as well as birch pollen washing waters. Experiments exploring heterogeneous ice nucleation above and below water saturation are performed to cover the whole range of atmospherically relevant thermodynamic conditions that can be investigated with the intercompared chambers. The Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) and the Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber coupled to the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PIMCA-PINC) performed measurements in the immersion freezing mode. Additionally, two continuous-flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs) PINC and the Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN) are used to perform measurements below and just above water saturation, nominally presenting deposition nucleation and condensation freezing.The results of LACIS and PIMCA-PINC agree well over the whole range of measured frozen fractions (FFs) and temperature. In general PINC and SPIN compare well and the observed differences are explained by the ice crystal growth and different residence times in

  17. Nucleation process of an M2 earthquake in a deep gold mine in South Africa inferred from on-fault foreshock activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Y.; Nakatani, M.; Naoi, M.; Philipp, J.; Janssen, C.; Kawakata, H.; Dresen, G. H.; Ogasawara, H.

    2014-12-01

    We observed foreshock activity of an Mw2.2 earthquake (the mainshock) that occurred in a gabbroic dyke at a depth of about 3.3 km from the surface in a deep gold mine in South Africa. Foreshock activity, selectively occurring on a plane on which the mainshock would occur, lasted for at least six months until the mainshock. Rock samples in the mainshock source region were recovered by drilling afterward. Indication of ancient hydrothermal alteration on the rupture plane of the mainshock suggests that the foreshock activity occurred on a pre-existing weakness, probably a healed joint, to nucleate the mainshock. The foreshocks during the three months leading up to the mainshock concentrated to three clusters (F1-F3), which, we interpreted, represent the nucleation at multiple sites. The temporal variation in the foreshock activity in the three months can be well explained by the temporal variation of the stressing state in the source region of the mainshock due to nearby mining. One of these clusters (cluster F2) showed an accelerated activity from about 10 days before the mainshock, while activity over the entire foreshock area was rather constant. The foreshock sources in the final 41 hours, during which the stress state was constant, migrated from F2 to F1 that neighbored to the mainshock hypocenter, suggesting coalescence of the two nuclei. The occurrence of mainshock was 0.4-2.3 days earlier than the time expected from an extrapolation of the accelerated foreshock activity in F2. The nucleation of mainshock may have been advanced to the criticality for dynamic instability in a stepwise manner upon the coalescence of nuclei.While the heterogeneity of geological structures obscures the straightforward manifestation of self-driven quasi-static nucleation, the present careful analysis suggests that some essence of such nucleation as known from the fracture theory and laboratory experiments was caught in the pre-M2 AE data on a natural joint at a depth of 3.3 km.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystal Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Sumida, John

    2000-01-01

    We have postulated that, in the case of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme, crystal growth occurs by the addition of pre-critical nuclei sized n-mers that form in the bulk solution, and that the n-mer growth units were multiples of the tetrameric 4(sub 3) helical structure. These have the strongest intermolecular bonds in the crystal and are therefore likely to be the first species formed. High resolution AFM studies provide strong supporting evidence for this model, but the data also suggest that the actual species in solution may not be identical in structure to that found in the crystal. We are using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the initial solution phase self-assembly process, using covalent fluorescent derivatives which crystallize in the characteristic P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2(sub 1) space group. FRET studies are being carried out between the cascade blue (CB-lys, donor, Ex(sub max) 366 nm, Em 420 nm) and lucifer yellow (LY-lys, acceptor, Ex(sub max) 430 nm, Em 528 nm) asp101 derivatives. The estimated R(sub 0) for this probe pair, the distance where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, is approx. 1.2 nm, compared to 2.2 nm between the side chain carboxyls of adjacent asp101's in the crystalline 4(sub 3) helix. The short donor lifetime of 2.80 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.644), coupled with the large average distances between the molecules (greater than or equal to 50 nm) in solution, ensure that any energy transfer observed is not due to random diffusive interactions. Lifetime data show that CB-lys has a single lifetime when it is the only species in solution. Similarly, LY-lys also exhibits a single lifetime of 4.63 ns (chi(sup 2) = 0.42) when alone in solution. Addition of LY-lys to CB-lys results in the appearance of a third lifetime component of 0.348ns for the CB-lys. The fractional intensities of the different species present can be used to estimate the distribution of monomer and n-mers in solution. The self

  19. Inorganic Nanoparticle Nucleation on Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteleski, Adrian John

    The introduction of inorganic nanoparticles into organic materials enhances both the mechanical and chemical properties of the material. Metallic nanoparticles, like silver and gold, have been introduced into polymers for use as antimicrobial coatings or dielectric materials, respectively. The challenge in creating these materials currently is the difficulty to homogeneously disperse the particles throughout the polymer matrix. The uneven dispersion of nanoparticles can lead to less than optimal quality and undesired properties. By creating a polymer nanocomposite material with well-controlled size inorganic materials that are evenly dispersed throughout the polymer matrix; we can improve the materials performance and properties. The objective for this research is to use polymer networks for the in situ mineralization of silver and other metallic materials to create intricate inorganic structures. The work performed here studied the ability to nucleate silver nanoparticles using poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) as the templating agent. Ionic silver was chemically reduced by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of PAA. The effect of varying reactant concentrations of silver, NaBH 4, and PAA on particle size was studied. Reaction conditions in terms of varying temperature and pH levels of the reaction solution were monitored to observe the effect of silver nanoparticle size, shape, and concentration. By monitoring the UV spectra over time the reaction mechanism of the silver reduction process was determined to be an autocatalytic process: a period of slow, continuous nucleation followed by rapid, autocatalytic growth. The reaction kinetics for this autocatalytic process is also reported. PAA was crosslinked both chemically and physically to 3 biopolymers; ELP, an elastin like peptide, cotton fabrics, and calcium alginate hydrogels. Various compositions of PAA were physically crosslinked with calcium alginate gels to design an antimicrobial hydrogel for use in wound

  20. High-speed infrared thermography for the measurement of microscopic boiling parameters on micro- and nano-structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Youngjae; Kim, Hyungdae; Kim, Hyungmo; Kim, Joonwon

    2014-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale structures on boiling surfaces can enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and critical heat flux (CHF). A few studies were conducted to explain the enhancements of HTC and CHF using the microscopic boiling parameters. Quantitative measurements of microscopic boiling parameters are needed to understand the physical mechanism of the boiling heat transfer augmentation on structured surfaces. However, there is no existing experimental techniques to conveniently measure the boiling parameters on the structured surfaces because of the small (nucleate pool boiling on micro- and nano-structured surfaces. The visualization results are analyzed to obtain the microscopic boiling parameters. Finally, quantitative microscopic boiling parameters are used to interpret the enhancement of HTC and CHF. In this study, liquid-vapor phase distributions of each surface were clearly visualized by IR thermography during the nucleate boiling phenomena. From the visualization results, following microscopic boiling parameters were quantitatively measured by image processing. - Number density of dry patch, NDP IR thermography technique was demonstrated by nucleate pool boiling experiments with M- and N surfaces. The enhancement of HTC and CHF could be explained by microscopic boiling parameters

  1. Critical Zone Co-dynamics: Quantifying Interactions between Subsurface, Land Surface, and Vegetation Properties Using UAV and Geophysical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Leger, E.; Peterson, J.; Falco, N.; Wainwright, H. M.; Wu, Y.; Tran, A. P.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Versteeg, R.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Improving understanding and modelling of terrestrial systems requires advances in measuring and quantifying interactions among subsurface, land surface and vegetation processes over relevant spatiotemporal scales. Such advances are important to quantify natural and managed ecosystem behaviors, as well as to predict how watershed systems respond to increasingly frequent hydrological perturbations, such as droughts, floods and early snowmelt. Our study focuses on the joint use of UAV-based multi-spectral aerial imaging, ground-based geophysical tomographic monitoring (incl., electrical and electromagnetic imaging) and point-scale sensing (soil moisture sensors and soil sampling) to quantify interactions between above and below ground compartments of the East River Watershed in the Upper Colorado River Basin. We evaluate linkages between physical properties (incl. soil composition, soil electrical conductivity, soil water content), metrics extracted from digital surface and terrain elevation models (incl., slope, wetness index) and vegetation properties (incl., greenness, plant type) in a 500 x 500 m hillslope-floodplain subsystem of the watershed. Data integration and analysis is supported by numerical approaches that simulate the control of soil and geomorphic characteristic on hydrological processes. Results provide an unprecedented window into critical zone interactions, revealing significant below- and above-ground co-dynamics. Baseline geophysical datasets provide lithological structure along the hillslope, which includes a surface soil horizon, underlain by a saprolite layer and the fractured Mancos shale. Time-lapse geophysical data show very different moisture dynamics in various compartments and locations during the winter and growing season. Integration with aerial imaging reveals a significant linkage between plant growth and the subsurface wetness, soil characteristics and the topographic gradient. The obtained information about the organization and

  2. The Gibbs free energy of homogeneous nucleation: From atomistic nuclei to the planar limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bingqing; Tribello, Gareth A; Ceriotti, Michele

    2017-09-14

    In this paper we discuss how the information contained in atomistic simulations of homogeneous nucleation should be used when fitting the parameters in macroscopic nucleation models. We show how the number of solid and liquid atoms in such simulations can be determined unambiguously by using a Gibbs dividing surface and how the free energy as a function of the number of solid atoms in the nucleus can thus be extracted. We then show that the parameters (the chemical potential, the interfacial free energy, and a Tolman correction) of a model based on classical nucleation theory can be fitted using the information contained in these free-energy profiles but that the parameters in such models are highly correlated. This correlation is unfortunate as it ensures that small errors in the computed free energy surface can give rise to large errors in the extrapolated properties of the fitted model. To resolve this problem we thus propose a method for fitting macroscopic nucleation models that uses simulations of planar interfaces and simulations of three-dimensional nuclei in tandem. We show that when the chemical potentials and the interface energy are pinned to their planar-interface values, more precise estimates for the Tolman length are obtained. Extrapolating the free energy profile obtained from small simulation boxes to larger nuclei is thus more reliable.

  3. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The acceleration of solid particles subjected to cavitation nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkent, B.M.; Arora, M.; Ohl, C.-D.

    2008-01-01

    The cavity -particle dynamics at cavitation inception on the surface of spherical particles suspended in water and exposed to a strong tensile stress wave is experimentally studied with high-speed photography. Particles, which serve as nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles, are set into a fast...... translatory motion during the explosive growth of the cavity. They reach velocities of ~40 ms-1 and even higher. When the volume growth of the cavity slows down, the particle detaches from the cavity through a process of neck-breaking, and the particle is shot away. The experimental observations are simulated...... with (i) a spherical cavity model and (ii) with an axisymmetric boundary element method (BEM). The input for both models is a pressure pulse, which is obtained from the observed radial cavity dynamics during an individual experiment. The model then allows us to calculate the resulting particle trajectory...

  5. Characterization of surface Ag nanoparticles in nanocomposite a-C:Ag coatings by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction at sub-critical angles of incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, N.K.; Oliveira, J.C.; Cavaleiro, A. [University of Coimbra, SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Carvalho, S. [University of Minho, GRF-CFUM, Physics Department, Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2016-03-15

    Silver diffusion within nanocomposite films and/or toward the film surface is often observed during annealing of the silver-based nanocomposite films. In order to control and/or minimize this process, it is crucial to characterize the aggregated silver nanoparticles on the films surface. In this paper grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) with both sub-critical and supra-critical angles of incidence is used to characterize the Ag nanoparticles distribution, shape and structure both inside the matrix and on the nanocomposite film surface. The nanocomposite carbon coating containing Ag nanoparticles (a-C:Ag) was deposited by dc magnetron sputtering. The coatings were analyzed by GIXRD using fixed incident angles both below and above the critical angle for total reflection. By using sub-critical angles it was possible to eliminate diffraction from the bulk material allowing to estimate the size distribution of the nanoparticles sitting on the surface. The results obtained by GIXRD analysis were checked through comparison with the observations made by both TEM and SEM analysis. The proposed methodology can be used to characterized nanoparticles deposition on a surface and/or island formation during film growth as long an adequate substrate with high critical angle for total reflection is used. (orig.)

  6. Effects of shear flow on phase nucleation and crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Federica; Zaccone, Alessio

    2016-04-01

    Classical nucleation theory offers a good framework for understanding the common features of new phase formation processes in metastable homogeneous media at rest. However, nucleation processes in liquids are ubiquitously affected by hydrodynamic flow, and there is no satisfactory understanding of whether shear promotes or slows down the nucleation process. We developed a classical nucleation theory for sheared systems starting from the molecular level of the Becker-Doering master kinetic equation and we analytically derived a closed-form expression for the nucleation rate. The theory accounts for the effect of flow-mediated transport of molecules to the nucleus of the new phase, as well as for the mechanical deformation imparted to the nucleus by the flow field. The competition between flow-induced molecular transport, which accelerates nucleation, and flow-induced nucleus straining, which lowers the nucleation rate by increasing the nucleation energy barrier, gives rise to a marked nonmonotonic dependence of the nucleation rate on the shear rate. The theory predicts an optimal shear rate at which the nucleation rate is one order of magnitude larger than in the absence of flow.

  7. Atmospheric nucleation: highlights of the EUCAARI project and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the project EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions, atmospheric nucleation was studied by (i developing and testing new air ion and cluster spectrometers, (ii conducting homogeneous nucleation experiments for sulphate and organic systems in the laboratory, (iii investigating atmospheric nucleation mechanism under field conditions, and (iv applying new theoretical and modelling tools for data interpretation and development of parameterisations. The current paper provides a synthesis of the obtained results and identifies the remaining major knowledge gaps related to atmospheric nucleation. The most important technical achievement of the project was the development of new instruments for measuring sub-3 nm particle populations, along with the extensive application of these instruments in both the laboratory and the field. All the results obtained during EUCAARI indicate that sulphuric acid plays a central role in atmospheric nucleation. However, also vapours other than sulphuric acid are needed to explain the nucleation and the subsequent growth processes, at least in continental boundary layers. Candidate vapours in this respect are some organic compounds, ammonia, and especially amines. Both our field and laboratory data demonstrate that the nucleation rate scales to the first or second power of the nucleating vapour concentration(s. This agrees with the few earlier field observations, but is in stark contrast with classical thermodynamic nucleation theories. The average formation rates of 2-nm particles were found to vary by almost two orders of magnitude between the different EUCAARI sites, whereas the formation rates of charged 2-nm particles varied very little between the sites. Overall, our observations are indicative of frequent, yet moderate, ion-induced nucleation usually outweighed by much stronger neutral nucleation events in the continental lower troposphere. The most concrete

  8. Thermodynamic evaluation of nucleation as a method for selection of aluminium nitride modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudyakova, V. S.; Shishkin, R. A.; Zykov, F. M.; Zvonarev, K. V.; Chukin, A. V.; Polyakov, E. V.; Beketov, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    The Volmer and Wulf models have been used to study the process of nucleation of aluminium nitride modifications. The sizes of the critical nuclei of aluminium nitride modifications have been determined depending on the degree of supersaturation. It has been demonstrated that by varying the technological parameters of chemical vapour deposition it is possible to determine the conditions for selection of AlN modifications.

  9. Nucleation of portlandite clusters in cement paste at very early stageof hydration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demo, Pavel; Sveshnikov, Alexey; Hošková, Š.; Tichá, P.; Kožíšek, Zdeněk

    636-637, Pt. 1-2 (2010), s. 1234-1238 ISSN 0255-5476. [5th International Materials Symposium/14th Conference of the Sociedade-Portuguesa-de-Materiais. Lisbon, 05.04.2009-08.04.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : hydrating cement paste * nucleation * critical size of cluster of portlandite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. A critical assessment of direct radiative effects of different aerosol types on surface global radiation and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiangao

    2014-01-01

    A critical assessment of direct radiative effects of different aerosol types on surface global, direct and diffuse radiation is presented. The analysis is based on measurements of aerosol optical properties and surface solar radiation (SSR) of cloud-free days at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Aerosol Robotic Network station (AERONET) of Xianghe over the North China Plain between October 2004 and May 2012. Six aerosol types are classified based on aerosol size and absorption from the AERONET retrieval products, including two coarse-mode dominated aerosol types: dust (DU: fine mode fraction (FMF)<0.4) and polluted dust (PD: FMF within 0.4–0.7) and four fine-mode dominated aerosol types (FMF>0.7) but with different single scattering albedo (SSA): highly absorbing (HA: SSA<0.85), moderately absorbing (MA: SSA within 0.85–0.90), slightly absorbing (SA: SSA within 0.90–0.95) and very weakly absorbing (WA: SSA>0.95). Dramatic differences in aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE) on global SSR and its components between the six aerosol types have been revealed. ADRE efficiency on global SSR for solar zenight angle (SZA) between 55° and 65° ranges from −106 W m −2 for WA to −181 W m −2 for HA. The minimum ADRE efficiency on diffuse SSR is derived for HA aerosols, being 113 W m −2 that is about half of that by DU, the maximum value of six aerosol types. ADRE efficiency on global SSR by DU and PD (−141 to −150 W m −2 for SZA between 55° and 65°) is comparable to that by MA, although 100 W m −2 more direct SSR is extincted by DU and PD than by MA. DU and PD induce more diffuse SSR than MA that offsets larger reduction of direct SSR by DU and PD. Implications of the results to related researches are detailed discussed. The results are derived from aerosol and radiation data in the North China Plain, however the method can be used to any other stations with similar measurements. - Highlights: • A statistical method is developed to

  11. Electrocrystallisation of zinc from acidic sulphate baths; A nucleation and crystal growth process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilakopoulos, D.; Bouroushian, M.; Spyrellis, N.

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical nucleation and growth of zinc on low-carbon steel from acidic (pH 2.0-4.5) baths containing ZnSO 4 , NaCl, and H 3 BO 3 , was studied by means of chronoamperometry at various cathodic potentials under a charge-transfer controlled regime. It is shown that at overpotentials in the range 0.30-0.55 V (negative to the Zn 2+ /Zn redox value) the electrodeposition proceeds by instantaneous three-dimensional nucleation, which turns to progressive at higher overpotentials and/or very acidic baths. At low cathodic overpotentials (<0.30 V), a two-dimensional contribution limited by the incorporation of Zn ad-atoms in the developing lattice becomes significant at the early stages of deposition, and is more progressive in type the more acidic is the bath pH. Nucleation rate constants were calculated and correlated analytically with the respective potentials, using the classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation, which though fails to lead to reasonable values for the critical nucleus size

  12. Differences in ice nucleation behavior of arable and desert soil dust in deposition nucleation regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Romy; Vogel, Franziska; Möhler, Ottmar; Höhler, Kristina; Schiebel, Thea

    2017-04-01

    Soil dust from arid and semi-arid regions is one of the most abundant aerosol types in the atmosphere with emission rates of about 1600 Tg per year (Andreae et al. (2009)). Therewith, soil dust plays an important role for the atmospheric radiative transfer and also for the formation of clouds. Soil dust refers to dust sampled from agricultural used areas, to dust from bare soil as well as to dust from desert regions. By mass-spectrometric measurements of the chemical composition of ice residuals, mineral dust as component of soil dust was found to be the major heterogeneous ice nucleating particle (INP) type (e.g. Cziczo et al. (2013)), in particular in the upper troposphere. Also in laboratory studies the ice nucleation efficiency of the different soil dusts was investigated. It was shown that desert dusts (Ullrich et al. (2017)) as well as soil dusts from arable regions (O'Sullivan et al. (2014), Tobo et al. (2014)) are efficient INP. However, there is still a lack of data for ice nucleation on soil dusts for temperatures below about 220 K. With the AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber, we are able to characterize the ice nucleation efficiency for different aerosol types to temperatures down to 180 K and high ice supersaturations. In order to extend the already existing AIDA data base for deposition nucleation on desert dusts and agricultural soil dusts, new experiments were done in the upper tropospheric temperature regime. This contribution will show the results of the new experiments with desert dust in comparison to existing data for higher temperatures. The first data analysis confirms the temperature dependent trend of the ice nucleation activity as discussed and parameterized in a recent paper by Ullrich et al. (2017). Furthermore, the update and extension of the recently published parameterization of deposition nucleation for desert dust to lower temperatures will be discussed. The experiments with agricultural soil

  13. Identification & Characterization of Fungal Ice Nucleation Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Kampf, Christopher Johannes; Mauri, Sergio; Weidner, Tobias; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures is dependent on ice nucleation catalysis facilitated by ice nuclei (IN). These IN can be of various origins and although extensive research was done and progress was achieved, the nature and mechanisms leading to an effective IN are to date still poorly understood. Some of the most important processes of our geosphere like the water cycle are highly dependent on effective ice nucleation at temperatures between -2°C - -8°C, a temperature range which is almost exclusively covered by biological IN (BioIN). BioIN are usually macromolecular structures of biological polymers. Sugars as well as proteins have been reported to serve as IN and the best characterized BioIN are ice nucleation proteins (IN-P) from gram negative bacteria. Fungal strains from Fusarium spp. were described to be effective IN at subfreezing temperatures up to -2°C already 25 years ago and more and more fungal species are described to serve as efficient IN. Fungal IN are also thought to be proteins or at least contain a proteinaceous compound, but to date the fungal IN-P primary structure as well as their coding genetic elements of all IN active fungi are unknown. The aim of this study is a.) to identify the proteins and their coding genetic elements from IN active fungi (F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, M. alpina) and b.) to characterize the mechanisms by which fungal IN serve as effective IN. We designed an interdisciplinary approach using biological, analytical and physical methods to identify fungal IN-P and describe their biological, chemical, and physical properties.

  14. Nucleation and growth characteristics of cavities during the early stages of tensile creep deformation in a superplastic zirconia-20 wt% alumina composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.M.; Chokshi, A.H.; Nutt, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    Constant-stress tensile creep experiments on a superplastic 3-mol%-yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia composite with 20 wt% alumina revealed that cavities nucleate relatively early during tensile deformation. The number of cavities nucleated increases with increasing imposed stress. The cavities nucleate at triple points associated largely with an alumina grain, and then grow rapidly in a cracklike manner to attain dimensions on the order of the grain facet size. It is suggested that coarser-grained superplastic ceramics exhibit lower ductility due to the ease in formation of such grain boundary facet-cracks and their interlinkage to form a macroscopic crack of critical dimensions

  15. Binary Homogeneous Nucleation in Selected Aqueous

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, František; Němec, Tomáš; Hrubý, Jan; Demo, Pavel; Kožíšek, Zdeněk; Petr, V.; Kolovratník, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 12 (2008), s. 1671-1708 ISSN 0095-9782 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/2524; GA AV ČR KJB400760701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA AV ČR IBS2076003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nucleation * steam * theory Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.241, year: 2008 http://www.springerlink.com/content/104381/

  16. Spin-liquid Mott quantum criticality in two dimensions: Destabilization of a spinon Fermi surface and emergence of one-dimensional spin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-Ho; Cho, Yong-Heum; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2017-06-01

    Resorting to a recently developed theoretical device called dimensional regularization for quantum criticality with a Fermi surface, we examine a metal-insulator quantum phase transition from a Landau's Fermi-liquid state to a U(1) spin-liquid phase with a spinon Fermi surface in two dimensions. Unfortunately, we fail to approach the spin-liquid Mott quantum critical point from the U(1) spin-liquid state within the dimensional regularization technique. Self-interactions between charge fluctuations called holons are not screened, which shows a run-away renormalization group flow, interpreted as holons remain gapped. This leads us to consider another fixed point, where the spinon Fermi surface can be destabilized across the Mott transition. Based on this conjecture, we reveal the nature of the spin-liquid Mott quantum critical point: Dimensional reduction to one dimension occurs for spin dynamics described by spinons. As a result, Landau damping for both spin and charge dynamics disappear in the vicinity of the Mott quantum critical point. When the flavor number of holons is over its critical value, an interacting fixed point appears to be identified with an inverted X Y universality class, controlled within the dimensional regularization technique. On the other hand, a fluctuation-driven first order metal-insulator transition results when it is below the critical number. We propose that the destabilization of a spinon Fermi surface and the emergence of one-dimensional spin dynamics near the spin-liquid Mott quantum critical point can be checked out by spin susceptibility with a 2 kF transfer momentum, where kF is a Fermi momentum in the U(1) spin-liquid state: The absence of Landau damping in U(1) gauge fluctuations gives rise to a divergent behavior at zero temperature while it vanishes in the presence of a spinon Fermi surface.

  17. Effects of Oxidation and fractal surface roughness on the wettability and critical heat flux of glass-peened zirconium alloy tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, R.W.L.; Nitheanandan, T.; Bullock, C.D.; Slater, L.F.; McRae, G.A.

    2003-05-01

    Glass-bead peening the outside surfaces of zirconium alloy tubes has been shown to increase the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) in pool boiling of water. The CHF is found to correlate with the fractal roughness of the metal tube surfaces. In this study on the effect of oxidation on glass-peened surfaces, test measurements for CHF, surface wettability and roughness have been evaluated using various glass-peened and oxidized zirconium alloy tubes. The results show that oxidation changes the solid-liquid contact angle (i.e., decreases wettability of the metal-oxide surface), but does not change the fractal surface roughness, appreciably. Thus, oxidation of the glass-peened surfaces of zirconium alloy tubes is not expected to degrade the CHF enhancement obtained by glass-bead peening. (author)

  18. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on dust particles sourced from nine deserts worldwide – Part 1: Immersion freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Boose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Desert dust is one of the most abundant ice nucleating particle types in the atmosphere. Traditionally, clay minerals were assumed to determine the ice nucleation ability of desert dust and constituted the focus of ice nucleation studies over several decades. Recently some feldspar species were identified to be ice active at much higher temperatures than clay minerals, redirecting studies to investigate the contribution of feldspar to ice nucleation on desert dust. However, so far no study has shown the atmospheric relevance of this mineral phase.For this study four dust samples were collected after airborne transport in the troposphere from the Sahara to different locations (Crete, the Peloponnese, Canary Islands, and the Sinai Peninsula. Additionally, 11 dust samples were collected from the surface from nine of the biggest deserts worldwide. The samples were used to study the ice nucleation behavior specific to different desert dusts. Furthermore, we investigated how representative surface-collected dust is for the atmosphere by comparing to the ice nucleation activity of the airborne samples. We used the IMCA-ZINC setup to form droplets on single aerosol particles which were subsequently exposed to temperatures between 233 and 250 K. Dust particles were collected in parallel on filters for offline cold-stage ice nucleation experiments at 253–263 K. To help the interpretation of the ice nucleation experiments the mineralogical composition of the dusts was investigated. We find that a higher ice nucleation activity in a given sample at 253 K can be attributed to the K-feldspar content present in this sample, whereas at temperatures between 238 and 245 K it is attributed to the sum of feldspar and quartz content present. A high clay content, in contrast, is associated with lower ice nucleation activity. This confirms the importance of feldspar above 250 K and the role of quartz and feldspars determining the ice nucleation activities

  19. Nucleation and growth of voids by radiation. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.M.; Brown, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    The original model of Brown, Kelly and Mayer [1] for the nucleation of interstitial loops has been extended to take into account the following: (i) mobility of the vacancies, (ii) generation and migration of gas atoms during irradiation, (iii) nucleation and growth of voids, and (iv) vacancy emission from voids and clusters at high temperatures. Using chemicalrate equations, additional expressions are formulated for the nucleation and growth of vacancy loops and voids. (orig.)

  20. Aerosol nucleation induced by a high energy particle beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2011-01-01

    -effect on aerosol nucleation using a particle beam under conditions that resemble the Earth's atmosphere. By comparison with ionization using a gamma source we further show that the nature of the ionizing particles is not important for the ion-induced component of the nucleation. This implies that inexpensive...... ionization sources - as opposed to expensive accelerator beams - can be used for investigations of ion-induced nucleation....

  1. Locating critical points on multi-dimensional surfaces by genetic algorithm: test cases including normal and perturbed argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Pinaki; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1999-03-01

    It is demonstrated that Genetic Algorithm in a floating point realisation can be a viable tool for locating critical points on a multi-dimensional potential energy surface (PES). For small clusters, the standard algorithm works well. For bigger ones, the search for global minimum becomes more efficient when used in conjunction with coordinate stretching, and partitioning of the strings into a core part and an outer part which are alternately optimized The method works with equal facility for locating minima, local as well as global, and saddle points (SP) of arbitrary orders. The search for minima requires computation of the gradient vector, but not the Hessian, while that for SP's requires the information of the gradient vector and the Hessian, the latter only at some specific points on the path. The method proposed is tested on (i) a model 2-d PES (ii) argon clusters (Ar 4-Ar 30) in which argon atoms interact via Lennard-Jones potential, (iii) Ar mX, m=12 clusters where X may be a neutral atom or a cation. We also explore if the method could also be used to construct what may be called a stochastic representation of the reaction path on a given PES with reference to conformational changes in Ar n clusters.

  2. Fatigue crack nucleation of type 316LN stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Jun Hwa; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2000-01-01

    Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) life decreases drastically with increasing temperature but increases with the addition of nitrogen at room and high temperatures. The effect of nitrogen on LCF life may be related to crack nucleation at high temperatures in austenitic stainless steel because the fraction of crack nucleation in LCF life is about 40%. The influence of nitrogen on the crack nucleation of LCF in type 316LN stainless steel is investigated by observations of crack population and crack depth after testing at 40% of fatigue life. Nitrogen increases the number of cycles to nucleate microcracks of 100 μm but decreases the crack population

  3. Sulfate-reducing bacteria influence the nucleation and growth of mackinawite and greigite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Gartman, Amy; Clarke, David R.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2018-01-01

    Sedimentary iron sulfide minerals play a key role in maintaining the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere over geological timescales; they also record critical geochemical information that can be used to reconstruct paleo-environments. On modern Earth, sedimentary iron sulfide mineral formation takes places in low-temperature environments and requires the production of free sulfide by sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) under anoxic conditions. Yet, most of our knowledge on the properties and formation pathways of iron sulfide minerals, including pyrite, derives from experimental studies performed in abiotic conditions, and as such the role of biotic processes in the formation of sedimentary iron sulfide minerals is poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of SRM in the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in laboratory experiments. We set out to test the hypothesis that SRM can influence Fe-S mineralization in ways other than providing sulfide through the comparison of the physical properties of iron sulfide minerals precipitated in the presence and in the absence of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio hydrothermalis AM13 under well-controlled conditions. X-ray diffraction and microscopy analyses reveal that iron sulfide minerals produced in the presence of SRM exhibit unique morphology and aggregate differently than abiotic minerals formed in media without cells. Specifically, mackinawite growth is favored in the presence of both live and dead SRM, when compared to the abiotic treatments tested. The cell surface of live and dead SRM, and the extracellular polymers produced by live cells, provide templates for the nucleation of mackinawite and favor mineral growth. The morphology of minerals is however different when live and dead cells are provided. The transformation of greigite from mackinawite occurred after several months of incubation only in the presence of live SRM, suggesting that SRM might accelerate the kinetics of greigite

  4. Earthquake nucleation in weak subducted carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzawski, Robert M.; Stipp, Michael; Niemeijer, André R.; Spiers, Christopher J.; Behrmann, Jan H.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean-floor carbonate- and clay-rich sediments form major inputs to subduction zones, especially at low-latitude convergent plate margins. Therefore, knowledge of their frictional behaviour is fundamental for understanding plate-boundary earthquakes. Here we report results of mechanical tests performed on simulated fault gouges prepared from ocean-floor carbonates and clays, cored during IODP drilling offshore Costa Rica. Clay-rich gouges show internal friction coefficients (that is, the slope of linearized shear stress versus normal stress data) of μint = 0.44 - 0.56, irrespective of temperature and pore-fluid pressure (Pf). By contrast, μint for the carbonate gouge strongly depends on temperature and pore-fluid pressure, with μint decreasing dramatically from 0.84 at room temperature and Pf = 20 MPa to 0.27 at T = 140 °C and Pf = 120 MPa. This effect provides a fundamental mechanism of shear localization and earthquake generation in subduction zones, and makes carbonates likely nucleation sites for plate-boundary earthquakes. Our results imply that rupture nucleation is prompted by a combination of temperature-controlled frictional instability and temperature- and pore-pressure-dependent weakening of calcareous fault gouges.

  5. Characterizing multiple sources and interaction in the critical zone through Sr-isotope tracing of surface and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrel, Philippe; Pauwels, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is the lithosphere-atmosphere boundary where complex physical, chemical and biological processes occurs and control the transfer and storage of water and chemical elements. This is the place where life-sustaining resources are, where nutrients are being released from the rocks. Because it is the place where we are living, this is a fragile zone, a critical zone as a perturbed natural ecosystem. Water resources in hard-rocks commonly involve different hydrogeological compartments such as overlying sediments, weathered rock, the weathered-fissured zone, and fractured bedrock. Streams, lakes and wetlands that drain such environments can drain groundwater, recharge groundwater, or do both. Groundwater resources in many countries are increasingly threatened by growing demand, wasteful use, and contamination. Surface water and shallow groundwater are particularly vulnerable to pollution, while deeper resources are more protected from contamination. Here, we first report on Sr isotope data as well as major ions, from shallow and deep groundwater in several granite and schist areas over France with intensive agriculture covering large parts of these catchments. In three granite and Brioverian 'schist' areas of the Armorican Massif, the range in Sr contents in groundwater from different catchments agrees with previous work on groundwater sampled from granites in France. The Sr content is well correlated with Mg and both are partly related to agricultural practices and water rock interaction. The relationship between Sr- isotope and Mg/Sr ratios allow defining the different end-members, mainly rain, agricultural practice and water-rock interaction. The data from the Armorican Massif and other surface and groundwater for catchment draining silicate bedrocks (300-450Ma) like the Hérault, Seine, Moselle, Garonne, Morvan, Margeride, Cantal, Pyrénées and Vosges are scattered between at least three geochemical signatures. These include fertilizer and

  6. Effect of lactic acid on nucleation morphology and surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deposition process started at some initial priority growing centres independently distributed on the substrate. We found that the morphology and ... agent in the bath solution, morphology of initial deposition centres change from coniform ... control the rate of release of free metal ions for the reduction reaction. The chemical ...

  7. Effect of lactic acid on nucleation morphology and surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electroless deposition technique of Ni–P alloy coating has been a well known commercial process which has found numerous applications in many fields due to its excellent properties of coatings such as high corrosion resistance, high wear resistance ... of electronic and computer equipment (Winowling Jappes et al 2005) ...

  8. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T P Mangan

    Full Text Available Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  9. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  10. Crystallization and melting behavior of isotactic polypropylene composites filled by zeolite supported {beta}-nucleator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Juan [Materials Science Institute, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composites and Functional Materials, the Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Gu, E-mail: ceslg@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composites and Functional Materials, the Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Tan, Nanshu [Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composites and Functional Materials, the Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Ding, Qian [Materials Science Institute, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composites and Functional Materials, the Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Mai, Kancheng, E-mail: cesmkc@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Materials Science Institute, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composites and Functional Materials, the Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supported calcium pimelate {beta}-zeolite was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {beta}-nucleation of zeolite was enhanced dramatically through reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High {beta}-phase content iPP composites were obtained by introducing the {beta}-zeolite into iPP. - Abstract: In order to prepare the zeolite filled {beta}-iPP composites, the calcium pimelate as {beta}-nucleator supported on the surface of zeolite ({beta}-zeolite) was prepared by the interaction between calcified zeolite and pimelic acid. The {beta}-nucleation, crystallization behavior and melting characteristic of zeolite, calcified zeolite and {beta}-zeolite filled iPP composites were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffractometer. The results indicated that addition of the zeolite and calcified zeolite as well as {beta}-zeolite increased the crystallization temperature of iPP. The zeolite and calcified zeolite filled iPP composites mainly crystallized in the {alpha}-crystal form and the strong {beta}-heterogeneous nucleation of {beta}-zeolite results in the formation of only {beta}-crystal in {beta}-zeolite filled iPP composites. The zeolite filled {beta}-iPP composites with high {beta}-crystal contents (above 0.90) can be easily obtained by adding {beta}-zeolite into iPP matrix.

  11. Earthquake simulations with time-dependent nucleation and long-range interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Dieterich

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A model for rapid simulation of earthquake sequences is introduced which incorporates long-range elastic interactions among fault elements and time-dependent earthquake nucleation inferred from experimentally derived rate- and state-dependent fault constitutive properties. The model consists of a planar two-dimensional fault surface which is periodic in both the x- and y-directions. Elastic interactions among fault elements are represented by an array of elastic dislocations. Approximate solutions for earthquake nucleation and dynamics of earthquake slip are introduced which permit computations to proceed in steps that are determined by the transitions from one sliding state to the next. The transition-driven time stepping and avoidance of systems of simultaneous equations permit rapid simulation of large sequences of earthquake events on computers of modest capacity, while preserving characteristics of the nucleation and rupture propagation processes evident in more detailed models. Earthquakes simulated with this model reproduce many of the observed spatial and temporal characteristics of clustering phenomena including foreshock and aftershock sequences. Clustering arises because the time dependence of the nucleation process is highly sensitive to stress perturbations caused by nearby earthquakes. Rate of earthquake activity following a prior earthquake decays according to Omori's aftershock decay law and falls off with distance.

  12. Integration of linear and dendritic actin nucleation in Nck-induced actin comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinskaya, Sofya; Velle, Katrina B; Campellone, Kenneth G; Talman, Arthur; Alvarez, Diego; Agaisse, Hervé; Wu, Yi I; Loew, Leslie M; Mayer, Bruce J

    2016-01-15

    The Nck adaptor protein recruits cytosolic effectors such as N-WASP that induce localized actin polymerization. Experimental aggregation of Nck SH3 domains at the membrane induces actin comet tails--dynamic, elongated filamentous actin structures similar to those that drive the movement of microbial pathogens such as vaccinia virus. Here we show that experimental manipulation of the balance between unbranched/branched nucleation altered the morphology and dynamics of Nck-induced actin comets. Inhibition of linear, formin-based nucleation with the small-molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 or overexpression of the formin FH1 domain resulted in formation of predominantly circular-shaped actin structures with low mobility (actin blobs). These results indicate that formin-based linear actin polymerization is critical for the formation and maintenance of Nck-dependent actin comet tails. Consistent with this, aggregation of an exclusively branched nucleation-promoting factor (the VCA domain of N-WASP), with density and turnover similar to those of N-WASP in Nck comets, did not reconstitute dynamic, elongated actin comets. Furthermore, enhancement of branched Arp2/3-mediated nucleation by N-WASP overexpression caused loss of the typical actin comet tail shape induced by Nck aggregation. Thus the ratio of linear to dendritic nucleation activity may serve to distinguish the properties of actin structures induced by various viral and bacterial pathogens. © 2016 Borinskaya et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze the Influences of Process Parameters on the Cut Surface in Fine Blanking Processes by Using Clearance-Dependent Critical Fracture Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyo Wai Myint

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The correct choice of process parameters is important in predicting the cut surface and obtaining a fully-fine sheared surface in the fine blanking process. The researchers used the value of the critical fracture criterion obtained by long duration experiments to predict the conditions of cut surfaces in the fine blanking process. In this study, the clearance-dependent critical ductile fracture criteria obtained by the Cockcroft-Latham and Oyane criteria were used to reduce the time and cost of experiments to obtain the value of the critical fracture criterion. The Finite Element Method (FEM was applied to fine blanking processes to study the influences of process parameters such as the initial compression, the punch and die corner radii and the shape and size of the V-ring indenter on the length of the sheared surface. The effects of stress triaxiality and punch diameters on the cut surface produced by the fine blanking process are also discussed. The verified process parameters and tool geometry for obtaining a fully-fine sheared SPCC surface are described. The results showed that the accurate and stable prediction of ductile fracture initiation can be achieved using the Oyane criterion.

  14. Phase space barriers and dividing surfaces in the absence of critical points of the potential energy: Application to roaming in ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauguière, Frédéric A. L., E-mail: frederic.mauguiere@bristol.ac.uk; Collins, Peter, E-mail: peter.collins@bristol.ac.uk; Wiggins, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.wiggins@mac.com [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW (United Kingdom); Kramer, Zeb C., E-mail: zebcolterkramer@gmail.com; Ezra, Gregory S., E-mail: gse1@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Baker Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Carpenter, Barry K., E-mail: carpenterb1@cardiff.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom); Farantos, Stavros C., E-mail: farantos@iesl.forth.gr [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, and Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Iraklion 711 10, Crete (Greece)

    2016-02-07

    We examine the phase space structures that govern reaction dynamics in the absence of critical points on the potential energy surface. We show that in the vicinity of hyperbolic invariant tori, it is possible to define phase space dividing surfaces that are analogous to the dividing surfaces governing transition from reactants to products near a critical point of the potential energy surface. We investigate the problem of capture of an atom by a diatomic molecule and show that a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold exists at large atom-diatom distances, away from any critical points on the potential. This normally hyperbolic invariant manifold is the anchor for the construction of a dividing surface in phase space, which defines the outer or loose transition state governing capture dynamics. We present an algorithm for sampling an approximate capture dividing surface, and apply our methods to the recombination of the ozone molecule. We treat both 2 and 3 degrees of freedom models with zero total angular momentum. We have located the normally hyperbolic invariant manifold from which the orbiting (outer) transition state is constructed. This forms the basis for our analysis of trajectories for ozone in general, but with particular emphasis on the roaming trajectories.

  15. In Situ Atomic-Scale Observation of Droplet Coalescence Driven Nucleation and Growth at Liquid/Solid Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Wang, Zhongchang; Deepak, Francis Leonard

    2017-06-27

    Unraveling dynamical processes of liquid droplets at liquid/solid interfaces and the interfacial ordering is critical to understanding solidification, liquid-phase epitaxial growth, wetting, liquid-phase joining, crystal growth, and lubrication processes, all of which are linked to different important applications in material science. In this work, we observe direct in situ atomic-scale behavior of Bi droplets segregated on SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 by using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy and demonstrate ordered interface and surface structures for the droplets on the oxide at the atomic scale and unravel a nucleation mechanism involving droplet coalescence at the liquid/solid interface. We identify a critical diameter of the formed nanocrystal in stabilizing the crystalline phase and reveal lattice-induced fast crystallization of the droplet at the initial stage of the coalescence of the nanocrystal with the droplet. Further sequential observations show the stepped coalescence and growth mechanism of the nanocrystals at the atomic scale. These results offer insights into the dynamic process at liquid/solid interfaces, which may have implications for many functionalities of materials and their applications.

  16. Study of the hovering period and bubble size in fully developed pool nucleate boiling of saturated liquid with a time-dependent heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Nelson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the bubble behavior in saturated pool boiling with a time-dependent heat source is analyzed. The study is restricted to the period from fully developed nucleate boiling until critical heat flux occurs. The hovering period and the departure volume of the bubble are selected as the characteristic parameters for bubble behavior. These parameters are quantified by solving the equation of motion for an idealized bubble. This equation is solved for cases in which the surface heat flux changes linearly and exponentially as a function of time. After nondimensionalization, the results are compared directly with the results of the steady-state problem. The comparison shows that the transient heat input has practically no effect on the hovering period. However, the transient heat flux causes a decreased volume at bubble departure. The volume decrease is dependent on the severity of the transient. These results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observation quoted in the literature

  17. Critical stages of a biodetection platform development from sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry and assay development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Yildiz

    2014-06-01

    Once viewed solely as a tool to analyse biomolecular interactions, biosensors are gaining widespread interest for diagnostics, biological defense, environmental and quality assurance in agriculture/food industries. Advanced micro fabrication techniques have facilitated integration of microfluidics with sensing functionalities on the same chip making system automation more convenient1. Biosensor devices relying on lab-on-a-chip technologies and nanotechnology has attracted much of attention in recent years for biological defense research and development. However, compared with the numerous publications and patents available, the commercialization of biosensors technology has significantly lagged behind the research output. This paper reviews the reasons behind the slow commercialisation of biosensors with an insight to the critical stages of a biosensor development from the sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry applications and nanotechnology applications in sensing with case studies. In addition, the paper includes the description of a new biodetection platform based on Real-time Electrochemical ProfilingTM (REPTM) that comprises novel electrode arrays and nanoparticle based sensing. The performance of the REPTM platform has been tested for the detection of Planktothrix agardhii, one of the toxic bloom-forming cyanobacteria, usually found in shallow fresh water sources that can be used for human consumption. The optimised REPTM assay allowed the detection of P. agardhii DNA down to 6 pM. This study, showed the potential of REPTM as a new biodetection platform for toxic bacteria and hence further studies will involve the development of a portable multi-analyte biosensor based on REPTM technology for on-site testing.

  18. Rainfall drives atmospheric ice-nucleating particles in the coastal climate of southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conen, Franz; Eckhardt, Sabine; Gundersen, Hans; Stohl, Andreas; Espen Yttri, Karl

    2017-09-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) active at modest supercooling (e.g. -8 °C; INP-8) can transform clouds from liquid to mixed phase, even at very small number concentrations (impact of raindrops on plant, litter and soil surfaces. Major snowfall and heavy rain onto snow-covered ground were not mirrored by enhanced numbers of INP-8. Further, transport model calculations for large (> 4 m-3) and small (climate.

  19. Studies of the viscoelastic properties of water confined between surfaces of specified chemical nature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Jack E.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Moore, Nathan W.; Feibelman, Peter J.

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 10-0973 of the same title. Understanding the molecular origin of the no-slip boundary condition remains vitally important for understanding molecular transport in biological, environmental and energy-related processes, with broad technological implications. Moreover, the viscoelastic properties of fluids in nanoconfinement or near surfaces are not well-understood. We have critically reviewed progress in this area, evaluated key experimental and theoretical methods, and made unique and important discoveries addressing these and related scientific questions. Thematically, the discoveries include insight into the orientation of water molecules on metal surfaces, the premelting of ice, the nucleation of water and alcohol vapors between surface asperities and the lubricity of these molecules when confined inside nanopores, the influence of water nucleation on adhesion to salts and silicates, and the growth and superplasticity of NaCl nanowires.

  20. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  1. Nucleation and Grain Refinement of 7A04 Aluminum Alloy Under a Low-Power Electromagnetic Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qingwei; Ma, Yonglin; Xing, Shuqing; Bao, Xinyu; Feng, Yanfei; Kang, Xiaolan

    2018-02-01

    The effects of a low-power electromagnetic pulse on the grain size and cooling curve of high-strength aluminum alloy 7A04 were investigated for various pulse duty cycles. This electromagnetic pulse treatment was found to effectively produce fine grains with globular crystals and a uniform microstructure for pulse duty cycles between 20 and 40%. The key factors that affected grain refinement under the electromagnetic pulse included the electromagnetic energy and the conversion frequency between \\varvec{B} and \\varvec{E} . The nucleation rate increased as the nucleation period was extended. A new kinetic condition of magnetic nucleation was explored by decreasing the critical Gibbs free energy in the electromagnetic pulse, which was more sensitive under low undercooling. In addition, the crystal orientation was controlled in such a solidification environment.

  2. New species of ice nucleating fungi in soil and air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Franc, Gray D.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere (1,2). Several types of PBAP have been identified as ice nuclei (IN) that can initiate the formation of ice at relatively high temperatures (3, 4). The best-known biological IN are common plant-associated bacteria. The IN activity of these bacteria is due to a surface protein on the outer cell membrane that catalyses ice formation, for which the corresponding gene has been identified and detected by DNA analysis (3). Fungal spores or hyphae can also act as IN, but the biological structures responsible for their IN activity have not yet been elucidated. Furthermore, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, properties, and effects of fungal IN in the atmosphere have neither been characterized nor quantified. Recent studies have shown that airborne fungi are highly diverse (1), and that atmospheric transport leads to efficient exchange of species among different ecosystems (5, 6). The results presented in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. 2012 (7) clearly demonstrate the presence of geographic boundaries in the global distribution of microbial taxa in air, and indicate that regional differences may be important for the effects of microorganisms on climate and public health. DNA analyses of aerosol samples collected during rain events showed higher diversity and frequency of occurrence for fungi belonging to the Sordariomycetes, than samples that were collected under dry conditions (8). Sordariomycetes is the class that comprises known ice nucleation active species (Fusarium spp.). By determination of freezing ability of fungal colonies isolated from air samples two species of ice nucleation active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators were found. By DNA-analysis they were identified as Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum. Both fungi belong to the phylum Ascomycota, produce fluorescent spores in the range of 1-4 µm in diameter, and induced freezing at -4 and

  3. Some ice nucleation characteristics of Asian and Saharan desert dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Field

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The large (7 m×4 m cylinder, 84 m3 AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud chamber facility at Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany was used to test the ice nucleating ability of two desert dust samples from the Sahara and Asia. Aerosol samples were lognormally distributed with a mode diameter of 0.4(±0.1 μm and geometric standard deviation of ~1.7(±0.2. At temperatures warmer than −40°C droplets were formed before ice crystals formed and there was generally no deposition nucleation observed. At temperatures colder than −40°C both dust samples exhibited dual nucleation events that were observed during the same expansion experiment. The primary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios of 1.1 to 1.3 and is likely to be a deposition nucleation mode. The secondary nucleation event occurred at ice saturation ratios between 1.35 and 1.5. We cannot categorically determine whether this ice nucleation event is via a further deposition mode or a condensation mode, but the presence of some soluble material in the dust samples leads us to favour the latter process. The activated fractions of desert dust ranged from ~5–10% at −20°C to 20–40% at temperatures colder than −40°C. There was no obvious difference between the nucleation behaviour of the two dust samples.

  4. Nucleation of domains under the influence of temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. It is found that the nucleation of domains can take place in Ba5Ti2O7Cl4 under the influence of temperature unlike in many other ferroelectrics. The nucleated domain can also be removed from the structure under the randomizing effect of tem- perature. These observations have been explained on the basis of a ...

  5. Mechanism of cube grain nucleation during recrystallization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Cube texture is a sharp recrystallization texture component in fcc metals like aluminium, copper, etc. It is described by an ideal orientation i.e. (100) 〈100〉. The subject of cube texture nucleation i.e. cube grain nucleation, from the deformed state of aluminium and copper is of scientific curiosity with concurrent.

  6. Nucleation and growth of polycrystalline SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, M.; Schimmel, S.; Jokubavicius, V.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleation and bulk growth of polycrystalline SiC in a 2 inch PVT setup using isostatic and pyrolytic graphite as substrates was studied. Textured nucleation occurs under near-thermal equilibrium conditions at the initial growth stage with hexagonal platelet shaped crystallites of 4H, 6H and ...

  7. Local structure of liquid carbon controls diamond nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Valeriani, C.; Meijer, E.J.; Frenkel, D.

    2009-01-01

    Diamonds melt at temperatures above 4000 K. There are no measurements of the steady-state rate of the reverse process: diamond nucleation from the melt, because experiments are difficult at these extreme temperatures and pressures. Using numerical simulations, we estimate the diamond nucleation rate

  8. Trapping crystal nucleation of cholesterol monohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomonov, I.; Weygand, M.J.; Kjær, K.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline nucleation of cholesterol at the air-water interface has been studied via grazing incidence x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The various stages of cholesterol molecular assembly from monolayer to three bilayers incorporating interleaving hydrogen-bonded water layers...... in a monoclinic cholesterol . H2O phase, has been monitored and their structures characterized to near atomic resolution. Crystallographic evidence is presented that this multilayer phase is similar to that of a reported metastable cholesterol phase of undetermined structure obtained from bile before...... transformation to the triclinic phase of cholesterol . H2O, the thermodynamically stable macroscopic form. According to grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements and crystallographic data, a transformation from the monoclinic film structure to a multilayer of the stable monohydrate phase involves...

  9. European Marine Background Ice Nucleating Particle concentrations Measured at the Mace Head Station, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, James; Kanji, Zamin A.; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Ice formation is an important process which controls cloud microphysical properties and can be critical in the creation of precipitation, therefore influencing the hydrological cycle and energy budget of the Earth. Ice Nucleating Particles (INP) can greatly increase the temperature and rate of ice formation, but the sources and geographical distributions of these particles is not well understood. Mace Head in Ireland is a coastal site on the north eastern edge of Europe with prevailing winds generally from the Atlantic Ocean with little continental influence. Observations of INP concentration from August 2015 using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC) at temperature of -30 C are presented. Correlations between the INP and meteorological conditions and aerosol compositions are made, as well as comparisons with commonly used INP concentration parameterisations. Observed INP concentrations are generally low, suggesting that oceanic sources in this region do not contribute significant numbers of INP to the global distribution.

  10. Heat transfer in nucleate pool boiling of aqueous SDS and triton X-100 solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasekar, Vivek M. [Tata Steel Limited, Department of Research and Development, Jamshedpur (India)

    2009-09-15

    Variation in degree of surface wettability is presented through the application of Cooper's correlative approach (h{proportional_to}M{sup -0.5}q{sub w}''0.67) for computing enhancement ({phi}) in nucleate pool boiling of aqueous solutions of SDS and Triton X-100 and its presentation with Marangoni parameter ({chi}) that represents the dynamic convection effects due to surface tension gradients. Dynamic spreading coefficient defined as {sigma} {sub dyn}N{sub a}, which relates spreading and wetting characteristics with the active nucleation site density on the heated surface and bubble evolution process, represents cavity filling and activation process and eliminates the concentration dependence of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in boiling of aqueous surfactant solutions. Using the dynamic spreading coefficient ({sigma}{sub dyn}N{sub a}=0.09q{sub w}''0.71), correlation predictions within {+-}15% for both SDS and triton X-100 solutions for low heat flux boiling condition (q{sub w}''{<=} 100 kW/m {sup 2}) characterised primarily by isolated bubble regime are presented. (orig.)

  11. Polyol Synthesis of Silver Nanowires by Heterogeneous Nucleation and Mechanistic Aspects Influencing its Length and Diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette, Waynie Mark

    Various additives are employed in the polyol synthesis of silver nanowires (Ag NWs), which are typically halide salts such as NaCl. A variety of mechanistic roles have been suggested for these additives. My research showed that the early addition of NaCl in the polyol synthesis of Ag NWs from AgNO3 in ethylene glycol results in the rapid formation of AgCl nanocubes, which induce the heterogeneous nucleation of metallic Ag upon their surfaces. Ag NWs subsequently grow from these nucleation sites. The conclusions are supported by studies using ex-situ generated AgCl nanocubes. Additionally, the final mean silver nanowire diameter is found to be independent of the size of the heterogeneous nucleant, showing that the diameter is not significantly influenced by the nucleation event. Kinetics studies determine that nanowire diameter, length, and aspect ratio grow in parallel to one another and with the extent of the Ag+ reduction reaction, demonstrating that growth is reduction-rate limited. The results are interpreted to support nanowire growth by a surface-catalyzed reduction process occurring on all nanowire surfaces, and to exclude nanoparticle aggregation or Ostwald ripening as primary components of the growth mechanism.

  12. Threefold atmospheric-pressure annealing for suppressing graphene nucleation on copper in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Seiya; Nagamori, Takashi; Matsuoka, Yuki; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2014-09-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising method of producing a large single-crystal graphene on a catalyst, especially on copper (Cu), and a further increase in domain size is desirable for electro/optic applications. Here, we report on threefold atmospheric-pressure (ATM) annealing for suppressing graphene nucleation in atmospheric CVD. Threefold ATM annealing formed a step and terrace surface of the underlying Cu, in contrast to ATM annealing. Atomic force microscopy and Auger electron mapping revealed that Si-containing particles existed on threefold-ATM- and ATM-annealed surfaces; particles on Cu had a lower density after threefold ATM annealing than after ATM annealing. The formation of a step and terrace surface and the lower density of particles following the threefold ATM annealing would play a role in reducing graphene nucleation. By combining threefold ATM annealing and electropolishing of Cu, the nucleation of graphene was effectively suppressed, and a submillimeter-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene was successfully obtained.

  13. Earthquake Nucleation Size: Evidence of Loading Rate Dependence in Laboratory Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin-Marthe, S.; Nielsen, S. B.; Giani, S.; Bird, R.; Di Toro, G.

    2017-12-01

    Slow slip precursors during the nucleation of earthquakes have potential implications for early-warning systems and probabilistic forecasting. Although most field studies on nucleation focus on foreshocks sequences, recent GPS observations of the 2014 Chile megathrust show a slow slip phase releasing a significant portion of the total moment. Despite hints from theoretical stability analysis (Rice & Ruina, 1983) and modelling (Rubin & Ampuero 2005; Kaneko et al. 2017), it is not fully understood what controls the prevalence and the size of slip in the nucleation process. Here we present laboratory observations of slow slip preceding dynamic rupture, where for the first time we observe a dependence of nucleation size on the loading rate (laboratory-equivalent of tectonic loading rate). The setup is composed of two polycarbonate plates under direct shear with a 30 cm slip interface. Rupture position, stresses and slip are monitored at high frequency using a high-speed camera, strain gages and laser positioning system placed along the simulated fault interface. The results of our laboratory experiments are in agreement with the pre-slip model proposed by Ellsworth (1995) and subsequently observed in laboratory experiments (Nielsen et al. 2010; Latour et al. 2013), which show a slow slip followed by an acceleration up to dynamic rupture velocity. However, further complexity arises from the effect of (1) rate of shear loading and (2) small-scale inhomogeneities on the fault surface. In particular, the nucleation length shrinks (from 3 cm to 0.5 cm) when loading is increased (from 10-2 MPa/s to 1 MPa/s).

  14. Impact of bacterial ice nucleating particles on weather predicted by a numerical weather prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyoun, Maher; Korsholm, Ulrik S.; Sørensen, Jens H.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Finster, Kai; Gosewinkel, Ulrich; Nielsen, Niels W.

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial ice-nucleating particles (INP) have the ability to facilitate ice nucleation from super-cooled cloud droplets at temperatures just below the melting point. Bacterial INP have been detected in cloud water, precipitation, and dry air, hence they may have an impact on weather and climate. In modeling studies, the potential impact of bacteria on ice nucleation and precipitation formation on global scale is still uncertain due to their small concentration compared to other types of INP, i.e. dust. Those earlier studies did not account for the yet undetected high concentration of nanoscale fragments of bacterial INP, which may be found free or attached to soil dust in the atmosphere. In this study, we investigate the sensitivity of modeled cloud ice, precipitation and global solar radiation in different weather scenarios to changes in the fraction of cloud droplets containing bacterial INP, regardless of their size. For this purpose, a module that calculates the probability of ice nucleation as a function of ice nucleation rate and bacterial INP fraction was developed and implemented in a numerical weather prediction model. The threshold value for the fraction of cloud droplets containing bacterial INP needed to produce a 1% increase in cloud ice was determined at 10-5 to 10-4. We also found that increasing this fraction causes a perturbation in the forecast, leading to significant differences in cloud ice and smaller differences in convective and total precipitation and in net solar radiation reaching the surface. These effects were most pronounced in local convective events. Our results show that bacterial INP can be considered as a trigger factor for precipitation, but not an enhancement factor.

  15. Latent heat transport and microlayer evaporation in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawurek, H.H.

    1977-08-01

    Part 1 of this work provides a broad overview and, where possible, a quantitative assessment of the complex physical processes which together constitute the mechanism of nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is shown that under a wide range of conditions the primary surface-to-liquid heat flows within an area of bubble influence are so redistributed as to manifest themselves predominantly as latent heat transport, that is, as vaporisation into attached bubbles. Part 2 deals in greater detail with one of the component processes of latent heat transport, namely microlayer evaporation. A literature review reveals the need for synchronised records of microlayer geometry versus time and of normal bubble growth and departure. An apparatus developed to provide such records is described. High-speed cine interference photography from beneath and through a transparent heating surface provided details of microlayer geometry and an image reflection system synchronised these records with the bubble profile views. Results are given for methanol and ethanol boiling at sub-atmospheric pressures and at various heat fluxes and bulk subcoolings. In all cases it is found that microlayers were of sub-micron thickness, that microlayer thinning was restricted to the inner layer edge (with the thickness elsewhere remaining constant or increasing with time) and that the contribution of this visible evaporation to the total vapour flow into bubbles was negligible. The observation of thickening towards the outer microlayer edge, however, demonstrates that a liquid replenishment flow occurred simultaneously with the evaporation process

  16. Critical shear stress on the surface of a cuttings bed; Tensao critica de cisalhamento na superficie de um leito de cascalhos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Luciana Mancor [Universidade Estadual Norte Fluminense (UENF), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia de Petroleo]. E-mail: luciana@lenep.uenf.br; Campos, Wellington [PETROBRAS, S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]. E-mail: campos@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Braga, Luiz Carvalho [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Ensino Descentralizada]. E-mail: luiz@lenep.uenf.br

    2000-07-01

    The cuttings transport during the drilling of highly inclined and horizontal wells is hindered by the creation of a cuttings bed in the annulus. In this work, it is shown that the equilibrium height of this bed can be determined from the shear stress on its surface. This fact enables the formulation of a methodology for evaluating the equilibrium height of the cuttings bed through the introduction of a new concept, that of critical shear stress. This is the shear stress that acts on the bed surface at the imminence of movement of the particles on the bed surface. The use of the methodology requires the determination of the acting shear stress and of the required critical shear stress. The acting shear stress is calculated by means of a computer program that solve the motion differential equations in the annular space; covering the cases of the laminar and turbulent flow regimes. The actuating shear stress is a function of flow rate and of the annular geometry in the presence of a cuttings bed; it is also a function of the physical properties of the fluid. On the other hand, the required critical shear stress is a function of the particles diameters and physical properties of the fluid and particles. A mechanistic model for the critical shear stress is also presented. (author)

  17. Hierarchical Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Micropatterned Nanowire Arrays for High-Efficiency Jumping Droplet Condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Rongfu; Xu, Shanshan; Zhao, Dongliang; Lee, Yung-Cheng; Ma, Xuehu; Yang, Ronggui

    2017-12-27

    Self-propelled droplet jumping on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces is of interest for a variety of industrial applications including self-cleaning, water harvesting, power generation, and thermal management systems. However, the uncontrolled nucleation-induced Wenzel state of condensed droplets at large surface subcooling (high heat flux) leads to the formation of unwanted large pinned droplets, which results in the flooding phenomenon and greatly degrades the heat transfer performance. In this work, we present a novel strategy to manipulate droplet behaviors during the process from the droplet nucleation to growth and departure through a combination of spatially controlling initial nucleation for mobile droplets by closely spaced nanowires and promoting the spontaneous outward movement of droplets for rapid removal using micropatterned nanowire arrays. Through the optical visualization experiments and heat transfer tests, we demonstrate greatly improved condensation heat transfer characteristics on the hierarchical superhydrophobic surface including the higher density of microdroplets, smaller droplet departure radius, 133% wider range of surface subcooling for droplet jumping, and 37% enhancement in critical heat flux for jumping droplet condensation, compared to the-state-of-art jumping droplet condensation on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces. The excellent water repellency of such hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces can be promising for many potential applications, such as anti-icing, antifogging, water desalination, and phase-change heat transfer.

  18. Effect of Oil on the Onset of Nucleate Pool Boiling of R-124 from a Single Horizontal Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    et al [Ref. 7] investigated the onset of nucleate boiling of R-113 under atmospheric conditions using an electrically heated 0.13 mm diameter chromel...brushing the porous surface with a soft bristle brush (i.e. toothbrush ) using ethyl alcohol and then with acetone. The tube was then allowed to air-dry

  19. Inhomogeneous nucleation and domain wall motion with Barkhausen avalanches in epitaxial PbZr0.4Ti0.6O3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Sang Mo; Kim, Hun Ho; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Ik Joo; Yoon, Jong Gul

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the ferroelectric (FE) domain nucleation and domain wall motion in epitaxial PbZr 0.4 Ti 0.6 O 3 capacitors by using modified piezoresponse force microscopy with the domain-tracing method. From time-dependent FE domain evolution images, we observed that defect-mediated inhomogeneous nucleation occurred with a stochastic nature. In addition, we found that the number of nuclei N(t) was linearly proportional to log t, where t is the accumulated time of the applied pulse fields. The time-dependence of N(t) suggests a distribution of energy barriers for nucleation, which may determine the stochastic nature of domain nucleation. We also observed that the domain grew with consecutive Barkhausen avalanches and that the growth direction became anisotropic when the domain radius was larger than a critical radius of about 100 nm.

  20. Analysis of isothermal and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing by a unifying stochastic ice nucleation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Alpert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Immersion freezing is an important ice nucleation pathway involved in the formation of cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Laboratory immersion freezing experiments are necessary to determine the range in temperature, T, and relative humidity, RH, at which ice nucleation occurs and to quantify the associated nucleation kinetics. Typically, isothermal (applying a constant temperature and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing experiments are conducted. In these experiments it is usually assumed that the droplets containing ice nucleating particles (INPs all have the same INP surface area (ISA; however, the validity of this assumption or the impact it may have on analysis and interpretation of the experimental data is rarely questioned. Descriptions of ice active sites and variability of contact angles have been successfully formulated to describe ice nucleation experimental data in previous research; however, we consider the ability of a stochastic freezing model founded on classical nucleation theory to reproduce previous results and to explain experimental uncertainties and data scatter. A stochastic immersion freezing model based on first principles of statistics is presented, which accounts for variable ISA per droplet and uses parameters including the total number of droplets, Ntot, and the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet(T. This model is applied to address if (i a time and ISA-dependent stochastic immersion freezing process can explain laboratory immersion freezing data for different experimental methods and (ii the assumption that all droplets contain identical ISA is a valid conjecture with subsequent consequences for analysis and interpretation of immersion freezing. The simple stochastic model can reproduce the observed time and surface area dependence in immersion freezing experiments for a variety of methods such as: droplets on a cold-stage exposed to air or surrounded by an oil matrix, wind and

  1. Electrostatics Control Actin Filament Nucleation and Elongation Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H.; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L.; Lamb, Don C.; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment. PMID:23486468

  2. Electrostatics control actin filament nucleation and elongation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevenna, Alvaro H; Naredi-Rainer, Nikolaus; Schönichen, André; Dzubiella, Joachim; Barber, Diane L; Lamb, Don C; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland

    2013-04-26

    The actin cytoskeleton is a central mediator of cellular morphogenesis, and rapid actin reorganization drives essential processes such as cell migration and cell division. Whereas several actin-binding proteins are known to be regulated by changes in intracellular pH, detailed information regarding the effect of pH on the actin dynamics itself is still lacking. Here, we combine bulk assays, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques, and theory to comprehensively characterize the effect of pH on actin polymerization. We show that both nucleation and elongation are strongly enhanced at acidic pH, with a maximum close to the pI of actin. Monomer association rates are similarly affected by pH at both ends, although dissociation rates are differentially affected. This indicates that electrostatics control the diffusional encounter but not the dissociation rate, which is critical for the establishment of actin filament asymmetry. A generic model of protein-protein interaction, including electrostatics, explains the observed pH sensitivity as a consequence of charge repulsion. The observed pH effect on actin in vitro agrees with measurements of Listeria propulsion in pH-controlled cells. pH regulation should therefore be considered as a modulator of actin dynamics in a cellular environment.

  3. A correlation to the heat transfer coefficient in nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribatski, Gherhardt; Jabardo, Jose M. Saiz

    1999-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer is a complex phenomenon, making the development of a correlation for the heat transfer coefficient rather cumbersome due to the number of physical parameters involved in it. Some authors have followed a pragmatic approach to the problem by correlating the heat transfer coefficient in terms of reduced primitive properties. Two of the most knowledgeable authors who have followed this approach are Gorenflo and Cooper. Comparisons have been performed among results from the correlations proposed by these researchers and experimental results obtained elsewhere for refrigerants R-11, R-113 and R-114. These comparisons have shown that Cooper's correlation is best fitted for halocarbon refrigerants. The correlation proposed by Gorenflo ads the difficulty of including a numerical factor specific for each fluid. Leiner modified Gorenflo's correlation to determine the numerical factor as a function of known physical parameters of the fluid. In present study, the form of this function has been investigated for halocarbon refrigerants. The obtained correlation is written in terms of the following parameters: reduced pressure, eccentric and compressibility factors at the critical state, and a dimensionless specific heat of the vapor phase. The correlation compares well with experimental results. (author)

  4. A Proposed Model for Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme, based upon fluorescence, light, neutron, and X-ray scattering data, size exclusion chromatography experiments, dialysis kinetics, AFM, and modeling of growth rate data, from this and other laboratories. The first species formed is postulated to be a 'head to side' dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this grows to a 4(sub 3) helix structure, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and subsequent crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates subsequent helix-helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub3)2(sub 1),2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. The process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the growth parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. In the general case for proteins the lack of a singularly defined

  5. Effects of Micro-fin Structure on Spray Cooling Heat Transfer in Forced Convection and Nucleate Boiling Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeung Chan

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, spray cooling heat transfer was experimentally investigated for the case in which water is sprayed onto the surfaces of micro-fins in forced convection and nucleate boiling regions. The experimental results show that an increase in the droplet flow rate improves heat transfer due to forced convection and nucleate boiling in the both case of smooth surface and surfaces of micro-fins. However, the effect of subcooling for fixed droplet flow rate is very weak. Micro-fins surfaces enhance the spray cooling heat transfer significantly. In the dilute spray region, the micro-fin structure has a significant effect on the spray cooling heat transfer. However, this effect is weak in the dense spray region. A previously determined correlation between the Nusselt number and Reynolds number shows good agreement with the present experimental data for a smooth surface

  6. In Situ Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Nucleation Kinetics and Pathways during Intra- and Extrafibrillar Mineralization of Collagen Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Doyoon [Department; amp, Chemical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States; Lee, Byeongdu [X-ray; Thomopoulos, Stavros [Department; Jun, Young-Shin [Department; amp, Chemical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States

    2016-08-04

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) nanocrystals nucleate and grow in intrafibrillar and/or extrafibrillar spaces of collagen fibrils during the mineralization of bones and teeth. Little is known about the early stages of CaP nucleation and distribution in fibrillar matrices, despite their significant influence on the physical and chemical structures of tissue-level constructs. Using in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we examined the nucleation and growth of CaP within collagen matrices and elucidated how a nucleation inhibitor, polyaspartic acid (pAsp), governs mineralization kinetics and pathways at multiple length scales. In situ SAXS analysis clearly revealed that nucleation sites, kinetically-controlled by the nucleation inhibitor, determined the pathways of CaP morphological transformation. Mineralization with pAsp led to intrafibrillar CaP plates with a spatial distribution gradient through the depth of the matrix. Mineralization without pAsp led initially to spherical aggregates of CaP in the entire extrafibrillar spaces. With time, the spherical aggregates transformed into plates at the outermost surface of the collagen matrix, preventing intrafibrillar mineralization inside. The results illuminate mineral nucleation kinetics and real-time nanoparticle distributions within organic matrices in solutions containing body fluid components. Because the macroscale mechanical properties of collagen matrices depend on their mineral content, phase, and arrangement at the nanoscale, this study contributes to better design and fabrication of biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  7. Thermodynamics and nucleation mechanism of ammonium jarosite in sulfuric acid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, PengFei; Zhang, YiFei; Wang, Li; You, ShaoWei; Bo, Jing

    2017-11-01

    Jarosite process is one of the most widely used methods in removing Fe, but in which the nucleation mechanism of ammonium jarosite has not been reported. Solubilities of the ammonium jarosite crystals under different Fe2(SO4)3 and (NH4)2SO4 concentrations and under different temperatures were measured, and the experiments of induction periods were systematically investigated in different temperatures (348 k, 358 k and 368 k) and H2SO4 concentrations (9 g/L, 10.8 g/L and 12.6 g/L) by reaction crystallization process based on the thermodynamic equilibrium data. According to the model of classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension and the surface entropy factors in different conditions were calculated as 1.21 mJ/m2, 1.85 mJ/m2, 1.71 mJ/m2 and 1.51, 1.27, 1.17. The SEM photographs of (H3O, NH4)Fe3(SO4)2(OH)6 approved that the ammonium jarosite crystals were clearly grown by the two-dimensional nucleation mechanism and/or the spiral growth mechanism. But the growth mechanism of (H3O, NH4)Fe3(SO4)2(OH)6 had been determined to be the continuous growth by the surface entropy factor.

  8. Understanding ice nucleation characteristics of selective mineral dusts suspended in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Marcolli, Claudia; Kaufmann, Lukas; Krieger, Ulrich; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Introduction & Objectives Freezing of liquid droplets and subsequent ice crystal growth affects optical properties of clouds and precipitation. Field measurements show that ice formation in cumulus and stratiform clouds begins at temperatures much warmer than those associated with homogeneous ice nucleation in pure water, which is ascribed to heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring on the foreign surfaces of ice nuclei (IN). Various insoluble particles such as mineral dust, soot, metallic particles, volcanic ash, or primary biological particles have been suggested as IN. Among these the suitability of mineral dusts is best established. The ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles may be modified when secondary organic or inorganic substances are accumulating on the dust during atmospheric transport. If the coating is completely wetting the mineral dust particles, heterogeneous ice nucleation occurs in immersion mode also below 100 % RH. A previous study by Kaufmann (PhD Thesis 2015, ETHZ) with Hoggar Mountain dust suspensions in various solutes (ammonium sulfate, PEG, malonic acid and glucose) showed reduced ice nucleation efficiency (in immersion mode) of the particles. Though it is still quite unclear of how surface modifications and coatings influence the ice nucleation activity of the components present in natural dust samples. In view of these results we run freezing experiments using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with the following mineral dust particles suspended in pure water and ammonium sulfate solutions: Arizona Test Dust (ATD), microcline, and kaolinite (KGa-2, Clay Mineral Society). Methodology Suspensions of mineral dust samples (ATD: 2 weight%, microcline: 5% weight, KGa-2: 5% weight) are prepared in pure water with varying solute concentrations (ammonium sulfate: 0 - 10% weight). 20 vol% of this suspension plus 80 vol% of a mixture of 95 wt% mineral oil (Aldrich Chemical) and 5 wt% lanolin (Fluka Chemical) is emulsified with a

  9. Nucleation of the lamellar phase from the disordered phase of the renormalized Landau-Brazovskii model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, Michael F.; Delaney, Kris T.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2018-02-01

    Using the zero-temperature string method, we investigate nucleation of a stable lamellar phase from a metastable disordered phase of the renormalized Landau-Brazovskii model at parameters explicitly connected to those of an experimentally accessible diblock copolymer melt. We find anisotropic critical nuclei in qualitative agreement with previous experimental and analytic predictions; we also find good quantitative agreement with the predictions of a single-mode analysis. We conduct a thorough search for critical nuclei containing various predicted and experimentally observed defect structures. The predictions of the renormalized model are assessed by simulating the bare Landau-Brazovskii model with fluctuations. We find that the renormalized model makes reasonable predictions for several important quantities, including the order-disorder transition (ODT). However, the critical nucleus size depends sharply on proximity to the ODT, so even small errors in the ODT predicted by the renormalized model lead to large errors in the predicted critical nucleus size. We conclude that the renormalized model is a poor tool to study nucleation in the fluctuating Landau-Brazovskii model, and recommend that future studies work with the fluctuating bare model directly, using well-chosen collective variables to investigate kinetic pathways in the disorder → lamellar transition.

  10. Control of nucleation and crystal growth of a silicate apatitic phase in a glassy matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligny, D.; Caurant, D.; Bardez, I.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Loiseau, P.; Neuville, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystal in an oxide glass was studied in a Si B Al Zr Nd Ca Na O system. The nucleation and growth process were monitored by thermal analysis and isothermal experiments. The effect of the network modifier was studied. Therefore for a Ca rich sample the crystallization is homogeneous in the bulk showing a slow increase of crystallinity as temperature increases. On the other hand, a Na rich sample undergoes several crystallization processes in the bulk or from the surface, leading to bigger crystals. The activation energy of the viscous flow and the glass transition are of same magnitude when that of crystallization is a lot smaller. Early diffusion of element is done with a mechanism different than the configurational rearrangements of the liquid sate. The global density and small size of the crystals within the Ca rich matrix confirmed that it would be a profitable waste form for minor actinides. (authors)

  11. Synchrotron x-ray imaging visualization study of capillary-induced flow and critical heat flux on surfaces with engineered micropillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dong In; Kwak, Ho Jae; Noh, Hyunwoo; Park, Hyun Sun; Fezzaa, Kamel; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Over the last several decades, phenomena related to critical heat flux (CHF) on structured surfaces have received a large amount of attention from the research community. The purpose of such research has been to enhance the safety and efficiency of a variety of thermal systems. A number of theories have been put forward to explain the key CHF enhancement mechanisms on structured surfaces. However, these theories have not been confirmed experimentally because of limitations in the available visualization techniques and the complexity of the phenomena. To overcome these limitations and elucidate the CHF enhancement mechanism on the structured surfaces, we introduce synchrotron x-ray imaging with high spatial (~2 μm) and temporal (~20,000 Hz) resolutions. This technique has enabled us to confirm that capillary-induced flow is the key CHF enhancement mechanism on structured surfaces. PMID:29492453

  12. The influence of surface roughness and solution concentration on pool boiling process in Diethanolamine aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshechin, Mohsen; Salimi, Farhad; Jahangiri, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    In this research, the effect of surface roughness and concentration of solution on bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density for pool boiling of water/diethanolamine (DEA) binary solution were investigated experimentally. In this investigation, boiling heat transfer coefficient, bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density have been experimentally investigated in various concentrations and heat fluxes. Microstructured surfaces with a wide range of well-defined surface roughness were fabricated, and a heat flux between 1.5-86 kW/m2 was achieved under atmospheric conditions. The Results indicated that surface roughness and concentration of solution increase the bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density with increasing heat flux. The boiling heat transfer coefficient in mixtures of water/DEA increases with increasing concentration of DEA in water. The experimental results were compared with predictions of several used correlations in the literatures. Results showed that the boiling heat transfer coefficients of this case study are much higher than the predicted values by major existing correlations and models. The excellent agreement for bubble departing frequency found between the models of Jackob and Fritz (1966) and experimental data and also the nucleation site density were in close agreement with the model of Paul (1983) data. f bubble departure frequency, 1/s or Hz N Number of nucleation sites per area per time R c Minimum cavity size, m D c critical diameter, m g gravitational acceleration, m/s2 ρ density, kg/m3 T temperature, °c ΔT temperature difference, °c d d vapor bubble diameter, m h fg enthalpy of vaporization, J/kg R Roughness, μm Ja Jakob number cp specific heat, J/kg °c Pr Prandtl number Ar Archimedes number h Heat transfer coefficient, J/(m2 °c) tg time it takes to grow a bubble, s q/A heat flux (kW/m2) tw time required to heat the layer, s gc Correction coefficient of incompatible units R a Surface

  13. Determining the Critical Slip Surface of Three-Dimensional Soil Slopes from the Stress Fields Solved Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-chuan Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The slope stability problem is an important issue for the safety of human beings and structures. The stability analysis of the three-dimensional (3D slope is essential to prevent landslides, but the most important and difficult problem is how to determine the 3D critical slip surface with the minimum factor of safety in earth slopes. Basing on the slope stress field with the finite element method, a stability analysis method is proposed to determine the critical slip surface and the corresponding safety factor of 3D soil slopes. Spherical and ellipsoidal slip surfaces are considered through the analysis. The moment equilibrium is used to compute the safety factor combined with the Mohr-Coulomb criteria and the limit equilibrium principle. Some assumptions are introduced to reduce the search range of center points and the radius of spheres or ellipsoids. The proposed method is validated by a classical 3D benchmark soil slope. Simulated results indicate that the safety factor of the benchmark slope is 2.14 using the spherical slip surface and 2.19 using the ellipsoidal slip surface, which is close to the results of previous methods. The simulated results indicate that the proposed method can be used for the stability analysis of a 3D soil slope.

  14. Nucleation of recrystallization at selected sites in deformed fcc metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling

    have higher average hardness values and higher nucleation probabilities. In general, indentations with higher hardness values have higher nucleation potentials. The orientations of the nuclei from different indentations in a given grain are observed not to be randomly distributed, but clustered...... indentations is also investigated non-destructively by the DAXM technique. By first characterizing the deformation microstructure within a selected gauge volume near a hardness indentation, then annealing the sample and measuring the same volume again, nucleation is directly correlated to the deformation...

  15. Non-self-averaging nucleation rate due to quenched disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sear, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    We study the nucleation of a new thermodynamic phase in the presence of quenched disorder. The quenched disorder is a generic model of both impurities and disordered porous media; both are known to have large effects on nucleation. We find that the nucleation rate is non-self-averaging. This is in a simple Ising model with clusters of quenched spins. We also show that non-self-averaging behaviour is straightforward to detect in experiments, and may be rather common. (fast track communication)

  16. Characterization of ice nucleating particles during continuous springtime measurements in Prudhoe Bay: an Arctic oilfield location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamean, J.; Spada, N. J.; Kirpes, R.; Pratt, K.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols that serve as ice nucleating particles (INPs) have the potential to modulate cloud microphysical properties. INPs can thus subsequently impact cloud radiative forcing in addition to modification of precipitation formation processes. In regions such as the Arctic, aerosol-cloud interactions are severely understudied yet have significant implications for surface radiation reaching the sea ice and snow surfaces. Further, uncertainties in model representations of heterogeneous ice nucleation are a significant hindrance to simulating Arctic mixed-phase cloud processes. Characterizing a combination of aerosol chemical, physical, and ice nucleating properties is pertinent to evaluating of the role of aerosols in altering Arctic cloud microphysics. We present preliminary results from an aerosol sampling campaign called INPOP (Ice Nucleating Particles at Oliktok Point), which took place at a U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE ARM) facility on the North Slope of Alaska. Three time- and size-resolved aerosol samplers were deployed from 1 Mar to 31 May 2017 and were co-located with routine measurements of aerosol number, size, chemical, and radiative property measurements conducted by DOE ARM at their Aerosol Observing System (AOS). Offline analysis of samples collected at a daily time resolution included composition and morphology via single-particle analysis and drop freezing measurements for INP concentrations, while analysis of 12-hourly samples included mass, optical, and elemental composition. We deliberate the possible influences on the aerosol and INP population from the Prudhoe Bay oilfield resource extraction and daily operations in addition to what may be local background or long-range transported aerosol. To our knowledge our results represent some of the first INP characterization measurements in an Arctic oilfield location and can be used as a benchmark for future INP characterization studies in Arctic locations impacted

  17. The Effect of Solution Thermal History on Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael W.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2001-01-01

    Proteins are highly flexible molecules and often exhibit defined conformational changes in response to changes in the ambient temperature. Chicken egg white lysozyme has been previously shown to undergo an apparent structural change when warmed above the tetragonal/orthorhombic phase transition temperature. This is reflected by a change in the habit of the tetragonal and orthorhombic crystals so formed. In this study, we show that possible conformational changes induced by heating are stable and apparently non-reversible by simple cooling. Exposure of protein solutions to temperatures above the phase change transition temperature, before combining with precipitant solution to begin crystallization, reduces final crystal numbers. Protein that is briefly warmed to 37 C, then cooled shows no sign of reversal to the unheated nucleation behavior even after storage for four weeks at 4 C. The change in nucleation behavior of tetragonal lysozyme crystals, attributed to a structural shift, occurs faster the greater the exposure to temperature above the equi-solubility point for the two phases. Heating for 2 hours at 48 C reduces crystal numbers by 20 fold in comparison to the same solution heated for the same time at 30 C. Thermal treatment of solutions is therefore a possible tool to reduce crystal numbers and increase crystal size. The effects of a protein's previous thermal history are now shown to be a potentially critical factor in subsequent macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth studies.

  18. Dynamic light scattering study of inhibition of nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite crystals by osteopontin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R de Bruyn

    Full Text Available We study the effect of isoforms of osteopontin (OPN on the nucleation and growth of crystals from a supersaturated solution of calcium and phosphate ions. Dynamic light scattering is used to monitor the size of the precipitating particles and to provide information about their concentration. At the ion concentrations studied, immediate precipitation was observed in control experiments with no osteopontin in the solution, and the size of the precipitating particles increased steadily with time. The precipitate was identified as hydroxyapatite by X-ray diffraction. Addition of native osteopontin (nOPN extracted from rat bone caused a delay in the onset of precipitation and reduced the number of particles that formed, but the few particles that did form grew to a larger size than in the absence of the protein. Recombinant osteopontin (rOPN, which lacks phosphorylation, caused no delay in initial calcium phosphate precipitation but severely slowed crystal growth, suggesting that rOPN inhibits growth but not nucleation. rOPN treated with protein kinase CK2 to phosphorylate the molecule (p-rOPN produced an effect similar to that of nOPN, but at higher protein concentrations and to a lesser extent. These results suggest that phosphorylations are critical to OPN's ability to inhibit nucleation, whereas the growth of the hydroxyapatite crystals is effectively controlled by the highly acidic OPN polypeptide. This work also demonstrates that dynamic light scattering can be a powerful tool for delineating the mechanism of protein modulation of mineral formation.

  19. The effect of solution thermal history on chicken egg white lysozyme nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael W.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    2001-11-01

    Proteins are highly flexible molecules and often exhibit defined conformational changes in response to changes in the ambient temperature. Chicken egg white lysozyme has been previously shown to undergo an apparent structural change when warmed above the tetragonal/orthorhombic phase transition temperature. This is reflected by a change in the habit of the tetragonal and orthorhombic crystals so formed. In this study, we show that possible conformational changes induced by heating are stable and apparently non-reversible by simple cooling. Exposure of protein solutions to temperatures above the phase change transition temperature, before combining with precipitant solution to begin crystallization, reduces final crystal numbers. Protein that is briefly warmed to 37°C, then cooled shows no sign of reversal to the unheated nucleation behavior even after storage for 4 weeks at 4°C. The change in nucleation behavior of tetragonal lysozyme crystals, attributed to a structural shift, occurs faster the greater the exposure to temperature above the equi-solubility point for the two phases. Heating for 2 h at 48°C reduces crystal numbers by 20 fold in comparison to the same solution heated for the same time at 30°C. Thermal treatment of solutions is therefore a possible tool to reduce crystal numbers and increase crystal size. The effects of a protein's previous thermal history are now shown to be a potentially critical factor in subsequent macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth studies.

  20. Microstructurally sensitive crack nucleation around inclusions in powder metallurgy nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Yang, J.; Zhang, T.; Zou, J.; Wang, Y.; Dunne, F.P.E.; Britton, T.B.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are used in high strength, high-value applications, such as gas turbine discs in aero engines. In these applications the integrity of the disc is critical and therefore understanding crack initiation mechanisms is of high importance. With an increasing trend towards powder metallurgy routes for discs, sometimes unwanted non-metallic inclusions are introduced during manufacture. These inclusions vary in size from ∼10 μm to 200 μm which is comparable to the grain size of the nickel-based superalloys. Cracks often initiate near these inclusions, and the precise size, shape, location and path of these cracks are microstructurally sensitive. In this study, we focus on crack initiation at the microstructural length scale using a controlled three-point bend test, with the inclusion deliberately located within the tensile fibre of the beam. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is combined with high spatial resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) to explore full field plastic strain distributions, together with finite element modelling, to understand the micro-crack nucleation mechanisms. This full field information and controlled sample geometry enable us to systematically test crack nucleation criteria. We find that a combined stored energy and dislocation density provide promising results. These findings potentially facilitate more reliable and accurate lifing prediction tools to be developed and applied to engineering components. - Highlights: • High resolution digital image correlation. • High resolution electron backscatter diffraction. • Crack nucleation. • Non-metallic inclusion.

  1. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  2. Quantifying the Effect of Stress on Sn Whisker Nucleation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chason, Eric; Vasquez, Justin; Pei, Fei; Jain, Nupur; Hitt, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Although Sn whiskers have been studied extensively, there is still a need to understand the driving forces behind whisker nucleation and growth. Many studies point to the role of stress, but confirming this requires a quantitative comparison between controlled stress and the resulting whisker evolution. Recent experimental studies applied stress to a Sn layer via thermal cycling and simultaneously monitored the evolution of the temperature, stress and number of nuclei. In this work, we analyze these nucleation kinetics in terms of classical nucleation theory to relate the observed behavior to underlying mechanisms including a stress dependent activation energy and a temperature and stress-dependent whisker growth rate. Non-linear least squares fitting of the data taken at different temperatures and strain rates to the model shows that the results can be understood in terms of stress decreasing the barrier for whisker nucleation.

  3. Nucleation from a cluster of inclusions, leading to void coalescense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2017-01-01

    A cell model analysis is used to study the nucleation and subsequent growth of voids from a non-uniform distribution of inclusions in a ductile material. Nucleation is modeled as either stress controlled or strain controlled. The special clusters considered consist of a number of uniformly spaced...... inclusions located along a plane perpendicular to the maximum principal tensile stress. A plane strain approximation is used, where the inclusions are parallel cylinders perpendicular to the plane. Clusters with different numbers of inclusions are compared with the nucleation and growth from a single...... inclusion, such that the total initial volume of the inclusions is the same for the clusters and the single inclusion. After nucleation, local void coalescence inside the clusters is accounted for, since this makes it possible to compare the rate of growth of the single larger void that results from...

  4. Mediating conducting polymer growth within hydrogels by controlling nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Patton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the efficacy of primary and secondary nucleation for electrochemical polymerisation of conductive polymers within poly(vinyl alcohol methacrylate hydrogels. The two methods of nucleation investigated were a primary heterogeneous mechanism via introduction of conductive bulk metallic glass (Mg64Zn30Ca5Na1 particles and a secondary mechanism via introduction of “pre-polymerised” conducting polymer within the hydrogel (PEDOT:PSS. Evidence of nucleation was not seen in the bulk metallic glass loaded gels, however, the PEDOT:PSS loaded gels produced charge storage capacities over 15 mC/cm2 when sufficient polymer was loaded. These studies support the hypothesis that secondary nucleation is an efficient approach to producing stand-alone conducting hydrogels.

  5. Availability analysis for heterogeneous nucleation in a uniform electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Saidi, M H

    2003-01-01

    Industrial demands for more compact heat exchangers are a motivation to find new technology features. Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is introduced as a promising phenomenon for heat transfer enhancement mechanisms. Similar to any new technology, EHD has not been understood completely yet and require more fundamental studies. In boiling phase change phenomena, nucleation is the dominant mechanism in heat transfer. Because of higher performance in heat transfer, nucleate boiling is considered as the main regime in thermal components. Hence, bubble dynamic investigation is a means to evaluate heat transfer. This study investigate bubble formation, including homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, from a thermodynamic point of view. Change in availability due to bubble embryo nucleation is discussed. Stability criteria for these systems are theoretically studied and results are discussed considering experimental data. In addition, a conceptual discussion on entropy generation in a thermodynamic system under electri...

  6. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tutum, Cem Celal; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis, metallogra...

  7. Evolution of a magnetic bubble after quantum nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defranzo, A.; Gunther, L.

    1989-06-01

    Chudnovsky and Gunther recently presented a theory of quantum nucleation in a ferromagnet [Phys. Rev. B 37, 9455 (1989)]. As a sequel, this paper is concerned with the evolution of the magnetic bubble after its materialization.

  8. Theoretical Studies Of Nucleation Kinetics And Nanodroplet Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilemski, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    The goals of this project were to (1) explore ways of bridging the gap between fundamental molecular nucleation theories and phenomenological approaches based on thermodynamic reasoning, (2) test and improve binary nucleation theory, and (3) provide the theoretical underpinning for a powerful new experimental technique, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) from nanodroplet aerosols, that can probe the compositional structure of nanodroplets. This report summarizes the accomplishments of this project in realizing these goals. Publications supported by this project fall into three general categories: (1) theoretical work on nucleation theory (2) experiments and modeling of nucleation and condensation in supersonic nozzles, and (3) experimental and theoretical work on nanodroplet structure and neutron scattering. These publications are listed and briefly summarized in this report.

  9. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joshua C., E-mail: joshchang@ucla.edu [Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA and Mathematical Biosciences Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Miura, Robert M., E-mail: miura@njit.edu [Department of Mathematical Sciences, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  10. Regulatory inhibition of biological tissue mineralization by calcium phosphate through post-nucleation shielding by fetuin-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C.; Miura, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, insufficient availability of calcium and inorganic phosphate ions in extracellular fluids leads to loss of bone density and neuronal hyper-excitability. To counteract this problem, calcium ions are usually present at high concentrations throughout bodily fluids—at concentrations exceeding the saturation point. This condition leads to the opposite situation where unwanted mineral sedimentation may occur. Remarkably, ectopic or out-of-place sedimentation into soft tissues is rare, in spite of the thermodynamic driving factors. This fortunate fact is due to the presence of auto-regulatory proteins that are found in abundance in bodily fluids. Yet, many important inflammatory disorders such as atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis are associated with this undesired calcification. Hence, it is important to gain an understanding of the regulatory process and the conditions under which it can go awry. In this manuscript, we extend mean-field continuum classical nucleation theory of the growth of clusters to encompass surface shielding. We use this formulation to study the regulation of sedimentation of calcium phosphate salts in biological tissues through the mechanism of post-nuclear shielding of nascent mineral particles by binding proteins. We develop a mathematical description of this phenomenon using a countable system of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A critical concentration of regulatory protein is identified as a function of the physical parameters that describe the system.

  11. Avalanche dynamics, surface roughening, and self-organized criticality: Experiments on a three-dimensional pile of rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter, C.M.; Gunther, R.; Wijngaarden, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    The results of both the avalanche and the roughening behavior of an experimental self-organized criticality (SOC) system are presented. In addition, simple arguments for universal scaling relations, derived by Paczuski et al. on general grounds, connecting the avalanche and the roughening behavior

  12. Development of an experimental apparatus for nucleate boiling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.J.A. de.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental apparatus is developed for the study of the parameters that affect nucleate boiling. The experimental set up is tested for nucleate boiling in an annular test section with subcooled water flow. The following parameters are analysed: pressure, fluid velocity and the fluid temperature at the test section entrance. The performance of the experimental apparatus is analysed by the results and by the problems raised by the operation of the setup. (Author) [pt

  13. Experimental investigations on nucleate boiling heat transfer of aqua based reduced graphene oxide nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, R.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is synthesized from graphite powder and various characterization techniques have been used to study the in-plane crystallite size, number of layers, presence of functional groups and surface morphology. The rGO flakes are dispersed in Millipore water to obtain 0.0005, 0.001, and 0.002 wt.% of rGO-water nanofluids. It is then used in the experimental facility to study the nucleate boiling heat transfer with different heating surfaces viz. smooth and sandblasted surface (SBS). Results of this study indicate (i) an enhancement in heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for concentration upto 0.001 wt.% and deterioration beyond this in the case of smooth surface, and (ii) an increase in HTC with concentrations is observed for SBS and shows a maximum enhancement of about 60% in comparison with smooth surface at 0.002 wt.%. It is found that the presence of secondary cavities (acts as nucleation sites) formed by the rGO flakes during boiling is responsible for the observed phenomena in addition to the possible effect of rGO in the fluid flow.

  14. Computer simulations of homogeneous nucleation of benzene from the melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manas; Santiso, Erik E; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-09-08

    Nucleation is the key step in crystallization by which the molecules (or atoms or ions) aggregate together, find the right relative orientations, and start to grow to form the final crystal structure. Since nucleation is an activated step involving a large gap in time scales between molecular motions and the nucleation event itself, nucleation must be studied using rare events methods. We employ a technique developed previously in our group known as aimless shooting [Peters, B.; Trout, B. L. J. Chem. Phys., 2006, 125, 054108], which is based on transition path sampling, to generate reactive trajectories between the disordered and ordered phases of benzene. Using the likelihood maximization algorithm, we analyze the aimless shooting trajectories to identify the key order parameters or collective variables to describe the reaction coordinate for the nucleation of benzene from the melt. We find that the local bond orientation and local relative orientation order parameters are the most important collective variables in describing the reaction coordinate for homogeneous nucleation from the melt, as compared to cluster size and space-averaged order parameters. This study also demonstrates the utility of recently developed order parameters for molecular crystals [Santiso, E. E.; Trout, B. L. J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 134, 064109].

  15. Connection of sulfuric acid to atmospheric nucleation in boreal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, T; Manninen, H E; Sihto, S L; Yli-Juuti, T; Mauldin, R L; Petäjä, T; Riipinen, I; Kerminen, V M; Kulmala, M

    2009-07-01

    Gas to particle conversion in the boundary layer occurs worldwide. Sulfuric acid is considered to be one of the key components in these new particle formation events. In this study we explore the connection between measured sulfuric acid and observed formation rate of both charged 2 nm as well as neutral clusters in a boreal forest environment A very short time delay of the order of ten minutes between these two parameters was detected. On average the event days were clearly associated with higher sulfuric acid concentrations and lower condensation sink (CS) values than the nonevent days. Although there was not a clear sharp boundary between the nucleation and no-nucleation days in sulfuric acid-CS plane, at our measurement site a typical threshold concentration of 3.10(5) molecules cm(-3) of sulfuric acid was needed to initiate the new particle formation. Two proposed nucleation mechanisms were tested. Our results are somewhat more in favor of activation type nucleation than of kinetic type nucleation, even though our data set is too limited to omit either of these two mechanisms. In line with earlier studies, the atmospheric nucleation seems to start from sizes very close to 2 nm.

  16. The surface chemistry of divalent metal carbonate minerals; a critical assessment of surface charge and potential data using the charge distribution multi-site ion complexation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation or CD–MUSIC modeling approach is used to describe the chemical structure of carbonate mineralaqueous solution interfaces. The new model extends existing surface complexation models of carbonate minerals, by including atomic scale information on

  17. Lamellipodia nucleation by filopodia depends on integrin occupancy and downstream Rac1 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillou, Herve; Depraz-Depland, Adeline; Planus, Emmanuelle; Vianay, Benoit; Chaussy, Jacques; Grichine, Alexei; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Block, Marc R.

    2008-01-01

    Time-lapse video-microscopy unambiguously shows that fibroblast filopodia are the scaffold of lamellipodia nucleation that allows anisotropic cell spreading. This process was dissected into elementary stages by monitoring cell adhesion on micropatterned extracellular matrix arrays of various pitches. Adhesion structures are stabilized by contact with the adhesive plots and subsequently converted into lamellipodia-like extensions starting at the filopodia tips. This mechanism progressively leads to full cell spreading. Stable expression of the dominant-negative Rac1 N17 impairs this change in membrane extension mode and stops cell spreading on matrix arrays. Similar expression of the dominant-negative Cdc42 N17 impairs cell spreading on homogenous and structured substrate, suggesting that filopodia extension is a prerequisite for cell spreading in this model. The differential polarity of the nucleation of lamellipodial structures by filopodia on homogenous and structured surfaces starting from the cell body and of filopodia tip, respectively, suggested that this process is triggered by areas that are in contact with extracellular matrix proteins for longer times. Consistent with this view, wild-type cells cannot spread on microarrays made of function blocking or neutral anti-β 1 integrin antibodies. However, stable expression of a constitutively active Rac1 mutant rescues the cell ability to spread on these integrin microarrays. Thereby, lamellipodia nucleation by filopodia requires integrin occupancy by matrix substrate and downstream Rac1 signaling

  18. Understanding and Controlling Cu-Catalyzed Graphene Nucleation: The Role of Impurities, Roughness, and Oxygen Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which Cu catalyst pretreatments control graphene nucleation density in scalable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is systematically explored. The intrinsic and extrinsic carbon contamination in the Cu foil is identified by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a major factor influencing graphene nucleation and growth. By selectively oxidizing the backside of the Cu foil prior to graphene growth, a drastic reduction of the graphene nucleation density by 6 orders of magnitude can be obtained. This approach decouples surface roughness effects and at the same time allows us to trace the scavenging effect of oxygen on deleterious carbon impurities as it permeates through the Cu bulk. Parallels to well-known processes in Cu metallurgy are discussed. We also put into context the relative effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of the most widely used Cu pretreatments, including wet etching and electropolishing, allowing a rationalization of current literature and determination of the relevant parameter space for graphene growth. Taking into account the wider CVD growth parameter space, guidelines are discussed for high-throughput manufacturing of “electronic-quality” monolayer graphene films with domain size exceeding 1 mm, suitable for emerging industrial applications, such as electronics and photonics. PMID:28133416

  19. Understanding and Controlling Cu-Catalyzed Graphene Nucleation: The Role of Impurities, Roughness, and Oxygen Scavenging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Brennan, Barry; Pollard, Andrew J; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-12-27

    The mechanism by which Cu catalyst pretreatments control graphene nucleation density in scalable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is systematically explored. The intrinsic and extrinsic carbon contamination in the Cu foil is identified by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry as a major factor influencing graphene nucleation and growth. By selectively oxidizing the backside of the Cu foil prior to graphene growth, a drastic reduction of the graphene nucleation density by 6 orders of magnitude can be obtained. This approach decouples surface roughness effects and at the same time allows us to trace the scavenging effect of oxygen on deleterious carbon impurities as it permeates through the Cu bulk. Parallels to well-known processes in Cu metallurgy are discussed. We also put into context the relative effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of the most widely used Cu pretreatments, including wet etching and electropolishing, allowing a rationalization of current literature and determination of the relevant parameter space for graphene growth. Taking into account the wider CVD growth parameter space, guidelines are discussed for high-throughput manufacturing of "electronic-quality" monolayer graphene films with domain size exceeding 1 mm, suitable for emerging industrial applications, such as electronics and photonics.