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Sample records for surface core-level shift

  1. Origin of metallic surface core-level shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Abrikosov, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The unique property of the open 4f energy shell in the lanthanide metals is used to show that the initial-state energy shift gives an insufficient description of surface core-level shifts. Instead a treatment, which fully includes the final-state screening, account for the experimentally observed...

  2. Surface core-level shifts for simple metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1994-01-01

    screening, whereby a SCLS becomes equivalent to the surface segregation energy of a core-ionized atom, a quantity we obtain by separate bulk and surface impurity calculations. The results are in good agreement with experiment in most of those cases where the data originates from single-crystal measurements....... We discuss the surface shifts of the electrostatic potentials and the band centers in order to trace the microscopic origin of the SCLS in the simple metals and find that the anomalous subsurface core-level shifts in beryllium are caused by charge dipoles, which persist several layers into the bulk...

  3. Ab initio surface core-level shifts and surface segregation energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the surface core-level energy shifts of the 4d and 5d transition metals by means of local-density theory and a Green’s-function technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Final-state effects are included by treating the core-ionized atom as an impurity located in...

  4. Deep layer-resolved core-level shifts in the beryllium surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, Börje

    1993-01-01

    Core-level energy shifts for the beryllium surface region are calculated by means of a Green’s function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. Both initial- and final-state effects in the core-ionization process are fully accounted for. Anomalously large energy shifts...

  5. Optimized surface-slab excited-state muffin-tin potential and surface core level shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundgren, J.

    2003-01-01

    An optimized muffin-tin (MT) potential for surface slabs with preassigned surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) is presented. By using the MT radii as adjustable parameters the model is able to conserve the definition of the SCLS with respect to the bulk and concurrently to generate a potential that is continuous at the MT radii. The model is conceived for elastic electron scattering in a surface slab with exchange-correlation interaction described by the local density approximation. The model employs two data bases for the self-energy of the signal electron (after Hedin and Lundqvist or Sernelius). The potential model is discussed in detail with two surface structures Be(101-bar0), for which SCLS's are available, and Cu(111)p(2x2)Cs, in which the close-packed radii of the atoms are extremely different. It is considered plausible that tensor LEED based on an optimized MT potential can be used for determining SCLS's

  6. Surface core level shifts of clean and oxygen covered Ir(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, M; Cassese, D; Cavallin, A; Comin, R; Orlando, F; Postregna, L [Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Via A Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Golfetto, E; Baraldi, A [Dipartimento di Fisica e CENMAT, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Via A Valerio 2, 34127, Trieste (Italy); Lizzit, S [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14 Km 163.5, 34012 Trieste (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.baraldi@elettra.trieste.it

    2009-06-15

    We present the results of high resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy employed to investigate the electronic structure of clean and oxygen covered Ir(111) surface. Ir 4f{sub 7/2} core level spectra are shown to be very sensitive to the local atomic environment. For the clean surface we detected two distinct components shifted by 550 meV, originated by surface and bulk atoms. The larger Gaussian width of the bulk component is explained as due to experimentally unresolved subsurface components. In order to determine the relevance of the phonon contribution we examined the thermal behaviour of the core level lineshape using the Hedin-Rosengren theory. From the phonon-induced spectral broadening we found the Debye temperature of bulk and surface atoms to be 298 and 181 K, respectively, which confirms the softening of the vibrational modes at the surface. Oxygen adsorption leads to the appearance of new surface core level components at -200 meV and +230 meV, which are interpreted as due to first-layer Ir atoms differently coordinated with oxygen. The coverage dependence of these components demonstrates that the oxygen saturation corresponds to 0.38 ML, in good agreement with recent density functional theory calculations.

  7. Structural dependence of the 5d-metal surface energies as deduced from surface core-level shift measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrartensson, N.; Saalfeld, H.B.; Kuhlenbeck, H.; Neumann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Surface core-level shift measurements performed at the BESSY storage ring yield -0.41(2) eV for Os(0001) and 0.00(10) eV for Re(0001). An analysis of the surface shifts in the 5d transition series shows that the surface energy as a function of Z has a maximum at lower Z for the bcc phase than for the fcc-hcp phases, at W and between Re and Os, respectively

  8. A method for the experimental determination of surface photoemission core-level shifts for 3d transition metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shamsutdinov, N.R.; Sloof, W.G.; Böttger, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    A method is presented to determine the photoelectron surface core-level shift (SCLS) of 3d transition metals using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimental difficulties arising from the relatively large broadening of photoemission lines in the 3d transition series can be overcome by the

  9. Self-consistent Green’s-function technique for bulk and surface impurity calculations: Surface core-level shifts by complete screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, M.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Johansson, B.

    1994-01-01

    of the frozen-core and atomic-sphere approximation but, in addition, includes the dipole contribution to the intersphere potential. Within the concept of complete screening, we identify the surface core-level binding-energy shift with the surface segregation energy of a core-ionized atom and use the Green......'s-function impurity technique in a comprehensive study of the surface core-level shifts (SCLS) of the 4d and 5d transition metals. In those cases, where observed data refer to single crystals, we obtain good agreement with experiment, whereas the calculations typically underestimate the measured shift obtained from...

  10. Orientation-dependent surface core-level shifts and chemical shifts on clean and H 2S-covered GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranke, W.; Finster, J.; Kuhr, H. J.

    1987-08-01

    Photoelectron spectra of the As 3d and Ga 3d core levels were studied in situ on a cylindrically shaped GaAs single crystal for the six inequivalent orientations (001), (113), (111), (110), (11¯1) and (11¯3). On the clean surface, prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), surface core levels are shifted by 0.25 to 0.55 eV towards smaller binding energy (BE) for As 3d and -0.25 to -0.35 eV towards higher BE for Ga, depending on orientation. Additional As causes As 3d contributions shifted between -0.45 and -0.7 eV towards higher BE. The position and intensity of them is influenced by H 2S adsorption. At 150 K, H 2S adsorbs preferentially on As sites. As chemical shifts appear at -0.6 to -0.9 eV towards higher BE. Simultaneously, As accumulation occurs on all orientations with the exception of (110). High temperature adsorption (550 K, 720 K) influences mainly the Ga 3d peaks. Two peaks shifted by about -0.45 and -0.8 eV towards higher Be were found which are attributed to Ga atoms with one or two sulfur ligands, respectively. At 720 K, also As depletion is observed. The compatibility of surface core-level positions and intensities with recent structural models for the (111) and (11¯1) surfaces is discussed.

  11. A high resolution photoemission study of surface core-level shifts in clean and oxygen-covered Ir(2 1 0) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladys, M.J.; Ermanoski, I.; Jackson, G.; Quinton, J.S.; Rowe, J.E.; Madey, T.E. E-mail: madey@physics.rutgers.edu

    2004-04-01

    High resolution soft X-ray photoemission electron spectroscopy (SXPS), using synchrotron radiation, is employed to investigate 4f core-level features of four differently-prepared Ir(2 1 0) surfaces: clean planar, oxygen-covered planar, oxygen-induced faceted, and clean faceted surfaces. Surface and bulk peak identifications are supported by measurements at different photon energies (thus probing different electron escape depths) and variable emission angles. Iridium 4f{sub 7/2} photoemission spectra are fitted with Doniach-Sunjic lineshapes. The surface components are identified with core levels positioned at lower binding energies than the bulk components, in contrast to previous reports of binding energy inversion on Ir(1 0 0) (1x1) and (5x1) surfaces. For clean planar Ir(2 1 0) three surface Ir 4f{sub 7/2} features are observed with core-level shifts of -765, -529, and -281 meV, with respect to the bulk; these are associated with the first, second and third layers of atoms, respectively, for atomically rough Ir(2 1 0). Adsorption of oxygen onto the planar Ir(2 1 0) surface is found to cause a suppression and shift of the surface features to higher binding energies. Annealing at T{>=}600 K in oxygen produces a faceted surface as verified by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). A comparison of planar and faceted oxygen-covered surfaces reveals minor differences in the normal emission SXPS spectra, while grazing emission spectra exhibit differences. The SXPS spectrum of the clean, faceted Ir(2 1 0) exhibits small differences in comparison to the clean planar case, with surface features having binding energy shifts of -710, -450, and -230 meV.

  12. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Berry, G.; Rockett, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe{sub 2}, one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies.

  13. Observation of core-level binding energy shifts between (100) surface and bulk atoms of epitaxial CuInSe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Berry, G.; Rockett, A.

    1997-01-01

    Core-level and valence band photoemission from semiconductors has been shown to exhibit binding energy differences between surface atoms and bulk atoms, thus allowing one to unambiguously distinguish between the two atomic positions. Quite clearly, surface atoms experience a potential different from the bulk due to the lower coordination number - a characteristic feature of any surface is the incomplete atomic coordination. Theoretical accounts of this phenomena are well documented in the literature for III-V and II-VI semiconductors. However, surface state energies corresponding to the equilibrium geometry of (100) and (111) surfaces of Cu-based ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors have not been calculated or experimental determined. These compounds are generating great interest for optoelectronic and photovoltaic applications, and are an isoelectronic analog of the II-VI binary compound semiconductors. Surface core-level binding energy shifts depend on the surface cohesive energies, and surface cohesive energies are related to surface structure. For ternary compound semiconductor surfaces, such as CuInSe 2 , one has the possibility of variations in surface stoichiometry. Applying standard thermodynamical calculations which consider the number of individual surface atoms and their respective chemical potentials should allow one to qualitatively determine the magnitude of surface core-level shifts and, consequently, surface state energies

  14. Structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts from Si(100)-c[4x2] surface: A spectral x-ray photoelectron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.; Tonner, B.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Denlinger, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)][Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors have performed angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) from a Si(100)-c(4x2) surface to study the structural origin of Si-2p core-level shifts. In the experiment, the highly resolved surface Si-2p core-level spectra were measured as a fine grid of hemisphere and photon energies, using the SpectroMicroscopy Facility {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} instrument. By carefully decomposing the spectra into several surface peaks, the authors are able to obtain surface-atom resolved XPD patterns. Using a multiple scattering analysis, they derived a detailed atomic model for the Si(100)-c(4x2) surface. In this model, the asymmetric dimers were found tilted by 11.5 plus/minus 2.0 degrees with bond length of 2.32 plus/minus 0.05{angstrom}. By matching model XPD patterns to experiment, the authors can identify which atoms in the reconstructed surface are responsible for specific photoemission lines in the 2p spectrum.

  15. Core level shifts in group IV semiconductors and semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, S.; Tosatti, E.

    1981-08-01

    We calculate the core level binding energy shift from the isolated atom to the crystalline solid, for group IV elemental semiconductors. This is done by simple extension of Johansson and Martensson's scheme for metals. We show that the core level energy in a nonmetal must be measured by the photo absorption (''core exciton'') threshold rather than by photo emission. As a byproduct, a simple scheme is also devised to evaluate impurity heats of solutions in semiconductors. (author)

  16. Detection of subsurface core-level shifts in Si 2p core-level photoemission from Si(111)-(1x1):As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggel, J.J. [Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Hasselblatt, M.; Horn, K. [Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschraft, Berlin (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The (7 x 7) reconstruction of the Si(111) surface arises from a lowering energy through the reduction of the number of dangling bonds. This reconstruction can be removed by the adsorption of atoms such as hydrogen which saturate the dangling bonds, or by the incorporation of atoms, such as arsenic which, because of the additional electron it possesses, can form three bonds and a nonreactive lone pair orbital from the remaining two electrons. Core and valence level photoemission and ion scattering data have shown that the As atoms replace the top silicon atoms. Previous core level spectra were interpreted in terms of a bulk and a single surface doublet. The authors present results demonstrate that the core level spectrum contains two more lines. The authors assign these to subsurface silicon layers which also experience changes in the charge distribution when a silicon atom is replaced by an arsenic atom. Subsurface core level shifts are not unexpected since the modifications of the electronic structure and/or of photohole screening are likely to decay into the bulk and not just to affect the top-most substrate atoms. The detection of subsurface components suggests that the adsorption of arsenic leads to charge flow also in the second double layer of the Si(111) surface. In view of the difference in atomic radius between As and Si, it was suggested that the (1 x 1): As surface is strained. The presence of charge rearrangement up to the second double layer implies that the atomic coordinates also exhibit deviations from their ideal Si(111) counterparts, which might be detected through a LEED I/V or photoelectron diffraction analysis.

  17. Adlayer Core-Level Shifts of Random Metal Overlayers on Transition-Metal Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Kudrnovský, J.; Scheffler, M.

    1997-01-01

    and the screening effects induced by the core hole, and study the influence of the alloy composition for a number of noble metal-transition metal systems. Our analysis clearly indicates the importance of final-state screening effects for the interpretation of measured core-level shifts. Calculated deviations from...

  18. Core-level binding energy shifts in Pt Ru nanoparticles: A puzzle resolved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewera, Adam; Zhou, Wei Ping; Hunger, Ralf; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Yockel, Scott; Bagus, Paul S.

    2007-10-01

    Synchrotron measurements of Pt and Ru core-level binding energies, BE's, in Pt-Ru nanoparticles, as a function of Pt content, quantify earlier indications that the Pt 4f BE shift is much larger than the Ru 3d BE shift. A complementary theoretical analysis relates the BE shifts to changes in the metal-metal distances as the composition of the nanoparticle changes. We establish that the large Pt and small Ru BE shifts arise from the different response of these metals to changes in the bond distances, an unexpected result. Our results give evidence that the magnitudes of the BE shifts depend on whether the d band is open, as for Ru, or essentially filled, as for Pt.

  19. Alkyl-terminated Si(111) surfaces: A high-resolution, core level photoelectron spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E. [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied with high-resolution core level photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) Olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond of the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, PES has revealed a C 1s component shifted to lower binding energy and a Si 2p component shifted to higher binding energy. Both components are attributed to the presence of a C{endash}Si bond at the interface. Along with photoelectron diffraction data [Appl. Phys. Lett. {bold 71}, 1056, (1997)], these data are used to show that these two synthetic methods can be used to functionalize the Si(111) surface. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Simulation of core-level binding energy shifts in germanium-doped lead telluride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyubin, A.S.; Dedyulin, S.N.; Yashina, L.V.; Shtanov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    To simulate the changes in core-level binding energies in germanium-doped lead telluride, cluster calculations of the changes in the electrostatic potential at the corresponding centers have been performed. Different locations of the Ge atom in the crystal bulk have been considered: near vacancies, near another dopant site, and near the surface. For calculating the potential in the clusters that model the bulk and the surface of the lead telluride crystal (c-PbTe), the electron density obtained in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods has been used [ru

  1. Extended Fenske-Hall LCAO MO calculations of core-level shifts in solid P compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, R.; Chassé, T.; Reinhold, J.; Streubel, P.; Szargan, R.

    1997-08-01

    Extended Fenske-Hall LCAO-MO ΔSCF calculations on solids modelled as H-pseudoatom saturated clusters are reported. The computational results verify the experimentally obtained initial-state (effective atomic charges, Madelung potential) and relaxation-energy contributions to the XPS phosphorus core-level binding energy shifts measured in Na 3PO 3S, Na 3PO 4, Na 2PO 3F and NH 4PF 6 in reference to red phosphorus. It is shown that the different initial-state contributions observed in the studied phosphates are determined by local and nonlocal terms while the relaxation-energy contributions are mainly dependent on the nature of the nearest neighbors of the phosphorus atom.

  2. Chemical bonding of water to metal surfaces studied with core-level spectroscopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the contact layer of water on surfaces is of relevance for many practical fields, including corrosion, electrochemistry, environmental science and heterogeneous catalysis. Here we focus on the geometric and electronic structure of the water contact layer on transition metal surfaces......-specific information on the partial local density of states, local atomic structure, geometrical parameters and molecular orientation, allowing general principles for water-metal interaction to be derived....

  3. Core-level photoelectron study of Si(1 1 1) sq root 7x sq root 3-(Pb, Sn) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Soda, K; Takada, T; Yoshimoto, O; Kato, M; Yagi, S; Morita, K; Kamada, M

    2003-01-01

    The Sn 4d and Pb 5d core-level photoelectron spectra have been studied in order to clarify their bonding properties and atomic arrangement on a Si(1 1 1) sq root 7x sq root 3-(Pb, Sn) surface, which is formed by the coadsorption of 0.4 ML Pb and 0.4 ML Sn and shows two kinds of bright spots in the scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) images: (A) those aligned zigzag on the T sub 1 site and (B) those on the T sub 1 and H sub 3 sites along the [1 1 -2] direction. The Pb 5d spectrum shows a single spin-orbit-split feature with weak tailing towards the high binding energy side, while the Sn 4d spectrum exhibits shoulder structures at the high binding energy side of the main peaks. This definitely indicates at least two different Sn-Si bonds or inequivalent Sn adsorbing sites and single bond or site for Pb. Thus the spots A at the T sub 1 site and those B at the T sub 1 and H sub 3 sites in the STM images are ascribed to Pb and Sn adatoms, respectively. The formation process of this surface will be also discussed ...

  4. Empirical isotropic chemical shift surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czinki, Eszter; Csaszar, Attila G.

    2007-01-01

    A list of proteins is given for which spatial structures, with a resolution better than 2.5 A, are known from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and isotropic chemical shift (ICS) values are known from the RefDB database related to the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank (BMRB) database. The structures chosen provide, with unknown uncertainties, dihedral angles φ and ψ characterizing the backbone structure of the residues. The joint use of experimental ICSs of the same residues within the proteins, again with mostly unknown uncertainties, and ab initio ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces obtained for the model peptides For-(l-Ala) n -NH 2 , with n = 1, 3, and 5, resulted in so-called empirical ICS(φ,ψ) surfaces for all major nuclei of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids. Out of the many empirical surfaces determined, it is the 13C α ICS(φ,ψ) surface which seems to be most promising for identifying major secondary structure types, α-helix, β-strand, left-handed helix (α D ), and polyproline-II. Detailed tests suggest that Ala is a good model for many naturally occurring α-amino acids. Two-dimensional empirical 13C α - 1 H α ICS(φ,ψ) correlation plots, obtained so far only from computations on small peptide models, suggest the utility of the experimental information contained therein and thus they should provide useful constraints for structure determinations of proteins

  5. Accessible surface area from NMR chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S., E-mail: david.wishart@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Computing Science (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Accessible surface area (ASA) is the surface area of an atom, amino acid or biomolecule that is exposed to solvent. The calculation of a molecule’s ASA requires three-dimensional coordinate data and the use of a “rolling ball” algorithm to both define and calculate the ASA. For polymers such as proteins, the ASA for individual amino acids is closely related to the hydrophobicity of the amino acid as well as its local secondary and tertiary structure. For proteins, ASA is a structural descriptor that can often be as informative as secondary structure. Consequently there has been considerable effort over the past two decades to try to predict ASA from protein sequence data and to use ASA information (derived from chemical modification studies) as a structure constraint. Recently it has become evident that protein chemical shifts are also sensitive to ASA. Given the potential utility of ASA estimates as structural constraints for NMR we decided to explore this relationship further. Using machine learning techniques (specifically a boosted tree regression model) we developed an algorithm called “ShiftASA” that combines chemical-shift and sequence derived features to accurately estimate per-residue fractional ASA values of water-soluble proteins. This method showed a correlation coefficient between predicted and experimental values of 0.79 when evaluated on a set of 65 independent test proteins, which was an 8.2 % improvement over the next best performing (sequence-only) method. On a separate test set of 92 proteins, ShiftASA reported a mean correlation coefficient of 0.82, which was 12.3 % better than the next best performing method. ShiftASA is available as a web server ( http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com http://shiftasa.wishartlab.com ) for submitting input queries for fractional ASA calculation.

  6. A study of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure as applied to the Ni 3p, Cu 3s, and Cu 3p core levels of the respective clean (111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The first non-s initial state angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) study of clean surfaces for the purpose of further understanding the technique is reported. The surface structure sensitivity of ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces and to arbitrary initial states is studied using normal photoemission data taken from the Ni 3p core levels of a Ni(111) single crystal and the Cu 3s and the Cu 3p core-levels of a Cu(111) single crystal. The Fourier transforms of these clean surface data are dominated by backscattering. Unlike the s initial state data, the p initial state data show a peak in the Fourier transform corresponding to in-plane scattering from the six nearest-neighbors to the emitter. Evidence was seen for single-scattering events from in the same plane as the emitters and double-scattering events. Using a newly developed, multiple-scattering calculation program, ARPEFS data from clean surfaces and from p initial states can be modeled to high precision. Although there are many layers of emitters when measuring photoemission from a clean surface, test calculations show that the ARPEFS signal is dominated by photoemission from atoms in the first two crystal layers. Thus, ARPEFS applied to clean surfaces is sensitive to surface reconstruction. The known contraction of the first two Cu(111) layers is confirmed. The best-fit calculation for clean Ni(111) indicates an expansion of the first two layers. To better understand the ARPEFS technique, the authors studied s and non-s initial state photoemission from clean metal surfaces.

  7. Nonlinear frequency shift of finite-amplitude electrostatic surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenflo, L.

    1989-01-01

    The problem concerning the appropriate form for the nonlinear frequency shift arising from slow density modulations of electrostatic surface waves in a semi-infinite unmagnetized plasma is reconsidered. The spatial dependence of the wave amplitude normal to the surface is kept general in order to allow for possible nonlinear attenuation behaviour of the surface waves. It is found that if the frequency shift is expressed as a function of the density and its gradient then the result is identical with that of Zhelyazkov, I. Proceedings International Conference on Plasma Physics, Kiev, 1987, Vol. 2, p. 694, who assumed a linear exponential attenuation behaviour. (author)

  8. Applications of core level spectroscopy to adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2002-01-01

    In the following review different applications of core-level spectroscopy to atomic and molecular adsorbates will be shown. Core-holes are created through core-level ionization and X-ray absorption processes and the core-hole decays by radiant and non-radiant processes. This forms the basis for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy. We will demonstrate how we can use the different methods to obtain information about the chemical state, local geometric structure, nature of chemical bonding and dynamics in electron transfer processes. The adsorption of N 2 and CO on Ni(100) will be used as prototype systems for chemisorption while N 2 on graphite and Ar on Pt for physisorption

  9. Core-level satellites and outer core-level multiplet splitting in Mn model compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A. J.; Reynolds, John G.; Roos, Joseph W.

    2000-01-01

    We report a systematic study of the Mn 2p, 3s, and 3p core-level photoemission and satellite structures for Mn model compounds. Charge transfer from the ligand state to the 3d metal state is observed and is distinguished by prominent shake-up satellites. We also observe that the Mn 3s multiplet splitting becomes smaller as the Mn oxidation state increases, and that 3s-3d electron correlation reduces the branching ratio of the 7 S: 5 S states in the Mn 3s spectra. In addition, as the ligand electronegativity decreases, the spin-state purity is lost in the 3s spectra, as evidenced by peak broadening. Our results are best understood in terms of the configuration-interaction model including intrashell electron correlation, charge transfer, and final-state screening. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  10. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy probed heterogeneous xenon/neon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokapanich, Wandared; Björneholm, Olle; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    Binary rare gas clusters; xenon and neon which have a significant contrariety between sizes, produced by a co-expansion set up and have been studied using synchrotron radiation based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Concentration ratios of the heterogeneous clusters; 1%, 3%, 5% and 10% were controlled. The core level spectra were used to determine structure of the mixed cluster and analyzed by considering screening mechanisms. Furthermore, electron binding energy shift calculations demonstrated cluster aggregation models which may occur in such process. The results showed that in the case of low mixing ratios of 3% and 5% of xenon in neon, the geometric structures exhibit xenon in the center and xenon/neon interfaced in the outer shells. However, neon cluster vanished when the concentration of xenon was increased to 10%. - Highlights: • Co-expansion setup is suitable for producing binary Xe/Ne clusters. • Appropriate temperature, pressure, and mixing ratios should be strictly controlled. • Low mixing ratio, Xe formed in the core and Xe/Ne interfacing in the outer shell. • High mixing ratio, only pure Xe clusters were detected.

  11. Extended averaging phase-shift schemes for Fizeau interferometry on high-numerical-aperture spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jan

    2010-08-01

    Phase-shifting Fizeau interferometry on spherical surfaces is impaired by phase-shift errors increasing with the numerical aperture, unless a custom optical set-up or wavelength shifting is used. This poses a problem especially for larger numerical apertures, and requires good error tolerance of the phase-shift method used; but it also constitutes a useful testing facility for phase-shift formulae, because a vast range of phase-shift intervals can be tested in a single measurement. In this paper I show how the "characteristic polynomials" method can be used to generate a phase-shifting method for the actual numerical aperture, and analyse residual cyclical phase errors by comparing a phase map from an interferogram with a few fringes to a phase mpa from a nulled fringe. Unrelated to the phase-shift miscalibration, thirdharmonic error fringes are found. These can be dealt with by changing the nominal phase shift from 90°/step to 60°/step and re-tailoring the evaluation formula for third-harmonic rejection. The residual error has the same frequency as the phase-shift signal itself, and can be removed by averaging measurements. Some interesting features of the characteristic polynomials for the averaged formulae emerge, which also shed some light on the mechanism that generates cyclical phase errors.

  12. Core-level photoemission revealing the Mott transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong-Do; Noh, Han-Jin; Kim, K.H.; Oh, S.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Ru 3d core-level X-ray photoemission spectra of various ruthenates are examined. They show in general two-peak structures, which can be assigned as the screened and unscreened peaks. The screened peak is absent in a Mott insulator, but develops into a main peak as the correlation strength becomes weak. This spectral behavior is well explained by the dynamical mean-field theory calculation for the single-band Hubbard model with the on-site core-hole potential using the exact diagonalization method. The new mechanism of the core-level photoemission satellite can be utilized to reveal the Mott transition phenomenon in various strongly correlated electron systems

  13. Red-shifting and blue-shifting OH groups on metal oxide surfaces - towards a unified picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Getachew G; Mitev, Pavlin D; Briels, Wim J; Hermansson, Kersti

    2018-05-09

    We analyse the OH vibrational signatures of 56 structurally unique water molecules and 34 structurally unique hydroxide ions in thin water films on MgO(001) and CaO(001), using DFT-generated anharmonic potential energy surfaces. We find that the OH stretching frequencies of intact water molecules on the surface are always downshifted with respect to the gas-phase species while the OH- groups are either upshifted or downshifted. Despite these differences, the main characteristics of the frequency shifts for all three types of surface OH groups (OHw, OsH and OHf) can be accounted for by one unified expression involving the in situ electric field from the surrounding environment, and the gas-phase molecular properties of the vibrating species (H2O or OH-). The origin behind the different red- and blueshift behaviour can be traced back to the fact that the molecular dipole moment of a gas-phase water molecule increases when an OH bond is stretched, but the opposite is true for the hydroxide ion. We propose that familiarity with the relations presented here will help surface scientists in the interpretation of vibrational OH spectra for thin water films on ionic crystal surfaces.

  14. Observation of Atom Wave Phase Shifts Induced by Van Der Waals Atom-Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perreault, John D.; Cronin, Alexander D.

    2005-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology and atom optics relies on understanding how atoms behave and interact with their environment. Isolated atoms can exhibit wavelike (coherent) behavior with a corresponding de Broglie wavelength and phase which can be affected by nearby surfaces. Here an atom interferometer is used to measure the phase shift of Na atom waves induced by the walls of a 50 nm wide cavity. To our knowledge this is the first direct measurement of the de Broglie wave phase shift caused by atom-surface interactions. The magnitude of the phase shift is in agreement with that predicted by Lifshitz theory for a nonretarded van der Waals interaction. This experiment also demonstrates that atom waves can retain their coherence even when atom-surface distances are as small as 10 nm

  15. Core Level Spectra of Organic Molecules Adsorbed on Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Ravikumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We perform first principle calculations based on density functional theory to investigate the effect of the adsorption of core-excited organic molecules on graphene. We simulate Near Edge X-ray absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS at the N and C edges for two moieties: pyridine and the pyridine radical on graphene, which exemplify two different adsorption characters. The modifications of molecular and graphene energy levels due to their interplay with the core-level excitation are discussed. We find that upon physisorption of pyridine, the binding energies of graphene close to the adsorption site reduce mildly, and the NEXAFS spectra of the molecule and graphene resemble those of gas phase pyridine and pristine graphene, respectively. However, the chemisorption of the pyridine radical is found to significantly alter these core excited spectra. The C 1s binding energy of the C atom of graphene participating in chemisorption increases by ∼1 eV, and the C atoms of graphene alternate to the adsorption site show a reduction in the binding energy. Analogously, these C atoms also show strong modifications in the NEXAFS spectra. The NEXAFS spectrum of the chemisorbed molecule is also modified as a result of hybridization with and screening by graphene. We eventually explore the electronic properties and magnetism of the system as a core-level excitation is adiabatically switched on.

  16. Analysis of Shift and Deformation of Planar Surfaces Using the Least Squares Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Matijević

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern methods of measurement developed on the basis of advanced reflectorless distance measurement have paved the way for easier detection and analysis of shift and deformation. A large quantity of collected data points will often require a mathematical model of the surface that fits best into these. Although this can be a complex task, in the case of planar surfaces it is easily done, enabling further processing and analysis of measurement results. The paper describes the fitting of a plane to a set of collected points using the least squares distance, with previously excluded outliers via the RANSAC algorithm. Based on that, a method for analysis of the deformation and shift of planar surfaces is also described.

  17. Comparative study of the core level photoemission of the ZrB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, L. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Duran, A. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 2681, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico); Falconi, R. [Division Academica de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Cunduacan, Tabasco, CP 86690, AP 24 (Mexico); Flores, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, Zapopan Jal 45101 (Mexico); Escamilla, R., E-mail: rauleg@servidor.unam.m [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-05-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) were used to investigate the binding energies and valence band for ZrB{sub 2} and ZrB{sub 12}. The Zr 3d and B 1s core levels were identified. The Zr 3d core level shows a spin-orbit split 3d{sub 5/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} while that for B 1s core level exhibited a single symmetric peak, these being typical of zirconium and boride signals. Comparing the Zr 3d and B 1s core levels with metallic Zr, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} reference materials only a negative chemical shift for Zr 3d associated to ZrB{sub 2} was observed, which suggests that the charge transfer model based on the concept of electronegativity was not applicable to explain the superconductivity in the ZrB{sub 12} sample. The measured valence band using UPS is consistent with the band-structure calculations indicating a higher density of states (DOS) at E{sub F} for ZrB{sub 12} respect to ZrB{sub 2}. Finally, we found that the weak mixed B-p and Zr-d states for ZrB{sub 12} is crucial for the superconductivity due to the state population increased the DOS at the E{sub F}.

  18. Solitary waves of surface plasmon polariton via phase shifts under Doppler broadening and Kerr nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Ahmad, A.; Bacha, B. A.; Khan, A. A.; Abdul Jabar, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) are theoretically investigated at the interface of a dielectric metal and gold. The output pulse from the dielectric is used as the input pulse for the generation of SPPs. The SPPs show soliton-like behavior at the interface. The solitary form of a SPP is maintained under the effects of Kerr nonlinearity, Doppler broadening and Fresnel dragging whereas its phase shift is significantly modified. A 0.3radian phase shift is calculated in the presence of both Kerr nonlinearity and Fresnel dragging in the absence of plasma motion. The phase shift is enhanced to 60radian due to the combined effect of Doppler broadening, Kerr nonlinearity and Fresnel dragging. The results may have significant applications in nano-photonics, optical tweezers, photovoltaic devices, plasmonster and sensing technology.

  19. The characterization of GH shifts of surface plasmon resonance in a waveguide using the FDTD method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Geum-Yoon; Kim, Doo Gun; Choi, Young-Wan

    2009-11-09

    We have explicated the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift in a mum-order Kretchmann-Raether configuration embedded in an optical waveguide structure by using the finite-difference time-domain method. For optical waveguide-type surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices, the precise derivation of the GH shift has become critical. Artmann's equation, which is accurate enough for bulk optics, is difficult to apply to waveguide-type SPR devices. This is because Artmann's equation, based on the differentiation of the phase shift, is inaccurate at the critical and resonance angles where drastic phase changes occur. In this study, we accurately identified both the positive and the negative GH shifts around the incidence angle of resonance. In a waveguide-type Kretchmann-Raether configuration with an Au thin film of 50 nm, positive and negative lateral shifts of -0.75 and + 1.0 microm are obtained on the SPR with the incident angles of 44.4 degrees and 47.5 degrees, respectively, at a wavelength of 632.8 nm.

  20. Theoretical studies on core-level spectra of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Akio

    1995-01-01

    I present a review on theoretical studies of core-level spectra (CLS) in solids. In CLS, the dynamical response of outer electrons to a core hole is reflected through the screening of core hole potential. Impurity Anderson model (IAM) or cluster model is successfully applied to the analysis of X-ray photoemission spectra (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) in f and d electron systems, where the f and d electron states are hybridized with the other valence or conduction electron states. The effect of the core-hole potential in the final state of XPS and XAS plays an important role, as well as the solid state hybridization and intra-atomic multiplet coupling effects. As typical examples, the calculated results for XPS of rare-earth compounds and transition metal compounds are shown, and some discussions are given. As a subject of remarkable progress with high brightness synchrotron radiation sources, I discuss some theoretical aspects of X-ray emission spectra (XES) and their resonant enhancement at the X-ray absorption threshold. Some experimental data and their theoretical analysis are also given. (author)

  1. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Johansson, Börje; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1995-01-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify...... the occupied and unoccupied 4f energy level shifts as the surface segregation energy of a 4fn-1 and 4fn+1 impurity atom, respectively, in a 4fn host metal. The calculations include both initial- and final-state effects and give values that are considerably lower than those measured on polycrystalline samples...... as well as those found in previous initial-state model calculations. The present theory agrees well with very recent high-resolution, single-crystal film measurements for Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu. We furthermore utilize the unique possibility offered by the lanthanide metals to clarify the roles...

  2. Phase-shifting Real-time Holographic Microscopy applied in micro-structures surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, I V; Gesualdi, M R R; Muramatsu, M; Ricardo, J

    2011-01-01

    The microscopic real-time analysis of micro structured materials is of great importance in various domains of science and technology. For other hand, the holographic interferometry comprises a group of powerful optical methods for non-destructive testing in surface analysis. The holographic microscopy uses the holographic interferometric techniques to obtain quantitative intensity and phase information of the optical waves by microscopic systems. With the development of CCD cameras, computers (hardware and software), and new materials for holographic recording, these techniques can be used to replace the classical form of registration and became promising tools in surface analysis. In this work, we developed a prototype of Photorefractive and Digital Holographic Microscope for real-time analysis of micro-structured systems based on the phase-shifting real-time holographic interferometry techniques. Using this apparatus, we are made analysis of shapes and surfaces to obtain the phase maps and the 3D profiles of some samples.

  3. Effect of surface roughness on the Goos-Hänchen shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Z.; Amiri, M.

    2016-04-01

    By considering an optically denser medium with a flat surface, but with natural roughness instead of abstract geometrical boundary, which leads to mathematical discontinuity on the boundary of two adjacent stratified media, we have thus established the importance of considering physical surfaces; and thus we studied the Goos-Hänchen (GH) effect by ray-optics description to shed light on parts of this effect that have remained ambiguous. We replaced the very thin region of surface roughness by a continuous inhomogeneous intermediary medium. Applying Fermat's principle for the incident light ray, few fundamental questions about GH shift are more convincingly addressed, which are in excellent agreement, even with the most details of the experimental results.

  4. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldén, M.; Johansson, B.; Skriver, H. L.

    1995-02-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green's-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify the occupied and unoccupied 4f energy level shifts as the surface segregation energy of a 4fn-1 and 4fn+1 impurity atom, respectively, in a 4fn host metal. The calculations include both initial- and final-state effects and give values that are considerably lower than those measured on polycrystalline samples as well as those found in previous initial-state model calculations. The present theory agrees well with very recent high-resolution, single-crystal film measurements for Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu. We furthermore utilize the unique possibility offered by the lanthanide metals to clarify the roles played by the initial and the different final states of the core-excitation process, permitted by the fact that the so-called initial-state effect is identical upon 4f removal and 4f addition. Surface energy and work function calculations are also reported.

  5. The high-level error bound for shifted surface spline interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Luh, Lin-Tian

    2006-01-01

    Radial function interpolation of scattered data is a frequently used method for multivariate data fitting. One of the most frequently used radial functions is called shifted surface spline, introduced by Dyn, Levin and Rippa in \\cite{Dy1} for $R^{2}$. Then it's extended to $R^{n}$ for $n\\geq 1$. Many articles have studied its properties, as can be seen in \\cite{Bu,Du,Dy2,Po,Ri,Yo1,Yo2,Yo3,Yo4}. When dealing with this function, the most commonly used error bounds are the one raised by Wu and S...

  6. Hydrological regime shift in a constructed catchment: Effect of vegetation encroachment on surface runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, C.; Caviedes-Voullieme, D.; Andezhath Mohanan, A.; Brueck, Y.; Zaplata, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Hühnerwasser catchment (Chicken Creek) was constructed to provide discharge for a small stream in the post-mining landscape of Lusatia, Germany. It has an area of 6 ha and quaternary sands with a thickness of 2-4 m were dumped on to a clay liner to prevent deep drainage. After completion of the construction the catchment was left to develop on its own without intervention and has been monitored since 2005. The upper part of the catchment discharges water and sediment into the lower part forming an alluvial fan. Below the alluvial fan is a pond receiving all surface and subsurface water from the upper catchment. After the formation of the drainage network vegetation started growing and surface runoff decreased until the water balance was dominated by evapotranspiration. This regime shift and the rate at which it happened depends on the vegetation encroachment into the rills and the interrill areas. Based on the hypothesis that vegetation will increase surface roughness and infiltration behavior, aerial photos were used to map rills and vegetation within and outside the rills for the last 10 years to obtain a time series of change. Observational evidence clearly shows that vegetation encroaches from the bottom, from the interrill areas as well as from the top. The rills themselves did not change their topology, however, the width of the erosion rills and gully increased at the bottom. For a subcatchment area a high resolution a physical based numerical model of overland flow was developed to explicitly assess the importance of increasing roughness and infiltration capacity for surface runoff. For the purpose of analyzing the effect of rainfall variability a rainfall generator was developed to carry out large sets of simulations. The simulations provide a means to assess how the roughness/infiltration feedback affects the rate of regime shift for a set of parameters that are consistent with the observed hydrological behavior of the drainage network.

  7. Deflecting Rayleigh surface acoustic waves by a meta-ridge with a gradient phase shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanlong; Yang, Zhichun; Cao, Liyun

    2018-05-01

    We propose a non-resonant meta-ridge to deflect Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (RSAWs) according to the generalized Snell’s law with a gradient phase shift. The gradient phase shift is predicted by an analytical formula, which is related to the path length of the traveling wave. The non-resonant meta-ridge is designed based on the characteristics of the RSAW: it only propagates along the interface with a penetration depth, and it is dispersion-free with a constant phase velocity. To guarantee that the characteristics are still valid when RSAWs propagate in a three-dimensional (3D) structure, grooves are employed to construct the supercell of the meta-ridge. The horizontal length, inclined angle, and thickness of the ridge, along with the filling ratio of the groove, are parametrically examined step by step to investigate their influences on the propagation of RSAWs. The final 3D meta-ridges are designed theoretically and their capability of deflecting the incident RSAWs are validated numerically. The study presents a new method to control the trajectory of RSAWs, which will be conducive to developing innovative devices for surface acoustic waves.

  8. Electrical and proximity-magnetic effects induced quantum Goos–Hänchen shift on the surface of topological insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuai, Jian [School of Physics and Electronics, Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng, 224002 Jiangsu (China); Da, H.X., E-mail: haixia8779@163.com [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-03-15

    We use scattering matrix method to theoretically demonstrate that the quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulator coated by ferromagnetic strips is sensitive to the magnitude of ferromagnetic magnetization. The dependence of quantum Goos–Hänchen shift on magnetization and gate bias is investigated by performing station phase approach. It is found that quantum Goos–Hänchen shift is positive and large under the magnetic barrier but may be positive as well as negative values under the gate bias. Furthermore, the position of quantum Goos–Hänchen peak can also be modulated by the combination of gate bias and proximity magnetic effects. Our results indicate that topological insulators are another candidates to support quantum Goos–Hänchen shift. - Highlights: • Quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators is first investigated. • The magnetization affects quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators. • Quantum Goos–Hänchen shift of the surface on three-dimensional topological insulators can be manipulated by the gate voltages.

  9. Valence-band and core-level photoemission study of single-crystal Bi2CaSr2Cu2O8 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z.; Lindberg, P.A.P.; Wells, B.O.; Mitzi, D.B.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-quality single crystals of Bi 2 CaSr 2 Cu 2 O 8 superconductors have been prepared and cleaved in ultrahigh vacuum. Low-energy electron diffraction measurements show that the surface structure is consistent with the bulk crystal structure. Ultraviolet photoemission and x-ray photoemission experiments were performed on these well-characterized sample surfaces. The valence-band and the core-level spectra obtained from the single-crystal surfaces are in agreement with spectra recorded from polycrystalline samples, justifying earlier results from polycrystalline samples. Cu satellites are observed both in the valence band and Cu 2p core level, signaling the strong correlation among the Cu 3d electrons. The O 1s core-level data exhibit a sharp, single peak at 529-eV binding energy without any clear satellite structures

  10. Multiplet splitting of x-ray photoemission spectra core levels in magnetic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.; McFeely, F.R.; Ley, L.; Shirley, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of high resolution x-ray photoemission studies of the multiplet splitting of the 3s core levels in the 3d transition metals and the 4s, 5s and 4d core levels in the lanthanide metals are reported

  11. Decadal Shift in West China Autumn Precipitation and its Association With Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; He, Shengping; Yan, Qing; Dong, Wenjie; Wen, Xiaohang

    2018-01-01

    West China autumn precipitation (WCAP) is the final stage of the rainy season in mainland China and is characterized as the secondary peak in annual cycle of precipitation in West China. This study reveals that WCAP experienced a significant interdecadal shift around the mid-1980s, with greatly reduced precipitation after this shift. Features related to the decrease in WCAP include the weakening of warm, wet southerlies prevailing from the oceans to inland China, the weakened Eurasian pattern, and the southward displacement of the East Asian jet stream (EAJS). Further analysis indicates that the interdecadal changes in WCAP may be attributed to the interdecadal increasing of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indo-Pacific warm pool (SSTIOP), North Pacific (SSTNP), and central equatorial Pacific (SSTCEP) after the 1980s. The warmer SSTIOP contributes to a weaker meridional land-sea thermal contrast, which inducts an anomalous local meridional circulation and northerly. The warmer SSTNP stimulates a Rossby wave train that leads to weakened West Pacific subtropical high and accompanying cyclonic circulation anomaly, hindering the transport of water vapor inland from the oceans. The increased SSTCEP leads to the southward displacement of the EAJS and its secondary circulation, generating an anomalous descending branch and reduced WCAP. Numerical simulations further support the conclusions derived from the diagnostic analysis that the decadal warming of the SSTIOP, SSTNP, and SSTCEP synergistically contributes to the reduction of WCAP after the 1980s.

  12. Photoelectron binding energy shifts observed during oxidation of group IIA, IIIA and IVA elemental surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, P.A.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    An extensive re-evaluation of XPS binding energies (BE's) and binding energy shifts (ΔBE's) from metals, oxides and the carbonates of the group II, III and IVA elements (exceptions are Be, Mg and Hf) has been carried out using a substrate specific BE referencing approach. From this, O-1s BE's are found to fall into surface oxide, bulk oxide and carbonate groupings, with bulk oxides showing the lowest BE's followed by surface oxides (+∼1.5 eV) and then carbonates (+∼3.0 eV). The O-1s BE's from the bulk oxides also appear to scale with 1/d, where d is inter-atomic distance. The same is noted in the ΔBE's observed from the metallic counterparts during oxidation of the elemental surfaces. This, and the decreasing BE exhibited by Ca, Sr and Ba on oxidation is explained within the charge potential model as resulting from competing inter- and intra-atomic effects, and is shown to be consistent with partial covalency arguments utilizing Madulung potentials. The ΔBE's also fall into groups according to the elements location in the periodic table, i.e. s, p or d block. These trends open up the possibility of approximating ΔBE's arising from initial and final state effects, and bond distances

  13. Quantification of plasmon excitations in core-level photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yubero, F.; Tougaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Calculation of photoelectron spectra (PES) based on our previous dielectric response model [A. C. Simonsen et al. Phys. Rev. B 56, 1612 (1997)] for electronic excitations in PES are compared with recently reported experimental data. It is found that the dielectric description of electron energy losses in photoemission reproduces quantitatively the angular dependence of the surface and bulk electron losses observed experimentally for the Al2s photoemission spectra of Al(111), excited with MgKα radiation. The model also allows to calculate the separate intrinsic and extrinsic effects in photoemission. Thus, the extrinsic losses account for more than 95% of the total surface excitations. Regarding the bulk excitations, both extrinsic and intrinsic contributions vary significantly with emission angle. The intrinsic contribution represents ∼35% of the intensity at the bulk plasmon position at normal emission while only 18% at 80 deg. glancing emission. The calculations presented here can easily be used to interpret PES spectra of other materials in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic effects, if their dielectric properties are known

  14. Near-field observation of spatial phase shifts associated with Goos-Hänschen and surface plasmon resonance effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, J.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2008-01-01

    We report the near-field observation of the phase shifts associated with total internal reflection on a glass-air interface and surface plasmon resonance on a glass-gold-air system. The phase of the evanescent waves on glass and gold surfaces, as a function of incident angle, is measured using a

  15. Frequency shifts of resonant modes of the Sun due to near-surface convective scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S. M.; Antia, H. M.

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the ``surface term.'' The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary 3D flows, can be reduced to an effective ``quiet-Sun'' wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt-Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection.

  16. FREQUENCY SHIFTS OF RESONANT MODES OF THE SUN DUE TO NEAR-SURFACE CONVECTIVE SCATTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Hanasoge, S.; Antia, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of oscillation frequencies of the Sun and stars can provide important independent constraints on their internal structure and dynamics. Seismic models of these oscillations are used to connect structure and rotation of the star to its resonant frequencies, which are then compared with observations, the goal being that of minimizing the difference between the two. Even in the case of the Sun, for which structure models are highly tuned, observed frequencies show systematic deviations from modeled frequencies, a phenomenon referred to as the “surface term.” The dominant source of this systematic effect is thought to be vigorous near-surface convection, which is not well accounted for in both stellar modeling and mode-oscillation physics. Here we bring to bear the method of homogenization, applicable in the asymptotic limit of large wavelengths (in comparison to the correlation scale of convection), to characterize the effect of small-scale surface convection on resonant-mode frequencies in the Sun. We show that the full oscillation equations, in the presence of temporally stationary three-dimensional (3D) flows, can be reduced to an effective “quiet-Sun” wave equation with altered sound speed, Brünt–Väisäla frequency, and Lamb frequency. We derive the modified equation and relations for the appropriate averaging of 3D flows and thermal quantities to obtain the properties of this effective medium. Using flows obtained from 3D numerical simulations of near-surface convection, we quantify their effect on solar oscillation frequencies and find that they are shifted systematically and substantially. We argue therefore that consistent interpretations of resonant frequencies must include modifications to the wave equation that effectively capture the impact of vigorous hydrodynamic convection

  17. ENSO shifts and their link to Southern Africa surface air temperature in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatsa, D.; Mukwada, G.; Makaba, L.

    2018-05-01

    ENSO has been known to influence the trends of summer warming over Southern Africa. In this work, we used observational and reanalysis data to analyze the relationship between ENSO and maximum surface air temperature (SATmax) trends during the three epochs created by the ENSO phase shifts around 1977 and 1997 for the period 1960 to 2014. We observed that while ENSO and cloud cover remains the dominant factor controlling SATmax variability, the first two epochs had the predominant La Niña (El Niño)-like events connected to robust positive (negative) trends in cloud fraction. However, this established relationship reversed in the post-1997 La Niña-like dominated epoch which coincided with a falling cloud cover trend. It is established that this deviation from the previously established link within the previous epochs could be due to the post-1998 era in which SATmin was suppressed while SATmax was enhanced. The resulting increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR) could have discouraged the formation of low-level clouds which have relatively more extensive areal coverage and hence allowing more solar energy to reach the surface to boost daytime SATmax. It is noted that these relationships are more pronounced from December to March.

  18. Innovations from the “ivory tower”: Wilhelm Barthlott and the paradigm shift in surface science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Neinhuis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is mainly about borders that have tremendous influence on our daily life, although many of them exist and act mostly unrecognized. In this article the first objective will be to address more generally the relation between university and society or industry, borders within universities, borders in thinking and the huge amount of misunderstandings and losses resulting from these obvious or hidden borders. In the second part and in more detail, the article will highlight the impact of the research conducted by Wilhelm Barthlott throughout his scientific career during which not only one border was removed, shifted or became more penetrable. Among the various fields of interest not mentioned here (e.g., systematics of Cactaceae, diversity and evolution of epiphytes, the unique natural history of isolated rocky outcrops called inselbergs, or the global distribution of biodiversity, plant surfaces and especially the tremendous diversity of minute structures on leaves, fruits, seeds and other parts of plants represent a common thread through 40 years of scientific career of Wilhelm Barthlott. Based on research that was regarded already old-fashioned in the 1970s and 1980s, systematic botany, results and knowledge were accumulated that, some 20 years later, initiated a fundamental turnover in how surfaces were recognized not only in biology, but even more evident in materials science.

  19. Albedo and land surface temperature shift in hydrocarbon seepage potential area, case study in Miri Sarawak Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman, A.; Rahman, M. Z. A.; Busu, I.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon seepage is generally associated with rock or mineral alteration product exposures, and changes of soil properties which manifest with bare development and stress vegetation. This alters the surface thermodynamic properties, changes the energy balance related to the surface reflection, absorption and emission, and leads to shift in albedo and LST. Those phenomena may provide a guide for seepage detection which can be recognized inexpensively by remote sensing method. District of Miri is used for study area. Available topographic maps of Miri and LANDSAT ETM+ were used for boundary construction and determination albedo and LST. Three land use classification methods, namely fixed, supervised and NDVI base classifications were employed for this study. By the intensive land use classification and corresponding statistical comparison was found a clearly shift on albedo and land surface temperature between internal and external seepage potential area. The shift shows a regular pattern related to vegetation density or NDVI value. In the low vegetation density or low NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to lower value than external area. Conversely in the high vegetation density or high NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to higher value than external area. Land surface temperature of internal seepage potential was generally shifted to higher value than external area in all of land use classes. In dense vegetation area tend to shift the temperature more than poor vegetation area.

  20. Albedo and land surface temperature shift in hydrocarbon seepage potential area, case study in Miri Sarawak Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suherman, A; Rahman, M Z A; Busu, I

    2014-01-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon seepage is generally associated with rock or mineral alteration product exposures, and changes of soil properties which manifest with bare development and stress vegetation. This alters the surface thermodynamic properties, changes the energy balance related to the surface reflection, absorption and emission, and leads to shift in albedo and LST. Those phenomena may provide a guide for seepage detection which can be recognized inexpensively by remote sensing method. District of Miri is used for study area. Available topographic maps of Miri and LANDSAT ETM+ were used for boundary construction and determination albedo and LST. Three land use classification methods, namely fixed, supervised and NDVI base classifications were employed for this study. By the intensive land use classification and corresponding statistical comparison was found a clearly shift on albedo and land surface temperature between internal and external seepage potential area. The shift shows a regular pattern related to vegetation density or NDVI value. In the low vegetation density or low NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to lower value than external area. Conversely in the high vegetation density or high NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to higher value than external area. Land surface temperature of internal seepage potential was generally shifted to higher value than external area in all of land use classes. In dense vegetation area tend to shift the temperature more than poor vegetation area

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of FEL pulse

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  3. Positive XPS binding energy shift of supported Cu{sub N}-clusters governed by initial state effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.; Peredkov, S. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Al-Hada, M. [Department of Physics, College of Education and Linguistics, University of Amran (Yemen); Neeb, M., E-mail: matthias.neeb@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen-Campus Adlershof, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, W. [Technische Universität Berlin, IOAP, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); DESY, Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Size dependent initial and final state effects of mass-selected deposited clusters. • Initial state effect dominates positive XPS shift in supported Cu-clusters. • Size dependent Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state of Cu cluster. • Size-dependent Auger parameter analysis. • Positive XPS shift differs from negative surface core level shift in crystalline copper. - Abstract: An initial state effect is established as origin for the positive 2p core electron binding energy shift found for Cu{sub N}-clusters supported by a thin silica layer of a p-doped Si(1 0 0) wafer. Using the concept of the Auger parameter and taking into account the usually neglected Coulomb correlation shift in the Auger final state (M{sub 4,5}M{sub 4,5}) it is shown that the initial state shift is comparable to the measured XPS shift while the final state relaxation shift contributes only marginally to the binding energy shift. The cluster results differ from the negative surface core-level shift of crystalline copper which has been explained in terms of a final state relaxation effect.

  4. Increasing sea surface temperature and range shifts of intertidal gastropods along the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubal, Marcos; Veiga, Puri; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    There are well-documented changes in abundance and geographical range of intertidal invertebrates related to climate change at north Europe. However, the effect of sea surface warming on intertidal invertebrates has been poorly studied at lower latitudes. Here we analyze potential changes in the abundance patterns and distribution range of rocky intertidal gastropods related to climate change along the Iberian Peninsula. To achieve this aim, the spatial distribution and range of sub-tropical, warm- and cold-water species of intertidal gastropods was explored by a fully hierarchical sampling design considering four different spatial scales, i.e. from region (100 s of km apart) to quadrats (ms apart). Variability on their patterns of abundance was explored by analysis of variance, changes on their distribution ranges were detected by comparing with previous records and their relationship with sea water temperature was explored by rank correlation analyses. Mean values of sea surface temperature along the Iberian coast, between 1949 and 2010, were obtained from in situ data compiled for three different grid squares: south Portugal, north Portugal, and Galicia. Lusitanian species did not show significant correlation with sea water temperature or changes on their distributional range or abundance, along the temperature gradient considered. The sub-tropical species Siphonaria pectinata has, however, increased its distribution range while boreal cold-water species showed the opposite pattern. The latter was more evident for Littorina littorea that was almost absent from the studied rocky shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Sub-tropical and boreal species showed significant but opposite correlation with sea water temperature. We hypothesized that the energetic cost of frequent exposures to sub-lethal temperatures might be responsible for these shifts. Therefore, intertidal gastropods at the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula coast are responding to the effect of global warming as it

  5. A common-path phase-shift interferometry surface plasmon imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.-T.; Chen, Shean-Jen; Yeh, T.-L.

    2005-03-01

    A biosensing imaging system is proposed based on the integration of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and common-path phase-shift interferometry (PSI) techniques to measure the two-dimensional spatial phase variation caused by biomolecular interactions upon a sensing chip. The SPR phase imaging system can offer high resolution and high-throughout screening capabilities to analyze microarray biomolecular interaction without the need for additional labeling. With the long-term stability advantage of the common-path PSI technique even with external disturbances such as mechanical vibration, buffer flow noise, and laser unstable issue, the system can match the demand of real-time kinetic study for biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA). The SPR-PSI imaging system has achieved a detection limit of 2×10-7 refraction index change, a long-term phase stability of 2.5x10-4π rms over four hours, and a spatial phase resolution of 10-3 π with a lateral resolution of 100μm.

  6. Photoemission spectroscopy of surfaces and adsorbates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, T.C.; Kaindl, G.; Himpsel, F.J.; Eastman, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Core level photoelectron spectroscopy is providing new information concerning the electronic properties of adsorbates and surfaces. Several examples will be discussed, including studies of adsorbed rare gas submonolayers and multilayers as well as clean metal surfaces. For rare gas multilayers adsorbed on metal surfaces, the photoelectrons and Auger electrons exhibit well-resolved increases in kinetic energy with decreasing distance between the excited atom and the substrate, allowing a direct labeling of the layers. These energy shifts are mainly due to the substrate screening effects, and can be described well by an image-charge model. For a Kr/Xe bilayer system prepared by first coating a Pd substrate with a monolayer of Kr and then overcoating with a layer of Xe, a thermally activated layer inversion process is observed when the temperature is raised, with Xe coming in direct contact with the substrate. For rare gas submonolayers adsorbed on the Al(111) surface, coverage-dependent core level shift and work function measurements provide information about the adatom spatial distributions, polarizabilities, and dipole moments for the ground and excited states. We have also studied the 2p core level shifts for a clean Al(001) surface relative to the bulk. The shifts have a large contribution from the initial-state effects

  7. Age-related differences in the control of weight-shifting within the surface of support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, E.; Caljouw, S.R.; Coppens, M.J.M.; Postema, K.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Lamoth, C.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: An important reason for falling in elderly is incorrect weight-shifting¹. In many daily life activities quick and accurate weight-shifting is needed to maintain balance, especially in situations when balance is suddenly disturbed and anticipation on the upcoming movement is

  8. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy of LiGaS2 and Ga-S bonding in complex sulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Isaenko, L.I.; Kesler, V.G.; Lobanov, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic parameters of the lithium thiogallate LiGaS 2 have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spectral features of all constituent element core levels and Auger lines have been considered. The Ga-S bonding effects in Ga-bearing sulfide crystals have been discussed using binding energy difference Δ 2p (S-Ga) = BE(S 2p) - BE(Ga 3d) as a representative parameter to quantify the valence electron shift from gallium to sulfur atoms. The value Δ 2p (S-Ga) = 141.9 eV found for LiGaS 2 is very close to that evaluated for AgGaS 2 . This relation is an indicator of closely coincident ionicity of Ga-S bonds in LiGaS 2 and AgGaS 2 .

  9. Core level photoelectron spectroscopy of LiGaS{sub 2} and Ga-S bonding in complex sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V., E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.r [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, 13, Lavrentieva Ave., Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Isaenko, L.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Laboratory of Physical Bases of Integrated Microelectronics, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation); Lobanov, S.I. [Laboratory of Crystal Growth, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 90, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-14

    The electronic parameters of the lithium thiogallate LiGaS{sub 2} have been evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spectral features of all constituent element core levels and Auger lines have been considered. The Ga-S bonding effects in Ga-bearing sulfide crystals have been discussed using binding energy difference {Delta}{sub 2p}(S-Ga) = BE(S 2p) - BE(Ga 3d) as a representative parameter to quantify the valence electron shift from gallium to sulfur atoms. The value {Delta}{sub 2p}(S-Ga) = 141.9 eV found for LiGaS{sub 2} is very close to that evaluated for AgGaS{sub 2}. This relation is an indicator of closely coincident ionicity of Ga-S bonds in LiGaS{sub 2} and AgGaS{sub 2}.

  10. Red-Shift Effects in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Spectral or Intensity Dependence of the Near-Field?

    KAUST Repository

    Colas, Florent; Cottat, Maximilien; Gillibert, Raymond; Guillot, Nicolas; Djaker, Nadia; Lidgi-Guigui, Nathalie; Toury, Timothé e; Barchiesi, Dominique; Toma, Andrea; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe; de la Chapelle, Marc Lamy

    2016-01-01

    Optimum amplification in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from individual nanoantennas is expected when the excitation is slightly blue-shifted with respect to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR), so that the LSPR peak falls in the middle between the laser and the Stokes Raman emission. Recent experiments have shown when moving the excitation from the visible to the near-infrared that this rule of thumb is no more valid. The excitation has to be red-shifted with respect to the LSPR peak, up to 80nm, to obtain highest SERS. Such discrepancy is usually attributed to a Near-Field (NF) to Far-Field (FF) spectral shift. Here we critically discuss this hypothesis for the case of gold nanocylinders. By combining multi-wavelength excitation SERS experiments with numerical calculations, we show that the red-shift of the excitation energy does not originate from a spectral shift between the extinction (FF) and the near-field distribution (NF), which is found to be not larger than 10nm. Rather, it can be accounted for by looking at the peculiar spectral dependence of the near-field intensity on the cylinders diameter, characterized by an initial increase, up to 180nm diameter, followed by a decrease and a pronounced skewness.

  11. Red-Shift Effects in Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Spectral or Intensity Dependence of the Near-Field?

    KAUST Repository

    Colas, Florent

    2016-06-06

    Optimum amplification in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from individual nanoantennas is expected when the excitation is slightly blue-shifted with respect to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR), so that the LSPR peak falls in the middle between the laser and the Stokes Raman emission. Recent experiments have shown when moving the excitation from the visible to the near-infrared that this rule of thumb is no more valid. The excitation has to be red-shifted with respect to the LSPR peak, up to 80nm, to obtain highest SERS. Such discrepancy is usually attributed to a Near-Field (NF) to Far-Field (FF) spectral shift. Here we critically discuss this hypothesis for the case of gold nanocylinders. By combining multi-wavelength excitation SERS experiments with numerical calculations, we show that the red-shift of the excitation energy does not originate from a spectral shift between the extinction (FF) and the near-field distribution (NF), which is found to be not larger than 10nm. Rather, it can be accounted for by looking at the peculiar spectral dependence of the near-field intensity on the cylinders diameter, characterized by an initial increase, up to 180nm diameter, followed by a decrease and a pronounced skewness.

  12. Structured Light Based 3d Scanning for Specular Surface by the Combination of Gray Code and Phase Shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujia; Yilmaz, Alper

    2016-06-01

    Surface reconstruction using coded structured light is considered one of the most reliable techniques for high-quality 3D scanning. With a calibrated projector-camera stereo system, a light pattern is projected onto the scene and imaged by the camera. Correspondences between projected and recovered patterns are computed in the decoding process, which is used to generate 3D point cloud of the surface. However, the indirect illumination effects on the surface, such as subsurface scattering and interreflections, will raise the difficulties in reconstruction. In this paper, we apply maximum min-SW gray code to reduce the indirect illumination effects of the specular surface. We also analysis the errors when comparing the maximum min-SW gray code and the conventional gray code, which justifies that the maximum min-SW gray code has significant superiority to reduce the indirect illumination effects. To achieve sub-pixel accuracy, we project high frequency sinusoidal patterns onto the scene simultaneously. But for specular surface, the high frequency patterns are susceptible to decoding errors. Incorrect decoding of high frequency patterns will result in a loss of depth resolution. Our method to resolve this problem is combining the low frequency maximum min-SW gray code and the high frequency phase shifting code, which achieves dense 3D reconstruction for specular surface. Our contributions include: (i) A complete setup of the structured light based 3D scanning system; (ii) A novel combination technique of the maximum min-SW gray code and phase shifting code. First, phase shifting decoding with sub-pixel accuracy. Then, the maximum min-SW gray code is used to resolve the ambiguity resolution. According to the experimental results and data analysis, our structured light based 3D scanning system enables high quality dense reconstruction of scenes with a small number of images. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons are performed to extract the advantages of our new

  13. Structural rearrangements in the C/W(001) surface system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, P.F.; Mullins, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the surface structure of the C/W(001) surface system at submonolayer C coverages using Auger-electron spectroscopy and high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy. Core-level spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of an atom's local electronic environment; by examining the core levels of the W atoms in the selvedge region, we monitored the response of the substrate to C adsorption. The average shift of the 4f core-level binding energy provided evidence for a heretofore unknown surface reconstruction that occurs upon submonolayer C adsorption. We also performed line-shape analysis on these core-level spectra, and have thereby elucidated the mechanism by which the low-coverage (√2 x √2 )R45 degree structure evolves to a c(3 √2 x √2 )R45 degree arrangement upon further C adsorption. The line-shape analysis also provides corroborating evidence for a proposed model of the saturated C/W(001)-(5x1) surface structure, and suggests that the first two or three atomic W layers are perturbed by the C adsorption and attendant reconstruction

  14. Surface potential measurement of insulators in negative-ion implantation by secondary electron energy-peak shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagumo, Shoji; Toyota, Yoshitaka; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki; Tanjyo, Masayasu; Matsuda, Kohji.

    1993-01-01

    Negative-ion implantation is expected to realize charge-up free implantation. In this article, about a way to specify surface potential of negative-ion implanted insulator by secondary-electron-energy distribution, its principle and preliminary experimental results are described. By a measuring system with retarding field type energy analyzer, energy distribution of secondary electron from insulator of Fused Quartz in negative-carbon-ion implantation was measured. As a result the peak-shift of its energy distribution resulted according with the surface potential of insulator. It was found that surface potential of insulator is negatively charged by only several volts. Thus, negative-ion implanted insulator reduced its surface charge-up potential (without any electron supply). Therefore negative-ion implantation is considered to be much more effective method than conventional positive-ion implantation. (author)

  15. Shifts in microbial community structure and function in surface waters impacted by unconventional oil and gas wastewater revealed by metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenfeld, N.L.; Reyes, Hannah Delos; Eramo, Alessia; Akob, Denise M.; Mumford, Adam; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional oil and gas (UOG) production produces large quantities of wastewater with complex geochemistry and largely uncharacterized impacts on surface waters. In this study, we assessed shifts in microbial community structure and function in sediments and waters upstream and downstream from a UOG wastewater disposal facility. To do this, quantitative PCR for 16S rRNA and antibiotic resistance genes along with metagenomic sequencing were performed. Elevated conductivity and markers of UOG wastewater characterized sites sampled downstream from the disposal facility compared to background sites. Shifts in overall high level functions and microbial community structure were observed between background sites and downstream sediments. Increases in Deltaproteobacteria and Methanomicrobia and decreases in Thaumarchaeota were observed at downstream sites. Genes related to dormancy and sporulation and methanogenic respiration were 18–86 times higher at downstream, impacted sites. The potential for these sediments to serve as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance was investigated given frequent reports of the use of biocides to control the growth of nuisance bacteria in UOG operations. A shift in resistance profiles downstream of the UOG facility was observed including increases in acrB and mexB genes encoding for multidrug efflux pumps, but not overall abundance of resistance genes. The observed shifts in microbial community structure and potential function indicate changes in respiration, nutrient cycling, and markers of stress in a stream impacted by UOG waste disposal operations.

  16. Gold Nanoparticles with Externally Controlled, Reversible Shifts of Local Surface Plasmon Resonance Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mustafa S.; Jensen, Gary C.; Penaloza, David P.; Seery, Thomas A. P.; Pendergraph, Samuel A.; Rusling, James F.; Sotzing, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    We have achieved reversible tunability of local surface plasmon resonance in conjugated polymer functionalized gold nanoparticles. This property was facilitated by the preparation of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) containing polynorbornene brushes on gold nanoparticles via surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization. Reversible tuning of the surface plasmon band was achieved by electrochemically switching the EDOT polymer between its reduced and oxidized states. PMID:19839619

  17. Behavior of Rydberg atoms at surfaces: energy level shifts and ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, F.B. E-mail: fbd@rice.edu; Dunham, H.R.; Oubre, C.; Nordlander, P

    2003-04-01

    The ionization of xenon atoms excited to the extreme red and blue states in high-lying Xe(n) Stark manifolds at a metal surface is investigated. The data show that, despite their very different initial spatial characteristics, the extreme members of a given Stark manifold ionize at similar atom/surface separations. This is explained, with the aid of complex scaling calculations, in terms of the strong perturbations in the energies and structure of the atomic states induced by the presence of the surface which lead to avoided crossings between neighboring levels as the surface is approached.

  18. Behavior of Rydberg atoms at surfaces: energy level shifts and ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B; Oubre, C D; Nordlander, P

    2003-01-01

    The ionization of xenon atoms excited to the extreme red and blue states in high-lying Xe(n) Stark manifolds at a metal surface is investigated. The data show that, despite their very different initial spatial characteristics, the extreme members of a given Stark manifold ionize at similar atom/surface separations. This is explained, with the aid of complex scaling calculations, in terms of the strong perturbations in the energies and structure of the atomic states induced by the presence of the surface which lead to avoided crossings between neighboring levels as the surface is approached.

  19. Origin of phase shift in atomic force microscopic investigation of the surface morphology of NR/NBR blend film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanawan, S. [Institute of Science and Technology for Research and Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom 73170 (Thailand)], E-mail: ststw@mahidol.ac.th; Radabutra, S.; Thamasirianunt, P.; Amornsakchai, T.; Suchiva, K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Salaya, Nakhon Pathom 73170 (Thailand)

    2009-01-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and surface properties of NR/NBR blend. Blends at 1/3, 1/1 and 3/1 weight ratios were prepared in benzene and formed film by casting. AFM phase images of these blends in tapping mode displayed islands in the sea morphology or matrix-dispersed structures. For blend 1/3, NR formed dispersed phase while in blends 1/1 and 3/1 phase inversion was observed. NR showed higher phase shift angle in AFM phase imaging for all blends. This circumstance was governed by adhesion energy hysteresis between the device tip and the rubber surface rather than surface stiffness of the materials, as proved by force distance measurements in the AFM contact mode.

  20. Origin of phase shift in atomic force microscopic investigation of the surface morphology of NR/NBR blend film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawan, S; Radabutra, S; Thamasirianunt, P; Amornsakchai, T; Suchiva, K

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology and surface properties of NR/NBR blend. Blends at 1/3, 1/1 and 3/1 weight ratios were prepared in benzene and formed film by casting. AFM phase images of these blends in tapping mode displayed islands in the sea morphology or matrix-dispersed structures. For blend 1/3, NR formed dispersed phase while in blends 1/1 and 3/1 phase inversion was observed. NR showed higher phase shift angle in AFM phase imaging for all blends. This circumstance was governed by adhesion energy hysteresis between the device tip and the rubber surface rather than surface stiffness of the materials, as proved by force distance measurements in the AFM contact mode.

  1. Resonantly enhanced production of excited fragments of gaseous molecules following core-level excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.M.; Lu, K.T.; Lee, J.M.; Ho, S.C.; Chang, H.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    2005-01-01

    State-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations have been investigated by resonant photoemission spectroscopy and dispersed UV/optical fluorescence spectroscopy. The main features in the gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 fluorescence spectrum are identified as the emission from excited Si*, Si + *, CH* and H*. The core-to-Rydberg excitations at both Si 2p and Cl 2p edges lead to a noteworthy production of not only the excited atomic fragments, neutral and ionic (Si*, Si + *) but also the excited diatomic fragments (CH*). In particular, the excited neutral atomic fragments Si* are significantly reinforced. The experimental results provide deeper insight into the state-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of molecules via core-level excitation

  2. Core level photoemission spectroscopy and chemical bonding in Sr2Ta2O7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Zhang, Z. M.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic parameters of constituent element core levels of strontium pyrotantalate (Sr2Ta2O7) were measured with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Sr2Ta2O7 powder sample was synthesized using standard solid state method. The valence electron transfer on the formation of the Sr-O and Ta......-O bonds was characterized by the binding energy differences between the O 1s and cation core levels, Delta(O-Sr) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Sr 3d(5/2)) and Delta(O-Ta) = BE(O 1s) - BE(Ta 4f(7/2)). The chemical bonding effects were considered on the basis of our XPS results for Sr2Ta2O7 and earlier published...

  3. LDA+DMFT approach to core-level spectroscopy: Application to 3d transition metal compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hariki, A.; Uozumi, T.; Kuneš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 045111. ISSN 2469-9950 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 646807 - EXMAG Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : core -level x-ray photoemission * dynamical mean-field theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  4. Relationship between atomically related core levels and ground state properties of solids: first-principles calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vackář, Jiří; Šipr, Ondřej; Šimůnek, Antonín

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 4 (2008), 045112/1-045112/6 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100514; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100637 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : core levels * ab-initio calculations * electronic states * ground state properties Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.322, year: 2008

  5. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • First non-destructive measurements of XPS core level binding energies for group IVb-VIb transition metal nitrides are presented. • All films are grown under the same conditions and analyzed in the same instrument, providing a useful reference for future XPS studies. • Extracted core level BE values are more reliable than those obtained from sputter-cleaned N-deficient surfaces. • Comparison to Ar+-etched surfaces reveals that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer. • The N/metal concentration ratios from capped samples are found to be 25-90% higher than those from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces. - Abstract: We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN’s) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N 2 atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar + ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy values. These

  6. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greczynski, G., E-mail: grzgr@ifm.liu.se [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Lu, J.; Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • First non-destructive measurements of XPS core level binding energies for group IVb-VIb transition metal nitrides are presented. • All films are grown under the same conditions and analyzed in the same instrument, providing a useful reference for future XPS studies. • Extracted core level BE values are more reliable than those obtained from sputter-cleaned N-deficient surfaces. • Comparison to Ar+-etched surfaces reveals that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer. • The N/metal concentration ratios from capped samples are found to be 25-90% higher than those from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces. - Abstract: We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN’s) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N{sub 2} atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar{sup +} ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy

  7. Phase shift errors in the theory and practice of surface intensity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgary, M. C.; Crocker, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The surface acoustical intensity method (sometimes known as the microphone-accelerometer cross-spectral method) is a relatively new noise source/path identification tool. Several researchers have had difficulties implementing this method because of instrumentation phase mis-match. A simple technique for measuring and correcting instrumentation phase mis-match has been developed. This new technique has been tested recently on a noise source identification problem of practical interest. The results of the experiments indicate that the surface acoustic intensity method produces reliable data and can be applied to a variety of noise source/path problems.

  8. Adsorbate reactivity and thermal mobility from simple modeling of high-resolution core-level spectra: application to O/Al(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schouborg, Jakob; Raarup, Merete K; Balling, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A high-resolution core-level spectroscopy investigation of the adsorption of oxygen on Al(111) at variable oxygen exposure demonstrates a low surface reactivity for an intensively cleaned surface. The threshold for oxide formation is as high as ∼200 L (langmuirs), at which point the coverage of the chemisorbed oxygen exceeds half a monolayer. A simple model is presented, using which it is possible to deduce the oxygen coverage from the core-level spectra and determine the initial sticking probability. For our data a value of 0.018 ± 0.004 is obtained. The changes in core-level spectra following low-temperature annealing of low-coverage O/Al(111) reflect the formation of gradually larger islands of oxygen atoms (Ostwald ripening). The island formation is consistent with a random-walk model from which the diffusion barrier can be deduced to be in the range of 0.80-0.90 eV.

  9. Observation of a hole-size-dependent energy shift of the surface-plasmon resonance in Ni antidot thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, H.; Akinoglu, E. M.; Fumagalli, P., E-mail: paul.fumagalli@fu-berlin.de [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Caballero, B.; García-Martín, A. [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, Tres Cantos, E-28760 Madrid (Spain); Papaioannou, E. Th. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Cuevas, J. C. [Departamento de Física Teórica de la Materia Condensada and Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Giersig, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Institute of Nanoarchitectures for Energy Conversion, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    A combined experimental and theoretical study of the magneto-optic properties of a series of nickel antidot thin films is presented. The hole diameter varies from 869 down to 636 nm, while the lattice periodicity is fixed at 920 nm. This results in an overall increase of the polar Kerr rotation with decreasing hole diameter due to the increasing surface coverage with nickel. In addition, at photon energies of 2.7 and 3.3 eV, where surface-plasmon excitations are expected, we observe distinct features in the polar Kerr rotation not present in continuous nickel films. The spectral position of the peaks exhibits a red shift with decreasing hole size. This is explained within the context of an effective medium theory by a change in the effective dielectric function of the Ni thin films.

  10. Shift in the microbial community composition of surface water and sediment along an urban river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Zhang, Jing; Li, Huilin; Yang, Hong; Peng, Chao; Peng, Zhengsong; Lu, Lu

    2018-06-15

    Urban rivers represent a unique ecosystem in which pollution occurs regularly, leading to significantly altered of chemical and biological characteristics of the surface water and sediments. However, the impact of urbanization on the diversity and structure of the river microbial community has not been well documented. As a major tributary of the Yangtze River, the Jialing River flows through many cities. Here, a comprehensive analysis of the spatial microbial distribution in the surface water and sediments in the Nanchong section of Jialing River and its two urban branches was conducted using 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The results revealed distinct differences in surface water bacterial composition along the river with a differential distribution of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria (P urban water. PICRUSt metabolic inference analysis revealed a growing number of genes associated with xenobiotic metabolism and nitrogen metabolism in the urban water, indicating that urban discharges might act as the dominant selective force to alter the microbial communities. Redundancy analysis suggested that the microbial community structure was influenced by several environmental factors. TP (P urban river. These results highlight that river microbial communities exhibit spatial variation in urban areas due to the joint influence of chemical variables associated with sewage discharging and construction of hydropower stations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Projected shifts in copepod surface communities in the Mediterranean Sea under several climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Adloff, F.; Irisson, J. O.; Ayata, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    Although future increases in water temperature and future changes in regional circulation are expected to have great impacts on the pelagic food-web, estimates focusing on community-level shifts are still lacking for the planktonic compartment. By combining statistical niche models (or species distribution models) with projections from a regional circulation model, the impact of climate change on copepod epipelagic communities is assessed for the Mediterranean Sea. Habitat suitability maps are generated for 106 of the most abundant copepod species to analyze emerging patterns of diversity at the community level. Using variance analysis, we also quantified the uncertainties associated to our modeling strategy (niche model choice, CO2 emission scenario, boundary forcings of the circulation model). Comparing present and future projections, changes in species richness (alpha diversity) and in community composition (beta diversity, decomposed into turnover and nestedness component) are calculated. Average projections show that copepod communities will mainly experience turn-over processes, with little changes in species richness. Species gains are mainly located in the Gulf of Lions, the Northern Adriatic and the Northern Aegean seas. However, projections are highly variable, especially in the Eastern Mediterranean basin. We show that such variability is mainly driven by the choice of the niche model, through interactions with the CO2 emission scenario or the boundary forcing of the circulation model can be locally important. Finally, the possible impact of the estimated community changes on zooplanktonic functional and phylogenetic diversity is also assessed. We encourage the enlargement of this type of study to other components of the pelagic food-web, and argue that niche models' outputs should always be given along with a measure of uncertainty, and explained in light of a strong theoretical background.

  12. Transformation of potential energy surfaces for estimating isotopic shifts in anharmonic vibrational frequency calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Patrick; Oschetzki, Dominik; Rauhut, Guntram, E-mail: rauhut@theochem.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Berger, Robert [Clemens-Schöpf Institut für Organische Chemie and Biochemie, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 22, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-05-14

    A transformation of potential energy surfaces (PES) being represented by multi-mode expansions is introduced, which allows for the calculation of anharmonic vibrational spectra of any isotopologue from a single PES. This simplifies the analysis of infrared spectra due to significant CPU-time savings. An investigation of remaining deviations due to truncations and the so-called multi-level approximation is provided. The importance of vibrational-rotational couplings for small molecules is discussed in detail. In addition, an analysis is proposed, which provides information about the quality of the transformation prior to its execution. Benchmark calculations are provided for a set of small molecules.

  13. Thermodynamics, core-level spectroscopy, morphology, and work function study of different TiCl3 crystalline phases: A theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Lei; Li, Wenpo; Feng, Wenjiang; Zhang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Shengtao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three TiCl 3 polymorphs materials were systematically investigated. • Structural results agree well with experimental and available theoretical data. • Morphological and thermodynamic properties were computed and analyzed. • Core-level spectroscopy and work function were obtained. - Abstract: Computer simulation has been widely applied in many research fields owing to its superiority in revealing an insight understanding of the phenomena. In this work, the thermodynamics, core-level spectroscopy, morphology, and work function of TiCl 3 with three different crystalline phases (α, β, and γ) have been comprehensively computed employing the Materials Studio package. Our computational DFT-D approach gives a structural description of the TiCl 3 phases in good agreement with experiment. The core-level spectroscopy confirmed that α, β, and γ modifications for TiCl 3 have lightly affected on the valences of the constitutional elements. A series of possible growth faces (h k l) were deduced using the classic Bravais–Friedel–Donnay–Harker (BFDH) model. We conclude that the sequence of work function for (0 0 1) surface was α > β ≈ γ

  14. Long range surface plasmon resonance enhanced electro-optically tunable Goos-Hänchen shift and Imbert-Fedorov shift in ZnSe prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nabamita; Kar, Aparupa; Saha, Ardhendu

    2014-11-01

    A new theoretical approach towards the tuning of Goos-Hänchen shift and Imbert-Fedorov shift for the reflected light beam is observed, designed and simulated in this paper through electro-optically tunable liquid crystal at an incident wavelength of 1550 nm within the communication window. Here the considered Kretschmann-Raether geometry comprises a ZnSe prism and a liquid crystal layer of E44 between two metal layers of silver, where with the application of electric field from (0-10) V electro-optically tuning of the Goos-Hänchen shift from 64.09 μm to -53.408 μm and the Imbert-Fedorov shift from 122.8 μm to -32.5 μm for a change in refractive index of the liquid crystal layer from 1.52-1.79 are envisaged. This idea expedites the scope of fine tuning in optical switching within the μm ranges.

  15. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty , a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org. (paper)

  16. Nb 3d and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Kalabin, I.E.; Kesler, V.G.; Pervukhina, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    A set of available experimental data on binding energies of Nb 3d 5/2 and O 1s core levels in niobates has been observed with using energy difference (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) as a robust parameter for compound characterization. An empirical relationship between (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) values measured with XPS for Nb 5+ -niobates and mean chemical bond length L(Nb-O) has been discussed. A range of (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) values possible in Nb 5+ -niobates has been defined. An energy gap ∼1.4-1.8 eV is found between (O 1s-Nb 3d 5/2 ) values reasonable for Nb 5+ and Nb 4+ states in niobates

  17. Nb 3d and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in niobates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.ru; Kalabin, I.E. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kesler, V.G. [Technical Center, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pervukhina, N.V. [Laboratory of Crystal Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2005-02-01

    A set of available experimental data on binding energies of Nb 3d{sub 5/2} and O 1s core levels in niobates has been observed with using energy difference (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) as a robust parameter for compound characterization. An empirical relationship between (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) values measured with XPS for Nb{sup 5+}-niobates and mean chemical bond length L(Nb-O) has been discussed. A range of (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) values possible in Nb{sup 5+}-niobates has been defined. An energy gap {approx}1.4-1.8 eV is found between (O 1s-Nb 3d{sub 5/2}) values reasonable for Nb{sup 5+} and Nb{sup 4+} states in niobates.

  18. Characterization of combustion chamber products by core-level photoabsorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    The lubricating performance of motor oil is adversely affected by the carbon soot contamination that is a natural by-product of the combustion process. Particularly in diesel engines, open-quote blow-by close-quote is a problem that greatly decreases the longevity of the engine-lubricating oil. Motor oil manufacturers spend considerable resources developing new oil formulations that counteract the adverse affects of this combustion soot. At present, the only effective way to test new formulations is in a working engine. This process is obviously expensive and not especially efficient. In this ongoing work in collaboration with Chevron Research and Technology, the authors goal is to find a form of carbon that chemically resembles the soot created by the open-quote blow-by close-quote in a diesel engine. The chemically correct soot substitute can be used in bench tests to replace the expensive full motor testing for new formulations. The final testing would still be done in the test motors but only with promising candidates. To these ends, Near Edge X-ray Adsorption spectroscopy Extended Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is an attractive technique in that it has chemical specificity through the core-level binding energy and because it probes the chemically important unoccupied molecular orbitals of the material. Core-level photoabsorption has been used to characterize the empty electronic states of a wide variety of materials. Specifically, the near-edge region of the photoabsorption process has been used to determine the relative quantity of sp 2 and sp 3 bonding in carbon films. The samples were fine grained powders pressed into pellets. The C(1s) absorption spectra were collected from each sample by measuring the total electron yield from the sample as a function of photon energy. The absorption intensity was normalized to the incoming photon flux by measuring the photoyield from a fine gold mesh

  19. Recent surface cooling in the Yellow and East China Seas and the associated North Pacific climate regime shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sun; Jang, Chan Joo; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2018-03-01

    The Yellow and East China Seas (YECS) are widely believed to have experienced robust, basin-scale warming over the last few decades. However, the warming reached a peak in the late 1990s, followed by a significant cooling trend. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of this low-frequency sea surface temperature (SST) variance and its dynamic relationship with large-scale climate variability through cyclostationary orthogonal function analysis for the 1982-2014 period. Both regressed surface winds on the primary mode of the YECS SST and trends in air-sea heat fluxes demonstrate that the intensification of the northerly winds in winter contribute largely to the recent cooling trend by increasing heat loss to the atmosphere. As a localized oceanic response to these winds, the upwind flow seems to bring warm waters and partially counteracts the basin-scale cooling, thus contributing to a weakening of the cooling trend along the central trough of the Yellow Sea. In the context of the large-scale climate variabilities, a strong relationship between the YECS SST variability and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) became weak considerably during the recent cooling period after the late 1990s as the PDO signals appeared to be confined within the eastern basin of the North Pacific in association with the regime shift. In addition to this decoupling of the YECS SST from the PDO, the intensifying Siberian High pressure system likely caused the enhanced northerly winds, leading to the recent cooling trend. These findings highlight relative roles of the PDO and the Siberian High in shaping the YECS SST variance through the changes in the large-scale atmospheric circulation and attendant oceanic advection.

  20. Self-consistent electronic structure of the contracted tungsten (001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posternak, M.; Krakauer, H.; Freeman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent linearized-augmented-plane-wave energy-band studies using the warped muffin-tin approximation for a seven-layer W(001) single slab with the surface-layer separation contracted by 6% of the bulk interlayer spacing are reported. Surface electronic structure, local densities of states, generalized susceptibility for the surface, work function, and core-level shifts are found to have insignificant differences with corresponding results for the unrelaxed surface. Several differences in surface states between theory and recent angle-resolved photoemission experiments are discussed in the light of new proposed models of the actual unreconstructed surface structure at high temperatures

  1. Shift Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publications & News Shift Colors Pages default Sign In NPC Logo Banner : Shift Colors Search Navy Personnel Command > Reference Library > Publications & News > Shift Colors Top Link Bar Navy Personnel Library Expand Reference Library Quick Launch Shift Colors Shift Colors Archives Mailing Address How to

  2. Determination of the bonding of alkyl monolayers to the Si(111) surface using chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E. [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied by conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction (PED) using synchrotron radiation. Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) olefin insertion into the H{endash}Si bond on the H{endash}Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl{endash}Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, XPS has revealed a C 1s signal chemically shifted to lower binding energy, which we have assigned to carbon bonded to silicon. PED has shown that both preparative methods result in carbon bonded in an atop site with the expected C{endash}Si bond length of 1.85{plus_minus}0.05{Angstrom}. Chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction is a particularly valuable probe of local structure at surfaces that contain the same element in multiple, chemically distinct environments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Determination of the bonding of alkyl monolayers to the Si(111) surface using chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.; Linford, M.R.; Wigren, C.; Cao, R.; Pianetta, P.; Chidsey, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    The bonding of alkyl monolayers to Si(111) surfaces has been studied by conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction (PED) using synchrotron radiation. Two very different wet-chemical methods have been used to prepare the alkyl monolayers: (i) olefin insertion into the H endash Si bond on the H endash Si(111) surface, and (ii) replacement of Cl on the Cl endash Si(111) surface by an alkyl group from an alkyllithium reagent. In both cases, XPS has revealed a C 1s signal chemically shifted to lower binding energy, which we have assigned to carbon bonded to silicon. PED has shown that both preparative methods result in carbon bonded in an atop site with the expected C endash Si bond length of 1.85±0.05 Angstrom. Chemical-shift, scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction is a particularly valuable probe of local structure at surfaces that contain the same element in multiple, chemically distinct environments. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Leif I., E-mail: lij@ifm.liu.se; Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10{sup 14 }cm{sup −2} after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene.

  5. Li induced effects in the core level and π-band electronic structure of graphene grown on C-face SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Leif I.; Xia, Chao; Virojanadara, Chariya

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the effects induced in the electronic structure after Li deposition, and subsequent heating, on graphene samples prepared on C-face SiC are reported. The as prepared graphene samples are essentially undoped, but after Li deposition, the Dirac point shifts down to 1.2 eV below the Fermi level due to electron doping. The shape of the C 1s level also indicates a doping concentration of around 10 14  cm −2 after Li deposition, when compared with recent calculated results of core level spectra of graphene. The C 1s, Si 2p, and Li 1s core level results show little intercalation directly after deposition but that most of the Li has intercalated after heating at 280 °C. Heating at higher temperatures leads to desorption of Li from the sample, and at 1030 °C, Li can no longer be detected on the sample. The single π-band observable from multilayer C-face graphene samples in conventional angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is reasonably sharp both on the initially prepared sample and after Li deposition. After heating at 280 °C, the π-band appears more diffuse and possibly split. The Dirac point becomes located at 0.4 eV below the Fermi level, which indicates occurrence of a significant reduction in the electron doping concentration. Constant energy photoelectron distribution patterns extracted from the as prepared graphene C-face sample and also after Li deposition and heating at 280 °C look very similar to earlier calculated distribution patterns for monolayer graphene

  6. Sensitivity of core-level spectroscopy to electrostatic environments of nitrile groups: An ab initio study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Hussain

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations have been performed to probe the influence of hydrogen bonding on the electronic structure of hydrogen cyanide (HCN. Our calculations determine the origin of nitrogen-specific Raman spectral features from resonant inelastic X-ray scattering occurring in the presence of a water molecule and an electric dipole field. The similarity of the two interactions in altering the electronic structure of the nitrogen atom differs only in the covalent contributions from the water molecule. The CN stretching mode as a structural probe was also investigated to study the electronic origin of the anomalous frequency shift of the nitrile group when subjected to hydrogen bonding and an electrostatic dipole field. The major changes in the electronic structure of HCN are electrostatic in nature and originate from dipole-dipole interactions. The relative shifts of the CN stretching frequency are in good agreement with those experimentally observed.

  7. Prediction of core level binding energies in density functional theory: Rigorous definition of initial and final state contributions and implications on the physical meaning of Kohn-Sham energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo Bellafont, Noèlia; Bagus, Paul S; Illas, Francesc

    2015-06-07

    A systematic study of the N(1s) core level binding energies (BE's) in a broad series of molecules is presented employing Hartree-Fock (HF) and the B3LYP, PBE0, and LC-BPBE density functional theory (DFT) based methods with a near HF basis set. The results show that all these methods give reasonably accurate BE's with B3LYP being slightly better than HF but with both PBE0 and LCBPBE being poorer than HF. A rigorous and general decomposition of core level binding energy values into initial and final state contributions to the BE's is proposed that can be used within either HF or DFT methods. The results show that Koopmans' theorem does not hold for the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. Consequently, Kohn-Sham orbital energies of core orbitals do not provide estimates of the initial state contribution to core level BE's; hence, they cannot be used to decompose initial and final state contributions to BE's. However, when the initial state contribution to DFT BE's is properly defined, the decompositions of initial and final state contributions given by DFT, with several different functionals, are very similar to those obtained with HF. Furthermore, it is shown that the differences of Kohn-Sham orbital energies taken with respect to a common reference do follow the trend of the properly calculated initial state contributions. These conclusions are especially important for condensed phase systems where our results validate the use of band structure calculations to determine initial state contributions to BE shifts.

  8. Surface characterization of amorphous and crystallized Fe 80B 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, D. R.; Overbury, S. H.; Zehner, D. M.; Budai, J. D.; Brower, W. E.

    1986-11-01

    Recent studies of catalysis by amorphous metals have prompted an interest in their surface properties. We have utilized Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy alkali ion scattering to study the surface composition, electronic properties and topography of amorphous and crystallized Fe 80B 20 ribbons. The majorresults are that the surface stoichiometry is approximately that of the bulk, unaltered by segregation. Bulk crystallization results in the diffusion of impurities to the surface, but does not change the Fe/B ratio. A small shift in the B1s core level binding energy was observed on crystalline, annealed surfaces relative to amorphous or sputtered surfaces, but no shifts were observed in the iron core level energies. A weak feature due to the B2p levels was observed in the valence band spectra from sputtered surfaces. The surfaces exhibit atomic scale roughness which is not altered by bulk crystallization. Finally, there were no observable differences in the structure, composition or electronic properties between the two sides of the ribbons.

  9. Scanning microscopy of magnetic domains using the Fe 3p core level transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Rozhko, I.; Voss, J.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.; Wedemeier, V.

    1999-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum ultraviolet analog to visible-light magneto-optical imaging of magnetic structures using the resonantly enhanced transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect at core level thresholds with incident p-polarized radiation. The advantages are element specificity and a variable information depth. We used the scanning x-ray microscope at HASYLAB capable of obtaining about 1 μm resolution by means of its focusing ellipsoidal ring mirror. The p-polarized component of the reflected light was selected using multilayer reflection at an additional plane mirror downstream to the sample. Micrographs of the optical reflectivity were taken in the vicinity of the Fe 3p core level threshold at 53.7 and 56.5 eV photon energy where the magneto-optical effect is of opposite sign. Magnetic domains are visible in the difference of both recorded images.

  10. Reference binding energies of transition metal carbides by core-level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy free from Ar+ etching artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Hultman, L.

    2018-04-01

    We report x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE's) for the widely-applicable groups IVb-VIb transition metal carbides (TMCs) TiC, VC, CrC, ZrC, NbC, MoC, HfC, TaC, and WC. Thin film samples are grown in the same deposition system, by dc magnetron co-sputtering from graphite and respective elemental metal targets in Ar atmosphere. To remove surface contaminations resulting from exposure to air during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, layers are either (i) Ar+ ion-etched or (ii) UHV-annealed in situ prior to XPS analyses. High resolution XPS spectra reveal that even gentle etching affects the shape of core level signals, as well as BE values, which are systematically offset by 0.2-0.5 eV towards lower BE. These destructive effects of Ar+ ion etch become more pronounced with increasing the metal atom mass due to an increasing carbon-to-metal sputter yield ratio. Systematic analysis reveals that for each row in the periodic table (3d, 4d, and 5d) C 1s BE increases from left to right indicative of a decreased charge transfer from TM to C atoms, hence bond weakening. Moreover, C 1s BE decreases linearly with increasing carbide/metal melting point ratio. Spectra reported here, acquired from a consistent set of samples in the same instrument, should serve as a reference for true deconvolution of complex XPS cases, including multinary carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides.

  11. $^{11}$B and $^{27}$Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation and Knight shift study of Mg$_{1-x}$Al$_x$B$_2$. Evidence for anisotropic Fermi surface

    OpenAIRE

    Papavassiliou, G.; Pissas, M.; Karayanni, M.; Fardis, M.; Koutandos, S.; Prassides, K.

    2002-01-01

    We report a detailed study of $^{11}$B and $^{27}$Al NMR spin-lattice relaxation rates ($1/T_1$), as well as of $^{27}$Al Knight shift (K) of Mg$_{1-x}$Al$_x$B$_2$, $0\\leq x\\leq 1$. The obtained ($1/T_1T$) and K vs. x plots are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. This asserts experimentally the prediction that the Fermi surface is highly anisotropic, consisting mainly of hole-type 2-D cylindrical sheets from bonding $2p_{x,y}$ boron orbitals. It is also shown that the density ...

  12. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Kozak, Ondrej; Berka, Karel; Siskova, Karolina M.; Havrdova, Marketa; Tucek, Jiri; Safarova, Klara; Otyepka, Michal; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zboril, Radek

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca; Fratesi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Summary By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001). The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes. PMID:26734516

  15. Core-level spectra and molecular deformation in adsorption: V-shaped pentacene on Al(001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Baby

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available By first-principle simulations we study the effects of molecular deformation on the electronic and spectroscopic properties as it occurs for pentacene adsorbed on the most stable site of Al(001. The rationale for the particular V-shaped deformed structure is discussed and understood. The molecule–surface bond is made evident by mapping the charge redistribution. Upon X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS from the molecule, the bond with the surface is destabilized by the electron density rearrangement to screen the core hole. This destabilization depends on the ionized carbon atom, inducing a narrowing of the XPS spectrum with respect to the molecules adsorbed hypothetically undistorted, in full agreement to experiments. When looking instead at the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectra, individual contributions from the non-equivalent C atoms provide evidence of the molecular orbital filling, hybridization, and interchange induced by distortion. The alteration of the C–C bond lengths due to the V-shaped bending decreases by a factor of two the azimuthal dichroism of NEXAFS spectra, i.e., the energy splitting of the sigma resonances measured along the two in-plane molecular axes.

  16. Adsorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 surface studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, M. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)]. E-mail: romshimo@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp; Ikejima, Y. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yajima, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yagi, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Goto, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gunnella, R. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); UdR INFM, Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino 62032 (Italy); Abukawa, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Fukuda, Y. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Kono, S. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2004-10-15

    Chemisorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1) surface has been studied by synchrotron radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES). Two adsorption-related components in Si 2p and S 2p spectra are observed after exposure of thiophene. It is suggested that the two components of Si 2p are ascribed to silicon bonded to hydrocarbon and sulfur. The core-level shift resolved photoelectron diffraction (PED) result indicates that the low-kinetic-energy component of S 2p can be ascribed to 2,5-dihydrothiophehe (DHT)-like species. Another S 2p component could be assigned to dissociated sulfur based on the results of PED and time evolution of the spectrum under irradiation. These assignments are consistent with the core-level shift of S 2p.

  17. Adsorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 surface studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, M.; Ikejima, Y.; Yajima, K.; Yagi, T.; Goto, T.; Gunnella, R.; Abukawa, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Kono, S.

    2004-01-01

    Chemisorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1) surface has been studied by synchrotron radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES). Two adsorption-related components in Si 2p and S 2p spectra are observed after exposure of thiophene. It is suggested that the two components of Si 2p are ascribed to silicon bonded to hydrocarbon and sulfur. The core-level shift resolved photoelectron diffraction (PED) result indicates that the low-kinetic-energy component of S 2p can be ascribed to 2,5-dihydrothiophehe (DHT)-like species. Another S 2p component could be assigned to dissociated sulfur based on the results of PED and time evolution of the spectrum under irradiation. These assignments are consistent with the core-level shift of S 2p

  18. Transformations accompanying a shift from surface to drip irrigation in the Cànyoles Watershed, Valencia, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sese-Minguez, Saioa; Boesveld, Harm; Asins-Velis, Sabina; Kooij, van der Saskia; Maroulis, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Drip irrigation is widely promoted in Spain to increase agricultural production and to save water. In the Cànyoles watershed, Valencia, we analysed the consequences of change from surface irrigation to drip irrigation over the past 25 years. There were a number of transformations resulting from,

  19. Ti 2p and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in titanium-bearing oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, Victor V.; Kesler, Valery G.; Pervukhina, Natalia V.; Zhang, Zhaoming

    2006-01-01

    A set of available experimental data on the binding energies of Ti 2p 3/2 and O 1s core levels in titanium-bearing oxides has been presented by using the binding energy difference (O 1s-Ti 2p 3/2 ) as a robust parameter to characterize these compounds. An empirical relationship between the (O 1s-Ti 2p 3/2 ) values measured with XPS and the mean chemical bond length L(Ti-O) in these crystals has been discussed for Ti 4+ -compounds

  20. Ti 2p and O 1s core levels and chemical bonding in titanium-bearing oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, Victor V. [Laboratory of Optical Materials and Structures, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: atuchin@thermo.isp.nsc.ru; Kesler, Valery G. [Technical Centre, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Pervukhina, Natalia V. [Laboratory of Crystal Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Zhaoming [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A set of available experimental data on the binding energies of Ti 2p{sub 3/2} and O 1s core levels in titanium-bearing oxides has been presented by using the binding energy difference (O 1s-Ti 2p{sub 3/2}) as a robust parameter to characterize these compounds. An empirical relationship between the (O 1s-Ti 2p{sub 3/2}) values measured with XPS and the mean chemical bond length L(Ti-O) in these crystals has been discussed for Ti{sup 4+}-compounds.

  1. Stiffness Matrix of Thin-Walled Open Bar Subject to Bending, Bending Torsion and Shift of Cross Section Middle Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenko, N. N.; Sinelschikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    One of the main stages in the analysis of complex 3D structures and engineering constructions made of thin-walled open bars using FEM is a stiffness matrix developing. Taking into account middle surface shear deformation caused by the work of tangential stresses in the formula to calculate a potential energy of thin-walled open bars, the authors obtain an important correction at calculation of the bar deformation and fundamental frequencies. The results of the analysis of the free end buckling of a cantilever H-bar under plane bending differ from exact solution by 0.53%. In the course of comparison of the obtained results with the cantilever bar buckling regardless the middle surface shear deformation, an increase made 16.6%. The stiffness matrix of a thin-walled open bar developed in the present work can be integrated into any software suite using FEM for the analysis of complex 3-D structures and engineering constructions with n-freedoms.

  2. Shifting Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  3. The effects of rare earths on activity and surface properties of Ru/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for water gas shift reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laitao Luo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of Ru-RE/γ- Al2O3 (RE = Ce, Pr, La, Sm, Tb or Gd and Ru/γ- Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by impregnation method. The influence of rare earths on the catalytic performance of Ru/γ- Al2O3 catalyst for the water gas shift reaction was studied. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, temperature programmed reduction (TPR, temperature programmed desorption (TPD, and CO chemisorption. The results show that the addition of rare earths increases the catalytic activity of Ru based catalyst. Among these cerium is the most remarkably. The addition of cerium increases the active surface area, improves the dispersion of ruthenium, and weakens the interaction between ruthenium and the support. Cerium also affects the adsorption and reduction properties of Ru/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

  4. Electronic properties of adsorbates and clean surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecante, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper surveys recent progress in experimental studies on electronic properties of adsorbates and clean metal surfaces. Electron spectroscopy and particularly angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy appears to be a very powerful tool to get informations on electronic levels of adsorbates or clean surfaces. Moreover this technique may also give informations about the atomic geometry of the surface. Experimental investigation about surface plasmons, surface states, core level shifts are presented for clean surfaces. As examples of adsorbate covered surfaces two typical cases are chosen: two dimensional band structure and oriented molecules. Finally the photoelectron diffraction may be used for surface structure determination either in the case of an adsorbate or a clean metal surface [fr

  5. Quantum Effects for a Proton in a Low-Barrier, Double-Well Potential: Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of Acetylacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyer, Vitaliy; Prince, Kevin C; Coreno, Marcello; Melandri, Sonia; Maris, Assimo; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther; Giuliano, Barbara M; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2018-02-01

    We have performed core level photoemission spectroscopy of gaseous acetylacetone, its fully deuterated form, and two derivatives, benzoylacetone and dibenzoylmethane. These molecules show intramolecular hydrogen bonds, with a proton located in a double-well potential, whose barrier height is different for the three compounds. This has allowed us to examine the effect of the double-well potential on photoemission spectra. Two distinct O 1s core hole peaks are observed, previously assigned to two chemical states of oxygen. We provide an alternative assignment of the double-peak structure of O 1s spectra by taking full account of the extended nature of the wave function associated with the nuclear motion of the proton, the shape of the ground and final state potentials in which the proton is located, and the nonzero temperature of the samples. The peaks are explained in terms of an unusual Franck-Condon factor distribution.

  6. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  7. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from (√3x√3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N 2 /Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature

  8. Study of metal specific interaction, F-LUMO and VL shift to understand interface of CuPc thin films and noble metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Sumona; Mukherjee, M., E-mail: manabendra.mukherjee@saha.ac.in

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • F-LUMO, a hybridized state near E{sub F} confirms partial charge transfer. • Non-significant role of partial charge transfer in VL shift over push back effect. • Pyrrole sites affected for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates. • Negligible effect on pyrrole cites for Pt and Au substrates. - Abstract: The performances of organic electronic devices are significantly associated with their energy level alignment at organic semiconductor/metal–electrode interfaces. The electronic character of an organic semiconducting molecular over-layer on a metal surface can vary from semiconducting to metallic, depending on the nature of the molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi level of the electrode. The general tendency of extrapolating established models for single crystal substrates to ‘real’ device substrates is highly misleading. Hence, the importance of metal specific interaction, former lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (F-LUMO) and vacuum level (VL) shift have been investigated as a function of thickness of the deposited films by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) to understand the interface between CuPc and Cu, Ag, Pt and Au foils sequentially. The XPS data provides the signature of affectability of pyrrole sites of CuPc molecules for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates while a negligible effect on pyrrole cites resulted for Pt and Au substrates. Furthermore, the appearance of F-LUMO, a hybridized state close to the Fermi level gives confirmatory information about partial charge transfer. Contrary to the general belief that vacuum level shift caused by charge transfer can partially or totally cancel that for push back effect, our observation indicates that the partial charge transfer does not play significant role in the shift of vacuum level. The entire thickness dependent electronic energy level alignment of CuPc films on all noble metal substrates is explained in terms

  9. Study of metal specific interaction, F-LUMO and VL shift to understand interface of CuPc thin films and noble metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Sumona; Mukherjee, M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • F-LUMO, a hybridized state near E_F confirms partial charge transfer. • Non-significant role of partial charge transfer in VL shift over push back effect. • Pyrrole sites affected for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates. • Negligible effect on pyrrole cites for Pt and Au substrates. - Abstract: The performances of organic electronic devices are significantly associated with their energy level alignment at organic semiconductor/metal–electrode interfaces. The electronic character of an organic semiconducting molecular over-layer on a metal surface can vary from semiconducting to metallic, depending on the nature of the molecular orbitals with respect to the Fermi level of the electrode. The general tendency of extrapolating established models for single crystal substrates to ‘real’ device substrates is highly misleading. Hence, the importance of metal specific interaction, former lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (F-LUMO) and vacuum level (VL) shift have been investigated as a function of thickness of the deposited films by means of photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) to understand the interface between CuPc and Cu, Ag, Pt and Au foils sequentially. The XPS data provides the signature of affectability of pyrrole sites of CuPc molecules for partial charge transfer from Cu and Ag substrates while a negligible effect on pyrrole cites resulted for Pt and Au substrates. Furthermore, the appearance of F-LUMO, a hybridized state close to the Fermi level gives confirmatory information about partial charge transfer. Contrary to the general belief that vacuum level shift caused by charge transfer can partially or totally cancel that for push back effect, our observation indicates that the partial charge transfer does not play significant role in the shift of vacuum level. The entire thickness dependent electronic energy level alignment of CuPc films on all noble metal substrates is explained in terms of a

  10. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Juanjuan; Kara, Abdelkader; Pasquali, Luca; Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto; Esaulov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments

  11. On sulfur core level binding energies in thiol self-assembly and alternative adsorption sites: An experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Juanjuan [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Université-Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, UMR 8214, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Orsay ISMO, Bâtiment 351, Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Kara, Abdelkader, E-mail: abdelkader.kara@ucf.edu, E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Pasquali, Luca [Dipartimento di Ingegneria “E. Ferrari,” Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy); IOM-CNR, s.s. 14, Km. 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Bendounan, Azzedine; Sirotti, Fausto [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Esaulov, Vladimir A., E-mail: abdelkader.kara@ucf.edu, E-mail: vladimir.esaulov@u-psud.fr [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Université-Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, UMR 8214, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Orsay ISMO, Bâtiment 351, Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); IOM-CNR, s.s. 14, Km. 163.5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-09-14

    Characteristic core level binding energies (CLBEs) are regularly used to infer the modes of molecular adsorption: orientation, organization, and dissociation processes. Here, we focus on a largely debated situation regarding CLBEs in the case of chalcogen atom bearing molecules. For a thiol, this concerns the case when the CLBE of a thiolate sulfur at an adsorption site can be interpreted alternatively as due to atomic adsorption of a S atom, resulting from dissociation. Results of an investigation of the characteristics of thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) obtained by vacuum evaporative adsorption are presented along with core level binding energy calculations. Thiol ended SAMs of 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol (BDMT) obtained by evaporation on Au display an unconventional CLBE structure at about 161.25 eV, which is close to a known CLBE of a S atom on Au. Adsorption and CLBE calculations for sulfur atoms and BDMT molecules are reported and allow delineating trends as a function of chemisorption on hollow, bridge, and atop sites and including the presence of adatoms. These calculations suggest that the 161.25 eV peak is due to an alternative adsorption site, which could be associated to an atop configuration. Therefore, this may be an alternative interpretation, different from the one involving the adsorption of atomic sulfur resulting from the dissociation process of the S–C bond. Calculated differences in S(2p) CLBEs for free BDMT molecules, SH group sulfur on top of the SAM, and disulfide are also reported to clarify possible errors in assignments.

  12. Hybridization and crystal-field effects in Kondo insulators studied by means of core-level spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Fabio

    2015-04-13

    and even for symmetries lower than tetragonal. In addition to that, HAXPES measurements on the CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 10} series are presented. A common technique for studying hybridization effects in rare earths, and their electronic structure in general, is photoelectron spectroscopy in the soft X-ray range (hv ≤ 1.5 keV). However, in this energy region surface effects are known to matter so that the picture about the hybridization interaction might be distorted with respect to the bulk. The use of hard X-rays (hν=5-10 keV) guarantees a sufficiently large probing depth for obtaining information about the actual bulk electronic structure. In a detailed quantitative analysis of HAXPES 3d core level spectra - using a combination of full multiplet calculations and a configuration interaction model (fm-CI model) - the hybridization strength can be quantified. The XAS results show that the CEF ground states of CeRu{sub 2}Al{sub 10} and CeOs{sub 2}Al are very similar, while it is clearly different for the non-ordering system CeFe{sub 2}Al{sub 10}. The CEF description nicely explains the magnetic anisotropy observed in susceptibility data and to a large extent the small ordered moments along the c axis. We provide a reliable quantitative description of the CEF ground state of the CeM{sub 2}Al{sub 10} compounds. Furthermore, the analysis of the HAXPES data in the fm-CI model allows to quantify the intermediate 4f valence and establishes that the exchange interaction increases within the series from Ru to Os to Fe. A substantial amount of Kondo screening is shown to be present even in the magnetically ordered Ru and Os compounds. The polarized XAS study on CeNiSn demonstrates that the monoclinic CEF is well described in a trigonal approximation, and the determined 4f ground-state wave function is consistent with results from inelastic neutron scattering for Cu-doped CeNiSn. Moreover, the systematic investigation of the CeRh{sub 1-x}Ir{sub x}In{sub 5} substitution series by means

  13. The unusual properties of beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, R.; Hannon, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Be is a ''marginal metal.'' The stable phase, hcp-Be, has a low Fermi-level density of states and very anisotropic structural and elastic properties, similar to a semiconductor's. At the Be(0001) surface, surface states drastically increase the Fermi-level density of states. The different nature of bonding in bulk-Be and at the Be(0001) surface explains the large outward relaxation. The presence of surface states causes large surface core-level shifts by inducing a higher electrostatic potential in the surface layers and by improving the screening at the surface. The authors experimental and theoretical investigations of atomic vibrations at the Be(0001) surface demonstrate clearly that Be screening of atomic motion by the surface states makes the surface phonon dispersion fundamentally different from that of the bulk. Properties of Be(0001) are so different from those of the bulk that the surface can be considered a new ''phase'' of beryllium with unique electronic and structural characteristics. For comparison they also study Be(11 bar 20), a very open surface without important surface states. Be(11 bar 20) is the only clean s-p metal surface known to reconstruct (1 x 3 missing row reconstruction)

  14. Coordination-resolved local bond relaxation, electron binding-energy shift, and Debye temperature of Ir solid skins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bo, Maolin [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan 411201 (China); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Yang, Xuexian [Department of Physics, Jishou University, Jishou, Hunan 416000 (China); Yang, Yezi [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Li, Can [Center for Coordination Bond Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 330018 (China); Sun, Chang Q., E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies, Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Cohesive energy of the representative bond determines the core-level shift. • XPS derives the energy level of an isolated atom and its bulk shift. • XPS derives the local bond length, bond energy, binding energy density. • Thermal XPS resolves the Debye temperature and atomic cohesive energy. - Abstract: Numerical reproduction of the measured 4f{sub 7/2} energy shift of Ir(1 0 0), (1 1 1), and (2 1 0) solid skins turns out the following: (i) the 4f{sub 7/2} level of an isolated Ir atom shifts from 56.367 eV to 60.332 eV by 3.965 eV upon bulk formation; (ii) the local energy density increases by up to 130% and the atomic cohesive energy decreases by 70% in the skin region compared with the bulk values. Numerical match to observation of the temperature dependent energy shift derives the Debye temperature that varies from 285.2 K (Surface) to 315.2 K (Bulk). We clarified that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms cause local densification and quantum entrapment of electron binding energy, which perturbs the Hamiltonian and the core shifts in the skin region.

  15. Synthesis of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance by pulsed laser ablation in water with CO2 absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, T.; Rey, N. A.; Rosado, T.; Landi, S.; Larrude, D. G.; Romani, E. C.; Freire Junior, F. L.; Quinteiro, S. M.; Cremona, M.; Aucelio, R. Q.; Margheri, G.; Pandoli, O.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a one-step procedure by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) at 532 nm of a solid gold target placed in aqueous solution containing CO2 absorbers, but without any stabilizing agent. Multi-wavelength surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows the identification of adsorbed amorphous carbon and graphite, Au-carbonyl, Au coordinated CO2-derived bicarbonates/carbonates and hydroxyl groups around the AuNPs core. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy highlight the organic shell structure around the crystalline metal core. The stability of the colloidal solution of nanocomposites (NCs) seems to be driven by solvation forces and is achieved only in neutral or basic pH using monovalent hydroxide counter-ions (NaOH, KOH). The NCs are characterized by a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band typical of metal-ligand stabilization by terminal π-back bonding, attributed to a core charging effect caused by Au-carbonyls. Total organic carbon measurements detect the final content of organic carbon in the colloidal solution of NCs that is about six times higher than the value of the water solution used to perform PLA. The colloidal dispersions of NCs are stable for months and are applied as analytical probes in amino glycoside antibiotic LSPR based sensing.

  16. Market shifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forst, Michael

    2013-11-01

    After years of oversupply and artificially low module pricing, market analysts believe that the solar industry will begin to stabilize by 2017. While the market activities are shifting from Europe to the Asia Pacific region and the United States, the solar shakeout continues to be in full swing including solar cell and module manufacturing. (orig.)

  17. Tough Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Verdezoto, Nervo; Holst, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    people to change their behavior at home. Leveraging prior research on encouraging reductions in residential energy use through game play, we introduce ShareBuddy: a casual mobile game intended to encourage players not only to reduce, but also to shift their electricity use. We conducted two field studies...... real-world resource use into a game....

  18. The influence of oxygen adsorption on the NEXAFS and core-level XPS spectra of the C60 derivative PCBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia; Eriksson, Olle; Brena, Barbara; Ericsson, Leif; Hansson, Rickard; Moons, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Fullerenes have been a main focus of scientific research since their discovery due to the interesting possible applications in various fields like organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, the derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C 60 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is currently one of the most popular choices due to its higher solubility in organic solvents compared to unsubstituted C 60 . One of the central issues in the field of OPVs is device stability, since modules undergo deterioration (losses in efficiency, open circuit voltage, and short circuit current) during operation. In the case of fullerenes, several possibilities have been proposed, including dimerization, oxidation, and impurity related deterioration. We have studied by means of density functional theory the possibility of oxygen adsorption on the C 60 molecular moiety of PCBM. The aim is to provide guidelines for near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements which can probe the presence of atomic or molecular oxygen on the fullerene cage. By analysing several configurations of PCBM with one or more adsorbed oxygen atoms, we show that a joint core level XPS and O1s NEXAFS investigation could be effectively used not only to confirm oxygen adsorption but also to pinpoint the bonding configuration and the nature of the adsorbate

  19. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  20. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  1. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yongling; Bo, Maolin; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yonghui; Sun, Chang Q.; Huang, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O"2"− lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta"+ electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta"+; the sp"3-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent insight into the

  2. A facile method to prepare "green" nano-phosphors with a large Stokes-shift and solid-state enhanced photophysical properties based on surface-modified gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C H; Huang, H Y; Talite, M J; Chou, W C; Yeh, J M; Yuan, C T

    2017-12-15

    Colloidal nano-materials, such as quantum dots (QDs) have been applied to light-conversion nano-phosphors due to their unique tunable emission. However, most of the QDs involve toxic elements and are synthesized in a hazardous solvent. In addition, conventional QD nano-phosphors with a small Stokes shift suffered from reabsorption losses and aggregation-induced quenching in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate a facile, matrix-free method to prepare eco-friendly nano-phosphors with a large Stokes shift based on aqueous thiolate-stabilized gold nanoclusters (GSH-AuNCs) with simple surface modifications. Our method is just to drop GSH-AuNCs solution on the aluminum foil and then surface-modified AuNCs (Al-GSH-AuNCs) can be spontaneously precipitated out of the aqueous solution. Compared with pristine GSH-AuNCs in solution, the Al-GSH-AuNCs exhibit enhanced solid-state PL quantum yields, lengthened PL lifetime, and spectral blue shift, which can be attributed to the aggregation-induced emission enhancement facilitated by surface modifications. Such surface-treatment induced aggregation of AuNCs can restrict the surface-ligand motion, leading to the enhancement of PL properties in the solid state. In addition, the Al-GSH-AuNCs nano-phosphors with a large Stokes shift can mitigate the aggregation-induced PL quenching and reabsorption losses, which would be potential candidates for "green" nano-phosphors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shifting Sugars and Shifting Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    No organism lives in a constant environment. Based on classical studies in molecular biology, many have viewed microbes as following strict rules for shifting their metabolic activities when prevailing conditions change. For example, students learn that the bacterium Escherichia coli makes proteins for digesting lactose only when lactose is available and glucose, a better sugar, is not. However, recent studies, including three PLOS Biology papers examining sugar utilization in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, show that considerable heterogeneity in response to complex environments exists within and between populations. These results join similar recent results in other organisms that suggest that microbial populations anticipate predictable environmental changes and hedge their bets against unpredictable ones. The classical view therefore represents but one special case in a range of evolutionary adaptations to environmental changes that all organisms face. PMID:25688600

  4. Shifting sugars and shifting paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L Siegal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available No organism lives in a constant environment. Based on classical studies in molecular biology, many have viewed microbes as following strict rules for shifting their metabolic activities when prevailing conditions change. For example, students learn that the bacterium Escherichia coli makes proteins for digesting lactose only when lactose is available and glucose, a better sugar, is not. However, recent studies, including three PLOS Biology papers examining sugar utilization in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, show that considerable heterogeneity in response to complex environments exists within and between populations. These results join similar recent results in other organisms that suggest that microbial populations anticipate predictable environmental changes and hedge their bets against unpredictable ones. The classical view therefore represents but one special case in a range of evolutionary adaptations to environmental changes that all organisms face.

  5. Binding energies and chemical shifts of least bound core electron excitations in cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechstedt, F.; Enderlein, R.; Wischnewski, R.

    1981-01-01

    Core electron binding energies Esup(B) with respect to the vacuum level and their chemical shifts are calculated for the least bound core levels of cations and anions of cubic Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) semiconductors. Starting from the HF-binding energy of the free atom absolute values of Esup(B) are obtained by adding core level shifts and relaxation energies. Core level shifts are calculated by means of an electrostatic model with ionic and bond charges according to Phillips' bond charge model. For the calculation of relaxation energies the linear dielectric theory of electronic polarization is applied. Valence and core electrons, and diagonal and non-diagonal screening are taken into account. The theoretical results for chemical shifts of binding energies are compared with experimental values from XPS-measurements corrected by work function data. Good agreement is obtained in all cases within the error limit of about one eV. Chemical and atomic trends of core level shifts, relaxation energies, and binding energies are discussed in terms of changes of atomic and solid state parameters. Chemical shifts and relaxation energies are predicted for various ternary Asub(N)Bsub(8-N) compounds. (author)

  6. Dissociation dynamics of anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous SiCl4 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J M; Lu, K T; Lee, J M; Chou, T L; Chen, H C; Chen, S A; Haw, S C; Chen, T H

    2008-01-01

    The state-selective dissociation dynamics for anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous SiCl 4 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations were characterized by combining measurements of the photon-induced anionic dissociation, x-ray absorption and UV/visible dispersed fluorescence. The transitions of core electrons to high Rydberg states/doubly excited states in the vicinity of both Si 2p and Cl 2p ionization thresholds of gaseous SiCl 4 lead to a remarkably enhanced production of anionic, Si - and Cl - , fragments and excited neutral atomic, Si*, fragments. This enhancement via core-level excitation near the ionization threshold of gaseous SiCl 4 is explained in terms of the contributions from the Auger decay of doubly excited states, shake-modified resonant Auger decay, or/and post-collision interaction. These complementary results provide insight into the state-selective anionic and excited neutral fragmentation of gaseous molecules via core-level excitation.

  7. O 1s core levels in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmigiani, F.; Shen, Z.X.; Mitzi, D.B.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W.E.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1991-01-01

    High-quality Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ superconducting single crystals, annealed at different oxygen partial pressures, have been studied using angular-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with a resolution higher than that used in any previous study. Two states of the oxygen, separated by ∼0.7 eV, are unambiguously observed. Examining these components at different angles makes it possible to distinguish bulk from surface components. Using this capability we discover that annealing under lower oxygen partial pressure (1 atm) results in oxygen intercalation beneath the Bi-O surface layer of the crystal, whereas for higher-pressure anneals (12 atm) additional oxygen is found on the Bi-O surfaces. This steplike intercalation mechanism is also confirmed by the changes observed in the Cu and Bi core lines as a function of the annealing oxygen partial pressure

  8. Diamond surface: atomic and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of the diamond surface (with primary emphasis on the (111) surface) are presented. Aspects of the diamond surface which are addressed include (1) the electronic structure, (2) the atomic structure, and (3) the effect of termination of the lattice by foreign atoms. Limited studies of graphite are discussed for comparison with the diamond results. Experimental results from valence band and core level photoemission spectroscopy (PES), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and carbon 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy (both the total electron yield (TEY) and Auger electron yield (AEY) techniques) are used to study and characterize both the clean and hydrogenated surface. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen with the diamond surface is examined using results from vibrational high resolution low energy electron loss spectroscopy (in collaboration with Waclawski, Pierce, Swanson, and Celotta at the National Bureau of Standards) and photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) yield at photon energies near the carbon k-edge (hv greater than or equal to 280 eV). Both EELS and PSID verify that the mechanically polished 1 x 1 surface is hydrogen terminated and also that the reconstructed surface is hydrogen free. The (111) 2 x 2/2 x 1 reconstructed surface is obtained from the hydrogenated (111) 1 x 1:H surface by annealing to approx. = 1000 0 C. We observe occupied intrinsic surface states and a surface chemical shift (0.95 +- 0.1 eV) to lower binding energy of the carbon 1s level on the hydrogen-free reconstructed surface. Atomic hydrogen is found to be reactive with the reconstructed surface, while molecular hydrogen is relatively inert. Exposure of the reconstructed surface to atomic hydrogen results in chemisorption of hydrogen and removal of the intrinsic surface state emission in and near the band gap region

  9. Surface electromyographic evaluation of jaw muscles in children with unilateral crossbite and lateral shift in the early mixed dentition. Sexual dimorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenguas, Leticia; Alarcón, José-Antonio; Venancio, Filipa; Kassem, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the activity of jaw muscles at rest and during maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) in children with unilateral posterior crossbite (UPXB) and functional lateral shift in the early mixed dentition and to evaluate sex differences. Material and Methods: The sample included 30 children (15 males, 15 females) aged 6 to 10 years old, with UPXB and functional mandibular lateral shift (≥1.5 mm) in the early mixed dentition. sEMG activity coming from the muscle areas (anterior temporalis [AT], posterior temporalis [PT], masseter [MA] and suprahyoid [SH]) were obtained from both the crossbite (XB) and noncrossbite (NONXB) sides at mandibular rest position. sEMG acti-vity of the bilateral AT and MA muscles sides was obtained during MVC. Asymmetry and activity indexes were calculated for each muscle area at rest and during MVC; the MA/TA ratio during MVC was also determined. Results: At rest, no differences were found between sexes for any muscle areas or asymmetry and activity indexes. No differences were found between XB and NONXB sides. During MVC, however, significant sex differences were found in AT and MA activity, with higher sEMG values in males than in females, on both XB and NONXB sides. Asymmetry indexes, activity indexes and MA/AT ratios did not show significant differences between the sexes. Activity was symmetric both in males and in females. Conclusions: At rest, no sex differences were found, but during MVC males showed higher activity than did females in both XB and NONXB AT and MA muscle areas. Muscular activity was symmetrical at rest and during MVC in both sexes. Sexual dimorphism should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of UPXB and lateral shift in the early mixed dentition. Key words:Unilateral crossbite, mandibular shift, jaw muscles, sEMG, early mixed dentition. PMID:22926468

  10. Electronic properties of semiconductor surfaces and metal/semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallarida, M.

    2005-05-15

    This thesis reports investigations of the electronic properties of a semiconductor surface (silicon carbide), a reactive metal/semiconductor interface (manganese/silicon) and a non-reactive metal/semiconductor interface (aluminum-magnesium alloy/silicon). The (2 x 1) reconstruction of the 6H-SiC(0001) surface has been obtained by cleaving the sample along the (0001) direction. This reconstruction has not been observed up to now for this compound, and has been compared with those of similar elemental semiconductors of the fourth group of the periodic table. This comparison has been carried out by making use of photoemission spectroscopy, analyzing the core level shifts of both Si 2p and C 1s core levels in terms of charge transfer between atoms of both elements and in different chemical environments. From this comparison, a difference between the reconstruction on the Si-terminated and the C-terminated surface was established, due to the ionic nature of the Si-C bond. The growth of manganese films on Si(111) in the 1-5 ML thickness range has been studied by means of LEED, STM and photoemission spectroscopy. By the complementary use of these surface science techniques, two different phases have been observed for two thickness regimes (<1 ML and >1 ML), which exhibit a different electronic character. The two reconstructions, the (1 x 1)-phase and the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 -phase, are due to silicide formation, as observed in core level spectroscopy. The growth proceeds via island formation in the monolayer regime, while the thicker films show flat layers interrupted by deep holes. On the basis of STM investigations, this growth mode has been attributed to strain due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and the silicide. Co-deposition of Al and Mg onto a Si(111) substrate at low temperature (100K) resulted in the formation of thin alloy films. By varying the relative content of both elements, the thin films exhibited different electronic properties

  11. Surface modification by vacuum annealing for field emission from heavily phosphorus-doped homoepitaxial (1 1 1) diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Nebel, Christoph E.; Somu, Kumaragurubaran; Shikata, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between field emission properties and C 1s core level shifts of heavily phosphorus-doped homoepitaxial (1 1 1) diamond is investigated as a function of annealing temperature in order to optimize surface carbon bonding configurations for device applications. A low field emission threshold voltage is observed from surfaces annealed at 800 deg. C for hydrogen-plasma treated surface, while a low field emission threshold voltage of wet-chemical oxidized surface is observed after annealing at 900 deg. C. The C 1s core level by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed a shoulder peak at 1 eV below the main peak over 800 and 900 deg. C annealing temperature for hydrogen-plasma treated and wet-chemical oxidized surfaces, respectively. When the shoulder peak intensity is less than 10% of the main peak intensity, lower threshold voltages are observed. This is due to the carbon-reconstruction which gives rise to a small positive electron affinity. By increasing annealing temperature, the shoulder peak ratios also increase, which indicates that a surface graphitization takes place. This leads to higher threshold voltages

  12. The energies of formation and mobilities of Cu surface species on Cu and ZnO in methanol and water gas shift atmospheres studied by DFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Temel, Burcin

    2012-01-01

    Catalysts based on copper, such as the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 system are widely used for industrial scale methanol synthesis and the low temperature water gas shift reaction. A common characteristic of these catalysts is that they deactivate quite rapidly during operation and therefore understanding...... their deactivation by sintering is highly relevant. In this work, we study the nature of the species that are responsible for transport of the Cu metal in this catalyst type using density functional theory calculations within a chemical potential formalism. The stability and mobility of Cu–X (Cu, OH, CO, CH3O, HCOO...

  13. Shift of localized surface plasmon resonance by Ar-ion irradiation of Ag–Au bimetallic films deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xuan [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Yu, Ruixuan; Takayanagi, Shinya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Effects of Ar-ion induced surface nanostructuring were studied using 100 keV Ar-ion irradiation of 30 nm Ag–Au bimetallic films deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals, under irradiation fluences ranging from 5.0 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} to 6.3 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. Scanning electron microscope was used to study the ion-beam-induced surface nanostructuring. As the irradiation fluence increased, dewetting of the bimetallic films on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate was observed, and formation of isolated Ag–Au nanostructures sustained on the substrate were obtained. Next, thermal annealing was performed under high vacuum at 1073 K for 2 h; a layer of photosensitive Ag–Au alloy nanoballs partially embedded in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate was obtained when higher fluence irradiation (>3.8 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}) was used. The microstructures of the nanoballs were investigated using a transmission electron microscope, and the nanoballs were found to be single crystals with a FCC structure. In addition, photoabsorption spectra were measured, and localized surface plasmon resonance peaks were observed. With increase in the irradiation fluence, the size of the Ag–Au nanoballs on the substrate decreased, and a blue-shift of the LSPR peaks was observed. Further control of the LSPR frequency over a wide range was achieved by modifying the chemical components, and a red-shift of the LSPR peaks was observed as the Au concentration increased. In summary, ion irradiation is an effective approach toward surface nanostructuring, and the nanocomposites obtained have potential applications in optical devices.

  14. Interplay of intra-atomic and interatomic effects: An investigation of the 2p core level spectra of atomic Fe and molecular FeCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, T.; Wolff, T.; Zimmermann, P.; Godehusen, K.; Martins, M.

    2004-01-01

    The 2p photoabsorption and photoelectron spectra of atomic Fe and molecular FeCl 2 were studied by photoion and photoelectron spectroscopy using monochromatized synchrotron radiation and atomic or molecular beam technique. The atomic spectra were analyzed with configuration interaction calculations yielding excellent agreement between experiment and theory. For the analysis of the molecular photoelectron spectrum which shows pronounced interatomic effects, a charge transfer model was used, introducing an additional 3d 7 configuration. The resulting good agreement between the experimental and theoretical spectrum and the remarkable similarity of the molecular with the corresponding spectrum in the solid phase opens a way to a better understanding of the interplay of the interatomic and intra-atomic interactions in the 2p core level spectra of the 3d metal compounds

  15. Measurement of core level and band offsets at the interface of ITO/Hg_3In_2Te_6(1 1 0) heterojunction by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yapeng; Fu, Li; Sun, Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash; Wang, Jia-ou

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The valence band maximum of ITO film and MIT were measured to be 1.6 eV and 0.6 eV, respectively. • The concentration of In element presented a trend of increasing first and then decreasing from MIT to ITO. • The valence band offsets of the ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction was confirmed to be a type-II band alignment phenomenon. - Abstract: The Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) film was deposited on the surface of Hg_3In_2Te_6 (short for MIT) (1 1 0) for the fabrication of ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction by using the pulsed laser deposition method. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to examine the band offsets and core level of ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunctions. The result showed that the valence band maximum of ITO films and MIT(1 1 0) were 1.6 eV and 0.6 eV, respectively. Meanwhile, it was found that the binding energy of Te 3d, Sn 3d and Hg 4f remained unchanged during the ITO deposition process. However, the binding energy of O 1s and In 3d_5_/_2 increased about 0.3 eV and 0.2 eV, respectively, with the thickness increasing of ITO film from 3.5 nm to 5 nm. This may due to the elements diffusion at the interface region during the film growing process. According to the core level spectrum, it can be speculated that no significant chemical reaction occurred at the interface of ITO/MIT(1 1 0). In addition, the valence band offset of the ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction can be calculated to be −1 ± 0.15 eV by the means of the photoelectron spectroscopy methods. The conduction band offset is deduced to be −3.96 ± 0.15 eV from the known valence band offset value, indicating that the band offsets of ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction is a type-II band alignment.

  16. Measurement of core level and band offsets at the interface of ITO/Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6}(1 1 0) heterojunction by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yapeng [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Fu, Li, E-mail: fuli@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Sun, Jie [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Ibrahim, Kurash; Wang, Jia-ou [Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • The valence band maximum of ITO film and MIT were measured to be 1.6 eV and 0.6 eV, respectively. • The concentration of In element presented a trend of increasing first and then decreasing from MIT to ITO. • The valence band offsets of the ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction was confirmed to be a type-II band alignment phenomenon. - Abstract: The Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) film was deposited on the surface of Hg{sub 3}In{sub 2}Te{sub 6} (short for MIT) (1 1 0) for the fabrication of ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction by using the pulsed laser deposition method. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to examine the band offsets and core level of ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunctions. The result showed that the valence band maximum of ITO films and MIT(1 1 0) were 1.6 eV and 0.6 eV, respectively. Meanwhile, it was found that the binding energy of Te 3d, Sn 3d and Hg 4f remained unchanged during the ITO deposition process. However, the binding energy of O 1s and In 3d{sub 5/2} increased about 0.3 eV and 0.2 eV, respectively, with the thickness increasing of ITO film from 3.5 nm to 5 nm. This may due to the elements diffusion at the interface region during the film growing process. According to the core level spectrum, it can be speculated that no significant chemical reaction occurred at the interface of ITO/MIT(1 1 0). In addition, the valence band offset of the ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction can be calculated to be −1 ± 0.15 eV by the means of the photoelectron spectroscopy methods. The conduction band offset is deduced to be −3.96 ± 0.15 eV from the known valence band offset value, indicating that the band offsets of ITO/MIT(1 1 0) heterojunction is a type-II band alignment.

  17. Micropatch Antenna Phase Shifting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thursby, Michael

    2000-01-01

    .... We have been looking at the ability of embedded element to adjust the phase shift seen by the element with the goal of being able to remove the phase shifting devices from the antenna and replace...

  18. Micropatch Antenna Phase Shifting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thursby, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... We have been looking at the ability of embedded element to adjust the phase shift seen by the element wit the goal of being able to remove the phase shifting devices from the antenna and replace...

  19. OpenShift Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rodriguez Peon, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Workshop to introduce developers to the OpenShift platform available at CERN. Several use cases will be shown, including deploying an existing application into OpenShift. We expect attendees to realize about OpenShift features and general architecture of the service.

  20. Element-specific and site-specific ion desorption from adsorbed molecules by deep core-level photoexcitation at the K-edges

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, Y H

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews our recent works on the ion desorption from adsorbed and condensed molecules at low temperature following the core-level photoexcitations using synchrotron soft x-rays. The systems investigated here are adsorbed molecules with relatively heavy molecular weight containing third-row elements such as Si, P, S, and Cl. Compared with molecules composed of second-row elements, the highly element-specific and site-specific fragment-ion desorption were observed when we tune the photon energy at the dipole-allowed 1s -> sigma sup * (3p sup *) resonance. On the basis of the resonance Auger decay spectra around the 1s ionization thresholds, the observed highly specific ion desorption is interpreted by the localization of the excited electrons (here we call as 'spectator electrons') in the antibonding sigma sup * orbital. In order to separate the direct photo-induced process from the indirect processes triggered by the secondary electrons, the photon-stimulated ion desorption was also investigated in...

  1. Core-level XPS studies of Ce and La intermetallic compounds and their implications for the 4f levels of Ce compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiburg, C.; Fuggle, J.C.; Hillebrecht, F.U.; Zolnierek, Z.; Laesser, R.

    1983-01-01

    The 3d core hole X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of approximately 30 intermetallic compounds of La and Ce are reported. Transitions to final states with approximately f 0 , f 1 and f 2 character are observed in some Ce compounds (f 0 and f 1 for La compounds). The results are discussed in terms of the current ideas of the influence of f-counts and f-levels hybridization on core level lineshapes. We cannot find an explanatoin of the observed spectra consisted with the ''promotial model'' where the 4f-count varies and 4f electron was thought to be entirely promoted to the Ce 5d6s valence bands in some compounds. There may be some small charge transfer from the f level, however. In conjunction with ideas on screening processes in XPS the observed lineshapes suggest coupling of the 4f electrons to other states is strongest in those compounds previously thought to have f 0 character. This coupling increases despite a large increase in the Ce-Ce distance when Ce is diluted with Ni or Pd. Thus it cannot be due to direct f-f interaction and must be attributed to coupling with the other valence electrons; possibly those centred on the partner sites. (orig./EZ) [de

  2. Quantitative study of the f-occupation in CeMIn{sub 5} and other cerium compounds with hard X-ray core level photo emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, Martin; Strigari, Fabio; Willers, Thomas; Severing, Andrea [University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Weinen, Jonas; Tjeng, Liu Hao [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Liao, Yen-Fa; Tsuei, Ku-Ding [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu (China); Bauer, Eric D.; Sarrao, John L.; Thompson, Joe D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States); Lejay, Pascal [Institut NEEL, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Tanaka, Arata [Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    Bulk-sensitive hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) data of the Ce3d core levels of the CeMIn{sub 5} family with M = Co, Rh, and Ir will be presented. The data analysis combines a full multiplet and configuration interaction model so that the strong plasmons intensities can be corrected for. This way spectral f{sup n} weights can be extracted and the configuration interaction model yields quantitative values for the initial state f-occupation of the CeMIn{sub 5}. The results are compared with HAXPES data of other heavy Ce compounds of very different hybridization strength. A systematic decrease of the hybridization strength V{sub eff} from CePd{sub 3} to CeRh{sub 3}B{sub 2} to CeRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is observed, and it is smallest for the three CeMIn{sub 5} compounds. The f-occupation increases in the same sequence and is close to one for the CeMIn{sub 5} family.

  3. Free Surface Properties of III-V Compound Semiconductor Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    selvage. Most important is the fact that atomic displacements also occur up to two layers into the substrate in the IaSb (ll0) selvage, presumably because of...result is that the interaction is of a disordering nature. 1 2,1 3 We took LEED measurements for a very large range of exposure to molecular oxygen (103...which the Al replaces the Ga. Arguments in favor of this reaction are given by measured photoemission peak shifts: 1 8󈧗 the Ga 3-d core level shifts

  4. Deduction of the chemical state and the electronic structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core-level and valence-band spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Le [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Lanting, E-mail: lantingzh@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Hirano Institute for Materials Innovation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sun, Limin, E-mail: lantingzh@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: lmsun@sjtu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Hirano, Shinichi [Hirano Institute for Materials Innovation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-10-28

    Characterization of chemical state and electronic structure of the technologically important Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is attractive for understanding the physical nature of its excellent magnetic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of such rare-earth compound is important and also challenging due to the easy oxidation of surface and small photoelectron cross-sections of rare-earth 4f electrons and B 2p electrons, etc. Here, we reported an investigation based on XPS spectra of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound as a function of Ar ion sputtering time. The chemical state of Fe and that of B in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound can be clearly determined to be 0 and −3, respectively. The Nd in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is found to have the chemical state of close to +3 instead of +3 as compared with the Nd in Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, by comparing the valence-band spectrum of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound to that of the pure Fe, the contributions from Nd, Fe, and B to the valence-band structure of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound is made more clear. The B 2p states and B 2s states are identified to be at ∼11.2 eV and ∼24.6 eV, respectively, which is reported for the first time. The contribution from Nd 4f states can be identified both in XPS core-level spectrum and XPS valence-band spectrum. Although Nd 4f states partially hybridize with Fe 3d states, Nd 4f states are mainly localized in Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compound.

  5. Choice Shifts in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kfir Eliaz; Debraj Ray

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of "choice shifts" in group decision-making is fairly ubiquitous in the social psychology literature. Faced with a choice between a ``safe" and ``risky" decision, group members appear to move to one extreme or the other, relative to the choices each member might have made on her own. Both risky and cautious shifts have been identified in different situations. This paper demonstrates that from an individual decision-making perspective, choice shifts may be viewed as a systematic...

  6. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  7. Insomnia in shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Annie; Azaiez, Aïda; Moreau, Vincent; LeBlanc, Mélanie; Morin, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Shift work disorder involves insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness associated with the work schedule. The present study examined the impact of insomnia on the perceived physical and psychological health of adults working on night and rotating shift schedules compared to day workers. A total of 418 adults (51% women, mean age 41.4 years), including 51 night workers, 158 rotating shift workers, and 209 day workers were selected from an epidemiological study. An algorithm was used to classify each participant of the two groups (working night or rotating shifts) according to the presence or absence of insomnia symptoms. Each of these individuals was paired with a day worker according to gender, age, and income. Participants completed several questionnaires measuring sleep, health, and psychological variables. Night and rotating shift workers with insomnia presented a sleep profile similar to that of day workers with insomnia. Sleep time was more strongly related to insomnia than to shift work per se. Participants with insomnia in the three groups complained of anxiety, depression, and fatigue, and reported consuming equal amounts of sleep-aid medication. Insomnia also contributed to chronic pain and otorhinolaryngology problems, especially among rotating shift workers. Work productivity and absenteeism were more strongly related to insomnia. The present study highlights insomnia as an important component of the sleep difficulties experienced by shift workers. Insomnia may exacerbate certain physical and mental health problems of shift workers, and impair their quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Near surface silicide formation after off-normal Fe-implantation of Si(001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbabaee, B., E-mail: khanbabaee@physik.uni-siegen.de; Pietsch, U. [Solid State Physics, University of Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D. [Fachbereich C - Physik, Bergische Universität Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Hübner, R.; Grenzer, J.; Facsko, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    We report on formation of non-crystalline Fe-silicides of various stoichiometries below the amorphized surface of crystalline Si(001) after irradiation with 5 keV Fe{sup +} ions under off-normal incidence. We examined samples prepared with ion fluences of 0.1 × 10{sup 17} and 5 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2} exhibiting a flat and patterned surface morphology, respectively. Whereas the iron silicides are found across the whole surface of the flat sample, they are concentrated at the top of ridges at the rippled surface. A depth resolved analysis of the chemical states of Si and Fe atoms in the near surface region was performed by combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The chemical shift and the line shape of the Si 2p core levels and valence bands were measured and associated with the formation of silicide bonds of different stoichiometric composition changing from an Fe-rich silicides (Fe{sub 3}Si) close to the surface into a Si-rich silicide (FeSi{sub 2}) towards the inner interface to the Si(001) substrate. This finding is supported by XAS analysis at the Fe K-edge which shows changes of the chemical environment and the near order atomic coordination of the Fe atoms in the region close to surface. Because a similar Fe depth profile has been found for samples co-sputtered with Fe during Kr{sup +} ion irradiation, our results suggest the importance of chemically bonded Fe in the surface region for the process of ripple formation.

  9. Blue and red shifted temperature dependence of implicit phonon shifts in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Sarita; Jindal, V. K.

    2017-07-01

    We have calculated the implicit shift for various modes of frequency in a pure graphene sheet. Thermal expansion and Grüneisen parameter which are required for implicit shift calculation have already been studied and reported. For this calculation, phonon frequencies are obtained using force constants derived from dynamical matrix calculated using VASP code where the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) is used in interface with phonopy software. The implicit phonon shift shows an unusual behavior as compared to the bulk materials. The frequency shift is large negative (red shift) for ZA and ZO modes and the value of negative shift increases with increase in temperature. On the other hand, blue shift arises for all other longitudinal and transverse modes with a similar trend of increase with increase in temperature. The q dependence of phonon shifts has also been studied. Such simultaneous red and blue shifts in transverse or out plane modes and surface modes, respectively leads to speculation of surface softening in out of plane direction in preference to surface melting.

  10. Shifted Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2007-01-01

    Delayed mixing is a problem of theoretical interest and practical importance, e.g., in speech processing, bio-medical signal analysis and financial data modelling. Most previous analyses have been based on models with integer shifts, i.e., shifts by a number of samples, and have often been carried...

  11. Homogeneous bilateral block shifts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Douglas class were classified in [3]; they are unilateral block shifts of arbitrary block size (i.e. dim H(n) can be anything). However, no examples of irreducible homogeneous bilateral block shifts of block size larger than 1 were known until now.

  12. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  13. Josephson shift registers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybysz, J.X.

    1989-01-01

    This paper gives a review of Josephson shift register circuits that were designed, fabricated, or tested, with emphasis on work in the 1980s. Operating speed is most important, since it often limits system performance. Older designs used square-wave clocks, but most modern designs use offset sine waves, with either two or three phases. Operating margins and gate bias uniformity are key concerns. The fastest measured Josephson shift register operated at 2.3 GHz, which compares well with a GaAs shift register that consumes 250 times more power. The difficulties of high-speed testing have prevented many Josephson shift registers from being operated at their highest speeds. Computer simulations suggest that 30-GHz operation is possible with current Nb/Al 2 O 3 /Nb technology. Junctions with critical current densities near 10 kA/cm 2 would make 100-GHz shift registers feasible

  14. Understanding and controlling chromaticity shift in LED devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Perkins, Curtis; Bobashev, Georgiy; Young, Joseph; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina

    2017-05-30

    Chromaticity shift in light-emitting diode (LED) devices arises from multiple mechanisms, and at least five different chromaticity shift modes (CSMs) have been identified to date. This paper focuses on the impacts of irreversible phosphor degradation as a cause of chromaticity shifts in LED devices. The nitride phosphors used to produce warm white LEDs are especially vulnerable to degradation due to thermal and chemical effects such as reactions with oxygen and water. As a result, LED devices utilizing these phosphors were found to undergo either a green shift or, less commonly, a red shift depending on the phosphor mix in the LED devices. These types of chromaticity shifts are classified as CSM-2 (green shift) and CSM-5 (red shift). This paper provides an overview of the kinetic processes responsible for green and red chromaticity shifts along with examples from accelerated stress testing of 6” downlights. Both CSMs appear to proceed through analogous mechanisms that are initiated at the surface of the phosphor. A green shift is produced by the surface oxidation of the nitride phosphor that changes the emission profile to lower wavelengths. As the surface oxidation reaction proceeds, reactant limitations slow the rate and bulk oxidation processes become more prevalent. We found that a red chromaticity shift arises from quenching of the green phosphor, also possibly due to surface reactions of oxygen, which shift the emission chromaticity in the red direction. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of these findings on projecting chromaticity.

  15. Defective pyrite (100) surface: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andras; Bernasconi, Marco; Parrinello, Michele

    2007-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of sulfur monomeric defects at the FeS 2 (100) surface have been studied by periodic density-functional calculations. We have shown that for a monomeric sulfur bound to an originally fivefold coordinated surface Fe site, the defect core features a triplet electronic ground state with unpaired spins localized on the exposed Fe-S unit. At this site, the iron and sulfur ions have oxidation states +4 and -2, respectively. This defect can be seen as produced via heterolytic bond breaking of the S-S sulfur dimer followed by a Fe-S redox reaction. The calculated sulfur 2p core-level shifts of the monomeric defects are in good agreement with experimental photoemission spectra, which allow a compelling assignment of the different spectroscopic features. The effect of water on the stability of the defective surface has also been studied, and it has been shown that the triplet state is stable against the wetting of the surface. The most important implications of the presence of the monomeric sulfur defect on the reactivity are also discussed

  16. Nurses' shift reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Hoeck, Bente; Hamilton, Bridget Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify reporting practices that feature in studies of nurses' shift reports across diverse nursing specialities. The objectives were to perform an exhaustive systematic literature search and to critically review the quality and findings of qualitative field studies...... of nurses' shift reports. BACKGROUND: Nurses' shift reports are routine occurrences in healthcare organisations that are viewed as crucial for patient outcomes, patient safety and continuity of care. Studies of communication between nurses attend primarily to 1:1 communication and analyse the adequacy...... and accuracy of patient information and feature handovers at the bedside. Still, verbal reports between groups of nurses about patients are commonplace. Shift reports are obvious sites for studying the situated accomplishment of professional nursing at the group level. This review is focused exclusively...

  17. Shift Verification and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Tara M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Evans, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davidson, Gregory G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnson, Seth R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Godfrey, Andrew T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-07

    This documentation outlines the verification and validation of Shift for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Five main types of problems were used for validation: small criticality benchmark problems; full-core reactor benchmarks for light water reactors; fixed-source coupled neutron-photon dosimetry benchmarks; depletion/burnup benchmarks; and full-core reactor performance benchmarks. We compared Shift results to measured data and other simulated Monte Carlo radiation transport code results, and found very good agreement in a variety of comparison measures. These include prediction of critical eigenvalue, radial and axial pin power distributions, rod worth, leakage spectra, and nuclide inventories over a burn cycle. Based on this validation of Shift, we are confident in Shift to provide reference results for CASL benchmarking.

  18. Electron spectroscopy studies of surface In-Ag alloy formation on the tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukaluk, A.; Trzcinski, M.; Okulewicz, K.

    2008-01-01

    XPS and UPS investigations of ultrathin films of In/Ag and Ag/In, deposited onto the W(1 1 0) surface in the ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed. Indium and silver films were formed by 'in-situ' evaporation on W(1 1 0) substrate. XPS and UPS studies have been performed by means of SCIENTA ESCA200 instrument. The changes of In4d core-level and Ag4d valence band emissions with increasing Ag and In coverage were monitored to observe the energy shift and shape of the spin-orbit doublet of In4d and Ag4d lines in the Ag/In/W and In/Ag/W systems. UPS (HeI and HeII) measurements were supported by XPS AlK α measurements of In3d and W4p levels, as well as by investigations of Ag3d levels. XPS and UPS data allowed to evaluate the coverage and make conclusions concerning intermixing and surface alloying in the In/Ag/W and Ag/In/W systems. W(1 1 0) substrate can be cleaned after each deposition by thermal desorption and no alloying in the In/W and Ag/W systems is observed

  19. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  20. Water-Gas Shift and CO Methanation Reactions over Ni-CeO2(111) Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Senanayake; J Evans; S Agnoli; L Barrio; T Chen; J Hrbek; J Rodriguez

    2011-12-31

    X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the interaction of Ni atoms with CeO{sub 2}(111) surfaces. Upon adsorption on CeO{sub 2}(111) at 300 K, nickel remains in a metallic state. Heating to elevated temperatures (500-800 K) leads to partial reduction of the ceria substrate with the formation of Ni{sup 2+} species that exists as NiO and/or Ce{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}O{sub 2-y}. Interactions of nickel with the oxide substrate significantly reduce the density of occupied Ni 3d states near the Fermi level. The results of core-level photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure point to weakly bound CO species on CeO{sub 2}(111) which are clearly distinguishable from the formation of chemisorbed carbonates. In the presence of Ni, a stronger interaction is observed with chemisorption of CO on the admetal. When the Ni is in contact with Ce{sup +3} cations, CO dissociates on the surface at 300 K forming NiC{sub x} compounds that may be involved in the formation of CH{sub 4} at higher temperatures. At medium and large Ni coverages (>0.3 ML), the Ni/CeO{sub 2}(111) surfaces are able to catalyze the production of methane from CO and H{sub 2}, with an activity slightly higher than that of Ni(100) or Ni(111). On the other hand, at small coverages of Ni (<0.3 ML), the Ni/CeO{sub 2}(111) surfaces exhibit a very low activity for CO methanation but are very good catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction.

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of β-BaB2O4 optical surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Kesler, V.G.; Kokh, A.E.; Pokrovsky, L.D.

    2004-01-01

    An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study has been performed for (0 0 1) BaB 2 O 4 . The crystal surface has been polished mechanically and cleaned by chemical etching. In XPS observation, depth profiling has been produced by sputtering with Ar + 3 keV ions. Photoelectron binding energies of original element core levels and valence band have been measured as a function of sputtering time. The persistence of binding energies of barium and boron core levels and valence band structure has been found. For O 1 s core level the formation of new spectral components with lower binding energies has been revealed

  2. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1981-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drivemechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displayer rods through the reactor vessel

  3. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.G.; Wilson, J.F.; Salton, R.B.; Fensterer, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements from the reactor core for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The apparatus includes drive mechanisms for moving the displacer elements relative to the core and guide mechanisms for guiding the displacer rods through the reactor vessel. (author)

  4. Communication: Systematic shifts of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital peak in x-ray absorption for a series of 3d metal porphyrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Cook, P. L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Porphyrins are widely used as dye molecules in solar cells. Knowing the energies of their frontier orbitals is crucial for optimizing the energy level structure of solar cells. We use near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to obtain the energy of the lowest unoccupied...... molecular orbital (LUMO) with respect to the N-1s core level of the molecule. A systematic energy shift of the N-1s to LUMO transition is found along a series of 3d metal octaethylporphyrins and explained by density functional theory. It is mainly due to a shift of the N-1s level rather than a shift...

  5. Chemical Speciation and Bond Lengths of Organic Solutes by Core-Level Spectroscopy: pH and Solvent Influence on p-Aminobenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Gainar, Adrian; Suljoti, Edlira; Xiao, Jie; Golnak, Ronny; Aziz, Emad F; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-05-04

    Through X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, the chemical, electronic and structural properties of organic species in solution can be observed. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the nitrogen K-edge of para-aminobenzoic acid reveal both pH- and solvent-dependent variations in the ionisation potential (IP), 1s→π* resonances and HOMO-LUMO gap. These changes unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic or anionic) present in solution. It is shown how this incisive chemical state sensitivity is further enhanced by the possibility of quantitative bond length determination, based on the analysis of chemical shifts in IPs and σ* shape resonances in the NEXAFS spectra. This provides experimental access to detecting even minor variations in the molecular structure of solutes in solution, thereby providing an avenue to examining computational predictions of solute properties and solute-solvent interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  7. Lung function studies before and after a work shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, R G

    1983-05-01

    The lung function of 23 underground coal workers and eight surface workers at a Scottish colliery was measured immediately before and after a work shift. Changes in lung function were assessed in relation to the measured respirable dust exposure and the time of day in which the shift was worked. Large, and statistically significant, decrements of lung function during the shift were found in night-shift workers compared with workers on other shifts. Measurements derived from the forced expiratory manoeuvre, particularly FEV1, Vmax50, and Vmax25, after three vital capacity breaths of an 80% He/20% O2 mixture, showed large reductions in night-shift men, smaller reductions in afternoon-shift men, and small increases or decreases in morning-shift underground and surface workers. Within-shift changes for other tests, such as closing volume, N2 index, and volume of isoflow, did not differ significantly between shifts. No significant relationship was found between dust exposure and functional changes during a shift for any test. Lung function changes in a control group of 25 female workers not exposed to dust (hospital nurses) did not show the same large variations between day and night shifts. Examination of a further control group of 16 office workers did not show any difference in diurnal changes between smokers and non-smokers. It is concluded that these coal miners, even on permanent shift patterns, had widely different changes in their lung function cycle depending on which shift they were working. These changes did not appear to be related to dust exposure or cigarette smoking and were not consistent with other biological adaptations known to result from regular night-shift working.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of {beta}-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} optical surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Kesler, V.G.; Kokh, A.E.; Pokrovsky, L.D

    2004-02-29

    An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study has been performed for (0 0 1) BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The crystal surface has been polished mechanically and cleaned by chemical etching. In XPS observation, depth profiling has been produced by sputtering with Ar{sup +} 3 keV ions. Photoelectron binding energies of original element core levels and valence band have been measured as a function of sputtering time. The persistence of binding energies of barium and boron core levels and valence band structure has been found. For O 1 s core level the formation of new spectral components with lower binding energies has been revealed.

  9. Surface and bulk 4f-photoemission spectra of CeIn3 and CeSn3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Tjernberg, O.; Chiaia, G.; Kumigashira, H.; Takahashi, T.; Duo, L.; Sakai, O.; Kasaya, M.; Lindau, I.

    1997-01-01

    Resonant photoemission spectroscopy was performed on CeIn 3 and CeSn 3 at the 4d-4f and 3d-4f core thresholds. Using the different surface sensitivity between the two photon energies, surface and bulk 4f-photoemission spectra were derived for both compounds. With the noncrossing approximation of the Anderson impurity model, the 4d-4f resonant spectra together with the surface and bulk spectra were self-consistently analyzed to obtain the microscopic parameters such as the 4f-electron energy and the hybridization strength with conduction electrons. The result shows a substantial difference in these parameters between the surface and the bulk, indicating that it is important to take into account the surface effect in analyzing photoemission spectra of Ce compounds. It is also found that the 4f surface core-level shift is different between CeIn 3 and CeSn 3 . copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  10. Size and alloying induced shift in core and valence bands of Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Govind

    2014-01-01

    In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been carried out on Pd, Ag, Cu, Pd-Ag, and Pd-Cu nanoparticles having identical sizes corresponding to mobility equivalent diameters of 60, 40, and 20 nm. The nanoparticles were prepared by the gas phase synthesis method. The effect of size on valence and core levels in metal and alloy nanoparticles has been studied by comparing the values to those with the 60 nm nanoparticles. The effect of alloying has been investigated by comparing the valence and core level binding energies of Pd-Cu and Pd-Ag alloy nanoparticles with the corresponding values for Pd, Ag, and Cu nanoparticles of identical sizes. These effects have been explained in terms of size induced lattice contractions, alloying induced charge transfer, and hybridization effects. The observation of alloying and size induced binding energy shifts in bimetallic nanoparticles is important from the point of view of hydrogen reactivity

  11. The shifting beverage landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Maureen

    2010-04-26

    STOREY, M.L. The shifting beverage landscape. PHYSIOL BEHAV, 2010. - Simultaneous lifestyle changes have occurred in the last few decades, creating an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure that has led to overweight and obesity. Trends in the food supply show that total daily calories available per capita increased 28% since 1970. Total energy intake among men and women has also increased dramatically since that time. Some have suggested that intake of beverages has had a disproportional impact on obesity. Data collected by the Beverage Marketing Corporation between 1988-2008 demonstrate that, in reality, fewer calories per ounce are being produced by the beverage industry. Moreover, data from the National Cancer Institute show that soft drink intake represents 5.5% of daily calories. Data from NHANES 1999-2003 vs. 2003-06 may demonstrate a shift in beverage consumption for age/gender groups, ages 6 to>60years. The beverages provided in schools have significantly changed since 2006 when the beverage industry implemented School Beverage Guidelines. This voluntary action has removed full-calorie soft drinks from participating schools across the country. This shift to lower-calorie and smaller-portion beverages in school has led to a significant decrease in total beverage calories in schools. These data support the concept that to prevent and treat obesity, public health efforts should focus on energy balance and that a narrow focus on sweetened beverages is unlikely to have any meaningful impact on this complex problem. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.; George, R.A.; Dollard, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift arrangement for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a plurality of reactor coolant displacer members which are inserted into a reactor core at the beginning of the core life to reduce the volume of reactor coolant-moderator in the core at start-up. However, as the reactivity of the core declines with fuel depletion, selected displacer members are withdrawn from the core at selected time intervals to increase core moderation at a time when fuel reactivity is declining. (author)

  13. Spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, W.R.; Piplica, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    A spectral shift pressurized water reactor comprising apparatus for inserting and withdrawing water displacer elements having differing neutron absorbing capabilities for selectively changing the water-moderator volume in the core thereby changing the reactivity of the core. The displacer elements comprise substantially hollow cylindrical low neutron absorbing rods and substantially hollow cylindrical thick walled stainless rods. Since the stainless steel displacer rods have greater neutron absorbing capability, they can effect greater reactivity change per rod. However, by arranging fewer stainless steel displacer rods in a cluster, the reactivity worth of the stainless steel displacer rod cluster can be less than a low neutron absorbing displacer rod cluster. (author)

  14. Formation of a silicon terminated (100) diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, Alex; Sear, Michael; Pakes, Chris; Tadich, Anton; O'Donnell, Kane M.; Ley, Lothar; Stacey, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    We report the preparation of an ordered silicon terminated diamond (100) surface with a two domain 3 × 1 reconstruction as determined by low energy electron diffraction. Based on the dimensions of the surface unit cell and on chemical information provided by core level photoemission spectra, a model for the structure is proposed. The termination should provide a homogeneous, nuclear, and electron spin-free surface for the development of future near-surface diamond quantum device architectures

  15. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  16. Origins of Stokes shift in PbS nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Levina, Larissa; Fan, Feng-Jia; Walters, Grant; Fan, James Z.; Kiani, Amirreza; Ip, Alexander H.; Thon, Susanna M.; Proppe, Andrew; Liu, Mengxia; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    shift of up to 200 meV is observed, substantially larger than the estimates of dark-bright state splitting or vibronic relaxations. The shift origin remains highly debated, as contradictory signatures of both surface and bulk character were reported

  17. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... night. Good daytime sleep is possible, though, if shift work is a necessary part of your work life. ... mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/expert-answers/shift-work/faq-20057991 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  18. Shifts of integration variable within four- and N-dimensional Feynman integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, V.; McKeon, G.; Mann, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    We resolve inconsistencies between integration in four dimensions, where shifts of integration variable may lead to surface terms, and dimensional regularization, where no surface terms accompany such shifts, by showing that surface terms arise only for discrete values of the dimension parameter. General formulas for variable-of-integration shifts within N-dimensional Feynman integrals are presented, and the VVA triangle anomaly is interpreted as a manifestation of surface terms occurring in exactly four dimensions

  19. Lanthanide shift reagents, binding, shift mechanisms and exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.W.M. de

    1977-01-01

    Paramagnetic lanthanide shift reagents, when added to a solution of a substrate, induce shifts in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the substrate molecules. The induced shifts contain information about the structure of the shift reagent substrate complex. The structural information, however, may be difficult to extract because of the following effects: (1) different complexes between shift reagent and substrate may be present in solution, e.g. 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, and the shift observed is a weighed average of the shifts of the substrate nuclei in the different complexes; (2) the Fermi contact interaction, arising from the spin density at the nucleus, contributes to the induced shift; (3) chemical exchange effects may complicate the NMR spectrum. In this thesis, the results of an investigation into the influence of these effects on the NMR spectra of solutions containing a substrate and LSR are presented. The equations describing the pseudo contact and the Fermi contact shift are derived. In addition, it is shown how the modified Bloch equations describing the effect of the chemical exchange processes occurring in the systems studied can be reduced to the familiar equations for a two-site exchange case. The binding of mono- and bifunctional ethers to the shift reagent are reported. An analysis of the induced shifts is given. Finally, the results of the experiments performed to study the exchange behavior of dimethoxyethane and heptafluorodimethyloctanedionato ligands are presented

  20. Faktor Dan Penjadualan Shift Kerja

    OpenAIRE

    Maurits, Lientje Setyawati; Widodo, Imam Djati

    2008-01-01

    Work shift has negative effect in physical and mental health, work performance and job accident. Disturbance of circadian rhythms is indicated as source of the problems. This article explores some researches related to the impacts of work shift and establishes basic principles of work shift scheduling that considers human need and limitation.

  1. Isotope shifting capacity of rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattner, P.; Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt

    1980-01-01

    Any oxygen isotope shifted rock volume exactly defines a past throughput of water. An expression is derived that relates the throughput of an open system to the isotope shift of reservoir rock and present-day output. The small isotope shift of Ngawha reservoir rock and the small, high delta oxygen-18 output are best accounted for by a magmatic water source

  2. The shift in windpower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gipe, P.

    1992-01-01

    Despite new production records, the near-term market for new windpower projects in the US remains bleak. Congressional incentives and project proposals in the mid-1990s offer promise, but for now most development has shifted to Europe. During 1992 and 1993 the largest wind projects developed by US companies will not be in the US, but in the United Kingdom and Spain. Indeed, most of the US's windpower industry is going abroad, establishing offices overseas. This move toward Europe comes as little surprise. New project development for US firms has faltered at home while the European market has burgeoned. The topics of the article include the move to Europe, a reduction in California's share of producing wind power plants, a rise in Europe's share of producing wind power plants, the future market for wind power in the US, and reawakening California's market

  3. Mercury's shifting, rolling past

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of scalloped-edged cliffs or lobate scarps on Mercury's surface are thrust faults that are consistent with the planet shrinking and cooling with time. However, compression occurred in the planet's early history and Mariner 10 images revealed decades ago that lobate scarps are among the youngest features on Mercury. Why don't we find more evidence of older compressive features?

  4. Chemical shift imaging: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brateman, L.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical shift is the phenomenon that is seen when an isotope possessing a nuclear magnetic dipole moment resonates at a spectrum of resonance frequencies in a given magnetic field. These resonance frequencies, or chemical shifts, depend on the chemical environments of particular nuclei. Mapping the spatial distribution of nuclei associated with a particular chemical shift (e.g., hydrogen nuclei associated with water molecules or with lipid groups) is called chemical shift imaging. Several techniques of proton chemical shift imaging that have been applied in vivo are presented, and their clinical findings are reported and summarized. Acquiring high-resolution spectra for large numbers of volume elements in two or three dimensions may be prohibitive because of time constraints, but other methods of imaging lipid of water distributions (i.e., selective excitation, selective saturation, or variations in conventional magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences) can provide chemical shift information. These techniques require less time, but they lack spectral information. Since fat deposition seen by chemical shift imaging may not be demonstrated by conventional magnetic resonance imaging, certain applications of chemical shift imaging, such as in the determination of fatty liver disease, have greater diagnostic utility than conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, edge artifacts caused by chemical shift effects can be eliminated by certain selective methods of data acquisition employed in chemical shift imaging

  5. Chemical shift homology in proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potts, Barbara C.M.; Chazin, Walter J.

    1998-01-01

    The degree of chemical shift similarity for homologous proteins has been determined from a chemical shift database of over 50 proteins representing a variety of families and folds, and spanning a wide range of sequence homologies. After sequence alignment, the similarity of the secondary chemical shifts of C α protons was examined as a function of amino acid sequence identity for 37 pairs of structurally homologous proteins. A correlation between sequence identity and secondary chemical shift rmsd was observed. Important insights are provided by examining the sequence identity of homologous proteins versus percentage of secondary chemical shifts that fall within 0.1 and 0.3 ppm thresholds. These results begin to establish practical guidelines for the extent of chemical shift similarity to expect among structurally homologous proteins

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and binding energies of Be 1s and O 1s core levels in clinobarylite, BaBe2Si2O7, from Khibiny massif, Kola peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuchin, V.V.; Kesler, V.G.; Sapozhnikov, V.K.; Yakovenchuk, V.N.

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structure of BaBe 2 Si 2 O 7 , clinobarylite, has been investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence band of the crystal is mainly formed by Ba 5p, Ba 3s and O 2s states. At higher binding energies the emission lines related to the Si 2p, Be 1s, Si 2s, O 1s and numerous Ba-related states were analyzed in the photoemission spectrum. The Si KLL Auger line has been measured under excitation by the bremsstrahlung X-rays from the Al anode. Chemical bonding effects for Be 1s core level have been considered by comparison with electronic parameters measured for other beryllium containing oxides

  7. The Si(100)-Sb 2x1 and Ge(100) 2x1 surfaces: A multi-technique study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, M.

    1993-08-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of the clean and Sb terminated Si(100)2x1 and Ge(100)-2x1 surfaces have been investigated using a multi-technique approach. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) spectroscopy and angle-integrated core-level photoemission electron spectroscopy (PES) were employed to measure the surface symmetry, defect structure, relevant bond lengths, atomic coordination and electronic structure. By employing a multi-technique approach, it is possible to correlate changes in the geometric structure to specific features of the core-level lineshape of the substrate. This allows for the assignment of components of the core-level lineshape to be assigned to specific surface and near-surface atoms

  8. Shifted-modified Chebyshev filters

    OpenAIRE

    ŞENGÜL, Metin

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of filter approximation method that utilizes shifted-modified Chebyshev filters. Construction of the new filters involves the use of shifted-modified Chebyshev polynomials that are formed using the roots of conventional Chebyshev polynomials. The study also includes 2 tables containing the shifted-modified Chebyshev polynomials and the normalized element values for the low-pass prototype filters up to degree 6. The transducer power gain, group dela...

  9. Portable shift register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbig, J.K.; Bourret, S.C.; Hansen, W.J.; Hicks, D.V.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    An electronics package for a small, battery-operated, self-contained, neutron coincidence counter based on a portable shift-register (PSR) has been developed. The counter was developed for applications not adequately addressed by commercial packages, including in-plant measurements to demonstrate compliance with regulations (domestic and international), in-plant process control, and in-field measurements (environmental monitoring or safeguards). Our package's features, which address these applications, include the following: Small size for portability and ease of installation;battery or mains operation; a built-in battery to power the unit and a typical detector such as a small sample counter, for over 6 h if power lines are bad or noisy, if there is a temporary absence of power, or if portability is desired; complete support, including bias, for standard neutron detectors; a powerful communications package to easily facilitate robust external control over a serial port; and a C-library to simplify creating external control programs in computers or other controllers. Whereas the PSR specifically addresses the applications mentioned above, it also performs all the measurements made by previous electronics packages for neutron coincidence counters developed at Los Alamos and commercialized. The PSR electronics package, exclusive of carrying handle, is 8 by 10 by 20 cm; it contains the circuit boards, battery, and bias supply and weighs less than 2 kg. This instrument package is the second in an emerging family of portable measurement instruments being developed; the first was the Miniature and Modular Multichannel Analyzer (M 3 CA). The PSR makes extensive use of hardware and software developed for the M 3 CA; like the M 3 CA, it is intended primarily for use with an external controller interfaced over a serial channel

  10. Phenological shifts conserve thermal niches in North American birds and reshape expectations for climate-driven range shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolar, Jacob B; Epanchin, Peter N; Beissinger, Steven R; Tingley, Morgan W

    2017-12-05

    Species respond to climate change in two dominant ways: range shifts in latitude or elevation and phenological shifts of life-history events. Range shifts are widely viewed as the principal mechanism for thermal niche tracking, and phenological shifts in birds and other consumers are widely understood as the principal mechanism for tracking temporal peaks in biotic resources. However, phenological and range shifts each present simultaneous opportunities for temperature and resource tracking, although the possible role for phenological shifts in thermal niche tracking has been widely overlooked. Using a canonical dataset of Californian bird surveys and a detectability-based approach for quantifying phenological signal, we show that Californian bird communities advanced their breeding phenology by 5-12 d over the last century. This phenological shift might track shifting resource peaks, but it also reduces average temperatures during nesting by over 1 °C, approximately the same magnitude that average temperatures have warmed over the same period. We further show that early-summer temperature anomalies are correlated with nest success in a continental-scale database of bird nests, suggesting avian thermal niches might be broadly limited by temperatures during nesting. These findings outline an adaptation surface where geographic range and breeding phenology respond jointly to constraints imposed by temperature and resource phenology. By stabilizing temperatures during nesting, phenological shifts might mitigate the need for range shifts. Global change ecology will benefit from further exploring phenological adjustment as a potential mechanism for thermal niche tracking and vice versa.

  11. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  12. Work shifts in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Recupero

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medicine is known as a high stress specialty. The adverse effect of constantly rotating shifts is the single most important reason given for premature attrition from the field. In this work problems tied with night shift work will be taken into account and some solutions to reduce the impact of night work on the emergency physicians will be proposed.

  13. Flexible Schedules and Shift Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Flexible work hours have gained prominence, as more than 25 million workers (27.6% of all full-time workers) can now vary their schedules. However, there has been little change since the mid-1980s in the proportion who work a shift other than a regular daytime shift. (JOW)

  14. Abrupt environmental shift associated with changes in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, signals, coherent with the 1996 shift recorded in sea surface temperatures, were also found in atmospheric surface pressure and zonal wind data for that region; interannual coastal SST variability is also shown to be correlated with zonal wind-stress forcing. As a result, increased wind-induced coastal upwelling ...

  15. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2018-01-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  16. Determination of the surface band bending in InxGa1−xN films by hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickael Lozac'h, Shigenori Ueda, Shitao Liu, Hideki Yoshikawa, Sang Liwen, Xinqiang Wang, Bo Shen, Kazuaki Sakoda, Keisuke Kobayashi and Masatomo Sumiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Core-level and valence band spectra of InxGa1−xN films were measured using hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES. Fine structure, caused by the coupling of the localized Ga 3d and In 4d with N 2s states, was experimentally observed in the films. Because of the large detection depth of HX-PES (~20 nm, the spectra contain both surface and bulk information due to the surface band bending. The InxGa1−xN films (x = 0–0.21 exhibited upward surface band bending, and the valence band maximum was shifted to lower binding energy when the mole fraction of InN was increased. On the other hand, downward surface band bending was confirmed for an InN film with low carrier density despite its n-type conduction. Although the Fermi level (EF near the surface of the InN film was detected inside the conduction band as reported previously, it can be concluded that EF in the bulk of the film must be located in the band gap below the conduction band minimum.

  17. Inequalities for scattering phase shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, B.; Grosse, H.

    1985-01-01

    A recently developed method, which was used to derive bounds on energy levels, is applied to continuous spectra and gives relations between scattering phase shifts of various angular momenta. (Author)

  18. Isotope shifts in unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebel, H.

    1980-05-01

    Current experimental investigations of isotope shifts in atomic spectra of unstable nuclei and the resulting information about size and shape of nuclei far off stability are discussed with reference to some representative examples. (orig.)

  19. Origins of Stokes shift in PbS nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, Oleksandr

    2017-10-27

    Stokes shift, an energy difference between the excitonic absorption and emission, is a property of colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) typically ascribed to splitting between dark and bright excitons. In some materials, e.g., PbS, CuInS2, CdHgTe, a Stokes shift of up to 200 meV is observed, substantially larger than the estimates of dark-bright state splitting or vibronic relaxations. The shift origin remains highly debated, as contradictory signatures of both surface and bulk character were reported for the Stokes-shifted electronic state. Here we show that the energy transfer among CQDs in a polydispersed ensemble in solution suffices to explain the excess Stokes shift. This energy transfer is primarily due to CQD aggregation, and can be substantially eliminated by extreme dilution, higher-viscosity solvent, or better-dispersed colloids. Our findings highlight that ensemble polydispersity remains the primary source of the Stokes shift in CQDs in solution, propagating into the Stokes shift in films and the open-circuit voltage deficit in CQD solar cells. Improved synthetic control can bring notable advancements in CQD photovoltaics, and the Stokes shift continues to provide a sensitive and significant metric to monitor ensemble size distribution.

  20. Shifting schedules: the health effects of reorganizing shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambra, Clare L; Whitehead, Margaret M; Sowden, Amanda J; Akers, Joanne; Petticrew, Mark P

    2008-05-01

    Approximately one fifth of workers are engaged in some kind of shift work. The harmful effects of shift work on the health and work-life balance of employees are well known. A range of organizational interventions has been suggested to address these negative effects. This study undertook the systematic review (following Quality Of Reporting Of Meta [QUORUM] analyses guidelines) of experimental and quasi-experimental studies, from any country (in any language) that evaluated the effects on health and work-life balance of organizational-level interventions that redesign shift work schedules. Twenty-seven electronic databases (medical, social science, economic) were searched. Data extraction and quality appraisal were carried out by two independent reviewers. Narrative synthesis was performed. The review was conducted between October 2005 and November 2006. Twenty-six studies were found relating to a variety of organizational interventions. No one type of intervention was found to be consistently harmful to workers. However, three types were found to have beneficial effects on health and work-life balance: (1) switching from slow to fast rotation, (2) changing from backward to forward rotation, and (3) self-scheduling of shifts. Improvements were usually at little or no direct organizational cost. However, there were concerns about the generalizability of the evidence, and no studies reported on impacts on health inequalities. This review reinforces the findings of epidemiologic and laboratory-based research by suggesting that certain organizational-level interventions can improve the health of shift workers, their work-life balance, or both. This evidence could be useful when designing interventions to improve the experience of shift work.

  1. SAT in shift manager training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, F.

    1995-01-01

    EDF has improved the organization of the operation shift teams with the replacement of shift supervisor in shift manager function. The shift manager is not only responsible for tasks associated to plant operation (production), but he is also responsible for safety of these tasks and for management of shift team members. A job analysis of this new job position has been performed in order to design the training programme. It resulted in a 10-month training programme that includes 8 weeks in safety-related topics and 12 weeks in soft-skills related topics. The safety related training courses are mandatory, the other courses are optional courses depending on individual trainee needs. The training also includes the development of management competencies. During the 10 month period, each trainee develops an individual project that is evaluated by NPP manager. As well, as group project is undertaken by the trainees and overseen by a steering committee. The steering committee participates in the evaluation process and provides operational experience feedback to the trainee groups and to the overall programme

  2. Validation of archived chemical shifts through atomic coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieping, Wolfgang; Vranken, Wim F

    2010-01-01

    The public archives containing protein information in the form of NMR chemical shift data at the BioMagResBank (BMRB) and of 3D structure coordinates at the Protein Data Bank are continuously expanding. The quality of the data contained in these archives, however, varies. The main issue for chemical shift values is that they are determined relative to a reference frequency. When this reference frequency is set incorrectly, all related chemical shift values are systematically offset. Such wrongly referenced chemical shift values, as well as other problems such as chemical shift values that are assigned to the wrong atom, are not easily distinguished from correct values and effectively reduce the usefulness of the archive. We describe a new method to correct and validate protein chemical shift values in relation to their 3D structure coordinates. This method classifies atoms using two parameters: the per-atom solvent accessible surface area (as calculated from the coordinates) and the secondary structure of the parent amino acid. Through the use of Gaussian statistics based on a large database of 3220 BMRB entries, we obtain per-entry chemical shift corrections as well as Z scores for the individual chemical shift values. In addition, information on the error of the correction value itself is available, and the method can retain only dependable correction values. We provide an online resource with chemical shift, atom exposure, and secondary structure information for all relevant BMRB entries (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pdbe/nmr/vasco) and hope this data will aid the development of new chemical shift-based methods in NMR. Proteins 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20602353

  3. Does the ARFIMA really shift?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monache, Davide Delle; Grassi, Stefano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    Short memory models contaminated by level shifts have long-memory features similar to those associated to processes generated under fractional integration. In this paper, we propose a robust testing procedure, based on an encompassing parametric specification, that allows to disentangle the level...... the highest power compared to other existing tests for spurious long-memory. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of the proposed approach on the daily series of bipower variation and share turnover and on the monthly inflation series of G7 countries....... shift term from the ARFIMA component. The estimation is carried out via a state-space methodology and it leads to a robust estimate of the fractional integration parameter also in presence of level shifts.The Monte Carlo simulations show that this approach produces unbiased estimates of the fractional...

  4. Procedure to decouple reflectance and down-shifting effects in luminescent down-shifting enhanced photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Ahmed M; Walker, Alexandre W; Wilkins, Matthew M; Kleiman, Rafael; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-06-12

    The down-shifting (DS) process is a purely optical approach used to improve the short-wavelength response of a solar cell by shifting high-energy photons to the visible range, which can be more efficiently absorbed by the solar cell. In addition to the DS effect, coupling a DS layer to the top surface of a solar cell results in a change in surface reflectance. The two effects are intermixed and therefore, usually reported as a single effect. Here we propose a procedure to decouple the two effects. Analytical equations are derived to decouple the two effects, that consider the experimentally measured quantum efficiency of the solar cell with and without the DS layer, in addition to transfer matrix simulations of the parasitic absorption in the device structure. In this work, an overall degradation of 0.46 mA/cm 2 is observed when adding a DS layer composed of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a quartz matrix to a silicon solar cell of 11% baseline efficiency. To fully understand the contribution from each effect, the surface reflectance and DS effects are decoupled and quantified using the described procedure. We observe an enhancement of 0.27 mA/cm 2 in short-circuit current density due to the DS effect, while the surface reflectance effect leads to a degradation of 0.73 mA/cm 2 in short-circuit current density.

  5. Paradigm Shifts in Ophthalmic Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, J; Sadun, Alfredo A; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    Future advances in ophthalmology will see a paradigm shift in diagnostics from a focus on dysfunction and disease to better measures of psychophysical function and health. Practical methods to define genotypes will be increasingly important and non-invasive nanotechnologies are needed to detect molecular changes that predate histopathology. This is not a review nor meant to be comprehensive. Specific topics have been selected to illustrate the principles of important paradigm shifts that will influence the future of ophthalmic diagnostics. It is our impression that future evaluation of vision will go beyond visual acuity to assess ocular health in terms of psychophysical function. The definition of disease will incorporate genotype into what has historically been a phenotype-centric discipline. Non-invasive nanotechnologies will enable a paradigm shift from disease detection on a cellular level to a sub-cellular molecular level. Vision can be evaluated beyond visual acuity by measuring contrast sensitivity, color vision, and macular function, as these provide better insights into the impact of aging and disease. Distortions can be quantified and the psychophysical basis of vision can be better evaluated than in the past by designing tests that assess particular macular cell function(s). Advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of eye diseases will enable better characterization of ocular health and disease. Non-invasive nanotechnologies can assess molecular changes in the lens, vitreous, and macula that predate visible pathology. Oxygen metabolism and circulatory physiology are measurable indices of ocular health that can detect variations of physiology and early disease. This overview of paradigm shifts in ophthalmology suggests that the future will see significant improvements in ophthalmic diagnostics. The selected topics illustrate the principles of these paradigm shifts and should serve as a guide to further research and development. Indeed

  6. Morphisms Between Sofic Shift Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Agentoft

    The lower entropy factor problem asks for necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a factor map from a (mixing) sofic shift space onto another (mixing) sofic subshift of lower entropy. The problem was posed by Mike Boyle in 1984. It remains an open problem, but the present thesis...... gives a re-formulation which can be used to effectively decide the question for a larger class of sofic shifts than all previous results. In addition, the methods are used to make progress on the corresponding embedding problem which asks for necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence...

  7. Shift-Variant Multidimensional Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-29

    x,y;u,v) is the system response at (x,y) to an unit impulse applied at (u,v). The presence of additive noise in the preceding input-output model of a...space model developed works very effi- ciently to deblur images affected by 2-D linear shift- varying blurs, its use, in presence of noise needs to be...causal linear shift-variant (LSV) system, whose impulse res- ponse is a K-th order degenerate sequence, a K-th order state-space model was obtained

  8. Explaining (Missing) Regulator Paradigm Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The global financial and economic crisis has prompted some scholars to suggest that a fundamental regulatory shift away from neoliberalism will take place – both in general and in the field of EU competition regulation. This paper shows that so far no radical break with the neoliberal type...... regulation after the crisis in the 1970s, the paper argues that the preconditions for a fundamental shift in this issue area are not present this time around. Several reasons account for this: the current crisis has been construed by economic and political elites as a crisis within and not of neoliberal...

  9. Leadership Shifts in Changing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    As groups representing local and state education players struggle to remain relevant in a policy conversation often dominated by foundations, think tanks, new advocacy groups, and political and business figures, a shift in leadership has been under way at major associations. Most of the changes have come as part of the natural churn; former…

  10. Crichton's phase-shift ambiguity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, D.; Johnson, P.W.; Mehta, N.; Roo, M. de

    1973-01-01

    A re-examination of the SPD phase-shift ambiguity is made with a view to understanding certain singular features of the elastic unitarity constraint. An explicit solution of Crichton's equations is presented, and certain features of this solution are displayed graphically. In particular, it is shown

  11. Environmental Protection: a shifting focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. ir. Jan Venselaar

    2004-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a fundamental change in the way chemistry handles environmental issues. A shift in focus has occurred from 'end-of-pipe' to prevention and process integration. Presently an even more fundamental change is brought about by the need for sustainable development. It is

  12. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Several observations of body size, shape, posture, and configuration were made to document changes resulting from direct effects of weightlessness during the Skylab 4 mission. After the crewmen were placed in orbit, a number of anatomical and anthropometric changes occurred including a straightening of the thoracolumbar spine, a general decrease in truncal girth, and an increase in height. By the time of the earliest in-flight measurement on mission day 3, all crewmen had lost more than two liters of extravascular fluid from the calf and thigh. The puffy facies, the bird legs effect, the engorgement of upper body veins, and the reduced volume of lower body veins were all documented with photographs. Center-of-mass measurements confirmed a fluid shift cephalad. This shift remained throughout the mission until recovery, when a sharp reversal occurred; a major portion of the reversal was completed in a few hours. The anatomical changes are of considerable scientific interest and of import to the human factors design engineer, but the shifts of blood and extravascular fluid are of more consequence. It is hypothesized that the driving force for the fluid shift is the intrinsic and unopposed lower limb elasticity that forces venous blood and then other fluid cephalad.

  13. Real-time monitoring of initial thermal oxidation on Si(001) surfaces by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshigoe, A; Teraoka, Y

    2003-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of Si(001) surfaces at 860 K, 895 K, 945 K and 1000 K under the O sub 2 pressure of 1 x 10 sup - sup 4 Pa has been investigated by time-resolved photoemission measurements with synchrotron radiation. Based on time evolution analyses by reaction kinetics models, it was found that the oxidation at 860 K, 895 K and 945 K has progressed with the Langmuir adsorption type, whereas the oxidation at 1000 K has showed the character of the two-dimensional island growth involving SiO desorption. The oxidation rates increases with increasing surface temperature in the passive oxidation condition. The time evolution of each Si oxidation state (Si sup n sup + : n = 1, 2, 3, 4) derived from the Si-2p core-level shifts has also been analyzed. The results revealed that the thermal energy contribution to the migration process of the adsorbed oxygen and the emission of the bulk silicon atoms. Thus, the fraction of the Si sup 4 sup + bonding state, i.e. SiO sub 2 structure, was increased. (author)

  14. Electronic and surface properties of Ga-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regoutz, A., E-mail: a.regoutz@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Egdell, R.G. [Department of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Morgan, D.J. [Cardiff Catalysis Institute (CCI), School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT (United Kingdom); Palgrave, R.G. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Téllez, H.; Skinner, S.J.; Payne, D.J. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Watson, G.W. [School of Chemistry and CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Scanlon, D.O. [University College London, Kathleen Lonsdale Materials Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    resolved in Ga 2p core level spectra. Thus the failure to observe chemically shifted structure associated with Ga{sup +} is not inconsistent with the proposal that band gap narrowing is associated with lone pair states at surfaces and interfaces.

  15. Ripplonic Lamb Shift for Electrons on Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, M. I.; Kono, K.; Konstantinov, D.; Lea, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    We study the shift of the energy levels of electrons on a helium surface due to the coupling to the quantum field of surface vibrations. As in quantum electrodynamics, the coupling is known, and it is known to lead to an ultraviolet divergence of the level shifts. We show that there are diverging terms of different nature and use the Bethe-type approach to show that they cancel each other, to leading order. This resolves the long-standing theoretical controversy and explains the existing experiments. The results allow us to study the temperature dependence of the level shift. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data, with no adjustable parameters.

  16. Programming the shape-shifting of flat soft matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, T.; Janbaz, S.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Shape-shifting of flat materials into the desired 3D configuration is an alternative design route for fabrication of complex 3D shapes, which provides many benefits such as access to the flat material surface and the ability to produce well-described motions. The advanced production techniques

  17. Integrated optics refractometry: sensitivity in relation to spectral shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Hugo; Hammer, M.

    2013-01-01

    A new variant of the Vernier-effect based sensor reported in ref. 1 is introduced. Both sensor types may show a huge index induced spectral shift. It will be shown in a poster presentation that with such sensors, as well as with surface plasmon based sensors, the constraints on the spectral

  18. Green binary and phase shifting mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shy, S. L.; Hong, Chao-Sin; Wu, Cheng-San; Chen, S. J.; Wu, Hung-Yu; Ting, Yung-Chiang

    2009-12-01

    SixNy/Ni thin film green mask blanks were developed , and are now going to be used to replace general chromium film used for binary mask as well as to replace molydium silicide embedded material for AttPSM for I-line (365 nm), KrF (248 nm), ArF (193 nm) and Contact/Proximity lithography. A bilayer structure of a 1 nm thick opaque, conductive nickel layer and a SixNy layer is proposed for binary and phase-shifting mask. With the good controlling of plasma CVD of SixNy under silane (50 sccm), ammonia (5 sccm) and nitrogen (100 sccm), the pressure is 250 mTorr. and RF frequency 13.56 MHz and power 50 W. SixNy has enough deposition latitude to meet the requirements as an embedded layer for required phase shift 180 degree, and the T% in 193, 248 and 365 nm can be adjusted between 2% to 20% for binary and phase shifting mask usage. Ni can be deposited by E-gun, its sheet resistance Rs is less than 1.435 kΩ/square. Jeol e-beam system and I-line stepper are used to evaluate these thin film green mask blanks, feature size less than 200 nm half pitch pattern and 0.558 μm pitch contact hole can be printed. Transmission spectrums of various thickness of SixNy film are inspected by using UV spectrometer and FTIR. Optical constants of the SixNy film are measured by n & k meter and surface roughness is inspected by using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

  19. [Burden and health effects of shift work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Jörg

    2010-10-01

    In Germany aprox. 15% of all employees have irregular or flexible working hours. Disturbed sleep and/or hypersomnia are direct consequences of shift work and therefore described as shift work disorder. Beyond this, shift work can also be associated with specific pathological disorders. There are individual differences in tolerance to shift work. Optimization of both shift schedules and sleep to "non-physiological" times of the day are measures to counteract the negative effects of shift work. There is still not enough evidence to recommend drugs for routine use in shift workers. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Special training of shift personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    The first step of on-the-job training is practical observation phase in an operating Nuclear Plant, where the participants are assigned to shift work. The simulator training for operating personnel, for key personnel and, to some extent, also for maintenance personnel and specialists give the practical feeling for Nuclear Power Plant behaviour during normal and abnormal conditions. During the commissioning phase of the own Nuclear Power Plant, which is the most important practical training, the participants are integrated into the commissioning staff and assisted during their process of practical learning by special instructors. The preparation for the licensing exams is vitally important for shift personnel and special courses are provided after the first non-nuclear trial operation of the plant. Personnel training also includes performance of programmes and material for retraining, training of instructors and assistance in building up special training programmes and material as well as training centers. (orig./RW)

  1. Shift work as an oxidative stressor

    OpenAIRE

    Pasalar Parvin; Farahani Saeed; Sharifian Akbar; Gharavi Marjan; Aminian Omid

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Some medical disorders have higher prevalence in shift workers than others. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of night-shift-working on total plasma antioxidant capacity, with respect to the causative role of oxidative stress in induction of some of these disorders. Methods Two blood samples were taken from 44 workers with a rotational shift schedule, one after their day shift and one after their night shift. The total plasma antioxidant capacity of each worke...

  2. Perihelium shifts in central potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, A.E.A.; Ferreira, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Motivated by the rigorous results on level ordering for arbitrary central potentials recently derived in the literature a classical treatment of the perihelium shifts is presented, based on the consideration of those orbits which lie in the vicinity of a circular orbit. The role played by the Laplacian of the potential is emphasized. By the same approach Bertrand's theorem is also discussed, in connection with Arnold's proof. (Author) [pt

  3. Multicolor Holography With Phase Shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikram, Chandra S.

    1996-01-01

    Prototype apparatus constructed to test feasibility of two-color holographic interferometric scheme in which data for reconstructing holographic wavefront obtained with help of phase-shifting technique. Provides two sets of data needed to solve equations for effects of temperature and concentration. Concept extended to holography at three or more wavelengths to measure three or more phenomena associated with significant variations in index of refraction

  4. Shift Work and Endocrine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review was to investigate the impact of shift and night work on metabolic processes and the role of alterations in the sleep-wake cycle and feeding times and environmental changes in the occurrence of metabolic disorders. The literature review was performed by searching three electronic databases for relevant studies published in the last 10 years. The methodological quality of each study was assessed, and best-evidence synthesis was applied to draw conclusions. The literature has shown changes in concentrations of melatonin, cortisol, ghrelin, and leptin among shift workers. Melatonin has been implicated for its role in the synthesis and action of insulin. The action of this hormone also regulates the expression of transporter glucose type 4 or triggers phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. Therefore, a reduction in melatonin can be associated with an increase in insulin resistance and a propensity for the development of diabetes. Moreover, shift work can negatively affect sleep and contribute to sedentarism, unhealthy eating habits, and stress. Recent studies on metabolic processes have increasingly revealed their complexity. Physiological changes induced in workers who invert their activity-rest cycle to fulfill work hours include disruptions in metabolic processes.

  5. PSYCHE Pure Shift NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozandeh, Mohammadali; Morris, Gareth; Nilsson, Mathias

    2018-03-13

    Broadband homodecoupling techniques in NMR, also known as "pure shift" methods, aim to enhance spectral resolution by suppressing the effects of homonuclear coupling interactions to turn multiplet signals into singlets. Such techniques typically work by selecting a subset of "active" nuclear spins to observe, and selectively inverting the remaining, "passive", spins to reverse the effects of coupling. Pure Shift Yielded by Chirp Excitation (PSYCHE) is one such method; it is relatively recent, but has already been successfully implemented in a range of different NMR experiments. Paradoxically, PSYCHE is one of the trickiest of pure shift NMR techniques to understand but one of the easiest to use. Here we offer some insights into theoretical and practical aspects of the method, and into the effects and importance of the experimental parameters. Some recent improvements that enhance the spectral purity of PSYCHE spectra will be presented, and some experimental frameworks including examples in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, for the implementation of PSYCHE will be introduced. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Unraveling the meaning of chemical shifts in protein NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark V; Wishart, David S

    2017-11-01

    Chemical shifts are among the most informative parameters in protein NMR. They provide wealth of information about protein secondary and tertiary structure, protein flexibility, and protein-ligand binding. In this report, we review the progress in interpreting and utilizing protein chemical shifts that has occurred over the past 25years, with a particular focus on the large body of work arising from our group and other Canadian NMR laboratories. More specifically, this review focuses on describing, assessing, and providing some historical context for various chemical shift-based methods to: (1) determine protein secondary and super-secondary structure; (2) derive protein torsion angles; (3) assess protein flexibility; (4) predict residue accessible surface area; (5) refine 3D protein structures; (6) determine 3D protein structures and (7) characterize intrinsically disordered proteins. This review also briefly covers some of the methods that we previously developed to predict chemical shifts from 3D protein structures and/or protein sequence data. It is hoped that this review will help to increase awareness of the considerable utility of NMR chemical shifts in structural biology and facilitate more widespread adoption of chemical-shift based methods by the NMR spectroscopists, structural biologists, protein biophysicists, and biochemists worldwide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Visual attention shifting in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Annette E; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal visual attention has been frequently observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Abnormal shifting of visual attention is related to abnormal development of social cognition and has been identified as a key neuropsychological finding in ASD. Better characterizing attention shifting in ASD and its relationship with social functioning may help to identify new targets for intervention and improving social communication in these disorders. Thus, the current study investigated deficits in attention shifting in ASD as well as relationships between attention shifting and social communication in ASD and neurotypicals (NT). To investigate deficits in visual attention shifting in ASD, 20 ASD and 20 age- and gender-matched NT completed visual search (VS) and Navon tasks with attention-shifting demands as well as a set-shifting task. VS was a feature search task with targets defined in one of two dimensions; Navon required identification of a target letter presented at the global or local level. Psychomotor and processing speed were entered as covariates. Relationships between visual attention shifting, set shifting, and social functioning were also examined. ASD and NT showed comparable costs of shifting attention. However, psychomotor and processing speed were slower in ASD than in NT, and psychomotor and processing speed were positively correlated with attention-shifting costs on Navon and VS, respectively, for both groups. Attention shifting on VS and Navon were correlated among NT, while attention shifting on Navon was correlated with set shifting among ASD. Attention-shifting costs on Navon were positively correlated with restricted and repetitive behaviors among ASD. Relationships between attention shifting and psychomotor and processing speed, as well as relationships between measures of different aspects of visual attention shifting, suggest inefficient top-down influences over preattentive visual processing in ASD. Inefficient attention shifting may be

  8. Al2O3 dielectric layers on H-terminated diamond: Controlling surface conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Koeck, Franz A.; Dutta, Maitreya; Wang, Xingye; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates how the surface conductivity of H-terminated diamond can be preserved and stabilized by using a dielectric layer with an in situ post-deposition treatment. Thin layers of Al2O3 were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) on H-terminated undoped diamond (100) surfaces. The changes of the hole accumulation layer were monitored by correlating the binding energy of the diamond C 1s core level with electrical measurements. The initial PEALD of 1 nm Al2O3 resulted in an increase of the C 1s core level binding energy consistent with a reduction of the surface hole accumulation and a reduction of the surface conductivity. A hydrogen plasma step restored the C 1s binding energy to the value of the conductive surface, and the resistance of the diamond surface was found to be within the range for surface transfer doping. Further, the PEALD growth did not appear to degrade the surface conductive layer according to the position of the C 1s core level and electrical measurements. This work provides insight into the approaches to establish and control the two-dimensional hole-accumulation layer of the H-terminated diamond and improve the stability and performance of H-terminated diamond electronic devices.

  9. Surface properties of indium tin oxide treated by Cl2 inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kongduo; Yang, Xilu; Yan, Hang; Gong, Junyi; Zhong, Shaofeng; Ou, Qiongrong; Liang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The work function of chlorinated ITO increases initially by up to 1 eV. • The chlorinated ITO keeps an increment of work function of 0.3 eV after 100 days. • The WF decrease curves can be fitted with double exponential functions. • The desorption of unstable Cl in the surface leads to the rapid decrease of WF. • The core levels of In 3d5 and Sn 3d5 and O 1s shift toward higher binding energies. - Abstract: The effects of Cl 2 inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment on the time dependence of work function (WF) and surface properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) were investigated. Kelvin probe (KP) measurements show that the WF after Cl 2 ICP treatment is close to 5.9 eV. The WF decrease curve of Cl 2 plasma treated ITO is fitted with double exponential functions with an adjusted R-square of 0.99. The mechanism under the decrease process is discussed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ITO WF decrease after Cl 2 ICP treatment performs much better than that after O 2 ICP treatment and the chlorinated ITO keeps a WF increment of 0.3 eV compared with that without plasma treatment after 100 days. Other properties of chlorinated ITO surface such as morphology and transmittance change slightly. The results are significant for the understanding of degradation of Cl 2 plasma treated ITO and the fabrication of organic semiconductor devices

  10. Surface properties of indium tin oxide treated by Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kongduo; Yang, Xilu; Yan, Hang; Gong, Junyi; Zhong, Shaofeng [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ou, Qiongrong, E-mail: qrou@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Liang, Rongqing [Department of Light Sources and Illuminating Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Engineering Research Center of Advanced Lighting Technology, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The work function of chlorinated ITO increases initially by up to 1 eV. • The chlorinated ITO keeps an increment of work function of 0.3 eV after 100 days. • The WF decrease curves can be fitted with double exponential functions. • The desorption of unstable Cl in the surface leads to the rapid decrease of WF. • The core levels of In 3d5 and Sn 3d5 and O 1s shift toward higher binding energies. - Abstract: The effects of Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment on the time dependence of work function (WF) and surface properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) were investigated. Kelvin probe (KP) measurements show that the WF after Cl{sub 2} ICP treatment is close to 5.9 eV. The WF decrease curve of Cl{sub 2} plasma treated ITO is fitted with double exponential functions with an adjusted R-square of 0.99. The mechanism under the decrease process is discussed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ITO WF decrease after Cl{sub 2} ICP treatment performs much better than that after O{sub 2} ICP treatment and the chlorinated ITO keeps a WF increment of 0.3 eV compared with that without plasma treatment after 100 days. Other properties of chlorinated ITO surface such as morphology and transmittance change slightly. The results are significant for the understanding of degradation of Cl{sub 2} plasma treated ITO and the fabrication of organic semiconductor devices.

  11. Cortisol shifts financial risk preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Narayanan; Hardy, Ben; Page, Lionel; Schaffner, Markus; Graggaber, Johann; Powlson, Andrew S; Fletcher, Paul C; Gurnell, Mark; Coates, John

    2014-03-04

    Risk taking is central to human activity. Consequently, it lies at the focal point of behavioral sciences such as neuroscience, economics, and finance. Many influential models from these sciences assume that financial risk preferences form a stable trait. Is this assumption justified and, if not, what causes the appetite for risk to fluctuate? We have previously found that traders experience a sustained increase in the stress hormone cortisol when the amount of uncertainty, in the form of market volatility, increases. Here we ask whether these elevated cortisol levels shift risk preferences. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol we raised cortisol levels in volunteers over 8 d to the same extent previously observed in traders. We then tested for the utility and probability weighting functions underlying their risk taking and found that participants became more risk-averse. We also observed that the weighting of probabilities became more distorted among men relative to women. These results suggest that risk preferences are highly dynamic. Specifically, the stress response calibrates risk taking to our circumstances, reducing it in times of prolonged uncertainty, such as a financial crisis. Physiology-induced shifts in risk preferences may thus be an underappreciated cause of market instability.

  12. Cortisol shifts financial risk preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Narayanan; Hardy, Ben; Page, Lionel; Schaffner, Markus; Graggaber, Johann; Powlson, Andrew S.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Gurnell, Mark; Coates, John

    2014-01-01

    Risk taking is central to human activity. Consequently, it lies at the focal point of behavioral sciences such as neuroscience, economics, and finance. Many influential models from these sciences assume that financial risk preferences form a stable trait. Is this assumption justified and, if not, what causes the appetite for risk to fluctuate? We have previously found that traders experience a sustained increase in the stress hormone cortisol when the amount of uncertainty, in the form of market volatility, increases. Here we ask whether these elevated cortisol levels shift risk preferences. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol we raised cortisol levels in volunteers over 8 d to the same extent previously observed in traders. We then tested for the utility and probability weighting functions underlying their risk taking and found that participants became more risk-averse. We also observed that the weighting of probabilities became more distorted among men relative to women. These results suggest that risk preferences are highly dynamic. Specifically, the stress response calibrates risk taking to our circumstances, reducing it in times of prolonged uncertainty, such as a financial crisis. Physiology-induced shifts in risk preferences may thus be an underappreciated cause of market instability. PMID:24550472

  13. Properties of the CuGaSe2 and CuInSe2 (001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniozou, T.

    2005-01-01

    The main task of this work was to investigate the (001) CuGaSe 2 and CuInSe 2 surface in dependence of preparation and stoichiometry. The knowledge of the atomic structure as well as other surface properties is important in respect to optimization of novel thin film solar cells. For the characterization of the layers mainly Auger electron Spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy were implemented. The development of an appropriate procedure with Ar + sputtering and annealing combined with decapping enabled the preparation of clean and well-ordered surfaces. Different surface structures were observed in dependence of the layer preparation and composition. A (4 x 1) reconstruction was observed for the first time on CuGaSe 2 layers grown with a moderate Cu-excess after preparation by sputtering and annealing. Similarly a (4 x 2) reconstruction was detected on CuInSe2 surfaces of Cu-poor layers. A reconstruction could be also observed on Cu-poorer layers, however the facets/steps could not be completely removed. Cu-richer layers were facet-free, however the observed reconstruction was also weaker. Thus it was shown that in contrary to recent expectations, according to which only the (112) surface is stable, also the (001) can be stable under particular conditions. The appearance of facets or steps is correlated with the presence of CuIn 3 Se 5 or CuGa 3 Se 5 phases. This information is furthermore important for the understanding of grain boundaries in polycrystalline CuGaSe 2 and CuInSe 2 . Binding energy shifts were observed for the first time on all Se3d, In4d, Ga3d, Cu3d core levels of the reconstructed surfaces. By comparison with results from the literature from the similar ZnSe (100) surface a modell for the (4 x 2) reconstruction was proposed. The surface components in the Se3d, In4d and Cu3d emission were attributed to Se dimers or In and Cu adatoms respectively. The x 1 periodicity of the (4 x 1) reconstruction of CuGaSe 2 is

  14. Surface chemistry of PH 3, PF 3 and PCl 3 on Ru(0001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, H.-S.; Diebold, U.; Shinn, N. D.; Madey, T. E.

    1994-06-01

    The adsorption, desorption and decomposition of PH 3, PF 3 and PCl 3 on Ru(0001) have been studied by soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) using synchrotron radiation. Due to large chemical shifts in the P 2p core levels, different phosphorus containing surface species can be identified. We find that PF 3 adsorbs molecularly on Ru(0001) at 80 and 300 K. At 80 K, PH 3 saturates the surface with one layer of atomic hydrogen, elemental phosphorus, subhydride (i.e., PHx (0 PH 3, with a total phosphorus coverage of 0.4 ML. At 300 K, PH 3 decomposes into atomic hydrogen and elemental phosphorus with a phosphorus coverage of 0.8 ML. At 80 K, PCl 3 adsorbs dissociatively into atomic chlorine, elemental phosphorus, PCl and possibly PCl 2 and PCl 3 in the first monolayer. Formation of multilayers of PCl 3 is observed at 80 K. At 300 K, PCl 3 adsorbs dissociatively as atomic chlorine and elemental phosphorus with a saturation phosphorus coverage of 0.1 ML. The variation in total phosphorus uptake at 300 K from PX3 ( X = H, FandCl) adsorption is a result of competition between site blocking by dissociation fragments and displacement reactions. Annealing surfaces with adsorbed phosphorus to 1000 K results in formation of RuzP ( z = 1 or 2), which is manifested by the chemical shifts in the P2p core level, as well as the P LVV Auger transition. The recombination of adsorbed phosphorus and adsorbed X ( = H, FandCl) from decomposition is also observed, but is a minor reaction channel on the surface. Thermochemical data are used to analyze the different stabilities of PX 3 at 300 K, namely, PF 3 adsorbs molecularly and PH 3 and PCl 3 dissociate completely. First, we compare the heat of molecular adsorption and the heat of dissociative adsorption of PX 3 on Ru(0001), using an enthalpy approach, and find results consistent with experimental observations. Second, we compare the total bond energy difference between molecular adsorption and complete dissociation of PX 3 on Ru

  15. Gaze shifts and fixations dominate gaze behavior of walking cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Trevor J.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Guttentag, Andrew I.; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri A.; Shah, Neet A.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2014-01-01

    Vision is important for locomotion in complex environments. How it is used to guide stepping is not well understood. We used an eye search coil technique combined with an active marker-based head recording system to characterize the gaze patterns of cats walking over terrains of different complexity: (1) on a flat surface in the dark when no visual information was available, (2) on the flat surface in light when visual information was available but not required, (3) along the highly structured but regular and familiar surface of a horizontal ladder, a task for which visual guidance of stepping was required, and (4) along a pathway cluttered with many small stones, an irregularly structured surface that was new each day. Three cats walked in a 2.5 m corridor, and 958 passages were analyzed. Gaze activity during the time when the gaze was directed at the walking surface was subdivided into four behaviors based on speed of gaze movement along the surface: gaze shift (fast movement), gaze fixation (no movement), constant gaze (movement at the body’s speed), and slow gaze (the remainder). We found that gaze shifts and fixations dominated the cats’ gaze behavior during all locomotor tasks, jointly occupying 62–84% of the time when the gaze was directed at the surface. As visual complexity of the surface and demand on visual guidance of stepping increased, cats spent more time looking at the surface, looked closer to them, and switched between gaze behaviors more often. During both visually guided locomotor tasks, gaze behaviors predominantly followed a repeated cycle of forward gaze shift followed by fixation. We call this behavior “gaze stepping”. Each gaze shift took gaze to a site approximately 75–80 cm in front of the cat, which the cat reached in 0.7–1.2 s and 1.1–1.6 strides. Constant gaze occupied only 5–21% of the time cats spent looking at the walking surface. PMID:24973656

  16. Individual differences in shift work tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers-van der Holst, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a key feature of our contemporary 24/7 society, employing several successive work teams to sustain around-the-clock operations. However, numerous studies imply that frequently shifting the periods of sleep and wakefulness poses a serious threat to the shift worker’s physical, mental

  17. Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Shifting Cultivation : Promoting Innovative Policy and Development Options in the Eastern Himalayas. Shifting ... pressure and market forces. The idea is to share good policies and practices related to shifting cultivation and alternative options through regional exchange. ... Les chaînes de valeur comme leviers stratégiques.

  18. Tilt shift determinations with spatial-carrier phase-shift method in temporal phase-shift interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Yang; He, Jianguo; Ji, Fang; Wang, Baorui

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed to deal with tilt-shift errors in temporal phase-shift interferometry (PSI). In the algorithm, the tilt shifts are detected with the spatial-carrier phase-shift (SCPS) method and then the tilt shifts are applied as priori information to the least-squares fittings of phase retrieval. The algorithm combines the best features of the SCPS and the temporal PSI. The algorithm could be applied to interferograms of arbitrary aperture without data extrapolation for the Fourier transform is not involved. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. The statistics of simulation results show a satisfied accuracy in detecting tilt-shift errors. Comparisons of the measurements with and without environmental vibration show that the proposed algorithm could compensate tilt-shift errors and retrieve wavefront phase accurately. The algorithm provides an approach to retrieve wavefront phase for the temporal PSI in vibrating environment. (paper)

  19. Steady State Shift Damage Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekjær, Claus; Bull, Thomas; Markvart, Morten Kusk

    2017-01-01

    The steady state shift damage localization (S3DL) method localizes structural deterioration, manifested as either a mass or stiffness perturbation, by interrogating the damage-induced change in the steady state vibration response with damage patterns cast from a theoretical model. Damage is, thus...... the required accuracy when examining complex structures, an extensive amount of degrees of freedom (DOF) must often be utilized. Since the interrogation matrix for each damage pattern depends on the size of the system matrices constituting the FE-model, the computational time quickly becomes of first......-order importance. The present paper investigates two sub-structuring approaches, in which the idea is to employ Craig-Bampton super-elements to reduce the amount of interrogation distributions while still providing an acceptable localization resolution. The first approach operates on a strict super-element level...

  20. Identical and shifted identical bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodder, R.S; Jones, E.F.; Hamilton, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous fission of 252 Cm was studied with 72 large Compton suppressed Ge detectors in Gamma sphere. New isotopes 160 Sm and 162 Gd were identified. Through X-ray-γ and γ-γ-γ) coincidence measurements, level energies were established to spins 14 + to 20 + in 152 , 154 156 60 Nd 92 94 96 , 156 , 158 , 160 62 Sm 94 , 96 , 98 , and 160 , 162 64 Gd 96 , 98 . These nuclei exhibit a remarkable variety of identical bands and bands where the energies and moments of inertia are shifted by the same constant amount for every spin state from 2 + to 12 + for various combinations of nuclei differing by 2n, 4n, 2p, 4p, and α

  1. How to detect the gravitationally induced phase shift of electromagnetic waves by optical-fiber interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is called to a laboratory experiment of an optical-fiber interferometer which can show the gravitationally induced phase shift of optical waves. A phase shift of approx.10 -6 rad is anticipated for the Earth's gravitational potential difference of 1 m when a He-Ne laser and two multiple-turn optical-fiber loops of length 5 km are used. The phase shift can be varied by rotating the loops about an axis parallel to the Earth's surface. This order of phase shifts can be detected by current optical-fiber interferometric techniques

  2. Effect of Shift Work on Nocturia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Wook

    2016-01-01

    To identify the circadian sensitive component of nocturia by comparing nocturia in patients who voluntarily choose a disrupted circadian rhythm, that is, shift workers, with those who maintain normal day-night cycles. Between 2011 and 2013, a total of 1741 untreated patients, 1376 nonshift workers and 365 shift workers, were compared for nocturia indices based on frequency volume charts (FVCs). General linear model of 8-hour interval urine production and frequency were compared between FVCs of nonshift workers, FVCs of night-shift workers, and FVCs of day-shift workers. Nocturia frequency was increased in the night-shift workers (2.38 ± 1.44) compared with nonshift workers (2.18 ± 1.04) (P night-shift workers, 0.34 ± 0.13 for nonshift workers, P = .24), nocturnal bladder capacity index increased significantly (1.41 ± 1.06 for night-shift workers, 1.26 ± 0.92 for nonshift workers, P shift (P shift changes (P = .35). Patients in alternating work shifts showed increased nocturia, especially during their night shift. These changes tended to be more associated with decreased nocturnal bladder capacity than increased nocturnal polyuria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Real life working shift assignment problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, San-Nah; Kwek, Yeek-Ling; Tiong, Wei-King; Chiew, Kang-Leng

    2017-07-01

    This study concerns about the working shift assignment in an outlet of Supermarket X in Eastern Mall, Kuching. The working shift assignment needs to be solved at least once in every month. Current approval process of working shifts is too troublesome and time-consuming. Furthermore, the management staff cannot have an overview of manpower and working shift schedule. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop working shift assignment simulation and propose a working shift assignment solution. The main objective for this study is to fulfill manpower demand at minimum operation cost. Besides, the day off and meal break policy should be fulfilled accordingly. Demand based heuristic is proposed to assign working shift and the quality of the solution is evaluated by using the real data.

  4. Dynamics and computation in functional shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a new type of shift dynamics as an extended model of symbolic dynamics, and investigate the characteristics of shift spaces from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation. This shift dynamics is called a functional shift, which is defined by a set of bi-infinite sequences of some functions on a set of symbols. To analyse the complexity of functional shifts, we measure them in terms of topological entropy, and locate their languages in the Chomsky hierarchy. Through this study, we argue that considering functional shifts from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation gives us opposite results about the complexity of systems. We also describe a new class of shift spaces whose languages are not recursively enumerable.

  5. Systematic study of the focal shift effect in planar plasmonic slit lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Bin; Wang Qijie; Zhang Ying

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we systematically studied the focal shift effect in planar plasmonic slit lenses. Through theoretical derivations and numerical simulations, we found that there is a focal length shift between the traditional design model and the finite-difference time-domain simulations. The shift is not only dependent on the Fresnel number (FN) of the lens, like traditional dielectric lenses, determined by the lens width and the designed focal length, but also on the surface plasmon polariton (SPPs) interaction on the lens surfaces, dependent on the slit numbers. We also found that the FN-induced focal shift is predominant when FN 1. An approximated theoretical model is presented to estimate the focal shift of plasmonic slit lens with FN < 1. (paper)

  6. S-matrix to potential inversion of low-energy. alpha. - sup 12 C phase shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.G.; Mackintosh, R.S. (Open Univ., Milton Keynes (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-10-22

    The IP S-matrix to potential inversion procedure is applied to phase shifts for selected partial waves over a range of energies below the inelastic threshold for {alpha}-{sup 12}C scattering. The phase shifts were determined by Plaga et al. Potentials found by Buck and Rubio to fit the low-energy alpha cluster resonances need only an increased attraction in the surface to accurately reproduce the phase-shift behaviour. Substantial differences between the potentials for odd and even partial waves are necessary. The surface tail of the potential is postulated to be a threshold effect. (orig.).

  7. S-Matrix to potential inversion of low-energy α-12C phase shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S. G.; Mackintosh, R. S.

    1990-10-01

    The IP S-matrix to potential inversion procedure is applied to phase shifts for selected partial waves over a range of energies below the inelastic threshold for α-12C scattering. The phase shifts were determined by Plaga et al. Potentials found by Buck and Rubio to fit the low-energy alpha cluster resonances need only an increased attraction in the surface to accurately reproduce the phase-shift behaviour. Substantial differences between the potentials for odd and even partial waves are necessary. The surface tail of the potential is postulated to be a threshold effect.

  8. Wavelength shift in a whispering gallery microdisk due to bacterial sensing: A theoretical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Ghali

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode microcavities have recently been studied as a means to achieve real-time label-free detection of biological targets such as virus particles, specific DNA sequences, or proteins. Binding of a biomolecule to the surface of a microresonator will increase its path length, leading to a shift in the resonance frequency according to the reactive sensing principle. In this paper, we develop a theoretical expression that will link the reactive shift to the bacteria and microdisk parameters and help quantify the number of bacteria that bind to the surface of a 200μm-diameter silica microdisk. Keywords: Optical microdisk, Wavelength shift, Bacterial sensing

  9. An isodose shift technique for obliquely incident electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulin, K.; Sternick, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that when an electron beam is incident obliquely on the surface of a phantom, the depth dose curve measured normal to the surface is shifted toward the surface. Based on geometrical arguments alone, the depth of the nth isodose line for an electron beam incident at an angle θ should be equal to the product of cos θ and the depth of the nth isodose line at normal incidence. This method, however, ignores the effects of scatter and can lead to significant errors in isodose placement for beams at large angles of incidence. A semi-empirical functional relationship and a table of isodose shift factors have been developed with which one may easily calculate the depth of any isodose line for beams at incident angles of 0 degree to 60 degree. The isodose shift factors are tabulated in terms of beam energy (6--22 MeV) and isodose line (10%--90%) and are shown to be relatively independent of beam size and incident angle for angles <60 degree. Extensive measurements have been made on a Varian Clinac 2500 linear accelerator with a parallel-plate chamber and polystyrene phantom. The dependence of the chamber response on beam angulation has been checked, and the scaling factor of the polystyrene phantom has been determined to be equal to 1.00

  10. The Atmospheric Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds Through Hydrogen Shift Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Hasse Christian

    a radical is denoted as a H-shift reaction. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out to investigate the potential energy surface of the H-shift reactions and the subsequent decomposition pathways. The transition state theory including the Eckart quantum tunneling correction have been used to calculate...... the reaction rate constants of the H-shift reactions. The autoxidation of volatile organic compounds is an important oxidation mechanism that produces secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and recycles hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The autoxidation cycle produces a second generation peroxy radical (OOQOOH) through...... a series of H-shift reactions and O2 attachments. I have investigated the H-shift reactions in two OOQOOH radicals (hydroperoxy peroxy radicals and hydroperoxy acyl peroxy radicals). The H-shift reaction rate constants have been compared with the bimolecular reaction rate constants of the peroxy radicals...

  11. Large Positive and Negative Lateral Shifts from an Anisotropic Metamaterial Slab Backed by a Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Cheng; Rong, Chen

    2009-01-01

    The lateral shift of a light beam at the surface of an anisotropic metamaterial (AMM) slab backed by a metal is investigated. Analytical expressions of the lateral shifts are derived using the stationary-phase method, in the case that total refection does and does not occur at the first interface. The sign of the lateral shift in two situations is discussed, and the necessary conditions for the lateral shift to be positive or negative are given. It is shown that the thickness and physical parameters of the AMM slab and the incident angle of the light beam strongly affect the properties of the lateral shift. Numerical results validate these conclusions. The lossy effect of the metamaterial on the lateral shift is also investigated

  12. Chemisorption-Induced Resonance Frequency Shift of a Microcantilever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ji-Qiao; Feng Xi-Qiao; Yu Shou-Wen; Huang Gan-Yun

    2012-01-01

    The autonomy and property of atoms/molecules adsorbed on the surface of a microcantilever can be probed by measuring its resonance frequency shift due to adsorption. The resonance frequency change of a cantilever induced by chemisorption is theoretically studied. Oxygen chemisorbed on the Si(100) surface is taken as a representative example. We demonstrate that the resonant response of the cantilever is mainly determined by the chemisorption-induced bending stiffness variation, which depends on the bond configurations formed by the adsorbed atoms and substrate atoms. This study is helpful for optimal design of microcantilever-based sensors for various applications. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  13. Non-occupational physical activity levels of shift workers compared with non-shift workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loef, Bette; Hulsegge, Gerben; Wendel-Vos, G C Wanda; Verschuren, W M Monique; Bakker, Marije F; van der Beek, Allard J; Proper, Karin I

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Lack of physical activity (PA) has been hypothesised as an underlying mechanism in the adverse health effects of shift work. Therefore, our aim was to compare non-occupational PA levels between shift workers and non-shift workers. Furthermore, exposure–response relationships for frequency of night shifts and years of shift work regarding non-occupational PA levels were studied. Methods Data of 5980 non-shift workers and 532 shift workers from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) were used in these cross-sectional analyses. Time spent (hours/week) in different PA types (walking/cycling/exercise/chores) and intensities (moderate/vigorous) were calculated based on self-reported PA. Furthermore, sports were operationalised as: playing sports (no/yes), individual versus non-individual sports, and non-vigorous-intensity versus vigorous-intensity sports. PA levels were compared between shift workers and non-shift workers using Generalized Estimating Equations and logistic regression. Results Shift workers reported spending more time walking than non-shift workers (B=2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 3.4)), but shift work was not associated with other PA types and any of the sports activities. Shift workers who worked 1–4 night shifts/month (B=2.4 (95% CI 0.6 to 4.3)) and ≥5 night shifts/month (B=3.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 5.6)) spent more time walking than non-shift workers. No exposure–response relationships were found between years of shift work and PA levels. Conclusions Shift workers spent more time walking than non-shift workers, but we observed no differences in other non-occupational PA levels. To better understand if and how PA plays a role in the negative health consequences of shift work, our findings need to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27872151

  14. Shift work-related health problems in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khavaji

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsShift work is a major feature of working life that affects diverse aspects of human life. The main purposes of this study were to investigate shift work-related health problems and their risk factors among workers of "12-hour shift" schedule.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was carried out at 8 petrochemical industries in Asalooyeh area. Study population consisted of 1203 workers including 549 shift worker (46% and 654 day worker (54%. Data on personal details, shift schedule and adverse effects of shift work werecollected by anonymous questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS, version 11.5. The level of significance was set at 5%.ResultsAlthough, the results showed that health problems among shift workers was more prevalent than day workers, but the differences were just significant in gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal disorders (p<0.05. Multiple linear regressions indicated that in addition to shift working, other variants such as long work hours, type of employment, second job, number of children and job title were associated with health problems.ConclusionPrevalence rates of gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal problems among shift workers were significantly higher than that of day workers. Although, working in shift system was the main significant factor associated with the reported problems, but other demographic andwork variables were also found to have association.

  15. Shift work as an oxidative stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasalar Parvin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some medical disorders have higher prevalence in shift workers than others. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of night-shift-working on total plasma antioxidant capacity, with respect to the causative role of oxidative stress in induction of some of these disorders. Methods Two blood samples were taken from 44 workers with a rotational shift schedule, one after their day shift and one after their night shift. The total plasma antioxidant capacity of each worker was measured through the FRAP method. The impacts of age and weight were also assessed. Results The total plasma antioxidant capacity was measured in 44 shift-workers with a mean age of 36.57 years (SD: 10.18 and mean BMI of 26.06 (SD: 4.37 after their day and night shifts. The mean reduction of total plasma antioxidant capacity after the night shift was 105.8 μmol/L (SD: 146.39. Also, a significant correlation was shown between age and weight and total plasma antioxidant capacity. Age and weight were found to be inversely related to total plasma antioxidant capacity; as age and weight increased, the total plasma antioxidant capacity decreased. Conclusion Shift work can act as an oxidative stressor and may induce many medical disorders. Aging and obesity in shift workers makes them more sensitive to this hazardous effect.

  16. Red Shifts and Existing Speculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2009-03-01

    There are many current flaws, mysteries, and errors in the standard model of the universe - all based upon speculative interpretation of many excellent and verified observations. The most serious cause of some errors is the speculation about the meaning of the redshifts observed in the 1930s by Hubble. He ascribed the redshifts as due to ``an apparent Doppler effect''. This led to speculation that the remote stars were receding, and the universe was expanding -- although without observational proof of the actual receding velocity of the stars. The age of the universe, based upon the Hubble constant is pure speculation because of lack of velocity demonstration. The belief in expansion, the big bang, and of inflation should be reexamined. Also, the redshift cannot always be used as a distance measure, particularly for photons from quasars containing massive black holes that can reduce photon energy through gravitational attraction. If the linear Hubble constant is extrapolated to the most remote super novae and beyond, it would eventually require that the corresponding photon energy go to zero or become negative -- according to Hubble linear relationship. This should require a reexamination of the meaning of the red shift and the speculative consequences and give a model with fewer mysteries.

  17. Core shift effect in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, A.; Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Mangalam, A.; Volvach, A. E.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Gu, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Volvach, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the pc-scale core shift effect using radio light curves for three blazars, S5 0716+714, 3C 279 and BL Lacertae, which were monitored at five frequencies (ν) between 4.8 and 36.8 GHz using the University of Michigan Radio Astronomical Observatory (UMRAO), the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO) and Metsähovi Radio Observatory for over 40 yr. Flares were Gaussian fitted to derive time delays between observed frequencies for each flare (Δt), peak amplitude (A) and their half width. Using A ∝ να, we infer α in the range of -16.67-2.41 and using Δ t ∝ ν ^{1/k_r}, we infer kr ∼ 1, employed in the context of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energy density for parameter estimation. From the estimated core position offset (Ωrν) and the core radius (rcore), we infer that opacity model may not be valid in all cases. The mean magnetic field strengths at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are in agreement with previous estimates. We apply the magnetically arrested disc model to estimate black hole spins in the range of 0.15-0.9 for these blazars, indicating that the model is consistent with expected accretion mode in such sources. The power-law-shaped power spectral density has slopes -1.3 to -2.3 and is interpreted in terms of multiple shocks or magnetic instabilities.

  18. Three-step interferometric method with blind phase shifts by use of interframe correlation between interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravsky, Leonid I.; Kmet', Arkady B.; Stasyshyn, Ihor V.; Voronyak, Taras I.; Bobitski, Yaroslav V.

    2018-06-01

    A new three-step interferometric method with blind phase shifts to retrieve phase maps (PMs) of smooth and low-roughness engineering surfaces is proposed. Evaluating of two unknown phase shifts is fulfilled by using the interframe correlation between interferograms. The method consists of two stages. The first stage provides recording of three interferograms of a test object and their processing including calculation of unknown phase shifts, and retrieval of a coarse PM. The second stage implements firstly separation of high-frequency and low-frequency PMs and secondly producing of a fine PM consisting of areal surface roughness and waviness PMs. Extraction of the areal surface roughness and waviness PMs is fulfilled by using a linear low-pass filter. The computer simulation and experiments fulfilled to retrieve a gauge block surface area and its areal surface roughness and waviness have confirmed the reliability of the proposed three-step method.

  19. Surface chemistry and electronic structure of nonpolar and polar GaN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Monu; Krishna, T.C. Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry and electronic structure of polar and nonpolar GaN is reported. • Influence of polarization on electron affinity of p & np GaN films is investigated. • Correlation between surface morphology and polarity has been deduced. - Abstract: Photoemission and microscopic analysis of nonpolar (a-GaN/r-Sapphire) and polar (c-GaN/c-Sapphire) epitaxial gallium nitride (GaN) films grown via RF-Molecular Beam Epitaxy is reported. The effect of polarization on surface properties like surface states, electronic structure, chemical bonding and morphology has been investigated and correlated. It was observed that polarization lead to shifts in core level (CL) as well as valence band (VB) spectra. Angle dependent X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic analysis revealed higher surface oxide in polar GaN film compared to nonpolar GaN film. On varying the take off angle (TOA) from 0° to 60°, the Ga−O/Ga−N ratio varied from 0.11–0.23 for nonpolar and 0.17–0.36 for polar GaN film. The nonpolar film exhibited N-face polarity while Ga-face polarity was perceived in polar GaN film due to the inherent polarization effect. Polarization charge compensated surface states were observed on the polar GaN film and resulted in downward band bending. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements revealed electron affinity and ionization energy of 3.4 ± 0.1 eV and 6.8 ± 0.1 eV for nonpolar GaN film and 3.8 ± 0.1 eV and 7.2 ± 0.1 eV for polar GaN film respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements divulged smooth morphology with pits on polar GaN film. The nonpolar film on the other hand showed pyramidal structures having facets all over the surface.

  20. Cost effective shift schedules enhance utility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes how new shift scheduling concepts can save utility operations millions of dollars every year and yet maintain safety and improve employee morale. The key to scheduling is to define and match the work load. This includes discretionary as well as daily, weekly, and yearly core work loads. In most power plants the overall work load (including maintenance, operations, materials handling, etc.) on day shift is greater than on other shifts, hence an unbalanced schedule would be appropriate

  1. Stochastic dynamical models for ecological regime shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Carstensen, Jacob; Madsen, Henrik

    the physical and biological knowledge of the system, and nonlinearities introduced here can generate regime shifts or enhance the probability of regime shifts in the case of stochastic models, typically characterized by a threshold value for the known driver. A simple model for light competition between...... definition and stability of regimes become less subtle. Ecological regime shifts and their modeling must be viewed in a probabilistic manner, particularly if such model results are to be used in ecosystem management....

  2. Time Zones, Shift Working and International Outsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Yuji; Fukushima, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    We build a trade model with two identical countries located in different time zones and a monopolistically competitive sector of which production requires differentiated goods produced in two successive stages. We introduce shift working disutility and allow consumers to choose between day and night shifts. Shift working disutility raises the cost of night production and firms can reduce costs by “virtually” outsourcing foreign labor. We found that firms only outsource if relat...

  3. Night shift work and modifiable lifestyle factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepłońska, Beata; Burdelak, Weronika; Krysicka, Jolanta; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Marcinkiewicz, Andrzej; Sobala, Wojciech; Klimecka-Muszyńska, Dorota; Rybacki, Marcin

    2014-10-01

    Night shift work has been linked to some chronic diseases. Modification of lifestyle by night work may partially contribute to the development of these diseases, nevertheless, so far epidemiological evidence is limited. The aim of the study was to explore association between night shift work and lifestyle factors using data from a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers employed in industrial plants in Łódź, Poland. The anonymous questionnaire was self-administered among 605 employees (236 women and 369 men, aged 35 or more) - 434 individuals currently working night shifts. Distribution of the selected lifestyle related factors such as smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), number of main meals and the hour of the last meal was compared between current, former, and never night shift workers. Adjusted ORs or predicted means were calculated, as a measure of the associations between night shift work and lifestyle factors, with age, marital status and education included in the models as covariates. Recreational inactivity (defined here as less than one hour per week of recreational physical activity) was associated with current night shift work when compared to never night shift workers (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.13-5.22) among men. Alcohol abstinence and later time of the last meal was associated with night shift work among women. Statistically significant positive relationship between night shift work duration and BMI was observed among men (p = 0.029). This study confirms previous studies reporting lower exercising among night shift workers and tendency to increase body weight. This finding provides important public health implication for the prevention of chronic diseases among night shift workers. Initiatives promoting physical activity addressed in particular to the night shift workers are recommended.

  4. Night shift work and modifiable lifestyle factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pepłońska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Night shift work has been linked to some chronic diseases. Modification of lifestyle by night work may partially contribute to the development of these diseases, nevertheless, so far epidemiological evidence is limited. The aim of the study was to explore association between night shift work and lifestyle factors using data from a cross-sectional study among blue-collar workers employed in industrial plants in Łódź, Poland. Material and Methods: The anonymous questionnaire was self-administered among 605 employees (236 women and 369 men, aged 35 or more - 434 individuals currently wor­king night shifts. Distribution of the selected lifestyle related factors such as smoking, alcohol drinking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI, number of main meals and the hour of the last meal was compared between current, former, and never night shift workers. Adjusted ORs or predicted means were calculated, as a measure of the associations between night shift work and lifestyle factors, with age, marital status and education included in the models as covariates. Results: Recreational inactivity (defined here as less than one hour per week of recreational physical activity was associated with current night shift work when compared to never night shift workers (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.13-5.22 among men. Alcohol abstinence and later time of the last meal was associated with night shift work among women. Statistically significant positive relationship between night shift work duration and BMI was observed among men (p = 0.029. Conclusions: This study confirms previous studies reporting lower exercising among night shift workers and tendency to increase body weight. This finding provides important public health implication for the prevention of chronic diseases among night shift workers. Initiatives promoting physical activity addressed in particular to the night shift workers are recommended.

  5. Examining paid sickness absence by shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catano, V M; Bissonnette, A B

    2014-06-01

    Shift workers are at greater risk than day workers with respect to psychological and physical health, yet little research has linked shift work to increased sickness absence. To investigate the relationship between shift work and sickness absence while controlling for organizational and individual characteristics and shift work attributes that have confounded previous research. The study used archive data collected from three national surveys in Canada, each involving over 20000 employees and 6000 private-sector firms in 14 different occupational groups. The employees reported the number of paid sickness absence days in the past 12 months. Data were analysed using both chi-squared statistics and hierarchical regressions. Contrary to previous research, shift workers took less paid sickness absence than day workers. There were no differences in the length of the sickness absence between both groups or in sickness absence taken by female and male workers whether working days or shifts. Only job tenure, the presence of a union in the workplace and working rotating shifts predicted sickness absence in shift workers. The results were consistent across all three samples. In general, shift work does not seem to be linked to increased sickness absence. However, such associations may be true for specific industries. Male and female workers did not differ in the amount of sickness absence taken. Rotating shifts, regardless of industry, predicted sickness absence among shift workers. Consideration should be given to implementing scheduled time off between shift changes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Gas transmission : a paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelson, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of energy markets in North America was discussed. The investment opportunities that are possible in a deregulated energy market, be it in production or in the generation of energy commodities, in the development of midstream infrastructure, or in the provision of energy services, were outlined. Deregulation of crude oil, natural gas and electricity has resulted in significant changes in the structure of energy markets and the way in which customers are served. One of the advantages of competition regarding power generation is that it has turned energy into a commodity which has resulted in greater customer choice and efficiency. As one example of midstream infrastructure development, the Alliance Pipeline project was described. This project was conceived as a means to enhance the value of western Canadian natural gas. The 1,900 mile pipeline will run from British Columbia, through Alberta into Chicago where it will interconnect with the North American gas transmission grid. The pipeline is an efficient means of transporting energy from Western Canada to North American markets, and Alliance, as a lowest cost transporter, will continue to put pressure on the traditional infrastructure to become even more competitive at the margin. As such, Alliance represents a paradigm shift in energy transportation, and serves as an excellent example of the type of investment opportunity that a deregulated market can provide. It was suggested that innovation and competition in a deregulated North American energy market will continue to increase. As electricity is deregulated, the energy market will respond more quickly to changes in supply and demand than it did in the past, in an effort to satisfy the needs of investors and customers. This will provide increased opportunities for restructuring and further competition

  7. Shifting currents: Progress, setbacks, and shifts in policy and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Dunning, Charles; Robertson, Dale M.

    2016-01-01

    clean water future. More than a decade has passed since our first statewide WOW conversation and the report that captured recommendations from its participants: Waters of Wisconsin: The Future of Our Aquatic Ecosystems and Resources. Drawing from a diverse and growing set of stakeholders from across the state, the Wisconsin Academy initiated a new conversation in 2012 (known as WOW II) to assess progress in regard to our 2003 recommendations. We also sought to review the status of waters in Wisconsin today. The result of this renewed conversation is Shifting Currents: Progress, Setbacks, and Shifts in Policy and Practice. The new report assesses progress in brief, and explores in greater depth the continuing and emerging challenges to water quality, supply, and aquatic ecosystems in Wisconsin.In this report, we first review the context and frameworks for public decision-making about water and then examine some of the root causes—or “drivers”—and ecological stressors that underlie many of the symptoms we see in the form of pollution or ecosystem degradation in Wisconsin. This is followed by a summary of current water issues, many of which had been identified in the 2003 report and remain relevant today. We examine progress since 2003 but also setbacks, and discuss issues that we are likely to continue to face in the coming decades, including controlling agricultural runoff, mitigating climate change and grappling with its effects on the state’s waters, protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination and other pollutants, and preventing groundwater depletion. We also attempt to anticipate issues on the horizon. We offer a deeper look at some particular challenges, such as phosphorus pollution and groundwater contamination. We then consider the current decision-making framework and how it is shaping our capacity to respond to water challenges in Wisconsin. Finally, we offer recommendations and identify opportunities to safeguard Wisconsin’s waters in the

  8. Goos-Haenchen shift in complex crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Staliunas, Kestutis [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Instituci Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avanats (ICREA), Universitat Politcnica de Catalunya, Colom 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The Goos-Haenchen (GH) effect for wave scattering from complex PT-symmetric periodic potentials (complex crystals) is theoretically investigated, with specific reference to optical GH shift in photonic crystal slabs with a sinusoidal periodic modulation of both real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The analysis highlights some distinct and rather unique features as compared to the GH shift found in ordinary crystals. In particular, as opposed to GH shift in ordinary crystals, which is large at the band gap edges, in complex crystals the GH shift can be large inside the reflection (amplification) band and becomes extremely large as the PT symmetry-breaking threshold is approached.

  9. Controlling the surface photovoltage on WSe2 by surface chemical modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ro-Ya; Ozawa, Kenichi; Terashima, Naoya; Natsui, Yuto; Feng, Baojie; Ito, Suguru; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Cheng, Cheng-Maw; Yamamoto, Susumu; Kato, Hiroo; Chiang, Tai-Chang; Matsuda, Iwao

    2018-05-01

    The surface photovoltage (SPV) effect is key to the development of opto-electronic devices such as solar-cells and photo-detectors. For the prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide WSe2, core level and valence band photoemission measurements show that the surface band bending of pristine cleaved surfaces can be readily modified by adsorption with K (an electron donor) or C60 (an electron acceptor). Time-resolved pump-probe photoemission measurements reveal that the SPV for pristine cleaved surfaces is enhanced by K adsorption, but suppressed by C60 adsorption, and yet the SPV relaxation time is substantially shortened in both cases. Evidently, adsorbate-induced electronic states act as electron-hole recombination centers that shorten the carrier lifetime.

  10. Reduced Tolerance to Night Shift in Chronic Shift Workers: Insight From Fractal Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Morris, Christopher J; Patxot, Melissa; Yugay, Tatiana; Mistretta, Joseph; Purvis, Taylor E; Scheer, Frank A J L; Hu, Kun

    2017-07-01

    Healthy physiology is characterized by fractal regulation (FR) that generates similar structures in the fluctuations of physiological outputs at different time scales. Perturbed FR is associated with aging and age-related pathological conditions. Shift work, involving repeated and chronic exposure to misaligned environmental and behavioral cycles, disrupts circadian coordination. We tested whether night shifts perturb FR in motor activity and whether night shifts affect FR in chronic shift workers and non-shift workers differently. We studied 13 chronic shift workers and 14 non-shift workers as controls using both field and in-laboratory experiments. In the in-laboratory study, simulated night shifts were used to induce a misalignment between the endogenous circadian pacemaker and the sleep-wake cycles (ie, circadian misalignment) while environmental conditions and food intake were controlled. In the field study, we found that FR was robust in controls but broke down in shift workers during night shifts, leading to more random activity fluctuations as observed in patients with dementia. The night shift effect was present even 2 days after ending night shifts. The in-laboratory study confirmed that night shifts perturbed FR in chronic shift workers and showed that FR in controls was more resilience to the circadian misalignment. Moreover, FR during real and simulated night shifts was more perturbed in those who started shift work at older ages. Chronic shift work causes night shift intolerance, which is probably linked to the degraded plasticity of the circadian control system. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Investigation of Innervation Zone Shift with Continuous Dynamic Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Nishihara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innervation zone (IZ has been identified as the origin of action potential propagation in isometric contraction. However, IZ shifts with changes in muscle length during muscle activity. The IZ shift has been estimated using raw EMG signals. This study aimed to investigate the movement of IZ location during continuous dynamic muscle contraction, using a computer program. Subjects flexed their elbow joint as repetitive dynamic muscle contractions. EMG signals were recorded from the biceps brachii muscle using an eight-channel surface electrode array. Approximately 100 peaks from EMG signals were detected for each channel and summed to estimate the IZ location. For each subject, the estimated IZ locations were subtracted from the IZ location during isometric contractions with the elbow flexed at 90°. The results showed that the IZ moved significantly with elbow joint movement from 45° to 135°. However, IZ movement was biased with only a 3.9 mm IZ shift on average when the elbow angle was acute but a 16 mm IZ shift on average when it was obtuse. The movement of IZ location during continuous dynamic muscle contraction can be investigated using this signal processing procedure without subjective judgment.

  12. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  13. Surface characterization of colossal magnetoresistive manganites La1-xSr xMnO3 using photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, N.; Rosenhahn, A.; Nambu, A.; Sell, B.C.; Mun, B.S.; Yang, S.-H.; Marchesini, S.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Ritchey, S.B.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the temperature and time dependence of Surface chemical composition and atomic structure of in situ fractured colossal magnetoresistive perovskites La 1-x Sr x MnO (x = 0.3, 0.4) using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction, simultaneous with observing marked changes in both core and valence electronic structure on going above the Curie temperature [N. Mannella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2004) 166401]. Stoichiometric analyses via core-level intensity ratios show that the near-surface composition is very nearly the same as that of the nominal (bulk) stoichiometry and further show that, during duration of our experiments, the degree of surface stoichiometry alteration or contamination has been minimal. The effects of photoelectron diffraction on such analyses are also explored. We comment on the degree to which near-surface composition or atomic-structure alterations might influence spectroscopic investigations of these manganites, or other strongly correlated materials

  14. Effects of extended work shifts and shift work on patient safety, productivity, and employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simone M

    2009-12-01

    It is estimated 1.3 million health care errors occur each year and of those errors 48,000 to 98,000 result in the deaths of patients (Barger et al., 2006). Errors occur for a variety of reasons, including the effects of extended work hours and shift work. The need for around-the-clock staff coverage has resulted in creative ways to maintain quality patient care, keep health care errors or adverse events to a minimum, and still meet the needs of the organization. One way organizations have attempted to alleviate staff shortages is to create extended work shifts. Instead of the standard 8-hour shift, workers are now working 10, 12, 16, or more hours to provide continuous patient care. Although literature does support these staffing patterns, it cannot be denied that shifts beyond the traditional 8 hours increase staff fatigue, health care errors, and adverse events and outcomes and decrease alertness and productivity. This article includes a review of current literature on shift work, the definition of shift work, error rates and adverse outcomes related to shift work, health effects on shift workers, shift work effects on older workers, recommended optimal shift length, positive and negative effects of shift work on the shift worker, hazards associated with driving after extended shifts, and implications for occupational health nurses. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Nonradioactive RNA mobility shift with chemiluminescent detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hesham

    RNA mobility shift is one among many procedures used to study RNA-protein interaction. Yet, there are some limitations for the radioactive RNA mobility shift including; 1) the risk of using radiolabeled nucleotides, 2) the long time to get the results; this could range from days to weeks, and 3) its high cost as compared to ...

  16. Pole Inflation - Shift Symmetry and Universal Corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broy, Benedict J.; Galante, Mario; Roest, Diederik; Westphal, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    An appealing explanation for the Planck data is provided by inflationary models with a singular non-canonical kinetic term: a Laurent expansion of the kinetic function translates into a potential with a nearly shift-symmetric plateau in canonical fields. The shift symmetry can be broken at large

  17. Machiavellianism, Discussion Time, and Group Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Helmut; Myers, David G.

    1976-01-01

    Social-emotional and rational-cognitive explanations of group risky shift on choice dilemmas (hypothetical life situations) were evaluated by comparing shift in groups of low Mach (emotional) and high Mach (non-emotional) subjects. Effects of Machiavellian beliefs on social functioning are examined. Group composition was not observed to affect…

  18. Gain Shift Corrections at Chi-Nu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tristan Brooks [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics; Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Ambient conditions have the potential to cause changes in liquid scintillator detector gain that vary with time and temperature. These gain shifts can lead to poor resolution in both energy as well as pulse shape discrimination. In order to correct for these shifts in the Chi-Nu high energy array, a laser system has been developed for calibration of the pulse height signals.

  19. Lamb Shift in Nonrelativistic Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotch, Howard

    1981-01-01

    The bound electron self-energy or Lamb shift is calculated in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. Retardation is retained and also an interaction previously dropped in other nonrelativistic approaches is kept. Results are finite without introducing a cutoff and lead to a Lamb shift in hydrogen of 1030.9 MHz. (Author/JN)

  20. Shifting identities : the musician as theatrical perfomer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hübner, Falk

    2013-01-01

    The artistic PhD research "Shifting Identities" investigates the musicians' professional identity and how this identity might shift when musicians start acting as theatrical performers. In most of the theatrical situations where musicians "perform", their profession is extended by additional tasks

  1. Social Change and Language Shift: South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwangamalu, Nkonko M.

    2003-01-01

    Examines language shift from majority African languages, such as Sotho, Xhosa, and Zulu to English in South Africa. Examines the extent to which sociopolitical changes that have taken place in South Africa have impacted everyday linguistic interaction and have contributed to language shift from the indigenous African language to English,…

  2. Hippocampal theta frequency shifts and operant behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Kamp, A.

    1. 1. A shift of hippocampal dominant theta frequency to 6 c/sec has been demonstrated in the post-reward period in two dogs, which occurs consistently related in time to a well defined behavioural pattern in the course of an operant conditioning paradigm. 2. 2. The frequency shift was detected and

  3. Lambda shifted photonic crystal cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Ek, Sara

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an alternative type of photonic crystal laser design that shifts all the holes in the lattice by a fixed fraction of the targeted emission wavelength. The structures are realized in InGaAsP =1.15 with InGaAsP quantum wells =1.52 as gain material. Cavities with shifts of...

  4. Multiscale regime shifts and planetary boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, T.P.; Carpenter, S.; Rockstrom, J.; Scheffer, M.; Walker, B.

    2013-01-01

    Life on Earth has repeatedly displayed abrupt and massive changes in the past, and there is no reason to expect that comparable planetary-scale regime shifts will not continue in the future. Different lines of evidence indicate that regime shifts occur when the climate or biosphere transgresses a

  5. Shift work, emotional labour and psychological well-being of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Vermaak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effect of emotional labour and the psychological experience of shift work on the psychological well-being at work (PWBW of long term care nursing staff (n = 206. The ‘psychological experience of shift work’ construct defines the perception of the negative effect that working shifts has on the employees’ daily life. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Support was found for the negative relationships between the psychological experience of shift work and PWBW, as well as the emotional labour dimension of surface acting and PWBW. A hierarchical regression analysis suggested that, when controlling for the effect of emotional labour and certain demographic variables (including number of dependents, tenure and actual shift worked, a significant amount of unique variance in PWBW, could be accounted for by the psychological experience of shift work. These results indicate that the PWBW of nursing staff is not only influenced by which shift the individual is on (i.e. day or night shift, but more so by the individuals’ psychological experience of shift work.

  6. Shift work and age in the offshore petroleum industry

    OpenAIRE

    Waage, Siri; Pallesen, Ståle; Moen, Bente Elisabeth; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    Background. Shift work is associated with sleep and health problems. Tolerance to shift work is reported to decrease with age. Shift work tolerance should be considered in different shift work populations. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between age, shift work exposure, shift type, and morningness and sleep/health problems in oil rig shift workers. Material and methods. A total of 199 workers participated. They worked either two weeks of 12-h day shifts (n = 96) or tw...

  7. Measurement of near neighbor separations of surface atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.I.

    Two techniques are being developed to measure the nearest neighbor distances of atoms at the surfaces of solids. Both measures extended fine structure in the excitation probability of core level electrons which are excited by an incident electron beam. This is an important problem because the structures of most surface systems are as yet unknown, even though the location of surface atoms is the basis for any quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics of surfaces and interfaces. These methods would allow any laboratory to make in situ determinations of surface structure in conjunction with most other laboratory probes of surfaces. Each of these two techniques has different advantages; further, the combination of the two will increase confidence in the results by reducing systematic error in the data analysis

  8. Does workplace health promotion reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: One reason for health disparities between shift and day workers may be that workplace health promotion does not reach shift workers to the same extent as it reaches day workers. This study aimed to investigate the association between shift work and the availability of and participation...... in workplace health promotion. METHODS: We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from a large representative sample of all employed people in Denmark. We obtained information on the availability of and participation in six types of workplace health promotion. We also obtained information on working hours, ie......). RESULTS: In the general working population, fixed evening and fixed night workers, and employees working variable shifts including night work reported a higher availability of health promotion, while employees working variable shifts without night work reported a lower availability of health promotion...

  9. Doppler interpretation of quasar red shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolsky, H S

    1966-08-05

    The hypothesis that the quasistellar sources (quasars) are local objects moving with velocities close to the speed of light is examined. Provided there is no observational cutoff on apparent bolometric magnitude for the quasars, the transverse Doppler effect leads to the expectation of fewer blue shifts than red shifts for an isotropic distribution of velocities. Such a distribution also yields a function N(z), the number of objects with red shift less than z which is not inconsistent with the present data. On the basis of two extreme assumptions concerning the origin of such rapidly moving sources, we computed curves of red shift plotted against magnitude. In particular, the curve obtained on the assumption that the quasars originated from an explosion in or nearby our own galaxy is in as good agreement with the observations as the curve of cosmological red shift plotted against magnitude.

  10. Methodological aspects of shift-work research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Anders

    2004-01-01

    A major issue in shift-work research is to understand the possible ways in which shift work can impact performance and health. Nearly all body functions, from those of the cellular level to those of the entire body, are circadian rhythmic. Disturbances of these rhythms as well as the social consequences of odd work hours are of importance for the health and well-being of shift workers. This article reviews a number of common methodological issues which are of relevance to epidemiological studies in this area of research. It discusses conceptual problems regarding the use of the term "shift work," and it underscores the need to develop models that explain the mechanisms of disease in shift workers.

  11. Shift-Peristrophic Multiplexing for High Density Holographic Data Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenta Ushiyama

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Holographic data storage is a promising technology that provides very large data storage capacity, and the multiplexing method plays a significant role in increasing this capacity. Various multiplexing methods have been previously researched. In the present study, we propose a shift-peristrophic multiplexing technique that uses spherical reference waves, and experimentally verify that this method efficiently increases the data capacity. In the proposed method, a series of holograms is recorded with shift multiplexing, in which the recording material is rotated with its axis perpendicular to the material’s surface. By iterating this procedure, multiplicity is shown to improve. This method achieves more than 1 Tbits/inch2 data density recording. Furthermore, a capacity increase of several TB per disk is expected by maximizing the recording medium performance.

  12. [Sleep quality of nurses working in shifts - Hungarian adaptation of the Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusz, Katalin; Tóth, Ákos; Fullér, Noémi; Müller, Ágnes; Oláh, András

    2015-12-06

    Sleep disorders among shift workers are common problems due to the disturbed circadian rhythm. The Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire assesses discrete sleep problems related to work shifts (day, evening and night shifts) and rest days. The aim of the study was to develop the Hungarian version of this questionnaire and to compare the sleep quality of nurses in different work schedules. 326 nurses working in shifts filled in the questionnaire. The authors made convergent and discriminant validation of the questionnaire with the Athens Insomnia Scale and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire. The questionnaire based on psychometric characteristics was suitable to assess sleep disorders associated with shift work in a Hungarian sample. The frequency of discrete symptoms significantly (pshifts. Nurses experienced the worst sleep quality and daytime fatigue after the night shift. Nurses working in irregular shift system had worse sleep quality than nurses working in regular and flexible shift system (pworking in shifts should be assessed with the Hungarian version of the Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire on a nationally representative sample, and the least burdensome shift system could be established.

  13. Non-occupational physical activity levels of shift workers compared with non-shift workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loef, Bette; Hulsegge, Gerben; Wendel-Vos, G C Wanda; Verschuren, W M Monique; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Bakker, Marije F.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Proper, Karin I

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lack of physical activity (PA) has been hypothesised as an underlying mechanism in the adverse health effects of shift work. Therefore, our aim was to compare non-occupational PA levels between shift workers and non-shift workers. Furthermore, exposure-response relationships for

  14. Variational study of spectral shifts. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peton, A.

    1979-01-01

    In a static gravitational field the paths of light are curved. This property can be a priori stated for a V 3 Riemannian manifold: through any two points of V 3 it is possible to draw two families of curves, the straight lines of Euclidean geometry and the photon trajectories z. A fibration of the Galilean space-time can be performed in an original way, by taking the z-trajectories of the photons as the base, the isochronic surfaces as fibres, and 'the equal length time on a z trajectory to reach a given point' as the equivalence relation. The straight lines of Euclidean geometry can then carry the classical mechanics time t, and the z trajectories can carry the optics time (T). These times are related by d(T)=F(x,t)dt. If the Universe is classed as a pseudo-Riemannian manifold of normal hyperbolic type Csup(infinity), the time (T) determined above can be taken as the time coordinate in V 4 . Under these conditions d(S) 2 =F 2 ds 2 , where d(S) 2 is the metric of the Riemannian manifold, conforming to the metric ds 2 and allowing (T) as the cosmic time. The results previously achieved by the author (Peton, 1979) can be used to find 1+zsub(G)=F(Asub(s), tsub(s))/F(Asub(O),tsub(O)) where zsub(G) denotes the shift of the spectral lines due to the metric. In the case of relative motion between O and S, 1+z'=(1+zsub(G))(1+βsub(r))(1-β 2 )sup(-1/2)). The Doppler-Fizeau effect therefore appears as a result of the application of the Fermat principle. (Auth.)

  15. Non-occupational physical activity levels of shift workers compared with non-shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loef, Bette; Hulsegge, Gerben; Wendel-Vos, G C Wanda; Verschuren, W M Monique; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Bakker, Marije F; van der Beek, Allard J; Proper, Karin I

    2017-05-01

    Lack of physical activity (PA) has been hypothesised as an underlying mechanism in the adverse health effects of shift work. Therefore, our aim was to compare non-occupational PA levels between shift workers and non-shift workers. Furthermore, exposure-response relationships for frequency of night shifts and years of shift work regarding non-occupational PA levels were studied. Data of 5980 non-shift workers and 532 shift workers from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) were used in these cross-sectional analyses. Time spent (hours/week) in different PA types (walking/cycling/exercise/chores) and intensities (moderate/vigorous) were calculated based on self-reported PA. Furthermore, sports were operationalised as: playing sports (no/yes), individual versus non-individual sports, and non-vigorous-intensity versus vigorous-intensity sports. PA levels were compared between shift workers and non-shift workers using Generalized Estimating Equations and logistic regression. Shift workers reported spending more time walking than non-shift workers (B=2.3 (95% CI 1.2 to 3.4)), but shift work was not associated with other PA types and any of the sports activities. Shift workers who worked 1-4 night shifts/month (B=2.4 (95% CI 0.6 to 4.3)) and ≥5 night shifts/month (B=3.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 5.6)) spent more time walking than non-shift workers. No exposure-response relationships were found between years of shift work and PA levels. Shift workers spent more time walking than non-shift workers, but we observed no differences in other non-occupational PA levels. To better understand if and how PA plays a role in the negative health consequences of shift work, our findings need to be confirmed in future studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. MR chemical shift imaging of human atheroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohiaddin, R.H.; Underwood, R.; Firmin, D.; Abdulla, A.K.; Rees, S.; Longmore, D.

    1988-01-01

    The lipid content of atheromatous plaques has been measured with chemical shift MR imaging by taking advantage of the different resonance frequencies of protons in lipid and water. Fifteen postmortem aortic specimens of the human descending aorta and the aortae of seven patients with documented peripheral vascular disease were studied at 0.5 T. Spin-echo images were used to localize the lesions before acquisition of the chemical shift images. The specimens were examined histologically, and the lipid distribution in the plaque showed good correlation with the chemical shift data. Validation in vivo and clinical applications remain to be established

  17. Giant Lamb shift in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuehua; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Gu Benyuan

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a general result for the Lamb shift of excited states of multilevel atoms in inhomogeneous electromagnetic structures and apply it to study atomic hydrogen in inverse-opal photonic crystals. We find that the photonic-crystal environment can lead to very large values of the Lamb shift, as compared to the case of vacuum. We also suggest that the position-dependent Lamb shift should extend from a single level to a miniband for an assembly of atoms with random distribution in space, similar to the velocity-dependent Doppler effect in atomic/molecular gases

  18. Forecasting interest rates with shifting endpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dijk, Dick; Koopman, Siem Jan; Wel, Michel van der

    2014-01-01

    We consider forecasting the term structure of interest rates with the assumption that factors driving the yield curve are stationary around a slowly time-varying mean or ‘shifting endpoint’. The shifting endpoints are captured using either (i) time series methods (exponential smoothing) or (ii......) long-range survey forecasts of either interest rates or inflation and output growth, or (iii) exponentially smoothed realizations of these macro variables. Allowing for shifting endpoints in yield curve factors provides substantial and significant gains in out-of-sample predictive accuracy, relative...... to stationary and random walk benchmarks. Forecast improvements are largest for long-maturity interest rates and for long-horizon forecasts....

  19. Search for Higgs shifts in white dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrio, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia " Galileo Galilei," Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Wegner, Gary A., E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com, E-mail: gary.a.wegner@dartmouth.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    We report on a search for differential shifts between electronic and vibronic transitions in carbon-rich white dwarfs BPM 27606 and Procyon B. The absence of differential shifts within the spectral resolution and taking into account systematic effects such as space motion and pressure shifts allows us to set the first upper bound of astrophysical origin on the coupling between the Higgs field and the Kreschmann curvature invariant. Our analysis provides the basis for a more general methodology to derive bounds to the coupling of long-range scalar fields to curvature invariants in an astrophysical setting complementary to the ones available from high-energy physics or table-top experiments.

  20. Beta-shifts, their languages and computability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    they give into the dynamics of the underlying system. We prove that the language of the ß-shift is recursive iff ß is a computable real number. That fact yields a precise characterization of the reals: The real numbers ß for which we can compute arbitrarily good approximations—hence in particular......For every real number ß >1, the ß-shift is a dynamical system describing iterations of the map x ¿ ßx mod 1 and is studied intensively in number theory. Each ß-shift has an associated language of finite strings of characters; properties of this language are studied for the additional insight...

  1. Examining the Conservative Shift from Harsh Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joycelyn Pollock

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a political shift has been observed, in that some political conservatives are now advocating, adjusting, or abandoning draconian drug laws, including mandatory minimums, and funding diversion, re-entry, and drug programs. Vocal proponents of this movement include Grover Norquist, Rand Paul, Edwin Meese, and Mark Levin, from the Texas Public Policy Council. Any movement away from the mass incarceration that has characterized the U.S. correctional policy for the last 30 years is welcomed; however, it is important to note carefully the philosophical foundation of the conservative’s interest in shifting correctional policy. This paper explores the potential factors contributing to this philosophical shift.

  2. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether...... the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. METHODS: We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector...

  3. Soft theorems for shift-symmetric cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Bernardo; Goon, Garrett; Pajer, Enrico; Santoni, Luca

    2018-03-01

    We derive soft theorems for single-clock cosmologies that enjoy a shift symmetry. These so-called consistency conditions arise from a combination of a large diffeomorphism and the internal shift symmetry and fix the squeezed limit of all correlators with a soft scalar mode. As an application, we show that our results reproduce the squeezed bispectrum for ultra-slow-roll inflation, a particular shift-symmetric, nonattractor model which is known to violate Maldacena's consistency relation. Similar results have been previously obtained by Mooij and Palma using background-wave methods. Our results shed new light on the infrared structure of single-clock cosmological spacetimes.

  4. The Prerequisites for a Degrowth Paradigm Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Hubert

    2018-01-01

    What would it take for a degrowth paradigm shift to take place? Drawing on contemporary critical political economy scholarship, this article identifies four prerequisites for socio-economic paradigm shifts: deep crisis, an alternative political project, a comprehensive coalition of social forces...... currently facing humanity. On the other hand, the prospects for a degrowth paradigm shift remain bleak: unlike political projects that became hegemonic in the past, degrowth has neither support from a comprehensive coalition of social forces nor any consent to its agenda among the broader population....

  5. Third ventricle midline shift on computed tomography as an alternative to septum pellucidum shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Carlos Francis A.; Oropilla, Jean Quint L; Alvarez, Victor M.

    2000-01-01

    The cerebral midline shift is measured using the displacement from midline of the third ventricle. It is an easily determined criterion from which CT scans of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hematoma may be investigated. Midline shift is a significant criteria in which to gauge the neurological status of patients. In a retrospective study of 32 patients with spontaneous unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage, a midline third ventricle shift correlated well with septum pellucidum shift. A greater than 7 mm midline third ventricle shift was associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score compared a shift less than 7mm. For the septum pellucidum, a greater than 10 mm shift was similarly associated with a significantly lower Glasgow Coma scale score. (Author)

  6. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Postnova

    Full Text Available Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8 in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  7. Adaptation to shift work: physiologically based modeling of the effects of lighting and shifts' start time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Robinson, Peter A; Postnov, Dmitry D

    2013-01-01

    Shift work has become an integral part of our life with almost 20% of the population being involved in different shift schedules in developed countries. However, the atypical work times, especially the night shifts, are associated with reduced quality and quantity of sleep that leads to increase of sleepiness often culminating in accidents. It has been demonstrated that shift workers' sleepiness can be improved by a proper scheduling of light exposure and optimizing shifts timing. Here, an integrated physiologically-based model of sleep-wake cycles is used to predict adaptation to shift work in different light conditions and for different shift start times for a schedule of four consecutive days of work. The integrated model combines a model of the ascending arousal system in the brain that controls the sleep-wake switch and a human circadian pacemaker model. To validate the application of the integrated model and demonstrate its utility, its dynamics are adjusted to achieve a fit to published experimental results showing adaptation of night shift workers (n = 8) in conditions of either bright or regular lighting. Further, the model is used to predict the shift workers' adaptation to the same shift schedule, but for conditions not considered in the experiment. The model demonstrates that the intensity of shift light can be reduced fourfold from that used in the experiment and still produce good adaptation to night work. The model predicts that sleepiness of the workers during night shifts on a protocol with either bright or regular lighting can be significantly improved by starting the shift earlier in the night, e.g.; at 21:00 instead of 00:00. Finally, the study predicts that people of the same chronotype, i.e. with identical sleep times in normal conditions, can have drastically different responses to shift work depending on their intrinsic circadian and homeostatic parameters.

  8. Shift manager workload assessment - A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berntson, K.; Kozak, A.; Malcolm, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    In early 2003, Bruce Power restarted two of its previously laid up units in the Bruce A generating station, Units 3 and 4. However, due to challenges relating to the availability of personnel with active Shift Manager licenses, an alternate shift structure was proposed to ensure the safe operation of the station. This alternate structure resulted in a redistribution of responsibility, and a need to assess the resulting changes in workload. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was contracted to perform a workload assessment based on the new shift structure, and to provide recommendations, if necessary, to ensure Shift Managers had sufficient resources available to perform their required duties. This paper discusses the performance of that assessment, and lessons learned as a result of the work performed during the Restart project. (authors)

  9. Isotope shift studies in gadolinium spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.A.; Saksena, G.D.; Venugopalan, A.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope shift studies have been carried out in the gadolinium spectrum using a recording Fabry-Perot spectrometer and gadolinium samples enriched in 156 Gd and 160 Gd isotopes. Isotope shifts Δsigma(156-160) have been recorded in 134 lines in the region 3930-4140 A. Some of these lines involve the recently identified even configuration 4f 8 5d6s of Gd I and the newly classified transition 4f 8 6s-4f 8 6p of Gd II. From the isotope shift measurements of lines involving the 4f 8 6s-4f 8 6p transition in Gd II, the isotope shift, ΔT(156-160)=87 mK, has been obtained for the 4f 8 6s configuration. Electronic configurations have been suggested for a number of energy levels and configuration mixing has been pointed out in certain cases. (Auth.)

  10. Achieving excellence on shift through teamwork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, L.

    1988-01-01

    Anyone familiar with the nuclear industry realizes the importance of operators. Operators can achieve error-free plant operations, i.e., excellence on shift through teamwork. As a shift supervisor (senior reactor operator/shift technical advisor) the author went through the plant's first cycle of operations with no scrams and no equipment damaged by operator error, having since changed roles (and companies) to one of assessing plant operations. This change has provided the opportunity to see objectively the importance of operators working together and of the team building and teamwork that contribute to the shift's success. This paper uses examples to show the effectiveness of working together and outlines steps for building a group of operators into a team

  11. [Sleep disorders among physicians on shift work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlafer, O; Wenzel, V; Högl, B

    2014-11-01

    Sleep disorders in physicians who perform shift work can result in increased risks of health problems that negatively impact performance and patient safety. Even those who cope well with shift work are likely to suffer from sleep disorders. The aim of this manuscript is to discuss possible causes, contributing factors and consequences of sleep disorders in physicians and to identify measures that can improve adaptation to shift work and treatment strategies for shift work-associated sleep disorders. The risk factors that influence the development of sleep disorders in physicians are numerous and include genetic factors (15 % of the population), age (> 50 years), undiagnosed sleep apnea,, alcohol abuse as well as multiple stress factors inherent in clinical duties (including shift work), research, teaching and family obligations. Several studies have reported an increased risk for medical errors in sleep-deprived physicians. Shift workers have an increased risk for psychiatric and cardiovascular diseases and shift work may also be a contributing factor to cancer. A relationship has been reported not only with sleep deprivation and changes in food intake but also with diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension and coronary heart disease. Nicotine and alcohol consumption are more frequent among shift workers. Increased sickness and accident rates among physicians when commuting (especially after night shifts) have a socioeconomic impact. In order to reduce fatigue and to improve performance, short naps during shiftwork or naps plus caffeine, have been proposed as coping strategies; however, napping during adverse circadian phases is less effective, if not impossible when unable to fall asleep. Bright and blue light supports alertness during a night shift. After shiftwork, direct sunlight exposure to the retina can be avoided by using dark sunglasses or glasses with orange lenses for commuting home. The home environment for daytime sleeping after a night shift should be

  12. Analytic matrix elements with shifted correlated Gaussians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.......Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics....

  13. Heuristic Approach for Balancing Shift Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Yun, Young Su; Lee, Yong Hee

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a heuristic approach for balancing shift schedules is proposed. For the shift schedules, various constraints which have usually been considered in realworld industry are used, and the objective is to minimize the differences of the workloads in each workgroup. The constraints and objective function are implemented in the proposed heuristic approach. Using a simple instance, the efficiency of the proposed heuristic approach is proved

  14. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), also known as “gel shift assay”, is used to examine the binding parameters and relative affinities of protein and DNA interactions. We produced recombinant CCA1 protein and tested its binding affinity for the promoter fragments that contain CBS (AAAAATCT) or evening element (EE, AAAATATCT) (1) using a modified procedure adopted from published protocols (2,3).

  15. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Canuto; Marcos Pascoal Pattussi; Jamile Block Araldi Macagnan; Ruth Liane Henn; Maria Teresa Anselmo Olinto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic ...

  16. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    OpenAIRE

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers.METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (...

  17. Health effects of the shift work system

    OpenAIRE

    Yüzügüllü, Didem Ata; Aytaç, Necdet; Akbaba, Muhsin

    2018-01-01

    Technological advances and the changes to methods ofproduction in many industrialized countries led to the introduction of shiftwork systems to ensure the continuity in operation of industries. Shift workhas long been known to disrupt circadian rhythm,sleep, and work-life balance.Alfredsson et al. carried out a study of 334 cases with myocardial infarctionand 882 controls, who were selected randomly from the general population in thesame region. The shift-work exposure was assessed from the o...

  18. Management Ownership and Risk-Shifting Investment

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuyuki Teshima

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between management ownership and its risk-shifting incentive. We first present a simple model showing that the risk-shifting incentive of management of financially distressed firms increases as the management ownership of the firm increases. Empirically, we test the hypothesis that under the former Japanese Corporate Reorganization Law, firms with higher management ownership are more likely to use legal rather than private reorganization. Since the reorgan...

  19. Ecosystem regime shifts disrupt trophic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempson, Tessa N; Graham, Nicholas A J; MacNeil, M Aaron; Hoey, Andrew S; Wilson, Shaun K

    2018-01-01

    Regime shifts between alternative stable ecosystem states are becoming commonplace due to the combined effects of local stressors and global climate change. Alternative states are characterized as substantially different in form and function from pre-disturbance states, disrupting the delivery of ecosystem services and functions. On coral reefs, regime shifts are typically characterized by a change in the benthic composition from coral to macroalgal dominance. Such fundamental shifts in the benthos are anticipated to impact associated fish communities that are reliant on the reef for food and shelter, yet there is limited understanding of how regime shifts propagate through the fish community over time, relative to initial or recovery conditions. This study addresses this knowledge gap using long-term data of coral reef regime shifts and recovery on Seychelles reefs following the 1998 mass bleaching event. It shows how trophic structure of the reef fish community becomes increasingly dissimilar between alternative reef ecosystem states (regime-shifted vs. recovering) with time since disturbance. Regime-shifted reefs developed a concave trophic structure, with increased biomass in base trophic levels as herbivorous species benefitted from increased algal resources. Mid trophic level species, including specialists such as corallivores, declined with loss of coral habitat, while biomass was retained in upper trophic levels by large-bodied, generalist invertivores. Recovering reefs also experienced an initial decline in mid trophic level biomass, but moved toward a bottom-heavy pyramid shape, with a wide range of feeding groups (e.g., planktivores, corallivores, omnivores) represented at mid trophic levels. Given the importance of coral reef fishes in maintaining the ecological function of coral reef ecosystems and their associated fisheries, understanding the effects of regime shifts on these communities is essential to inform decisions that enhance ecological

  20. Detecting Fermi-level shifts by Auger electron spectroscopy in Si and GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debehets, J.; Homm, P.; Menghini, M.; Chambers, S. A.; Marchiori, C.; Heyns, M.; Locquet, J. P.; Seo, J. W.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, changes in surface Fermi-level of Si and GaAs, caused by doping and cleaning, are investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy. Based on the Auger voltage contrast, we compared the Auger transition peak energy but with higher accuracy by using a more accurate analyzer and an improved peak position determination method. For silicon, a peak shift as large as 0.46 eV was detected when comparing a cleaned p-type and n-type wafer, which corresponds rather well with the theoretical difference in Fermi-levels. If no cleaning was applied, the peak position did not differ significantly for both wafer types, indicating Fermi-level pinning in the band gap. For GaAs, peak shifts were detected after cleaning with HF and (NH4)2S-solutions in an inert atmosphere (N2-gas). Although the (NH4)2S-cleaning in N2 is very efficient in removing the oxygen from the surface, the observed Ga- and As-peak shifts are smaller than those obtained after the HF-cleaning. It is shown that the magnitude of the shift is related to the surface composition. After Si-deposition on the (NH4)2S-cleaned surface, the Fermi-level shifts back to a similar position as observed for an as-received wafer, indicating that this combination is not successful in unpinning the Fermi-level of GaAs.

  1. Nucleic acid interactions with pyrite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo-Marti, E.; Briones, C.; Rogero, C.; Gomez-Navarro, C.; Methivier, Ch.; Pradier, C.M.; Martin-Gago, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The study of the interaction of nucleic acid molecules with mineral surfaces is a field of growing interest in organic chemistry, origin of life, material science and biotechnology. We have characterized the adsorption of single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (ssPNA) on a natural pyrite surface, as well as the further adsorption of ssDNA on a PNA-modified pyrite surface. The characterization has been performed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The N(1s) and S(2p) XPS core level peaks of PNA and PNA + DNA have been decomposed in curve-components that we have assigned to different chemical species. RAIRS spectra recorded for different concentrations show the presence of positive and negative adsorption bands, related to the semiconducting nature of the surface. The combination of the information gathered by these techniques confirms that PNA adsorbs on pyrite surface, interacting through nitrogen-containing groups of the nucleobases and the iron atoms of the surface, instead of the thiol group of the molecule. The strong PNA/pyrite interaction inhibits further hybridization of PNA with complementary ssDNA, contrary to the behavior reported on gold surfaces

  2. Nucleic acid interactions with pyrite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateo-Marti, E. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850-Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mateome@inta.es; Briones, C.; Rogero, C. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850-Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Navarro, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Methivier, Ch.; Pradier, C.M. [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, UMR CNRS 7609. Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Pl Jussieu, 75005-Paris (France); Martin-Gago, J.A. [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Ajalvir, Km. 4, 28850-Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2008-09-03

    The study of the interaction of nucleic acid molecules with mineral surfaces is a field of growing interest in organic chemistry, origin of life, material science and biotechnology. We have characterized the adsorption of single-stranded peptide nucleic acid (ssPNA) on a natural pyrite surface, as well as the further adsorption of ssDNA on a PNA-modified pyrite surface. The characterization has been performed by means of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The N(1s) and S(2p) XPS core level peaks of PNA and PNA + DNA have been decomposed in curve-components that we have assigned to different chemical species. RAIRS spectra recorded for different concentrations show the presence of positive and negative adsorption bands, related to the semiconducting nature of the surface. The combination of the information gathered by these techniques confirms that PNA adsorbs on pyrite surface, interacting through nitrogen-containing groups of the nucleobases and the iron atoms of the surface, instead of the thiol group of the molecule. The strong PNA/pyrite interaction inhibits further hybridization of PNA with complementary ssDNA, contrary to the behavior reported on gold surfaces.

  3. Shift systems in nuclear power plants - aspects for planning, shift systems, utility practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    1986-01-01

    This lecture contains the most important aspects of shift structure and shift organisation. The criteria for shift planning involving essential tasks, duties, laws and regulations, medical aspects, social aspects, will be presented. In the Federal Republic of Germany some basic models were established, which will be shown and explained with special reference to the number of teams, size of shift crews and absence regulations. Moreover, the lecture will deal with rotation systems and provisions for the transfer of shift responsibilities. By example of a utility plant commissioning time scale (1300 MW PWR) the practice of shift installations will be shown as well as the most important points of education and training. Within this compass the criteria and requirements for training and education of operational personnel in the Federal Republic of Germany will also be touched. (orig.)

  4. Night shift work exposure profile and obesity: Baseline results from a Chinese night shift worker cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenting; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Liuzhuo; Wu, Zijun; Li, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; He, Yonghua; Xie, Shaohua; Li, Mengjie; Fok, Joan P. C.; Tse, Gary; Wong, Martin C. S.; Tang, Jin-ling; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Evans, Greg; Vermeulen, Roel; Tse, Lap Ah

    2018-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to evaluate the associations between types of night shift work and different indices of obesity using the baseline information from a prospective cohort study of night shift workers in China. Methods A total of 3,871 workers from five companies were recruited from the baseline survey. A structured self-administered questionnaire was employed to collect the participants’ demographic information, lifetime working history, and lifestyle habits. Participants were grouped into rotating, permanent and irregular night shift work groups. Anthropometric parameters were assessed by healthcare professionals. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the associations between night shift work and different indices of obesity. Results Night shift workers had increased risk of overweight and obesity, and odds ratios (ORs) were 1.17 (95% CI, 0.97–1.41) and 1.27 (95% CI, 0.74–2.18), respectively. Abdominal obesity had a significant but marginal association with night shift work (OR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.01–1.43). A positive gradient between the number of years of night shift work and overweight or abdominal obesity was observed. Permanent night shift work showed the highest odds of being overweight (OR = 3.94, 95% CI, 1.40–11.03) and having increased abdominal obesity (OR = 3.34, 95% CI, 1.19–9.37). Irregular night shift work was also significantly associated with overweight (OR = 1.56, 95% CI, 1.13–2.14), but its association with abdominal obesity was borderline (OR = 1.26, 95% CI, 0.94–1.69). By contrast, the association between rotating night shift work and these parameters was not significant. Conclusion Permanent and irregular night shift work were more likely to be associated with overweight or abdominal obesity than rotating night shift work. These associations need to be verified in prospective cohort studies. PMID:29763461

  5. Night shift work exposure profile and obesity: Baseline results from a Chinese night shift worker cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miaomiao; Feng, Wenting; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Liuzhuo; Wu, Zijun; Li, Zhimin; Zhang, Bo; He, Yonghua; Xie, Shaohua; Li, Mengjie; Fok, Joan P C; Tse, Gary; Wong, Martin C S; Tang, Jin-Ling; Wong, Samuel Y S; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Evans, Greg; Vermeulen, Roel; Tse, Lap Ah

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associations between types of night shift work and different indices of obesity using the baseline information from a prospective cohort study of night shift workers in China. A total of 3,871 workers from five companies were recruited from the baseline survey. A structured self-administered questionnaire was employed to collect the participants' demographic information, lifetime working history, and lifestyle habits. Participants were grouped into rotating, permanent and irregular night shift work groups. Anthropometric parameters were assessed by healthcare professionals. Multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate the associations between night shift work and different indices of obesity. Night shift workers had increased risk of overweight and obesity, and odds ratios (ORs) were 1.17 (95% CI, 0.97-1.41) and 1.27 (95% CI, 0.74-2.18), respectively. Abdominal obesity had a significant but marginal association with night shift work (OR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.01-1.43). A positive gradient between the number of years of night shift work and overweight or abdominal obesity was observed. Permanent night shift work showed the highest odds of being overweight (OR = 3.94, 95% CI, 1.40-11.03) and having increased abdominal obesity (OR = 3.34, 95% CI, 1.19-9.37). Irregular night shift work was also significantly associated with overweight (OR = 1.56, 95% CI, 1.13-2.14), but its association with abdominal obesity was borderline (OR = 1.26, 95% CI, 0.94-1.69). By contrast, the association between rotating night shift work and these parameters was not significant. Permanent and irregular night shift work were more likely to be associated with overweight or abdominal obesity than rotating night shift work. These associations need to be verified in prospective cohort studies.

  6. Working the Night Shift: The Impact of Compensating Wages and Local Economic Conditions on Shift Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Colene Trent; Walter J. Mayer

    2014-01-01

    The theory of compensating differentials asserts that night shift workers should receive compensating wage differentials due to undesirable work conditions. In weak local economies, workers may have difficulty finding jobs; thus, these workers might be more likely to accept night shift work and be less concerned with the size of the compensating differential for night shifts. Using CPS data from 2001, this paper employs maximum likelihood estimation of an endogenous switching regression model...

  7. Change from an 8-hour shift to a 12-hour shift, attitudes, sleep, sleepiness and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, A; Kecklund, G; Axelsson, J; Akerstedt, T

    1998-01-01

    The present study sought to evaluate the effect of a change from a rotating 3-shift (8-hour) to a 2-shift shift (12 hour) schedule on sleep, sleepiness, performance, perceived health, and well-being. Thirty-two shift workers at a chemical plant (control room operators) responded to a questionnaire a few months before a change was made in their shift schedule and 10 months after the change. Fourteen workers also filled out a diary, carried activity loggers, and carried out reaction-time tests (beginning and end of shift). Fourteen day workers served as a reference group for the questionnaires and 9 were intensively studied during a week with workdays and a free weekend. The questionnaire data showed that the shift change increased satisfaction with workhours, sleep, and time for social activities. Health, perceived accident risk, and reaction-time performance were not negatively affected. Alertness improved and subjective recovery time after night work decreased. The quick changes in the 8-hour schedule greatly increased sleep problems and fatigue. Sleepiness integrated across the entire shift cycle showed that the shift workers were less alert than the day workers, across workdays and days off (although alertness increased with the 12-hour shift). The change from 8-hour to 12-hour shifts was positive in most respects, possibly due to the shorter sequences of the workdays, the longer sequences of consecutive days off, the fewer types of shifts (easier planning), and the elimination of quick changes. The results may differ in groups with a higher work load.

  8. Validation of a Cephalad Fluid Shift Countermeasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, B.; Cole, C.; Kesari, S.; Hargens, A.; Stenger, M.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S. M. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Liu, J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This project will provide critical data required to objectively determine how an optimized thigh cuff could be incorporated into the NASA integrated physiological countermeasure suite. This project will determine if thigh cuffs used during simulated spaceflight impact intracranial pressure (ICP), ocular structure and function, and intraocular pressure (IOP) using state of-the-art techniques. Additionally, some of the same methods, hardware, and protocols will be employed in the present investigation to enable direct comparisons to the International Space Station (ISS) "Fluid Shifts" experiment with Chibis-Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP). This study will determine the temporal physiological responses of thigh cuff application and removal on ocular and cerebral variables (including invasive ICP) in a microgravity analog. Furthermore, this proposed study will determine tissue pressure distribution applied by thigh cuffs in order to improve comfort, mobility, and efficacy of the countermeasure. Our specific aim is to determine the efficacy of a novel thigh cuff device to mitigate cephalad fluid shifts. We hypothesize that a thigh cuff countermeasure employed in a microgravity analog will temporarily reverse or attenuate ocular and cerebral-volume-pressure variables, approaching normal Earth-based seated posture, the most frequent posture assumed in daily life. In addition, we hypothesize that the magnitude of fluid and pressure redistribution using a thigh cuff countermeasure may require a longer exposure time than that of Chibis-LBNP (using ground-based data from our "Fluid Shifts" project). This project directly addresses Critical Path Roadmap Risks and Questions regarding "Risk of Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension/Vision Alterations," and IRP Gap VIIP13: We need to identify preventative and treatment countermeasures to mitigate changes in ocular structure and function and intracranial pressure during spaceflight. METHODS: Noninvasive

  9. Surface states in an external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steslicka, M.

    1975-10-01

    Under conditions typical for field ion microscopy, true surface states can exist. Their shift towards higher energies can be quite significant and, moreover, additional surface levels at still higher energies can appear. The latter can play an important role in the process of tunneling of image gas electrons into surface states

  10. Modelling a Nurse Shift Schedule with Multiple Preference Ranks for Shifts and Days-Off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Cheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to nurse shift schedules, it is found that the nursing staff have diverse preferences about shift rotations and days-off. The previous studies only focused on the most preferred work shift and the number of satisfactory days-off of the schedule at the current schedule period but had few discussions on the previous schedule periods and other preference levels for shifts and days-off, which may affect fairness of shift schedules. As a result, this paper proposes a nurse scheduling model based upon integer programming that takes into account constraints of the schedule, different preference ranks towards each shift, and the historical data of previous schedule periods to maximize the satisfaction of all the nursing staff's preferences about the shift schedule. The main contribution of the proposed model is that we consider that the nursing staff’s satisfaction level is affected by multiple preference ranks and their priority ordering to be scheduled, so that the quality of the generated shift schedule is more reasonable. Numerical results show that the planned shifts and days-off are fair and successfully meet the preferences of all the nursing staff.

  11. Influences on Dietary Choices during Day versus Night Shift in Shift Workers: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnell, Emily K.; Huggins, Catherine E.; Huggins, Chris T.; McCaffrey, Tracy A.; Palermo, Claire; Bonham, Maxine P.

    2017-01-01

    Shift work is associated with diet-related chronic conditions such as obesity and cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to explore factors influencing food choice and dietary intake in shift workers. A fixed mixed method study design was undertaken on a convenience sample of firefighters who continually work a rotating roster. Six focus groups (n = 41) were conducted to establish factors affecting dietary intake whilst at work. Dietary intake was assessed using repeated 24 h dietary recalls (n = 19). Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and interpreted using thematic analysis. Dietary data were entered into FoodWorks and analysed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test; p shift schedule; attitudes and decisions of co-workers; time and accessibility; and knowledge of the relationship between food and health. Participants reported consuming more discretionary foods and limited availability of healthy food choices on night shift. Energy intakes (kJ/day) did not differ between days that included a day or night shift but greater energy density (EDenergy, kJ/g/day) of the diet was observed on night shift compared with day shift. This study has identified a number of dietary-specific shift-related factors that may contribute to an increase in unhealthy behaviours in a shift-working population. Given the increased risk of developing chronic diseases, organisational change to support workers in this environment is warranted. PMID:28245625

  12. Combined chemical shift changes and amino acid specific chemical shift mapping of protein-protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, Frank H.; Riepl, Hubert [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany); Maurer, Till [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Analytical Sciences Department (Germany); Gronwald, Wolfram [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany); Neidig, Klaus-Peter [Bruker BioSpin GmbH, Software Department (Germany); Kalbitzer, Hans Robert [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry (Germany)], E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de

    2007-12-15

    Protein-protein interactions are often studied by chemical shift mapping using solution NMR spectroscopy. When heteronuclear data are available the interaction interface is usually predicted by combining the chemical shift changes of different nuclei to a single quantity, the combined chemical shift perturbation {delta}{delta}{sub comb}. In this paper different procedures (published and non-published) to calculate {delta}{delta}{sub comb} are examined that include a variety of different functional forms and weighting factors for each nucleus. The predictive power of all shift mapping methods depends on the magnitude of the overlap of the chemical shift distributions of interacting and non-interacting residues and the cut-off criterion used. In general, the quality of the prediction on the basis of chemical shift changes alone is rather unsatisfactory but the combination of chemical shift changes on the basis of the Hamming or the Euclidian distance can improve the result. The corrected standard deviation to zero of the combined chemical shift changes can provide a reasonable cut-off criterion. As we show combined chemical shifts can also be applied for a more reliable quantitative evaluation of titration data.

  13. Expert system application for prioritizing preventive actions for shift work: shift expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Hatice; Hatipoğlu, Tuğçen; Cihan, Ahmet; Fiğlali, Nilgün

    2017-09-19

    Shift patterns, work hours, work arrangements and worker motivations have increasingly become key factors for job performance. The main objective of this article is to design an expert system that identifies the negative effects of shift work and prioritizes mitigation efforts according to their importance in preventing these negative effects. The proposed expert system will be referred to as the shift expert. A thorough literature review is conducted to determine the effects of shift work on workers. Our work indicates that shift work is linked to demographic variables, sleepiness and fatigue, health and well-being, and social and domestic conditions. These parameters constitute the sections of a questionnaire designed to focus on 26 important issues related to shift work. The shift expert is then constructed to provide prevention advice at the individual and organizational levels, and it prioritizes this advice using a fuzzy analytic hierarchy process model, which considers comparison matrices provided by users during the prioritization process. An empirical study of 61 workers working on three rotating shifts is performed. After administering the questionnaires, the collected data are analyzed statistically, and then the shift expert produces individual and organizational recommendations for these workers.

  14. Written Language Shift among Norwegian Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Norway there are two written Norwegian languages, Bokmål and Nynorsk. Of these two written languages Bokmål is being used by the majority of the people, and Bokmål has the highest prestige in the society. This article is about the shift of written language from Nynorsk to Bokmål among young people in a traditional Nynorsk district in the country. Drawing on empirical data we conclude that many adolescents are experiencing written language shift. We discuss various reasons for this phenomenon in the linguistic landscape of Norway. In our discussions we emphasize the importance of the school with regard to language maintenance and language revitalization. We call for a new language policy in the educational system that can prevent language shift. Having several dialects and two officially written forms of Norwegian in the country, creates a special linguistic landscape in Norway. Despite the fact that the Norwegian language situation is in several ways unique, it’s done very little research on how the existing policy works in practice. Our research reveals that the existing language policy and practice in the school system is not powerful enough to prevent language shift and language decay among the youngsters. The school system functions like a fabric for language shift.

  15. The development of shifting radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiteng; Chen Yonghong; Yin Fujun; Che Mingsheng; Hu Xiaodan; Yao Shouzhong

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear field, When the nuclear material shifting from the glove-box,use the technology of plastic welding package in accordance with tradition. There are some defects in this technology because of the plastic character, such as package pierced easily, wrapper not fitted storage for long term, etc. Because of this limit. Plastic shifting technology is only fit for shifting radwaste and nuclear material not need storage from radioactive close area to non-radioactive open area for long term.As the nuclear material exiting leak when shifting in plastic package,and the plastic material don't meet the need of storaging safely for long term.We research into a new technology of nuclear material shifting. When nuclear material is carried out from the glove box. It should be sealed by welding case, then it can be storaged safely for long term. At the same time, nuclear material wouldn't pollute the glove box outside.The study achieved well effect in apply. (authors)

  16. Staffing, overtime, and shift scheduling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent events at the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant have demonstrated the need to establish a quantifiable basis for assessing the safety significance of long work hours on nuclear power plant operators. The incidents at TMI-2, Chernobyl, and Bhopal, which all occurred during the late evening/night shift, further highlight the importance of the relationship between shift scheduling and performance. The objective of this project is to estimate, using statistical analysis on data from the nuclear industry, the effects on safety of staffing levels, overtime, and shift scheduling for operators and maintenance personnel. Regarding staffing levels, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently has no explicit regulation concerning the minimum acceptable levels of staffing in a plant that has an operating license. The NRC has no systematic method for collecting data on the number of licensed operators on the operating crews. In 1982 the NRC recommended that plants write into their technical specifications a model policy on overtime. Currently, 77 nuclear power plant units have the model policy or a modification of it written into their technical specifications; 33 units have no policy on overtime. The model policy sets limits on overtime for safety related personnel, although these limits can be exceeded with plant manger approval. The US nuclear power industry has three types of shift schedules: (1) forward-rotating 8-hour/day shift schedules, (2) backward-rotating 8-hour/day schedules, and (3) 12-hour/day schedules

  17. Choice Shift in Opinion Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbay, Michael

    Choice shift is a phenomenon associated with small group dynamics whereby group discussion causes group members to shift their opinions in a more extreme direction so that the mean post-discussion opinion exceeds the mean pre-discussion opinion. Also known as group polarization, choice shift is a robust experimental phenomenon and has been well-studied within social psychology. In opinion network models, shifts toward extremism are typically produced by the presence of stubborn agents at the extremes of the opinion axis, whose opinions are much more resistant to change than moderate agents. However, we present a model in which choice shift can arise without the assumption of stubborn agents; the model evolves member opinions and uncertainties using coupled nonlinear differential equations. In addition, we briefly describe the results of a recent experiment conducted involving online group discussion concerning the outcome of National Football League games are described. The model predictions concerning the effects of network structure, disagreement level, and team choice (favorite or underdog) are in accord with the experimental results. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  18. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector. The questions concerned usual working hours, quality of leadership, and self-reported implementation of workplace activities aimed at stress reduction, reorganization of the working hours, and participation in improvements of working procedures or qualifications. Compared with day workers, shift workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership to some extent explained the lack of reach of interventions especially among fixed evening workers. In the light of the evidence of shift workers' stressful working conditions, we suggest that future studies focus on the generalizability of results of the present study and on how to reach this group and meet their needs when designing and implementing workplace interventions.

  19. Dark refraction shift with allowance for astigmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.D.H. Gillan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To show that the dark refraction shift (dark focus is a more complicated phenomenon than implied when presented as spherical. Methods: Fifty autorefractor measurements of refractive state of the right eye were obtained in light  and  dark  conditions.  Multivariate  methods were used to analyze the data and stereo-pair scat-ter plots, polar meridional profiles and other means of presenting results are used to show important characteristics of the dark refraction shift. Results: The complexity of the dark refrac-tion shift is indicated by stereo-pair scatter plots showing the amount of stigmatic and antistigmatic variation that occurs in light and dark conditions. The mean dark refraction shift is presented in a complete manner including all three components of refractive state. The greater variance and covari-ance under dark conditions is clearly shown by the term-by-term dark-light variance-covariance ratio and polar profiles  of variance and covariance.Conclusions: The  dark  refraction  shift  is  a more complicated phenomenon than implied by representations as purely spherical in nature.

  20. [Shift and night work and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancini, Angela; Ciarrocca, Manuela; Capozzella, Assunta; Corbosiero, Paola; Fiaschetti, Maria; Caciari, Tiziana; Cetica, Carlotta; Scimitto, Lara; Ponticiello, Barnaba Giuseppina; Tasciotti, Zaira; Schifano, Maria Pia; Andreozzit, Giorgia; Tomei, Francesco; Tomei, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Aim of our study was to evaluate the influence that shift work and night work could have on mental health. A review of literary articles from 1990 to 2011 on shift work and night work was carried out. The results of this review confirmed that the shift work and night work affect mental health with the onset of neuropsychological disorders such as mood disorders, anxiety, nervousness, depressive anxiety syndromes, chronic fatigue and chronic insomnia irritability, sleep disturbances, reduction in levels of attention, cognitive impairments, alteration of circadian rhythm. Night work and shift work cause severe desynchronization of the cronobiological rhythms and a disruption of social life with negative effects on performance at work, on health and on social relationships. In the light of these results and recognizing shift work and night work as risk factors for the health of workers is necessary to implement preventive and periodic health checks by the occupational doctor to ensure the health and safety of workers taking account of the different environmental and individual factors.

  1. Competition for FDI and Profit Shifting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jie; Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis

    When countries compete for the location of a new multinational plant they need to be aware of the profit shifting opportunities this new plant creates for the global multinational firm. By modelling explicitly the multinational’s intra-firm transactions, we show that the home market advantage...... that large countries have due to their size will be counteracted by such profit shifting opportunities. As a result of this, large countries will not be able to capitalize on their size and sustain high corporate taxes. We show that, on the basis of these profit shifting opportunities, a small country can...... easily win the location game ahead of a large country. How lenient the small country is in implementing transfer pricing regulations turns out to be an important variable in such location games....

  2. Scandinavian Object Shift and Optimality Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engels, Eva; Vikner, Sten

    This study presents an account of object shift, a word order phenomenon found in most of the Scandinavian languages where an object occurs unexpectedly to the left and not to the right of a sentential adverbial. The book examines object shift across many of the Scandinavian languages and dialects...... and original observations, this book is an important addition to the fields of phonology, optimality theory and theoretical syntax......., and analyses the variation, for example whether object shift is optional or obligatory, whether it applies only to pronouns or other objects as well, and whether it applies to adverbials. The authors show that optimality theory, traditionally used in phonology, is a useful framework for accounting...

  3. The affective shift model of work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledow, Ronald; Schmitt, Antje; Frese, Michael; Kühnel, Jana

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of self-regulation theories, the authors develop an affective shift model of work engagement according to which work engagement emerges from the dynamic interplay of positive and negative affect. The affective shift model posits that negative affect is positively related to work engagement if negative affect is followed by positive affect. The authors applied experience sampling methodology to test the model. Data on affective events, mood, and work engagement was collected twice a day over 9 working days among 55 software developers. In support of the affective shift model, negative mood and negative events experienced in the morning of a working day were positively related to work engagement in the afternoon if positive mood in the time interval between morning and afternoon was high. Individual differences in positive affectivity moderated within-person relationships. The authors discuss how work engagement can be fostered through affect regulation. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Special offer for early shift takers!

    CERN Multimedia

    Muriel

    Peter Jenni, spokesperson of the ATLAS collaboration, just made the following announcement. "Despite the few problems that we are encountering, which of course are unavoidable in such a large project, I am very pleased with the way the ATLAS experiment is taking shape. With the imminence of data taking, I would like to make a special gesture as a thank you to all of you who are working so hard for ATLAS to meet its many deadlines. The first 100 ATLAS members who will sign up for shifts will receive twice the standard OTSMOU credit." You can sign up for shifts as of April 1st by sending an e-mail to Atlas.Shifts@cern.ch.

  5. Application of the power-shift transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchamp, J.J.; Kane, V.E.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the practical consequences of entertaining the power-shift transformation are examined for both analysis of variance and simple random sampling data. The appropriateness of different procedures for estimating the transformation parameters is also considered. Standard maximum likelihood (ml) estimation is shown not to be feasible for the joint estimation of the power-shift parameters. However, it is possible to compute local ml estimates for some problems, but special estimation methods may be necessary. An alternative weighted order statistic (wos) estimator is shown to be useful in some situations. Characteristics of ml and wos estimation for the power-shift transformation are examined by a Monte Carlo experiment. A Box and Cox (1964) example and several other data sets are used to illustrate the estimation procedures. 46 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  6. Shift Work, Chronotype, and Melatonin Patterns among Female Hospital Employees on Day and Night Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Tranmer, Joan; Hung, Eleanor; Korsiak, Jill; Day, Andrew G; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    Shift work-related carcinogenesis is hypothesized to be mediated by melatonin; however, few studies have considered the potential effect modification of this underlying pathway by chronotype or specific aspects of shift work such as the number of consecutive nights in a rotation. In this study, we examined melatonin patterns in relation to shift status, stratified by chronotype and number of consecutive night shifts, and cumulative lifetime exposure to shift work. Melatonin patterns of 261 female personnel (147 fixed-day and 114 on rotations, including nights) at Kingston General Hospital were analyzed using cosinor analysis. Urine samples were collected from all voids over a 48-hour specimen collection period for measurement of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin concentrations using the Buhlmann ELISA Kit. Chronotypes were assessed using mid-sleep time (MSF) derived from the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ). Sociodemographic, health, and occupational information were collected by questionnaire. Rotational shift nurses working nights had a lower mesor and an earlier time of peak melatonin production compared to day-only workers. More pronounced differences in mesor and acrophase were seen among later chronotypes, and shift workers working ≥3 consecutive nights. Among nurses, cumulative shift work was associated with a reduction in mesor. These results suggest that evening-types and/or shift workers working ≥3 consecutive nights are more susceptible to adverse light-at-night effects, whereas long-term shift work may also chronically reduce melatonin levels. Cumulative and current exposure to shift work, including nights, affects level and timing of melatonin production, which may be related to carcinogenesis and cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(5); 830-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Shift work in a security environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhouser, G.A. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Human beings are diurnal species, normally active by day and asleep by night. Yet over thirty million Americans struggle with work schedules that include an off-normal work effort. The railroads, law enforcement, health services, Department of Defense, factory workers, chemical plants and public services, communications and utility workers must provide some form of around-the-clock effort. Shift work has been around since the advent of recorded history. There has always been a need for some type of off-normal service and assistance. The impact of shift work is replete with tales and factual evidence of an increased personnel error rate; disorders, both personal and family, and of course, increased accident events. In recent memory, the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant incident, Union Carbide's explosion in Bhopal, and the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant catastrophe all occurred during off-normal working hours. Yet management overall has done little to correct the production-driven twelve hour, seven day week shift mentality of the nineteenth century. Most schedules in use today are nothing more than cosmetic variations of the old production schedules. This could be driven by a management consideration of the worker's response to change coupled with a reluctant buy-in of responsibility for the effects of change. Florida Power Corporation has developed for its nuclear security force, a unique work schedule which attempts to employ the sound principles of circadian rhythms coupled with a comprehensive training program to counter the problems associated with shift work. The results over the last four years have seen a marked reduction in the generic problems of personnel errors, absenteeism, unscheduled overtime and turnover rates. Utilization and understanding of this scheduling process for rotational shift work needs to be assessed to determine if the benefits are site specific or provide an expected response to the problems of shift work

  8. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, Raquel; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Macagnan, Jamile Block Araldi; Henn, Ruth Liane; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status), socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift), and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration) of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2). The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2), followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64), workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93) and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24). On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73). CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Canuto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if metabolic syndrome and its altered components are associated with demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral factors in fixed-shift workers. METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 902 shift workers of both sexes in a poultry processing plant in Southern Brazil in 2010. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was determined according to the recommendations from Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome. Its frequency was evaluated according to the demographic (sex, skin color, age and marital status, socioeconomic (educational level, income and work shift, and behavioral characteristics (smoking, alcohol intake, leisure time physical activity, number of meals and sleep duration of the sample. The multivariate analysis followed a theoretical framework for identifying metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers. RESULTS The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the sample was 9.3% (95%CI 7.4;11.2. The most frequently altered component was waist circumference (PR 48.4%; 95%CI 45.5;51.2, followed by high-density lipoprotein. Work shift was not associated with metabolic syndrome and its altered components. After adjustment, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was positively associated with women (PR 2.16; 95%CI 1.28;3.64, workers aged over 40 years (PR 3.90; 95%CI 1.78;8.93 and those who reported sleeping five hours or less per day (PR 1.70; 95%CI 1.09;2.24. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome was inversely associated with educational level and having more than three meals per day (PR 0.43; 95%CI 0.26;0.73. CONCLUSIONS Being female, older and deprived of sleep are probable risk factors for metabolic syndrome, whereas higher educational level and higher number of meals per day are protective factors for metabolic syndrome in fixed-shift workers.

  10. Nuclear polarization shifts in light muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfelder, R.

    1983-01-01

    A consistent nonrelativistic expression for the energy shift in muonic atoms due to second-order processes is derived under the assumption that the muon is weakly bound. The transverse contribution is shown to be finite only if the two-photon ('seagull') amplitude is taken into account as required by gauge invariance. Numerical results are presented for muonic 12 C using a recently developed model for the nuclear response function. The total transverse contributions to the energy shift are found to be small although dependent to some extent on the detailed high-momentum behaviour of the seagull term. (orig.)

  11. Lamb shift in the muonic deuterium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P. [Samara State University, Pavlov street 1, 443011, Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State University, Pavlov Street 1, 443011, Samara, Russia and Samara State Aerospace University named after academician S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    We present an investigation of the Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in the muonic deuterium ({mu}D) atom using the three-dimensional quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The vacuum polarization, nuclear-structure, and recoil effects are calculated with the account of contributions of orders {alpha}{sup 3}, {alpha}{sup 4}, {alpha}{sup 5}, and {alpha}{sup 6}. The results are compared with earlier performed calculations. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift at 202.4139 meV can be considered a reliable estimate for comparison with forthcoming experimental data.

  12. Lamb shift in helium-like uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munger, C.T. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The author reports an experimental value of 70.4 (8.3) ev for the one-electron Lamb shift in uranium, in agreement with the theoretical value of 75.3 (0.4) ev. He extracts the Lamb shift from a beam-foil time-of-flight measurement of the 54.4 (3.4) ps lifetime of the 1s2p/sub 1/2/ 3 P 0 state of helium-like (two electron) uranium

  13. Sleep, immunity and shift workers: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Oliveira de Almeida

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available To date, shift workers represent between 15% and 25% of the modern day workforce. Work time poses a great challenge to workers as it requires that they balance productivity and sleep time between shifts. As a result, these workers experience chronic sleep deprivation with increased fatigue and drowsiness due to this sleep deprivation. The impact of this kind of work on the immune system is not yet known. We conducted a literature review with the aim of evaluating articles on this specific type of work's effects on sleep and immunity.

  14. S2p core level spectroscopy of short chain oligothiophenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseggio, O.; Toffoli, D.; Stener, M.; Fronzoni, G.; de Simone, M.; Grazioli, C.; Coreno, M.; Guarnaccio, A.; Santagata, A.; D'Auria, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Near-Edge X-ray-Absorption Fine-Structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) of short-chain oligothiophenes (thiophene, 2,2'-bithiophene, and 2,2':5',2″-terthiophene) in the gas phase have been measured in the sulfur L2,3-edge region. The assignment of the spectral features is based on the relativistic two-component zeroth-order regular approximation time dependent density functional theory approach. The calculations allow us to estimate both the contribution of the spin-orbit splitting and of the molecular-field splitting to the sulfur binding energies and give results in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The deconvolution of the calculated S2p NEXAFS spectra into the two manifolds of excited states converging to the LIII and LII edges facilitates the attribution of the spectral structures. The main S2p NEXAFS features are preserved along the series both as concerns the energy positions and the nature of the transitions. This behaviour suggests that the electronic and geometrical environment of the sulfur atom in the three oligomers is relatively unaffected by the increasing chain length. This trend is also observed in the XPS spectra. The relatively simple structure of S2p NEXAFS spectra along the series reflects the localized nature of the virtual states involved in the core excitation process.

  15. Thoughts on future ESSR studies of inner core levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    Much of the research to be done at a tunable high-brightness, high-energy photon source can take as a starting point work done in the past, some in the distant past, some in the recent past, but almost always rudimentary or exploratory in nature. It began in the mid-twenties when Pierre Auger observed various tracks in a Wilson Cloud Chamber filled with a rare gas and irradiated by energetic x rays. Now-a-days this photographic plate is shown as evidence for the experimental discovery of the radiationless process of atomic de-excitation, the Auger Effect - no doubt true; but these plates also served the important purpose of determining the angular distributions of the photoelectrons, actually the primary goal at the outset of Auger's thesis. Today, the author shows this plate as an illustration of electron spectroscopy which at its very beginning used x rays of high energies lying in the regime to be covered by the APS, and sources such as PEP, ESRF and SPring 8

  16. Influences on Dietary Choices during Day versus Night Shift in Shift Workers: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnell, Emily K; Huggins, Catherine E; Huggins, Chris T; McCaffrey, Tracy A; Palermo, Claire; Bonham, Maxine P

    2017-02-26

    Shift work is associated with diet-related chronic conditions such as obesity and cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to explore factors influencing food choice and dietary intake in shift workers. A fixed mixed method study design was undertaken on a convenience sample of firefighters who continually work a rotating roster. Six focus groups ( n = 41) were conducted to establish factors affecting dietary intake whilst at work. Dietary intake was assessed using repeated 24 h dietary recalls ( n = 19). Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and interpreted using thematic analysis. Dietary data were entered into FoodWorks and analysed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test; p night shift. Energy intakes (kJ/day) did not differ between days that included a day or night shift but greater energy density (ED energy , kJ/g/day) of the diet was observed on night shift compared with day shift. This study has identified a number of dietary-specific shift-related factors that may contribute to an increase in unhealthy behaviours in a shift-working population. Given the increased risk of developing chronic diseases, organisational change to support workers in this environment is warranted.

  17. Contributors to shift work tolerance in South Korean nurses working rotating shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hye-Sun; Lee, Bokim

    2015-05-01

    Shift workers have rapidly increased in South Korea; however, there is no published research exploring shift work tolerance among South Korean workers. This study aimed to investigate factors related to shift work tolerance in South Korean nurses. The sample comprised of 660 nurses who worked shifts in a large hospital in South Korea. A structured questionnaire included following comprehensive variables: demographic (age and number of children), individual (morningness and self-esteem), psychosocial (social support and job stress), lifestyle (alcohol consumption, physical activity, and BMI), and working condition factors (number of night shifts and working hours). Shift work tolerance was measured in terms of insomnia, fatigue, and depression. The results of hierarchical regressions indicate that all variables, except for three, number of children, BMI, and working hours, were related to at least one of the symptoms associated with shift work tolerance. Based on these results, we offer some practical implications to help improve shift work tolerance of workers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Shift Work Disorder and Mental and Physical Effects of Shift Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the growing prevalence of shift work all over the the world, the relationship between the daily lives of irregular lifestyles and rhythms is being investigated for those working as shift workers and their families. The effect of shift work on physical and mental health is a very important field of research in recent years. The onset and persistence of medical complications in shift workers includes impaired synchronization between work schedule rhythms and circadian clock. In this context, studies have been carried out showing the increased risk of sleep-wake disorders, gastrointestinal problems, and cardiovascular diseases. There is little information about the actual frequency, effect on health and treatment of shift work disorder, known as circadian rhythm sleep disorder. Shift work disorder includes insomnia and/or excessive sleepiness related with the work schedule. The aim of this rewiev, mentioning about the physical and mental effects of shift work, and to provide information about the diagnosis, clinic and treatment methods of shift-work disorder.

  19. Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem using finite set of phase shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Apagyi, B; Scheid, W

    2003-01-01

    A system of nonlinear equations is presented for the solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem (1970 J. Math. Phys. 11 805) at fixed energy. From a given finite set of phase shifts for physical angular momenta, the nonlinear equations determine related sets of asymptotic normalization constants and nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta from which all quantities of interest, including the inversion potential itself, can be calculated. As a first application of the method we use input data consisting of a finite set of phase shifts calculated from Woods-Saxon and box potentials representing interactions with diffuse or sharp surfaces, respectively. The results for the inversion potentials, their first moments and asymptotic properties are compared with those provided by the Newton-Sabatier quantum inversion procedure. It is found that in order to achieve inversion potentials of similar quality, the Cox-Thompson method requires a smaller set of phase shifts than the Newton-Sabatier procedure.

  20. Solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem using finite set of phase shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apagyi, Barnabas; Harman, Zoltan; Scheid, Werner

    2003-01-01

    A system of nonlinear equations is presented for the solution of the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering problem (1970 J. Math. Phys. 11 805) at fixed energy. From a given finite set of phase shifts for physical angular momenta, the nonlinear equations determine related sets of asymptotic normalization constants and nonphysical (shifted) angular momenta from which all quantities of interest, including the inversion potential itself, can be calculated. As a first application of the method we use input data consisting of a finite set of phase shifts calculated from Woods-Saxon and box potentials representing interactions with diffuse or sharp surfaces, respectively. The results for the inversion potentials, their first moments and asymptotic properties are compared with those provided by the Newton-Sabatier quantum inversion procedure. It is found that in order to achieve inversion potentials of similar quality, the Cox-Thompson method requires a smaller set of phase shifts than the Newton-Sabatier procedure

  1. A canonical correlation analysis based EMG classification algorithm for eliminating electrode shift effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe Fan; Zhong Wang; Guanglin Li; Ruomei Wang

    2016-08-01

    Motion classification system based on surface Electromyography (sEMG) pattern recognition has achieved good results in experimental condition. But it is still a challenge for clinical implement and practical application. Many factors contribute to the difficulty of clinical use of the EMG based dexterous control. The most obvious and important is the noise in the EMG signal caused by electrode shift, muscle fatigue, motion artifact, inherent instability of signal and biological signals such as Electrocardiogram. In this paper, a novel method based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) was developed to eliminate the reduction of classification accuracy caused by electrode shift. The average classification accuracy of our method were above 95% for the healthy subjects. In the process, we validated the influence of electrode shift on motion classification accuracy and discovered the strong correlation with correlation coefficient of >0.9 between shift position data and normal position data.

  2. TIPS (trigger an IIF paradigm shift)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcup, P.E. Glen [Intel Corporation, MS: F9-016, 4100 Sara Road, Rio Rancho, NM 87124 (United States)]. E-mail: glen.w.kilcup@intel.com; Hickox, Dick [Intel Corporation, MS: F9-016, 4100 Sara Road, Rio Rancho, NM 87124 (United States); Reynaga, Adolfo [Intel Corporation, MS: F9-016, 4100 Sara Road, Rio Rancho, NM 87124 (United States)

    2007-04-11

    Challenge: New Mexico Corporate Services (NMCS) recordable injuries have been averaging 2-4 per year for the last 5 years with no statistical improvement. However, we believe all NM employees must go home incident and injury free every day and just as healthy as they came to work. In addition, we have received feedback from several sources, that indicates some employees are reluctant to report injuries. These indicators showed us that continuing our current strategies, making incremental improvement and changes, would not give us the improvement desired. We needed a paradigm shift to get everyone completely engaged in the IIF (Incident and Injury Free) culture, in order to achieve true IIF results. Methods/Strategies: We formed a small (3-person) taskforce consisting of safety representatives from EHS, Site Services and CS Operations. We reviewed 5 years worth of data to determine what was injuring our people. We also decided to review all injuries, not simply those classified as recordable by OSHA standards. First we identified the types of injury information needed to get a true picture of our safety issues. We analyzed IRB (Incident Review Board) data showing us the following factors and whether any of them contributed to the injury: - Date - Incident Description - Severity - Root Cause - Type of Injury - Season - Work Group/Shift - Area - Improper evaluation of hazard - Inadequate work procedures - Incorrect Mental Model - Inadequate PPE Requirement - Failure to Follow or Unaware of PPE Requirement - Shortcut or Schedule Pressure - Last or First Day of Shift or Adjacent to Holiday - OT - Aggravate Existing Condition - Inadequate Training or Passdown - Experience in Task - Corrective Action Taken - Overall Quality of Response. Once this information was collected for all injuries in an Excel file, we graphed it several ways to help reveal trends: - Shift 7 had double the injuries of shift 5 - Night shift injuries were relatively high but lower than Shift 7 -Shift

  3. TIPS (trigger an IIF paradigm shift)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcup, P.E. Glen; Hickox, Dick; Reynaga, Adolfo

    2007-01-01

    Challenge: New Mexico Corporate Services (NMCS) recordable injuries have been averaging 2-4 per year for the last 5 years with no statistical improvement. However, we believe all NM employees must go home incident and injury free every day and just as healthy as they came to work. In addition, we have received feedback from several sources, that indicates some employees are reluctant to report injuries. These indicators showed us that continuing our current strategies, making incremental improvement and changes, would not give us the improvement desired. We needed a paradigm shift to get everyone completely engaged in the IIF (Incident and Injury Free) culture, in order to achieve true IIF results. Methods/Strategies: We formed a small (3-person) taskforce consisting of safety representatives from EHS, Site Services and CS Operations. We reviewed 5 years worth of data to determine what was injuring our people. We also decided to review all injuries, not simply those classified as recordable by OSHA standards. First we identified the types of injury information needed to get a true picture of our safety issues. We analyzed IRB (Incident Review Board) data showing us the following factors and whether any of them contributed to the injury: - Date - Incident Description - Severity - Root Cause - Type of Injury - Season - Work Group/Shift - Area - Improper evaluation of hazard - Inadequate work procedures - Incorrect Mental Model - Inadequate PPE Requirement - Failure to Follow or Unaware of PPE Requirement - Shortcut or Schedule Pressure - Last or First Day of Shift or Adjacent to Holiday - OT - Aggravate Existing Condition - Inadequate Training or Passdown - Experience in Task - Corrective Action Taken - Overall Quality of Response. Once this information was collected for all injuries in an Excel file, we graphed it several ways to help reveal trends: - Shift 7 had double the injuries of shift 5 - Night shift injuries were relatively high but lower than Shift 7 -Shift

  4. TIPS (trigger an IIF paradigm shift).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcup P E, Glen; Hickox, Dick; Reynaga, Adolfo

    2007-04-11

    New Mexico Corporate Services (NMCS) recordable injuries have been averaging 2-4 per year for the last 5 years with no statistical improvement. However, we believe all NM employees must go home incident and injury free every day and just as healthy as they came to work. In addition, we have received feedback from several sources, that indicates some employees are reluctant to report injuries. These indicators showed us that continuing our current strategies, making incremental improvement and changes, would not give us the improvement desired. We needed a paradigm shift to get everyone completely engaged in the IIF (Incident & Injury Free) culture, in order to achieve true IIF results. We formed a small (3-person) taskforce consisting of safety representatives from EHS, Site Services and CS Operations. We reviewed 5 years worth of data to determine what was injuring our people. We also decided to review all injuries, not simply those classified as recordable by OSHA standards. First we identified the types of injury information needed to get a true picture of our safety issues. We analyzed IRB (Incident Review Board) data showing us the following factors and whether any of them contributed to the injury: - Date - Incident Description - Severity - Root Cause - Type of Injury - Season - Work Group/Shift - Area - Improper evaluation of hazard - Inadequate work procedures - Incorrect Mental Model - Inadequate PPE Requirement - Failure to Follow or Unaware of PPE Requirement - Shortcut or Schedule Pressure - Last or First Day of Shift or Adjacent to Holiday - OT - Aggravate Existing Condition - Inadequate Training or Passdown - Experience in Task - Corrective Action Taken - Overall Quality of Response. Once this information was collected for all injuries in an Excel file, we graphed it several ways to help reveal trends: Shift 7 had double the injuries of shift 5. Night shift injuries were relatively high but lower than Shift 7. Shift 5 had no severe (recordable

  5. Work shift duration: a review comparing eight hour and 12 hour shift systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L; Folkard, S; Tucker, P; Macdonald, I

    1998-04-01

    Shiftwork is now a major feature of working life across a broad range of industries. The features of the shift systems operated can impact on the wellbeing, performance, and sleep of shiftworkers. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge on one major characteristic of shift rotas-namely, shift duration. Evidence comparing the relative effects of eight hour and 12 hour shifts on fatigue and job performance, safety, sleep, and physical and psychological health are considered. At the organisational level, factors such as the mode of system implementation, attitudes towards shift rotas, sickness absence and turnover, overtime, and moonlighting are discussed. Manual and electronic searches of the shiftwork research literature were conducted to obtain information on comparisons between eight hour and 12 hour shifts. The research findings are largely equivocal. The bulk of the evidence suggests few differences between eight and 12 hour shifts in the way they affect people. There may even be advantages to 12 hour shifts in terms of lower stress levels, better physical and psychological wellbeing, improved durations and quality of off duty sleep as well as improvements in family relations. On the negative side, the main concerns are fatigue and safety. It is noted that a 12 hour shift does not equate with being active for only 12 hours. There can be considerable extension of the person's time awake either side of the shift. However, the effects of longer term exposure to extended work days have been relatively uncharted in any systematic way. Longitudinal comparative research into the chronic impact of the compressed working week is needed.

  6. Comparison of sleep disturbances in shift workers and people working with a fixed shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yazdi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different types of sleep disturbances can have a serious negative effect on a person’s ability, function and overall well-being. One of the most important issues that can result in sleep disturbances are occupational causes, the most important among them is shift work. The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of sleep disturbances between shift work and non-shift workers. Material and Methods: This study was designed as a case-control study in 196 shift workers and 204 non-shift workers in a textile factory. The data were collected by using a comprehensive questionnaire including Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index questionnaire, Berlin Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Insomnia Severity Index and Restless Leg Syndrome Questionnaire. Data analyses were carried out using the SPSS software version 13 by student's t-test, Chi square and multiple logistic regressions. Results: The duration of night sleep in shift workers was less than day workers (p<0.001. Prevalence of poor sleep quality and insomnia were higher in shift workers significantly than non shift workers (p<0.001, OR=2.3 95% CI: 1.7-2.9. The most prevalent type of insomnia was problems in initiating sleep (P=0.022, OR=2.2 95% CI: 1.5-3.2. There was no difference in the prevalence of excessive day-time sleepiness, restless leg syndrome, snoring, obstructive sleep apnea and different types of parasomnias between two groups. Conclusion: Reduced length of sleep and higher prevalence of poor sleep quality and insomnia in shift workers emphasizes the importance of serious attention to sleep disorders in shift workers.

  7. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2001-01-01

    This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO(sub 2). During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO(sub 2) partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO(sub 2) partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO(sub 2). Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al(sub 2)O(sub 3) catalysts under conditions of high CO(sub 2) partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H(sub 2)S that is required in the feed

  8. Positron probes of the Ge(1 0 0) surface: The effects of surface reconstructions and electron-positron correlations on positron trapping and annihilation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazleev, N.G.; Jung, E.; Weiss, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) has been applied to study the Ge(1 0 0) surface. The high-resolution PAES spectrum from the Ge(1 0 0) surface displays several strong Auger peaks corresponding to M 4,5 N 1 N 2,3 , M 2,3 M 4,5 M 4,5 , M 2,3 M 4,5 V and M 1 M 4,5 M 4,5 Auger transitions. The integrated peak intensities of Auger transitions are used to obtain experimental annihilation probabilities for the Ge 3d and 3p core level electrons. These experimental results are analyzed by performing calculations of positron surface states and annihilation characteristics of surface trapped positrons with relevant Ge core-level electrons for the non-reconstructed and reconstructed Ge(1 0 0)-p(2 x 1), Ge(1 0 0)-p(2 x 2) and Ge(1 0 0)-c(4 x 2) surfaces. It is found that the positron surface state wave function extends into the Ge lattice in the regions where atoms are displaced from their ideal terminated positions due to reconstructions. Estimates of the positron binding energy and the positron annihilation characteristics reveal their sensitivity to the specific atomic structure of the topmost layers of Ge(1 0 0). A comparison with PAES data reveals an agreement with theoretical core annihilation probabilities for the Auger transitions considered

  9. The Third Perspective on Shifting Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanya Sharma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT There are two perspectives in which the understanding of food sustainability in the world is entangled. The first perspective which believes that food sustainability can be achieved by technology presents shifting cultivation as a reflection of a lower state of cultural evolution in comparison with more sophisticated societies (O’Brien 2002.The second perspective which believes in culture, in the ‘way of life’ paradigm valorise shifting cultivation as a form of indigenous genius, representing the indigenous people as perhaps the original environmentalist (Bandy et al.1993; Conklin 1957; Grandstaff 1981; Hong 1987. The biasness of both the perspectives is well visible. The task now is to document and evaluate indigenous strategies of shifting cultivation through a process of research and development. This process involves identification of promising indigenous practices, characterization of the practices, validation of the utility of the practice for other communities, extrapolation to other locations, verification with key farmers, and wide-scale extension. This can be treated as the third perspective available to the policy makers. By this, the detrimental effects of shifting cultivation can be mitigated and productivity increased (Mali 2003.

  10. Entropy of a bit-shift channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggen, Stan; Balakirsky, Vladimir; Denteneer, Dee; Egner, Sebastian; Hollmann, Henk; Tolhuizen, Ludo; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2006-01-01

    We consider a simple transformation (coding) of an iid source called a bit-shift channel. This simple transformation occurs naturally in magnetic or optical data storage. The resulting process is not Markov of any order. We discuss methods of computing the entropy of the transformed process, and

  11. Ambiguity Produces Attention Shifts in Category Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo, Miguel A.; Orgaz, Cristina; Luque, David; Nelson, James Byron

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that people and nonhuman animals protect their knowledge from interference by shifting attention toward the context when presented with information that contradicts their previous beliefs. Despite that suggestion, no studies have directly measured changes in attention while participants are exposed to an interference…

  12. Doppler Shift Compensation Schemes in VANETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nyongesa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V communication has received a lot of attention as it is a crucial issue in intravehicle communication as well as in Intelligent Transportation System (ITS. In ITS the focus is placed on integration of communication between mobile and fixed infrastructure to execute road safety as well as nonsafety information dissemination. The safety application such as emergence alerts lays emphasis on low-latency packet delivery rate (PDR, whereas multimedia and infotainment call for high data rates at low bit error rate (BER. The nonsafety information includes multimedia streaming for traffic information and infotainment applications such as playing audio content, utilizing navigation for driving, and accessing Internet. A lot of vehicular ad hoc network (VANET research has focused on specific areas including channel multiplexing, antenna diversity, and Doppler shift compensation schemes in an attempt to optimize BER performance. Despite this effort few surveys have been conducted to highlight the state-of-the-art collection on Doppler shift compensation schemes. Driven by this cause we survey some of the recent research activities in Doppler shift compensation schemes and highlight challenges and solutions as a stock-taking exercise. Moreover, we present open issues to be further investigated in order to address the challenges of Doppler shift in VANETs.

  13. Work Shifts and Disability: A National View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Harriet B.; Altman, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    More than one-fifth of employed persons with disabilities work late or rotating shifts, about the same as nondisabled workers. Day workers with disabilities receive lower hourly wages than nondisabled workers. Except for men, nonday workers with disabilities receive wages similar to their nondisabled counterparts. (Contains 27 references.)…

  14. Credit default swaps and risk-shifting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campello, M.; Matta, R.

    2012-01-01

    Credit default swaps (CDSs) are thought to ease borrowing by protecting lenders against default. This paper develops a model of the demand for CDS when borrowers choose the riskiness of investment and verification is imperfect. The model shows that CDSs may lead to risk-shifting, increasing the

  15. Critical Review--Outsourcing: A Paradigm Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakabadse, Nada; Kakabadse, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Discusses trends in outsourcing, provision of goods and services to an organization that were previously delivered in house. Addresses outsourcing in the public sector, advantages and disadvantages, implications for human resource development, and the shift to the new "psychological contract" between employers and employees. (Contains…

  16. Robust balance shift control with posture optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavafoglu, Z.; Kavafoglu, Ersan; Egges, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a control framework which creates robust and natural balance shifting behaviours during standing. Given high-level features such as the position of the center of mass projection and the foot configurations, a kinematic posture satisfying these features is synthesized using

  17. Call for Policy Shift to Happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Ott (Jan Cornelis)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractRichard Layard is an economist and an expert in unemployment and inequality. He worked for the British government as an economic advisor and in 2000 he became a member of the House of Lords. His ambition is to shift the direction of public policy away from crude economic goals like

  18. Early detection of ecosystem regime shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Martin; Dakos, Vasilis; Groeger, Joachim P.

    2012-01-01

    methods may have limited utility in ecosystem-based management as they show no or weak potential for early-warning. We therefore propose a multiple method approach for early detection of ecosystem regime shifts in monitoring data that may be useful in informing timely management actions in the face...

  19. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitor...

  20. Improper, Blue-Shifting Hydrogen Bond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel; Havlas, Zdeněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 108, - (2002), s. 325-334 ISSN 1432-881X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905; CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : improper, blue-shifting hydrogen bond * properties * nature Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.421, year: 2002

  1. Hippocampal frequency shifts in different behavioural situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, A.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Storm van Leeuwen, W.

    1971-01-01

    Electrical activity of the dog's hippocampus was recorded in (a) an operant behaviour situation, and (b) a field situation by a radio-telemetering system. The dominant frequency of the theta rhythm shifted consistently from 4–5 c/sec to 6–7 c/sec when a dog (a) withdrew from a pedal after being

  2. Lamb-shift measurement in hydrogenic phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pross, H.; Budelsky, D.; Kremer, L.; Platte, D.; von Brentano, P.; Gassen, J.; Mueller, D.; Scheuer, F.; Pape, A.; Sens, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The final result of a 2s 2 S 1/2-- 2p 2 P 1/2 Lamb-shift measurement by the laser resonance method in hydrogenic phosphorus is reported. Metastable 2s 2 S 1/2 ions were prepared using a β∼0.08 velocity beam of 31 P 14+ ions obtained from the MP tandem accelerator at the Centre de Recherches Nucleaires in Strasbourg. From the metastable state the transition to the 2p 2 P 3/2 state was induced with a high-power dye laser leading to a measured transition energy of ΔE=2.231 33(12) eV. Subtracting the well-known fine-structure splitting ΔE FS =2.314 82(2) eV, the Lamb shift is deduced to be E expt (LS)=20 188(29) GHz. This result is compared with the theoretical value E theor (LS)=20 254(10) GHz and with other experimental results for the Lamb shift in the region Z≤18. Finally, the utility of the Lamb-shift measurements in testing the G(Zα) function of the self-energy, which includes only terms in (Zα) n , n≥6, is discussed

  3. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  4. NEG-shift, Licensing, and Repair Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ken Ramshøj

    2008-01-01

    I entertain the idea that the cross-linguistic variation in the licensing of NEG-shift, the movement of negative objects to spec-NegP, can be accounted for by a few representational constraints that are not directly related to case licensing or feature checking, and which potentially conflict...

  5. Tilts and Ionic Shifts in Rhombohedral Perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noheda, Beatriz; Duan, Ning; Cereceda, Noé; Gonzalo, Julio A.

    1998-01-01

    We make a comparative analysis of rhombohedral perovskites (ABO3) with/without oxygen rotations and ionic shifts, within the framework of a generalised effective field approach. We analyse available data on LaAlO3 and LiTaO3 and new data on Zr-rich PZT, examples of three different ways of structural

  6. Josephson shift register design and layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybysz, J.X.; Buttyan, J.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Integrated circuit chips were designed and fabricated, based on Josephson shift register circuit that simulated operation at 25 GHz using the SPICE program. The 6.25 mm square chip featured a twelve-gate, four-stage shift register fabricated with Nb/AlO/sub x//Nb Josephson junctions with a design value of 2000 A/cm/sup 2/ critical current density. SUPERCOMPACT, a general program for the design of monolithic microwave integrated circuits, was used to model the effects of layout geometry on the uniformity and phase coherence of logic gate bias currents. Gate bias resistors were treated as resistive transmission lines. A layout geometry for the superconductive transmission lines and thin film bias resistors was developed. The original SPICE-designed circuit was modified as a result of these calculations. Modeling indicated that bias current variations could be limited to 3% for all possible logic states of the shift register, and phase coherence of the gates could be maintained to within 2 degrees of 10 Ghz. The fundamental soundness of the circuit design was demonstrated by the proper operation of fabricated shift registers

  7. Effectiveness of the Twelve-Hour Shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Although labor unions traditionally have fought for shorter working hours, there have been recent reversals in this trend. The Pulp and Paperboard Division of Temple-Eastex Incorporated converted to a 12-hour shift and found that safety improved, productivity increased, and overtime decreased. (JOW)

  8. Unraveling the Shift to the Entrepreneurial Economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.B. Audretsch (David); A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA recent literature has emerged providing compelling evidence that a major shift in the organization of the developed economies has been taking place: away from what has been characterized as the managed economy towards the entrepreneurial economy. In particular, the empirical evidence

  9. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  10. Regime Shifts and Resilience in Fisheries Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Chuan Zhong; Villasante, Sebastian; Zhu, Xueqin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of potential regime shifts in Argentinean hake fishery and the inter-linkage between ecological and economic resilience. We develop a theoretical model incorporated with the hazard function for resource management under alternative conditions, and derive the corrective

  11. Calculation of the density shift and broadening of the transition lines in pionic helium: Computational problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalov, Dimitar, E-mail: dbakalov@inrne.bas.bg [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, INRNE (Bulgaria)

    2015-08-15

    The potential energy surface and the computational codes, developed for the evaluation of the density shift and broadening of the spectral lines of laser-induced transitions from metastable states of antiprotonic helium, fail to produce convergent results in the case of pionic helium. We briefly analyze the encountered computational problems and outline possible solutions of the problems.

  12. Shifts in the Microbial Population in Relation to in situ Caries Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, R. Z.; Zijnge, V.; Cicek, A.; de Soet, J. J.; Harmsen, H. J. M.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The shift in microbial diversity from young to mature plaque, related to caries activity on sound and restored surfaces, was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. During a 20-week in situ study on caries progression 8 subjects wearing restored and unrestored dentin and enamel

  13. Shifts in the microbial population in relation to in situ caries progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, R.Z.; Zijnge, V.; Ciçek, A.; de Soet, J.J.; Harmsen, H.J.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The shift in microbial diversity from young to mature plaque, related to caries activity on sound and restored surfaces, was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. During a 20-week in situ study on caries progression 8 subjects wearing restored and unrestored dentin and enamel

  14. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  15. Identifying Patterns of Participant Shifts in the Psalms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erwich, C.M.

    2017-01-01

    A great challenge of reading the Hebrew poetry of the Psalms is the identification of participants. The major cause of this problem is a continual shift in person, gender and number (so-called PGN-shifts, or participant shifts) in the text. To account for these PGN-shifts, scholars have always used

  16. Objectively measured physical activity of hospital shift workers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loef, Bette; van der Beek, Allard J; Holtermann, Andreas; Hulsegge, Gerben; van Baarle, Debbie; Proper, Karin I

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Shift work may alter workers' leisure-time and occupational physical activity (PA) levels, which might be one of the potential underlying mechanisms of the negative health effects of shift work. Therefore, we compared objectively measured PA levels between hospital shift and non-shift

  17. Strain-Induced Spin-Resonance Shifts in Silicon Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, J. J.; Bienfait, A.; Pica, G.; Mansir, J.; Mohiyaddin, F. A.; Zeng, Z.; Niquet, Y. M.; Morello, A.; Schenkel, T.; Morton, J. J. L.; Bertet, P.

    2018-04-01

    In spin-based quantum-information-processing devices, the presence of control and detection circuitry can change the local environment of a spin by introducing strain and electric fields, altering its resonant frequencies. These resonance shifts can be large compared to intrinsic spin linewidths, and it is therefore important to study, understand, and model such effects in order to better predict device performance. We investigate a sample of bismuth donor spins implanted in a silicon chip, on top of which a superconducting aluminum microresonator is fabricated. The on-chip resonator provides two functions: it produces local strain in the silicon due to the larger thermal contraction of the aluminum, and it enables sensitive electron spin-resonance spectroscopy of donors close to the surface that experience this strain. Through finite-element strain simulations, we are able to reconstruct key features of our experiments, including the electron spin-resonance spectra. Our results are consistent with a recently observed mechanism for producing shifts of the hyperfine interaction for donors in silicon, which is linear with the hydrostatic component of an applied strain.

  18. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  19. Plasmon Geometric Phase and Plasmon Hall Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li-kun; Song, Justin C. W.

    2018-04-01

    The collective plasmonic modes of a metal comprise a simple pattern of oscillating charge density that yields enhanced light-matter interaction. Here we unveil that beneath this familiar facade plasmons possess a hidden internal structure that fundamentally alters its dynamics. In particular, we find that metals with nonzero Hall conductivity host plasmons with an intricate current density configuration that sharply departs from that of ordinary zero Hall conductivity metals. This nontrivial internal structure dramatically enriches the dynamics of plasmon propagation, enabling plasmon wave packets to acquire geometric phases as they scatter. At boundaries, these phases accumulate allowing plasmon waves that reflect off to experience a nonreciprocal parallel shift. This plasmon Hall shift, tunable by Hall conductivity as well as plasmon wavelength, displaces the incident and reflected plasmon trajectories and can be readily probed by near-field photonics techniques. Anomalous plasmon geometric phases dramatically enrich the nanophotonics toolbox, and yield radical new means for directing plasmonic beams.

  20. Is the Lamb shift chemically significant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Schwenke, David W.; Pyykko, Pekka; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the Lamb shift to the atomization energies of some prototype molecules, BF3, AlF3, and GaF3, is estimated by a perturbation procedure. It is found to be in the range of 3-5% of the one-electron scalar relativistic contribution to the atomization energy. The maximum absolute value is 0.2 kcal/mol for GaF3. These sample calculations indicate that the Lamb shift is probably small enough to be neglected for energetics of molecules containing light atoms if the target accuracy is 1 kcal/mol, but for higher accuracy calculations and for molecules containing heavy elements it must be considered.

  1. Energy phase shift as mechanism for catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2012-05-01

    Catalysts are agents that by binding reactant molecules lower the energy barriers to chemical reaction. After reaction the catalyst is regenerated, its unbinding energy recruited from the environment, which is associated with an inevitable loss of energy. We show that combining several catalytic sites to become energetically and temporally phase-shifted relative to each other provides a possibility to sustain the overall reaction by internal \\'energy recycling\\', bypassing the need for thermal activation, and in principle allowing the system to work adiabatically. Using an analytical model for superimposed, phase-shifted potentials of F 1-ATP synthase provides a description integrating main characteristics of this rotary enzyme complex. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A compressed shift schedule: dealing with some of the problems of shift work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, J B [Victoria University, Victoria, BC (Canada). School of Public Administration

    1989-07-01

    This study examines some of the psychological and behavioural effects of a 12-hour compressed shift schedule on coal miners in two organisations in Western Canada. It suggests that young, married compressed shift workers are more satisfied with their family relationship. They spend less of their leisure time with spouses when working shifts, and do not spend any more time with them on their days off. They have less time available for many leisure activities on their workdays. The extra time on days off is not reallocated to the leisure activities they were unable to do on their workdays. Some extra leisure time on days off may be spent on personal hobbies. There is no suggestion that the compressed shift schedule has any negative effect on the individual's health. 38 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Research and Implementation of Tractor Power Shift Clutch Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Li Chengjun; Ke Meicong; Wu Youyu

    2018-01-01

    Applying power shift control technology on tractor can improve the power, economy and driving comfort of tractor. The separation and engagement control of clutch in tractor power shift transmission system is the key factor to optimize the quality of shift. Through many experiments and tests, an electronic control unit based on MC9S12 was developed, and an effective clutch control strategy was put forward, which improved the jerk of power shift and shortened the gear shift time.

  4. Lamb shift measurement in hydrogenlike phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Gassen, J.; Kremer, L.

    1988-01-01

    In hydrogenlike phosphorus ions the 2S 1/2 -2P 1/2 energy splitting (Lamb shift) has been found to be E exp (LS)=0.08343(29) eV using laser spectroscopy. This result is to be compared with the most recent theoretical value E th (LS)=0.08376(4) eV by Mohr and Johnson and Soff

  5. Oxidative DNA damage during night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Parveen; Mirick, Dana K; Randolph, Timothy W; Gong, Jicheng; Buchanan, Diana Taibi; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Davis, Scott

    2017-09-01

    We previously reported that compared with night sleep, day sleep among shift workers was associated with reduced urinary excretion of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), potentially reflecting a reduced ability to repair 8-OH-dG lesions in DNA. We identified the absence of melatonin during day sleep as the likely causative factor. We now investigate whether night work is also associated with reduced urinary excretion of 8-OH-dG. For this cross-sectional study, 50 shift workers with the largest negative differences in night work versus night sleep circulating melatonin levels (measured as 6-sulfatoxymelatonin in urine) were selected from among the 223 shift workers included in our previous study. 8-OH-dG concentrations were measured in stored urine samples using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Mixed effects models were used to compare night work versus night sleep 8-OH-dG levels. Circulating melatonin levels during night work (mean=17.1 ng/mg creatinine/mg creatinine) were much lower than during night sleep (mean=51.7 ng/mg creatinine). In adjusted analyses, average urinary 8-OH-dG levels during the night work period were only 20% of those observed during the night sleep period (95% CI 10% to 30%; psleep, is associated with reduced repair of 8-OH-dG lesions in DNA and that the effect is likely driven by melatonin suppression occurring during night work relative to night sleep. If confirmed, future studies should evaluate melatonin supplementation as a means to restore oxidative DNA damage repair capacity among shift workers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Emotional Branding The shift in branding paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Mei Yan

    2004-01-01

    An extensive amount of academic papers have acknowledged that consumers’ decision making process involves not only tangible but also intangible attributes (Copeland, 1925; Sharitt, 1992; Paul & Olson, 1994; Antonides & Raaij, 1998; Aakar, 1991; Kotler, 1996; Zaltman, 2003) However, the power of emotion has been largely neglected by most companies in the past few decades. Recently, as some practitioners recognised the shift of economy and increasing expectation derived from consumers, the bran...

  7. Corporate Profit Shifting and the Multinational Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes ways in which Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) shift profits from one country to another to reduce their income tax expense. This is an important topic for a number of reasons. From a country’s perspective, its income tax rates and policies can have a significant impact upon its tax revenue, economic competitiveness, and the vibrancy of its economy. From the MNE’s perspective, income tax rates and policies determine a firm’s tax obligations, and thus ...

  8. Exploring Insight: Focus on Shifts of Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatnik, Alik; Koichu, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents and analyses a sequence of events that preceded an insight solution to a challenging problem in the context of numerical sequences. A three­week long solution process by a pair of ninth­-grade students is analysed by means of the theory of shifts of attention. The goal for this article is to reveal the potential of this theory…

  9. Security Shift in Future Network Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, T.; Schotanus, H.A.; Verkoelen, C.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    In current practice military communication infrastructures are deployed as stand-alone networked information systems. Network-Enabled Capabilities (NEC) and combined military operations lead to new requirements which current communication architectures cannot deliver. This paper informs IT architects, information architects and security specialists about the separation of network and information security, the consequences of this shift and our view on future communication infrastructures in d...

  10. Ontogenetic shifts of heart position in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Lillywhite, Steven M

    2017-08-01

    Heart position relative to total body length (TL) varies among snakes, with anterior hearts in arboreal species and more centrally located hearts in aquatic or ground-dwelling species. Anterior hearts decrease the cardiac work associated with cranial blood flow and minimize drops in cranial pressure and flow during head-up climbing. Here, we investigate whether heart position shifts intraspecifically during ontogenetic increases in TL. Insular Florida cottonmouth snakes, Agkistrodon conanti, are entirely ground-dwelling and have a mean heart position that is 33.32% TL from the head. In contrast, arboreal rat snakes, Pantherophis obsoleta, of similar lengths have a mean heart position that is 17.35% TL from the head. In both species, relative heart position shifts craniad during ontogeny, with negative slopes = -.035 and -.021% TL/cm TL in Agkistrodon and Pantherophis, respectively. Using a large morphometric data set available for Agkistrodon (N = 192 individuals, 23-140 cm TL), we demonstrate there is an anterior ontogenetic shift of the heart position within the trunk (= 4.56% trunk length from base of head to cloacal vent), independent of head and tail allometry which are both negative. However, in longer snakes > 100 cm, the heart position reverses and shifts caudally in longer Agkistrodon but continues toward the head in longer individuals of Pantherophis. Examination of data sets for two independent lineages of fully marine snakes (Acrochordus granulatus and Hydrophis platurus), which do not naturally experience postural gravity stress, demonstrate both ontogenetic patterns for heart position that are seen in the terrestrial snakes. The anterior migration of the heart is greater in the terrestrial species, even if TL is standardized to that of the longer P. obsoleta, and compensates for about 5 mmHg gravitational pressure head if they are fully upright. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Experience with the shift technical advisor position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Olson, J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Winges, L.

    1984-03-01

    The provision of engineering expertise on shift at commercial nuclear power plants has mainly taken the form of the Shift Technical Advisor (STA). This person, acting in a capacity that is part engineer and part operator, is expected to advise the operations crew in the event of an emergency and review plant operating experience during normal circumstances. The position was mandated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission following the incident at Three Mile Island. This report expands on a growing body of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of the STA. The new data presented here come from interviews with plant personnel and utility officials from nine sites. Researchers from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) interviewed plant personnel, including the STA and immediate management, the shift supervisor and management, the training department, and ancillary staff, all of whom affect the intended performance of the STA. The conclusions of the report are that the design of the STA position results in limited contribution during emergencies; more comprehensive ways should be sought to provide the variety and specificity of engineering expertise needed during such times

  12. Experience with the shift technical advisor position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, B.D.; Olson, J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Winges, L.

    1984-03-01

    The provision of engineering expertise on shift at commercial nuclear power plants has mainly taken the form of the Shift Technical Advisor (STA). This person, acting in a capacity that is part engineer and part operator, is expected to advise the operations crew in the event of an emergency and review plant operating experience during normal circumstances. The position was mandated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission following the incident at Three Mile Island. This report expands on a growing body of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of the STA. The new data presented here come from interviews with plant personnel and utility officials from nine sites. Researchers from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) interviewed plant personnel, including the STA and immediate management, the shift supervisor and management, the training department, and ancillary staff, all of whom affect the intended performance of the STA. The conclusions of the report are that the design of the STA position results in limited contribution during emergencies; more comprehensive ways should be sought to provide the variety and specificity of engineering expertise needed during such times.

  13. Is there a shift to 'active nanostructures'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Vrishali; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Shapira, Philip

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology development is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present different or increased societal impacts and require new approaches for risk assessment. An active nanostructure 'changes or evolves its state during its operation,' according to the National Science Foundation's (2006) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems grant solicitation. Active nanostructure examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This article considers two questions: (a) Is there a 'shift' to active nanostructures? (b) How can we characterize the prototypical areas into which active nanostructures may emerge? We build upon the NSF definition of active nanostructures to develop a research publication search strategy, with a particular intent to distinguish between passive and active nanotechnologies. We perform bibliometric analyses and describe the main publication trends from 1995 to 2008. We then describe the prototypes of research that emerge based on reading the abstracts and review papers encountered in our search. Preliminary results suggest that there is a sharp rise in active nanostructures publications in 2006, and this rise is maintained in 2007 and through to early 2008. We present a typology that can be used to describe the kind of active nanostructures that may be commercialized and regulated in the future.

  14. Energy efficiency improvement by gear shifting optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojevic Ivan A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have proved that elements of driver’s behavior related to gear selection have considerable influence on the fuel consumption. Optimal gear shifting is a complex task, especially for inexperienced drivers. This paper presents an implemented idea for gear shifting optimization with the aim of fuel consumption minimization with more efficient engine working regimes. Optimized gear shifting enables the best possible relation between vehicle motion regimes and engine working regimes. New theoretical-experimental approach has been developed using On-Board Diagnostic technology which so far has not been used for this purpose. The matrix of driving modes according to which tests were performed is obtained and special data acquisition system and analysis process have been developed. Functional relations between experimental test modes and adequate engine working parameters have been obtained and all necessary operations have been conducted to enable their use as inputs for the designed algorithm. The created Model has been tested in real exploitation conditions on passenger car with Otto fuel injection engine and On-Board Diagnostic connection without any changes on it. The conducted tests have shown that the presented Model has significantly positive effects on fuel consumption which is an important ecological aspect. Further development and testing of the Model allows implementation in wide range of motor vehicles with various types of internal combustion engines.

  15. The shifting demographic landscape of pandemic influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As Pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza spreads around the globe, it strikes school-age children more often than adults. Although there is some evidence of pre-existing immunity among older adults, this alone may not explain the significant gap in age-specific infection rates.Based on a retrospective analysis of pandemic strains of influenza from the last century, we show that school-age children typically experience the highest attack rates in primarily naive populations, with the burden shifting to adults during the subsequent season. Using a parsimonious network-based mathematical model which incorporates the changing distribution of contacts in the susceptible population, we demonstrate that new pandemic strains of influenza are expected to shift the epidemiological landscape in exactly this way.Our analysis provides a simple demographic explanation for the age bias observed for H1N1/09 attack rates, and suggests that this bias may shift in coming months. These results have significant implications for the allocation of public health resources for H1N1/09 and future influenza pandemics.

  16. Michelson interferometer based spatial phase shift shearography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin; Yang, Lianxiang; Xu, Nan; Chen, Xu

    2013-06-10

    This paper presents a simple spatial phase shift shearography based on the Michelson interferometer. The Michelson interferometer based shearographic system has been widely utilized in industry as a practical nondestructive test tool. In the system, the Michelson interferometer is used as a shearing device to generate a shearing distance by tilting a small angle in one of the two mirrors. In fact, tilting the mirror in the Michelson interferometer also generates spatial frequency shift. Based on this feature, we introduce a simple Michelson interferometer based spatial phase shift shearography. The Fourier transform (FT) method is applied to separate the spectrum on the spatial frequency domain. The phase change due to the loading can be evaluated using a properly selected windowed inverse-FT. This system can generate a phase map of shearography by using only a single image. The effects of shearing angle, spatial resolution of couple charge device camera, and filter methods are discussed in detail. The theory and the experimental results are presented.

  17. A phenomenological view of language shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsipis, Lukas D

    2004-01-01

    Sociolinguistic studies of language shift have in their majority framed their research object in a horizon of theoretically received variables such as class, ethnicity, locality, attitudes etc. In spite of a limited usefulness of such conceptual variables, and of a recently emerging focus on agency, negotiation, and praxis the best results we obtain have not questioned in a coherent and theoretically sound manner the continuing hegemony of mechanistic-metaphorical models (language death, language suicide). In this paper I propose to examine language shift as a multifaceted phenomenon, joining in this respect work by other linguistic anthropologists researching similar areas. I specifically argue that by replacing vertical concepts such as age and generation, and dichotomous logics such as center and periphery with phenomenologically inspired concepts such as typifications, consociateship, contemporariness, and stream of consciousness we are in a better position to generalize about language shift dynamics. Data for this work is derived primarily from the Albanian speech communities of modern Greece, but also from other communities for comparative purposes.

  18. Is there a shift to "active nanostructures"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vrishali; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Shapira, Philip

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology development is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present different or increased societal impacts and require new approaches for risk assessment. An active nanostructure "changes or evolves its state during its operation," according to the National Science Foundation's (2006) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems grant solicitation. Active nanostructure examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This article considers two questions: (a) Is there a "shift" to active nanostructures? (b) How can we characterize the prototypical areas into which active nanostructures may emerge? We build upon the NSF definition of active nanostructures to develop a research publication search strategy, with a particular intent to distinguish between passive and active nanotechnologies. We perform bibliometric analyses and describe the main publication trends from 1995 to 2008. We then describe the prototypes of research that emerge based on reading the abstracts and review papers encountered in our search. Preliminary results suggest that there is a sharp rise in active nanostructures publications in 2006, and this rise is maintained in 2007 and through to early 2008. We present a typology that can be used to describe the kind of active nanostructures that may be commercialized and regulated in the future.

  19. Shift of biome patterns due to simulated climate variability and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claussen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The variability of simulated equilibrium-response patterns of biomes caused by simulated climate variability and climate shift is analysed. This investigation is based on various realisations of simulated present-day climate and climate shift. It has been found that the difference between biomes computed from three 10-year climatologies and from the corresponding 30-year climatology, simulated by the Hamburg climate model at T21 resolution, amounts to approximately 6% of the total land area, Antarctica excluded. This difference is mainly due to differences in annual moisture availability and winter temperatures. When intercomparing biomes from the 10-year climatologies a 10% difference is seen, but there is no unique difference pattern. In contrast to the interdecadal variability, the shift of conditions favorable for biomes due to a shift in climate in the next 100 years, caused by an increase in sea-surface temperatures and atmospheric CO 2 , reveals a unique trend pattern. It turns out that the strongest and most significant signal is the north-east shift of conditions for boreal biomes. This signal is caused by an increase of annual temperature sums as well as mean temperatures of the coldest and warmest months. Trends in annual moisture availability are of secondary importance globally. Regionally, a decrease in water availability affects biomes in Central and East Europe and an increase of water availability leads to a potential increase in tropical rain forest. In total, all differences amount to roughly 30% of the total land surface, Antarctica excluded. (orig./KW)

  20. Paradigm Shift in the Management Strategy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; McAlpine, Jessica N; Lheureux, Stephanie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Oza, Amit M

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis on the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer continues to evolve. Although epithelial ovarian cancer had been assumed to arise from the coelomic epithelium of the ovarian surface, it is now becoming clearer that the majority of serous carcinomas arise from epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, whereas clear cell and endometrioid cancers arise from endometriosis. Molecular and genomic characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer have been extensively investigated. Our understanding of pathogenesis of the various histologic types of ovarian cancer have begun to inform changes to the strategies for management of epithelial ovarian cancer, which represent a paradigm shift not only for treatment but also for prevention, which previously had not been considered achievable. In this article, we will discuss novel attempts at the prevention of high-grade serous ovarian cancer and treatment strategies for two distinct entities in epithelial ovarian cancer: low-grade serous and clear cell ovarian carcinomas, which are relatively rare and resistant to conventional chemotherapy.

  1. Age differences in strategy shift: retrieval avoidance or general shift reluctance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David J; Touron, Dayna R; Hertzog, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of metacognitive age differences in skill acquisition strategies have relied exclusively on tasks with a processing shift from an algorithm to retrieval strategy. Older adults' demonstrated reluctance to shift strategies in such tasks could reflect either a specific aversion to a memory retrieval strategy or a general, inertial resistance to strategy change. Haider and Frensch's (1999) alphabet verification task (AVT) affords a non-retrieval-based strategy shift. Participants verify the continuation of alphabet strings such as D E F G [4] L, with the bracketed digit indicating a number of letters to be skipped. When all deviations are restricted to the letter-digit-letter portion, participants can speed their responses by selectively attending to only that part of the stimulus. We adapted the AVT to include conditions that promoted shift to a retrieval strategy, a selective attention strategy, or both strategies. Item-level strategy reports were validated by eye movement data. Older adults shifted more slowly to the retrieval strategy but more quickly to the selective attention strategy than young adults, indicating a retrieval-strategy avoidance. Strategy confidence and perceived strategy difficulty correlated with shift to the two strategies in both age groups. Perceived speed of responses with each strategy specifically correlated with older adults' strategy choices, suggesting that some older adults avoid retrieval because they do not appreciate its efficiency benefits.

  2. Age Differences in Strategy Shift: Retrieval Avoidance or General Shift Reluctance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David J.; Touron, Dayna R.; Hertzog, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of metacognitive age differences in skill acquisition strategies have relied exclusively on tasks with a processing shift from an algorithm to retrieval strategy. Older adults’ demonstrated reluctance to shift strategies in such tasks could reflect either a specific aversion to a memory retrieval strategy or a general, inertial resistance to strategy change. Haider and Frensch’s (1999) alphabet verification task (AVT) affords a non-retrieval-based strategy shift. Participants verify the continuation of alphabet strings such as D E F G [4] L, with the bracketed digit indicating a number of letters to be skipped. When all deviations are restricted to the letter-digit-letter portion, participants can speed their responses by selectively attend only to that part of the stimulus. We adapted the AVT to include conditions which promoted shift to a retrieval strategy, a selective attention strategy, or both strategies. Item-level strategy reports were validated by eye movement data. Older adults shifted more slowly to the retrieval strategy but more quickly to the selective attention strategy than young adults, indicating a retrieval-strategy avoidance. Strategy confidence and perceived strategy difficulty correlated with shift to the two strategies in both age groups. Perceived speed of responses with each strategy specifically correlated with older adults’ strategy choices, suggesting that some older adults avoid retrieval because they do not appreciate its efficiency benefits. PMID:23088195

  3. Frequency shift of the Bragg and Non-Bragg backscattering from periodic water wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Biyang; Li, Ke

    2016-08-01

    Doppler effect is used to measure the relative speed of a moving target with respect to the radar, and is also used to interpret the frequency shift of the backscattering from the ocean wave according to the water-wave phase velocity. The widely known relationship between the Doppler shift and the water-wave phase velocity was deduced from the scattering measurements data collected from actual sea surface, and has not been verified under man-made conditions. Here we show that this ob- served frequency shift of the scattering data from the Bragg and Non-Bragg water wave is not the Doppler shift corresponding to the water-wave phase velocity as commonly believed, but is the water-wave frequency and its integral multiple frequency. The power spectrum of the backscatter from the periodic water wave consists of serials discrete peaks, which is equally spaced by water wave frequency. Only when the water-wave length is the integer multiples of the Bragg wave, and the radar range resolution is infinite, does the frequency shift of the backscattering mathematically equal the Doppler shift according to the water-wave phase velocity.

  4. Surface Relief of Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Manuel F.; Almeida, Jose B.

    1989-02-01

    We will describe in this communication a noncont act method of measuring surface profile, it does not require any surface preparation, and it can be used with a very large range of surfaces from highly reflecting to non reflecting ones and as complex as textile surfaces. This method is reasonably immune to dispersion and diffraction, which usually make very difficult the application of non contact profilometry methods to a wide range of materials and situations, namely on quality control systems in industrial production lines. The method is based on the horizontal shift of the bright spot on a horizontal surface when this is illuminated with an oblique beam and moved vertically. in order to make the profilometry the sample is swept by an oblique light beam and the bright spot position is compared with a reference position. The bright spot must be as small as possible, particularly in very irregular surfaces; so the light beam diameter must be as small as possible and the incidence angle must not be too small. The sensivity of a system based on this method will be given, mostly, by the reception optical system.

  5. Using the Moist Static Energy Budget to Understand Storm Track Shifts across a Range of Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barpanda, P.; Shaw, T.

    2017-12-01

    Storm tracks shift meridionally in response to forcing across a range of time scales. Here we formulate a moist static energy (MSE) framework for storm track position and use it to understand storm track shifts in response to seasonal insolation, El Niño minus La Niña conditions, and direct (increased CO2 over land) and indirect (increased sea surface temperature) effects of increased CO2. Two methods (linearized Taylor series and imposed MSE flux divergence) are developed to quantify storm track shifts and decompose them into contributions from net energy (MSE input to the atmosphere minus atmospheric storage) and MSE flux divergence by the mean meridional circulation and stationary eddies. Net energy is not a dominant contribution across the time scales considered. The stationary eddy contribution dominates the storm-track shift in response to seasonal insolation, El Niño minus La Niña conditions, and CO2 direct effect in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas the mean meridional circulation contribution dominates the shift in response to CO2 indirect effect during northern winter and in the Southern Hemisphere during May and October. Overall, the MSE framework shows the seasonal storm-track shift in the Northern Hemisphere is connected to the stationary eddy MSE flux evolution. Furthermore, the equatorward storm-track shift during northern winter in response to El Niño minus La Niña conditions involves a different regime than the poleward shift in response to increased CO2 even though the tropical upper troposphere warms in both cases.

  6. Bloch–Siegert shift in application to the astrophysical determination of the fundamental constants variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyev, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    We have evaluated the Bloch–Siegert shift for the different values of magnetic field's strengths defined at astrophysical conditions, i.e. when the stars with the strong surface magnetic fields are taken as a powerful pumping source of radiation. It is found that the additional shift of resonant frequency should be taken into account in the search for the time variation of the fundamental constants. The main conclusion is that the influence of the electromagnetic field should be considered carefully in each special case of the corresponding frequency determination

  7. Cα chemical shift tensors in helical peptides by dipolar-modulated chemical shift recoupling NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Xiaolan; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hong Mei

    2002-01-01

    The Cα chemical shift tensors of proteins contain information on the backbone conformation. We have determined the magnitude and orientation of the Cα chemical shift tensors of two peptides with α-helical torsion angles: the Ala residue in G*AL (φ=-65.7 deg., ψ=-40 deg.), and the Val residue in GG*V (φ=-81.5 deg., ψ=-50.7 deg.). The magnitude of the tensors was determined from quasi-static powder patterns recoupled under magic-angle spinning, while the orientation of the tensors was extracted from Cα-Hα and Cα-N dipolar modulated powder patterns. The helical Ala Cα chemical shift tensor has a span of 36 ppm and an asymmetry parameter of 0.89. Its σ 11 axis is 116 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-Hα bond while the σ 22 axis is 40 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-N bond. The Val tensor has an anisotropic span of 25 ppm and an asymmetry parameter of 0.33, both much smaller than the values for β-sheet Val found recently (Yao and Hong, 2002). The Val σ 33 axis is tilted by 115 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-Hα bond and 98 deg. ± 5 deg. from the Cα-N bond. These represent the first completely experimentally determined Cα chemical shift tensors of helical peptides. Using an icosahedral representation, we compared the experimental chemical shift tensors with quantum chemical calculations and found overall good agreement. These solid-state chemical shift tensors confirm the observation from cross-correlated relaxation experiments that the projection of the Cα chemical shift tensor onto the Cα-Hα bond is much smaller in α-helices than in β-sheets

  8. Characterization of the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of RNase A using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Robustelli, Paul; De Simone, Alfonso; Cavalli, Andrea; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-03-07

    Following the recognition that NMR chemical shifts can be used for protein structure determination, rapid advances have recently been made in methods for extending this strategy for proteins and protein complexes of increasing size and complexity. A remaining major challenge is to develop approaches to exploit the information contained in the chemical shifts about conformational fluctuations in native states of proteins. In this work we show that it is possible to determine an ensemble of conformations representing the free energy surface of RNase A using chemical shifts as replica-averaged restraints in molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of this surface indicates that chemical shifts can be used to characterize the conformational equilibrium between the two major substates of this protein. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  9. Meaning shift: findings from wellness acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stibich, Mark; Wissow, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Wellness or holistic acupuncture places an emphasis on working with and developing the patient's understanding of health and illness. This research project examines changes in meaning in 367 letters from successful wellness acupuncture. Mentions of changes of the meaning of health and illness were categorized into themes using content analysis. Five main meaning shifts were identified in the data. These shifts are (1) from a goal of fixing the problem to a goal of increasing health, (2) from symptoms as problems to symptoms as teachers, (3) from healing as passive to healing as active, (4) from being dominated by illness to moving beyond the illness, and (5) from regarding the practitioner as a technician to regarding the practitioner as a healer or friend. The shifts in meaning seen in the data illustrate a potential pathway for bringing health benefits to patients and may provide a useful strategy for healing. Narrative (defined here as "first-person accounts by respondents of their experience") is thought to play a major role in the manifestation of symptoms and the ability of patients to cope with illness. Patients suffer not only from their primary symptoms, but also from the results and effects of their illnesses, such as depression and changes in their relationships. For the patient, symptoms often hold much meaning beyond physical sensation. A recurrence of symptoms can have other unpleasant results, such as additional trips to doctors, paying for medications, time off from work, not being able to play with children, or changes in relationships with family members. In many cases, the anxiety and depression surrounding the symptoms causes suffering which are greater than the suffering caused by the physical symptoms directly. These factors also change how the ill individual interacts socially, thereby reducing both instrumental and emotional social support, resulting in a downward spiral of suffering. By interacting with narrative, a path to improved health

  10. Random coil chemical shift for intrinsically disordered proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Brander, Søren; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2011-01-01

    . Temperature has a non-negligible effect on the (13)C random coil chemical shifts, so temperature coefficients are reported for the random coil chemical shifts to allow extrapolation to other temperatures. The pH dependence of the histidine random coil chemical shifts is investigated in a titration series......, which allows the accurate random coil chemical shifts to be obtained at any pH. By correcting the random coil chemical shifts for the effects of temperature and pH, systematic biases of the secondary chemical shifts are minimized, which will improve the reliability of detection of transient secondary...

  11. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2018-01-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  12. A partial differential equation for pseudocontact shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, G T P; Kuprov, Ilya

    2014-10-07

    It is demonstrated that pseudocontact shift (PCS), viewed as a scalar or a tensor field in three dimensions, obeys an elliptic partial differential equation with a source term that depends on the Hessian of the unpaired electron probability density. The equation enables straightforward PCS prediction and analysis in systems with delocalized unpaired electrons, particularly for the nuclei located in their immediate vicinity. It is also shown that the probability density of the unpaired electron may be extracted, using a regularization procedure, from PCS data.

  13. Mexican oil industry: Shifting to difficult oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazan G., Gerardo; Gonzalez, Cristobal J.

    2010-09-15

    Mexico has stepped into an important transition of declining oil fields and new challenging oil projects. The aim of this paper is to show a new perspective of the oil resources that have been exploited throughout the Mexican territory, as well as the remaining resources yet to be exploited. We have developed a resources/production-costs chart that illustrates the historical and future development of the Mexican oil industry, showing the shift that the industry will face in the coming years; this chart was taken from a model already in use by the most prestige energy agencies in the world.

  14. Isotope shift studies in gadolinium spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.A.; Saksena, G.D.; Venugopalan, A.

    1975-01-01

    Isotope shift studies have been carried out in the gadolinium spectrum using a recording Fabry-Perot spectrometer and gadolinium samples enriched in 156 Gd and 160 Gd isotopes. The source used is a liquid-nitrogen-cooled hollow cathode with Ne as the carrier gas and operating at about 30 mA. Isotope shifts Δsigma (156-160) have been recorded in 350 transitions of Gd I and Gd II. In the case of the Gd I spectrum, the transitions studied presently involve almost all the reported configurations assigned to the energy levels of Gd I. The odd configurations are 4f 7 5d6s 2 , 4f 7 5d 2 6s, 4f 7 5d 3 , 4f 8 6s6p, 4f 7 5d6s7s and 4f 7 6s 2 6p, and the even ones are 4f 8 6s 2 , 4f 7 5d6s6p, 4f 7 6s 2 6p, 4f 8 5d6s and 4f 7 5d 2 6p. In the case of the Gd II spectrum isotope shifts in the lines of the newly classified transition 4f 8 6s - 4f 8 6p have been studied and isotope shift ΔT (156-160) 87 mK has been obtained for the 4f 8 6s configuration. The other transitions of Gd II involve the odd configurations 4f 7 5d6s, 4f 7 6s 2 , 4f 7 5d 2 and 4f 8 6p and the even ones 4f 7 6s6p, 4f 8 5d, 4f 7 5d6p and 4f 8 6p. The ΔT (156-160) of a large number of odd and even levels of Gd I and Gd II have been evaluated. Electronic configurations have been suggested for a number of energy levels and configuration mixing has been pointed out in certain cases. A number of hitherto unreported transitions have been found and using a monoisotopic sample of Gd, that is 160 Gd, their separations from the closest listed transitions have been measured. (author)

  15. Pendulum Shifts, Context, Error, and Personal Accountability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Blackman; Oren Hester

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a series of tools that were developed to achieve a balance in under-standing LOWs and the human component of events (including accountability) as the INL continues its shift to a learning culture where people report, are accountable and interested in making a positive difference - and want to report because information is handled correctly and the result benefits both the reporting individual and the organization. We present our model for understanding these interrelationships; the initiatives that were undertaken to improve overall performance.

  16. Proton chemical shift imaging after myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, A.; Doyle, M.; Pohost, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to test whether chemical shift imaging could detect spatially the lipids known to accumulate in myocardium after an ischemic insult. Seven dogs underwent a 24-hour coronary artery occlusion. Hearts were removed and imaged ex vivo by the Dixon method (1.5 T), and myocardial samples were obtained for high-resolution H-1 spectroscopy. Lipid images revealed regions of increased signal intensity in the periphery f the myocardial infarction. The zones of high lipid signal corresponded to zones with elevated mobile lipids as detected by H-1 spectroscopy

  17. Research by Design: A paradigm shift?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will argue that architectural research is becoming more and more important, not only in academia but also in architectural practice. Moreover, a shift is taking place from using and absorbing research methods from other disciplines towards building on the own specific strength...... of the discipline of architecture, i.e. using design and creative practice as a method to generate knowledge and disclose unknown aspects of reality. In doing so, this paper tries to place the Delft ARENA meeting Architectural Research Network Meeting (November 2013) in perspective....

  18. Work-life balance among shift workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Karen; Garde, Anne Helene; Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aims of the study were to explore the effects of the implementation of IT-based tools for planning of rosters among shift workers on work-family-related outcomes and to interpret the results in light of the different implementation processes. METHODS: A quasi-experimental interventio...... of the implementation of self-rostering was found on the balance between work and private life. However, results from the process evaluation suggested that the organizational aim with the intervention was crucial for the effect....

  19. Estimate of coherent tune shifts for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.Y.; Chao, A.W.

    1981-02-01

    Transverse and longitudinal instabilities for a bunched PEP beam with a Gaussian distribution are treated using the standard technique in which instability problems are solved by looking for eigenvalues of the linearized Vlasov equation. The eigen solutions are conveniently expanded in terms of the Laquerre polynomials, and the eigenvalues are given by a symmetric matrix whose elements can be expressed in infinite series. The well-known formalism is used to obtain the matrix formula, and then applied numerically to the PEP ring to estimate the transverse coherent tune shifts. The impedance used is that estimated for the PEP RF cavities. The agreement with experimental data seems reasonable

  20. Space charge effects: tune shifts and resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.

    1986-08-01

    The effects of space charge and beam-beam interactions on single particle motion in the transverse degree of freedom are considered. The space charge force and the resulting incoherent tune shift are described, and examples are given from the AGS and CERN's PSB. Equations of motion are given for resonances in the presence of the space charge force, and particle behavior is examined under resonance and space charge conditions. Resonance phase space structure is described with and without space charge. Uniform and bunched beams are compared. Beam-beam forces and resonances and beam-beam detuning are described. 18 refs., 15 figs

  1. Associations between number of consecutive night shifts and impairment of neurobehavioral performance during a subsequent simulated night shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Michelle; Sletten, Tracey L; Ferguson, Sally A; Grunstein, Ronald R; Anderson, Clare; Kennaway, David J; Lockley, Steven W; Rajaratnam, Shantha Mw

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate sleep and circadian phase in the relationships between neurobehavioral performance and the number of consecutive shifts worked. Thirty-four shift workers [20 men, mean age 31.8 (SD 10.9) years] worked 2-7 consecutive night shifts immediately prior to a laboratory-based, simulated night shift. For 7 days prior, participants worked their usual shift sequence, and sleep was assessed with logs and actigraphy. Participants completed a 10-minute auditory psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) at the start (~21:00 hours) and end (~07:00 hours) of the simulated night shift. Mean reaction times (RT), number of lapses and RT distribution was compared between those who worked 2-3 consecutive night shifts versus those who worked 4-7 shifts. Following 4-7 shifts, night shift workers had significantly longer mean RT at the start and end of shift, compared to those who worked 2-3 shifts. The slowest and fastest 10% RT were significantly slower at the start, but not end, of shift among participants who worked 4-7 nights. Those working 4-7 nights also demonstrated a broader RT distribution at the start and end of shift and had significantly slower RT based on cumulative distribution analysis (5 (th), 25 (th), 50 (th), 75 (th)percentiles at the start of shift; 75th percentile at the end of shift). No group differences in sleep parameters were found for 7 days and 24 hours prior to the simulated night shift. A greater number of consecutive night shifts has a negative impact on neurobehavioral performance, likely due to cognitive slowing.

  2. P1-9: Relationship between Color Shifts in Land's Two-Color Method and Higher- and Lower-Level Visual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Iwaida

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Land's two-color method gives rise to apparent full-color perception, even though only two colors (e.g., red and gray are used. Previous studies indicate that chromatic adaptation, color memory, and inductive effects contribute to the shifts of color perception from real to illusory colors (e.g., Kuriki, 2006 Vision Research 46 3055–3066. This paper investigates the relationship between the color shifts induced by Land images and the skewness of the luminance histogram. In Experiment 1, several Land images are created based on a yellow ball, and the magnitude of the color shifts of the images are measured. The results of Experiment 1 show a significant correlation between the magnitude of the color shifts and skewness, suggesting that skewness is critical for the color shifts. In Experiment 2, we test the hypothesis that color shifts depends on just skewness; the color shifts should be invariant even if the Land images are scrambled. However, the results of Experiment 2 demonstrate that scrambled Land images exhibit less intense color shifts, suggesting that color shifts are determined by the object's overall shape or surface gloss, not just skewness. Taken together, we conclude that both low-level visual processes, such as those associated with luminance histogram skew, and high-level cognitive functions, such as object interpretation or understanding of surface gloss, are involved in the color shift of Land images.

  3. Tachyons, Lamb Shifts and Superluminal Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    2000-01-01

    An elementary account on the origins of cosmic chaos in an open and multiply connected universe is given; there is a finite region in the open 3-space in which the world-lines of galaxies are chaotic, and the mixing taking place in this chaotic nucleus of the universe provides a mechanism to create equidistribution. The galaxy background defines a distinguished frame of reference and a unique cosmic time order; in this context superluminal signal transfer is studied. Tachyons are described by a real Proca field with negative mass square, coupled to a current of subluminal matter. Estimates on tachyon mixing in the geometric optics limit are derived. The potential of a static point source in this field theory is a damped periodic function. We treat this tachyon potential as a perturbation of the Coulomb potential, and study its effects on energy levels in hydrogenic systems. By comparing the induced level shifts to high-precision Lamb shift measurements and QED calculations, we suggest a tachyon mass of 2.1 ke...

  4. Pole shifting with constrained output feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, D.; Mensah, S.; Boisvert, J.

    1984-03-01

    The concept of pole placement plays an important role in linear, multi-variable, control theory. It has received much attention since its introduction, and several pole shifting algorithms are now available. This work presents a new method which allows practical and engineering constraints such as gain limitation and controller structure to be introduced right into the pole shifting design strategy. This is achieved by formulating the pole placement problem as a constrained optimization problem. Explicit constraints (controller structure and gain limits) are defined to identify an admissible region for the feedback gain matrix. The desired pole configuration is translated into an appropriate cost function which must be closed-loop minimized. The resulting constrained optimization problem can thus be solved with optimization algorithms. The method has been implemented as an algorithmic interactive module in a computer-aided control system design package, MVPACK. The application of the method is illustrated to design controllers for an aircraft and an evaporator. The results illustrate the importance of controller structure on overall performance of a control system

  5. The Underlying Social Dynamics of Paradigm Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sickert, Carlos; Cosmelli, Diego; Claro, Francisco; Fuentes, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    We develop here a multi-agent model of the creation of knowledge (scientific progress or technological evolution) within a community of researchers devoted to such endeavors. In the proposed model, agents learn in a physical-technological landscape, and weight is attached to both individual search and social influence. We find that the combination of these two forces together with random experimentation can account for both i) marginal change, that is, periods of normal science or refinements on the performance of a given technology (and in which the community stays in the neighborhood of the current paradigm); and ii) radical change, which takes the form of scientific paradigm shifts (or discontinuities in the structure of performance of a technology) that is observed as a swift migration of the knowledge community towards the new and superior paradigm. The efficiency of the search process is heavily dependent on the weight that agents posit on social influence. The occurrence of a paradigm shift becomes more likely when each member of the community attaches a small but positive weight to the experience of his/her peers. For this parameter region, nevertheless, a conservative force is exerted by the representatives of the current paradigm. However, social influence is not strong enough to seriously hamper individual discovery, and can act so as to empower successful individual pioneers who have conquered the new and superior paradigm.

  6. Shifting bone marrow edema of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosikasuwan, Josh B.; Schultz, Elizabeth; Miller, Theodore T.; Math, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to describe shifting bone marrow edema in the knee as the MR imaging feature of intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis of the knee. Five men, aged 45-73 years, were referred by orthopedic surgeons for MR imaging evaluation of knee pain, which had been present for 2 weeks to 6 months. One patient had a prior history of blunt trauma. None had risk factors for osteonecrosis. Four patients had two MR examinations and the patient with prior blunt trauma had four. Plain radiographs were obtained in all patients. In all cases, a large area of marrow edema initially involved a femoral condyle, with migration of the bone marrow edema to the other femoral condyle, tibia, and/or patella occurring over a 2- to 4-month period. Adjacent soft tissue edema was present in all five patients, while none had a joint effusion. Radiographs of two patients showed generalized osteopenia. In the absence of acute trauma or clinical suspicion of infection, a large area of bone marrow edema without a zone of demarcation may represent intra-articular regional migratory osteoporosis. Demonstration of shifting bone marrow edema on follow-up examinations suggests this diagnosis. (orig.)

  7. Language Lateralization Shifts with Learning by Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Elena; Almryde, Kyle; Patterson, Dianne K.; Vance, Christopher J.; Asbjørnsen, Arve E.

    2014-01-01

    For the majority of the population, language is a left hemisphere lateralized function. During childhood, a pattern of increasing left lateralization for language has been described in brain imaging studies, suggesting this trait develops. This development could reflect change due to brain maturation or change due to skill acquisition, given that children acquire and refine language skills as they mature. We test the possibility that skill acquisition, independent of age-associated maturation can result in shifts in language lateralization in classic language cortex. We imaged adults exposed to unfamiliar language during three successive fMRI scans. Participants were then asked to identify specific words embedded in Norwegian sentences. Exposure to these sentences, relative to complex tones, resulted in consistent activation in the left and right superior temporal gyrus. Activation in this region became increasingly left lateralized with repeated exposure to the unfamiliar language. These results demonstrate that shifts in lateralization can be produced in the short-term within a learning context, independent of maturation. PMID:25285756

  8. Grizzly bear diet shifting on reclaimed mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Cristescu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Industrial developments and reclamation change habitat, possibly altering large carnivore food base. We monitored the diet of a low-density population of grizzly bears occupying a landscape with open-pit coal mines in Canada. During 2009–2010 we instrumented 10 bears with GPS radiocollars and compared their feeding on reclaimed coal mines and neighboring Rocky Mountains and their foothills. In addition, we compared our data with historical bear diet for the same population collected in 2001–2003, before extensive mine reclamation occurred. Diet on mines (n=331 scats was dominated by non-native forbs and graminoids, while diets in the Foothills and Mountains consisted primarily of ungulates and Hedysarum spp. roots respectively, showing diet shifting with availability. Field visitation of feeding sites (n=234 GPS relocation clusters also showed that ungulates were the main diet component in the Foothills, whereas on reclaimed mines bears were least carnivorous. These differences illustrate a shift to feeding on non-native forbs while comparisons with historical diet reveal emergence of elk as an important bear food. Food resources on reclaimed mines attract bears from wilderness areas and bears may be more adaptable to landscape change than previously thought. The grizzly bear’s ready use of mines cautions the universal view of this species as umbrella indicative of biodiversity.

  9. Enormous periodic doppler shifts in SS 433

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margon, B.; Ford, H.C.; Grandi, S.A.; Stone, R.P.S.

    1979-01-01

    We have previously reported prominent ''moving' emission lines in the visible spectrum of Stephenson-Sanduleak 433, the optical counterpart of a variable radio and X-ray source. Further observations show that despite the implausible velocities and changes in velocities implied if the moving features are interpreted as Doppler-shifted Balmer lines, this explanation is indeed correct. Spectroscopy of SS 433 on 51 mights in 1978--1979 reveals that the unidentified features are two sets of Balmer and He I lines, one with large and changing redshift, and the other with large and changing blueshift. Combining our data with published earlier observations, we obtain Doppler shifts on 80 nights in the period 1978 June to 1979 June. These data indicate that the velocity variations are cyclical, repeating in both the blueshift and redshift systems with a period of 164 +- 3 days. The two systems have thus far been observed to reach maximum positive and negative radial velocities of +50,000 and -35,000 km s -1 , respectively, are always symmetric about redshift z=0.04, and follow roughly sinusoidal velocity curves. We discuss in addition a variety of interesting short-term spectroscopic details, including minor but highly significant deviations of the radial velocity from the sinusoid, and nightly line profile changes, sometimes appearing as mirror-image events in the redshift and blueshift systems. The behavior of SS 433 is unprecedented

  10. The Underlying Social Dynamics of Paradigm Shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodriguez-Sickert

    Full Text Available We develop here a multi-agent model of the creation of knowledge (scientific progress or technological evolution within a community of researchers devoted to such endeavors. In the proposed model, agents learn in a physical-technological landscape, and weight is attached to both individual search and social influence. We find that the combination of these two forces together with random experimentation can account for both i marginal change, that is, periods of normal science or refinements on the performance of a given technology (and in which the community stays in the neighborhood of the current paradigm; and ii radical change, which takes the form of scientific paradigm shifts (or discontinuities in the structure of performance of a technology that is observed as a swift migration of the knowledge community towards the new and superior paradigm. The efficiency of the search process is heavily dependent on the weight that agents posit on social influence. The occurrence of a paradigm shift becomes more likely when each member of the community attaches a small but positive weight to the experience of his/her peers. For this parameter region, nevertheless, a conservative force is exerted by the representatives of the current paradigm. However, social influence is not strong enough to seriously hamper individual discovery, and can act so as to empower successful individual pioneers who have conquered the new and superior paradigm.

  11. Theory of Lamb Shift in Muonic Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karshenboim, Savely G., E-mail: savely.karshenboim@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching 85748, Germany and Pulkovo Observatory, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Korzinin, Evgeny Yu.; Shelyuto, Valery A. [D. I. Mendeleev Institute for Metrology, St. Petersburg 190005 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir G. [Pulkovo Observatory, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    There has been for a while a large discrepancy between the values of the proton charge radius measured by the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and by other methods. It has already been clear that theory of muonic hydrogen is reliable at the level of this discrepancy and an error there cannot be a reason for the contradiction. Still the status of theory at the level of the uncertainty of the muonic-hydrogen experiment (which is two orders of magnitude below the discrepancy level) requires an additional clarification. Here, we revisit theory of the 2p − 2s Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We summarize all the theoretical contributions in order α{sup 5}m, including pure quantum electrodynamics (QED) ones as well as those which involve the proton-structure effects. Certain enhanced higher-order effects are also discussed. We basically confirm former QED calculations of other authors, present a review of recent calculations of the proton-structure effects, and treat self-consistently higher-order proton-finite-size corrections. We also overview theory of the 2p states. Eventually, we derive a value of the root-mean-square proton charge radius. It is found to be 0.840 29(55) fm, which is slightly different from that previously published in the literature (0.840 87(39) fm [Antognini et al., Science 339, 417 (2013)])

  12. Design of a projection display screen with vanishing color shift for rear-projection HDTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu; Zhu, Jin-lin

    1996-09-01

    Using bi-convex cylinder lens with matrix structure, the transmissive projection display screen with high contrast and wider viewing angle has been widely used in large rear projection TV and video projectors, it obtained a inhere color shift and puzzled the designer of display screen for RGB projection tube in-line adjustment. Based on the method of light beam racing, the general software of designing projection display screen has been developed and the computer model of vanishing color shift for rear projection HDTV has bee completed. This paper discussed the practical designing method to vanish the defect of color shift and mentioned the relations between the primary optical parameters of display screen and relative geometry sizes of lens' surface. The distributions of optical gain to viewing angle and the influences on engineering design are briefly analyzed.

  13. Correction of phase-shifting error in wavelength scanning digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiangchao; Xu, Min; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2018-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is a promising method for measuring complex micro-structures with high slopes. A quasi-common path interferometric apparatus is adopted to overcome environmental disturbances, and an acousto-optic tunable filter is used to obtain multi-wavelength holograms. However, the phase shifting error caused by the acousto-optic tunable filter reduces the measurement accuracy and, in turn, the reconstructed topographies are erroneous. In this paper, an accurate reconstruction approach is proposed. It corrects the phase-shifting errors by minimizing the difference between the ideal interferograms and the recorded ones. The restriction on the step number and uniformity of the phase shifting is relaxed in the interferometry, and the measurement accuracy for complex surfaces can also be improved. The universality and superiority of the proposed method are demonstrated by practical experiments and comparison to other measurement methods.

  14. Stability of highly shifted equilibria in a large aspect ratio low-field tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Leboeuf, J.-N.; Neches, R. Y.

    2007-01-01

    In the long run, the economics of fusion will dictate that reactors confine large plasma pressure rather efficiently. A possible route manifests itself as equilibria with large shift of the plasma magnetic axis. This shift compresses the flux surfaces on the outer part of the plasma, hereby increasing the allowable plasma pressure a machine can confine for a given toroidal magnetic field, which is the main cost of the device. As a first step toward a reactor, we propose investigating the stability of such configurations in a low magnetic field high aspect ratio machine. By focusing our arguments solely on the shape of the toroidal plasma current density profile we discuss the stability of highly shifted equilibria and their robustness to current profile variations that could occur in actual experiments. The evolution of the plasma parameters, as the beta poloidal is increased, is also examined to give a better understanding of the difference in performance between the various regimes

  15. SHIFT: server for hidden stops analysis in frame-shifted translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2013-02-23

    Frameshift is one of the three classes of recoding. Frame-shifts lead to waste of energy, resources and activity of the biosynthetic machinery. In addition, some peptides synthesized after frame-shifts are probably cytotoxic which serve as plausible cause for innumerable number of diseases and disorders such as muscular dystrophies, lysosomal storage disorders, and cancer. Hidden stop codons occur naturally in coding sequences among all organisms. These codons are associated with the early termination of translation for incorrect reading frame selection and help to reduce the metabolic cost related to the frameshift events. Researchers have identified several consequences of hidden stop codons and their association with myriad disorders. However the wealth of information available is speckled and not effortlessly acquiescent to data-mining. To reduce this gap, this work describes an algorithmic web based tool to study hidden stops in frameshifted translation for all the lineages through respective genetic code systems. This paper describes SHIFT, an algorithmic web application tool that provides a user-friendly interface for identifying and analyzing hidden stops in frameshifted translation of genomic sequences for all available genetic code systems. We have calculated the correlation between codon usage frequencies and the plausible contribution of codons towards hidden stops in an off-frame context. Markovian chains of various order have been used to model hidden stops in frameshifted peptides and their evolutionary association with naturally occurring hidden stops. In order to obtain reliable and persuasive estimates for the naturally occurring and predicted hidden stops statistical measures have been implemented. This paper presented SHIFT, an algorithmic tool that allows user-friendly exploration, analysis, and visualization of hidden stop codons in frameshifted translations. It is expected that this web based tool would serve as a useful complement for

  16. Minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Sauvigny, Friedrich; Jakob, Ruben; Kuster, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    Minimal Surfaces is the first volume of a three volume treatise on minimal surfaces (Grundlehren Nr. 339-341). Each volume can be read and studied independently of the others. The central theme is boundary value problems for minimal surfaces. The treatise is a substantially revised and extended version of the monograph Minimal Surfaces I, II (Grundlehren Nr. 295 & 296). The first volume begins with an exposition of basic ideas of the theory of surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, followed by an introduction of minimal surfaces as stationary points of area, or equivalently

  17. Adaptation of Shift Sequence Based Method for High Number in Shifts Rostering Problem for Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Liogys

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—is to investigate a shift sequence-based approach efficiency then problem consisting of a high number of shifts.Research objectives:• Solve health care workers rostering problem using a shift sequence based method.• Measure its efficiency then number of shifts increases.Design/methodology/approach—Usually rostering problems are highly constrained. Constraints are classified to soft and hard constraints. Soft and hard constraints of the problem are additionally classified to: sequence constraints, schedule constraints and roster constraints. Sequence constraints are considered when constructing shift sequences. Schedule constraints are considered when constructing a schedule. Roster constraints are applied, then constructing overall solution, i.e. combining all schedules.Shift sequence based approach consists of two stages:• Shift sequences construction,• The construction of schedules.In the shift sequences construction stage, the shift sequences are constructed for each set of health care workers of different skill, considering sequence constraints. Shifts sequences are ranked by their penalties for easier retrieval in later stage.In schedules construction stage, schedules for each health care worker are constructed iteratively, using the shift sequences produced in stage 1.Shift sequence based method is an adaptive iterative method where health care workers who received the highest schedule penalties in the last iteration are scheduled first at the current iteration.During the roster construction, and after a schedule has been generated for the current health care worker, an improvement method based on an efficient greedy local search is carried out on the partial roster. It simply swaps any pair of shifts between two health care workers in the (partial roster, as long as the swaps satisfy hard constraints and decrease the roster penalty.Findings—Using shift sequence method for solving health care workers rostering problem

  18. Adaptation of Shift Sequence Based Method for High Number in Shifts Rostering Problem for Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Liogys

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—is to investigate a shift sequence-based approach efficiency then problem consisting of a high number of shifts. Research objectives:• Solve health care workers rostering problem using a shift sequence based method.• Measure its efficiency then number of shifts increases. Design/methodology/approach—Usually rostering problems are highly constrained.Constraints are classified to soft and hard constraints. Soft and hard constraints of the problem are additionally classified to: sequence constraints, schedule constraints and roster constraints. Sequence constraints are considered when constructing shift sequences. Schedule constraints are considered when constructing a schedule. Roster constraints are applied, then constructing overall solution, i.e. combining all schedules.Shift sequence based approach consists of two stages:• Shift sequences construction,• The construction of schedules.In the shift sequences construction stage, the shift sequences are constructed for each set of health care workers of different skill, considering sequence constraints. Shifts sequences are ranked by their penalties for easier retrieval in later stage.In schedules construction stage, schedules for each health care worker are constructed iteratively, using the shift sequences produced in stage 1. Shift sequence based method is an adaptive iterative method where health care workers who received the highest schedule penalties in the last iteration are scheduled first at the current iteration. During the roster construction, and after a schedule has been generated for the current health care worker, an improvement method based on an efficient greedy local search is carried out on the partial roster. It simply swaps any pair of shifts between two health care workers in the (partial roster, as long as the swaps satisfy hard constraints and decrease the roster penalty.Findings—Using shift sequence method for solving health care workers rostering

  19. The Hausdorff measure of chaotic sets of adjoint shift maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Huoyun [Department of Mathematics of Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)]. E-mail: wanghuoyun@sina.com; Song Wangan [Department of Computer, Huaibei Coal Industry Teacher College, Huaibei 235000 (China)

    2006-11-15

    In this paper, the size of chaotic sets of adjoint shift maps is estimated by Hausdorff measure. We prove that for any adjoint shift map there exists a finitely chaotic set with full Hausdorff measure.

  20. Shift Performance Test and Analysis of Multipurpose Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented an analysis of the gear shifting performances of a multipurpose vehicle transmission in driving condition by Ricardo's Gear Shift Quality Assessment (GSQA system. The performances of the transmission included the travel and effort of the gear shift lever and synchronizing time. The mathematic models of the transmission including the gear shift mechanism and synchronizer were developed in MATLAB. The model of the gear shift mechanism was developed to analyze the travel map of the gear shift lever and the model of the synchronizer was developed to obtain the force-time curve of the synchronizer during the slipping time. The model of the synchronizer was used to investigate the relationship between the performances of the transmission and the variation of parameters during gear shifting. The mathematic models of the gear shift mechanism and the synchronizer provided a rapid design and verification method for the transmission with ring spring.

  1. Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

  2. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  3. Cα and Cβ Carbon-13 Chemical Shifts in Proteins From an Empirical Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwadate, Mitsuo; Asakura, Tetsuo; Williamson, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed an extensive database of 13C Cα and Cβ chemical shifts in proteins of solution, for proteins of which a high-resolution crystal structure exists, and for which the crystal structure has been shown to be essentially identical to the solution structure. There is no systematic effect of temperature, reference compound, or pH on reported shifts, but there appear to be differences in reported shifts arising from referencing differences of up to 4.2 ppm. The major factor affecting chemical shifts is the backbone geometry, which causes differences of ca. 4 ppm between typical α- helix and β-sheet geometries for Cα, and of ca. 2 ppm for Cβ. The side-chain dihedral angle χ1 has an effect of up to 0.5 ppm on the Cα shift, particularly for amino acids with branched side-chains at Cβ. Hydrogen bonding to main-chain atoms has an effect of up to 0.9 ppm, which depends on the main- chain conformation. The sequence of the protein and ring-current shifts from aromatic rings have an insignificant effect (except for residues following proline). There are significant differences between different amino acid types in the backbone geometry dependence; the amino acids can be grouped together into five different groups with different φ,ψ shielding surfaces. The overall fit of individual residues to a single non-residue-specific surface, incorporating the effects of hydrogen bonding and χ1 angle, is 0.96 ppm for both Cα and Cβ. The results from this study are broadly similar to those from ab initio studies, but there are some differences which could merit further attention

  4. Dietary habits among persons hired on shift work

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Strzemecka; Iwona Bojar; Ewa Strzemecka; Alfred Owoc

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Shift-work determinates irregular nutrition habits. The quality as well as the quantity of meals consumed by shift-workers can significantly affects their health. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dietary habits of people performing shift work in the Bogdanka mine. Material and Methods. The study was carried out in the Bogdanka mine in Leczna. The questionnaire, which was designed by the author of this dissertation, was conducted among 700 shift-workers,...

  5. Rumble surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    National Institute for Transport and Road

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumble surfaces are intermittent short lengths of coarse-textured road surfacings on which vehicle tyres produce a rumbling sound. used in conjunction with appropriate roadsigns and markings, they can reduce accidents on rural roads by alerting...

  6. Shift in Terms of Trade Towards the Rural Economy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Shift in Terms of Trade Towards the Rural Economy. Three Questions. What is the evidence? How did this shift in ToT come about? What are the implications and challenges of this shift on the way forward? Notes: No Notes.

  7. 5 CFR 532.505 - Night shift differentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Night shift differentials. 532.505... PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Premium Pay and Differentials § 532.505 Night shift differentials. (a) Employees shall be entitled to receive night shift differentials in accordance with section 5343 of title 5...

  8. 12-hour shifts: an ethical dilemma for the nurse executive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Susan G

    2008-06-01

    Flexible work hours, including 12-hour shifts, have become a common scheduling option for nurses. The author explores whether 12-hour shifts are an ethical scheduling option for nurses because recent research suggests that 12-hour shifts are a potential hazard to patients. A multistep model for ethical decision making, reflecting the concept of procedural justice, is used to examine this issue.

  9. Gear shift map design methodology for automotive transmissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngo, Viet Dac; Hofman, Theo; Steinbuch, Maarten; Serrarens, Alex

    In this paper, a design methodology is developed to condtruct the gear shift map for the automotive transmissions used in conventional and hybrid electric vehicles. The methodology utilizes an optimal gear shift strategy to derive the optimal gear shift patterns over a wide range of driving

  10. Uniqueness and zeros of q-shift difference polynomials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we consider the zero distributions of -shift difference polynomials of meromorphic functions with zero order, and obtain two theorems that extend the classical Hayman results on the zeros of differential polynomials to -shift difference polynomials. We also investigate the uniqueness problem of -shift ...

  11. Surface thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moliner, F.

    1975-01-01

    Basic thermodynamics of a system consisting of two bulk phases with an interface. Solid surfaces: general. Discussion of experimental data on surface tension and related concepts. Adsorption thermodynamics in the Gibbsian scheme. Adsorption on inert solid adsorbents. Systems with electrical charges: chemistry and thermodynamics of imperfect crystals. Thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Simple models of charge transfer chemisorption. Adsorption heat and related concepts. Surface phase transitions

  12. WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION; A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

    2001-01-01

    Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H(sub 2) removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H(sub 2)-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H(sub 2) to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO(sub 2)-rich gases, a Cu-CeO(sub 2) catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H(sub 2) permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window

  13. Application of Phase Shifted, Laser Feedback Interferometry to Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovryn, Ben; Eppell, Steven J.; Andrews, James H.; Khaydarov, John

    1996-01-01

    We have combined the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce a new instrument that can measure both optical path length (OPL) changes and discern sample reflectivity variations. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. LFI can yield a high signal-to-noise ratio even for low reflectivity samples. By combining PSI and LFI, we have produced a robust instrument, based upon a HeNe laser, with high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static (dc) or oscillatory changes along the optical path. As with other forms of interferometry, large changes in OPL require phase unwrapping. Conversely, small phase changes are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured. We introduce the phase shifts with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and use either the Carre or Hariharan algorithms to determine the phase and visibility. We have determined the accuracy and precision of our technique by measuring both the bending of a cantilevered piezoelectric bimorph and linear ramps to the EOM. Using PSI, sub-nanometer displacements can be measured. We have combined our interferometer with a commercial microscope and scanning piezoelectric stage and have measured the variation in OPL and visibility for drops of PDMS (silicone oil) on coated single crystal silicon. Our measurement of the static contact angle agrees with the value of 68 deg stated in the literature.

  14. Physiological responses to unvarying (steady) and 2-2-1 shifts : Miami International Flight Service Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    Two types of shift rotation in the same air traffic facility were investigated in order to determine the relative advantages and disadvantages of nonrotating shift work (steady shift) and rotating shift work. The rotating shift work chosen for compar...

  15. Fuzzy Determination of Target Shifting Time and Torque Control of Shifting Phase for Dry Dual Clutch Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the independently developed five-speed dry dual clutch transmission (DDCT, the paper proposes the torque coordinating control strategy between engine and two clutches, which obtains engine speed and clutch transferred torque in the shifting process, adequately reflecting the driver intention and improving the shifting quality. Five-degree-of-freedom (DOF shifting dynamics model of DDCT with single intermediate shaft is firstly established according to its physical characteristics. Then the quantitative control objectives of the shifting process are presented. The fuzzy decision of shifting time and the model-based torque coordinating control strategy are proposed and also verified by simulating under different driving intentions in up-/downshifting processes with the DCT model established on the MATLAB/Simulink. Simulation results validate that the shifting control algorithm proposed in this paper can not only meet the shifting quality requirements, but also adapt to the various shifting intentions, having a strong robustness.

  16. Comparison of Mental Health and Quality of Life between Shift and Non-shift Employees of Service Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahal Salimi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between the employment practices and employees' mental health and quality of life in Iran. In particular, the study compared the mental health and quality of life of shift and non-shift workers in sensitive employment settings. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 120 individuals employed in two airline companies as either shift or non-shift employees completed the survey for the study. Data was collected using General Health Question (GHQ28 for mental health, the Short Form (36 Health Survey (SF-36 for Quality of Life and a demographic questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA was used to analyze the collected data. The results showed that (1 type of work (shift or non-shift has an effect on mental health and quality of life; and (2 there are significant differences in dimensions of quality of life and mental health between shift and non-shift staff.

  17. Light-induced, dark-reversible colour shifts in petals of Phlox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjön, G.S.; Braune, W.; Bjön, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Flowers of some Phlox (Phlox x paniculata L.) varieties undergo daily colour shifts, being blue in the early morning, turning red during the day, and returning to blue in the evening. The colour shift, which occurs only in the upper (adaxial) petal surfaces, is due to the daily changes in ambient light. In the laboratory, colour shifts could be induced by 2.5 h of ultraviolet, visible or far-red light and recorded by reflectance spectrophotometry. There are indications that irradiations with different kinds of light cause qualitatively different colour shifts, and that thus more than one photoreceptor pigment and more than one primary light reaction may be involved. The presence of phytochrome was demonstrated in petals of white Phlox flowers by in vivo transmission spectrophotometry. It is therefore possible that colour shifts in coloured Phlox flowers are mediated by phytochrome. Possibly the movement of ions (e.g. hydrogen ions) into or out of the vacuole (where the visible pigments are located) is affected by light absorption in a pigment in the tonoplast

  18. Novel immobilizations of an adhesion peptide on the TiO2 surface: An XPS investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Battocchio, C.; Gambaretto, R.; Bello, C. Di; Polzonetti, G.

    2007-01-01

    The covalent attachment of an adhesive peptide, reproducing the 351-359 sequence of human vitronectin, to oxidized titanium surfaces was investigated by XPS spectroscopy. The peptide enhances osteoblast adhesion to titanium, the most used biomaterial for implants and prostheses. Core level spectra of the TiO 2 surface and of the biomimetic surface were investigated. Novel selective covalent immobilization of (351-359) HVP was carried out by treatment of the TiO 2 surface with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane, glutaric anhydride and a side chain protected peptide sequence presenting only a free terminal amino group, followed by side chain deprotection. An alternative strategy for covalent attachment consists in photoactivation of physisorbed (351-359) HVP directly on the TiO 2 surface; samples were incubated with HVP solution and subsequently irradiated with UV light. A comparison with the results previously obtained for non-selective HVP immobilization will be discussed

  19. Shift versus no-shift in local regularization of Chern-Simons theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giavarini, G.; Parma Univ.; Martin, C.P.; Ruiz Ruiz, F.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a family of local BRS-invariant higher covariant derivative regularizations of SU(N) Chern-Simons theory that do not shift the value of the Chern-Simons parameter k to k + sign(k) c v at one loop. (orig.)

  20. Optimal control of the gear shifting process for shift smoothness in dual-clutch transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Görges, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    The control of the transmission system in vehicles is significant for the driving comfort. In order to design a controller for smooth shifting and comfortable driving, a dynamic model of a dual-clutch transmission is presented in this paper. A finite-time linear quadratic regulator is proposed for the optimal control of the two friction clutches in the torque phase for the upshift process. An integral linear quadratic regulator is introduced to regulate the relative speed difference between the engine and the slipping clutch under the optimization of the input torque during the inertia phase. The control objective focuses on smoothing the upshift process so as to improve the driving comfort. Considering the available sensors in vehicles for feedback control, an observer design is presented to track the immeasurable variables. Simulation results show that the jerk can be reduced both in the torque phase and inertia phase, indicating good shift performance. Furthermore, compared with conventional controllers for the upshift process, the proposed control method can reduce shift jerk and improve shift quality.