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Sample records for surface condition soil

  1. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  2. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

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    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival of Pochonia chlamydosporia on the soil surface after different exposure intervals at ambient conditions.

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    Fernandes, Rafael Henrique; Lopes, Everaldo Antônio; Borges, Darlan Ferreira; Bontempo, Amanda Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    Exposure of the nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia to solar radiation and elevated temperatures before being incorporated into the soil can reduce its survival and efficiency as biocontrol agent. A field experiment was carried out to assess the effect of the exposure period on the viability of P. chlamydosporia applied on the soil surface. A commercial bionematicide based on P. chlamydosporia was sprayed on soil, and soil samples were collected before and at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150min after fungal application. Relative humidity (RH), the irradiance (IR), air temperature (AT), and soil temperature (ST) were recorded. The number of P. chlamydosporia colony forming units (CFUs) was evaluated after 20 days of incubation. P. chlamydosporia survival decreased over the time of exposure on the soil surface. Overall, the number of CFUs decreased by more than 90% at 150min after application. Exposure to RH ≥61%, ST and AT between 25-35°C and 19-29°C, and IR between 1172 and 2126μmol of photons m -2 s -1 induced a negative exponential effect on the survival of the fungus over the time. Exposure to climatic conditions on the soil surface reduces P. chlamydosporia viability. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Shallow groundwater effect on land surface temperature and surface energy balance under bare soil conditions: modeling and description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Alkhaier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding when and how groundwater affects surface temperature and energy fluxes is significant for utilizing remote sensing in groundwater studies and for integrating aquifers within land surface models. To investigate the shallow groundwater effect under bare soil conditions, we numerically exposed two soil profiles to identical metrological forcing. One of the profiles had shallow groundwater. The different responses that the two profiles manifested were inspected regarding soil moisture, temperature and energy balance at the land surface. The findings showed that the two profiles differed in three aspects: the absorbed and emitted amounts of energy, the portioning out of the available energy and the heat fluency in the soil. We concluded that due to their lower albedo, shallow groundwater areas reflect less shortwave radiation and consequently get a higher magnitude of net radiation. When potential evaporation demand is sufficiently high, a large portion of the energy received by these areas is consumed for evaporation. This increases the latent heat flux and reduces the energy that could have heated the soil. Consequently, lower magnitudes of both sensible and ground heat fluxes are caused to occur. The higher soil thermal conductivity in shallow groundwater areas facilitates heat transfer between the top soil and the subsurface, i.e. soil subsurface is more thermally connected to the atmosphere. For the reliability of remote sensors in detecting shallow groundwater effect, it was concluded that this effect can be sufficiently clear to be detected if at least one of the following conditions occurs: high potential evaporation and high contrast between day and night temperatures. Under these conditions, most day and night hours are suitable for shallow groundwater depth detection.

  5. Soil and glass surface photodegradation of etofenprox under simulated california rice growing conditions.

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    Vasquez, Martice; Cahill, Thomas; Tjeerdema, Ronald

    2011-07-27

    Photolysis is an important degradation process to consider when evaluating a pesticide's persistence in a rice field environment. To simulate both nonflooded and flooded California rice field conditions, the photolytic degradation of etofenprox, an ether pyrethroid, was characterized on an air-dried rice soil and a flooded rice soil surface by determination of its half-life (t(1/2)), dissipation rate constant (k) and identification and quantitation of degradation products using LC/MS/MS. Photodegradation was also characterized on a glass surface alone to rule out confounding soil factors. Measured photolytic dissipation rates were used as input parameters into a multimedia environmental fate model to predict etofenprox persistence in a rice field environment. Photolytic degradation proceeded at a faster rate (0.23/day, t(1/2) = 3.0 days) on the flooded soil surface compared to the air-dried surface (0.039/day, t(1/2) = 18 days). Etofenprox degradation occurred relatively quickly on the glass surface (3.1/day, t(1/2) = 0.23 days or 5.5 h) compared to both flooded and air-dried soil layers. Oxidation of the ether moiety to the ester was the major product on all surfaces (max % yield range = 0.2 ± 0.1% to 9.3 ± 2.3%). The hydroxylation product at the 4' position of the phenoxy phenyl ring was detected on all surfaces (max % yield range = 0.2 ± 0.1% to 4.1 ± 1.0%). The air-dried soil surface did not contain detectable residues of the ester cleavage product, whereas it was quantitated on the flooded soil (max % yield = 0.6 ± 0.3%) and glass surface (max % yield = 3.6 ± 0.6%). Dissipation of the insecticide in dark controls was significantly different (p < 0.05) compared to the light-exposed surfaces indicating that degradation was by photolysis. Laboratory studies and fate model predictions suggest photolysis will be an important process in the overall degradation of etofenprox in a rice field environment.

  6. A modified surface-resistance approach for representing bare-soil evaporation: wind tunnel experiments under various atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, T.; Takeda, A.; Sugita, F.

    1997-01-01

    A physically based (i.e., nonempirical) representation of surface-moisture availability is proposed, and its applicability is investigated. This method is based on the surface-resistance approaches, and it uses the depth of evaporating surface rather than the water content of the surface soil as the determining factor of surface-moisture availability. A simple energy-balance model including this representation is developed and tested against wind tunnel experiments under various atmospheric conditions. This model can estimate not only the latent heat flux but also the depth of the evaporating surface simultaneously by solving the inverse problem of energy balance at both the soil surface and the evaporating surface. It was found that the depth of the evaporating surface and the latent heat flux estimated by the model agreed well with those observed. The agreements were commonly found out under different atmospheric conditions. The only limitation of this representation is that it is not valid under conditions of drastic change in the radiation input, owing to the influence of transient phase transition of water in the dry surface layer. The main advantage of the approach proposed is that it can determine the surface moisture availability on the basis of the basic properties of soils instead of empirical fitting, although further investigations on its practical use are needed

  7. Surface water ponding on clayey soils managed by conventional and conservation tillage in boreal conditions

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    L. ALAKUKKU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface water ponding and crop hampering due to soil wetness was monitored in order to evaluate the effects of conservation tillage practices and perennial grass cover on soil infiltrability for five years in situ in gently sloping clayey fields. Thirteen experimental areas, each having three experimental fields, were established in southern Finland. The fields belonged to: autumn mouldboard ploughing (AP, conservation tillage (CT and perennial grass in the crop rotation (PG. In the third year, direct drilled (DD fields were established in five areas. Excluding PG, mainly spring cereals were grown in the fields. Location and surface area of ponded water (in the spring and autumn as well as hampered crop growth (during June-July were determined in each field by using GPS devices and GIS programs. Surface water ponding or crop hampering occurred when the amount of rainfall was clearly greater than the long-term average. The mean of the relative area of the ponded surface water, indicating the risk of surface runoff, and hampered crop growth was larger in the CT fields than in the AP fields. The differences between means were, however, not statistically significant. Complementary soil physical measurements are required to investigate the reasons for the repeated surface water ponding.;

  8. Water erosion in surface soil conditions: runoff velocity, concentration and D50 index of sediments in runoff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Ramos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Water erosion and contamination of water resources are influenced by concentration and diameter of sediments in runoff. This study aimed to quantify runoff velocity and concentration and the D50 index of sediments in runoff under different soil surface managements, in the following treatments: i cropped systems: no-tilled soil covered by ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. residue, with high soil cover and minimal roughness (HCR; no tilled soil covered by vetch (Vicia sativa L. residue, with high soil cover and minimal roughness (HCV; chiseled soil after ryegrass crop removing the above-ground residues and keeping only the root system, with high roughness (HRR; chiseled soil after vetch crop removing the above-ground residues and keeping only the root system, with high roughness (HRV; ii bare and chiseled soil, with high roughness (BHR. The research was conducted on a Humic Dystrupept under simulated rainfall. The design was completely randomized and each treatment was replicated twice. Eight rainfall events of controlled intensity (65 mm h−1 were applied to each treatment for 90 minutes. The D50 index, runoff velocity and sediment concentration were influenced by crop and soil management. Runoff velocity was more intensely reduced by cover crop residues than by surface roughness. Regardless of surface condition, the D50 index and concentration of sediment in runoff were lower under ryegrass than vetch crop. Runoff velocity and the D50 index were exponentially and inversely correlated with soil cover by residues and with surface roughness, while the D50 index was positively and exponentially correlated with runoff velocity.

  9. Evaluating controls of soil properties and climatic conditions on the use of an exponential filter for converting near surface to root zone soil moisture contents

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    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; You, Jinsheng; Shulski, Martha D.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2017-05-01

    Root zone soil moisture (RZSM) is an important state variable for understanding various land surface and ecohydrological processes. Due to the lack of field measurements, different methods have been proposed to estimate RZSM, including the use of exponential filters to predict RZSM from remotely sensed near surface soil moisture data. However, inconsistent findings about the controls on the optimal characteristic time length Topt, which is used in the exponential filter method, have been reported in the literature. To reconcile these inconsistent findings and further improve the use of the method, the impacts of soil properties and climatic conditions on Topt were assessed in this study using observed and modelled soil moisture datasets. Daily soil moisture data, daily meteorological records, and soil properties were retrieved from the Automated Weather Data Network (AWDN) and the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) within the continental United States. Data from the AWDN stations showed that Topt was mostly controlled by soil texture (e.g., a negative correlation with the sand fraction and a positive one with the clay fraction) as compared to climatic conditions. However, at SCAN stations, Topt was mostly affected by precipitation (P), and no significant correlation was found between Topt and soil texture. The difference in controlling factors between ADWN and SCAN stations can be largely attributed to the higher spatial variability in P across the SCAN stations, which overrode the impacts of soil properties on Topt. A 1-D vadose zone model was also utilized to simulate soil moisture at selected SCAN sites using a generated soil hydraulic parameter dataset. The simulation results further demonstrated the negative relationship between Topt and P observed for the SCAN stations. Moreover, the simulation results revealed that Topt was larger under vegetated conditions than under bare surface conditions. Under the same climatic conditions at each simulated site, which

  10. Spatiotemporal evolution of water content at the rainfall-event scale under soil surface sealing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, S.; Svoray, T.; Assouline, S.

    2012-04-01

    Surface water content dynamics rules the partitioning between infiltration, runoff, and evaporation fluxes. Extending the knowledge on factors controlling top-soil water content temporal stability (TS) is needed to calibrate and validate various remote sensing technologies. Spatiotemporal evolution of water content is highly non-linear, being affected by various factors at different spatial and temporal scales. In semi-arid climates, this evolution is significantly affected by the formation of surface seals, shown in previous studies to significantly reduce both infiltration and evaporation fluxes from the soil. The drying regime in a natural sealed soil system exerts a sharp contrast in the soil profile - a very dry seal is superimposed on top of a wetter soil layer. One question is thus, whether seal layers contribute to or destroy temporal stability of top soil water content at the hillslope scale. To address this question, a typical hillslope (0.115 km2) was chosen at the LTER Lehavim site in the south of Israel (31020' N, 34045' E) offering different aspects and a classic geomorphologic banding. The annual rainfall is 297 mm, the soils are brown lithosols and arid brown loess and the dominant rock formations are Eocenean limestone and chalk with patches of calcrete. The vegetation is characterised by scattered dwarf shrubs (dominant species Sarcopoterium spinosum) and patches of herbaceous vegetation, mostly annuals, are spread between rocks and dwarf shrubs. An extensive spatial database of soil hydraulic and environmental parameters (e.g. slope, radiation, bulk density) was measured in the field and interpolated to continuous maps using geostatistical techniques and physically based modelling. To explore the effect of soil surface sealing, Mualem and Assouline [1989] model describing the change in hydraulic parameters resulting from soil seal formation were applied. This spatio-temporal database was used to characterise 8240 spatial cells (3X3m2) serving as

  11. Linking crop structure, throughfall, soil surface conditions, runoff and soil detachment: 10 land uses analyzed in Northern Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Guillaume; Valentin, Christian; Sounyafong, Phabvilay; de Rouw, Anneke; Soulileuth, Bounsamai; Silvera, Norbert; Pierret, Alain; Sengtaheuanghoung, Oloth; Ribolzi, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    In Montane Southeast Asia, deforestation and unsuitable combinations of crops and agricultural practices degrade soils at an unprecedented rate. Typically, smallholder farmers gain income from "available" land by replacing fallow or secondary forest by perennial crops. We aimed to understand how these practices increase or reduce soil erosion. Ten land uses were monitored in Northern Laos during the 2015 monsoon, using local farmers' fields. Experiments included plots of the conventional system (food crops and fallow), and land uses corresponding to new market opportunities (e.g. commercial tree plantations). Land uses were characterized by measuring plant cover and plant mean height per vegetation layer. Recorded meteorological variables included rainfall intensity, throughfall amount, throughfall kinetic energy (TKE), and raindrop size. Runoff coefficient, soil loss, and the percentage areas of soil surface types (free aggregates and gravel; crusts; macro-faunal, vegetal and pedestal features; plant litter) were derived from observations and measurements in 1-m 2 micro-plots. Relationships between these variables were explored with multiple regression analyses. Our results indicate that TKE induces soil crusting and soil loss. By reducing rainfall infiltration, crusted area enhances runoff, which removes and transports soil particles detached by splash over non-crusted areas. TKE is lower under land uses reducing the velocity of raindrops and/or preventing an increase in their size. Optimal vegetation structures combine minimum height of the lowest layer (to reduce drop velocity at ground level) and maximum coverage (to intercept the largest amount of rainfall), as exemplified by broom grass (Thysanolaena latifolia). In contrast, high canopies with large leaves will increase TKE by enlarging raindrops, as exemplified by teak trees (Tectona grandis), unless a protective understorey exists under the trees. Policies that ban the burning of multi-layered vegetation

  12. Longevity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia on the soil surface under field conditions

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    Ricardo Brustolin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The longevity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum sclerotia was quantified in an experiment carried out in the field. Sclerotia naturally formed in soybean plants in an infested commercial field were collected in a grain-cleaning machine and those present in the stem pith, with c.a. 8 mm in length and 1.9 mm in diameter were selected. Fifty sclerotia were kept inside a white nylon mesh (0.25mm screen bag (25 x 25cm. Eighty bags were laid on the soil surface-simulating no till farming. At monthly intervals, four bags were taken and brought to the laboratory. Sclerotia were washed with tap water and surface desinfested with sodium hypochlorite and exposed to germinate on sterilized moist river sand in a growth chamber at 15oC and 12h photoperiod. After 12 months, sclerotia kept on the soil surface, lost their viability. It may be concluded that under no till, crop rotation with nonsusceptible crops, can reduce the sclerotia bank in the soil.

  13. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water. © 2015 SETAC.

  14. Impact of groundwater capillary rises as lower boundary conditions for soil moisture in a land surface model

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    Vergnes, Jean-Pierre; Decharme, Bertrand; Habets, Florence

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is a key component of the global hydrological cycle. It sustains base flow in humid climate while it receives seepage in arid region. Moreover, groundwater influences soil moisture through water capillary rise into the soil and potentially affects the energy and water budget between the land surface and the atmosphere. Despite its importance, most global climate models do not account for groundwater and their possible interaction with both the surface hydrology and the overlying atmosphere. This study assesses the impact of capillary rise from shallow groundwater on the simulated water budget over France. The groundwater scheme implemented in the Total Runoff Integrated Pathways (TRIP) river routing model in a previous study is coupled with the Interaction between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model. In this coupling, the simulated water table depth acts as the lower boundary condition for the soil moisture diffusivity equation. An original parameterization accounting for the subgrid elevation inside each grid cell is proposed in order to compute this fully-coupled soil lower boundary condition. Simulations are performed at high (1/12°) and low (0.5°) resolutions and evaluated over the 1989-2009 period. Compared to a free-drain experiment, upward capillary fluxes at the bottom of soil increase the mean annual evapotranspiration simulated over the aquifer domain by 3.12 % and 1.54 % at fine and low resolutions respectively. This process logically induces a decrease of the simulated recharge from ISBA to the aquifers and contributes to enhance the soil moisture memory. The simulated water table depths are then lowered, which induces a slight decrease of the simulated mean annual river discharges. However, the fully-coupled simulations compare well with river discharge and water table depth observations which confirms the relevance of the coupling formalism.

  15. Downscaling near-surface soil moisture from field to plot scale: A comparative analysis under different environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasta, Paolo; Penna, Daniele; Brocca, Luca; Zuecco, Giulia; Romano, Nunzio

    2018-02-01

    Indirect measurements of field-scale (hectometer grid-size) spatial-average near-surface soil moisture are becoming increasingly available by exploiting new-generation ground-based and satellite sensors. Nonetheless, modeling applications for water resources management require knowledge of plot-scale (1-5 m grid-size) soil moisture by using measurements through spatially-distributed sensor network systems. Since efforts to fulfill such requirements are not always possible due to time and budget constraints, alternative approaches are desirable. In this study, we explore the feasibility of determining spatial-average soil moisture and soil moisture patterns given the knowledge of long-term records of climate forcing data and topographic attributes. A downscaling approach is proposed that couples two different models: the Eco-Hydrological Bucket and Equilibrium Moisture from Topography. This approach helps identify the relative importance of two compound topographic indexes in explaining the spatial variation of soil moisture patterns, indicating valley- and hillslope-dependence controlled by lateral flow and radiative processes, respectively. The integrated model also detects temporal instability if the dominant type of topographic dependence changes with spatial-average soil moisture. Model application was carried out at three sites in different parts of Italy, each characterized by different environmental conditions. Prior calibration was performed by using sparse and sporadic soil moisture values measured by portable time domain reflectometry devices. Cross-site comparisons offer different interpretations in the explained spatial variation of soil moisture patterns, with time-invariant valley-dependence (site in northern Italy) and hillslope-dependence (site in southern Italy). The sources of soil moisture spatial variation at the site in central Italy are time-variant within the year and the seasonal change of topographic dependence can be conveniently

  16. Modeling effect of cover condition and soil type on rotavirus transport in surface flow.

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    Bhattarai, Rabin; Davidson, Paul C; Kalita, Prasanta K; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S

    2017-08-01

    Runoff from animal production facilities contains various microbial pathogens which pose a health hazard to both humans and animals. Rotavirus is a frequently detected pathogen in agricultural runoff and the leading cause of death among children around the world. Diarrheal infection caused by rotavirus causes more than two million hospitalizations and death of more than 500,000 children every year. Very little information is available on the environmental factors governing rotavirus transport in surface runoff. The objective of this study is to model rotavirus transport in overland flow and to compare the model results with experimental observations. A physically based model, which incorporates the transport of infective rotavirus particles in both liquid (suspension or free-floating) and solid phase (adsorbed to soil particles), has been used in this study. Comparison of the model results with experimental results showed that the model could reproduce the recovery kinetics satisfactorily but under-predicted the virus recovery in a few cases when multiple peaks were observed during experiments. Similarly, the calibrated model had a good agreement between observed and modeled total virus recovery. The model may prove to be a promising tool for developing effective management practices for controlling microbial pathogens in surface runoff.

  17. Assessing the ability of mechanistic volatilization models to simulate soil surface conditions: a study with the Volt'Air model.

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    Garcia, L; Bedos, C; Génermont, S; Braud, I; Cellier, P

    2011-09-01

    Ammonia and pesticide volatilization in the field is a surface phenomenon involving physical and chemical processes that depend on the soil surface temperature and water content. The water transfer, heat transfer and energy budget sub models of volatilization models are adapted from the most commonly accepted formalisms and parameterizations. They are less detailed than the dedicated models describing water and heat transfers and surface status. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of one of the available mechanistic volatilization models, Volt'Air, to accurately describe the pedo-climatic conditions of a soil surface at the required time and space resolution. The assessment involves: (i) a sensitivity analysis, (ii) an evaluation of Volt'Air outputs in the light of outputs from a reference Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model (SiSPAT) and three experimental datasets, and (iii) the study of three tests based on modifications of SiSPAT to establish the potential impact of the simplifying assumptions used in Volt'Air. The analysis confirmed that a 5 mm surface layer was well suited, and that Volt'Air surface temperature correlated well with the experimental measurements as well as with SiSPAT outputs. In terms of liquid water transfers, Volt'Air was overall consistent with SiSPAT, with discrepancies only during major rainfall events and dry weather conditions. The tests enabled us to identify the main source of the discrepancies between Volt'Air and SiSPAT: the lack of gaseous water transfer description in Volt'Air. They also helped to explain why neither Volt'Air nor SiSPAT was able to represent lower values of surface water content: current classical water retention and hydraulic conductivity models are not yet adapted to cases of very dry conditions. Given the outcomes of this study, we discuss to what extent the volatilization models can be improved and the questions they pose for current research in water transfer modeling and parameterization

  18. Observed and simulated effect of plant physiology and structure on land surface energy fluxes and soil conditions

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    Lu, Yen-Sen; Rihani, Jehan; Langensiepen, Matthias; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    The parameterization of stomatal conductance and leaf area index (LAI) in land surface models largely influence simulated terrestrial system states. While stomatal conductance mainly controls transpiration, latent heat flux, and root-water-uptake, LAI impacts additionally the radiative energy exchange. Thus both affect canopy evaporation and transpiration and land surface energy and water fluxes as a whole. Common parameterizations of stomatal conductance follow either semi-mechanistic forms based on photosynthesis (Ball-Berry Type (BB)) or forms which consider environmental factors such as impact of light, temperature, humidity and soil moisture (Jarvis-Stewart Type (JS)). Both approaches differ also in the interpretation of humidity effects and light-use efficiency. While soil moisture plays an important role for root-water-uptake there is no clear conclusion yet about how soil moisture interacts with stomata activity. Values for LAI can be obtained from field measurements, satellite estimates or modelling and are used as an essential model input. While field measurements are very time consuming and only represent single points, satellite estimates may have biases caused by variable albedo and sensor limitations. Representing LAI within land surface models requires complex schemes in order to represent all processes contributing to plant growth. We use the Terrestrial System Modelling Platform (TerrSysMP) over the Rur watershed in Germany for studying the influence of plant physiology and structure on the state of the terrestrial system. The Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (TR32) extensively monitors this catchment for almost a decade. The land surface (CLM3.5) and the subsurface (ParFlow) modules of TerrSysMP are conditioned based on satellite-retrieved land cover and the soil map from FAO and forced with a high-resolution reanalysis by DWD. For studying the effect of plant physiology, the Ball-Berry-Leuning, and Jarvis-Stewart stomatal

  19. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

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    J. Y. Tang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC for representing the air–soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1 accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2 accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3 enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4 is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air–water volatile tracer exchange; and (5 is applicable to site, regional, and global land models.

    Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1 gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2 liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92 indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1 the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2 the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance.

    We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer

  20. Seed banks in a degraded desert shrubland: Influence of soil surface condition and harvester ant activity on seed abundance

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    DeFalco, L.A.; Esque, T.C.; Kane, J.M.; Nicklas, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    We compared seed banks between two contrasting anthropogenic surface disturbances (compacted, trenched) and adjacent undisturbed controls to determine whether site condition influences viable seed densities of perennial and annual Mojave Desert species. Viable seeds of perennials were rare in undisturbed areas (3-4 seeds/m2) and declined to importance of litter as an indicator of site degradation and recovery potential in arid lands.

  1. Soil conditions and plant growth'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passioura, J. B.

    2002-02-01

    Plants can respond to soil conditions in ways that can not readily be explained in terms of the ability of the roots to take up water and nutrients. Roots may sense difficult conditions in the soil and thence send inhibitory signals to the shoots which harden the plants against the consequences of a deteriorating or restrictive environment, especially if the plants' water supply is at risk. Generally, this behaviour can be interpreted as feedforward responses to the soil becoming too dry or too hard, or to the available soil volume being very small as with bonsai plants, or to roots' becoming infected with pathogens. However, soil that is too soft or in which the roots are forced to grow in very large pores can also induce large conservative responses, the significance of which is unclear. The inhibitory signals may affect stomatal conductance, cell expansion, cell division and the rate of leaf appearance. Their nature is still under debate, and the debate is becoming increasingly complex, which probably signifies that a network of hormonal and other responses is involved in attuning the growth and development of a plant to its environment.

  2. A Study of Spatial Soil Moisture Estimation Using a Multiple Linear Regression Model and MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data Corrected by Conditional Merging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunggil Jung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to estimate spatial soil moisture in South Korea (99,000 km2 from January 2013 to December 2015 using a multiple linear regression (MLR model and the Terra moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS land surface temperature (LST and normalized distribution vegetation index (NDVI data. The MODIS NDVI was used to reflect vegetation variations. Observed precipitation was measured using the automatic weather stations (AWSs of the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA, and soil moisture data were recorded at 58 stations operated by various institutions. Prior to MLR analysis, satellite LST data were corrected by applying the conditional merging (CM technique and observed LST data from 71 KMA stations. The coefficient of determination (R2 of the original LST and observed LST was 0.71, and the R2 of corrected LST and observed LST was 0.95 for 3 selected LST stations. The R2 values of all corrected LSTs were greater than 0.83 for total 71 LST stations. The regression coefficients of the MLR model were estimated seasonally considering the five-day antecedent precipitation. The p-values of all the regression coefficients were less than 0.05, and the R2 values were between 0.28 and 0.67. The reason for R2 values less than 0.5 is that the soil classification at each observation site was not completely accurate. Additionally, the observations at most of the soil moisture monitoring stations used in this study started in December 2014, and the soil moisture measurements did not stabilize. Notably, R2 and root mean square error (RMSE in winter were poor, as reflected by the many missing values, and uncertainty existed in observations due to freezing and mechanical errors in the soil. Thus, the prediction accuracy is low in winter due to the difficulty of establishing an appropriate regression model. Specifically, the estimated map of the soil moisture index (SMI can be used to better understand the severity of droughts with the

  3. Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics. Flow in porous media under rarefied gas conditions. Research phase: Fluid conductivity of lunar surface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, F. C.; Jih, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research on fluid conductivity of lunar surface materials is summarized. Theoretical methods were developed for the analysis of transitional and free-molecular flows, and for analysis of lunar permeability probe data in general. Experimental studies of rarefied flows under conditions of a large pressure gradient show flows in the continuum regime to be responsible for the largest portion of the pressure drop between source and sink for one dimensional flow, provided the entrance Knudsen number is sufficiently small. The concept of local similarity leading to a universal nondimensional function of Knudsen number was shown to have approximate validity; flows in all regimes may be described in terms of an area fraction and a single length parameter. Synthetic porous media prepared from glass beads exhibited flow behavior similar in many regards to that of a natural sandstone; studies using artificial stones with known pore configurations may lead to new insight concerning the structure of natural materials. The experimental method involving the use of segmented specimens of large permeability is shown to be fruitful.

  4. Grass mulching effect on infiltration, surface runoff and soil loss of three agricultural soils in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekalu, K O; Olorunfemi, I A; Osunbitan, J A

    2007-03-01

    Mulching the soil surface with a layer of plant residue is an effective method of conserving water and soil because it reduces surface runoff, increases infiltration of water into the soil and retard soil erosion. The effectiveness of using elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) as mulching material was evaluated in the laboratory using a rainfall simulator set at rainfall intensities typical of the tropics. Six soil samples, two from each of the three major soil series representing the main agricultural soils in South Western Nigeria were collected, placed on three different slopes, and mulched with different rates of the grass. The surface runoff, soil loss, and apparent cumulative infiltration were then measured under each condition. The results with elephant grass compared favorably with results from previous experiments using rice straw. Runoff and soil loss decreased with the amount of mulch used and increased with slope. Surface runoff, infiltration and soil loss had high correlations (R = 0.90, 0.89, and 0.86, respectively) with slope and mulch cover using surface response analysis. The mean surface runoff was correlated negatively with sand content, while mean soil loss was correlated positively with colloidal content (clay and organic matter) of the soil. Infiltration was increased and soil loss was reduced greatly with the highest cover. Mulching the soils with elephant grass residue may benefit late cropping (second cropping) by increasing stored soil water for use during dry weather and help to reduce erosion on sloping land.

  5. PREDICTING OF RISKS OF GROUNDWATER AND SURFACE WATER POLLUTION WITH DIFFERENT CLASSES OF HERBICIDES IN SOIL IN EASTERN EUROPE CLIMATE CONDITIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshun, M; Dema, O; Kucherenko, O; Korshun, O; Garkavyi, S; Pelio, I; Antonenko, A; Velikaia, N

    2016-11-01

    Application of pesticides in modern agriculture is a powerful permanent risk factor for public health and the natural environment. The aim of the study was a comparative hygienic assessment of the danger of contamination of ground and surface water sources with most widely used herbicides of different chemical classes (sulfonylureas, imidazolinones, pirimidinilkarboksilovye compounds semicarbazones). Field hygienic experiments for studying of the residues dynamics of studied herbicides concentration in agrocenosis objects were made by us in different types of soils: chernozem, sod-podzolic, podzolized forest. Then the half-life periods (DT50) of the substances in the soil were calculated. It was found that according to GUS index there is a high probability of leaching into groundwater of sulfonylureas and imidazolinones; according to LEACH index all investigated substances have a high risk of run-off into groundwater and surface water.

  6. Using IR-measured soil surface temperatures to estimate hydraulic properties of the top soil layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenpass, Christian; Vanderborght, Jan; Herbst, Michael; Simunek, Jirka; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    The temporal and spatial development of soil surface temperatures (SST) depends on water availability in the near-surface soil layer. Since the soil loses latent heat during evaporation and water available for evaporation depends on soil hydraulic properties (SHP), the temporal variability of SST should contain information about the near-surface SHP. This study was conducted to investigate the information content of soil surface temperatures for estimation of soil hydraulic properties and their uncertainties, and to determine the effect of soil tillage on near-surface SHP. A hydrological model (HYDRUS-1D) coupled with a global optimizer (DREAM) was used to inversely estimate the van Genuchten-Mualem parameters of SHP from infra-red measured SST and TDR-measured water contents. The general applicability of this approach was tested using synthetic data. The same approach was then applied to a real data set, which was collected during September 2008 in Selhausen, Germany. The synthetic data set was generated using HYDRUS-1D for the same initial and boundary conditions and measurement protocol as the real data set. Using synthetic and real data it was found that although estimated SHP are sensitive to SST, their estimates are relatively uncertain when only information about SST is used. These uncertainties can be reduced by additionally considering also measured soil water contents. A comparison of SHP determined in the laboratory on undisturbed soil samples with those estimated from SST and TDR data measured in a harrowed soil showed similar results for the deeper undisturbed soil and large differences for the harrowed part of the soil profile. This shows the important effect of soil tillage on soil hydraulic properties. Application of the method in the field to characterize the hydraulic properties of the upper soil layer may reduce the amount of needed in-soil measurements and therefore allows larger scale observations.

  7. Soil physical conditions in Nigerian savannas and biomass production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salako, F.K.

    2004-01-01

    Nigeria is located in the tropical zone, with a vast area having savanna vegetation. This is a region that is itself diverse, necessitating a classification into derived savanna, southern Guinea savanna and northern Guinea savanna. These classifications reflect environmental characteristics such as length of growing period, which for instance is 151-180 days for the northern Guinea savanna, 181-210 days for the southern Guinea savanna and 211-270 days for the derived savanna/coastal savanna. The major soils found in the various agro-ecological zones have coarse-textured surface soil, and are low in organic matter and chemical fertility. Although, yields can be improved by addition of inorganic and organic fertilizer, this can only be sustained and assured with high soil physical qualities. Soil physical qualities can be sustained at a high level with conservation tillage and soil conservation measures. Tillage is physical manipulation of the soil. Thus, the most profound effect of tillage is in relation to soil physical properties. For socio-economic and cultural reasons, manual tillage is still widely practiced in Africa as farming is largely at subsistence level. However, there are now a number of commercial farms especially for cash crop production in many parts of Africa. Many of these are located in locations which were hitherto reserved as forest and a need for sustainable production in pertinent to maintain ecological balance. Soils with coarse texture are not often sensitive to some physical parameters while some physical parameters are more relevant in a given study than others. Sustainable crop production researches in the tropics have focused on the role of planted fallows and their spatial arrangement (e.g., as in alley cropping) for many decades. Application of soil physics in the area of food production and environmental management still lags behind other sub-disciplines of soil science, particularly soil fertility in the tropics. A great challenge is

  8. Effects of soil surface management practices on soil and tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects on soil, leaf and fruit element concentrations of organic (compost, straw mulch and hand weeding) and integrated (inorganic fertilisers and herbicide usage; IP) soil surface management practices in the tree rows, in combination with weed covers, cover crops and straw mulch in the work rows, were investigated in a ...

  9. Can hydromorphic conditions accelerate soil development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Horváth-Szabó, Kata; Réka Balázs, Brigitta; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szabó, Máté; Jakab, Gergely; Madarász, Balázs; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The formation and development of waterlogged (hydromorphic) soils are primarily determined by long-term water saturation. The presence of water in the profile can result increasing speed of soil forming processes including the accumulation of organic matter or other components and mineralogical transformations. Original papers refer more than hundreds of years for this kinds of mineral transformations. We suppose that this process could be more rapid. This study focuses on the mineralogical investigation of a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) located in a swampy area in Central Hungary. The starting time of the soil formation is a well documented fact: the parent material deposited during an extremely heavy flood event in the 1960s. Therefore, the studied soil profile is the result of the last half century. Our aim was to explore the degree of mineral phase alteration via soil formation during a half-century under hydromorphic conditions. Routine laboratory measurements (selective dissolution methods for the determination of amorphous and crystalline Fe, and Mn content, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy measurements for elemental composition determination, X-ray powder diffraction for mineralogical composition, and particle sizing by laser diffraction) were implemented. Morphological and chemical study of carbonate and iron nodules was carried out by electron microprobe. Simple chemical tests (eg. Fe2+ indication by dipiridil test) and morphological observations were performed on the field. Redox potential (Eh) and pH were measured in 20 cm and 40 cm depths by field monitoring station during the vegetation period. Results show that well developed horizons have emerged during fifty years in the studied soil profile. The most intense mineralogical transformations developed in the zone of the heaviest redox oscillation. Soil formation under hydromorphic conditions proceeds at higher speeds contrariwise to the century time scale reported in

  10. Experimental study on soluble chemical transfer to surface runoff from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juxiu; Yang, Jinzhong; Hu, Bill X; Sun, Huaiwei

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff, under condition of irrigation and subsurface drainage, would improve surface water quality. In this paper, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of various soil and hydraulic factors on chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff. The factors include maximum depth of ponding water on soil surface, initial volumetric water content of soil, depth of soil with low porosity, type or texture of soil and condition of drainage. In the experiments, two soils, sand and loam, mixed with different quantities of soluble KCl were filled in the sandboxes and prepared under different initial saturated conditions. Simulated rainfall induced surface runoff are operated in the soils, and various ponding water depths on soil surface are simulated. Flow rates and KCl concentration of surface runoff are measured during the experiments. The following conclusions are made from the study results: (1) KCl concentration in surface runoff water would decrease with the increase of the maximum depth of ponding water on soil surface; (2) KCl concentration in surface runoff water would increase with the increase of initial volumetric water content in the soil; (3) smaller depth of soil with less porosity or deeper depth of soil with larger porosity leads to less KCl transfer to surface runoff; (4) the soil with finer texture, such as loam, could keep more fertilizer in soil, which will result in more KCl concentration in surface runoff; and (5) good subsurface drainage condition will increase the infiltration and drainage rates during rainfall event and will decrease KCl concentration in surface runoff. Therefore, it is necessary to reuse drained fertile water effectively during rainfall, without polluting groundwater. These study results should be considered in agriculture management to reduce soluble chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff for reducing non-point sources pollution.

  11. SMEX02 Land Surface Information: Soils Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) took place in Ames, Iowa USA between 25 June and 12 July 2002. The NASA Land Surface Hydrology Data Archive maintains an...

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of soil temperature, moisture and surface soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, B. F.; Dane, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to: (l) Relate in-situ measured soil-water content and temperature profiles to remotely sensed surface soil-water and temperature conditions; to model simultaneous heat and water movement for spatially and temporally changing soil conditions; (2) Determine the spatial and temporal variability of surface soil properties affecting emissivity, reflectance, and material and energy flux across the soil surface. This will include physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics of primary soil components and aggregate systems; and (3) Develop surface soil classes of naturally occurring and distributed soil property assemblages and group classes to be tested with respect to water content, emissivity and reflectivity. This document is a report of studies conducted during the period funded by NASA grants. The project was designed to be conducted over a five year period. Since funding was discontinued after three years, some of the research started was not completed. Additional publications are planned whenever funding can be obtained to finalize data analysis for both the arid and humid locations.

  13. The effect of some soil characteristics on soil radon concentration and radon exhalation from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kainan; Cheng, Jianping; Guo, Qiuju

    2004-01-01

    To find out the impacts of soil characters on radon concentration in soil and radon exhalation from soil, field measurements on soil radon concentrations (60 cm under the soil surface) and radon exhalation rate from soil surface were carried out in totally 31 points with different types of soil in three cities in both South and North China. Soil radium contents, water contents, soil porosity and grain size were concretely analyzed in our laboratory. The linear simulation was used to analyze the above data. The results showed that radon exhalation rate from soil and radon concentrations in soil have direct proportion to soil radium contents. Rather high radium content and radon exhalation rate were measured in Guiyang area, 67±28Bq/Kg and 40±59 mBq/m 2 ·s, however no high soil radon concentration was found due to the difficulties in the measurements on clay soils with high saturation. Compared with soil radium contents, radon exhalation rate from soil and soil radon concentrations are more easily impacted by soil characters and change in a rather large range. (author)

  14. Quantifying the changes of soil surface microroughness due to rainfall impact on a smooth surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. B. Abban

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the rainfall-induced change in soil microroughness of a bare smooth soil surface in an agricultural field. The majority of soil microroughness studies have focused on surface roughness on the order of ∼ 5–50 mm and have reported a decay of soil surface roughness with rainfall. However, there is quantitative evidence from a few studies suggesting that surfaces with microroughness less than 5 mm may undergo an increase in roughness when subject to rainfall action. The focus herein is on initial microroughness length scales on the order of 2 mm, a low roughness condition observed seasonally in some landscapes under bare conditions and chosen to systematically examine the increasing roughness phenomenon. Three rainfall intensities of 30, 60, and 75 mm h−1 are applied to a smoothened bed surface in a field plot via a rainfall simulator. Soil surface microroughness is recorded via a surface-profile laser scanner. Several indices are utilized to quantify the soil surface microroughness, namely the random roughness (RR index, the crossover length, the variance scale from the Markov–Gaussian model, and the limiting difference. Findings show a consistent increase in roughness under the action of rainfall, with an overall agreement between all indices in terms of trend and magnitude. Although this study is limited to a narrow range of rainfall and soil conditions, the results suggest that the outcome of the interaction between rainfall and a soil surface can be different for smooth and rough surfaces and thus warrant the need for a better understanding of this interaction.

  15. Acoustic techniques for studying soil-surface seals and crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of raindrops on a soil surface during a rainstorm may cause soil-surface sealing and upon drying, soil crusting. Soil-surface sealing is a result of the clogging of interaggregate pores by smaller suspended particles in the water and by structural deformation of the soil fabric, which red...

  16. Armazenamento de água e densidade do solo sob três condições de superfície, em um Cambissol gleico de Lugo, Espanha Soil water storage and bulk density under three conditions of soil surface in a Cambisol of Lugo, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio P. González

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com o presente trabalho, investigar as variações de armazenamento de água e da densidade do solo de um Cambissol gleico, em Lugo, Espanha, sob três condições de superfície. A avaliação do teor de água e da densidade do solo no campo foi acompanhada com leituras durante 16 meses, usando-se uma sonda de nêutrons gama. Três condições de superfícies foram estudadas: pastagem (Lolium perenne com 4 anos; pastagem com 2 anos e solo descoberto. As avaliações foram realizadas nas profundidades de 0,20, 0,30, 0,60 e 1,20 m. Com base nos resultados, concluiu-se que: as condições de superfície proporcionaram diferenças no armazenamento de água, até a profundidade de 0,60 m; as variações de armazenamento de água influenciaram a avaliação da densidade do solo; a superfície com o solo descoberto apresentou menor variação no conteúdo de água armazenada enquanto a superfície com a pastagem de 4 anos mostrou maior variação.The present work aimed to investigate the soil water storage and bulk density of a Cambisol gleico in Lugo, Spain, with three conditions of soil surface. Thus, the main objective was to study the conservation of the water in the soil. In order to evaluate the soil water content and bulk density, readings were accomplished during 16 months, using a neutron gamma probe under the field conditions. Three plots were used: plot 1 - pasture (Lolium perenne with 4 years; plot 2 - pasture (Lolium perenne with 2 years and plot 3 - bare soil. The obtained data at depths of 0.20, 0.30, 0.60 and 1.20 m were discussed. Results show that soil surface conditions were different in the soil water storage until the depth of 0.60 m; the variations of soil water storage influenced the bulk density. Soil water storage variations were lower for the bare soil and higher for the soil surface under 4 year pasture.

  17. Dissipation of oxytetracycline in soils under different redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jigeng; Ying Guangguo; Zhou Lijun; Liu Shan; Zhao Jianliang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the dissipation kinetics of oxytetracycline in soils under aerobic and anoxic conditions. Laboratory experiments showed that the dissipation of oxytetracycline in soil followed first-order reaction kinetics and its dissipation rates decreased with increasing concentration. Oxytetracycline dissipated faster in soil under aerobic conditions than under anoxic conditions. The half-lives for oxytetracycline in soil under aerobic conditions ranged between 29 and 56 days for non-sterile treatments and 99-120 days for sterile treatments, while under anoxic conditions the half-lives of oxytetracycline ranged between 43 and 62 days in the non-sterile soil and between 69 and 104 days in the sterile soil. This suggests microbes can degrade oxytetracycline in agricultural soil. Abiotic factors such as strong sorption onto soil components also played a role in the dissipation of oxytetracycline in soil. - Oxytetracycline dissipation in soils is influenced by redox conditions and soil properties.

  18. Soil surface roughness decay in contrasting climates, tillage types and management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Bertol, Ildegardis; Tondello Barbosa, Fabricio; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    results indicate that two or more parameters may be needed to characterize the spatial variability of the soil surface microrelief and to best describe the roughness decay in agricultural soils under the various climatic and anthropogenic conditions studied. Then, rates of soil surface roughness decay were used to evaluate the susceptibility to degradation of the soil surface under the main tillage ands management types studied. Finally the effects of soil surface roughness on soil losses and water losses under typical tillage and management systems of the two contrasting regions studied were outlined.

  19. Overcoming soil compaction in surface mine reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweigard, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Rubber-tyred soil reconstruction equipment causes compaction of soil and means surface mine operators cannot satisfy crop yield standards defined by the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. Soil compaction can be overcome by either modifying the reconstruction process or alleviating the problem, for example by deep tillage, once it occurs. The Dept. of Mining Engineering at the Institute of Mining and Minerals Research is conducting a laboratory investigation into a method of injecting low density porous organic material into a bin containing soil at the same time as the soil is ripped. This should prevent voids collapsing when subjected to forces from farm equipment and natural sources. Soil analyses are performed before and after the injection. Ripping and injection with ground pecan shells had a residual effect on nuclear bulk density compared to the initially compacted case and also showed an improvement in hydraulic conductivity. Work is in progress on modifying the system to handle other injection material and should lead on to field tests on a prototype involving both soil analysis and crop yield determination. 1 fig

  20. Effects of soil surface management practices on soil and tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of integrated production (IP) and organic-acceptable soil surface management practices were investigated in a 'Cripps Pink'/M7 apple orchard in the Elgin area, South Africa. Work row treatments included cover crops, weeds and straw mulch. In the IP tree rows, weeds were controlled with herbicide and nitrogen (N) ...

  1. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role on the recently abandoned agriculture land where determine the recovery and the erosion rates (Cerdà, 1995), on the soil water repellency degree (Bodí et al., 2011) and on the hydrological cycle (Cerdà, 1999), the plant development (García Fayos et al., 2000) and the seasonality of the geomorphological processes (Cerdà, 2002). Moreover, Soil moisture is a key factor on the semiarid land (Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013), on the productivity of the land (Qadir et al., 2013) and soils treated with amendments (Johnston et al., 2013) and on soil reclamation on drained saline-sodic soils (Ghafoor et al., 2012). In previous study (Azorin-Molina et al., 2013) we investigated the intraannual evolution of soil moisture in soils under different land managements in the Valencia region, Eastern Spain, and concluded that soil moisture recharges are much controlled by few heavy precipitation events; 23 recharge episodes during 2012. Most of the soil moisture recharge events occurred during the autumn season under Back-Door cold front situations. Additionally, sea breeze front episodes brought isolated precipitation and moisture to mountainous areas within summer (Azorin-Molina et al., 2009). We also evidenced that the intraanual evolution of soil moisture changes are positively and significatively correlated (at pGeoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment

  2. Movement of Irrigation Water in Soil from a Surface Emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abbas Dawood

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available rickle irrigation is one of the most conservative irrigation techniques since it implies supplying water directly on the soil through emitters. Emitters dissipate energy of water at the end of the trickle irrigation system and provide water at emission points. The area wetted by an emitter depends upon the discharge of emitter, soil texture, initial soil water content, and soil permeability. The objectives of this research were to predict water distribution profiles through different soils for different conditions and quantify the distribution profiles in terms of main characteristics of soil and emitter. The wetting patterns were simulated at the end of each hour for a total time of application of 12 hrs, emitter discharges of 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 lph, and five initial volumetric soil water contents. Simulation of water flow from a single surface emitter was carried out by using the numerically-based software Hydrus-2D/3D, Version 2.04. Two approaches were used in developing formulas to predict the domains of the wetted pattern. In order to verify the results obtained by implementing the software Hydrus-2D/3D a field experiment was conducted to measure the wetted diameter and compare measured values with simulated ones. The results of the research showed that the developed formulas to express the wetted diameter and depth in terms of emitter discharge, time of application, and initial soil water content are very general and can be used with very good accuracy.

  3. Bioavailability of Soil-Sorbed Tetracycline to Escherichia coli under Unsaturated Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeyou; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Yingjie; Gao, Yanzheng; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Tiedje, James M; Zhu, Dongqiang; Li, Hui

    2017-06-06

    Increasing concentrations of anthropogenic antibiotics in soils are partly responsible for the proliferation of bacterial antibiotic resistance. However, little is known about how soil-sorbed antibiotics exert selective pressure on bacteria in unsaturated soils. This study investigated the bioavailability of tetracycline sorbed on three soils (Webster clay loam, Capac sandy clay loam, and Oshtemo loamy sand) to a fluorescent Escherichia coli bioreporter under unsaturated conditions using agar diffusion assay, microscopic visualization, and model simulation. Tetracycline sorbed on the soils could be desorbed and become bioavailable to the E. coli cells at matric water potentials of -2.95 to -13.75 kPa. Bright fluorescent rings were formed around the tetracycline-loaded soils on the unsaturated agar surfaces, likely due to radial diffusion of tetracycline desorbed from the soils, tetracycline uptake by the E. coli cells, and its inhibition on E. coli growth, which was supported by the model simulation. The bioavailability of soil-sorbed tetracycline was much higher for the Oshtemo soil, probably due to faster diffusion of tetracycline in coarse-textured soils. Decreased bioavailability of soil-sorbed tetracycline at lower soil water potential likely resulted from reduced tetracycline diffusion in soil pore water at smaller matric potential and/or suppressed tetracycline uptake by E. coli at lower osmotic potential. Therefore, soil-sorbed tetracycline could still exert selective pressure on the exposed bacteria, which was influenced by soil physical processes controlled by soil texture and soil water potential.

  4. Surface Mining: Soil, Coal, and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. Fred

    Soil is a resource that is for all practical purposes nonrenewable. Natural soils have been formed over periods of thousands of years, although with intensive management and with inputs of nutrients and conditioners this time could be reduced.Coal is another precious resource, of critical importance as an interim fuel for perhaps the next hundred years or so, until renewable energy resources based on nuclear fusion or solar energy can become economic and widespread. Surface mining is the most efficient method for obtaining coal at lowest cost. But it disturbs the soil and takes it out of agricultural production for many years or decades, and sometimes forever, unless the land is properly restored at considerable cost.

  5. Light structures phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O Davies

    Full Text Available The upper few millimeters of soil harbour photosynthetic microbial communities that are structurally distinct from those of underlying bulk soil due to the presence of light. Previous studies in arid zones have demonstrated functional importance of these communities in reducing soil erosion, and enhancing carbon and nitrogen fixation. Despite being widely distributed, comparative understanding of the biodiversity of the soil surface and underlying soil is lacking, particularly in temperate zones. We investigated the establishment of soil surface communities on pasture soil in microcosms exposed to light or dark conditions, focusing on changes in phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface (0-3 mm and bulk soil (3-12 mm using ribosomal marker gene analyses. Microbial community structure changed with time and structurally similar phototrophic communities were found at the soil surface and in bulk soil in the light exposed microcosms suggesting that light can influence phototroph community structure even in the underlying bulk soil. 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant selection for diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Nostoc punctiforme and Anabaena spp., in addition to the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The soil surface also harboured distinct heterotrophic bacterial and fungal communities in the presence of light, in particular, the selection for the phylum Firmicutes. However, these light driven changes in bacterial community structure did not extend to the underlying soil suggesting a discrete zone of influence, analogous to the rhizosphere.

  6. Photodegradation of pesticides on plant and soil surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    Photodegradation is an abiotic process in the dissipation of pesticides where molecular excitation by absorption of light energy results in various organic reactions, or reactive oxygen species such as OH*, O3, and 1O2 specifically or nonspecifically oxidize the functional groups in a pesticide molecule. In the case of soil photolysis, the heterogeneity of soil together with soil properties varying with meteorological conditions makes photolytic processes difficult to understand. In contrast to solution photolysis, where light is attenuated by solid particles, both absorption and emission profiles of a pesticide are modified through interaction with soil components such as adsorption to clay minerals or solubilization to humic substances. Diffusion of a pesticide molecule results in heterogeneous concentration in soil, and either steric constraint or photoinduced generation of reactive species under the limited mobility sometimes modifies degradation mechanisms. Extensive investigations of meteorological effects on soil moisture and temperature as well as development of an elaborate testing chamber controlling these factors seems to provide better conditions for researchers to examine the photodegradation of pesticides on soil under conditions similar to the real environment. However, the mechanistic analysis of photodegradation has just begun, and there still remain many issues to be clarified. For example, how photoprocesses affect the electronic states of pesticide molecules on soil or how the reactive oxygen species are generated on soil via interaction with clay minerals and humic substances should be investigated in greater detail. From this standpoint, the application of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and usage or development of various probes to trap intermediate species is highly desired. Furthermore, only limited information is yet available on the reactions of pesticides on soil with atmospheric chemical species. For photodegradation on plants, the

  7. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    found between soil surface temperature and solar altitude, suggesting an empirical predicator that solar altitude can serve for soil surface ...... of soil surface temperature are often more important to plants and animals than the average ... shrub, and a long light shadow is obvious on the lee side. At 14:00, shadow is much ...

  8. Measuring evaporation from soil surfaces for environmental and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are many reasons for the need to assess rates and quantities of evaporation or evapotranspiration from natural soil surfaces, the surfaces of deposits of mine or industrial waste, or soil-covered waste surfaces. These include assessing water balances for nearsurface soil strata, landfills, tailings dams and waste dumps ...

  9. Estimation of bare soil surface temperature from air temperature and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil surface temperature has critical influence on climate, agricultural and hydrological activities since it serves as a good indicator of the energy budget of the earth's surface. Two empirical models for estimating soil surface temperature from air temperature and soil depth temperature were developed. The coefficient of ...

  10. Parameter estimation of a two-horizon soil profile by combining crop canopy and surface soil moisture observations using GLUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelash, K.; Sekhar, M.; Ruiz, L.; Tomer, S. K.; Guérif, M.; Buis, S.; Durand, P.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryEstimation of soil parameters by inverse modeling using observations on either surface soil moisture or crop variables has been successfully attempted in many studies, but difficulties to estimate root zone properties arise when heterogeneous layered soils are considered. The objective of this study was to explore the potential of combining observations on surface soil moisture and crop variables - leaf area index (LAI) and above-ground biomass for estimating soil parameters (water holding capacity and soil depth) in a two-layered soil system using inversion of the crop model STICS. This was performed using GLUE method on a synthetic data set on varying soil types and on a data set from a field experiment carried out in two maize plots in South India. The main results were (i) combination of surface soil moisture and above-ground biomass provided consistently good estimates with small uncertainity of soil properties for the two soil layers, for a wide range of soil paramater values, both in the synthetic and the field experiment, (ii) above-ground biomass was found to give relatively better estimates and lower uncertainty than LAI when combined with surface soil moisture, especially for estimation of soil depth, (iii) surface soil moisture data, either alone or combined with crop variables, provided a very good estimate of the water holding capacity of the upper soil layer with very small uncertainty whereas using the surface soil moisture alone gave very poor estimates of the soil properties of the deeper layer, and (iv) using crop variables alone (else above-ground biomass or LAI) provided reasonable estimates of the deeper layer properties depending on the soil type but provided poor estimates of the first layer properties. The robustness of combining observations of the surface soil moisture and the above-ground biomass for estimating two layer soil properties, which was demonstrated using both synthetic and field experiments in this study, needs now to

  11. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Relations between soil surface roughness, tortuosity, tillage treatments, rainfall intensity and soil and water losses from a red yellow latosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Bramorski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil surface roughness increases water retention and infiltration, reduces the runoff volume and speed and influences soil losses by water erosion. Similarly to other parameters, soil roughness is affected by the tillage system and rainfall volume. Based on these assumptions, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tillage treatments on soil surface roughness (RR and tortuosity (T and to investigate the relationship with soil and water losses in a series of simulated rainfall events. The field study was carried out at the experimental station of EMBRAPA Southeastern Cattle Research Center in São Carlos (Fazenda Canchim, in São Paulo State, Brazil. Experimental plots of 33 m² were treated with two tillage practices in three replications, consisting of: untilled (no-tillage soil (NTS and conventionally tilled (plowing plus double disking soil (CTS. Three successive simulated rain tests were applied in 24 h intervals. The three tests consisted of a first rain of 30 mm/h, a second of 30 mm/h and a third rain of 70 mm/h. Immediately after tilling and each rain simulation test, the surface roughness was measured, using a laser profile meter. The tillage treatments induced significant changes in soil surface roughness and tortuosity, demonstrating the importance of the tillage system for the physical surface conditions, favoring water retention and infiltration in the soil. The increase in surface roughness by the tillage treatments was considerably greater than its reduction by rain action. The surface roughness and tortuosity had more influence on the soil volume lost by surface runoff than in the conventional treatment. Possibly, other variables influenced soil and water losses from the no-tillage treatments, e.g., soil type, declivity, slope length, among others not analyzed in this study.

  14. Prevention of soiling of heliostat surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, B.; Binette, M.

    1980-12-01

    Methods for preventing or minimizing soiling of the surface of the glass mirrored heliostat and the plastic dome over the aluminized Mylar mirror were developed. The substrates used were float glass, Kynar, and Petra A polyester. The two general classes of compounds which were being investigated were antistatic and antisoiling agents. The categories of antistatic agents used were amine derivatives, quaternary ammonium salts, phosphate esters, and polyethylene glycol esters. The soil release agents were either hydrophilic ionic or hydrophilic nonionic in character. These compounds were attached to the substrate surface by silane or titanate coupling agents or as a mixture with a hard, weather resistant coating. The silanol groups on the surface of glass provided suitable attachment sites; whereas, the plastic substrates required activation by various procedures. Another route to these objectives lay in direct reaction of an organic compound with a functional group in the glass surface. Evaluation of the various coatings on the three substrates was accomplished by a sequential screening procedure.

  15. Quantitative parameterization of soil surface structure with increasing rainfall volumes

    OpenAIRE

    Edison Aparecido Mome Filho

    2016-01-01

    The study of soil structure allows inferences on soil behavior. Quantitative parameters are oftentimes required to describe soil structure and the multifractal ones are still underused in soil science. Some studies have shown relations between the multifractal spectrum and both soil surface roughness decay by rainfall and porous system heterogeneity, however, a particular multifractal response to a specific soil behavior is not established yet. Therefore, the objectives of this research were:...

  16. Effect of soil and cover conditions on soil-water relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R., Jr. Trimble; Charles E. Hale; H. Spencer Potter

    1951-01-01

    People who make flood-control surveys for the U.S. Department of Agriculture are concerned with the physical condition of the soils in the watersheds. The condition of the soil determines how fast water moves into and through the soil, and how much water is held in storage. The condition of the soil has a great influence on stream flow, erosion, floods and water supply...

  17. Effect of some surface and subsurface attributes on soil water erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertol, Ildegardis; César Ramos, Júlio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Mirás Avalos, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon depending on climate, topography, soil intrinsic characteristics, crop and residue cover, and management and conservation practices that may be accelerated by man activities. Within the above mentioned factors, soil cover and soil management most influence soil erosion. Soil management includes mechanical mobilization and in soil conservationist systems soil residues are mobilized for increasing soil surface roughness. Even if soil roughness is ephemeral, it increases soil water storage and sediment retention in surface microdepressions, which contributes to decrease water erosion. Conservationist soil management systems also maintain the soil surface covered by crop residues, which are more persistent than roughness and contribute to dissipate kinetic energy from raindrops and partly also from runoff. Crop residues are more efficient than soil roughness in controlling water erosion because of its ability to retain detached soil particles. The objective of this study was to assess the efficiency of both soil cover by crop residues and soil surface roughness in controlling water erosion. A field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. The following treatments were evaluated: 1) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum), 2) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa), 3) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass, 4) scarification after cultivation of common vetch, 5) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. Treatments #1 and 2 involved no-tilled soil with a rather smooth soil surface, where roots and crop residues of the previous crop were maintained. Treatments # 3 and 4 involved a rather high roughness, absence of previous crop residues and maintenance of antecedent roots. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator

  18. [Effects of soil surface mulching on solar greenhouse grafted and own-rooted cucumber growth and soil environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Sheng; Liang, Yinli; Wang, Juyuan

    2005-12-01

    The study on the effects of different soil surface mulching models, including wheat straw mulching (WS), plastic film mulching (PF), and wheat straw plus plastic film mulching (WP), on the growth of solar greenhouse grafted and own-rooted cucumber and on soil environment showed that soil surface mulching not only increased the individuals of pistillate flower, improved its differentiation and development, shortened fruit-developing period, increased fruit weight, reduced fruit malformation percentage, but also raised total yield. Among the test mulching models, WP was better than WS and PF, and the effects were superior on grafted than on own-rooted cucumber. Soil surface mulching also had considerable effects on soil environment, but the effects varied with different modules. For example, under field condition, the diurnal change of soil temperature was a single-peak curve, with its peak higher and appeared at 14:30 in 5 cm and 10 cm soil depth, but lower and appeared later in deeper soil layers. In this study, WS lowered the maximum soil temperature and raised the minimum soil temperature, making soil temperature quite stable, while PF raised the maximum soil temperature much higher and enhanced the minimum soil temperature less than WS and WP, making the largest variation range of soil temperature. WP played a role of raising soil temperature and kept it stable. Similar to the diurnal change of soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm depth, that of soil respiration rate was also a single-peak curve. The soil respiration rate in all treatmentg was significantly higher than that of CK, and WP had a higher soil respiration rate than PF and WS. There was a significant positive correlation between soil respiration rate and soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm depth. By the end of the experiment, soil bulk density at the depth of 0-20 cm was measured, which was significantly lower in WS and WP than in CK and PF. The difference in soil bulk density was gradually inconspicuous

  19. Impact of surface coal mining on soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    X. Liu; J. Q. Wu; P. W. Conrad; S. Dun; C. S. Todd; R. L. McNearny; William Elliot; H. Rhee; P. Clark

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is strongly related to soil hydraulic properties. Understanding how surface coal mining affects these properties is therefore important in developing effective management practices to control erosion during reclamation. To determine the impact of mining activities on soil hydraulic properties, soils from undisturbed areas, areas of roughly graded mine...

  20. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    30 N latitude) are used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal soil moisture variations. The effect of rainfall on diurnal and seasonal soil moisture is discussed. We have investigated relationships of soil moisture with sur- face albedo and soil thermal diffusivity. The diurnal variation of surface albedo appears as a.

  1. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, ...

  2. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the effects of shrub (Caragana korshinskii) canopy on the soil surface temperature heterogeneity at areas under shrub canopy ... Results indicated that diurnal mean soil surface temperature under the C. korshinskii canopy (ASB and BMC) was ...... dunes and interdunes in southern New Mexico: A study of soil properties ...

  3. Environmental Radionuclides in Surface Soils of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.; Hiep, H.T.; Quang, N.H.; Luyen, T.V.; Binh, T.V.; Ngo, N.T.; Long, N.Q.; Bac, V.T.

    2012-01-01

    A database on 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs in surface soils was established to provide inputs for the assessment of the collective dose to the population of Vietnam and to support soil erosion studies using 137 Cs as a tracer. A total of 292 soil samples were taken from undisturbed sites across the territory and the concentrations of radionuclides were determined by gamma spectrometry method. The multiple regression of 137 Cs inventories against characteristics of sampling locations allowed us to establish the distribution of 137 Cs deposition density and its relationship with latitude and annual rainfall. The 137 Cs deposition density increases northward and varies from 178 Bq m -2 to 1,920 Bq m -2 . High rainfall areas in the northern and central parts of the country have received considerable 137 Cs inputs exceeding 600 Bq m -2 , which is the maximum value that can be expected for Vietnam from the UNSCEAR global pattern. The mean activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K are 45, 59 and 401 Bq kg- 1 , respectively, which entail an average absorbed dose rate in air of 62 nGy h -1 , which is about 7% higher than the world average. (author)

  4. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  5. A study of soil surface characteristics in a small watershed in the hilly, gullied area on the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Guobin,; Xu Mingxiang,; Ritsema, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Soil surface characteristics are closely related to soil surface depressional storage, infiltration, runoff generation and soil erosion, especially in highly erodible loess soil. Soil surface random roughness, soil cohesion and aggregate stability are necessary parameters in the Limburg Soil Erosion

  6. SMEX03 Surface and Soil Temperature Measurements: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains land surface temperature and soil temperature data at depths of 1 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003...

  7. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or fill..., twigs, and wood scraps must be removed in areas where footings are to be placed. After removal of...

  8. Relationship between Mineral Soil Surface Area and the Biological Degradation of Biosolids Added to Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqi Wen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical and biological processes that operate in the soil matrix and on the soil surface are important to the degradation of biosolids in soil. Due to the large surface area of soils it is assumed that the microbial ecology is associated with mineral soil surface area. The total mineral surface areas were determined for soils from eight different fields selected from a long term study (1972–2006 of annual biosolids application to 41 fields in central Illinois varying in size from 3.6 to 66 ha. The surface areas for the soils varied from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. The biological degradation rates for the eight soils were determined using a biological degradation rate model (DRM and varied from 0.02 to 0.20/year−1. Regression analysis revealed that the degradation rate was positively associated with mineral soil surface area (1 m2/g produces 0.018 year−1 increase in the degradation rate. The annual soil sequestration rate was calculated to increase from 1% to 6% when the soil total surface area increased from 1 to 9 m2/g of soil. Therefore, land application of biosolids is an effective way to enhance carbon sequestration in soils and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. [Soil Microbial Respiration Under Different Soil Temperature Conditions and Its Relationship to Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon and Invertase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Shu-tao; Hu, Zheng-hua; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the soil microbial respiration under different temperature conditions and its relationship to soil dissolved organic carbon ( DOC) and invertase, an indoor incubation experiment was performed. The soil samples used for the experiment were taken from Laoshan, Zijinshan, and Baohuashan. The responses of soil microbial respiration to the increasing temperature were studied. The soil DOC content and invertase activity were also measured at the end of incubation. Results showed that relationships between cumulative microbial respiration of different soils and soil temperature could be explained by exponential functions, which had P values lower than 0.001. The coefficient of temperature sensitivity (Q10 value) varied from 1.762 to 1.895. The Q10 value of cumulative microbial respiration decreased with the increase of soil temperature for all soils. The Q10 value of microbial respiration on 27 days after incubation was close to that of 1 day after incubation, indicating that the temperature sensitivity of recalcitrant organic carbon may be similar to that of labile organic carbon. For all soils, a highly significant ( P = 0.003 ) linear relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and soil DOC content could be observed. Soil DOC content could explain 31.6% variances of cumulative soil microbial respiration. For the individual soil and all soils, the relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and invertase activity could be explained by a highly significant (P soil microbial respiration.

  10. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 4. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo and soil thermal ... The diurnal variation of surface albedo appears as a U-shaped curve on sunny days. Surface albedo decreases with the increase of solar elevation angle, and it tends ...

  11. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  12. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2014-01-01

    We coupled a radiative transfer model and a soil hydrologic model (HYDRUS 1D) with an optimization routine to derive soil hydraulic parameters, surface roughness, and soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot using measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band), rainfall, and potential soil evaporation. The robustness of the approach was evaluated using five 28-d data sets representing different meteorological conditions. We considered two soil hydraulic property models: the unimodal Mualem-van Genuchten and the bimodal model of Durner. Microwave radiative transfer was modeled by three different approaches: the Fresnel equation with depth-averaged dielectric permittivity of either 2-or 5-cm-thick surface layers and a coherent radiative transfer model (CRTM) that accounts for vertical gradients in dielectric permittivity. Brightness temperatures simulated by the CRTM and the 2-cm-layer Fresnel model fitted well to the measured ones. L-band brightness temperatures are therefore related to the dielectric permittivity and soil moisture in a 2-cm-thick surface layer. The surface roughness parameter that was derived from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling was similar to direct estimates from laser profiler measurements. The laboratory-derived water retention curve was bimodal and could be retrieved consistently for the different periods from brightness temperatures using inverse modeling. A unimodal soil hydraulic property function underestimated the hydraulic conductivity near saturation. Surface soil moisture contents simulated using retrieved soil hydraulic parameters were compared with in situ measurements. Depth-specific calibration relations were essential to derive soil moisture from near-surface installed sensors. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA.

  13. Soil Structure - A Neglected Component of Land-Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatichi, S.; Or, D.; Walko, R. L.; Vereecken, H.; Kollet, S. J.; Young, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Hengl, T.; Agam, N.; Avissar, R.

    2017-12-01

    Soil structure is largely absent in most standard sampling and measurements and in the subsequent parameterization of soil hydraulic properties deduced from soil maps and used in Earth System Models. The apparent omission propagates into the pedotransfer functions that deduce parameters of soil hydraulic properties primarily from soil textural information. Such simple parameterization is an essential ingredient in the practical application of any land surface model. Despite the critical role of soil structure (biopores formed by decaying roots, aggregates, etc.) in defining soil hydraulic functions, only a few studies have attempted to incorporate soil structure into models. They mostly looked at the effects on preferential flow and solute transport pathways at the soil profile scale; yet, the role of soil structure in mediating large-scale fluxes remains understudied. Here, we focus on rectifying this gap and demonstrating potential impacts on surface and subsurface fluxes and system wide eco-hydrologic responses. The study proposes a systematic way for correcting the soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity functions—accounting for soil-structure—with major implications for near saturated hydraulic conductivity. Modification to the basic soil hydraulic parameterization is assumed as a function of biological activity summarized by Gross Primary Production. A land-surface model with dynamic vegetation is used to carry out numerical simulations with and without the role of soil-structure for 20 locations characterized by different climates and biomes across the globe. Including soil structure affects considerably the partition between infiltration and runoff and consequently leakage at the base of the soil profile (recharge). In several locations characterized by wet climates, a few hundreds of mm per year of surface runoff become deep-recharge accounting for soil-structure. Changes in energy fluxes, total evapotranspiration and vegetation productivity

  14. Fresh and composted industrial sludge restore soil functions in surface soil of degraded agricultural land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Riaz, Muhammad; Shahzad, Sher Muhammad; Yasmeen, Tahira; Ashraf, Muhammad; Siddique, Muhammad; Mubarik, Muhammad Salman; Bragazza, Luca; Buttler, Alexandre

    2018-04-01

    A field study was conducted to test the potential of 5-year consecutive application of fresh industrial sludge (FIS) and composted industrial sludge (CIS) to restore soil functions at surface (0-15cm) and subsurface (15-30cm) of the degraded agricultural land. Sludge amendments increased soil fertility parameters including total organic carbon (TOC), soil available nitrogen (SAN), soil available phosphorus (SAP) and soil available potassium (SAK) at 0-15cm depth. Soil enzyme activities i.e. dehydrogenase (DHA), β-glucosidase (BGA) and alkaline phosphatase (ALp) were significantly enhanced by FIS and CIS amendments in surface soil. However, urease activity (UA) and acid phosphatase (ACp) were significantly reduced compared to control soil. The results showed that sludge amendments significantly increased microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) at both soil depth, and soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) only at 0-15cm depth. Significant changes were also observed in the population of soil culturable microflora (bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes) with CIS amendment in surface soil suggesting persistence of microbial activity owing to the addition of organic matter source. Sludge amendments significantly reduced soil heavy metal concentrations at 0-15cm depth, and the effect was more pronounced with CIS compared to unamended control soil. Sludge amendments generally had no significant impact on soil heavy metal concentrations in subsoil. Agronomic viability test involving maize was performed to evaluate phytotoxicity of soil solution extract at surface and sub-surface soil. Maize seeds grown in solution extract (0-15cm) from sludge treated soil showed a significant increase of relative seed germination (RSG), relative root growth (RRG) and germination index (GI). These results suggested that both sludge amendments significantly improved soil properties, however, the CIS amendment was relatively more effective in restoring soil functions

  15. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Mathilde I; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2008-12-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a time-course experiment was performed under laboratory conditions. Earthworms were incubated in perspex columns filled with sandy soil (2% organic matter, 2.9% clay) or loamy clay soil (15% organic matter, 20% clay), and surface casts were collected after up to 80 days. On the sandy soil, A. caliginosa and L. rubellus brought approximately 7.1-16 g dry wt. casts/g fresh wt. earthworm to the surface, which is significantly more than A. chlorotica and L. terrestris (2.5-5.0 g dry wt./g fresh wt.). A. caliginosa was the only species that produced significantly more surface casts in the sandy soil than in the loamy clay soil. In the loamy clay soil, no differences in biomass-corrected casting rates were found among the species. Surface casting rates tended to decrease after 20 days. Considering the densities of the different species in a Dutch floodplain area Afferdensche and Deestsche Waarden, surface cast production is estimated to amount to 2.0 kg dry soil/m2 after 80 days, which could be extrapolated to 2.7-9.1 kg/m2 per year. These amounts correspond to a surface deposition of a layer of approximately 1.9-6.5 mm/year, which is of the same order or even slightly higher than the sedimentation rate and much higher than the amount of soil brought to the soil surface by bioturbating small mammals.

  16. Assessment of metolachlor and diuron leaching in a tropical soil using undisturbed soil columns under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, Eliana F G C; De Souza, Luana; Villa, Ricardo D; Pinto, Alicio Alves

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] and metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-metoxi-1-methylethyl)acetamide] leaching was studied in undisturbed soil columns collected in a cotton crop area in Mato Grosso State, Brazil. The pesticides were applied to the soil surface in dosages similar to those used in a cotton plantation. To assess the leaching process, soil columns were submitted to simulated rain under laboratory conditions at 25 ± 3°C, in the absence of wind and direct solar radiation. During the rain simulations, leachate solutions were collected and herbicide concentrations were determined. At the end of the experiment, the soil columns were cut into 10 cm sections to determine the remaining herbicide concentrations through the soil profile. Metolachlor was detected in all soil sections, and approximately 4% of the applied mass was leached. Diuron was detected only in the upper two soil sections and was not detected in the leachate. A linear correlation (r > 0.94) between the metolachlor soil concentrations and the organic contents of the soil sections was observed. Mass balance suggests that around 56% of diuron and 40% of metolachlor were degraded during the experiments. Measurements of the water table depth in the area where the samples were collected showed that it varied from 2 to 6 m and is therefore vulnerable to contamination by the studied herbicides, particularly metolachlor, which demonstrated a higher leaching potential.

  17. Inclusion of Solar Elevation Angle in Land Surface Albedo Parameterization Over Bare Soil Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiyuan; Wei, Zhigang; Wen, Zhiping; Dong, Wenjie; Li, Zhenchao; Wen, Xiaohang; Zhu, Xian; Ji, Dong; Chen, Chen; Yan, Dongdong

    2017-12-01

    Land surface albedo is a significant parameter for maintaining a balance in surface energy. It is also an important parameter of bare soil surface albedo for developing land surface process models that accurately reflect diurnal variation characteristics and the mechanism behind the solar spectral radiation albedo on bare soil surfaces and for understanding the relationships between climate factors and spectral radiation albedo. Using a data set of field observations, we conducted experiments to analyze the variation characteristics of land surface solar spectral radiation and the corresponding albedo over a typical Gobi bare soil underlying surface and to investigate the relationships between the land surface solar spectral radiation albedo, solar elevation angle, and soil moisture. Based on both solar elevation angle and soil moisture measurements simultaneously, we propose a new two-factor parameterization scheme for spectral radiation albedo over bare soil underlying surfaces. The results of numerical simulation experiments show that the new parameterization scheme can more accurately depict the diurnal variation characteristics of bare soil surface albedo than the previous schemes. Solar elevation angle is one of the most important factors for parameterizing bare soil surface albedo and must be considered in the parameterization scheme, especially in arid and semiarid areas with low soil moisture content. This study reveals the characteristics and mechanism of the diurnal variation of bare soil surface solar spectral radiation albedo and is helpful in developing land surface process models, weather models, and climate models.

  18. Effects of Near Soil Surface Characteristics on the Soil Detachment Process in a Chronological Series of Vegetation Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing

    2017-04-01

    The effects of near soil surface characteristics on the soil detachment process might be different at different stages of vegetation restoration. This study was performed to investigate the effects of the near soil surface factors of plant litter, biological soil crusts (BSCs), dead roots and live roots on the soil detachment process by overland flow at different stages of restoration. Soil samples (1 m long, 0.1 m wide, and 0.05 m high) under four treatment conditions were collected from 1-yr-old and 24-yr-old natural grasslands and subjected to flow scouring under five different shear stresses ranging from 5.3 to 14.6 Pa. The results indicated that the effects of near soil surface characteristics on soil detachment were substantial during the process of vegetation restoration. The total reduction in the soil detachment capacity of the 1-yr-old grassland was 98.1%, and of this total, 7.9%, 30.0% and 60.2% was attributed to the litter, BSCs and plant roots, respectively. In the 24-yr-old grassland, the soil detachment capacity decreased by 99.0%, of which 13.2%, 23.5% and 62.3% was caused by the litter, BSCs and plant roots, respectively. Combined with the previously published data of a 7-yr-old grassland, the influence of plant litter on soil detachment was demonstrated to increase with restoration time, but soil detachment was also affected by the litter type and composition. The role of BSCs was greater than that of plant litter in reducing soil detachment during the early stages of vegetation recovery. However, its contribution weakened with time since restoration. The influence of plant roots accounted for at least half or up to two-thirds of the total near soil surface factors, of which more than 72.6% was attributed to the physical binding effects of the roots. The chemical bonding effect of the roots increased with time since restoration and was greater than the effect of the litter on soil detachment in the late stages of vegetation restoration. The

  19. Effects of Soil Management Practices on Water Erosion under Natural Rainfall Conditions on a Humic Dystrudept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Ferreira Chaves de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Water erosion is the main cause of soil degradation and is influenced by rainfall, soil, topography, land use, soil cover and management, and conservation practices. The objective of this study was to quantify water erosion in a Humic Dystrudept in two experiments. In experiment I, treatments consisted of different rates of fertilizer applied to the soil surface under no-tillage conditions. In experiment II, treatments consisted of a no-tillage in natural rangeland, burned natural rangeland and natural rangeland. Forage turnip, black beans, common vetch, and corn were used in rotation in the treatments with crops in the no-tillage during study period. The treatments with crops and the burned rangeland and natural rangeland were compared to a bare soil control, without cultivation and without fertilization. Increasing fertilization rates increased organic carbon content, soil resistance to disintegration, and the macropore volume of the soil, due to the increase in the dry mass of the crops, resulting in an important reduction in water erosion. The exponential model of the ŷ = ae-bx type satisfactorily described the reduction in water and soil losses in accordance with the increase in fertilization rate and also described the decrease in soil losses in accordance with the increase in dry mass of the crops. Water erosion occurred in the following increasing intensity: in natural rangeland, in cultivated natural rangeland, and in burned natural rangeland. Water erosion had less effect on water losses than on soil losses, regardless of the soil management practices.

  20. Heterogeneity of soil surface temperature induced by xerophytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variation characteristics of the soil surface temperature induced by shrub canopy greatly affects the nearsurface biological and biochemical processes in desert ecosystems. However, information regarding the effects of shrub upon the heterogeneity of soil surface temperature is scarce. Here we aimed to characterize the ...

  1. Integrated Assessment of Vegetation and Soil Conditions Following Herbicide Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-25

    ER D C/ EL T R- 17 -9 Integrated Assessment of Vegetation and Soil Conditions Following Herbicide Application En vi ro nm en ta l L ab...good. Find out more at www.erdc.usace.army.mil. To search for other technical reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http...acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. ERDC/EL TR-17-9 July 2017 Integrated Assessment of Vegetation and Soil Conditions Following Herbicide Application

  2. An experimental study on mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Gerzabek, M.H.; Mueck, K.

    1994-03-01

    Radionuclide contaminated soil adhered to plant surfaces can contribute to human ingestion dose. To determine this contribution, a method of 46 Sc neutron activation analysis was established and tested, by which a detection limit of 0.05 mg soil per g dry plant biomass can be obtained. In the field and greenhouse experiment the mass loading of soil on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and broad bean (Vicia faba L.) was investigated and the contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion were evaluated separately. Soil retained on plant surfaces in field conditions in Seibersdorf/Austria was 5.77 ± 1.44 mg soil per g dry plant for ryegrass and 9.51 ± 0.73 mg soil per g dry plant for broad bean. Estimates of contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion to soil contamination of plant during the experimental period are 68 % and 32 % for broadbean, 47 % and 53 % for ryegrass, respectively. Mass loading results from field studies indicate that soil adhesion on plant surfaces can contribute up to 23 % of plant 137 Cs contamination, the transfer factors modified by mass loading decline differently, depending on 137 Cs concentration of the soil and the soil mass adhered to plant surfaces. (authors)

  3. An experimental study on mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. G.; Gerzabek, M. H.; Mueck, K.

    1994-01-01

    Radionuclide contaminated soil adhered to plant surfaces can contribute to human ingestion dose. To determine this contribution, a method of 46 Sc neutron activation analysis was established and tested, by which a detection limit of 0.05 mg soil per g dry plant biomass can be obtained. In the field and greenhouse experiment the mass loading of soil on ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and broadbean (Vicia faba L.) was investigated and the contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion were evaluated separately. Soil retained on plant surfaces in field conditions in Seibersdorf/Austria was 5.77 ± 1.44 mg soil per g dry plant for ryegrass and 9.51 ± 0.73 mg soil per g dry plant for broadbean. Estimates of contribution from rainsplash and wind erosion to soil contamination of plants during the experimental period are 68 % and 32 % for broadbean 47 % and 53 % for ryegrass respectively. Mass loading results from field studies indicate that soil adhesion on plant surfaces can contribute up to 23 % of plant 137 Cs contamination, the transfer factors modified by mass loading decline differently, depending on 137 Cs concentration of the soil and the soil mass adhered to plant surfaces. (author)

  4. Using lagged dependence to identify (de)coupled surface and subsurface soil moisture values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Coleen D. U.; van der Ploeg, Martine J.; Torfs, Paul J. J. F.

    2018-04-01

    Recent advances in radar remote sensing popularized the mapping of surface soil moisture at different spatial scales. Surface soil moisture measurements are used in combination with hydrological models to determine subsurface soil moisture values. However, variability of soil moisture across the soil column is important for estimating depth-integrated values, as decoupling between surface and subsurface can occur. In this study, we employ new methods to investigate the occurrence of (de)coupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture. Using time series datasets, lagged dependence was incorporated in assessing (de)coupling with the idea that surface soil moisture conditions will be reflected at the subsurface after a certain delay. The main approach involves the application of a distributed-lag nonlinear model (DLNM) to simultaneously represent both the functional relation and the lag structure in the time series. The results of an exploratory analysis using residuals from a fitted loess function serve as a posteriori information to determine (de)coupled values. Both methods allow for a range of (de)coupled soil moisture values to be quantified. Results provide new insights into the decoupled range as its occurrence among the sites investigated is not limited to dry conditions.

  5. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Parinussa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the current Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP satellite missions observe the Earth's surface in the L-band frequency. In the past, several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E and WindSat have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture using multi-channel observations obtained at higher microwave frequencies. While AMSR-E and WindSat lack an L-band channel, they are able to leverage multi-channel microwave observations to estimate additional land surface parameters. In particular, the availability of Ka-band observations allows AMSR-E and WindSat to obtain coincident surface temperature estimates required for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. In contrast, SMOS and SMAP carry only a single frequency radiometer and therefore lack an instrument suited to estimate the physical temperature of the Earth. Instead, soil moisture algorithms from these new generation satellites rely on ancillary sources of surface temperature (e.g. re-analysis or near real time data from weather prediction centres. A consequence of relying on such ancillary data is the need for temporal and spatial interpolation, which may introduce uncertainties. Here, two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques, the triple collocation (TC approach and the Rvalue data assimilation approach, are applied to quantify the global-scale impact of replacing Ka-band based surface temperature retrievals with Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA surface temperature output on the accuracy of WindSat and AMSR-E based surface soil moisture retrievals. Results demonstrate that under sparsely vegetated conditions, the use of

  6. Soil Surface Sealing Reverse or Promote Desertification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, S.; Thompson, S. E.; Chen, L.; Svoray, T.; Sela, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation cover in dry regions is a key variable determining desertification. Bare soils exposed to rainfall by desertification can form physical crusts that reduce infiltration, exacerbating water stress on the remaining vegetation. Paradoxically, field studies show that crust removal is associated with plant mortality in desert systems, while artificial biological crusts can improve plant regeneration. Here, it is shown how physical crusts can act as either drivers of, or buffers against desertification depending on their environmental context. The behavior of crusts is first explored using a simplified theory for water movement on a uniform, partly vegetated slope subject to stationary hydrologic conditions. Numerical model runs supplemented with field data from a semiarid Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site are then applied to represent more realistic environmental conditions. When vegetation cover is significant, crusts can drive desertification, but this process is potentially self-limiting. For low vegetation cover, crusts mitigate against desertification by providing water subsidy to plant communities through a runoff-runon mechanism.

  7. Impact of environmental conditions on sub-surface storage tanks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cast iron made storage tanks with gasoline fluid were buried under the soil at a depth of 4 m under various environment conditions. The simulated conditions include natural rain fail, temperature and acidic, alkaline and neutral soils. A control condition of neutral sea sand as base and filling materials were also investigated.

  8. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data.

  9. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data. PMID:26090852

  10. Highly stable superhydrophobic surfaces under flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonchan; Yim, Changyong; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized hydrophobic anodic aluminum oxide nanostructures with pore diameters of 35, 50, 65, and 80 nm directly on quartz crystal microresonators, and the stability of the resulting superhydrophobicity was investigated under flow conditions by measuring changes in the resonance frequency and dissipation factor. When the quartz substrates were immersed in water, their hydrophobic surfaces did not wet due to the presence of an air interlayer. The air interlayer was gradually replaced by water over time, which caused decreases in the resonance frequency (i.e., increases in mass) and increases in the dissipation factor (i.e., increases in viscous damping). Although the water contact angles of the nanostructures increased with increasing pore size, the stability of their superhydrophobicity increased with decreasing pore size under both static conditions (without flow) and dynamic conditions (with flow); this increase can be attributed to an increase in the solid surface area that interacts with the air layer above the nanopores as the pore size decreases. Further, the effects of increasing the flow rate on the stability of the superhydrophobicity were quantitatively determined.

  11. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atively longer memory of soil moisture in com- parison with the variation of controlling parame- ters often leads to climatic ... and vegetation cover changes the soil colour and thus varies the surface albedo (Todd and Hoffer. 1998). .... The colour of the soil at the experimental site varied from dark brown to dark reddish brown.

  12. Updated global soil map for the Weather Research and Forecasting model and soil moisture initialization for the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DY, C. Y.; Fung, J. C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A meteorological model requires accurate initial conditions and boundary conditions to obtain realistic numerical weather predictions. The land surface controls the surface heat and moisture exchanges, which can be determined by the physical properties of the soil and soil state variables, subsequently exerting an effect on the boundary layer meteorology. The initial and boundary conditions of soil moisture are currently obtained via National Centers for Environmental Prediction FNL (Final) Operational Global Analysis data, which are collected operationally in 1° by 1° resolutions every 6 h. Another input to the model is the soil map generated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (FAO-UNESCO) soil database, which combines several soil surveys from around the world. Both soil moisture from the FNL analysis data and the default soil map lack accuracy and feature coarse resolutions, particularly for certain areas of China. In this study, we update the global soil map with data from Beijing Normal University in 1 km by 1 km grids and propose an alternative method of soil moisture initialization. Simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model show that spinning-up the soil moisture improves near-surface temperature and relative humidity prediction using different types of soil moisture initialization. Explanations of that improvement and improvement of the planetary boundary layer height in performing process analysis are provided.

  13. Spatio-temporal variation of surface soil moisture over the Yellow River basin during 1961–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture plays a significant role in agricultural and ecosystem development. However, in the real world soil moisture data are very limited due to many factors. VIC-3L model, as a semi-distribution hydrological model, can potentially provide valuable information regarding soil moisture. In this study, daily soil moisture contents in the surface soil layer (0–10 cm of 1500 grids at 0.25 × 0.25 degree were simulated by the VIC-3L model. The Mann-Kendall trend test and Morlet wavelet analysis methods were used for the analysis of annual and monthly average surface soil moisture series. Results showed that the trend of surface soil moisture was not obvious on the basin scale, but it varied with spatial and temporal conditions. Different fluctuation amplitudes and periods of surface soil moisture were also discovered on the Yellow River basin during 1961 to 2012.

  14. Implementing a physical soil water flow model with minimal soil characteristics and added value offered by surface soil moisture measurements assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanzy, André

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable for many soil physical and biogeochemical processes. Its dynamic results from water fluxes in soil and at its boundaries, as well as soil water storage properties. If the water flows are dominated by diffusive processes, modelling approaches based on the Richard's equation or the Philip and de Vries coupled heat and water flow equations lead to a satisfactory representation of the soil moisture dynamic. However, It requires the characterization of soil hydraulic functions, the initialisation and the boundary conditions, which are expensive to obtain. The major problem to assess soil moisture for decision making or for representing its spatiotemporal evolution over complex landscape is therefore the lack of information to run the models. The aim of the presentation is to analyse how a soil moisture model can be implemented when only climatic data and basic soil information are available (soil texture, organic matter) and what would be the added of making a few soil moisture measurements. We considered the field scale, which is the key scale for decision making application (the field being the management unit for farming system) and landscape modelling (field size being comparable to the computation unit of distributed hydrological models). The presentation is limited to the bare soil case in order to limit the complexity of the system and the TEC model based on Philip and De Vries equations is used in this study. The following points are addressed: o the within field spatial variability. This spatial variability can be induced by the soil hydraulic properties and/or by the amount of infiltrated water induced by water rooting towards infiltration areas. We analyse how an effective parameterization of soil properties and boundary conditions can be used to simulate the field average moisture. o The model implementation with limited information. We propose strategies that can be implemented when information are limited to soil texture and

  15. Unraveling the size distributions of surface properties for purple soil and yellow soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Zhu, Hualing; Tian, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Soils contain diverse colloidal particles whose properties are pertinent to ecological and human health, whereas few investigations systematically analyze the surface properties of these particles. The objective of this study was to elucidate the surface properties of particles within targeted size ranges (i.e. >10, 1-10, 0.5-1, 0.2-0.5 and soil (Entisol) and a yellow soil (Ultisol) using the combined determination method. The mineralogy of corresponding particle-size fractions was determined by X-ray diffraction. We found that up to 80% of the specific surface area and 85% of the surface charge of the entire soil came from colloidal-sized particles (soil had a larger specific surface area, stronger electrostatic field, and higher surface charge than the yellow soil due to differences in mineralogy. Likewise, the differences in surface properties among the various particle-size fractions can also be ascribed to mineralogy. Our results indicated that soil surface properties were essentially determined by the colloidal-sized particles, and the soil properties. The composition of clay minerals within the diverse particle-size fractions could fully explain the size distributions of surface properties. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dew-worms in white nights: High latitude light constrains earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) behaviour at the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil is an effective barrier to light penetration that limits the direct influence of light on belowground organisms. Variation in aboveground light conditions, however, is important to soil-dwelling animals that are periodically active on the soil surface. A prime example is the earthworm Lumbricus...

  17. Microbial destruction of chitin in soils under different moisture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavtsev, A. M.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2009-07-01

    The most favorable moisture conditions for the microbial destruction of chitin in soils are close to the total water capacity. The water content has the most pronounced effect on chitin destruction in soils in comparison with other studied substrates. It was found using gas-chromatographic and luminescent-microscopic methods that the maximum specific activity of the respiration of the chitinolytic community was at a rather low redox potential with the soil moisture close to the total water capacity. The range of moisture values under which the most intense microbial transformation of chitin occurred was wider in clayey and clay loamy soils as compared with sandy ones. The increase was observed due to the contribution of mycelial bacteria and actinomycetes in the chitinolytic complex as the soil moisture increased.

  18. Transcriptional plasticity of a soil arthropod across different ecological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, Tjalf E; Birlutiu, Adriana; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Dijkstra, Tjeerd M H; Van Straalen, Nico M; Ylstra, Bauke; Roelofs, Dick

    2011-03-01

    Ecological functional genomics, dealing with the responses of organisms to their natural environment is confronted with a complex pattern of variation and a large number of confounding environmental factors. For gene expression studies to provide meaningful information on conditions deviating from normal, a baseline or normal operating range (NOR) response needs to be established which indicates how an organism's transcriptome reacts to naturally varying ecological factors. Here we determine the transcriptional plasticity of a soil arthropod, Folsomia candida, exposed to various natural environments, as part of a first attempt in establishing such a NOR. Animals were exposed to 26 different field soils after which gene expression levels were measured. The main factor found to regulate gene expression was soil-type (sand or clay). Cell homeostasis and DNA replication were affected in collembolans exposed to sandy soil, indicating general stress. Multivariate analysis identified soil fertility as the main factor influencing gene expression. Regarding land-use, only forest soils showed an expression pattern deviating from the others. No significant effect of land-use, agricultural practice or soil type on fitness was observed, but arsenic concentration was negatively correlated with reproductive output. In conclusion, transcriptional responses remained within a limited range across the different land-uses but were significantly affected by soil-type. This may be caused by the contrasting soil physicochemical properties to which F. candida strongly responds. The broad range of conditions over which this soil-living detritivore is able to survive and reproduce, indicates a strategy of high plasticity, which comes with extensive gene expression regulation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclide-bearing soil particles on plant surfaces can be ingested and contribute to human dose, but evaluating the potential dose is limited by the relatively few data available on the masses of soil particles present on plant surfaces. This report summarizes mass loading data (i.e., mass of soil per unit of vegetation) for crops in the southeastern United States and compares these data to (1) those from other regions and (2) the mass loadings used in radionuclide transfer models to predict soil contamination of plant surfaces. Mass loadings were estimated using the 238Pu content of crops as an indicator of soil on plant surfaces. Crops were grown in two soils: a sandy clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil. Concentrations of soil on southeastern crops (i.e., mg soil g-1 plant) differed by more than a factor of 100 due to differences in crop growth form and biomass. Mean concentrations ranged from 1.7 mg g-1 for corn to 260 mg g-1 for lettuce. Differences in mass loadings between soils were less than those among crops. Concentrations differed by less than a factor of two between the two soil types. Because of (1) the differences among crops and (2) the limited data available from other systems, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding regional or climatic variation in mass loadings. There is, however, little evidence to suggest large differences among regions. The mass loadings used to predict soil contamination in current radionuclide transfer models appear to be less than those observed for most crops

  20. Bioventing of gasoline-contaminated soil under varied laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, M.; Shewfelt, K.; Lee, H.; Zytner, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Bioventing is becoming a popular in situ soil remediation technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. Bioventing relies on enhancing the growth of indigenous microorganisms, which can mineralize the contaminant in the presence of sufficient nutrients. Although bioventing is currently being used as a remediation technology, there are some important questions that remain to be answered in order to optimize the process. These questions include the optimum soil moisture content, type and amount of nutrients necessary, and the best means of producing these conditions in the field. To address these questions, two distinct phases of experiments were conducted. The first experimental phase was designed to determine the optimum moisture content, C:N ratio and form of nitrogen supply for this soil. Using approximately 200g of contaminated soil in each of a series of sealed respirometers, microbial degradation of gasoline under bioventing conditions was quantified for C:N ratios of 5, 10 and 20:1, using varying mixtures of NH 4 + - and NO 3 - -N. The results of the studies indicated that the optimum soil moisture content was 15 wt%, with a C:N ratio of 10:1, using a 100% ammonium application. Using the results of the first phase, a second phase of laboratory research was initiated. Five mesoscale reactors have been developed to simulate the bioventing process that takes place in the field. These reactors are filled with approximately 4kg of gasoline-contaminated soil. The initial results are favourable. (author)

  1. Location of Bare Soil Surface and Soil Line on the RED-NIR Spectral Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, P. V.; Rukhovich, D. I.; Rukhovich, A. D.; Rukhovich, D. D.; Kulyanitsa, A. L.; Trubnikov, A. V.; Kalinina, N. V.; Simakova, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil as a separate natural body occupies certain area with its own set of spectral characteristics within the RED-NIR spectral space. This is an ellipse-shaped area, and its semi-major axis is the soil line for a satellite image. The spectral area for a bare soil surface is neighboring to the areas of black carbon, straw, vegetating plants, and missing RED-NIR values. A reliable separation of the bare soil surface within the spectral space is possible with the technology of spectral neighborhood of soil line. The accuracy of this method is 90%. The determination of the bare soil surface using vegetation indices, both relative (NDVI), and perpendicular (PVI), is incorrect; the accuracy of these methods does not exceed 65%, and for most of the survey seasons it may be lower than 50%. The flat part of the "tasseled cap" described as the soil line, is not a synonym for the area of the bare soil surface. The bare soil surface on the RED-NIR plots occupies significantly smaller areas than the area of soil line according to Kauth and Thomas.

  2. Effect of soil surface roughness on infiltration water, ponding and runoff on tilled soils under rainfall simulation experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Longshan; Hou, Rui; Wu, Faqi; Keesstra, Saskia

    2018-01-01

    Agriculture has a large effect on the properties of the soil and with that on soil hydrology. The partitioning of rainfall into infiltration and runoff is relevant to understand runoff generation, infiltration and soil erosion. Tillage manages soil surface properties and generates soil surface

  3. Diurnal pattern of nitrous oxide emissions from soils under different vertical moisture distribution conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzeng Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal pattern of nitrous oxide (N2O emissions is essential in understanding how weather and soil conditions influence the daily mean estimate of N2O fluxes. Incubation experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of vertical soil moisture distribution patterns on diurnal variation of N2O emissions. Clear diurnal patterns of N2O emissions on both surface watering (SW and subsurface watering (SUW treatments (SUW12, SUW15, and SUW18 were detected from soil sample (I, silty clay, and soil sample (II, sandy loam, where peak N2O fluxes usually occurred between 12:00 and 18:00 h. Different vertical watering patterns resulted in changes in the daily range of N2O fluxes and peak time. Mean fluxes from the SUW12, SUW15, and SUW18 treatments were 37.4%, 32.7%, and 43.3% lower than those from SW treatments from soil sample I, and 32.0%, 40.3%, and 41.1% from soil sample II. Moisture distribution patterns under SUW soils could be effective to mitigate N2O emissions. The N2O emissions from soil sample I ranged from178.3 to 2741.0 μg N2O m-2 h-1, which was more than in soil sample II with 7.0 to 83.7 μg N2O m-2 h-1. The different soil texture and N content level might account for the differences in magnitude of N2O fluxes from soils. The optimal soil moisture condition for peak N2O fluxes in the SW treatment had relatively narrower ranges than the SUW treatments with 46% to 60% water-filled pore space (WFPS for soil sample I and 26% to 34% WFPS for soil sample II even though surface soil moisture for peak N2O fluxes were somewhat different from the previously reported optimal soil moisture range of 45% to 75% WFPS.

  4. Effects of Seasonal Land Surface Conditions on Hydrometeorological Dynamics in South-western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-21

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Arid and semiarid landscapes in regions with seasonal precipitation experience dramatic changes that alter land surface...semiarid landscapes in regions with seasonal precipitation experience dramatic changes that alter land surface conditions, including soil moisture...aerial vehicle data acquisition and high performance computing-based hydrologic modeling designed to capture, account for and predict seasonal variations

  5. Applying Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Soil Surface Roughness Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutin Milenković

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning can provide high-resolution, two-dimensional sampling of soil surface roughness. While previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of these roughness measurements in geophysical applications, questions about the number of required scans and their resolution were not investigated thoroughly. Here, we suggest a method to generate digital elevation models, while preserving the surface’s stochastic properties at high frequencies and additionally providing an estimate of their spatial resolution. We also study the impact of the number and positions of scans on roughness indices’ estimates. An experiment over a smooth and isotropic soil plot accompanies the analysis, where scanning results are compared to results from active triangulation. The roughness measurement conditions for ideal sampling are revisited and updated for diffraction-limited sampling valid for close-range laser scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness. Our results show that terrestrial laser scanning can be readily used for roughness assessment on scales larger than 5 cm, while for smaller scales, special processing is required to mitigate the effect of the laser beam footprint. Interestingly, classical roughness parametrization (correlation length, root mean square height (RMSh was not sensitive to these effects. Furthermore, comparing the classical roughness parametrization between one- and four-scan setups shows that the one-scan data can replace the four-scan setup with a relative loss of accuracy below 1% for ranges up to 3 m and incidence angles no larger than 50°, while two opposite scans can replace it over the whole plot. The incidence angle limit for the spectral slope is even stronger and is 40°. These findings are valid for scanning over smooth and isotropic soil roughness.

  6. Radar Mapping of Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Dubois, P. C.; van Zyl, J.

    1997-01-01

    Intended as an overview aimed at potential users of remotely sensed spatial distributions and temporal variations of soil moisture, this paper begins with an introductory section on the fundamentals of radar imaging and associated attributes.

  7. Effects of artificial soil surface management on changes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of size distribution, stability of the aggregates, and other soil properties are very important due to their influence on tilth, water infiltration, and nutrient dynamics and more importantly on accelerated erosion but are affected by soil surface management. Both chemical e.g. pH, organic carbon, (OC), exchangeable ...

  8. Directional reflectance factors for monitoring spatial changes in soil surface structure and soil organic matter erosion in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soils can experience rapid structural degradation in response to land cover changes, resulting in reduced soil productivity, increased erodibility and a loss of soil organic matter (SOM). The breakdown of soil aggregates through slaking and raindrop impact is linked to organic matter turnover, with subsequently eroded material often displaying proportionally more SOM. A reduction in aggregate stability is reflected in a decline in soil surface roughness (SSR), indicating that a soil structural change can be used to highlight soil vulnerability to SOM loss through mineralisation or erosion. Accurate, spatially-continuous measurements of SSR are therefore needed at a variety of spatial and temporal scales to understand the spatial nature of SOM erosion and deposition. Remotely-sensed data can provide a cost-effective means of monitoring changes in soil surface condition over broad spatial extents. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of directional reflectance factors to monitor soil crusting within a controlled laboratory experiment, due to changes in the levels of self-shadowing effects by soil aggregates. However, further research is needed to test this approach in situ, where other soil variables may affect measured reflectance factors and to investigate the use of directional reflectance factors for monitoring soil erosion processes. This experiment assesses the potential of using directional reflectance factors to monitor changes in SSR, aggregate stability and soil organic carbon (SOC) content for two agricultural conditions. Five soil plots representing tilled and seedbed soils were subjected to different durations of natural rainfall, producing a range of different levels of SSR. Directional reflectance factors were measured concomitantly with sampling for soil structural and biochemical tests at each soil plot. Soil samples were taken to measure aggregate stability (wet sieving), SOC (loss on ignition) and soil moisture (gravimetric method). SSM

  9. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  10. Residues of endosulfan in surface and subsurface agricultural soil and its bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of many hydrophobic pesticides has been reported by various workers in various soil environments and its bioremediation is a major concern due to less bioavailability. In the present study, the pesticide residues in the surface and subsurface soil in an area of intense agricultural activity in Pakkam Village of Thiruvallur District, Tamilnadu, India, and its bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium was investigated. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface soils (15-30 cm and 30-40 cm) were sampled, and pesticides in different layers of the soil were analyzed. Alpha endosulfan and beta endosulfan concentrations ranged from 1.42 to 3.4 mg/g and 1.28-3.1 mg/g in the surface soil, 0.6-1.4 mg/g and 0.3-0.6 mg/g in the subsurface soil (15-30 cm), and 0.9-1.5 mg/g and 0.34-1.3 mg/g in the subsurface soil (30-40 cm) respectively. Residues of other persistent pesticides were also detected in minor concentrations. These soil layers were subjected to bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium under a simulated soil profile condition in a soil reactor. The complete removal of alpha and beta endosulfan was observed over 25 days. Residues of endosulfate were also detected during bioremediation, which was subsequently degraded on the 30th day. This study revealed the existence of endosulfan in the surface and subsurface soils and also proved that the removal of such a ubiquitous pesticide in the surface and subsurface environment can be achieved in the field by bioaugumenting a biosurfactant-producing bacterial consortium that degrades pesticides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. EFFECT OF SOIL TILLAGE AND PLANT RESIDUE ON SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF AN OXISOL UNDER SIMULATED RAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elói Panachuki

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness of the soil is formed by mechanical tillage and is also influenced by the kind and amount of plant residue, among other factors. Its persistence over time mainly depends on the fundamental characteristics of rain and soil type. However, few studies have been developed to evaluate these factors in Latossolos (Oxisols. In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil tillage and of amounts of plant residue on surface roughness of an Oxisol under simulated rain. Treatments consisted of the combination of the tillage systems of no-tillage (NT, conventional tillage (CT, and minimum tillage (MT with rates of plant residue of 0, 1, and 2 Mg ha-1 of oats (Avena strigosa Schreb and 0, 3, and 6 Mg ha-1 of maize (Zea mays L.. Seven simulated rains were applied on each experimental plot, with intensity of 60±2 mm h-1 and duration of 1 h at weekly intervals. The values of the random roughness index ranged from 2.94 to 17.71 mm in oats, and from 5.91 to 20.37 mm in maize, showing that CT and MT are effective in increasing soil surface roughness. It was seen that soil tillage operations carried out with the chisel plow and the leveling disk harrow are more effective in increasing soil roughness than those carried out with the heavy disk harrow and leveling disk harrow. The roughness index of the soil surface decreases exponentially with the increase in the rainfall volume applied under conditions of no tillage without soil cover, conventional tillage, and minimum tillage. The oat and maize crop residue present on the soil surface is effective in maintaining the roughness of the soil surface under no-tillage.

  12. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3–5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. - Highlights: • Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface area of 32 cm 2 can be measured at level of 10 mBq/(m 2 s) at the uncertainty ≤30%. • The method has a metrological justification. • No need to consider climate conditions, soil properties and conditions, mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil.

  13. Antisoiling technology: Theories of surface soiling and performance of antisoiling surface coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P. B.

    1984-11-01

    Physical examination of surfaces undergoing natural outdoor soiling suggests that soil matter accumulates in up to three distinct layers. The first layer involves strong chemical attachment or strong chemisorption of soil matter on the primary surface. The second layer is physical, consisting of a highly organized arrangement of soil creating a gradation in surface energy from a high associated with the energetic first layer to the lowest possible state on the outer surfce of the second layer. The lowest possible energy state is dictated by the physical nature of the regional atmospheric soiling materials. These first two layers are resistant to removal by rain. The third layer constitutes a settling of loose soil matter, accumulating in dry periods and being removed during rainy periods. Theories and evidence suggest that surfaces that should be naturally resistant to the formation of the first two-resistant layers should be hard, smooth, hydrophobic, free of first-period elements, and have the lowest possible surface energy. These characteristics, evolving as requirements for low-soiling surfaces, suggest that surfaces or surface coatings should be of fluorocarbon chemistry. Evidence for the three-soil-layer concept, and data on the positive performance of candidate fluorocarbon coatings on glass and transparent plastic films after 28 months of outdoor exposure, are presented.

  14. Analysis of Eh Condition and Evolutional Trend of Paddy Soils in a Toposequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    javad seyedmohammadi

    2017-02-01

    iron were determined using nitric acid, dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate and ammonium oxalate methods, respectively. The means of different Fe forms values compared through LSD test. Results and Discussion: It can be seen especial morphological and physicochemical characteristics in studied paddy soils with high groundwater table due to artificial submerging in rice growing seasonDifferent Fe mottles such as orange mottles include lepidocrocite mineral was observed in studied soils. Low redox potential with average 145/7mV and rH with average 19.6 in lowland and coastal soils implicate intense reduction condition. In lowland soils Eh was lower than other units and it was lower in top horizons than to sub horizons in all of units. Eh index had inverse relationship with organic matter, because of high organic matter amount caused high activity of anaerobic micro-organisms, increase of iron reduction and reduction soils degree decrease. rH index amounts showed that studied soils had reduction condition and presence of brown iron and black manganese minerals proved this condition. CEC was high in top soil of physiographic units due to high amount of organic matter and clay content. Clay particles in plateaues were lower than other units because of alteration and suitable aeration and showed high evolution in these soils. Clay coatings were not observed due to high ground water table and its alternative fluctuation. Results showed amorphous iron in surface horizons with average amount of 24.3g kg-1 was higher than subsurface in all soils and had positive correlation with organic matter, because of high activity of anaerobic micro-organisms that prevent from transformation of amorphous iron to crystallized iron, therefore amorphous iron amount increased in presence of organic matter. Pedogenic iron was high in A and B horizons with regard to BC and C horizons due to aeration and weathering. In lowland and coastal land Fed was lower than plateaues and upper terraces and river

  15. Effect of Management Practices on Soil Microstructure and Surface Microrelief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Garcia Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil surface roughness (SSR and porosity were evaluated from soils located in two farms belonging to the Plant Breeding Institute of the University of Sidney. The sites differ in their soil management practices; the first site (PBI was strip-tilled during early fall (May 2010, and the second site (JBP was under power harrowed tillage at the end of July 2010. Both sites were sampled in mid-August. At each location, SSR was measured for three 1 m2 subplots using shadow analysis. To evaluate porosity and aggregation, soil samples were scanned using X-ray computed tomography with 5 μm resolution. The results show a strong negative correlation between SSR and porosity, 20.13% SSR and 41.38% porosity at PBI versus 42.00% SSR and 18.35% porosity at JBP. However, soil images show that when soil surface roughness is higher due to conservation and soil management practices, the processes of macroaggregation and structural porosity are enhanced. Further research must be conducted on SSR and porosity in different types of soils, as they provide complementary information on the evaluation of soil erosion susceptibility.

  16. Modeling Soil Sodicity Problems under Dryland and Irrigated Conditions: Case Studies in Argentina and Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2014-05-01

    Salt-affected soils, both saline and sodic, my develop both under dryland and irrigated conditions, affecting negatively the physical and chemical soil properties, the crop production and the animal and human health.Among the development processes of salt-affected soils, the processes of sodification have been generally received less attention and is less understood than the development of saline soils. Although in both of them, hydrological processes are involved in their development, in the case of sodic soils we have to consider some additional chemical and physicochemical reactions, making more difficult their modeling and prediction. In this contribution we present two case studies: one related to the development of sodic soils in the lowlands of the Argentina Pampas, under dryland conditions and sub-humid temperate climate, with pastures for cattle production; the other deals with the development of sodic soils in the Colombia Cauca Valley, under irrigated conditions and tropical sub-humid climate, in lands used for sugarcane cropping dedicated to sugar and ethanol production. In both cases the development of sodicity in the surface soil is mainly related to the effects of the composition and level of groundwater, affected in the case of Argentina Pampas by the off-site changes in dryland use and management in the upper zones and by the drainage conditions in the lowlands, and in the case of the Cauca Valley, by the on-site irrigation and drainage management in lands with sugarcane. There is shown how the model SALSODIMAR, developed by the main author, based on the balance of water and soluble componentes of both the irrigation water and groundwater under different water and land management conditions, may be adapted for the diagnosis and prediction of both problems, and for the selection of alternatives for their management and amelioration.

  17. Mapping surface soil moisture with L-band radiometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James R.; Shiue, James C.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1989-01-01

    A NASA C-130 airborne remote sensing aircraft was used to obtain four-beam pushbroom microwave radiometric measurements over two small Kansas tall-grass prairie region watersheds, during a dry-down period after heavy rainfall in May and June, 1987. While one of the watersheds had been burned 2 months before these measurements, the other had not been burned for over a year. Surface soil-moisture data were collected at the time of the aircraft measurements and correlated with the corresponding radiometric measurements, establishing a relationship for surface soil-moisture mapping. Radiometric sensitivity to soil moisture variation is higher in the burned than in the unburned watershed; surface soil moisture loss is also faster in the burned watershed.

  18. Investigation of (de)coupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture using a Distributed Lag Non-linear Model (DNLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Coleen; van der Ploeg, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimates of water content in the soil profile are essential for environmental and climate modeling studies. Current trends for estimating profile soil moisture incorporate remote sensing methods for mapping soil moisture at greater spatial coverage but is limited to the upper soil layers (e.g. 5cm for radar satellites). Data assimilation methods offer promising computational techniques to translate mapped surface soil moisture to estimates of profile soil moisture, in conjunction with physical models. However, a variety of factors, such as differences in the drying rates, can lead to "decoupling" (Capehart and Carlson, 1997) of surface and subsurface soil moisture. In other words, surface soil moisture conditions no longer reflect or represent subsurface conditions. In this study, we investigated the relation and observed decoupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture from 15-minute interval time series datasets in four selected Dutch agricultural fields (SM_05, SM_09, SM_13, SM_20) from the soil moisture network in Twente region. The idea is that surface soil moisture conditions will be reflected in the subsurface after a certain time lag because of its movement or flow from the surface. These lagged associations were analysed using distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM). This statistical technique provides a framework to simultaneously represent non-linear exposure-response dependencies and delayed effects. DNLM was applied to elucidate which surface soil moisture conditions resulted in a high association to subsurface values, indicating good correlation between the two zones. For example, initial results for this ongoing study from SM_13 show an overall low but increasing association from dry to intermediate soil moisture values (0 to 25%). At this range of values, we say that the two zones are decoupled. Above these values towards near saturated conditions ( 40%), associations between the two zones remain high. For predictor

  19. Surface Roughness effects on Runoff and Soil Erosion Rates Under Simulated Rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil surface roughness is identified as one of the controlling factors governing runoff and soil loss yet, most studies pay little attention to soil surface roughness. In this study, we analyzed the influence of random soil surface roughness on runoff and soil erosion rates. Bulk samples of a silt l...

  20. Sound absorption at the soil surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, A.R.P.

    1969-01-01

    The properties of a soil structure may be examined in various manners. As well as a study of the stability, a knowledge of the geometry of the volume of air filled pores is often needed. The most common measurements, like those of porosity and flow resistance to gases do not permit a detailed

  1. Development of a soil fugacity sampler for determination of air-soil partitioning of persistent organic pollutants under field controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, Ana; Dachs, Jordi; Barceló, Damià

    2009-11-01

    Soils are the main reservoir of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and thus air-soil exchange and partitioning are key processes controlling the fate and transport of POPs at regional and global scales. To date, soil fugacity has been estimated from models of the soil-air partition coefficients, with the associated unavoidable uncertainties; or by experimental procedures in the laboratory with uncertain application in field conditions. The development of an operational soil fugacity sampler is presented here; one which ensures optimal field data of the POP fugacity in soil and environmentally relevant surface (soil+grass, etc.) and therefore ensuring accurate soil-air partition coefficients and surface-air fugacity gradients. The sampler flow rate is optimized, sampler reproducibility is assessed, and equilibrium between the gas and soil concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is demonstrated. The development and comprehensive validation of a soil fugacity sampler opens the door for the first time to field studies that accurately determine the variables driving the soil-air partitioning and fluxes of POPs.

  2. Spectral reflectance of surface soils: Relationships with some soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesewetter, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    Using a published atlas of reflectance curves and physicochemical properties of soils, a statistical analysis was carried out. Reflectance bands which correspond to five of the wavebands used by NASA's Thematic Mapper were examined for relationships to specific soil properties. The properties considered in this study include: Sand Content, Silt Content, Clay Content, Organic Matter Content, Cation Exchange Capacity, Iron Oxide Content and Moisture Content. Regression of these seven properties on the mean values of five TM bands produced results that indicate that the predictability of the properties can be increased by stratifying the data. The data was stratified by parent material, taxonomic order, temperature zone, moisture zone and climate (combined temperature and moisture). The best results were obtained when the sample was examined by climatic classes. The middle Infra-red bands, 5 and 7, as well as the visible bands, 2 and 3, are significant in the model. The near Infra-red band, band 4, is almost as useful and should be included in any studies. General linear modeling procedures examined relationships of the seven properties with certain wavebands in the stratified samples.

  3. TOLERANCE OF PEANUT GENOTYPES TO ACIDIC SOIL CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astanto Kasno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The acidic soil is generally less productive due to soil pH ranging from 3.1 to 5.0. However, it could be solved through soil amelioration, planting tolerant varieties to acidic soil condition, and a combination of both. Twenty peanut genotypes including two check varieties (Jerapah and Talam 1 were evaluated on dolomite-ameliorated and non ameliorated soil. In the greenhouse, the treatments were laid out in factorial design with four replications, while in the field using strip plot design with three replications. Assessment of tolerance was using Stressed Tolerance Index (STI according to Fernandez (1992. Results showed that dolomite application at dose equivalent to 0.5 x exchangeable Al was optimal in improving peanut growth, and peanut yield on acidic soil. Lines of GH3 (G/92088/92088-02-B-2-8-1 and GH 4 (G/92088/ 92088-02-B-2-8-2 genotypes had high STI with average yield of 2.47 tha-1 and 2.62 t ha-1 of dry pods and potential yield of 4.05 t ha-1 and 3.73 t ha-1 of dry pods, respectively as well as check varieties (Jerapah and Talam-1. It is concluded that peanut genotype of G/92088//92088-02-B-2-8-1 and G/92088//920 88- 02-B-2-8-2 were adaptable and tolerance to acidic, and tolerance of peanuts on acidic soil condition were probably controlled by the buffering mechanisms.

  4. Seismic Soil-Pile Interaction Considering Nonlinear Soil Column Behavior in Saturated and Dry Soil Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Moeini; Mehrdad Ghyabi; Kiarash Mohtasham Dolatshahi

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates seismic soil-pile interaction using the Beam on Nonlinear Winkler Foundation (BNWF) approach. Three soil types are considered to cover all the possible responses, as well as nonlinear site response analysis using finite element method in OpenSees platform. Excitations at each elevation that are output of the site response analysis are used as the input excitation to the soil pile system implementing multi-support excitation method. Spectral intensities of acceleration ...

  5. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also ...

  6. Reductive precipitation of neptunium on iron surfaces under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Cui, D.; Grolimund, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Brütsch, R.; Amme, M.; Kutahyali, C.; Wiss, A. T.; Puranen, A.; Spahiu, K.

    2017-12-01

    Reductive precipitation of the radiotoxic nuclide 237Np from nuclear waste on the surface of iron canister material at simulated deep repository conditions was investigated. Pristine polished as well as pre-corroded iron specimens were interacted in a deoxygenated solution containing 10-100 μM Np(V), with 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM NaHCO3 as background electrolytes. The reactivity of each of the two different systems was investigated by analyzing the temporal evolution of the Np concentration in the reservoir. It was observed that pre-oxidized iron specimen with a 40 μm Fe3O4 corrosion layer are considerably more reactive regarding the reduction and immobilization of aqueous Np(V) as compared to pristine polished Fe(0) surfaces. 237Np immobilized by the reactive iron surfaces was characterized by scanning electron microscopy as well as synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At the end of experiments, a 5-8 μm thick Np-rich layer was observed to be formed ontop of the Fe3O4 corrosion layer on the iron specimen. The findings from this work are significant in the context of performance assessments of deep geologic repositories using iron as high level radioactive waste (HLW) canister material and are of relevance regarding removing pollutants from contaminated soil or groundwater aquifer systems.

  7. Salt Efflorescence Effects on Soil Surface Erodibility and Dust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pelt, R. S.; Zhang, G.

    2017-12-01

    Soluble salts resulting from weathering of geological materials often form surface crusts or efflorescences in areas with shallow saline groundwater. In many cases, the affected areas are susceptible to wind erosion due to their lack of protective vegetation and their flat topography. Fugitive dusts containing soluble salts affect the biogeochemistry of deposition regions and may result in respiratory irritation during transport. We created efflorescent crusts on soil trays by surface evaporation of single salt solutions and bombarded the resultant efflorescences with quartz abrader sand in a laboratory wind tunnel. Four replicate trays containing a Torrifluvent soil affected by one of nine salts commonly found in arid and semiarid streams were tested and the emissions were captured by an aspirated multi-stage deposition and filtering system. We found that in most cases the efflorescent crust reduced the soil surface erodibility but also resulted in the emission of salt rich dust. Two of the salts, sodium thiosulfate and calcium chloride, resulted in increased soil volume and erodibility. However, one of the calcium chloride replicates was tested after an outbreak of humid air caused hygroscopic wetting of the soil and it became indurated upon drying greatly decreasing the erodibility. Although saline affected soils are not used for agricultural production and degradation is not a great concern, the release of salt rich dust is an area of environmental concern and steps to control the dust emissions from affected soils should be developed. Future testing will utilize suites of salts found in streams of arid and semiarid regions.

  8. Improvement CBR of Gypseous Soil By Geogrid Under Soaking Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kadum Fakhraldin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of gypsum in soils causes significant changes in the behavior and alters the properties of these types of soils. Gypsum and anhydrite rocks are often found in many countries of the world in extensive deposits. It was known in Greek as Gypsosa, in German as gips (which could be probably derived from Greek and in Latin as gypsum. Large area in middle and west of Iraq is classified as a gypseous soil. This paper aims to study the benefit of using Netlon CE121 geogrid as reinforcing material on CBR (California Bearing Ratio which is adopted as an indication for treatment. A laboratory tests were performed on a gypseous soil samples to study the effect of the first layer location (u of geogrid and soaking on CBR are studied. 4, 15 and 30 days are adopted as a period of soaking. CBR corresponding to 14 kN/m3 is adopted as a reference value to make the comparisons. The results show that the use of geogrid reinforcement increase the value of California Bearing Ratio (CBR and the location of first layer of geogrid under the surface have a large influence on CBR, the reliable depth is 0.15D where D is the diameter of CBR mold. CBR value for the optimum point increased almost two times when compared with unreinforced soil. Also CBR decrease when the period of soaking increases for unreinforced and reinforced soil. The experimental results shows that the ultimate bearing capacity increase when CBR increase for unreinforced and reinforced soil

  9. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorn, M.I.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a

  10. Influence and modelling of view angles and microrelief on surface temperature measurements of bare agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Michel; Cierniewski, Jerzy

    The exploitation of remote sensing instruments with large fields of view necessarily implies the analysis of instruments acquired over a wide variety of viewing geometries. The purpose of this study is to underline the effects of view angles and microrelief on the directional surface temperature measurements of cultivated bare soils. A campaign of measurements was carried out at Poznan (Poland) in April 1995. The directional temperatures were measured on a furrowed sandy soil. The measurements were acquired at ground level with a radiothermometer in the 8-14 μm band. The radiothermometer was fixed on a special goniometric support 2.1 m above the soil surface and was directed at the soil with view zenith angles varying from -60° to +60° by steps of 10°. The data were collected for solar zenith angles ranging from 40.2° to 62.3°. In the experiment, for a given sun position, the difference between oblique and nadir measurements could reach 6°C. A model aimed at explaining the variations of the surface temperature measurements of furrowed soil in relation to its viewing conditions is presented. This model requires the precise soil microrelief geometry configuration, the illumination and viewing conditions of the surface and the radiative temperatures of the shaded and sunlit soil facets. The results show a good correlation between the predicted and the measured data. This type of modelling can be used to correct radiative temperature measurements of soils from view angles and soil microrelief geometry effects.

  11. Circumpolar freeze/thaw surface status and surface soil moisture from Metop ASCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Annett; Paulik, Christoph; Melzer, Thomas; Hahn, Sebastian; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Circumpolar surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw surface status has been derived from Metop ASCAT within the framework of the ESA DUE Permafrost and STSE ALANIS-Methane projects. The dataset is available via Pangaea (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.775959) and can be vizualized with the WebGIS of the DUE Permafrost data portal (www.ipf.tuwien.ac.at/permafrost). MetOp ASCAT data have been used for both the near surface soil moisture (SSM) product and determination of freeze/thaw status at panboreal/ arctic scale. Metop-A, launched in October 2006 by the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), is the first of three satellites within EUMETSAT's Polar System (EPS). The ASCAT SSM DUE Permafrost product is the result of an improved SSM retrieval algorithm developed at the Institute for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (IPF) of the Vienna University of Technology. The SSM Product is delivered with a weekly temporal resolution and 25 km spatial resolution. The soil moisture product also includes a quality flag which contains the number of used measurements. Data are masked for frozen ground conditions also based on MetOp ASCAT. The daily SSF is available as separate flag. The SSM product is provided as weekly averaged images north of 50°N in GeoTIFF/NetCDF format and EASE Grid projection Further, complementary regional scale (1km) freeze/thaw information is available at selected sites based on ENVISAT ASAR GM (PANGAEA http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.779658).

  12. Potential use of copper as a hygienic surface; problems associated with cumulative soiling and cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, P; Verran, J

    2007-11-01

    It has been suggested that antibacterial copper could be used in place of stainless steel to help reduce the occurrence of hospital-acquired infections. The antibacterial activity of copper has been clearly demonstrated when using cell suspensions held in prolonged contact with copper or copper alloys. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial properties of copper in comparison with stainless steel in a generally dry environment. Three stainless steels of varying surface finish and polished copper were soiled with Staphylococcus aureus suspended in a protein-based organic soil (bovine serum album), dried rapidly, and then incubated for 24 h. Surfaces were then wiped clean using a standardised wiping procedure with two cleaning agents recommended by UK National Health Service guidelines. This soiling/cleaning procedure was carried out daily over five days. After each cleaning cycle the amount of residual soil and live cells was assessed using direct epifluorescence microscopy. All materials were easily cleaned after the first soiling episode but a build-up of cells and soil was observed on the copper surfaces after several cleaning/wiping cycles. Stainless steel remained highly cleanable. Accumulation of material on copper is presumably due to the high reactivity of copper, resulting in surface conditioning. This phenomenon will affect subsequent cleaning, aesthetic properties and possibly antibacterial performance. It is important to select the appropriate cleaning/disinfecting protocols for selected surfaces.

  13. Correlative assessment of two predictive soil hydrology models with measured surface soil geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T. R.; Li, M.; Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.; Yan, Q.; Papanicolaou, T.; Hou, T.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial variability of surface soil organic matter on the hill slope scale is strongly influenced by topographic variation, especially in sloping terrains, where the coupled effects of soil moisture and texture are principle drivers for stabilization and decomposition. Topographic wetness index (TWI) calculations have shown reasonable correlations with soil organic carbon (SOC) content at broad spatial scales. However, due to inherent limitations of the "depression filling" approach, traditional TWI methods are generally ineffectual at capturing how small-scale micro-topographic ( 1m2) variation controls water dynamics and, subsequently, poorly correlate to surface soil biogeochmical measures. For TWI models to capture biogeochmical controls at the scales made possible by LiDAR data they need to incoportate the dynamic connection between soil moisture, local climate, edaphic properties, and micro-topographic variability. We present the results of a study correlating surface soil geochemical data across field sites in the Upper Sangamon River Basin (USRB) in Central Illinois, USA with a range of land use types to SAGA TWI and a newly developed Dynamic Topographic Wetness Index (DTWI). The DTWI for all field sites were obtained from the probability distribution of long-term stochastically modeled soil moisture in between wilting point (WP) and field capacity (FC) using Dhara modeling framework. Whereas the SAGA TWI showed no correlation with soil geochemistry measures across the site-specific data, the DTWI, within a site, was strongly, positively correlated with soil nitrogen, organic carbon, and δ15N at three of the six sites and revealed controls potentially related to connectivity to local drainage paths. Overall, this study indicates that soil moisture derived by DTWI may offer a significant improvement in generating estimates in long-term soil moisture, and subsequently, soil biogeochemistry dynamics at a crucial landscape scale.

  14. Repeated Loading of Cohesive Soil - Shakedown Theory in Undrained Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głuchowski, Andrzej; Szymański, Alojzy; Sas, Wojciech

    2015-06-01

    The development of industry and application of new production techniques could bring about extraordinary problems that have been neglected. One of these challenges in terms of soil mechanics is high frequency cyclic loading. Well constructed foundation may reduce this troublesome phenomenon but excluding it is usually uneconomic. In this paper, shakedown theory assumptions were studied. Cyclically loaded soils behave in various ways depending on the applied stress rate. Common cohesive soils in Poland, i.e., sandy-silty clays are problematic and understanding of their behaviour in various conditions is desired. In order to study repeated loading of this material, cyclic triaxial test were carried out. Cyclic loading tests were conducted also in one way compression. These methods in small strain regime allow permanent strain increment analysis with resilient response after numerous cycles. This behaviour was subsequently exploited in the study of shakedown theory. This paper contains some conclusions concerning the above-mentioned theory.

  15. Evaluation of Volatilization by Organic Chemicals Residing Below the Soil Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jury, William A.; Russo, David; Streile, Gary; El Abd, Hesham

    1990-01-01

    Although volatile organic compounds located in buried waste repositories or distributed through the unsaturated soil zone have the potential to migrate to the atmosphere by vapor diffusion, little attention has been paid in the past to estimating the importance of volatilization losses. In this paper a screening model is introduced which evaluates the relative volatilization losses of a number of organic compounds under standard soil conditions. The model is an analytic solution to the problem wherein the organic chemical is located at time zero at uniform concentration in a finite layer of soil covered by a layer of soil devoid of chemical. The compound is assumed to move by vapor or liquid diffusion and by mass flow under the influence of steady upward or zero water flow while undergoing first-order degradation and linear equilibrium adsorption. Loss to the atmosphere is governed by vapor diffusion through a stagnant air boundary layer. Calculations are performed on 35 organic compounds in two model soils with properties characteristic of sandy and clayey soil. The model identifies those compounds with high potential for loss during 1 year after incorporation under 100 cm of soil cover and also is used to calculate the minimum soil cover thickness required to reduce volatilization losses to insignificant levels during the lifetime of the compound in the soil. From the latter calculation it was determined that certain compounds may volatilize from deep subsurface locations or even groundwater unless the soil surface is sealed to prevent gas migration.

  16. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.H.; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K d model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data

  17. Effects of plant–soil feedback on tree seedling growth under arid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.S.; Holmgren, M.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Plants are able to influence their growing environment by changing biotic and abiotic soil conditions. These soil conditions in turn can influence plant growth conditions, which is called plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback is known to be operative in a wide variety of ecosystems ranging

  18. Effects of plant-soil feedback on tree seedling growth under arid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.S.; Holmgren, M.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Plants are able to influence their growing environment by changing biotic and abiotic soil conditions. These soil conditions in turn can influence plant growth conditions, which is called plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback is known to be operative in a wide variety of ecosystems ranging

  19. Nitrogen isotope ratios in surface and sub-surface soil horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennie, D.A.; Paul, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    Nitrogen isotope analysis of surface soils and soil-derived nitrate for selected chernozemic and luvisolic soils showed mean delta 15 N values of 11.7 and 11.3, respectively. Isotope enrichment of the total N reached a maximum in the lower B horizon. Sub-soil parent material samples from the one deep profile included in the study indicated a delta 15 N value (NO 3 -N) of 1/3 that of the Ap horizon, at a depth of 180 cm. The delta 15 N of sub-surface soil horizons containing residual fertilizer N were low (-2.2) compared to the surface horizon (9.9). The data reported from this preliminary survey suggest that the natural variations in 15 N abundance between different soils and horizons of the same soil reflect the cumulative effects of soil genesis and soil management. More detailed knowledge and understanding of biological and other processes which control N isotope concentrations in these soils must be obtained before the data reported can be interpreted. (author)

  20. The sensitivity of US wildfire occurrence to pre-season soil moisture conditions across ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Daniel; Reager, John T; Zajic, Brittany; Rousseau, Nick; Rodell, Matthew; Hinkley, Everett

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that year-to-year variability in moisture conditions and drought are linked with increased wildfire occurrence. However, quantifying the sensitivity of wildfire to surface moisture state at seasonal lead-times has been challenging due to the absence of a long soil moisture record with the appropriate coverage and spatial resolution for continental-scale analysis. Here we apply model simulations of surface soil moisture that numerically assimilate observations from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission with the US Forest Service's historical Fire-Occurrence Database over the contiguous United States. We quantify the relationships between pre-fire-season soil moisture and subsequent-year wildfire occurrence by land-cover type and produce annual probable wildfire occurrence and burned area maps at 0.25-degree resolution. Cross-validated results generally indicate a higher occurrence of smaller fires when months preceding fire season are wet, while larger fires are more frequent when soils are dry. This result is consistent with the concept of increased fuel accumulation under wet conditions in the pre-season. These results demonstrate the fundamental strength of the relationship between soil moisture and fire activity at long lead-times and are indicative of that relationship's utility for the future development of national-scale predictive capability.

  1. The sensitivity of US wildfire occurrence to pre-season soil moisture conditions across ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Daniel; Reager, John T.; Zajic, Brittany; Rousseau, Nick; Rodell, Matthew; Hinkley, Everett

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that year-to-year variability in moisture conditions and drought are linked with increased wildfire occurrence. However, quantifying the sensitivity of wildfire to surface moisture state at seasonal lead-times has been challenging due to the absence of a long soil moisture record with the appropriate coverage and spatial resolution for continental-scale analysis. Here we apply model simulations of surface soil moisture that numerically assimilate observations from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission with the USDA Forest Service’s historical Fire-Occurrence Database over the contiguous United States. We quantify the relationships between pre-fire-season soil moisture and subsequent-year wildfire occurrence by land-cover type and produce annual probable wildfire occurrence and burned area maps at 0.25 degree resolution. Cross-validated results generally indicate a higher occurrence of smaller fires when months preceding fire season are wet, while larger fires are more frequent when soils are dry. This is consistent with the concept of increased fuel accumulation under wet conditions in the pre-season. These results demonstrate the fundamental strength of the relationship between soil moisture and fire activity at long lead-times and are indicative of that relationship’s utility for the future development of national-scale predictive capability.

  2. Spatial Variability of Soil Properties and its Impact on Simulated Surface Soil Moisture Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, W.; Bothe, T.; Reichenau, T. G.; Schneider, K.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial variability of soil properties (particle size distribution, PSD, and bulk density, BD) has large effects on the spatial variability of soil moisture and therefore on plant growth and surface exchange processes. In model studies, soil properties from soil maps are considered homogeneous over mapping units, which neglects the small scale variability of soil properties and leads to underestimated small scale variability of simulated soil moisture. This study focuses on the validation of spatial variability of simulated surface soil moisture (SSM) in a winter wheat field in Western Germany using the eco-hydrological simulation system DANUBIA. SSM measurements were conducted at 20 different sampling points and nine different dates in 2008. Frequency distributions of BD and PSD were derived from an independent dataset (n = 486) of soil physical properties from Germany and the USA. In the simulations, BD and PSD were parameterized according to these frequency distributions. Mean values, coefficients of variation and frequency distributions of simulated SSM were compared to the field measurements. Using the heterogeneous model parameterization, up to 76 % of the frequency distribution of the measured SSM can be explained. Furthermore, the results show that BD has a larger impact on the variability of SSM than PSD. The introduced approach can be used for simulating mean SSM and SSM variability more accurately and can form the basis for a spatially heterogeneous parameterization of soil properties in mesoscale models.

  3. Forest Management Effects on Surface Soil Carbon and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer D. Knoepp; Wayne T. Swank

    1997-01-01

    Changes in surface soil C and N can result from forest management practices and may provide an index of impacts on long-term site productivity. Soil C and N were measured over time for five water- sheds in the southern Appalachians: two aggrading hardwood forests, one south- and one north-facing, undisturbed since the 1920s;a white pine (PinussfrobusL.) plantation...

  4. Evaluation of antibiotic mobility in soil associated with swine-slurry soil amendment under cropping conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, C; Flores, C; Caixach, J; Mita, L; Piña, B; Comas, J; Bayona, J M

    2014-11-01

    Interest in identifying pools of antibacterial-resistance genes has grown over the last decade, with veterinary antibiotics (VAs) receiving particular attention. In this paper, a mesoscale study aimed at evaluating the vertical transport of common VAs-namely, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and lincosamides in agricultural soil subjected to drip irrigation-was performed under greenhouse conditions. Accordingly, leachates of cropped and uncropped soil, amended with swine-slurry leading to 19-38 μg kg(-1) (dry mass) antibiotics in the soil, were analyzed over the course of the productive cycle of a lettuce (42 days) with three sampling campaigns (N = 24). High lincomycin (LCM) concentrations (30-39 μg L(-1)) were detected in the leachates collected from the swine-slurry-amended soil. The highest LCM mass recovered in the leachates (30.1 ± 1.63 %) was obtained from cropped experimental units. In addition, the LCM leaching constant and its leaching potential as obtained from the first-order model were higher in the leachates from the cropped experimental units. Lower concentrations of sulfadimethoxine were also detected in leachates and in soil. Enrofloxacin and oxytetracycline occurred only in soil, which is consistent with high soil interaction.

  5. Meteorological conditions during extreme wind erosion events on heavy soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislava Mužíková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion in the Czech Republic conditions poses relatively a lot of danger, especially for the most fertile areas, where agricultural land is more vulnerable due to the large pieces of land and inappropriate crop rotation. This process causes damage to agriculture by loss of topsoil, fertilizers, seeds and crop damage as well as sedimentation in water recipients and on roads. It also has negative impacts on human health (airborne dust. Wind erosion is especially affected by climatic elements (wind, temperature, precipitation and evaporation etc. and soil characteristics (soil type, content of erodible particles, soil moisture. Wind erosion affects mainly light and medium heavy soil. South Moravia is an example of the territories to which this rule does not apply. Although soils in the Carpathian flysch subsoil are mainly heavy, erosion has been causing damage here for many decades. Quite strong dust storms are not rare, especially at the end of winter and in early spring when the soil is not covered by vegetation.Notable cases of dust storms in the area were recorded in local chronicles, and then written in the summary publication by dr. Švehlík. Interest of this publication was focused on the most destructive cases of dust storms in Bílé Karpaty foothills. The aim was to study meteorological conditions during the period before and during the occurrence of dust storms in the area in detail and to find the relationship between weather and the intensity of wind erosion. The data of wind speed and direction, temperature, precipitation and snow were evaluated. In all cases the average daily air temperature and ground air temperature was over the freezing point or closely under it. The temperature generally increased before the dust storm occurrence and it often happened from negative to positive temperature and the soil probably defrosted. Snow cover was very small or there was no snow cover at all. In the course of April wind erosion

  6. Soil surface acidity plays a determining role in the atmospheric-terrestrial exchange of nitrous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Melissa A; Bish, David L; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-12-30

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important hydroxyl (OH) radical source that is formed on both ground and aerosol surfaces in the well-mixed boundary layer. Recent studies report the release of HONO from nonacidic soils, although it is unclear how soil that is more basic than the pKa of HONO (∼ 3) is capable of protonating soil nitrite to serve as an atmospheric HONO source. Here, we used a coated-wall flow tube and chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) to study the pH dependence of HONO uptake onto agricultural soil and model substrates under atmospherically relevant conditions (1 atm and 30% relative humidity). Experiments measuring the evolution of HONO from pH-adjusted surfaces treated with nitrite and potentiometric titrations of the substrates show, to our knowledge for the first time, that surface acidity rather than bulk aqueous pH determines HONO uptake and desorption efficiency on soil, in a process controlled by amphoteric aluminum and iron (hydr)oxides present. The results have important implications for predicting when soil nitrite, whether microbially derived or atmospherically deposited, will act as a net source or sink of atmospheric HONO. This process represents an unrecognized mechanism of HONO release from soil that will contribute to HONO emissions throughout the day.

  7. Impact of land surface conditions on 2004 North American monsoon in GCM experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Bosilovich, M.; Houser, P.; Chern, J.-D.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two sets of six-member ensemble simulations were performed for the boreal summer of 2004 using the Finite Volume General Circulation model to investigate the sensitivity of the North American monsoon (NAM) system to land surface conditions and further to identify the mechanisms by which land surface processes control the NAM precipitation. The control simulation uses a fully interactive land surface model, whereas the sensitivity experiment uses prescribed land surface fields from the Global Land Data Assimilation System.The response of the monsoon precipitation to land surface changes varies over different regions modulated by two different soil moisture-precipitation feedbacks. The vast northern NAM region, including most of Arizona and New Mexico, as well as the northwestern Mexico shows that soil moisture has a positive feedback with precipitation primarily due to local recycling mechanisms. The reduction of soil moisture decreases latent heat flux and increases sensible heat flux and consequently increases the Bowen ratio and surface temperature, leading to a deep (warm and dry) boundary layer, which suppresses convection and hence reduces precipitation. Over the west coast of Mexico near Sinaloa, a negative soil moisture-precipitation relationship is noted to be associated with a large-scale mechanism. The reduced soil moisture changes surface fluxes and hence boundary layer instability and ultimately low-level circulation. As a result, the changes in surface pressure and large scale wind field increase moisture flux convergence and consequently moisture content, leading to increased atmospheric instability and in turn enhancing convection and accordingly precipitation. These results further reinforce the important role of land surface conditions on surface process, boundary structure, atmospheric circulation, and rainfall during the NAM development.

  8. Ethylene Dibromide Mineralization in Soils under Aerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, Joseph J.

    1986-01-01

    1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB), which is a groundwater contaminant in areas where it was once used as a soil fumigant, was shown to be degraded aerobically by microorganisms in two types of surface soils from an EDB-contaminated groundwater discharge area. At initial concentrations of 6 to 8 μg/liter, EDB was degraded in a few days to near or below the detection limit of 0.02 μg/liter. At 15 to 18 mg/liter, degradation was slower. Bromide ion release at the higher concentrations was 1.4 ± 0.3 and 2.1 ± 0.2 molar equivalents for the two soils. Experiments with [14C]EDB showed that EDB was converted to approximately equal amounts of CO2 and apparent cellular carbon; only small amounts of added 14C were not attributable to these products or unreacted EDB. These results are encouraging, because they indicate that groundwater bacteria may hasten the removal of EDB from contaminated aerobic groundwater supplies. This report also provides evidence for soil-mediated chemical transformations of EDB. PMID:16347020

  9. Long-range alpha detection applied to soil surface monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caress, R.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Catlett, M.M.; MacArthur, D.W.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    The long-range alpha detection (LRAD) technique depends on the detection of ion pairs generated by alpha particles losing energy in air rather than on detection of the alpha particles themselves. Typical alpha particles generated by uranium will travel less than 3 cm in air. In contrast, the ions have been successfully detected many inches or feet away from the contamination. Since LRAD detection systems are sensitive to all ions simultaneously, large LRAD soil surface monitors (SSMS) can be used to collect all of the ions from a large sample. The LRAD SSMs are designed around the fan-less LRAD detector. In this case a five-sided box with an open bottom is placed on the soil surface. Ions generated by alpha decays on the soil surface are collected on a charged copper plate within the box. These ions create a small current from the plate to ground which is monitored with a sensitive electrometer. The current measured is proportional to the number of ions in the box, which is, in turn, proportional to the amount of alpha contamination on the surface of the soil. This report includes the design and construction of a 1-m by 1-m SSM as well as the results of a study at Fernald, OH, as part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

  10. Soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of soil organic matter is a key factor for that of radioiodide in surface and subsurface soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Yusuke; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takeda, Akira; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution of the soil-soil-solution distribution coefficients (K d ) of 125 I, 137 Cs, and 85 Sr in organic-rich surface soil and organic-poor subsurface soil of a pasture and an urban forest near a spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. K d of 137 Cs was highly correlated with water-extractable K + . K d of 85 Sr was highly correlated with water-extractable Ca 2+ and SOC. K d of 125 I - was low in organic-rich surface soil, high slightly below the surface, and lowest in the deepest soil. This kinked distribution pattern differed from the gradual decrease of the other radionuclides. The thickness of the high- 125 I - K d middle layer (i.e., with high radioiodide retention ability) differed between sites. K d of 125 I - was significantly correlated with K d of soil organic carbon. Our results also showed that the layer thickness is controlled by the ratio of K d -OC between surface and subsurface soils. This finding suggests that the addition of SOC might prevent further radioiodide migration down the soil profile. As far as we know, this is the first report to show a strong correlation of a soil characteristic with K d of 125 I - . Further study is needed to clarify how radioiodide is retained and migrates in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three Gorges Reservoir Area: soil erosion under natural condition vs. soil erosion under current land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbrodt, Sarah; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Apparently, the current most prominent human-induced example for large scale environmental impact is the Three Gorges Dam in China. The flooding alongside the Yangtze River, and its tributaries results in a vast loss of settlement and farmland area with productive, fertile valley soils. Due to the associated high land use dynamic on uphill-sites, the soil resources are underlying high land use pressure. Within our study, the soil erosion under natural conditions is compared to the soil erosion under current land use after the impoundment. Both were modeled using the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) which is able to predict long-term annual soil loss with limited data. The database consists of digital terrain data (45 m resolution DEM, erosive slope length based on Monte-Carlo-Aggregation according to Behrens et al. (2008)), field investigations of recent erosion forms, and literature studies. The natural disposition to soil erosion was calculated considering the USLE factors R, S, and K. The soil erosion under current land use was calculated taking into account all USLE factors. The study area is the catchment of the Xiangxi River in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. Within the Xiangxi Catchment (3,200 km²) the highly dynamic backwater area (580 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (Xiangjiaba with 2.8 km², and Quyuan with 88 km²) are considered more detailed as they are directly affected by the river impoundment. Central features of the Xiangxi Catchment are the subtropical monsoon climate, an extremely steep sloping relief (mean slope angle 39°, SD 22.8°) artificially fractured by farmland terraces, and a high soil erodibility (mean K factor 0.37, SD 0.13). On the catchment scale the natural disposition to soil erosion makes up to mean 518.0 t ha-1 a-1. The maximum potential soil loss of 1,730.1 t ha-1 a-1 under natural conditions is reached in the Quyuan site (mean 635.8 t ha-1 a-1) within the backwater area (mean 582.9 t ha-1 a-1). In the

  12. A New Empirical Model for Radar Scattering from Bare Soil Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Baghdadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose a new semi-empirical radar backscattering model for bare soil surfaces based on the Dubois model. A wide dataset of backscattering coefficients extracted from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images and in situ soil surface parameter measurements (moisture content and roughness is used. The retrieval of soil parameters from SAR images remains challenging because the available backscattering models have limited performances. Existing models, physical, semi-empirical, or empirical, do not allow for a reliable estimate of soil surface geophysical parameters for all surface conditions. The proposed model, developed in HH, HV, and VV polarizations, uses a formulation of radar signals based on physical principles that are validated in numerous studies. Never before has a backscattering model been built and validated on such an important dataset as the one proposed in this study. It contains a wide range of incidence angles (18°–57° and radar wavelengths (L, C, X, well distributed, geographically, for regions with different climate conditions (humid, semi-arid, and arid sites, and involving many SAR sensors. The results show that the new model shows a very good performance for different radar wavelengths (L, C, X, incidence angles, and polarizations (RMSE of about 2 dB. This model is easy to invert and could provide a way to improve the retrieval of soil parameters.

  13. The Impact of Organo-Mineral Complexation on Mineral Weathering in the Soil Zone under Unsaturated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Tan, F.; Yoo, K.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2017-12-01

    While organo-mineral complexes can protect organic matter (OM) from biodegradation, their impact on soil mineral weathering is not clear. Previous bench-scale experiments that focused on specific OM and minerals showed that the adsorption of OM to mineral surfaces accelerates the dissolution of some minerals. However, the impact of natural organo-mineral complexes on mineral dissolution under unsaturated conditions is not well known. In this study, soil samples prepared from an undisturbed forest site were used to determine mineral weathering rates under differing conditions of OM sorption to minerals. Two types of soil samples were generated: 1) soil with OM (C horizon soil from 84-100cm depth), and 2) soil without OM (the same soil as in 1) but with OM removed by heating to 350°for 24 h). Soil samples were column-packed and subjected to intermittent infiltration and drainage to mimic natural rainfall events. Each soil sample type was run in duplicate. The unsaturated condition was created by applying gas pressure to the column, and the unsaturated chemical weathering rates during each cycle were calculated from the effluent concentrations. During a single cycle, when applying the same gas pressure, soils with OM retained more moisture than OM-removed media, indicating increased water retention capacity under the impact of OM. This is consistent with the water retention data measured by evaporation experiments (HYPROP) and the dew point method (WP4C Potential Meter). Correspondingly, silicon (Si) denudation rates indicated that dissolution of silicate minerals was 2-4 times higher in OM soils, suggesting that organo-mineral complexes accelerate mineral dissolution under unsaturated conditions. When combining data from all cycles, the results showed that Si denudation rates were positively related to soil water content: denundation rate increased with increasing water content. Therefore, natural mineral chemical weathering under unsaturated conditions, while

  14. Electron Conditioning of Technical Aluminium Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, F

    2004-09-02

    The effect of electron conditioning on commercially aluminium alloys 1100 and 6063 were investigated. Contrary to the assumption that electron conditioning, if performed long enough, can reduce and stabilize the SEY to low values (= 1.3, value of many pure elements [1]), the SEY of aluminium did not go lower than 1.8. In fact, it reincreases with continued electron exposure dose.

  15. Development of provisions for oil contaminated soil neutralizing in the conditions of Siberia and the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtripling, L. O.; Kholkin, E. G.

    2017-08-01

    Siberia and the Arctic zone of the Russian Federation occupy a large area of the country and they differ from other regions in special climatic conditions, in particular, a long period of freezing temperatures and relatively poor infrastructure. The main problem of neutralizing soils contaminated with oil products in conditions of negative ambient temperature is that the contaminated soil is in a frozen state, and it prevents the normal course of neutralization process, so additional energy is required for preparing the soil. There is proposed a technology adapted to the conditions of Siberia and the Arctic for the operational elimination of emergency situations consequences accompanied with oil spills. The technology for neutralizing soils contaminated with petroleum products is based on the encapsulation of a pollutant (reagent capsulation technology) using an alkaline calcium-based reagent. Powdered building quicklime is used as a reagent, and it is a product of roasting carbonate rocks or a mixture of this product with mineral additives (calcium oxide). The encapsulated material obtained as a result of neutralizing soils contaminated with petroleum products is resistant to natural and man-made factors such as moisture, temperature fluctuations, acid rain and high pressure. Energy use from the chemical detoxification exothermic process of soils contaminated with petroleum products in combination with the forced supply of carbon dioxide to the neutralization zone during the formation of a shell from calcium carbonate on the surface of the pollutant makes it possible to neutralize soils contaminated with oil products in the extreme climatic conditions of the Arctic using reagent Encapsulation. The principle of equipment operation that allows neutralizing soils contaminated with petroleum products in the natural and climatic conditions of the Arctic using reagent capsulation technology has been described. The results of experimental studies have been presented that

  16. Free surface flows under compensated gravity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyer, Miachel E

    2007-01-01

    This book considers the behavior of fluids in a low-gravity environment with special emphasis on application in PMD (propellant management device) systems . In the compensated gravity environment of a spacecraft, the hydrostatic pressure decreases to very low values depending on the residual acceleration, and surface tension forces become dominant. Consequently, surface tension can be used to transport and position liquids if the residual acceleration and the resulting hydrostatic pressure are small compared to the capillary pressure. One prominent application is the use of PMDs in surface-tension satellite tanks. PMDs must ensure that the tank outlet is covered with liquid whenever outflow is demanded. Furthermore, PMDs are used to ensure expulsion and refilling of tanks for liquids and gases for life support, reactants, and experiment supplies. Since most of the PMD designs are not testable on ground and thus rely on analytical or numerical concepts, this book treats three different flow problems with analy...

  17. Leaching of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid through Silty Clay Soil Columns under Outdoor Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Marco; Cecchi, Stefano; Zanchi, Camillo A; Orlandini, Simone

    2015-09-01

    Glyphosate [-(phosphono-methyl)-glycine] is the main herbicide used in the Chianti vineyards. Considering the pollution risk of the water table and that the vineyard tile drain may deliver this pollutant into nearby streams, the objective of the present study was to estimate the leaching losses of glyphosate under natural rainfall conditions in a silty clay soil in the Chianti area. The leaching of glyphosate and its metabolite (aminomethylphosphonic acid [AMPA]) through soils was studied in 1-m-deep soil columns under outdoor conditions over a 3-yr period. Glyphosate was detected in the leachates for up to 26 d after treatments at concentrations ranging between 0.5 and 13.5 μg L. The final peak (0.28 μg L) appeared in the leachates approximately 319 d after the first annual treatment. Aminomethylphosphonic acid first appeared (21.3 μg L) in the soil leachate 6.8 d after the first annual treatment. Aminomethylphosphonic acid detection frequency and measured concentration in the leachates were more than that observed for the glyphosate. Aminomethylphosphonic acid was detected in 20% of the soil leachates at concentrations ranging from 1 to 24.9 μg L. No extractable glyphosate was detected in the soil profile. However, the AMPA content in the lowest layer ranged from 13.4 to 21.1 mg kg, and on the surface layer, it ranged from 86.7 to 94 mg kg. Overall, these results indicate that both glyphosate and AMPA leaching through a 1-m soil column may be potential groundwater contaminants. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. The impact of the soil surface properties in water erosion seen through LandSoil model sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampalini, Rossano; Follain, Stéphane; Cheviron, Bruno; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Couturier, Alain; Walter, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative models of soil redistribution at the landscape scale are the current tools for understanding space-time processes in soil and landscape evolution. But models use larger and larger numbers of variables and sometimes it becomes difficult to understand their relative importance and model behaviours in critical conditions. Sensitivity analysis (SA) is widely used to clarify models behaviours, their structure giving fundamental information to ameliorate models their selves. We tested the LandSoil model (LANDscape design for SOIL conservation under soil use and climate change) a model designed for the analysis of agricultural landscape evolution at a fine spatial resolution scale [1-10 meters] and a mid-term temporal scale [10-100 years]. LandSoil is suitable for simulations from parcel to catchment scale. It is spatially distributed, event-based, and considers water and tillage erosion processes that use a dynamic representation of the agricultural landscape through parameters such as a monthly representation of soil surface properties. Our aim was to identify most significant parameters driving the model and to highlight potential particular/singular behaviours of parameter combinations and relationships. The approach was to use local sensitivity analysis, also termed 'one-factor-at-time' (OAT) which consists of a deterministic, derivative method, inquiring the local response O to a particular input factor Pi at a specified point P0 within the full input parameter space of the model expressed as: δO/δP = (O2-O1) / (P2-P1) The local sensitivity represents the partial derivatives of O with respect to Pi at the point P0. In the SA procedure the topographical entity is represented by a virtual hillslope on which soil loss and sensitivity are calculated. Virtual hillslope is inspired from the virtual catchment framework proposed by Cheviron at al. (2011): a fixed topology consisting of a 3X3 square pixel structure having 150 m length allowing to test

  19. Evaluating Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity to Land and Soil Conditions Representative of Karst Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Fan, Xingang; Mahmood, Rezaul; Groves, Chris; Polk, Jason S.; Yan, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Due to their particular physiographic, geomorphic, soil cover, and complex surface-subsurface hydrologic conditions, karst regions produce distinct land-atmosphere interactions. It has been found that floods and droughts over karst regions can be more pronounced than those in non-karst regions following a given rainfall event. Five convective weather events are simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model to explore the potential impacts of land-surface conditions on weather simulations over karst regions. Since no existing weather or climate model has the ability to represent karst landscapes, simulation experiments in this exploratory study consist of a control (default land-cover/soil types) and three land-surface conditions, including barren ground, forest, and sandy soils over the karst areas, which mimic certain karst characteristics. Results from sensitivity experiments are compared with the control simulation, as well as with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction multi-sensor precipitation analysis Stage-IV data, and near-surface atmospheric observations. Mesoscale features of surface energy partition, surface water and energy exchange, the resulting surface-air temperature and humidity, and low-level instability and convective energy are analyzed to investigate the potential land-surface impact on weather over karst regions. We conclude that: (1) barren ground used over karst regions has a pronounced effect on the overall simulation of precipitation. Barren ground provides the overall lowest root-mean-square errors and bias scores in precipitation over the peak-rain periods. Contingency table-based equitable threat and frequency bias scores suggest that the barren and forest experiments are more successful in simulating light to moderate rainfall. Variables dependent on local surface conditions show stronger contrasts between karst and non-karst regions than variables dominated by large-scale synoptic systems; (2) significant

  20. Evaluating Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity to Land and Soil Conditions Representative of Karst Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Fan, Xingang; Mahmood, Rezaul; Groves, Chris; Polk, Jason S.; Yan, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Due to their particular physiographic, geomorphic, soil cover, and complex surface-subsurface hydrologic conditions, karst regions produce distinct land-atmosphere interactions. It has been found that floods and droughts over karst regions can be more pronounced than those in non-karst regions following a given rainfall event. Five convective weather events are simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model to explore the potential impacts of land-surface conditions on weather simulations over karst regions. Since no existing weather or climate model has the ability to represent karst landscapes, simulation experiments in this exploratory study consist of a control (default land-cover/soil types) and three land-surface conditions, including barren ground, forest, and sandy soils over the karst areas, which mimic certain karst characteristics. Results from sensitivity experiments are compared with the control simulation, as well as with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction multi-sensor precipitation analysis Stage-IV data, and near-surface atmospheric observations. Mesoscale features of surface energy partition, surface water and energy exchange, the resulting surface-air temperature and humidity, and low-level instability and convective energy are analyzed to investigate the potential land-surface impact on weather over karst regions. We conclude that: (1) barren ground used over karst regions has a pronounced effect on the overall simulation of precipitation. Barren ground provides the overall lowest root-mean-square errors and bias scores in precipitation over the peak-rain periods. Contingency table-based equitable threat and frequency bias scores suggest that the barren and forest experiments are more successful in simulating light to moderate rainfall. Variables dependent on local surface conditions show stronger contrasts between karst and non-karst regions than variables dominated by large-scale synoptic systems; (2) significant

  1. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and evaporation under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massman, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heating of soils during fires can have long-term and irreversible consequences and given the increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing probability of wildfires associated with global warming, one approach to improving understanding of these consequences is to better understand and model the dynamics of the coupled heat, (liquid) moisture, and vapor transport in soils during extreme heating events. The present study describes a model developed to simulate non-equilibrium soil evaporation and the transport of heat, moisture, and water vapor under conditions during fires where the surface heating of the soil often ranges between 10,000 and 100,000 Wm-2 for several minutes to several hours. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. Model performance is tested against laboratory measurements of soil temperature and moisture changes. Testing the present model with different formulations for soil hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, water activity, and the non-equilibrium evaporative source term, indicates that virtually all the model's successes result from the use of a temperature dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term, a rather surprising and unexpected result. On the other hand, the model solution is not a completely faithful representation of the laboratory data. Nevertheless, this new non-equilibrium model circumvents many of the problems that plagued an equilibrium model developed for the same purpose (Massman 2012: Water Resources Research 48, WR011710) and provides a much more physically realistic simulation than the earlier model. Finally, the present model should provide insight into modeling of heat and mass transport and evaporation, not only during high temperature and low moisture conditions, but for modeling these soil processes under less extreme environmental conditions as well.

  2. Soil aquifer treatment of artificial wastewater under saturated conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Essandoh, H. M K

    2011-05-01

    A 2000 mm long saturated laboratory soil column was used to simulate soil aquifer treatment under saturated conditions to assess the removal of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand (COD and BOD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen and phosphate, using high strength artificial wastewater. The removal rates were determined under a combination of constant hydraulic loading rates (HLR) and variable COD concentrations as well as variable HLR under a constant COD. Within the range of COD concentrations considered (42 mg L-1-135 mg L-1) it was found that at fixed hydraulic loading rate, a decrease in the influent concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total nitrogen and phosphate improved their removal efficiencies. At the high COD concentrations applied residence times influenced the redox conditions in the soil column. Long residence times were detrimental to the removal process for COD, BOD and DOC as anoxic processes and sulphate reduction played an important role as electron acceptors. It was found that total COD mass loading within the range of 911 mg d-1-1780 mg d-1 applied as low COD wastewater infiltrated coupled with short residence times would provide better effluent quality than the same mass applied as a COD with higher concentration at long residence times. The opposite was true for organic nitrogen where relatively high concentrations coupled with long residence time gave better removal efficiency. © 2011.

  3. Environmental behaviors of phoxim with two formulations in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Ni, Zhanglin; Mo, Runhong; Shen, Danyu; Zhong, Donglian; Tang, Fubin

    2015-09-01

    Phoxim (emulsifiable concentrate (EC) and granules (G)) has been widely used in bamboo forests. The persistence and magnitude of phoxim residues in the crop and soil must be investigated to ensure human and environmental safety. The environmental behaviors of the two formulations were investigated in a bamboo forest under soil surface mulching conditions (CP) and non-covered cultivation conditions (NCP). The half-lives of phoxim in soil under the two conditions in soil were 4.1-6.2days (EC) and 31.5-49.5days (G), respectively. Phoxim in EC could be leached from the topsoil into the subsoil. A minimized leaching effect was observed for G under NCP. Inversely, an enhanced leaching effect was observed for G under CP. The G formulation resulted in more parent compound (in bamboo shoots) and metabolite (in soil) residues of phoxim than in the case of EC, especially under CP conditions. In addition, the intensity and duration of the formulation effect on soil pH adjustment from G were more obvious than that from EC. Results showed that the environmental behaviors (distribution, degradation, residue) of phoxim in the bamboo forest were significantly influenced by the type of formulation. The prolongation effect from phoxim G might cause persistence and long-term environmental risk. However, bamboo shoot consumption could be considered relatively safe after applying the recommended dose of the two phoxim formulations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. L band microwave remote sensing and land data assimilation improve the representation of prestorm soil moisture conditions for hydrologic forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, W. T.; Chen, F.; Reichle, R. H.; Liu, Q.

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing and land data assimilation purport to improve the quality of antecedent soil moisture information available for operational hydrologic forecasting. We objectively validate this claim by calculating the strength of the relationship between storm-scale runoff ratio (i.e., total streamflow divided by total rainfall accumulation in depth units) and prestorm surface soil moisture estimates from a range of surface soil moisture data products. Results demonstrate that both satellite-based, L band microwave radiometry and the application of land data assimilation techniques have significantly improved the utility of surface soil moisture data sets for forecasting streamflow response to future rainfall events.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryForecasting streamflow conditions is important for minimizing loss of life and property during flooding and adequately planning for low streamflow conditions accompanying drought. One way to improve these forecasts is measuring the amount of water in the soil—since soil moisture conditions determine what fraction of rainfall will run off horizontally into stream channels (versus vertically infiltrate into the soil column). Within the past 5 years, there have been important advances in our ability to monitor soil moisture over large scales using both satellite-based sensors and the application of new land data assimilation techniques. This paper illustrates that these advances have significantly improved our capacity to forecast how much streamflow will be generated by future precipitation events. These results may eventually be used by operational forecasters to improve flash flood forecasting and agricultural water use management.

  5. Variability in chemistry of surface and soil waters of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water chemistry is important for the maintenance of wetland structure and function. Interpreting ecological patterns in a wetland system therefore requires an in-depth understanding of the water chemistry of that system. We investigated the spatial distribution of chemical solutes both in soil pore water and surface water, ...

  6. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  7. Soil fertility in deserts: a review on the influence of biological soil crusts and the effect of soil surface disturbance on nutrient inputs and losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.; Phillips, S.; Duniway, M.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    Sources of desert soil fertility include parent material weathering, aeolian deposition, and on-site C and N biotic fixation. While parent materials provide many soil nutrients, aeolian deposition can provide up to 75% of plant-essential nutrients including N, P, K, Mg, Na, Mn, Cu, and Fe. Soil surface biota are often sticky, and help retain wind-deposited nutrients, as well as providing much of the N inputs. Carbon inputs are from both plants and soil surface biota. Most desert soils are protected by cyanobacterial-lichen-moss soil crusts, chemical crusts and/or desert pavement. Experimental disturbances applied in US deserts show disruption of soil surfaces result in decreased N and C inputs from soil biota by up to 100%. The ability to glue aeolian deposits in place is compromised, and underlying soils are exposed to erosion. The ability to withstand wind increases with biological and physical soil crust development. While most undisturbed sites show little sediment production, disturbance by vehicles or livestock produce up to 36 times more sediment production, with soil movement initiated at wind velocities well below commonly-occurring wind speeds. Soil fines and flora are often concentrated in the top 3 mm of the soil surface. Winds across disturbed areas can quickly remove this material from the soil surface, thereby potentially removing much of current and future soil fertility. Thus, disturbances of desert soil surfaces can both reduce fertility inputs and accelerate fertility losses.

  8. Soil surface decontamination and revegetation progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of work by Rockwell Hanford Operations related to large-area decontamination efforts. Rockwell has a Program Office which manages the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) efforts. Part of the program is involved with large-surface area cleanup in conjunction with surveillance and maintenance of retired sites and facilities. The other part is the decontamination and decommissioning of structures. There are 322 surplus contaminated sites and facilities for which Rockwell has responsibility on the Hanford Site. A Program Office was established for a disciplined approach to cleanup of these retired sites. There are three major projects: the first is surveillance and maintenance of the sites prior to D and D, the project under which the radiation area cleanup is contained. Another project is for contaminated-equipment volume reduction; size reduction with arc saw cut-up and volume reduction with a vacuum furnace meltdown are being used. The third major project is structural D and D

  9. Surface irrigation reduces the emission of volatile 1,3-dichloropropene from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, D J; Yates, S R

    2007-04-01

    Low-cost, practicable techniques are required to limit the release of volatile organic compound-containing fumigants such as 1,3-D to the atmosphere. In this study, we aimed to quantify 1,3-D diffusion and emission from laboratory soil columns maintained under realistic conditions and thereby assess the efficacy of soil irrigation as a technique for reducing emissions. In two soils (one relatively high, and one relatively low, in organic matter), irrigation led to a limiting of upward diffusion of the fumigant and to the maintenance of higher soil gas concentrations. Therefore, rather than being emitted from the column, the 1,3-D was maintained in the soil where it was ultimately degraded. As a consequence, emission of 1,3-D from the irrigated columns was around half of thatfrom the nonirrigated columns. It is concluded that surface irrigation represents an effective, low-cost, and readily practicable approach to lessening the environmental impact of 1,3-D fumigant use. In addition, the higher organic matter soil exhibited emissions of around one-fifth of the lower organic matter soil in both irrigated and nonirrigated treatments, due to markedly enhanced degradation of the fumigant. Organic matter amendment of soils may, therefore, also represent an extremely effective, relatively low-cost approach to reducing 1,3-D emissions.

  10. Mapping soil resistance under different soil water content conditions using indicator kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miras-Avalos, J. M.; Bonnin-Acosta, J.; Sande-Fouz, P.; Pereira-Lanças, K.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.

    2009-04-01

    In many agricultural problems, it is of interest to map the zones where the variable under study shows the probability of being greater than a threshold value. Soil resistances higher than 2 MPa might difficult the establishment of cultures; therefore, further management or tillage techniques should be undertaken. The aim of this work was to map soil resistance using geostatistical techniques, therefore, an analysis of the spatial distribution of soil compaction and the influence of soil water content on the resistance to penetration was carried out. The studied clay-textured soil was managed under no-tillage practices. Soil resistance was described by the cone index which was obtained using a penetrometer. This attribute was assessed at 5 different depths, i.e. 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm, 30-40 cm and deeper than 40 cm, whereas soil water content was described at 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm. In the end, 73 data points were surveyed. Soil water conditions varied during the five different samplings. Statistical analysis showed that datasets followed a normal distribution, therefore, no transformation was required. Studied attributes showed low and non-significant correlation coefficients which impeded the application of cross-variogram and cokriging techniques. Because of the limited number of measured data, only the omnidirectional semivariogram was computed, and hence the spatial variability is assumed to be identical in all directions. Spatial dependence was observed in 33 out of 35 data series, both for cone index and soil water content. Fitted theoretical structures corresponded to exponential models in 20 cases, 10 Gaussian models and 3 spherical models. Nugget effect varied from 0 to 44.4 depending on the dataset and spatial dependence maximum range was 90 m. A strong spatial dependence was observed in 18 of the data sets whereas only 2 showed a weak autocorrelation. Taking into account the 2 MPa threshold, indicator kriging was used to map the soil resistance

  11. Tractability conditions for disc ploughing on a loamy sand soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    ABSTRACT. For agricultural field operations such as tillage and planting, an agricultural soil is considered tractable if it can develop adequate shear resistance to minimize tyre slip and soil damage and can produce required soil tilth without undue soil pulverization or the formation of large clods. Furthermore, the soil must ...

  12. Hydrological behaviour of sealing under different soil management conditions in the Center South Cordoba, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricchi, E.

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of soils to form seals induced by rain depends on a combination of physical, chemical and biological processes, which are, indeed, affected by climatic characteristics and the type of soil. If we consider the weather factors, the energy of rain, as a function of quantity and intensity, is the most important one. The soil properties that favor the formation of sealing are texture, organic matter content, structural stability and sodium adsorption relationship. Regarding texture, silt is the particle, which is most highly involved. In central Argentina, specifically in the central southern region of Cordoba Province, the most representative soils show a low content of clays and a high content of silt and fine sand. This land has undergone different production systems, not only agricultural ones but also combined systems, as summer crops, with intense labouring and scarce, even lacking, stubble supply. Therefore these soils have had important loss in organic matter, degradation of the structure of the superficial horizons. It became necessary, then, to look for a combination of technologies leading to an energy input throughout conservation tillage systems, soil covering and agrochemicals which tend to improve soil quality in order to obtain a sustainable production. The trial was conducted by using a simple at-random design with two repetitions for each treatment. Only in F the initial saturated hydraulic conductivity (K si ) (non-sealing condition) and the final hydraulic conductivity (K sf ) (sealing conditions) were determined in the superficial of soil in 2000, by means of a rain simulator using an intensity up to 50 mm/h for 60 minutes (kinetic energy of 0.1336 J.cm -2 ). The K s values obtained by applying Darcy's equation were used to fit the Horton type exponential decay function which describes Ks as a function of the time of exposure to a simulated rain. It can be concluded that the removal of natural vegetation and crop systems have

  13. Tools to support maintenance strategies under soft soil conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. M. Lambert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Costs for maintenance of infrastructure in municipalities with soft soil underground conditions, are estimated to be almost 40 % higher than in others. As a result, these municipalities meet financial problems that cause overdue maintenance. In some cases municipalities are even afraid to be unable to offer a minimum service level in future. In common, traditional practice, roads and sewerage systems have been constructed in trenches that consist of sandy material that replaces the upper meters of the soft soil. Under influence of its weight, this causes accelerated settlements of the construction. A number of alternative constructions have been developed, e.g. using light-weight materials to limit settlement velocity. In order to limit future maintenance costs, improvement of maintenance strategies is desired. Tools have been and will be developed to support municipalities in improving their maintenance strategies and save money by doing that. A model (BALANS that weighs the attractiveness of alternative solutions under different soil, environmental and economic circumstances, will be presented.

  14. Near Surface Soil Moisture Controls Beyond the Darcy Support Scale: A Remote Sensing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Gaur, N.

    2014-12-01

    Variability observed in near-surface soil moisture is a function of spatial and temporal scale and an understanding of the same is required in numerous environmental and hydrological applications. Past literature has focused largely on the Darcy support scale of measurement for generating knowledge about soil moisture variability and the factors causing it. With the advent of a remote sensing era, it is essential to develop a comprehensive understanding of soil moisture variability and the factors creating it at the remote sensing footprint scale. This understanding will facilitate knowledge transfer between scales which remains an area of active research. In this study, we have presented the hierarchy of controls that physical factors namely, soil, vegetation and topography exert on soil moisture distributions from airborne remote sensor footprint scale (~800 m) to a satellite footprint scale (12800 m) across 3 hydro-climates- humid (Iowa), sub-humid (Oklahoma) and semi-arid (Arizona). We evaluated the effect of physical factors on soil moisture variability at coarse spatial support scales but fine (daily) temporal spacing scales which are typical of remotely sensed soil moisture data. The hierarchy or ranking scheme defined in the study is a function of the areal extent of controls of the different physical factors and the magnitude of their effect in creating spatial variability of soil moisture. We found that even though the areal influence of soil on soil moisture variability remained significant at all scales, it decreased as we went from airborne scale to coarser scales whereas the influence of topography and vegetation increased for all three hydro-climates. The magnitude of the effect of these factors, however, was dependent on antecedent soil moisture conditions and hydro-climate.

  15. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Draper

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%, this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  16. Assimilation of ASCAT near-surface soil moisture into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, C.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Martin, E.; Wagner, W.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines whether the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations might benefit an operational hydrological model, specifically Météo-France's SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) model. Soil moisture data derived from ASCAT backscatter observations are assimilated into SIM using a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter (SEKF) over 3.5 years. The benefit of the assimilation is tested by comparison to a delayed cut-off version of SIM, in which the land surface is forced with more accurate atmospheric analyses, due to the availability of additional atmospheric observations after the near-real time data cut-off. However, comparing the near-real time and delayed cut-off SIM models revealed that the main difference between them is a dry bias in the near-real time precipitation forcing, which resulted in a dry bias in the root-zone soil moisture and associated surface moisture flux forecasts. While assimilating the ASCAT data did reduce the root-zone soil moisture dry bias (by nearly 50%), this was more likely due to a bias within the SEKF, than due to the assimilation having accurately responded to the precipitation errors. Several improvements to the assimilation are identified to address this, and a bias-aware strategy is suggested for explicitly correcting the model bias. However, in this experiment the moisture added by the SEKF was quickly lost from the model surface due to the enhanced surface fluxes (particularly drainage) induced by the wetter soil moisture states. Consequently, by the end of each winter, during which frozen conditions prevent the ASCAT data from being assimilated, the model land surface had returned to its original (dry-biased) climate. This highlights that it would be more effective to address the precipitation bias directly, than to correct it by constraining the model soil moisture through data assimilation.

  17. Weathering of Olivine during Interaction of Sulfate Aerosols with Mars Soil under Current Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P. B.; Golden, D. C.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    Sulfur concentrations in the Mars soils are elevated above 1 wt% in nearly every location visited by landed spacecraft. This observation was first made by the Viking landers, and has been confirmed by subsequent missions. The wide distribution of sulfur in martian soils has been attributed to volcanic degassing, formation of sulfate aerosols, and later incorporation into martian soils during gravitational sedimentation. However, later discoveries of more concentrated sulfur bearing sediments by the Opportunity rover has led some to believe that sulfates may instead be a product of evaporation and aeolian redistribution. One question that has not been addressed is whether the modern surface conditions are too cold for weathering of volcanic materials by sulfate aerosols. We suggest here that mixtures of atmospheric aerosols, ice, and dust have the potential for creating small films of cryo-concentrated acidic solutions that may represent an important unexamined environment for understanding weathering processes on Mars. Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate weathering of olivine under Mars-like conditions. The weathering rates measured in this study suggest that fine grained olivine on Mars would weather into sulfate minerals in short time periods if they are exposed to H2SO4 aerosols at temperatures at or above -40°C. In this system, the strength of the acidic solution is maximized through eutectic freezing in an environment where the silicate minerals are extremely fine grained and have high surface areas. This provides an ideal environment for olivine weathering despite the very low temperatures. The likelihood of substantial sulfur-rich volcanism on Mars and creation of abundant sulfate aerosols suggests that this process would have been important during formation of martian soils and sediments. Future work modeling sulfur release rates during volcanic eruptions and aerosol distribution over the surface will help understand how well this process

  18. Mapping Surface Heat Fluxes by Assimilating SMAP Soil Moisture and GOES Land Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Farhadi, Leila; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-12-01

    Surface heat fluxes play a crucial role in the surface energy and water balance. In situ measurements are costly and difficult, and large-scale flux mapping is hindered by surface heterogeneity. Previous studies have demonstrated that surface heat fluxes can be estimated by assimilating land surface temperature (LST) and soil moisture to determine two key parameters: a neutral bulk heat transfer coefficient (CHN) and an evaporative fraction (EF). Here a methodology is proposed to estimate surface heat fluxes by assimilating Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture data and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) LST data into a dual-source (DS) model using a hybrid particle assimilation strategy. SMAP soil moisture data are assimilated using a particle filter (PF), and GOES LST data are assimilated using an adaptive particle batch smoother (APBS) to account for the large gap in the spatial and temporal resolution. The methodology is implemented in an area in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. Assessment against in situ observations suggests that soil moisture and LST estimates are in better agreement with observations after assimilation. The RMSD for 30 min (daytime) flux estimates is reduced by 6.3% (8.7%) and 31.6% (37%) for H and LE on average. Comparison against a LST-only and a soil moisture-only assimilation case suggests that despite the coarse resolution, assimilating SMAP soil moisture data is not only beneficial but also crucial for successful and robust flux estimation, particularly when the uncertainties in the model estimates are large.

  19. Summer season soil temperature conditions, and soil moisture properties on the extensive green roofs in Oslo, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Atefeh, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, green roofs have been investigated more and more in order to improve the quality of municipal environment particularly to reduce the urban heat island effect and storm water runoff. Soil temperature and soil moisture are therefore two key factors in this respect. They should also be considered as important elements for plant distribution and community composition on extensive green roofs. The aim of this study is to investigate summer season soil temperature conditions, and soil ...

  20. Determination of antibiotic residues in manure, soil, and surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, T.; Schneider, R.J.; Farber, H.A.; Skutlarek, D.; Meyer, M.T.; Goldbach, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    In the last years more and more often detections of antimicrobially active compounds ("antibiotics") in surface waters have been reported. As a possible input pathway in most cases municipal sewage has been discussed. But as an input from the realm of agriculture is conceivable as well, in this study it should be investigated if an input can occur via the pathway application of liquid manure on fields with the subsequent mechanisms surface run-off/interflow, leaching, and drift. For this purpose a series of surface waters, soils, and liquid manures from North Rhine-Westphalia (Northwestern Germany) were sampled and analyzed for up to 29 compounds by HPLC-MS/MS. In each of the surface waters antibiotics could be detected. The highest concentrations were found in samples from spring (300 ng/L of erythromycin). Some of the substances detected (e.g., tylosin), as well as characteristics in the landscape suggest an input from agriculture in some particular cases. In the investigation of different liquid manure samples by a fast immunoassay method sulfadimidine could be detected in the range of 1...2 mg/kg. Soil that had been fertilized with this liquid manure showed a content of sulfadimidine extractable by accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of 15 ??g/kg dry weight even 7 months after the application. This indicates the high stability of some antibiotics in manure and soil.

  1. Disaggregation of remotely sensed soil moisture under all sky condition using machine learning approach in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Kim, H.; Choi, M.; Kim, K.

    2016-12-01

    Estimating spatiotemporal variation of soil moisture is crucial to hydrological applications such as flood, drought, and near real-time climate forecasting. Recent advances in space-based passive microwave measurements allow the frequent monitoring of the surface soil moisture at a global scale and downscaling approaches have been applied to improve the spatial resolution of passive microwave products available at local scale applications. However, most downscaling methods using optical and thermal dataset, are valid only in cloud-free conditions; thus renewed downscaling method under all sky condition is necessary for the establishment of spatiotemporal continuity of datasets at fine resolution. In present study Support Vector Machine (SVM) technique was utilized to downscale a satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. The 0.1 and 0.25-degree resolution of daily Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM) L3 soil moisture datasets from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) were disaggregated over Northeast Asia in 2015. Optically derived estimates of surface temperature (LST), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and its cloud products were obtained from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the purpose of downscaling soil moisture in finer resolution under all sky condition. Furthermore, a comparison analysis between in situ and downscaled soil moisture products was also conducted for quantitatively assessing its accuracy. Results showed that downscaled soil moisture under all sky condition not only preserves the quality of AMSR2 LPRM soil moisture at 1km resolution, but also attains higher spatial data coverage. From this research we expect that time continuous monitoring of soil moisture at fine scale regardless of weather conditions would be available.

  2. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate...... with a measured weight distribution of the soil aggregates. The results have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the cultivated and the uncultivated soil surface. A sensor system suitable for capturing in-situ high resolution 3D images of the soil surface is also described. This sensor system...

  3. Adaptive Surface Modeling of Soil Properties in Complex Landforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Spatial discontinuity often causes poor accuracy when a single model is used for the surface modeling of soil properties in complex geomorphic areas. Here we present a method for adaptive surface modeling of combined secondary variables to improve prediction accuracy during the interpolation of soil properties (ASM-SP. Using various secondary variables and multiple base interpolation models, ASM-SP was used to interpolate soil K+ in a typical complex geomorphic area (Qinghai Lake Basin, China. Five methods, including inverse distance weighting (IDW, ordinary kriging (OK, and OK combined with different secondary variables (e.g., OK-Landuse, OK-Geology, and OK-Soil, were used to validate the proposed method. The mean error (ME, mean absolute error (MAE, root mean square error (RMSE, mean relative error (MRE, and accuracy (AC were used as evaluation indicators. Results showed that: (1 The OK interpolation result is spatially smooth and has a weak bull's-eye effect, and the IDW has a stronger ‘bull’s-eye’ effect, relatively. They both have obvious deficiencies in depicting spatial variability of soil K+. (2 The methods incorporating combinations of different secondary variables (e.g., ASM-SP, OK-Landuse, OK-Geology, and OK-Soil were associated with lower estimation bias. Compared with IDW, OK, OK-Landuse, OK-Geology, and OK-Soil, the accuracy of ASM-SP increased by 13.63%, 10.85%, 9.98%, 8.32%, and 7.66%, respectively. Furthermore, ASM-SP was more stable, with lower MEs, MAEs, RMSEs, and MREs. (3 ASM-SP presents more details than others in the abrupt boundary, which can render the result consistent with the true secondary variables. In conclusion, ASM-SP can not only consider the nonlinear relationship between secondary variables and soil properties, but can also adaptively combine the advantages of multiple models, which contributes to making the spatial interpolation of soil K+ more reasonable.

  4. Surface free energy for systems with integrable boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehmann, Frank; Bortz, Michael; Frahm, Holger

    2005-01-01

    The surface free energy is the difference between the free energies for a system with open boundary conditions and the same system with periodic boundary conditions. We use the quantum transfer matrix formalism to express the surface free energy in the thermodynamic limit of systems with integrable boundary conditions as a matrix element of certain projection operators. Specializing to the XXZ spin-1/2 chain we introduce a novel 'finite temperature boundary operator' which characterizes the thermodynamical properties of surfaces related to integrable boundary conditions

  5. Age and activation of microbial communities in soils under burial mounds and in recent surface soils of steppe zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkina, T. S.; Khomutova, T. E.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; Demkina, E. V.; Stretovich, I. V.; El-Registan, G. I.; Demkin, V. A.

    2008-12-01

    Chestnut paleosols buried under steppe kurgans about 4800, 4000, and 2000 years ago and their background analogues were studied in the dry steppe zone on the Volga-Don interfluve. Morphological, chemical, microbiological, biochemical, and radiocarbon studies were performed. Paleoclimatic conditions in the region were reconstructed on the basis of paleosol data. The ages of microbial fractions isolated from the buried and surface soils were determined using the method of 14C atomic mass-spectrometry. It reached 2100 years in the A1 horizon of the buried paleosol, which corresponded to the archaeological age of the kurgan (1st century AD). The ages of microbial biomass isolated from the B2 horizons of the buried paleosol and the background surface soil comprised 3680 ± 35 and 3300 ± 30 years, respectively. The obtained data confirmed our assumption about preservation of microorganisms of the past epochs in the paleosols buried under archaeological monuments. It is ensured by various mechanisms of adaptation of soil microbial communities to unfavorable environmental conditions (anabiosis, transformation of bacteria into nanoforms, etc.). The possibility to stimulate germination of the ancient dormant microbial pool isolated from the buried paleosols by 2-3 orders of magnitude with the use of β-indolyl-3-acetic acid as a signal substance was demonstrated.

  6. Insecticide dissipation from soil and plant surfaces in tropical horticulture of southern Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Atcha-Ahowé, Cyrien; James, Braima; Amelung, Wulf

    2009-06-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, horticulture provides livelihood opportunities for millions of people, especially in urban and peri-urban areas. Although the vegetable agroecosystems are often characterized by intensive pesticide use, risks resulting therefrom are largely unknown under tropical horticultural conditions. The objective of this study therefore was to study the fate of pesticides in two representative horticultural soils (Acrisol and Arenosol) and plants (Solanum macrocarpon L.) after field application and thus to gain first insight on environmental persistence and dispersion of typical insecticides used in vegetable horticulture in Benin, West Africa. On plant surfaces, dissipation was rapid with half lives ranging from 2 to 87 h (alpha-endosulfan < beta-endosulfan < deltamethrin). Soil dissipation was considerably slower than dissipation from plant surfaces with half-lives ranging from 3 (diazinon) to 74 d (total endosulfan), but persistence of pesticides in soil was still reduced compared to temperate climates. Nevertheless, for deltamethrin and endosulfan, a tendency for mid-term accumulation in soil upon repeated applications was observed. The soil and plant surface concentrations of the metabolite endosulfan sulfate increased during the entire trial period, indicating that this compound is a potential long-term pollutant even in tropical environments.

  7. The influence of rolled erosion control systems on soil temperature and surface albedo: part I. A greenhouse experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, R.A.; Menard, T.; Perry, J.L.; Penn, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    A greenhouse study examined the influences of various surface covers (a bare control soil and seven rolled erosion control systems—RECS) on surface radiative properties, and soil temperature. In our companion paper we examine relationships with soil moisture, biomass production, and nutrient assimilation. Randomization and replication were key components to our study of microclimate under tropical radiation conditions. The bare Oxisol control soil exhibited the most extreme microclimatic conditions with the lowest albedo (not significantly different from that of P300© North American Green, a dark green polypropylene system), and the highest mean and maximum hourly temperatures recorded at depths of 5 and 8 cm. This hostile climatic environment was not conducive to biomass production or moisture storage and it is likely that the observed soil surface crusts impeded plant emergence. Rolled erosion control systems, on the other hand, generally moderated soil temperatures by reflecting more shortwave radiation, implying less heat energy at the surface for conduction to the soil. The result was that RECS exhibited lower mean soil temperatures, higher minimum temperatures and lower maximum soil temperatures. An aspen excelsior system (Curlex I© Excelsior) had the highest albedo and the soil beneath this system exhibited the greatest temperature modulation. Open-weave systems composed of jute (Geojute© Price & Pictures) and coconut fibers (BioD-Mat 70© RoLanka) were the RECS most similar in temperature response to the bare control soil. Other systems examined were intermediate in their temperature response and surface albedo (i.e., SC150BN© North American Green, C125© North American Green and Futerra© Conwed Fibers). (author)

  8. Assessment of soil compaction properties based on surface wave techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihan Syamimi Jafri, Nur; Rahim, Mohd Asri Ab; Zahid, Mohd Zulham Affandi Mohd; Faizah Bawadi, Nor; Munsif Ahmad, Muhammad; Faizal Mansor, Ahmad; Omar, Wan Mohd Sabki Wan

    2018-03-01

    Soil compaction plays an important role in every construction activities to reduce risks of any damage. Traditionally, methods of assessing compaction include field tests and invasive penetration tests for compacted areas have great limitations, which caused time-consuming in evaluating large areas. Thus, this study proposed the possibility of using non-invasive surface wave method like Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW) as a useful tool for assessing soil compaction. The aim of this study was to determine the shear wave velocity profiles and field density of compacted soils under varying compaction efforts by using MASW method. Pre and post compaction of MASW survey were conducted at Pauh Campus, UniMAP after applying rolling compaction with variation of passes (2, 6 and 10). Each seismic data was recorded by GEODE seismograph. Sand replacement test was conducted for each survey line to obtain the field density data. All seismic data were processed using SeisImager/SW software. The results show the shear wave velocity profiles increase with the number of passes from 0 to 6 passes, but decrease after 10 passes. This method could attract the interest of geotechnical community, as it can be an alternative tool to the standard test for assessing of soil compaction in the field operation.

  9. Surface conditions and viscoelastic properties of the denture liner Permaflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, D; Beal, Y

    1995-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the viscoelastic properties of Permaflex compared to other soft lining materials. The surface condition of this material was also investigated under both laboratory and simulated clinical conditions and with and without the application of a varnish. The tests provided practical instructions for the use of Permaflex, which showed good adaptive properties to stress and surface condition initially and after adjustment.

  10. Hanford Site surface soil radioactive contamination control plan, March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mix, P.D.; Winship, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    The Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Program is responsible to the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office, for the safe and cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 closures at the Hanford Site. This program also manages the Radiation Area Remedial Action that includes the surveillance, maintenance, decontamination, and/or interim stabilization of inactive burial grounds, cribs, ponds, trenches, and unplanned release sites. This plan addresses only the Radiation Area Remedial Action activity requirements for managing and controlling the contaminated surface soil areas associated with these inactive sites until they are remediated as part of the Hanford Site environmental restoration process. All officially numbered Radiation Area Remedial Action and non-Radiation Area Remedial Action contaminated surface soil areas are listed in this document so that a complete list of the sites requiring remediation is contained in one document

  11. Comparing the ensemble and extended Kalman filters for in situ soil moisture assimilation with contrasting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fairbairn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two data assimilation (DA methods are compared for their ability to produce an accurate soil moisture analysis using the Météo-France land surface model: (i SEKF, a simplified extended Kalman filter, which uses a climatological background-error covariance, and (ii EnSRF, the ensemble square root filter, which uses an ensemble background-error covariance and approximates random rainfall errors stochastically. In situ soil moisture observations at 5 cm depth are assimilated into the surface layer and 30 cm deep observations are used to evaluate the root-zone analysis on 12 sites in south-western France (SMOSMANIA network. These sites differ in terms of climate and soil texture. The two methods perform similarly and improve on the open loop. Both methods suffer from incorrect linear assumptions which are particularly degrading to the analysis during water-stressed conditions: the EnSRF by a dry bias and the SEKF by an over-sensitivity of the model Jacobian between the surface and the root-zone layers. These problems are less severe for the sites with wetter climates. A simple bias correction technique is tested on the EnSRF. Although this reduces the bias, it modifies the soil moisture fluxes and suppresses the ensemble spread, which degrades the analysis performance. However, the EnSRF flow-dependent background-error covariance evidently captures seasonal variability in the soil moisture errors and should exploit planned improvements in the model physics. Synthetic twin experiments demonstrate that when there is only a random component in the precipitation forcing errors, the correct stochastic representation of these errors enables the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF. It might therefore be possible for the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF with real data, if the rainfall uncertainty was accurately captured. However, the simple rainfall error model is not advantageous in our real experiments. More realistic rainfall error models are

  12. In vitro lead bioaccessibility and phosphate leaching as affected by surface application of phosphoric acid in lead-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Mosby, D E; Casteel, S W; Blanchar, R W

    2002-11-01

    Phosphate treatment of lead-contaminated soil may be a cost-effective remedial alternative for in situ stabilizing soil Pb and reducing Pb toxicology to human. The leaching behaviors of the P added to soil surface and the effect on subsurface Pb bioaccessibility must be addressed for this remedial technology to be acceptable. A smelter-contaminated soil containing an average of 2,670 mg Pb kg(-1), collected from the Jasper County Superfund Site located in Jasper County, Missouri, was surface treated with 10 g P kg(-1) as phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)). Following a simulated column leaching and 90-day treatment of field plots, respectively, bioaccessible Pb, P, and pH in soil profile were measured. Surface treatment using H(3)PO(4) effectively stabilized soil Pb and reduced leachable Pb and the bioaccessibility. Phosphate leached into deeper profile significantly lowered bioaccessible Pb in subsurface. Reduction of Pb bioaccessibility increased as a linear function of increasing soil P. Although surface H(3)PO(4) treatment resulted in an enhanced leaching of added P and may increase potential risk of surface and groundwater pollution, the P leaching under field conditions is very limited. Lime addition following the treatment may reduce the leachability of added P and further immobilize soil Pb.

  13. Erosão hídrica influenciada por condições físicas de superfície e subsuperfície do solo resultantes do seu manejo, na ausência de cobertura vegetal Water erosion influenced by surface and subsurface soil physical conditions resulting from its management, in the absence of vegetal cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. S. Volk

    2004-08-01

    com cultivo, mostrou a maior perda de solo no estudo. A semeadura direta, apesar de também ter recuperado a estrutura do solo pelo cultivo, apresentou a maior perda de água, ficando a perda de solo próxima à do preparo convencional com resíduo cultural removido e intermediária entre o preparo convencional com resíduo cultural incorporado e o sem cultivo. A perda de solo após o cultivo do milho foi praticamente o dobro da observada após o cultivo da aveia preta, independentemente do preparo do solo e da incorporação ou remoção dos resíduos culturais, enquanto a perda de água foi apenas ligeiramente maior. Os resultados confirmaram que as condições físicas de superfície e subsuperfície do solo resultantes do seu manejo que governam as perdas de solo por erosão hídrica são distintas das que governam as perdas de água pelo mesmo fenômeno.Different management practices lead to distinct surface and subsurface soil physical conditions, which in turn result in different levels of rainfall erosion. In this context, a 5.5 year field erosion-study was conducted with the objective of studying the effects of both tillage and cropping systems and forms of crop residue management on some surface and subsurface physical soil conditions and their influence on rainfall erosion. For this purpose, rainfall was simulated on a severely degraded, sandy loam Paleudult with 0.08 m m-1 slope-steepness. Treatments consisted of: corn and black oat cultivation, both under no-tillage and conventional tillage (the latter with incorporation or removal of crop residues, and no-plant cultivation under conventional tillage (control. For all treatments, the soil was freshly-tilled or consolidated, without residue cover, when the erosion tests were performed. Ten rainfall tests were imposed with the rotating-boom rainfall simulator at a constant intensity of 64.0 mm h-1 during 90 min, short after the harvest of one crop and the soil tillage (or no-tillage for the subsequent crop

  14. Mobilization and Release of colloidal Carbon from a Soil Column Under Redox Oscillation Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the most mobile form of carbon (C), strongly influences the cycling, distribution and behavior of C in soil. In wetlands, the reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides releases large quantities of DOM into the soil solution. The objective of this study is to quantify the changes in aqueous organic carbon concentration in different sized fractions induced by reduction of iron and increase in pH. Twenty four cm long soil columns were prepared. Columns were run under oxic (as control) and anoxic conditions. Two platinum redox probes were inserted at 10 and 17 cm depths from the soil surface to monitor the redox status of the column. Anoxic and oxic conditions were maintained by flushing with either nitrogen or oxygen gas through the soil. No additional organic sources were added. After 35 days of anoxic environment, column leachate samples were separated by differential centrifugation into five colloidal sized fractions ( 450 nm), 0.59-5.12% (450-220 nm), 0.45-4.91% (220-100 nm), 0.18-2.91% (100-50 nm), 15.48-35.23% (50 nm - 2.3 nm) and 49.15-63.94% (<2.3 nm). The preliminary results confirmed the release of more nanoparticulate (50-2.3 nm) and truly dissolved (<2.3 nm) organic matter from the anoxic soil column. This study will allow us to systematically evaluate the contribution of colloid mobilization on C release and the distribution of different sized fractions of C under redox dynamic environment.

  15. Lead concentrations and risk exposure assessment in surface soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated lead concentrations in < 250 μm and < 75 μm of deposited dust and< 2000 μm, < 250 μm, and < 75 μm of surface soils at undeveloped residential lands leased to auto-mechanic artisans for a minimum of ten years and estimated exposure risk for children that will reside on the polluted lands after the ...

  16. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  17. Clay Mineralogy Studies of Soils Located on Different Geomorphic Surfaces in Jabalbarez-Jiroft Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    naser boroumand

    2017-02-01

    clay mineralogy. Results and Discussion: Argillic horizon found in mantled pediment and piedmont alluvial plain surfaces and stable hill, respectively. In thin horizons coating of clay were observed. Pedofeatures formed in this geomorphic surface, seemed to have been buried in the soil, due to the favorable conditions in terms of the time factor and the presence of moisture in the past. Fig. 2 showed clay coatings in the Bt horizon of pedons 4,5 and 6. The presence of argillic horizons in the arid climate of the research area is attributed to a more humid paleoclimate, which was also reported by Farpoor et al. (2002, Khademi and Mermut (2003, and Sanjari et al. (2011 in Rafsanjan, Isfahan and Jiroft, central Iran, respectively. Clay minerals illite, smectite, chlorite and kaolinite were identified by using X-ray diffractometer. Similar results were also obtained by Sanjari et al. (2011 in the Jiroft area. Kaolinite and illite in soils of arid and semi-arid environments of Iran have been reported with an inherited origin (Khormali and Abtahi, 2003; Sanjari et al., 2011. As the environmental conditions are not favorable for the pedogenic formation of such minerals in soils of this study area , it is proposed that they might be inherited from their parent material. Just as previously stated by other researchers that the origin of the kaolinite minerals in the dry climate regionsis due to itsinheritance from parent materials (Farpoor et al., 2002; Khormali and Abtahi, 2003. The dominant of smectite minerals in soils on stable geomorphic surfaces ofhills and mantled pediment can be cause of stable level and more moisture content in the past and the present, which may be resulted to smectite formation from illite and chlorite transformation. Also, chlorite minerals on stable surface of mantled pediment were not observed. High amount of leaching, low pH level (

  18. Soil and surface layer type affect non-rainfall water inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, Nurit; Berliner, Pedro; Jiang, Anxia

    2017-04-01

    Non-rainfall water inputs (NRWIs), which include fog deposition, dew formation, and direct water vapor adsorption by the soil, play a vital role in arid and semiarid regions. Environmental conditions, namely radiation, air temperature, air humidity, and wind speed, largely affect the water cycle driven by NRWIs. The substrate type (soil type and the existence/absence of a crust layer) may as well play a major role. Our objective was to quantify the effects of soil type (loess vs. sand) and surface layer (bare vs. crusted) on the gain and posterior evaporation of NRWIs in the Negev Highlands throughout the dry summer season. Four undisturbed soil samples (20 cm diameter and 50 cm depth) were excavated and simultaneously introduced into a PVC tube. Two samples were obtained in the Negev's Boker plain (loess soil) and two in the Nizzana sand dunes in the Western Negev. On one sample from each site the crust was removed while on the remaining one the natural crust was left in place. The samples were brought to the research site at the Jacob Bluestein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel (31˚08' N, 34˚53' E, 400 meter above the sea level) where they were exposed to the same environmental conditions. The four samples in their PVC tubes were placed on top of scales and the samples mass was continuously monitored. Soil temperatures were monitored at depths of 1, 2, 3, 5 and10 cm in each microlysimeter (ML) using Copper-Constantan thermocouples. The results of particle size distribution indicated that the crust of the loess soil is probably a physical crust, i.e., a crust that forms due to raindroplets impact; while the crust on the sand soil is biological. On most days, the loess soils adsorbed more water than their corresponding sand soil samples. For both soils, the samples for which the crust was removed adsorbed more water than the samples for which it was intact. The difference in daily water adsorption amount between crusted

  19. Long term impact of organic amendments on forest soil properties under semiarid Mediterranean climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso González, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2017-04-01

    postafforestation); (iv) spring 2015 (42 months postafforestation) and; (v) spring 2016 (54 months postafforestation). The sampling strategy for each plot involved the collection of four disturbed soil samples taken from the surface (0 to 10-cm depth). The soil properties analyzed were as follows: (i) soil organic carbon (SOC); (ii) pH; (iii) electrical conductivity (EC); (iv) aggregates stability (AS) and; (v) texture (TE). Regarding to soil aggregate stability, 54 month after the afforestation, the percentage of stable aggregates has increased slightly in all the treatments (HP, RU, PM, SM and SH) in relation to control. Specifically, the differences were recorded in the fraction of macroaggregates (≥ 0.250 mm). The largest increases have been associated with SM, PM and RU treatments. Although the SM, PM and RU treatments helped to maintain the SOC at high levels in the 54 months following application. Conversely, not significant differences relative to the control plots were found for the pH, EC or texture, 54 months following afforestation. To conclude, these results showed an increase in the SOC and the stability of the macroaggregates when soil is amended with sludge, pinus mulch and straw much. This fact has been due to an increase in the number cementing agents due to: (i) the application of pinus, straw and sludge had resulted in the release of carbohydrates to the soil; and thus (ii) it has favored the development of a protective vegetation cover, which has increased the number of roots in the soil and the organic contribution to it. References: Casals P, Cortina J, Bottner P, Coûteaux MM, Vallejo VR.: CO2 efflux from a Mediterranean semi-arid forest soil. I. Seasonality and effects of stoniness. Biogeochemistry 48: 261-281, 2000. Eaton JM, McGoff NM, Byrne KA, Leahy P, Kiely G.: Land cover change and soil organic C stocks in the Republic of Ireland 1851-2000. Climatic Change 91: 317-334, 2008. García-Orenes F, Guerrero C, Roldán A, Mataix-Solera J, Cerdà A, Campoy

  20. Exigências de uma semeadora-adubadora de precisão variando a velocidade e a condição da superfície do solo Seeder requiriment changing the speed and soil surface condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Angeli Furlani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o desempenho de um conjunto trator-semeadora-adubadora de quatro linhas, variando as marchas do trator e preparo do solo. A semeadura foi realizada em Latossolo Vermelho Eutroférrico. Os tratamentos foram: preparo do solo (convencional, reduzido e plantio direto e marchas do trator (5,9km h-1 e 7,0km h-1, em delineamento de blocos casualizados em fatorial 3 x 2 com quatro repetições. Foram analisadas: velocidade de deslocamento, capacidade de campo operacional, consumo de combustível horário e por área, patinagem, força de tração e potência na barra. A velocidade, a patinagem e os consumos de combustível horário e por área foram maiores para a marcha M2 (7,0km h-1 e o conjunto trabalhando em área cujo preparo do solo foi realizado com escarificador apresentou maiores valores para os consumos de combustível horário e por área e também menor velocidade operacional.The objective of the work was to evaluate the performance of a set tractor-four lines seeder, when and operating at different tractor gears and soil tillage, on corn crop planting. The sowing was carried out through in dark-red Oxisoil, eutrophic. The treatments designs had been composites of tillage systems (conventional, reduced and no-tillage and marches of the set tractor-seeder (5.9 and 7.0km h-1. The experimental delineation was in a randomized blocks design in factorial array of 3 x 2 with 4 replications. The analyzed variables had been: forward speed, field operational capacity, hourly and area fuel consumption, wheels lip, draft force and drawbar power. The speed, the wheels lip and fuel consumption had been higher for gear M2 (7.0km.h-1 when operating in soil prepared by reduced soil tillage also presented greater values fuel consumption and lower speed of sowing.

  1. Operational assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness at the Met Office

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dharssi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, no extensive, near real time, global soil moisture observation network exists. Therefore, the Met Office global soil moisture analysis scheme has instead used observations of screen temperature and humidity. A number of new space-borne remote sensing systems, operating at microwave frequencies, have been developed that provide a more direct retrieval of surface soil moisture. These systems are attractive since they provide global data coverage and the horizontal resolution is similar to weather forecasting models. Several studies show that measurements of normalised backscatter (surface soil wetness from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT on the meteorological operational (MetOp satellite contain good quality information about surface soil moisture. This study describes methods to convert ASCAT surface soil wetness measurements to volumetric surface soil moisture together with bias correction and quality control. A computationally efficient nudging scheme is used to assimilate the ASCAT volumetric surface soil moisture data into the Met Office global soil moisture analysis. This ASCAT nudging scheme works alongside a soil moisture nudging scheme that uses observations of screen temperature and humidity. Trials, using the Met Office global Unified Model, of the ASCAT nudging scheme show a positive impact on forecasts of screen temperature and humidity for the tropics, North America and Australia. A comparison with in-situ soil moisture measurements from the US also indicates that assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness improves the soil moisture analysis. Assimilation of ASCAT surface soil wetness measurements became operational during July 2010.

  2. Effect of Saturated Near Surface on Nitrate and Ammonia Nitrogen Losses in Surface Runoff at the Loess Soil Hillslope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-bin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water pollution from agricultural fields is a global problem and cause of eutrophication of surface waters. A laboratory study was designed to evaluate the effects of near-surface hydraulic gradients on NO3–N and NH4–N losses in surface runoff from soil boxes at 27% slope undersimulated rainfall of a loess soil hillslope. Experimental treatments included two near-surface hydraulic gradients (free drainage, FD; saturation, SA, three fertilizer application rates (control, no fertilizer input; low, 120 kg N ha-1; high, 240 kg N ha-1, and simulated rainfall of 100 mm h-1 was applied for 70 min. The results showed that saturated near-surface soil moisture had dramatic effects on NO3–N and NH4–N losses and water quality. Under the low fertilizer treatment, average NO3–N concentrations in runoff water of SA averaged 2.2 times greater than that of FD, 1.6 times greater for NH4–N. Under the high fertilizer treatment, NO3–N concentrations in runoff water from SA averaged 5.7 times greater than that of FD, 4.3 times greater for NH4–N. Nitrogen loss formed with NO3–N is dominant during the event, but not NH4–N. Under the SA condition, the total loss of NO3–N from low fertilizer treatment was 34.2 to 42.3% of applied nitrogen, while under the FD treatment that was 3.9 to 6.9%. However, the total loss of NH4–N was less than 1% of applied nitrogen. These results showed that saturated condition could make significant contribution to water quality problems.

  3. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods.

  4. A simple interpretation of the surface tenperature/vegetation index space for assessment of soil moisture status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Inge; Andersen, J.; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2002-01-01

    Remote Sensing, soil moisture, surface temperature, vegetation index, hydrology, Africa, Senegal, semiarid......Remote Sensing, soil moisture, surface temperature, vegetation index, hydrology, Africa, Senegal, semiarid...

  5. Heavy metal pollution of surface soil in Thrace region (Turkey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goskun, Mahmut; Goskun, Munevver; Steinnes, E.; Eidhammer Sjobakk, T.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Demkina, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    Samples of surface soil were collected at 73 sites in the Thrace region, northwest part of Turkey. Two complementary analytical techniques, epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with flame and graphite furnace atomization were used to determine 37 elements in the soil samples. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd, Mn, Co, Pb, and As were determined using AAS and GF AAS and ENAA was used for the remaining 29 elements. Results for As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, I, In, K, La, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, and V are reported for the first time for soils from this region. The results show that concentrations of the most elements were little affected by the industrial and other anthropogenic activities performed in the region. Except for distinctly higher levels of Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn in Istanbul district than the median values for the Thrace region, the observed distributions seem to be mainly associated with lithogenic variations. Spatial distributions of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd, Cr, Pb, and As were plotted in relation to the concentration values in soil using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology

  6. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  7. Soil Specific Surface Area and Non-Singularity of Soil-Water Retention at Low Saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Møldrup, Per

    2013-01-01

    The dry end of the soil water characteristic (SWC) is important for modeling vapor flow dynamics and predicting soil properties such as specific surface area (SSA) and clay content (CL). Verification of new instrumentation for rapid measurement of the dry end of the SWC is relevant to avoid long...... equilibration times and potential for hydraulic decoupling. The objectives of this study were to measure both adsorption and desorption branches of the dry end of the SWC for 21 variably-textured Arizona soils using new, fully automated instrumentation (AquaSorp); apply the data to parameterize the Tuller...... and Or (TO) and new single-parameter non-singularity (SPN) models; and evaluate estimates of SSA from water sorption, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and N2–BET methods. The AquaSorp successfully measured water sorption isotherms (∼140 data points) within a reasonably short time (1–3 d). The SPN...

  8. Wireless sensor network for monitoring soil moisture and weather conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wireless sensor network (WSN) was developed and deployed in three fields to monitor soil water status and collect weather data for irrigation scheduling. The WSN consists of soil-water sensors, weather sensors, wireless data loggers, and a wireless modem. Soil-water sensors were installed at three...

  9. Dryland photoautotrophic soil surface communities endangered by global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Emilio; Belnap, Jayne; Büdel, Burkhard; Crutzen, Paul J.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2018-02-01

    Photoautotrophic surface communities forming biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are crucial for soil stability as well as water, nutrient and trace gas cycling at regional and global scales. Quantitative information on their global coverage and the environmental factors driving their distribution patterns, however, are not readily available. We use observations and environmental modelling to estimate the global distribution of biocrusts and their response to global change using future projected scenarios. We find that biocrusts currently covering approximately 12% of Earth's terrestrial surface will decrease by about 25-40% within 65 years due to anthropogenically caused climate change and land-use intensification, responding far more drastically than vascular plants. Our results illustrate that current biocrust occurrence is mainly driven by a combination of precipitation, temperature and land management, and future changes are expected to be affected by land-use and climate change in similar proportion. The predicted loss of biocrusts may substantially reduce the microbial contribution to nitrogen cycling and enhance the emissions of soil dust, which affects the functioning of ecosystems as well as human health and should be considered in the modelling, mitigation and management of global change.

  10. The SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root-zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf; Crow, Wade; Koster, Randal; Kimball, John

    2010-01-01

    that are informed by and consistent with SMAP observations. Such estimates are obtained by merging SMAP observations with estimates from a land surface model in a soil moisture data assimilation system. The land surface model component of the assimilation system is driven with observations-based surface meteorological forcing data, including precipitation, which is the most important driver for soil moisture. The model also encapsulates knowledge of key land surface processes, including the vertical transfer of soil moisture between the surface and root zone reservoirs. Finally, the model interpolates and extrapolates SMAP observations in time and in space. The L4_SM product thus provides a comprehensive and consistent picture of land surface hydrological conditions based on SMAP observations and complementary information from a variety of sources. The assimilation algorithm considers the respective uncertainties of each component and yields a product that is superior to satellite or model data alone. Error estimates for the L4_SM product are generated as a by-product of the data assimilation system.

  11. Radon and Thoron Exhalation Rates from Surface Soil of Bangka - Belitung Islands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarbaini Syarbaini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.2.1.35-42Radon and thoron exhalation rate from soil is one of the most important factors that can influence the radioactivity level in the environment. Radon and thoron gases are produced by the decay of the radioactive elements those are radium and thorium in the soil, where its concentration depends on the soil conditions and the local geological background. In this paper, the results of radon and thoron exhalation rate measurements from surface soil of Bangka Belitung Islands at thirty six measurement sites are presented. Exhalation rates of radon and thoron were measured by using an accumulation chamber equipped with a solid-state alpha particle detector. Furthermore, the correlations between radon and thoron exhalation rates with their parent nuclide (226Ra and 232Th concentrations in collected soil samples from the same locations were also evaluated. The result of the measurement shows that mostly the distribution of radon and thoron is similar to 226Ra and 232Th, eventhough it was not a good correlation between radon and thoron exhalation rate with their parent activity concentrations (226Ra and 232Th due to the environmental factors that can influence the radon and thoron mobilities in the soil. In comparison to a world average, Bangka Belitung Islands have the 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates higher than the world average value for the regions with normal background radiation.

  12. Variations in FASST Predictions of Soil Surface Temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peck, Lindamae

    2006-01-01

    ..., initial volumetric soil moisture content, bulk density of the dry soil material, albedo (sunny days), and porosity. The thermal conductivity of the dry soil material has a minor effect on predicted soil temperature...

  13. Hydro-mechanical paths within unsaturated compacted soil framed through water retention surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelizzari Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction is a key issue of modern earthworks... From sustainable development, a need arise of using materials for compaction under given conditions that would normally be avoid due to unpredictable pathologies. The application of compaction on fine grained soils, without a change of gravimetric water content, lead to very important modifications of the void ratio and hence suction. Therefore the hydro-mechanical behaviour of fine grained soil need to be rendered around three variables: suction, void ratio, saturation degree or water content. The barring capacity of the soil is assessed through Penetrometers (In-situ manual penetrometer, CBR in order to assess gains through compaction. The three states variables are then assessed for in situ and frame through water retention surfaces, realized from Proctor tests, in which compaction effect and path could be described.

  14. Does plant uptake or low soil mineral-N production limit mineral-N losses to surface waters and groundwater from soils under grass in summer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, Ambreen; McClean, Colin J.; Cresser, Malcolm S.

    2013-01-01

    Summer minima and autumn/winter maxima in nitrate concentrations in rivers are reputedly due to high plant uptake of nitrate from soils in summer. A novel alternative hypothesis is tested here for soils under grass. By summer, residual readily mineralizable plant litter from the previous autumn/winter is negligible and fresh litter input low. Consequently little mineral-N is produced in the soil. Water-soluble and KCl-extractable mineral N in fresh soils and soils incubated outdoors for 7 days have been monitored over 12 months for soil transects at two permanent grassland sites near York, UK, using 6 replicates throughout. Vegetation-free soil is shown to produce very limited mineral-N in summer, despite the warm, moist conditions. Litter accumulates in autumn/winter and initially its high C:N ratio favours N accumulation in the soil. It is also shown that mineral-N generated monthly in situ in soil substantially exceeds the monthly mineral-N inputs via wet deposition at the sites. -- Highlights: •Soil mineral-N has been measured over a year at two grassland sites in the UK. •Rates of mineral-N production have also been measured in vegetation-free soils. •In summer, though soils were warm and moist, rate of mineral-N production was low. •The effect is attributed to low litter inputs in summer when grass is growing well. •Low mineral-N production in summer must be limiting N losses to fresh waters. -- Low mineral-N production in soils under grass limits summer N losses to surface- and ground-waters

  15. Evaluating near-surface soil moisture using Heat Capacity Mapping Mission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    Four dates of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) data were analyzed in order to evaluate HCMM thermal data use in estimating near-surface soil moisture in a complex agricultural landscape. Because of large spatial and temporal ground cover variations, HCMM radiometric temperatures alone did not correlate with soil water content. The radiometric temperatures consisted of radiance contributions from different canopies and their respective soil backgrounds. However, when surface soil temperatures were empirically estimated from HCMM temperatures and percent cover of each pixel, a highly significant correlation was obtained between the estimated soil temperatures and near-surface soil water content.

  16. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Experimental simulations of oxidizing conditions and organic decomposition on the surface of Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoker, C.R.; Mancinelli, R.L.; Mckay, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    One important scientific objective of a Mars Rover Sample Return mission would be to look for traces of living and extinct life on Mars. An instrument to search for organic carbon may be the simplest instrument that could screen samples which are interesting from a biological point of view. An experimental program is described which would help to understand the nature of the oxidizing soil on Mars and the mechanism responsible for organic degradation on the Martian surface. This is approached by lab simulations of the actual conditions that occur on Mars, particularly the oxidant production by atmospheric photochemistry, and the combined effects of UV light and oxidants in decomposing organic compounds. The results will be used to formulate models of the photochemistry of the atmospheric, the atmosphere-soil interaction, and the diffusion of reactive compounds into the soils. This information will provide insights and constraints on the design of a sampling strategy to search for organic compounds on Mars

  18. Time-dependent movement and distribution of chlorpyrifos and its metabolism in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihua; Shen, Danyu; Zhong, Donglian; Mo, Runhong; Ni, Zhanglin; Tang, Fubin

    2014-07-16

    The dissipation and distribution of chlorpyrifos (CHP) granule formulation in bamboo forest under soil surface mulching conditions (CP) and noncovered cultivation conditions (NCP) from soil to product were investigated. In the CP treatment, the CHP granule with slow-release effect leached from the topsoil to the subsoil. Conversely, the CHP was fixed in the topsoil (0-5 cm layer) in the NCP treatment, and no obvious leaching effect could be observed. The residue of CHP could be found in bamboo shoots from CP treatment, mainly at the bottom part (5 cm length). CHP could be degraded into 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) in the soil and bamboo shoots. In addition, the straw used as the mulching material with higher OM and pH had some regulatory role in changing the pH and OM characteristics of the soil. Thus the straw could indirectly affect the adsorption and degradation behavior of CHP and TCP in the soil.

  19. Soil heat flux and day time surface energy balance closure at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil heat flux is an important input component of surface energy balance. Estimates of soil heat flux were made in the year 2008 using soil temperature data at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, south Kerala. Hourly values of soil heat flux from 00 to 24 LST are presented for selected days typical of the winter, ...

  20. Assessing the relative influence of surface soil moisture and ENSO SST on precipitation predictability over the contiguous United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-06-28

    This study assesses the relative influence of soil moisture memory and tropical sea surface temperature (SST) in seasonal rainfall over the contiguous United States. Using observed precipitation, the NINO3.4 index and soil moisture and evapotranspiration simulated by a land surface model for 61 years, analysis was performed using partial correlations to evaluate to what extent land surface and SST anomaly of El Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can affect seasonal precipitation over different regions and seasons. Results show that antecedent soil moisture is as important as concurrent ENSO condition in controlling rainfall anomalies over the U.S., but they generally dominate in different seasons with SST providing more predictability during winter while soil moisture, through its linkages to evapotranspiration and snow water, has larger influence in spring and early summer. The proposed methodology is applicable to climate model outputs to evaluate the intensity of land-atmosphere coupling and its relative importance.

  1. Assessing the relative influence of surface soil moisture and ENSO SST on precipitation predictability over the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Leung, L. Ruby

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses the relative influence of soil moisture memory and tropical sea surface temperature (SST) in seasonal rainfall over the contiguous United States. Using observed precipitation, the NINO3.4 index, and soil moisture and evapotranspiration simulated by a land surface model for 61 years, analysis was performed using partial correlations to evaluate to what extent land surface and SST anomaly of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can affect seasonal precipitation over different regions and seasons. Results show that antecedent soil moisture is as important as concurrent ENSO condition in controlling rainfall anomalies over the U.S., but they generally dominate in different seasons with SST providing more predictability during winter while soil moisture, through its linkages to evapotranspiration and snow water, has larger influence in spring and early summer. The proposed methodology is applicable to climate model outputs to evaluate the intensity of land-atmosphere coupling and its relative importance.

  2. Using infrared thermography for understanding and quantifying soil surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, João L. M. P.

    2017-04-01

    At present, our understanding of the soil hydrologic response is restricted by measurement limitations. In the literature, there have been repeatedly calls for interdisciplinary approaches to expand our knowledge in this field and eventually overcome the limitations that are inherent to conventional measuring techniques used, for example, for tracing water at the basin, hillslope and even field or plot scales. Infrared thermography is a versatile, accurate and fast technique of monitoring surface temperature and has been used in a variety of fields, such as military surveillance, medical diagnosis, industrial processes optimisation, building inspections and agriculture. However, many applications are still to be fully explored. In surface hydrology, it has been successfully employed as a high spatial and temporal resolution non-invasive and non-destructive imaging tool to e.g. access groundwater discharges into waterbodies or quantify thermal heterogeneities of streams. It is believed that thermal infrared imagery can grasp the spatial and temporal variability of many processes at the soil surface. Thermography interprets the heat signals and can provide an attractive view for identifying both areas where water is flowing or has infiltrated more, or accumulated temporarily in depressions or macropores. Therefore, we hope to demonstrate the potential for thermal infrared imagery to indirectly make a quantitative estimation of several hydrologic processes. Applications include: e.g. mapping infiltration, microrelief and macropores; estimating flow velocities; defining sampling strategies; identifying water sources, accumulation of waters or even connectivity. Protocols for the assessment of several hydrologic processes with the help of IR thermography will be briefly explained, presenting some examples from laboratory soil flumes and field.

  3. Boundary conditions for soft glassy flows: slippage and surface fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansard, Vincent; Bocquet, Lydéric; Colin, Annie

    2014-09-28

    We explore the question of surface boundary conditions for the flow of a dense emulsion. We make use of microlithographic tools to create surfaces with well controlled roughness patterns and measure using dynamic confocal microscopy both the slip velocity and the shear rate close to the wall, which we relate to the notion of surface fluidization. Both slippage and wall fluidization depend non-monotonously on the roughness. We interpret this behavior within a simple model in terms of the building of a stratified layer and the activation of plastic events by the surface roughness.

  4. Land surface model performance using cosmic-ray and point-scale soil moisture measurements for calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Iwema

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available At very high resolution scale (i.e. grid cells of 1 km2, land surface model parameters can be calibrated with eddy-covariance flux data and point-scale soil moisture data. However, measurement scales of eddy-covariance and point-scale data differ substantially. In our study, we investigated the impact of reducing the scale mismatch between surface energy flux and soil moisture observations by replacing point-scale soil moisture data with observations derived from Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNSs made at larger spatial scales. Five soil and evapotranspiration parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES were calibrated against point-scale and Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor soil moisture data separately. We calibrated the model for 12 sites in the USA representing a range of climatic, soil, and vegetation conditions. The improvement in latent heat flux estimation for the two calibration solutions was assessed by comparison to eddy-covariance flux data and to JULES simulations with default parameter values. Calibrations against the two soil moisture products alone did show an advantage for the cosmic-ray technique. However, further analyses of two-objective calibrations with soil moisture and latent heat flux showed no substantial differences between both calibration strategies. This was mainly caused by the limited effect of calibrating soil parameters on soil moisture dynamics and surface energy fluxes. Other factors that played a role were limited spatial variability in surface fluxes implied by soil moisture spatio-temporal stability, and data quality issues.

  5. Anoxic conditions drive phosphorus limitation in humid tropical forest soil microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, A.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.; Blazewicz, S.; Silver, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    The elemental stoichiometry of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) of soil microorganisms (C:N:P ratios) regulates transfers of energy and nutrients to higher trophic levels. In humid tropical forests that grow on P-depleted soils, the ability of microbes to concentrate P from their surroundings likely plays a critical role in P-retention and ultimately in forest productivity. Models predict that climate change will cause dramatic changes in rainfall patterns in the humid tropics and field studies have shown these changes can affect the redox state of tropical forest soils, influencing soil respiration and biogeochemical cycling. However, the responses of soil microorganisms to changing environmental conditions are not well known. Here, we incubated humid tropical soils under oxic or anoxic conditions with substrates differing in both C:P stoichiometry and lability, to assess how soil microorganisms respond to different redox regimes. We found that under oxic conditions, microbial C:P ratios were similar to the global optimal ratio (55:1), indicating most microbial cells can adapt to persistent aerated conditions in these soils. However, under anoxic conditions, the ability of soil microbes to acquire soil P declined and their C:P ratios shifted away from the optimal ratio. NanoSIMS elemental imaging of single cells extracted from soil revealed that under anoxic conditions, C:P ratios were above the microbial optimal value in 83% of the cells, in comparison to 41% under oxic conditions. These data suggest microbial growth efficiency switched from being energy limited under oxic conditions to P-limited under anoxic conditions, indicating that, microbial growth in low P humid tropical forests soils may be most constrained by P-limitation when conditions are oxygen-limited. We suggest that differential microbial responses to soil redox states could have important implications for productivity of humid tropical forests under future climate scenarios.

  6. Characteristics of woodland rhizobial populations from surface- and deep-soil environments of the sonoran desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, H B; Jenkins, M B; Virginia, R A; Harding, E E

    1989-12-01

    A collection of 74 rhizobial isolates recovered from nodules of the desert woody legumes Prosopis glandulosa, Psorothamnus spinosus, and Acacia constricta were characterized by using 61 nutritional and biochemical tests. We compared isolates from A. constricta and Prosopis glandulosa and tested the hypothesis that the rhizobia from a deep-phreatic rooting zone of a Prosopis woodland in the Sonoran Desert of southern California were phenetically distinct from rhizobia from surface soils. Cluster analysis identified four major homogeneous groups. The first phenon contained slow-growing (SG) Prosopis rhizobia from surface and deep-phreatic-soil environments. These isolates grew poorly on most of the media used in the study, probably because of their requirement for a high medium pH. The second group of isolates primarily contained SG Prosopis rhizobia from the deep-phreatic rooting environment and included two fast-growing (FG) Psorothamnus rhizobia. These isolates were nutritionally versatile and grew over a broad pH range. The third major phenon was composed mainly of FG Prosopis rhizobia from surface and dry subsurface soils. While these isolates used a restricted range of carbohydrates (including sucrose) as sole carbon sources, they showed better growth on a range of organic acids as sole carbon sources and amino acids as sole carbon and nitrogen sources than did other isolates in the study. They grew better at 36 degrees C than at 26 degrees C. The FG Acacia rhizobia from surface-soil environments formed a final major phenon that was distinct from the Prosopis isolates. They produced very high absorbance readings on all of the carbohydrates tested except sucrose, grew poorly on many of the other substrates tested, and preferred a 36 to a 26 degrees C incubation temperature. The surface populations of Prosopis rhizobia required a higher pH for growth and, under the conditions used in this study, were less tolerant of low solute potential and high growth

  7. WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L2 V001 (LPRM_WINDSAT_SOILM2) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — WindSat/Coriolis surface soil moisture (LPRM) L2 V001 is a Level 2 (swath) data set. Its land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin)...

  8. A soil technological study on effectuating and maintaining adequate playing conditions of grass sports fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van A.L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Playing conditions of grass sports fields have been studied focusing on top layer soil strength meeting the requirements of usage. In a field investigation a reproducible soil strength criterion was found from firmness appraisals and simultaneous measurements of soil strength. From

  9. An assessment of the soil-conditioning capacity of gums exuded by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assesses the soil conditioning capacity of tree gums based on the level of resistance to crumble posed by moulds of treated soils to the impacts of artificial raindrops. Gums exuded by trees viz., Acacia occidental and Parkia bicolor as well as a sample of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) were used as soil conditioners.

  10. Soil Physical and Environmental Conditions Controlling Patterned-Ground Variability at a Continuous Permafrost Site, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Christiansen, Hanne Hvidtfeldt

    2017-01-01

    This study examines soil physical and environmental conditions controlling patterned-ground variability on an alluvial fan in a continuous permafrost landscape, at Adventdalen, Svalbard. On-site monitoring of ground temperature, soil moisture and snow depth, laboratory analyses of soil physical...

  11. Heavy Metal Pollution of Surface Soil in Thrace Region (Turkey)

    CERN Document Server

    Cocskun, M; Frontasyeva, M V; Munevver, C; Eidhammer Sjobakk, T; Demkina, S V

    2004-01-01

    Samples of surface soil were collected at 73 sites in the Thrace region, northwest part of Turkey. Two complementary analytical techniques, epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with flame and graphite furnace atomization were used to determine 37 elements in the soil samples. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd, Mn, Co, Pb, and As were determined using AAS and GF AAS and ENAA was used for the remaining 29 elements. Results for As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, I, In, K, La, Mn, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, U, and V are reported for the first time for soils from this region. The results show that concentrations of the most elements were little affected by the industrial and other anthropogenic activities performed in the region. Except for distinctly higher levels of Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn in Istanbul district than the median values for the Thrace region, the observed distributions seem to be mainly associated with lithogenic variations. S...

  12. Land preparation techniques and vegetation type commonly determine soil conditions in a typical hilly watershed, Loess Plateau of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Wei; Chen, Liding; Feng, Tianjiao; Qin, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Soil is a key component of the earth, it plays important role in regulating the chemical, hydrological and biological cycles. Land preparation techniques (e.g., leveled ditches, leveled benches, adversely graded tableland and fish-scale pits) is one of the most effective ecological engineering practices to reduce water erosion. Land preparation greatly affects soil physicochemical properties, soil moisture variation, runoff and sediment prevention. This study investigated the influence of different land preparation techniques on soil conditions, runoff and erosion during vegetation restoration, which remained poorly understand to date. Soil samples were collected from depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, 40-60 cm, 60-80 cm and 80-100 cm, in the typical hilly watershed of Dingxi City, Loess Plateau. Soil bulk density (BD), soil organic matter (SOM) and total nitrogen (TN) were determined for different land preparations and vegetation type (Caragana korshinskii, Platycladus orientalis, Pinus tabulaeformis and Prunus armeniaca) combinations. Fractal theory was used to analyze the soil particle size distribution (PSD). Redundancy analyses were conducted to distinguish the relationships between soil conditions and the factors influencing them (land preparation and vegetation). The analysis of runoff coefficient and erosion rates were calculated considering the monitoring time. The results indicated that: 1) the effect of land preparation on soil properties and PSD varies with soil depth. For each land preparation category, SOM and TN values showed a significant difference between the top soil layer and the underlying soil depth. 2) The 20 cm soil layer was a boundary that distinguished the explanatory factors, with land preparation and vegetation type as the controlling factors in the 0-20 cm and 20-100 cm soil layers, respectively. Land preparation and vegetation significantly affected soil properties in the surface soil layer, while land preparation (41.6%) was the

  13. Effects of rice husk compost application on soil quality parameters in greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Demir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of rice husk compost (RHC on some soil quality parameters under greenhouse conditions were investigated. Experiment were conducted in a randomized plot design with different application doses of RHC (0, 3, 6 and 9% into surface soil (0-20 cm with three replications in a greenhouse of Agricultural Faculty in Ondokuz Mayıs University. RHC application generally improved the soil quality parameters according to the control treatment during the experiment carried out with growing tomato plant in the greenhouse in 2010. The soil organic matter (OM contents significantly increased by the application of RHC in the following order; 9%>6%>3%>0%. While RHC applications in the greenhouses significantly reduced pH contents of soils according to the control, the RHC application increased the values of respiration rate (CO2, EC, NO3-N and available phosphorus (P. While the exchangeable Ca values of soils generally decreased, the exchangeable Mg and K values generally increased according to the control with RHC application. Bulk density (BD values in the greenhouse were reduced with RHC application doses in the following order 0%>3%> 6%>9%. The values of field capacity (FC, permanent wilting point (PWP and available water capacity (AWC generally increased according to the control with the application of RHC dosses in the following order 9%>6%>3%. The highest positive correlations among the physical, chemical and biological properties were found between OM and PWP (0.924**, AWC and FC (0.907**, OM and FC (0.897**, CO2 and PWP (0.862**, PWP and FC (0.791**; while the highest negative correlations were found between BD and FC (-0.854**, BD and PWP (-0.871**, BD and OM (-0.868**, BD and CO2 (-0.838**, BD and P (-0.821**, Ca and FC (-0.812**. The highest tomato yield (7.77 ton/da was obtained with the 9% of RHC application. RHC application to the soil in greenhouse generally improved soil quality and tomato yield.

  14. Radiochlorine concentration ratios for agricultural plants in various soil conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashparov, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Colle, C. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN/DEI/SECRE), Cadarache bat 159, BP 3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)]. E-mail: claude.colle@irsn.fr; Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Yoschenko, V. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Zvarich, S. [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Strasse 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine)

    2007-06-15

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ({sup 36}Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, Podzoluvisol, Greyzem, Phaeozem and Chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR = concentration of {sup 36}Cl in the fresh plant material divided by its concentration in the dried soil in the upper 20 cm layer) were obtained in green peas (2.6 {+-} 0.4), onions (1.5 {+-} 0.5), potatoes (8 {+-} 1), clover (90 {+-} 26) and ryegrass (158 {+-} 88) hay, oat seeds (36 {+-} 23) and straw (305 {+-} 159), wheat seeds (35 {+-} 10) and straw (222 {+-} 82). These values correlate with the stable chlorine values for the same plants. It was shown that {sup 36}Cl plant/soil CR in radish roots (CR = 9.7 {+-} 1.4) does not depend on the stable chlorine content in the soil (up to 150 mg kg{sup -1}), soil type and thus, that stable chlorine CR values (9.4 {+-} 1.2) can also be used for {sup 36}Cl. Injection of additional quantities of stable chlorine into the soil (100 mg kg{sup -1} of dry soil) with fertilizer does not change the soil-to-plant transfer of {sup 36}Cl. The results from a batch experiment showed that chlorine is retained in the investigated soils only by live biota and transfers quickly (in just a few hours) into the soil solution from dry vegetation even without decomposition of dead plants and is integrated in the migration processes in soil.

  15. Radiochlorine concentration ratios for agricultural plants in various soil conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashparov, V.; Colle, C.; Levchuk, S.; Yoschenko, V.; Zvarich, S.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term field experiments have been carried out in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radiochlorine ( 36 Cl) transfer to plants from four types of soil, namely, Podzoluvisol, Greyzem, Phaeozem and Chernozem. Radiochlorine concentration ratios (CR = concentration of 36 Cl in the fresh plant material divided by its concentration in the dried soil in the upper 20 cm layer) were obtained in green peas (2.6 ± 0.4), onions (1.5 ± 0.5), potatoes (8 ± 1), clover (90 ± 26) and ryegrass (158 ± 88) hay, oat seeds (36 ± 23) and straw (305 ± 159), wheat seeds (35 ± 10) and straw (222 ± 82). These values correlate with the stable chlorine values for the same plants. It was shown that 36 Cl plant/soil CR in radish roots (CR = 9.7 ± 1.4) does not depend on the stable chlorine content in the soil (up to 150 mg kg -1 ), soil type and thus, that stable chlorine CR values (9.4 ± 1.2) can also be used for 36 Cl. Injection of additional quantities of stable chlorine into the soil (100 mg kg -1 of dry soil) with fertilizer does not change the soil-to-plant transfer of 36 Cl. The results from a batch experiment showed that chlorine is retained in the investigated soils only by live biota and transfers quickly (in just a few hours) into the soil solution from dry vegetation even without decomposition of dead plants and is integrated in the migration processes in soil

  16. LPRM/WindSat/Coriolis L2 Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 (swath) data set¿s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  17. LPRM/TMI/TRMM L2 Surface Soil Moisture, Ancillary Params, and QC V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Level 2 (swath) data set’s land surface parameters, surface soil moisture, land surface (skin) temperature, and vegetation water content, are derived from...

  18. Application of Ultrasonic Sensors in Road Surface Condition Distinction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Nakashima

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The number of accidents involving elderly individuals has been increasing with the increase of the aging population, posing increasingly serious challenges. Most accidents are caused by reduced judgment and physical abilities, which lead to severe consequences. Therefore, studies on support systems for elderly and visually impaired people to improve the safety and quality of daily life are attracting considerable attention. In this study, a road surface condition distinction method using reflection intensities obtained by an ultrasonic sensor was proposed. The proposed method was applied to movement support systems for elderly and visually impaired individuals to detect dangerous road surfaces and give an alarm. The method did not perform well in previous studies of puddle detection, because the alert provided by the method did not enable users to avoid puddles. This study extended the method proposed by previous studies with respect to puddle detection ability. The findings indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method by considering four road surface conditions. The proposed method could detect puddle conditions. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified in all four conditions, since users could differentiate between road surface conditions and classify the conditions as either safe or dangerous.

  19. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture using the particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating surface sensible and latent heat fluxes from land surface temperature (LST) time series and soil moisture observations. Surface turbulent heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology and other climate-related fields, but in-situ measurements are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that the time series of LST contains information of energy partitioning and that surface turbulent heat fluxes can be determined from assimilation of LST. These studies are mainly based on two assumptions: (1) a monthly value of bulk heat transfer coefficient under neutral conditions (CHN) which scales the sum of the fluxes, and (2) an evaporation fraction (EF) which stays constant during the near-peak hours of the day. Previous studies have applied variational and ensemble approaches to this problem. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) algorithm is adopted to test its capability in this application. The PBS can be seen as an extension of the standard particle filter (PF) in which the states and parameters within a fix window are updated in a batch using all observations in the window. The aim of this study is two-fold. First, the PBS is used to assimilate only LST time series into the force-restore model to estimate fluxes. Second, a simple soil water transfer scheme is introduced to evaluate the benefit of assimilating soil moisture observations simultaneously. The experiments are implemented using the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) (FIFE) data. It is shown that the restored LST time series using PBS agrees very well with observations, and that assimilating LST significantly improved the flux estimation at both daily and half-hourly time scales. When soil moisture is introduced to further constrain EF, the accuracy of estimated EF is greatly improved. Furthermore, the RMSEs of retrieved fluxes are effectively reduced at both

  20. Osteogenic potential of laser modified and conditioned titanium zirconium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P David Charles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The osseointegration of dental implant is related to their composition and surface treatment. Titanium zirconium (TiZr has been introduced as an alternative to the commercially pure titanium and its alloys as dental implant material, which is attributed to its superior mechanical and biological properties. Surface treatments of TiZr have been introduced to enhance their osseointegration ability; however, reliable, easy to use surface modification technique has not been established. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd-YAG laser surface treatment of TiZr implant alloy on their osteogenic potential. Materials and Methods: Twenty disc-shaped samples of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm height were milled from the TiZr alloy ingot. The polished discs were ultrasonically cleaned in distilled water. Ten samples each were randomly selected as Group A control samples and Group B consisted of Nd-YAG laser surface etched and conditioned test samples. These were evaluated for cellular response. Cellular adhesion and proliferation were quantified, and the results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric analysis. Cellular morphology was observed using electron and epiflurosence microscopy. Results: Nd-YAG laser surface modified and conditioned TiZr samples increased the osteogenic potential. Conclusion: Nd-YAG laser surface modification of TiZr, improves the cellular activity, surface roughness, and wettability, thereby increasing the osteogenic potential.

  1. Soil Organic Carbon in Mangrove Ecosystems with Different Vegetation and Sedimentological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiro Matsui

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies have been conducted on organic carbon (OC variation in mangrove ecosystems. However, few have examined its relationship with soil quality and stratigraphic condition. Mangrove OC characteristics would be explicitly understood if those two parameters were taken into account. The aim of this study was to examine mangrove OC characteristics qualitatively and quantitatively after distinguishing mangrove OC from other OC. Geological survey revealed that the underground of a mangrove ecosystem was composed of three layers: a top layer of mangrove origin and two underlying sublayers of geologic origin. The underlying sublayers were formed from different materials, as shown by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Despite a large thickness exceeding 700 cm in contrast to the 100 cm thickness of the mangrove mud layer, the sublayers had much lower OC stock. Mangrove mud layer formation started from the time of mangrove colonization, which dated back to between 1330 and 1820 14C years BP, and OC stock in the mangrove mud layer was more than half of the total OC stock in the underground layers, which had been accumulating since 7200 14C years BP. pH and redox potential (Eh of the surface soils varied depending on vegetation type. In the surface soils, pH correlated to C% (r = −0.66, p < 0.01. C/N ratios varied widely from 3.9 to 34.3, indicating that mangrove OC had various sources. The pH and Eh gradients were important factors affecting the OC stock and the mobility/uptake of chemical elements in the mangrove mud layer. Humic acids extracted from the mangrove mud layer had relatively high aliphatic contents, in contrast with the carboxylic acid rich sublayers, indicating that humification has not yet progressed in mangrove soil.

  2. Computed leaching of pesticides from soil under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Dekkers, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    With a computer model, pesticide behavior in soil after spring application to a sandy loam field with a potato crop, was simulated. Special attention was paid to the risk of leaching through the upper meter of soil in catchment areas. Unsaturated water flow resulting from rainfall was modeled in

  3. Soil strength response of select soil disturbance classes on a wet pine flat in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily A. Carter; W. Michael Aust; James A. Burger

    2007-01-01

    Harvest operations conducted under conditions of high soil moisture on a et pine flat in South Carolina resulted in a high degree of soil surface disturbance. Less soil surface disturbance occurred when soil moisture content was lower. Soil strength varied by soil disturbance class in wet harvested locations and highly disturbed areas were associated with low soil...

  4. Metribuzin transport in undisturbed soil cores under controlled water potential conditions: experiments and modelling to evaluate the risk of leaching in a sandy loam soil profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Valérie; Benoit, Pierre; Le Menn, Mona; Eklo, Ole-Martin; Sveistrup, Tore; Kvaerner, Jens

    2011-04-01

    Mobility of pesticides in soils is often evaluated and characterised in the surface soil layers rather than at different depths where soil characteristics such as soil organic matter, microbial biomass or clay contents can strongly change pesticide behaviour. The objective of this work was to characterise the reactivity of the herbicide metribuzin in three main soil horizons found in the 0-80 cm profile of an alluvial soil of southern Norway under dynamic transport conditions. A laboratory infiltrometer was used to perform percolation experiments in soil cores sampled in the three horizons Ap, Bw and Bw/C, at a fixed matric potential of -10 cm, thus preventing pores of equivalent radii higher than 0.015 cm from contributing to water flow. The physical equilibrium transport model correctly described the transport of water tracer (bromide). The distribution coefficient K(d) values were estimated to be 0.29, 0.17 ± 0.02 and 0.15 ± 0.00 L kg(-1) for horizons Ap, Bw and Bw/C respectively, in close agreement with batch sorption data. Degradation was found only for the surface horizon with a short half-life of about 5 days, in disagreement with longer half-lives found in batch and field degradation data. For all horizons, a kinetic sorption model was needed for better description of metribuzin leaching. Chemical non-equilibrium was greatest in the Bw horizon and lowest in the Bw/C horizon. Overall, metribuzin exhibited a greater mobility in the deeper horizons. The risk of metribuzin transfer to groundwater in such alluvial soils should therefore be considered. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture in Irrigated Lands by Assimilation of Landsat Vegetation Indices, Surface Energy Balance Products, and Relevance Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso F. Torres-Rua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial surface soil moisture can be an important indicator of crop conditions on farmland, but its continuous estimation remains challenging due to coarse spatial and temporal resolution of existing remotely-sensed products. Furthermore, while preceding research on soil moisture using remote sensing (surface energy balance, weather parameters, and vegetation indices has demonstrated a relationship between these factors and soil moisture, practical continuous spatial quantification of the latter is still unavailable for use in water and agricultural management. In this study, a methodology is presented to estimate volumetric surface soil moisture by statistical selection from potential predictors that include vegetation indices and energy balance products derived from satellite (Landsat imagery and weather data as identified in scientific literature. This methodology employs a statistical learning machine called a Relevance Vector Machine (RVM to identify and relate the potential predictors to soil moisture by means of stratified cross-validation and forward variable selection. Surface soil moisture measurements from irrigated agricultural fields in Central Utah in the 2012 irrigation season were used, along with weather data, Landsat vegetation indices, and energy balance products. The methodology, data collection, processing, and estimation accuracy are presented and discussed.

  6. Conditions on holographic entangling surfaces in higher curvature gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Flory, Mario; Sleight, Charlotte [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805, Munich (Germany)

    2014-06-17

    We study the extremal surfaces of functionals recently proposed for the holographic calculation of entanglement entropy in general higher curvature theories, using New Massive gravity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity as concrete examples. We show that the entropy functionals admit closed extremal surfaces, which for black hole backgrounds can encircle the event horizon of the black hole. In the examples considered, such closed surfaces correspond to a lower value of the entropy functional than expected from CFT calculations, implying a seeming mismatch between the bulk and boundary calculations. For Lorentzian settings we show that this problem can be resolved by imposing a causality constraint on the extremal surfaces. The possibility of deriving conditions from an alternative conical boundary condition method as proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena is explored.

  7. Near-saturated surface soil hydraulic properties under different land uses in the St Denis National Wildlife Area, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodhinayake, Waduwawatte; Si, Bing Cheng

    2004-10-01

    Surface soil hydraulic properties are key factors controlling the partition of rainfall and snowmelt into runoff and soil water storage, and their knowledge is needed for sound land management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of three land uses (native grass, brome grass and cultivated) on surface soil hydraulic properties under near-saturated conditions at the St Denis National Wildlife Area, Saskatchewan, Canada. For each land use, water infiltration rates were measured using double-ring and tension infiltrometers at -0.3, -0.7, -1.5 and -2.2 kPa pressure heads. Macroporosity and unsaturated hydraulic properties of the surface soil were estimated. Mean field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs), unsaturated hydraulic conductivity at -0.3 kPa pressure head, inverse capillary length scale () and water-conducting macroporosity were compared for different land uses. These parameters of the native grass and brome grass sites were significantly (p 1.36 × 10-4 m in diameter in the three land uses. Land use modified near-saturated hydraulic properties of surface soil and consequently may alter the water balance of the area by changing the amount of surface runoff and soil water storage.

  8. Feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to study seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this paper is to study the feasibility of using a seismic surface wave method to investigate seasonal and weather effects on shallow surface soils. In the study, temporal variations of subsurface soil properties were measured and monitored by using a combination of a new seismic su...

  9. In situ mapping of radionuclides in subsurface and surface soils: 1994 Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilk, A.J.; Hubbard, C.W.; Knopf, M.A.; Abel, K.H.

    1995-04-01

    Uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites occasionally caused local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils. The thorough cleanup of these sites is a major public concern and a high priority for the US Department of Energy, but before any effective remedial protocols can be established, the three-dimensional distributions of target contaminants must be characterized. Traditional means of measuring radionuclide activities in soil are cumbersome, expensive, time-consuming, and often do not accurately reflect conditions over very large areas. New technologies must be developed, or existing ones improved, to allow cheaper, faster, and safer characterization of radionuclides in soils at these sites. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies to measure uranium in surface and subsurface soils. In partial completion of this effort, PNL developed an improved in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to satisfy the technical requirements. This document summarizes fiscal-year 1994 efforts at PNL to fulfill requirements for TTP number-sign 321103 (project number-sign 19307). These requirements included (a) developing a user-friendly software package for reducing field-acquired gamma-ray spectra, (b) constructing an improved data-acquisition hardware system for use with high-purity germanium detectors, (c) ensuring readiness to conduct field mapping exercises as specified by the sponsor, (d) evaluating the in situ gamma-ray spectrometer for the determination of uranium depth distribution, and (e) documenting these efforts

  10. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    -pools were estimated for different compartments over the available age classes. The sampling of humus and surface vegetation was done using 30x30 and 50x50 cm frame. It was distinguished between following fractions: fine/coarse roots ( than 2 mm), woody debris (dead wood, branches, cones and acorns), living vegetation (ground vegetation and its roots), litter (leaves fresh and decomposed coarse organic layer) and humus (more than 30% of fine organic matter). C and N stocks in mineral soil were assessed for the 10, 30 and 60 cm depth. Furthermore, the influence of solar radiation on humus and mineral soil C and N was evaluated using the GSF (global site factor) estimated with hemispherical photography. The photographs were taken on each sampling point using the 180_ viewing angle looking upward into the canopy. As expected, the solar energy strongly influences the occurrence of herbaceous layer in spruce and oak stands. Furthermore, beech and oak chronosequences display positive (although not strong) correlation between the light factor and C & N accumulation in the humus fractions. In the beech chronosequence, good correlation with light conditions in stands is only found in the sum of all forest floor compartments (litter, woody debris and humus). On the contrary, with exception of spruce (r = 0.391** for the 10 cm depth) no significant correlation was found with the mineral soil C for the three observed depths. depths.

  11. Release of colloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from a contaminated soil under natural conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Kögel-Knabner, I.

    2003-04-01

    Mobile colloidal particles play an important role in the carrier-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing solutes. They act as a possible sorbent for contaminants and are possible pollutant carriers. Knowledge on the release and transport of soil-borne colloidal particles is mandatory for the understanding of the mobility of hydrophobic or surface-complexing contaminants. In soils, the major fraction of colloidal phase particles is of organic provenience. Their mobility in soils is controlled by the release from and the interactions with the immobile solid phase, by microbial formation processes as well as by the flow regime. Important factors of the release and transport are the site-specific meteorological conditions like groundwater recharge, temperature and moisture regime, and amount and distribution of precipitation. We studied the release of natural organic colloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from a coarse textured, calcareous porous media under field conditions. Three natural gradient lysimeters and nine precipitation gauges were installed at a contaminated site. Sampling of the seepage water was triggered by rainfall events. Analysis of the samples comprised the determination of the 16 EPA-PAH in the liquid phase and in the colloidal and suspended particle fraction, dissolved and colloidal phase organic carbon (DCOC), pH, electrolytic conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results show a direct response of the release of colloids to strong rainfall events. The amount of seepage corresponds directly with the precipitation rate. Mean concentrations of DCOC in the seepage water range between 2 and 6 mg/l. PAH concentrations are very low in the liquid phase but reach up to 660 mg/kg in the colloidal and suspended particle fraction. This points to the importance of colloid-facilitated transport of the contaminant through the unsaturated soil zone.

  12. Dissipation of triclosan, triclocarban, carbamazepine and naproxen in agricultural soil following surface or sub-surface application of dewatered municipal biosolids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON N5V 4T3 (Canada); Department of Biology, Western University, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    In many jurisdictions land application of municipal biosolids is a valued source of nutrients for crop production. The practice must be managed to ensure that crops and adjacent water are not subject to contamination by pharmaceuticals or other organic contaminants. The broad spectrum antimicrobial agents triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC), the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ), and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen (NAP) are widely used and are carried in biosolids. In the present study, the effect of biosolids and depth of placement in the soil profile on the rates of TCS, TCC, CBZ, and NAP dissipation were evaluated under semi-field conditions. Aggregates of dewatered municipal biosolids (DMBs) supplemented with {sup 14}C-labeled residues were applied either on the soil surface or in the subsurface of the soil profile, and incubated over several months under ambient outdoor conditions. The dissipation of TCS, TCC and NAP was significantly faster in sub-surface than surface applied biosolid aggregates. In contrast the dissipation rate for CBZ was the same in surface applied and incorporated aggregates. Overall, the present study has determined a significant effect of depth of placement on the dissipation rate of biodegradable molecules. - Highlights: • We characterized the soil fate of four organic contaminants carried in biosolids. • Biosolids were placed on the soil surface or incorporated within the soil profile. • Naproxen, triclosan and triclocarban were dissipated more rapidly when incorporated. • Depth of placement did not influence the rate of carbamazepine dissipation. • Soil incorporation of biosolids will result in more rapid dissipation of contaminants.

  13. Testing of newly developed functional surfaces under pure sliding conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godi, Alessandro; Mohaghegh, Kamran; Grønbæk, J.

    2013-01-01

    -polished counterpart. A number of experiments were carried out at different normal pressures employing for all specimens the same reciprocating movement and the same lubrication. The measured friction forces were plotted against the incremental normal pressure, and the friction coefficients were calculated....... The results comparison showed clearly how employing multifunctional surfaces can reduce friction forces up to 50 % at high normal loads compared to regularly ground or turned surfaces. Friction coefficients approximately equal to 0.12 were found for classically machined surfaces, whereas the values were 0...... the surfaces in an industrial context. In this paper, a number of experimental tests were performed using a novel test rig, called axial sliding test, simulating the contact of surfaces under pure sliding conditions. The aim of the experiments is to evaluate the frictional behavior of a new typology...

  14. Potential feedbacks between snow cover, soil moisture and surface energy fluxes in Southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox Nilsen, Irene; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Stordal, Frode

    2017-04-01

    At high latitudes, the snow season has become shorter during the past decades because snowmelt is highly sensitive to a warmer climate. Snowmelt influences the energy balance by changing the albedo and the partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes. It further influences the water balance by changing the runoff and soil moisture. In a previous study, we identified southern Norway as a region where significant temperature changes in summer could potentially be explained by land-atmosphere interactions. In this study we hypothesise that changes in snow cover would influence the summer surface fluxes in the succeeding weeks or months. The exceptionally warm summer of 2014 was chosen as a test bed. In Norway, evapotranspiration is not soil moisture limited, but energy limited, under normal conditions. During warm summers, however, such as in 2014, evapotranspiration can be restricted by the available soil moisture. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model we replace the initial ground conditions for 2014 with conditions representative of a snow-poor spring and a snow-rich spring. WRF was coupled to Noah-MP at 3 km horizontal resolution in the inner domain, and the simulations covered mid-May through September 2014. Boundary conditions used to force WRF were taken from the Era-Interim reanalysis. Snow, runoff, soil moisture and soil temperature observational data were provided by the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate for validation. The validation shows generally good agreement with observations. Preliminary results show that the reduced snowpack, hereafter "sim1" increased the air temperature by up to 5 K and the surface temperature by up to 10 K in areas affected by snow changes. The increased snowpack, hereafter "sim2", decreased the air and surface temperature by the same amount. These are weekly mean values for the first eight simulation weeks from mid May. Because of the higher net energy available ( 100 Wm-2) in sim 1, both

  15. Biological soil crust succession impact on soil moisture and temperature in the sub-surface along a rainfall gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, E.; Yizhaq, H.; Ashkenazy, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Biological soil crusts produce mucilage sheets of polysaccharides that cover the soil surface. This hydrophobic coating can seal the soil micro-pores and thus cause reduction of water permeability and may influence soil temperature. This study evaluates the impact of crust composition on sub-surface water and temperature over time. We hypothesized that the successional stages of biological soil crusts, affect soil moisture and temperature differently along a rainfall gradient throughout the year. Four experimental sites were established along a rainfall gradient in the western Negev Desert. At each site three treatments; crust removal, pure sand (moving dune) and natural crusted were monitored. Crust successional stage was measured by biophysiological and physical measurements, soil water permeability by field mini-Infiltrometer, soil moisture by neutron scattering probe and temperature by sensors, at different depths. Our main interim conclusions from the ongoing study along the rainfall gradient are: 1. the biogenic crust controls water infiltration into the soil in sand dunes, 2. infiltration was dependent on the composition of the biogenic crust. It was low for higher successional stage crusts composed of lichens and mosses and high with cyanobacterial crust. Thus, infiltration rate controlled by the crust is inverse to the rainfall gradient. Continuous disturbances to the crust increase infiltration rates, 3. despite the different rainfall amounts at the sites, soil moisture content below 50 cm is almost the same. We therefore predict that climate change in areas that are becoming dryer (desertification) will have a positive effect on soil water content and vice versa.

  16. Extracting Archaeological Feautres from GPR Surveys Conducted with Variable Soil Moisture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, I. M.; Glisic, B.; Gonciar, A.

    2017-12-01

    As a common tool for subsurface archaeological prospection, ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a useful method for increasing the efficiency of archaeological excavations. Archaeological sites are often temporally and financially constrained, therefore having limited ability to reschedule surveys compromised by weather. Furthermore, electromagnetic GPR surveys are especially sensitive to variations in water content, soil type, and site-specific interference. In this work, GPR scans of a partially excavated Roman villa consisting of different construction materials and phases (limestone, andesite, brick) in central Romania are compared. Surveys were conducted with a 500 MHz GPR antenna in both dry (pre-rain event) and wet (post-rain event) conditions. Especially in time or depth slices, wet surveys present additional archaeological features that are not present or clear in the standard dry conditions, while simultaneously masking the clutter present in those scans. When dry, the limestone has a similar dielectric constant to the soil and does not provide enough contrast in electromagnetic properties for strong reflections despite the significant difference in their physical properties. Following precipitation, however, the electromagnetic properties of these two materials is dominated by their respective water content and the contrast is enhanced. For this reason, the wet surveys are particularly necessary for revealing reflections from the limestone features often invisible in dry surveys. GPR surveys conducted in variable environmental conditions provide unique archaeological information, with potential near-surface geophysical applications in nondestructive material characterization and identification.

  17. Quantifying the Interactions Between Soil Thermal Characteristics, Soil Physical Properties, Hydro-geomorphological Conditions and Vegetation Distribution in an Arctic Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Leger, E.; Robert, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Peterson, J. E.; Soom, F.; Biraud, S.; Tran, A. P.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Improving understanding of Arctic ecosystem functioning and parameterization of process-rich hydro-biogeochemical models require advances in quantifying ecosystem properties, from the bedrock to the top of the canopy. In Arctic regions having significant subsurface heterogeneity, understanding the link between soil physical properties (incl. fraction of soil constituents, bedrock depth, permafrost characteristics), thermal behavior, hydrological conditions and landscape properties is particularly challenging yet is critical for predicting the storage and flux of carbon in a changing climate. This study takes place in Seward Peninsula Watersheds near Nome AK and Council AK, which are characterized by an elevation gradient, shallow bedrock, and discontinuous permafrost. To characterize permafrost distribution where the top of permafrost cannot be easily identified with a tile probe (due to rocky soil and/or large thaw layer thickness), we developed a novel technique using vertically resolved thermistor probes to directly sense the temperature regime at multiple depths and locations. These measurements complement electrical imaging, seismic refraction and point-scale data for identification of the various thermal behavior and soil characteristics. Also, we evaluate linkages between the soil physical-thermal properties and the surface properties (hydrological conditions, geomorphic characteristics and vegetation distribution) using UAV-based aerial imaging. Data integration and analysis is supported by numerical approaches that simulate hydrological and thermal processes. Overall, this study enables the identification of watershed structure and the links between various subsurface and landscape properties in representative Arctic watersheds. Results show very distinct trends in vertically resolved soil temperature profiles and strong lateral variations over tens of meters that are linked to zones with various hydrological conditions, soil properties and vegetation

  18. Spatial Scaling Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Estimations Using Remotely Sensed Data for Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Esfahani, L.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne and Landsat remote sensing are promising technologies for measuring the response of agricultural crops to variations in several agricultural inputs and environmental conditions. Of particular significance to precision agriculture is surface soil moisture, a key component of the soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface and affects vegetation health. Its estimation using the spectral reflectance of agricultural fields could be of value to agricultural management decisions. While top soil moisture can be estimated using radiometric information from aircraft or satellites and data mining techniques, comparison of results from two different aerial platforms might be complicated because of the differences in spatial scales (high resolution of approximately 0.15m versus coarser resolutions of 30m). This paper presents a combined modeling and scale-based approach to evaluate the impact of spatial scaling in the estimation of surface soil moisture content derived from remote sensing data. Data from Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI and AggieAirTM aerial imagery are utilized. AggieAirTM is an airborne remote sensing platform developed by Utah State University that includes an autonomous Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) which captures radiometric information at visual, near-infrared, and thermal wavebands at spatial resolutions of 0.15 m or smaller for the optical cameras and about 0.6 m or smaller for the thermal infrared camera. Top soil moisture maps for AggieAir and Landsat are developed and statistically compared at different scales to determine the impact in terms of quantitative predictive capability and feasibility of applicability of results in improving in field management.

  19. Continuous measurements of soil radon under regular field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, LL

    1999-01-01

    Continuous soil radon measurements were performed in the frame of an European Community-radon network using the Clipperton II detector. It has been found that in some periods, soil radon levels obtained with one Clipperton II probe are very different from those obtained with another probe placed at the same depth but a short distance apart. It has been also found that the response of the probes to a sudden change of radon concentration is controlled by the diffusion process along the bottom tube of the probe. Therefore, this study shows that the experimental data can be attributed to the natural behaviour of soil radon

  20. Effects of soil surface roughness on interrill erosion processes and sediment particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenfeng; Huang, Chihua

    2017-10-01

    Soil surface roughness significantly impacts runoff and erosion under rainfall. Few previous studies on runoff generation focused on the effects of soil surface roughness on the sediment particle size distribution (PSD), which greatly affects interrill erosion and sedimentation processes. To address this issue, a rainfall-simulation experiment was conducted with treatments that included two different initial soil surface roughnesses and two rainfall intensities. Soil surface roughness was determined by using photogrammetric method. For each simulated event, runoff and sediment samples were collected at different experimental times. The effective (undispersed) PSD of each sediment sample and the ultimate (after dispersion) PSD were used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment movement. The results show that soil surface roughness significantly delayed runoff initiation, but had no significant effect on the steady runoff rate. However, a significant difference in the soil loss rate was observed between the smooth and rough soil surfaces. Sediments from smooth soil surfaces were more depleted in clay-size particles, but more enriched in sand-size particles than those from rough soil surfaces, suggesting that erosion was less selective on smooth than on rough soil surfaces. The ratio of different sizes of transported sediment to the soil matrix indicates that most of the clay was eroded in the form of aggregates, silt-size particles were transported mainly as primary particles, and sand-size particles were predominantly aggregates of finer particles. Soil surface roughness has a crucial effect on the sediment size distribution and erosion processes. Significant differences of the enrichment ratios for the effective PSD and the ultimate PSD were observed under the two soil surface roughness treatments. These findings demonstrate that we should consider each particle size separately rather than use only the total sediment discharge in

  1. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.

    1978-09-01

    This study of the potential links between soil freezing and wind erosion was conducted at Rocky Flats during 4 winters. Most of the study has involved the conditions leading to the growth of segregation ice in the surface soil and the ground heave which that produces. This occurs about 15 times in the average winter at Rocky Flats, always on a diurnal cycle. Such frost action is preferentially distributed in time and space and cannot be estimated from air temperatures alone. November and March are the months of most frequent frost heave, and then only in the days following precipitation or snowmelt. The most marked frost effects are found on exposed interfluve and hillcrest situations, where there are patches of bare soil. Almost no effects are found on the valley floors. Soil disturbance by segregation ice leads to a marked decrease in soil bulk density, and presumably in soil strength though this change has not been quantitatively defined. However, this does not lead to wind erosion of the soil at the study site because that surface is more influenced by the vegetation cover than by the soil characteristics.

  2. Mobility of spiromesifen in packed soil columns under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Ch Jamkhokai; Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar

    2014-11-01

    On percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall, spiromesifen formulation did not leach out of 25-cm long columns, and 62.7 % of this was recovered in 5-10-cm soil depth. In columns treated with the analytical grade, 52.40 % of the recovered spiromesifen was confined to 0-5-cm soil depth, with 0.04 % in leachate fraction, suggesting high adsorption in soil. Results revealed that percolating 400 mL of water, residues of enol metabolite of spiromesifen was detected up to 20-25-cm soil layer, with 23.50 % residues of spiromesifen in this layer and 1.73 % in the leachate fraction indicating that metabolite is more mobile as compared to the parent compound. Results suggested a significant reduction in leaching losses of enol metabolite in amended soil columns with 5 % nano clay, farmyard manure (FYM), and vermicompost. No enol spiromesifen was recovered in the leachate in columns amended with nano clay, vermicompost, and FYM; however, 85.30, 70.5, and 65.40 %, respectively, was recovered from 0-5 cm-soil depth of column after percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall. Spiromesifen formulation is less mobile in sandy loam soil than analytical grade spiromesifen. The metabolite, enol spiromesifen, is relatively more mobile than the parent compound and may leach into groundwater. The study suggested that amendments were very effective in reducing the downward mobility of enol metabolite in soil column. Further, it resulted in greater retention of enol metabolite in the amendment application zone.

  3. Characterization Investigation Study: Volume 3, Radiological survey of surface soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solow, A.J.; Phoenix, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Feed Materials Production Center was constructed to produce high purity uranium metal for use at various Department of Energy facilities. The waste products from these operations include general uncontaminated scrap and refuse, contaminated and uncontaminated metal scrap, waste oils, low-level radioactive waste, co-contaminated wastes, mixed waste, toxic waste, sludges from water treatment, and fly ash from the steam plant. This material is estimated to total more than 350,000 cubic meters. Other wastes stored in this area include laboratory chemicals and other combustible materials in the burn pit; fine waste stream sediments in the clear well; fly ash and waste oils in the two fly ash areas; lime-alum sludges and boiler plant blowdown in the lime sludge ponds; and nonradioactive sanitary waste, construction rubble, and asbestos in the sanitary landfill. A systematic survey of the surface soils throughout the Waste Storage Area, associated on-site drainages, and the fly ash piles was conducted using a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-Energy Radiation (FIDLER). Uranium is the most prevalent radioactive element in surface soil; U-238 is the principal radionuclide, ranging from 2.2 to 1790 pCi/g in the general Waste Storage Area. The maximum values for the next highest activity concentrations in the same area were 972 pCi/g for Th-230 and 298 pCi/g for U-234. Elevated activity concentrations of Th-230 were found along the K-65 slurry line, the maximum at 3010 pCi/g. U-238 had the highest value of 761 pCi/g in the drainage just south of pit no. 5. The upper fly ash area had the highest radionuclide activity concentrations in the surface soils with the maximum values for U-238 at 8600 pCi/g, U-235 at 2190 pCi/g, U-234 at 11,400 pCi/g, Tc-99 at 594 pCi/g, Ra-226 at 279 pCi/g, and Th-230 at 164 pCi/g.

  4. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Effective Specific Soil Surface Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, A. V.; Bashina, A. S.; Klyueva, V. V.; Kubareva, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    A new method of assessing the effective specific surface area based on the successive thermal desorption of water vapor at different temperature stages of sample drying is analyzed in comparison with the conventional static adsorption method using a representative set of soil samples of different genesis and degree of dispersion. The theory of the method uses the fundamental relationship between the thermodynamic water potential (Ψ) and the absolute temperature of drying ( T): Ψ = Q - aT, where Q is the specific heat of vaporization, and a is the physically based parameter related to the initial temperature and relative humidity of the air in the external thermodynamic reservoir (laboratory). From gravimetric data on the mass fraction of water ( W) and the Ψ value, Polyanyi potential curves ( W(Ψ)) for the studied samples are plotted. Water sorption isotherms are then calculated, from which the capacity of monolayer and the target effective specific surface area are determined using the BET theory. Comparative analysis shows that the new method well agrees with the conventional estimation of the degree of dispersion by the BET and Kutilek methods in a wide range of specific surface area values between 10 and 250 m2/g.

  5. Integration of multi-sensor data to measure soil surface changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltner, Anette; Schneider, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation models (DEM) of high resolution and accuracy covering a suitable sized area of interest can be a promising approach to help understanding the processes of soil erosion. Thereby, the plot under investigation should remain undisturbed. The fragile marl landscape in Andalusia (Spain) is especially prone to soil detachment and transport with unique sediment connectivity characteristics due to the soil properties and climatic conditions. A 600 m² field plot is established and monitored during three field campaigns (Sep. 2013, Nov. 2013 and Feb. 2014). Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are suitable tools to generate high resolution topography data that describe soil surface changes at large field plots. Thereby, the advantages of both methods are utilised in a synergetic manner. On the one hand, TLS data is assumed to comprise a higher reliability regarding consistent error behaviour than DEMs derived from overlapping UAV images. Therefore, global errors (e.g. dome effect) and local errors (e.g. DEM blunders due to erroneous image matching) within the UAV data are assessed with the DEMs produced by TLS. Furthermore, TLS point clouds allow for fast and reliable filtering of vegetation spots, which is not as straightforward within the UAV data due to known image matching problems in areas displaying plant cover. On the other hand, systematic DEM errors linked to TLS are detected and possibly corrected utilising the DEMs reconstructed from overlapping UAV images. Furthermore, TLS point clouds are filtered corresponding to the degree of point quality, which is estimated from parameters of the scan geometry (i.e. incidence angle and footprint size). This is especially relevant for this study because the area of interest is located at gentle hillslopes that are prone to soil erosion. Thus, the view of the scanning device onto the surface results in an adverse angle, which is solely slightly improved by the

  6. Soil microbial diversity, site conditions, shelter forest land, saline water drip-irrigation, drift desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhengzhong; Lei, Jiaqiang; Li, Shengyu; Xu, Xinwen

    2013-10-01

    Soil microbes in forest land are crucial to soil development in extreme areas. In this study, methods of conventional culture, PLFA and PCR-DGGE were utilized to analyze soil microbial quantity, fatty acids and microbial DNA segments of soils subjected to different site conditions in the Tarim Desert Highway forest land. The main results were as follows: the soil microbial amount, diversity indexes of fatty acid and DNA segment differed significantly among sites with different conditions (F 84%), followed by actinomycetes and then fungi (Desert Highway shelter-forest promoted soil biological development; however, for enhancing sand control efficiency and promoting sand development, we should consider the effects of site condition in the construction and regeneration of shelter-forest ecological projects. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    system, soil moisture has a long memory (Pielke et al 1999; Wu et al 2002). The climatic anom- alies persist because the memory of soil moisture .... The colour of the soil at the experimental site varies from dark brown to dark reddish brown as we go to the deeper layers. Correspondingly the soil texture varies from grav-.

  8. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Ploughing in good soil moisture conditions in soil structure protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Dell'Abate

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out within the framework on the EFFICOND Project, focused at evaluating the effectiveness of the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs established for Cross Compliance implementation under EC Regulation 1782/2003. In particular the standard 3.1b deals with soil structure protection through appropriate machinery use, with particular reference to ploughing in good soil moisture conditions. The study deals with the evaluation of soil structure after tillage in tilth and no-tilth conditions at soil moisture contents other than the optimum water content for tillage. The Mean Weight Diameter (MWD of water stable aggregates was used as an indicator of tillage effectiveness. The study was carried out in the period 2008-2009 at six experimental farms belonging to Research Centres and Units of the Italian Agricultural Research Council (CRA with different pedo-climatic and cropping conditions. Farm management and data collection in the different sites were carried out by the local CRA researchers and technicians. The comparison of MWD values in tilth and no tilth theses showed statistically significant differences in most cases, depending on topsoil texture. On clay, clay loam, silty clay, and silty clay loam topsoils a general and significant increase of MWD values under no tilth conditions were observed. No significant differences were observed in silt loam and sandy loam textures, probably due to the weak soil structure of the topsoils. Moreover, ploughing in good soil moisture condition determined higher crop production and less weed development than ploughing in high soil moisture conditions.

  9. Control of surface composition and hydrogen recycling by plasma conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.

    1984-01-01

    Data from a laboratory simulator, TEXTOR, JET, and other tokamaks are used to show that oxygen and carbon surface impurities on the walls of plasma chambers are interrelated and can be manipulated by controlling the composition of the gas used for plasma surface conditioning. Not only can oxygen be reduced to low levels, but carbon (and other elements) can be either removed or deposited and reacted with the substrate. In the case of carbon deposits, a thin metal-carbide layer can be formed or thicker deposits of elemental carbon can be made. Surface compositions can be reproduced easily and reversibly in a controlled way. Furthermore, these composition changes can alter the hydrogen recycling speed and plasma impurity levels by an order of magnitude or more. In the simulator we have related gas composition to surface composition changes and resulting recycling behavior. Surface oxygen levels can be reduced from 30 to less than 3 at.% in less than 45 min of discharge cleaning. Carbon and oxygen levels as well as those of other surface active impurities are interrelated. Examples are shown and discussed. Comparisons are made to show the changes in the hydrogen recycling behavior caused by various surface preparations (compositions). (orig.)

  10. Relating coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) incidence to soil moisture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E J; Bell, J E; Benedict, K; Shriber, J; McCotter, O; Cosh, M H

    2017-04-17

    Coccidioidomycosis (also called Valley fever) is caused by a soilborne fungus, Coccidioides spp. , in arid regions of the southwestern United States. Though some who develop infections from this fungus remain asymptomatic, others develop respiratory disease as a consequence. Less commonly, severe illness and death can occur when the infection spreads to other regions of the body. Previous analyses have attempted to connect the incidence of coccidioidomycosis to broadly available climatic measurements, such as precipitation or temperature. However, with the limited availability of long-term, in situ soil moisture data sets, it has not been feasible to perform a direct analysis of the relationships between soil moisture levels and coccidioidomycosis incidence on a larger temporal and spatial scale. Utilizing in situ soil moisture gauges throughout the southwest from the U.S. Climate Reference Network and a model with which to extend those estimates, this work connects periods of higher and lower soil moisture in Arizona and California between 2002 and 2014 to the reported incidence of coccidioidomycosis. The results indicate that in both states, coccidioidomycosis incidence is related to soil moisture levels from previous summers and falls. Stated differently, a higher number of coccidioidomycosis cases are likely to be reported if previous bands of months have been atypically wet or dry, depending on the location.

  11. An analytical model of evaporation efficiency for unsaturated soil surfaces with an arbitrary thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Olivier; Al Bitar, Ahmad; Rivalland, Vincent; Béziat, Pierre; Ceschia, Eric; Dedieu, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    doi: 10.1175/2010JAMC2418.1; Analytical expressions of evaporative efficiency over bare soil (defined as the ratio of actual to potential soil evaporation) have been limited to soil layers with a fixed depth and/or to specific atmospheric conditions. To fill the gap, a new analytical model is developed for arbitrary soil thicknesses and varying boundary layer conditions. The soil evaporative efficiency is written [0.5 – 0.5 cos(πθL/ θmax)]^P with θL being the water content in the soil layer o...

  12. Soil Organic Matter Quality in Jatropha spp. Plantations in Different Edaphoclimatic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Alves de Freitas

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The substitution of native vegetation by agricultural ecosystems can change the quantity and quality of soil organic matter (SOM, and the intensity of these changes depends on the soil type, climate, and land use. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of organic matter in chronosequences of Jatropha cultivation in contrasting soil and climatic conditions. Soil samples were evaluated at depths of 0.00-0.10, 0.20-0.30, and 0.80-1.00 m in chronosequences located in Planaltina, Distrito Federal (Cerrado-Pasture-Jatropha, Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul (Atlantic Forest-Corn-Jatropha, and Araripina, Pernambuco (Caatinga-Jatropha. To assess SOM quality, we determined C contents in the SOM fractions, C stocks, the carbon management index (CMI, the SOM humification index (HLIF, and the C and N concentrations in the microbial biomass. The conversion of native vegetation to agropastoral systems changed the composition of SOM in the biomes evaluated, especially in the surface layers. The CMI and the C and N contents in the microbial biomass were the most responsive to land use changes in all the biomes studied. The pasture improved SOM quality by increasing the CMI (116 and the C content by 8, 21, and 6 % in the organic, mineral, and organomineral fractions, respectively, while maintaining the SOM humification index and the C and N contents in the microbial biomass in the 0-0.10 m layer. The lowest values of C in the SOM fractions, the CMI (52, and C microbial biomass (136 mg kg-1 were observed for annual crops. Jatropha cultivation increased C contents in the SOM fractions, C stocks, the CMI, and C and N in the microbial biomass with an increase in cultivation time, which demonstrates the potential of this long-term system for improving SOM quality.

  13. Degradation of sustainable mulch materials in two types of soil under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime; González, Sara; Moreno, Carmen; Aceituno, Patricia; Campos, Juan; Meco, Ramón; María Moreno, Marta

    2017-04-01

    Mulching is a technique used in cultivation worldwide, especially for vegetable crops, for reducing weed growth, minimising or eliminating soil erosion, and often for enhancing total yields. Manufactured plastic films, mainly polyethylene (PE), have been widely used for this purpose due to their excellent mechanical properties, light weight and relatively low prices in recent years. However, the use of PE is associated with serious environmental problems related to its petrochemical origin and its long shelf-life, which causes a waste problem in our crop fields. For this reason, the use of biodegradable mulch materials (biopolymers and papers) as alternative to PE is increasing nowadays, especially in organic farming. However, these materials can suffer an undesirable early degradation (and therefore not fulfilling their function successfully), greatly resulting from the type of soil. For this reason, this study aimed to analyse the degradation pattern of different mulch materials buried in two types of soils, clay and sand, under laboratory conditions (25°C, dark surroundings, constant humidity). The mulch materials used were: 1) black polyethylene (15 µm); black biopolymers (15 µm): 2) maize starch-based, 3) potato starch-based, 4) polylactic acid-based, 5) black paper, 85 g/m2. Periodically (every 15-20 days), the weight and surface loss of the different materials were recorded. The results indicate that mulch degradation was earlier and higher in the clay soil, especially in the paper and in the potato starch-based materials, followed by the maize starch-based mulch, while polylactic acid-based suffered the least and the latest degradation. Keywords: mulch, biodegradable, biopolymer, paper, degradation. Acknowledgements: the research was funded by Project RTA2011-00104-C04-03 from the INIA (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  14. Neural Network-Based Retrieval of Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture using Multi-Frequency Remotely-Sensed Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Alemohammad, Seyed; Kolassa, Jana; Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of root zone soil moisture is essential in studying plant's response to different stress conditions since plant photosynthetic activity and transpiration rate are constrained by the water available through their roots. Current global root zone soil moisture estimates are based on either outputs from physical models constrained by observations, or assimilation of remotely-sensed microwave-based surface soil moisture estimates with physical model outputs. However, quality of these estimates are limited by the accuracy of the model representations of physical processes (such as radiative transfer, infiltration, percolation, and evapotranspiration) as well as errors in the estimates of the surface parameters. Additionally, statistical approaches provide an alternative efficient platform to develop root zone soil moisture retrieval algorithms from remotely-sensed observations. In this study, we present a new neural network based retrieval algorithm to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture from passive microwave observations of SMAP satellite (L-band) and AMSR2 instrument (X-band). SMAP early morning observations are ideal for surface soil moisture retrieval. AMSR2 mid-night observations are used here as an indicator of plant hydraulic properties that are related to root zone soil moisture. The combined observations from SMAP and AMSR2 together with other ancillary observations including the Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) estimates from GOME-2 instrument provide necessary information to estimate surface and root zone soil moisture. The algorithm is applied to observations from the first 18 months of SMAP mission and retrievals are validated against in-situ observations and other global datasets.

  15. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  16. Environmental conditioning on uranium surface distribution in the tropical region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Heitor Evangelista da; Licinio, Marcus V.S.; Miranda, Marcio R.

    2001-01-01

    Based on a high resolution aerogammaspectrometer survey over the State of Rio de Janeiro, it is presented an associative study of equivalent uranium concentration and environmental parameters. The aspects considered in this study included geological domains like Sandys, Gnaisses, Granites, Xists; soils domains like Organic and Alluvial ones, Litolic, Glei, Podzolic, Red-yellow, Latossolo, Planossolo, Red bruizem, Cambissolo, Hidromorphic Podzol, Yellow latossolo; geomorphology (Coast Plains and River Accumulation Land, Coast Tabulators, Pomba-Muriae Rivers Spread Depression, Northern Mantiqueira, main Hills and Coastal Rock Massifs, Steep slopes and Reverses of Serra do Mar Mountain Range ,Serra dos Orgaos Mountain Range and Bocaina Tablelands), Paraiba do Sul Crests Alignment, Medium Paraiba do Sul Depression); influence of mean annual rain intensity and hydrographical categories were also evaluated. Geoprocessing of each environmental data base at the same cartographical base of uranium surface distribution was the basic methodology employed. (author)

  17. Effect of meteorology and soil condition on metolachlor and atrazine volatilization over a 10 year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatilization of pesticides can detrimentally affect the environment by contaminating soil and surface waters far away from where the pesticides were applied. A 10-year study was conducted to focus on the impact of soil and climatic factors governing herbicide volatilization from an agricultural f...

  18. Persistent organic pollutants in the Tibetan surface soil: Spatial distribution, air–soil exchange and implications for global cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoping; Sheng Jiujiang; Gong Ping; Xue Yonggang; Yao Tandong; Jones, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the soils of the Tibetan Plateau. This paper presents data from a survey of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in 40 background surface (0–5 cm) soils of the Tibetan Plateau. Soil concentrations (pg/g, dw) ranged as follows: DDTs, 13-7700; HCHs, 64-847; HCB, 24-564; sum of 15 PCBs, 75-1021; and sum of 9 PBDEs, below detection limit −27. Soil DDT, HCB, PCB and PBDE concentrations were strongly influenced by soil organic carbon content. HCH concentrations were clearly associated with the proximity to source regions in south Asia. The air–soil equilibrium status of POPs suggested the Tibetan soils may be partial “secondary sources” of HCB, low molecular weight PCBs and HCHs and will likely continue to be “sinks” for the less volatile DDE and DDT. - Highlights: ► Soil organic carbon content influence the spatial distribution of persistent organic pollutants. ► The Tibetan soil acts as “secondary sources” for HCB, low molecular weight PCBs and HCHs. ► The Tibetan soil will continue to be “sinks” for DDE and DDT. - Tibetan soils may be potential “secondary sources” of the HCB, low molecular weight PCBs and HCHs that are observed in air.

  19. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  20. Spatial downscaling of SMAP soil moisture using MODIS land surface temperature and NDVI during SMAPVEX15

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission provides global surface soil moisture product at 36 km resolution from its L-band radiometer. While the coarse resolution is satisfactory to many applications there are also a lot of applications which would benefit from a higher resolution soil moistu...

  1. Effects of surface soil loss in South Eastern Nigeria: I. crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The widespread incidence of soil erosion in the tropics has been identified, though few studies have dealt with specific problems of decline in crop productivity associated with soil loss. An understanding of the influence of surface soil loss on crop yield is necessary in order to find out their effects on performance of crops.

  2. Sagebrush wildfire effects on surface soil nutrient availability: A temporal and spatial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildfires occurring in Artemisia (sagebrush) ecosystems can temporarily increase soil nutrient availability in surface soil. Less is known, however, on how soil nutrient availability changes over time and microsite location post-wildfire. In Oct., 2013 a wildfire approximately 30 km north of Reno, N...

  3. Statistical Analysis of Nitrogen in the Soil of Constructed Wetland with Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubaszek Anita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The removal of nitrogen compounds in constructed wetlands depends on various physical, chemical and biomechanical factors as well as on conditions of the environment. The paper presents the results of a statistical analysis of the depositing of nitrogen at HSSF (horizontal subsurface flow construcred wetland. The results of the substrate showed that the highest contents of nitrogen existed in the surface soil layer up to 20 cm of the depth. Nitrogen accumulation decreased in the deposit with depth, and in the direction of the wastewater flow.

  4. Mapping soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions: comparison of two thermal inertia approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2013-01-01

    A critical analysis of a thermal inertia approach to map surface soil water content on bare and sparsely vegetated soils by means of remotely sensed data is reported. The study area is an experimental field located in Barrax, Spain. In situ data were acquired within the Barrax 2011 research project. An advanced hyperspectral scanner airborne imager provides images in the visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bands. Images were acquired both in day and night times by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial between 12th and 13th of June 2011. The scene covers a corn irrigation pivot surrounded by bare soil, where a set of in situ data have been collected both previously and simultaneously to overpasses. To validate remotely sensed estimations, an ad hoc dataset has been produced by measuring spectra, radiometric temperatures, surface soil water content, and soil thermal properties. These data were collected on two transects covering bare and sparsely vegetated soils. This ground dataset was used (1) to verify if a thermal inertia method can be applied to map the water content on soil covered by sparse vegetation and (2) to quantify a correction factor accounting for solar radiation reduction due to sky cloudiness. The experiment intended to test a spatially constant and a spatially distributed approach to estimate the phase difference. Both methods were then applied to the airborne images collected during the following days to obtain the spatial distribution of surface soil water content. Results confirm that the thermal inertia method can be applied to sparsely vegetated soil characterized by low fractional cover if the solar radiation reaching the ground is accurately estimated. A spatially constant value of the phase difference allows a good assessment of thermal inertia, whereas the comparison with the three-temperature approach did not give conclusive responses. Results also show that clear sky, only at the time of the acquisition, does not provide

  5. Evidence of weak land-atmosphere coupling under varying bare soil conditions: Are fully coupled Darcy/Navier-Stokes models necessary for simulating soil moisture dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Trautz, A. C.; Howington, S. E.; Cihan, A.

    2017-12-01

    It is a well-established fact that the land and atmosphere form a continuum in which the individual domains are coupled by heat and mass transfer processes such as bare-soil evaporation. Soil moisture dynamics can be simulated at the representative elementary volume (REV) scale using decoupled and fully coupled Darcy/Navier-Stokes models. Decoupled modeling is an asynchronous approach in which flow and transport in the soil and atmosphere is simulated independently; the two domains are coupled out of time-step via prescribed flux parameterizations. Fully coupled modeling in contrast, solves the governing equations for flow and transport in both domains simultaneously with the use of coupling interface boundary conditions. This latter approach, while being able to provide real-time two-dimensional feedbacks, is considerably more complex and computationally intensive. In this study, we investigate whether fully coupled models are necessary, or if the simpler decoupled models can sufficiently capture soil moisture dynamics under varying land preparations. A series of intermediate-scale physical and numerical experiments were conducted in which soil moisture distributions and evaporation estimates were monitored at high spatiotemporal resolutions for different heterogeneous packing and soil roughness scenarios. All experimentation was conducted at the newly developed Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) wind tunnel-porous media user test-facility at the Colorado School of. Near-surface atmospheric measurements made during the experiments demonstrate that the land-atmosphere coupling was relatively weak and insensitive to the applied edaphic and surface conditions. Simulations with a decoupled multiphase heat and mass transfer model similarly show little sensitivity to local variations in atmospheric forcing; a single, simple flux parameterization can sufficiently capture the soil moisture dynamics (evaporation and redistribution

  6. Using Remote Sensing Platforms to Estimate Near-Surface Soil Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Rickman, D.; Mask, P. L.; Wersinger, J. M.; Luvall, J.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of near-surface soil properties via remote sensing (RS) could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction, fertilization regimes, and allocation of agrochemicals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and near surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil water content, soil organic carbon (SOC), particle size distribution (PSD), and citrate dithionite extractable iron (Fed) content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured at sampling. Results showed RS data acquired from lands with less than 4 % surface soil water content best approximated near-surface soil properties at the Coastal Plain site where loamy sand textured surfaces were predominant. Utilizing a combination of band ratios in stepwise regression, Fed (r2 = 0.61), SOC (r2 = 0.36), sand (r2 = 0.52), and clay (r2 = 0.76) were related to RS data at the Coastal Plain site. In contrast, the more clayey Ridge and Valley soils had r-squares of 0.50, 0.36, 0.17, and 0.57. for Fed, SOC, sand and clay, respectively. Use of estimated eEmissivity did not generally improve estimates of near-surface soil attributes.

  7. Downscaling of Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval by Combining MODIS/Landsat and In Situ Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyang Xu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture, especially surface soil moisture (SSM, plays an important role in the development of various natural hazards that result from extreme weather events such as drought, flooding, and landslides. There have been many remote sensing methods for soil moisture retrieval based on microwave or optical thermal infrared (TIR measurements. TIR remote sensing has been popular for SSM retrieval due to its fine spatial and temporal resolutions. However, because of limitations in the penetration of optical TIR radiation and cloud cover, TIR methods can only be used under clear sky conditions. Microwave SSM retrieval is based on solid physical principles, and has advantages in cases of cloud cover, but it has low spatial resolution. For applications at the local scale, SSM data at high spatial and temporal resolutions are important, especially for agricultural management and decision support systems. Current remote sensing measurements usually have either a high spatial resolution or a high temporal resolution, but not both. This study aims to retrieve SSM at both high spatial and temporal resolutions through the fusion of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Land Remote Sensing Satellite (Landsat data. Based on the universal triangle trapezoid, this study investigated the relationship between land surface temperature (LST and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI under different soil moisture conditions to construct an improved nonlinear model for SSM retrieval with LST and NDVI. A case study was conducted in Iowa, in the United States (USA (Lat: 42.2°~42.7°, Lon: −93.6°~−93.2°, from 1 May 2016 to 31 August 2016. Daily SSM in an agricultural area during the crop-growing season was downscaled to 120-m spatial resolution by fusing Landsat 8 with MODIS, with an R2 of 0.5766, and RMSE from 0.0302 to 0.1124 m3/m3.

  8. Influence of soil properties and climatic conditions on 137Cs vertical distribution in some Chilean soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, P.; Ellies, A.

    1996-01-01

    Long-term downward distribution of global fallout 137 Cs was studied in different soil types of four Chilean climatic zones, in natural and semi-natural environments. The 137 Cs soil content showed an exponential decrease with depth; relaxation depth ranged from 0.9 cm in the polar climate environment up to 6.8 cm in the mesothermal warm summer one. In the Antarctic and Westpatagonic ecosystems the long freezing periods hindered the 137 Cs downward movement. In temperate and tropical climate zones, the amount of soil coarse pore volume, and annual rainfall rates appear to be the main factors influencing the radionuclide's distribution in the soil profiles. (author)

  9. The use of physicochemical methods to detect organic food soils on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, K A; Benson, P; Smith, L A; Verran, J

    2009-11-01

    Food processing surfaces fouled with organic material pose problems ranging from aesthetic appearance, equipment malfunction and product contamination. Despite the importance of organic soiling for subsequent product quality, little is known about the interaction between surfaces and organic soil components. A range of complex and defined food soils was applied to 304 stainless steel (SS) surfaces to determine the effect of type and concentration of soil on surface physicochemical parameters, viz surface hydrophobicity (DeltaG(iwi)), surface free energy (gamma(s)), Lifshitz van der Waals (gamma_LW(s)), Lewis acid base (gamma_AB(s)), electron acceptor (gamma_+(s) ) and electron donor (gamma_-(s) ) measurements. When compared to the control surface, changes in gamma_AB(s), gamma_+(s) and gamma_-(s) were indicative of surface soiling. However, soil composition and surface coverage were heterogeneous, resulting in complex data being generated from which trends could not be discerned. These results demonstrate that the retention of food soil produces changes in the physicochemical parameters of the surface that could be used to indicate the hygienic status of a surface.

  10. (AJST) AN ASSESSMENT OF THE SOIL-CONDITIONING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structure. Soil structure refers to the size, shape and arrangement of the aggregates formed when primary particles are clustered together into larger separable units, called 'peds'. .... differences in structural characteristics; the samples were all collected from the .... cylindrical glass column, having a diameter of 3.2 cm and.

  11. Bioremediation of endosulfan contaminated soil and water-Optimization of operating conditions in laboratory scale reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mathava [Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Division, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Philip, Ligy [Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Division, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)]. E-mail: ligy@iitm.ac.in

    2006-08-21

    A mixed bacterial culture consisted of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus circulans-I and -II has been enriched from contaminated soil collected from the vicinity of an endosulfan processing industry. The degradation of endosulfan by mixed bacterial culture was studied in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions via batch experiments with an initial endosulfan concentration of 50 mg/L. After 3 weeks of incubation, mixed bacterial culture was able to degrade 71.58 {+-} 0.2% and 75.88 {+-} 0.2% of endosulfan in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions, respectively. The addition of external carbon (dextrose) increased the endosulfan degradation in both the conditions. The optimal dextrose concentration and inoculum size was estimated as 1 g/L and 75 mg/L, respectively. The pH of the system has significant effect on endosulfan degradation. The degradation of alpha endosulfan was more compared to beta endosulfan in all the experiments. Endosulfan biodegradation in soil was evaluated by miniature and bench scale soil reactors. The soils used for the biodegradation experiments were identified as clayey soil (CL, lean clay with sand), red soil (GM, silty gravel with sand), sandy soil (SM, silty sand with gravel) and composted soil (PT, peat) as per ASTM (American society for testing and materials) standards. Endosulfan degradation efficiency in miniature soil reactors were in the order of sandy soil followed by red soil, composted soil and clayey soil in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In bench scale soil reactors, endosulfan degradation was observed more in the bottom layers. After 4 weeks, maximum endosulfan degradation efficiency of 95.48 {+-} 0.17% was observed in red soil reactor where as in composted soil-I (moisture 38 {+-} 1%) and composted soil-II (moisture 45 {+-} 1%) it was 96.03 {+-} 0.23% and 94.84 {+-} 0.19%, respectively. The high moisture content in compost soil reactor-II increased the endosulfan concentration in the leachate. Known intermediate

  12. Bioremediation of endosulfan contaminated soil and water -- optimization of operating conditions in laboratory scale reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mathava; Philip, Ligy

    2006-08-21

    A mixed bacterial culture consisted of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus circulans-I and -II has been enriched from contaminated soil collected from the vicinity of an endosulfan processing industry. The degradation of endosulfan by mixed bacterial culture was studied in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions via batch experiments with an initial endosulfan concentration of 50mg/L. After 3 weeks of incubation, mixed bacterial culture was able to degrade 71.58+/-0.2% and 75.88+/-0.2% of endosulfan in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions, respectively. The addition of external carbon (dextrose) increased the endosulfan degradation in both the conditions. The optimal dextrose concentration and inoculum size was estimated as 1g/L and 75mg/L, respectively. The pH of the system has significant effect on endosulfan degradation. The degradation of alpha endosulfan was more compared to beta endosulfan in all the experiments. Endosulfan biodegradation in soil was evaluated by miniature and bench scale soil reactors. The soils used for the biodegradation experiments were identified as clayey soil (CL, lean clay with sand), red soil (GM, silty gravel with sand), sandy soil (SM, silty sand with gravel) and composted soil (PT, peat) as per ASTM (American society for testing and materials) standards. Endosulfan degradation efficiency in miniature soil reactors were in the order of sandy soil followed by red soil, composted soil and clayey soil in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In bench scale soil reactors, endosulfan degradation was observed more in the bottom layers. After 4 weeks, maximum endosulfan degradation efficiency of 95.48+/-0.17% was observed in red soil reactor where as in composted soil-I (moisture 38+/-1%) and composted soil-II (moisture 45+/-1%) it was 96.03+/-0.23% and 94.84+/-0.19%, respectively. The high moisture content in compost soil reactor-II increased the endosulfan concentration in the leachate. Known intermediate metabolites of

  13. Bioremediation of endosulfan contaminated soil and water-Optimization of operating conditions in laboratory scale reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Mathava; Philip, Ligy

    2006-01-01

    A mixed bacterial culture consisted of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus circulans-I and -II has been enriched from contaminated soil collected from the vicinity of an endosulfan processing industry. The degradation of endosulfan by mixed bacterial culture was studied in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions via batch experiments with an initial endosulfan concentration of 50 mg/L. After 3 weeks of incubation, mixed bacterial culture was able to degrade 71.58 ± 0.2% and 75.88 ± 0.2% of endosulfan in aerobic and facultative anaerobic conditions, respectively. The addition of external carbon (dextrose) increased the endosulfan degradation in both the conditions. The optimal dextrose concentration and inoculum size was estimated as 1 g/L and 75 mg/L, respectively. The pH of the system has significant effect on endosulfan degradation. The degradation of alpha endosulfan was more compared to beta endosulfan in all the experiments. Endosulfan biodegradation in soil was evaluated by miniature and bench scale soil reactors. The soils used for the biodegradation experiments were identified as clayey soil (CL, lean clay with sand), red soil (GM, silty gravel with sand), sandy soil (SM, silty sand with gravel) and composted soil (PT, peat) as per ASTM (American society for testing and materials) standards. Endosulfan degradation efficiency in miniature soil reactors were in the order of sandy soil followed by red soil, composted soil and clayey soil in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In bench scale soil reactors, endosulfan degradation was observed more in the bottom layers. After 4 weeks, maximum endosulfan degradation efficiency of 95.48 ± 0.17% was observed in red soil reactor where as in composted soil-I (moisture 38 ± 1%) and composted soil-II (moisture 45 ± 1%) it was 96.03 ± 0.23% and 94.84 ± 0.19%, respectively. The high moisture content in compost soil reactor-II increased the endosulfan concentration in the leachate. Known intermediate metabolites of

  14. Parameterization of albedo, thermal inertia, and surface roughness of desert scrub/sandy soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Mccumber, M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral albedo, A sub n, for the direct solar beam is defined as A sub n (r sub i,s, theta sub 0) = r sub i exp(-s tan theta sub 0)1-I(s) where I(s) is the integral over all reflection angles describing the interception by the absorbing plants of the flux reflected from the soil, r sub i soil reflectance, assumed Lambertian, S the projection on a vertical plane of plants per unit surface area, and theta sub 0 is the solar zenith angle. Hemispheric reflectance for the direct solar beam equals 1-I(s) times the reflectance to the zenith. The values of s of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 respectively quantify sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert scrub. Thin plants are assumed to be of negligible thermal inertia, and thus directly yield the absorbed insolation to the atmosphere. Surface thermal inertia is therefore effectively reduced. The ratio of surface roughness height to plant height is parameterized for sparse, moderately dense, and very dense desert-scrub as a function of s based on data expressing the dependence of this ratio on plant silhouette.

  15. Symmetrical electroadhesives independent of different interfacial surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Hovell, T.; Bamber, T.; Petzing, J.; Justham, L.

    2017-11-01

    Current electroadhesive actuators cannot produce stable electroadhesive forces on the same substrate with different interfacial surface interactions. It is, therefore, desirable to develop electroadhesive actuators that can generate stable adhesive forces on different surface conditions. A symmetrical electroadhesive pad that is independent of different interfacial scratch directions is developed and presented. A relative difference of only 6.4% in the normal force direction was observed when the electroadhesive was facing an aluminium plate with surface scratch directions of 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°. This step-change improvement may significantly promote the application of electroadhesion technology. In addition, this manifests that significant performance improvements could be achieved via further investigations into electroadhesive designs.

  16. Mineralogical and geochemical patterns of urban surface soils, the example of Pforzheim, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norra, Stefan; Lanka-Panditha, Mahesh; Kramar, Utz; Stueben, Doris

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of urban surface soils. Many studies on urban soils are restricted to purely chemical surveys in order to investigate soil pollution caused by anthropogenic activities such as traffic, heating, industrial processing, waste disposal and many more. In environmental studies, chemical elements are often distinguished as lithogenic and anthropogenic elements. As a novel contribution to those studies, the authors combined the analysis of a broad set of chemical elements with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases. The semi-quantification of mineralogical phases supported the assignment of groups of chemical elements to lithogenic or anthropogenic origin. Minerals are important sinks for toxic elements. Thus, knowledge about their distribution in soils is crucial for the assessment of the environmental hazards due to pollution of urban soils. In Pforzheim, surface soils (0-5 cm depth) from various land use types (forest, agriculture, urban green space, settlement areas of various site densities) overlying different geological units (clastic and chemical sediments) were investigated. Urban surface soils of Pforzheim reflect to a considerable degree the mineral and chemical composition of parent rocks. Irrespective of the parent rocks, elevated concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Sn, Ag) were found in soils throughout the whole inner urban settlement area of Pforzheim indicating pollution. These pollutants will tend to accumulate in inner urban surface soils according to the available adsorption capacity, which is normally higher in soils overlying limestone than in soils overlying sandstone. However, inner urban surface soils overlying sandstone show elevated concentrations of carbonates, phyllo-silicates and Fe and elevated pH values compared with forest soils overlying sandstone. Thus, in comparison to forest soils overlying sandstones, inner urban soils overlying sandstone affected by

  17. Long-term changes in the surface conditions of PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.; Rossnagel, S.M.; Picraux, S.T.; Borders, J.A.; Magee, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term changes in the surface conditions of the PLT vacuum vessel wall have been monitored by the periodic analysis of a variety of sample substrates (stainless steel, alumina, silicon), exposed to PLT discharges for periods of up to several months and subsequently removed for analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), photoelectron spectroscopy, ion backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy

  18. Model-based surface soil moisture (SSM) retrieval algorithm using multi-temporal RISAT-1 C-band SAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Dharmendra K.; Maity, Saroj; Bhattacharya, Bimal; Misra, Arundhati

    2016-05-01

    Accurate measurement of surface soil moisture of bare and vegetation covered soil over agricultural field and monitoring the changes in surface soil moisture is vital for estimation for managing and mitigating risk to agricultural crop, which requires information and knowledge to assess risk potential and implement risk reduction strategies and deliver essential responses. The empirical and semi-empirical model-based soil moisture inversion approach developed in the past are either sensor or region specific, vegetation type specific or have limited validity range, and have limited scope to explain physical scattering processes. Hence, there is need for more robust, physical polarimetric radar backscatter model-based retrieval methods, which are sensor and location independent and have wide range of validity over soil properties. In the present study, Integral Equation Model (IEM) and Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) model were used to simulate averaged backscatter coefficients in various soil moisture (dry, moist and wet soil), soil roughness (smooth to very rough) and crop conditions (low to high vegetation water contents) over selected regions of Gujarat state of India and the results were compared with multi-temporal Radar Imaging Satellite-1 (RISAT-1) C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in σ°HH and σ°HV polarizations, in sync with on field measured soil and crop conditions. High correlations were observed between RISAT-1 HH and HV with model simulated σ°HH & σ°HV based on field measured soil with the coefficient of determination R2 varying from 0.84 to 0.77 and RMSE varying from 0.94 dB to 2.1 dB for bare soil. Whereas in case of winter wheat crop, coefficient of determination R2 varying from 0.84 to 0.79 and RMSE varying from 0.87 dB to 1.34 dB, corresponding to with vegetation water content values up to 3.4 kg/m2. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods were adopted for model-based soil moisture inversion. The training datasets for the NNs were

  19. Effect of surface wettability caused by radiation induced surface activation on leidenfrost condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamasa, T.; Hazuku, T.; Tamura, N.; Okamoto, K. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Furuya, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Improving the limit of boiling heat transfer or critical heat flux requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. From this basis, we investigated surface wettability and Leidenfrost condition using metal oxides irradiated by {gamma}-rays. In our previous study, contact angle, an indicator of macroscopic wettability, of a water droplet on metal oxide at room temperature was measured by image processing of the images obtained by a CCD video camera. The results showed that the surface wettability on metal oxide pieces of titanium, Zircaloy No. 4, SUS-304, and copper was improved significantly by the Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) phenomenon. To delineate the effect of Radiation Induced Surface Activation (RISA) on heat transferring phenomena, the Leidenfrost condition and quenching of metal oxides irradiated by {gamma}-rays were investigated. In the Leidenfrost experiment, when the temperature of the heating surface reached the wetting limit temperature, water-solid contact vanished because a stable vapor film existed between the droplet and the metal surface; i.e., a Leidenfrost condition obtained. The wetting limit temperature increased with integrated irradiation dose. After irradiation, the wet length and the duration of contact increased, and the contact angle decreased. In the quenching test, high surface wettability, or a highly hydrophilic condition, of a simulated fuel rod made of SUS was achieved, and the quenching velocities were increased up to 20-30% after 300 kGy 60Co {gamma}-ray irradiation.

  20. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  1. Testing of a conceptualisation of catchment scale surface soil moisture in a hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komma, J.; Parajka, J.; Naeimi, V.; Blöschl, G.; Wagner, W.

    2009-04-01

    In this study the simulated surface soil moisture of a dual layer conceptual hydrologic model is tested against ERS scatterometer top soil moisture observations. The study catchment at the Kamp river with a size of 1550 km² is located in north-eastern Austria. The hydrologic simulations in this study are based on a well calibrated hydrologic model. The model consists of a spatially distributed soil moisture accounting scheme and a flood routing component. The spatial and temporal resolutions of the model are 1 x 1 km² and 15 minutes. The soil moisture accounting scheme simulates the mean moisture state over the entire vertical soil column. To get additional information about moisture states in a thin surface soil layer from the continuous rainfall-runoff model, the soil moisture accounting scheme is extended by a thin skin soil storage sitting at the top of the main soil reservoir. The skin soil storage is filled by rain and snow melt. The skin soil reservoir and the main soil reservoir are connected by a bidirectional moisture flux which is assumed to be a linear function of the vertical soil moisture gradient. The calibration of the additional dual layer component is based on hydrologic reasoning and the incorporation of measured soil water contents close to the study catchment. The comparison of the simulated surface soil moisture with the ERS scatterometer top soil moisture observations is performed in the period 1993-2005. On average, about 3 scatterometer images per month with a mean spatial coverage of about 82% are available at the Kamp catchment. The correlation between the catchment mean values of the two top soil moisture estimates changes with the season. The differences tend to be smaller due the summer month from July to October. The results indicate a good agreement between the modelled and remote sensed spatial moisture patterns in the study area.

  2. Resonant Absorption of Surface Sausage and Surface Kink Modes under Photospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dae Jung; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Goossens, Marcel

    2017-11-01

    We study the effect of resonant absorption of surface sausage and surface kink modes under photospheric conditions where the slow surface sausage modes undergo resonant damping in the slow continuum and the surface kink modes in the slow and Alfvén continua at the transitional layers. We use recently derived analytical formulas to obtain the damping rate (time). By considering linear density and linear pressure profiles for the transitional layers, we show that resonant absorption in the slow continuum could be an efficient mechanism for the wave damping of the slow surface sausage and slow surface kink modes while the damping rate of the slow surface kink mode in the Alfvén continuum is weak. It is also found that the resonant damping of the fast surface kink mode is much stronger than that of the slow surface kink mode, showing a similar efficiency as under coronal conditions. It is worth noting that the slow body sausage and kink modes can also resonantly damp in the slow continuum for those linear profiles.

  3. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmondson, Jill L; Stott, Iain; Davies, Zoe G

    2016-01-01

    temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a midsized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11...

  4. Retrieving near surface soil moisture from microwave radiometric observations: current status and future plans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigneron, J.P.; Calvet, J.C.; Pellarin, T.; vd Griend, A.A.; Berger, M.; Ferrazzoli, P.

    2003-01-01

    Surface soil moisture is a key variable used to describe water and energy exchanges at the land surface/atmosphere interface. Passive microwave remotely sensed data have great potential for providing estimates of soil moisture with good temporal repetition on a daily basis and on a regional scale (∼

  5. Phosphorus solubility of agricultural soils: a surface charge and phosphorus-31 NMR speciation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated ten soils from six states in United States to determine the relationship between potentiometric titration derived soil surface charge and Phosphorus-31 (P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) speciation with the concentration of water-extractable P (WEP). The surface charge value at the...

  6. Monitoring Multidecadal satellite earth observation of soil moisture products through land surface reanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albergel, C.; Dorigo, W.; Balsamo, G.; Sabatar, J; de Rosnay, P.; Isaksen, I; Brocca, L; de Jeu, R.A.M.; Wagner, W.

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture from ERA-Land, a revised version of the land surface components of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim reanalysis (ERA-Interim), is used to monitor at a global scale the consistency of a new microwave based multi-satellite surface soil moisture date set

  7. Effect of soil surface management on radiocesium concentrations in apple orchard and fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaba, Shinnosuke; Matsuoka, Kaori; Abe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of soil surface management on radiocesium accumulation in an apple orchard in Fukushima Prefecture over 4 years after Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in mid-March 2011. Different types of soil surface management such as clean cultivation, intertillage management, intertillage with bark compost application, sod culture, and zeolite application were employed. The radiocesium concentrations in soil were higher in the surface layer (0–5 cm) than in the other layers. The radiocesium concentration in the surface layer soil with sod culture in 2014 increased non-significantly compared with that observed in 2011. The radiocesium concentration in the mid-layer soil (5–15 cm) managed with intertillage was higher than that in soil managed using other types of management. The radiocesium amount in the organic matter on the soil surface was the highest in sod culture, and was significantly lower in the management with intertillage. The radiocesium concentration in fruit decreased exponentially during the 4 years in each types of soil surface management. The decrease in radiocesium concentration showed similar trends with each type of soil surface management, even if the concentration in each soil layer varied according to the management applied. Furthermore, intertillage with bark compost application did not affect the radiocesium concentration in fruit. These results suggest that the soil surface management type that affected the radiocesium distribution in the soil or the compost application with conventional practice did not affect its concentration in fruit of apple trees for at least 4 years since the nuclear power plant accident, at a radiocesium deposition level similar to that recorded in Fukushima City. (author)

  8. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration.

  9. Role of soil health in maintaining environmental sustainability of surface coal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Peter M; Fox, James F; Campbell, J Elliott; Jones, Alice L; Rowe, Harold; Martin, Darren; Bryson, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Mountaintop coal mining (MCM) in the Southern Appalachian forest region greatly impacts both soil and aquatic ecosystems. Policy and practice currently in place emphasize water quality and soil stability but do not consider upland soil health. Here we report soil organic carbon (SOC) measurements and other soil quality indicators for reclaimed soils in the Southern Appalachian forest region to quantify the health of the soil ecosystem. The SOC sequestration rate of the MCM soils was 1.3 MgC ha(-1) yr(-1) and stocks ranged from 1.3 ± 0.9 to 20.9 ± 5.9 Mg ha(-1) and contained only 11% of the SOC of surrounding forest soils. Comparable reclaimed mining soils reported in the literature that are supportive of soil ecosystem health had SOC stocks 2.5-5 times greater than the MCM soils and sequestration rates were also 1.6-3 times greater. The high compaction associated with reclamation in this region greatly reduces both the vegetative rooting depth and infiltration of the soil and increases surface runoff, thus bypassing the ability of soil to naturally filter groundwater. In the context of environmental sustainability of MCM, it is proposed that the entire watershed ecosystem be assessed and that a revision of current policy be conducted to reflect the health of both water and soil.

  10. The influence of land use systems on soil and surface litter fauna in the western region of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Luise Carolina Bartz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the abundance of soil and surface litter fauna in the western region of Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil, in the following land use systems (LUS: no-tillage crops (NT, integrated crop-livestock (ICL, pasture (PA, Eucalyptus plantation (EP and native forest fragments (NF. Sampling was done in three counties in the western region of Santa Catarina: Xanxerê, Chapecó and São Miguel do Oeste, in two seasons (winter and summer. The evaluation of soil/litter fauna in each LUS was performed by installing nine "pitfall traps" per sampling grid (3 x 3. The counties are true replicas. The soil for the chemical attributes was collected at the same sampling points for soil fauna. Altogether, 17 taxa were identified in the five LUS. The presence of groups of fauna was influenced by the type of soil management used. The LUS NF and EP provide better soil conditions for the development of a higher diversity of soil fauna groups compared to other LUS, which showed varying degrees of human intervention, regardless of the sampling season (winter or summer. However, annual crop systems NT and ICL groups showed greater richness and total abundance when compared to the perennial systems (EP and PA. Principal component analysis is an important tool in the study of biological indicators of sustainability because it allows use of soil attributes (chemical and physical as explanatory environmental variables, which helps in the interpretation of ecological data.

  11. Effects of earthquake rupture shallowness and local soil conditions on simulated ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsel, Randy J.; Hadley, David M.; Hart, Robert S.

    1983-03-01

    The paucity of strong ground motion data in the Eastern U.S. (EUS), combined with well recognized differences in earthquake source depths and wave propagation characteristics between Eastern and Western U.S. (WUS) suggests that simulation studies will play a key role in assessing earthquake hazard in the East. This report summarizes an extensive simulation study of 5460 components of ground motion representing a model parameter study for magnitude, distance, source orientation, source depth and near-surface site conditions for a generic EUS crustal model. The simulation methodology represents a hybrid approach to modeling strong ground motion. Wave propagation is modeled with an efficient frequency-wavenumber integration algorithm. The source time function used for each grid element of a modeled fault is empirical, scaled from near-field accelerograms. This study finds that each model parameter has a significant influence on both the shape and amplitude of the simulated response spectra. The combined effect of all parameters predicts a dispersion of response spectral values that is consistent with strong ground motion observations. This study provides guidelines for scaling WUS data from shallow earthquakes to the source depth conditions more typical in the EUS. The modeled site conditions range from very soft soil to hard rock. To the extent that these general site conditions model a specific site, the simulated response spectral information can be used to either correct spectra to a site-specific environment or used to compare expected ground motions at different sites. (author)

  12. Influence of soil conditions on dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils: a controlled growth chamber study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Oh, Hae Sung; Hur, Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of various soil conditions, including drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise, on the quantities and the composition of dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils. A set of forest and wetland soils with and without the nitrogen deposition were incubated in the growth chambers under three different temperatures. The moisture contents were kept constant, except for two-week drying intervals. Comparisons between the original and the treated samples revealed that drying-rewetting was a crucial environmental factor driving changes in the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The DOC was also notably increased by the nitrogen deposition to the dry forest soil and was affected by the temperature of the dry wetland soil. A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified three sub-fractions of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and their compositions depended on drying-rewetting. The data as a whole, including the DOC and PARAFAC components and other optical indices, were possibly explained by the two main variables, which were closely related with the PARAFAC components and DOC based on principal component analysis (PCA). Our results suggested that the DOC and PARAFAC component information could provide a comprehensive interpretation of the changes in the soil-leached DOM in response to the different environmental conditions.

  13. Soil conditions and cereal root system architecture: review and considerations for linking Darwin and Weaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Sarah M; Watt, Michelle

    2013-03-01

    Charles Darwin founded root system architecture research in 1880 when he described a root bending with gravity. Curving, elongating, and branching are the three cellular processes in roots that underlie root architecture. Together they determine the distribution of roots through soil and time, and hence the plants' access to water and nutrients, and anchorage. Most knowledge of these cellular processes comes from seedlings of the model dicotyledon, Arabidopsis, grown in soil-less conditions with single treatments. Root systems in the field, however, face multiple stimuli that interact with the plant genetics to result in the root system architecture. Here we review how soil conditions influence root system architecture; focusing on cereals. Cereals provide half of human calories, and their root systems differ from those of dicotyledons. We find that few controlled-environment studies combine more than one soil stimulus and, those that do, highlight the complexity of responses. Most studies are conducted on seedling roots; those on adult roots generally show low correlations to seedling studies. Few field studies report root and soil conditions. Until technologies are available to track root architecture in the field, soil analyses combined with knowledge of the effects of factors on elongation and gravitropism could be ranked to better predict the interaction between genetics and environment (G×E) for a given crop. Understanding how soil conditions regulate root architecture can be effectively used to design soil management and plant genetics that best exploit synergies from G×E of roots.

  14. Predicting root zone soil moisture with satellite near-surface moisture data in semiarid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, S.; Baldwin, D. C.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.; Caylor, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most critical variables in semiarid environment is the soil water content that represents a controlling factor for both ecological and hydrological processes. Soil moisture monitoring over large scales may be extremely useful, but it is limited by the fact that most of the available tools provides only surface measurements not representative of the effective amount of water stored in the subsurface. Therefore, a methodology able to infer root-zone soil moisture starting from surface measurements is highly desirable. Recently a new simplified formulation has been introduced to provide a formal description of the mathematical relationship between surface measurements and root-zone soil moisture (Manfreda et al., HESS 2014). This is a physically based approach derived from the soil water balance equation, where different soil water loss functions have been explored in order to take into account for the non-linear processes governing soil water fluxes. The study highlighted that the soil loss function is the key for such relationship that is therefore strongly influenced by soil type and physiological plant types. The new formulation has been tested on soil moisture based on measurements taken from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) databases. The method sheds lights on the physical controls for soil moisture dynamics and on the possibility to use such a simplified method for the description of root-zone soil moisture. Furthermore, the method has been also couple with an Enasamble Kalman Filter (EnKF) in order to optimize its performances for the large scale monitoring based the new satellite near-surface moisture data (SMAP). The optimized SMAR-EnKF model does well in both wet and dry climates and across many different soil types (51 SCAN locations) providing a strategy for real-time soil moisture monitoring.

  15. Modified hot-conditioning of PHT system surfaces of PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, G.

    1997-01-01

    The increased awareness on the importance of controlling activity transport and radiation buildup on out-of-core surfaces of water cooled nuclear reactors is leading to a host of measures both from chemistry as well as engineering sides being undertaken. Passivation of the surfaces of structural materials is one such. Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors of CANDU design use large surface area of carbon steel alloy in the Primary Heat Transport System. Hot-conditioning of the PHT system with deoxygenated light water at temperatures ≅ 473 - 523 K during commissioning stage is done to form a protective magnetite film on the surfaces of carbon steel essentially to guard this material from corrosion during the intervening period between initial commissioning and first fuel loading and achieving nuclear heat. However, a need is felt to improve the quality of this magnetite film and control the crud release so that the twin objectives of controlling the corrosion of carbon steel and reducing a possible deposition of corrosion products on surfaces of fuel clad could be achieved. Laboratory static autoclave investigations have been carried out on the formation of protective magnetite film on carbon steel at 473 K, pH 10 (pH at 298 K) deoxygenated aqueous solutions of chelants like HEDTA, DTPA, NTA apart from EDTA. Additionally, influence of AVT chemicals like hydrazine, cyclohexylamine, morpholine and additives like glucose, boric acid has been studied. The data have been compared with the standard procedure of hot-conditioning namely with simple LiOH. It is found that chelants increase the base metal loss but the oxide formed is more protective than the one formed under simple LiOH treatment. The efficiency of passivation is greatly enhanced by hydrazine and boric acid while it is adversely affected by glucose. AVT chemicals acts as effective corrosion inhibitors. (author). 14 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Soil contamination of plant surfaces from grazing and rainfall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T.G.; Stoll, J.M.; Tobler, L.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminants often attach to soil particles, and their subsequent environmental transport is largely determined by processes that govern soil movement. We examined the influence of grazing intensity on soil contamination of pastures. Four different grazing densities of sheep were tested against an ungrazed control plot. Scandium concentrations were determined by neutron activation analysis and was used as a tracer of soil adhesion on vegetation. Soil loadings ( g soil kg -1 dry plant) increased 60% when grazing intensity was increased by a factor of four (p 0.003). Rain and wind removed soil from vegetation in the ungrazed control plots, but when grazing sheep were present, an increase in rain from 0.3 to 9.7 mm caused a 130% increase in soil contamination. Multiple regression was used to develop an equation that predicts soil loadings as a function of grazing density, rainfall and wind speed (p = 0.0001, r 2 = 0.78). The model predicts that if grazing management were to be used as a tool to reduce contaminant intake from inadvertent consumption of resuspended soil by grazing animals, grazing densities would have to be reduced 2.5 times to reduce soil loadings by 50%. (author)

  17. Optimization of soil physical and chemical conditions for the bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atagana, H I; Haynes, R J; Wallis, F M

    2003-08-01

    Mispah type soil (FAO : Lithosol) contaminated with > 250 000 mg kg(-1) creosote was collected from the yard of a creosote treatment plant. The soil's carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus contents were determined. Due to creosote contamination, the carbon content of the soil was found to be 130,000 mg C kg(-1). This concentration was found to greatly affect the nitrogen content (0.08%). The phosphorus content was less affected (4.5%). It was estimated that a nutrient amendment to bring the soil to a C : N 10 : 1 would be adequate to stimulate microbial growth and creosote degradation. The soil was amended with a range of C : N ratios below and above the estimated ratio. In one of the treatments, the phosphorus content was amended. Sterile and natural controls were also set up. The soil was incubated at 30 +/- 2 degrees C on a rotary shaker at 150 rpm in the dark for six weeks. Water content was maintained at 70% field capacity. The lowest nitrogen supplementation (C : N = 25 : 1) was more effective in enhancing microbial growth (3.12E + 05) and creosote removal (68.7%) from the soil. Additional phosphorus was not very effective in enhancing the growth of microorganisms and removal of creosote. The highest nitrogen supplementation (C : N = 5 : 1) did not enhance microbial growth and creosote removal. Phenolics and lower molecular mass polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were observed to be more susceptible to microbial degradation than higher molecular mass compounds. Nutrient concentration, moisture content and pH were thus observed to play very significant roles in the utilization of creosote in soil. These results are being used for the development of a bioremediation technology for the remediation of creosote contaminated soils in a treatment plant in South Africa.

  18. The CO2 emission in urbanic soils in the conditions of intensive technogenic pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviatova, Tatiana; Alaeva, Liliia; Negrobova, Elena; Kramareva, Tatiana

    2017-04-01

    Massive industrial pollution of the environment including soils leads to drastic changes in the vital activity of microorganisms, plants and animals. As objects of research was selected soils of the industrial and residential zones, farmland soils, forest soils. Comparative analysis showed that the emission of CO2 urbanizable increase compared to the suburban soils in recreational areas is 1.5 times, in the residential and industrial zones - in 3-5 times. In addition, identified a local point located in the vicinity of chemical plants, where soil CO2 emission increased up to 40 times compared to the suburban soils. Air technogenic pollution of soils by industrial emissions and transport enhances the mineralization of soil organic matter, increases its lability. These trends are associated with nonspecific adaptive reactions of the soil microbial complex in terms of pollution. Strengthening of the processes of mineralization may be due to the increase in the proportion of fungi in the microbial community. According to numerous reports they are more resistant to pollution compared to bacteria and actinomycetes. Admission to the soil organic matter of anthropogenic origin also increases the process of mineralization. According to the findings, low concentrations of petroleum products lead to increased "breathing" of the soil. Strengthening of the processes of mineralization and, consequently, of CO2 emissions, in the conditions of technogenic pollution of the soils identified in our studies, confirmed by numerous studies by other authors. According to reports in Russia the emission of CO2 from soils is 4.5 times higher than the industrial receipt of its atmosphere. The contribution of local anthropogenic CO2 emissions is not so significant compared to the indirect influence of soil pollution on increased CO2 emissions. Consequently, the expansion of technogenic contaminated soil is becoming a more significant factor adversely affecting the state of the atmosphere

  19. Variability of parameters for modelling soil moisture conditions : studies on loamy to silty soils on marly bedrock in the Ardeche drainage basin (France)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Field experiments and additional measurements on undisturbed soil samples in the laboratory were done to investigate the variability of the parameters used in modelling soil moisture conditions.

    The conditions of soil water control the amount of moisture available for the

  20. Modeling carbon dynamics in two adjacent spruce forests with different soil conditions in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kurbatova

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE was measured with eddy covariance method for two adjacent forests located at the southern boundary of European taiga in Russia in 1999–2004. The two spruce forests shared similar vegetation composition but differed in soil conditions. The wet spruce forest (WSF possessed a thick peat layer (60 cm with a high water table seasonally close to or above the soil surface. The dry spruce forest (DSF had a relatively thin organic layer (5 cm with a deep water table (>60 cm. The measured multi-year average NEE fluxes (2000 and –1440 kg C ha−1yr−1 for WSF and DSF, respectively indicated that WSF was a source while DSF a sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 during the experimental years. A process-based model, Forest-DNDC, was employed in the study to interpret the observations. The modeled multi-year average NEE fluxes were 1800 and –2200 kg C ha−1yr−1 for WSF and DSF, respectively, which were comparable with observations. The modeled data also showed high soil heterotrophic respiration rates at WSF that suggested that the water table fluctuation at WSF could have played a key role in determining the negative carbon balance in the wetland ecosystem. A sensitivity test was conducted by running Forest-DNDC with varied water table scenarios for WSF. The results indicated that the NEE fluxes from WSF were highly sensitive to the water table depth. When the water table was high, the WSF ecosystem maintained as a sink of atmospheric CO2; while along with the drop of the water table the length of the flooded period reduced and more organic matter in the soil profile suffered from rapid decomposition that gradually converted the ecosystem into a source of atmospheric CO2. The general effect of water table variation on wetland carbon balance observed from this modeling study could be applicable for a wide range of wetland ecosystems that

  1. Characterization and conditioning of SSPX plasma facing surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchenauer, D.A.; Mills, B.E.; Wood, R.; Woodruff, S.; Hill, D.N.; Hooper, E.B.; Cowgill, D.F.; Clift, M.W.; Yang, N.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) will examine the confinement properties of spheromak plasmas sustained by DC helicity injection. Understanding the plasma-surface interactions is an important component of the experimental program since the spheromak plasma is in close contact with a stabilizing wall (flux conserver) and is maintained by a high current discharge in the coaxial injector region. Peak electron temperatures in the range of 400 eV are expected, so the copper plasma facing surfaces in SSPX have been coated with tungsten to minimize sputtering and plasma contamination. Here, we report on the characterization and conditioning of these surfaces used for the initial studies of spheromak formation in SSPX. The high pressure plasma-sprayed tungsten facing the SSPX plasma was characterized in situ using β-backscattering and ex situ using laboratory measurements on similarly prepared samples. Measurements showed that water can be desorbed effectively through baking while the removal rates of volatile impurity gases during glow discharge and shot conditioning indicated a large source of carbon and oxygen in the porous coating

  2. Restauração da estrutura do solo por sequências culturais implantadas em semeadura direta, e sua relação com a erosão hídrica em distintas condições físicas de superfície Restoration of the soil structure by crop sequences established in no-till, as related to water erosion in distinct surface physical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeane Cruz Portela

    2010-08-01

    ísicas internas ou subsuperficiais. De modo geral, todas as sequências culturais foram eficazes na restauração da estrutura do solo no período da experimentação: aquela que envolveu teosinto no que se refere à perda de solo e água e a que envolveu milho + feijão-miúdo e milheto no tocante à perda de solo foram as que melhor controlaram o processo de erosão hídrica pluvial. A superfície de solo não mobilizada e com pouca cobertura por resíduo cultural foi a que mais favoreceu a enxurrada e a erosão, independentemente da presença e do tipo de crosta, especialmente quando esta última foi levemente rompida antes da aplicação da chuva. A superfície de solo inteiramente coberta por resíduo cultural - tenha sido ela não mobilizada ou recém-escarificada - controlou a enxurrada de modo eficaz e impediu totalmente a erosão. A superfície de solo recém-gradeada sobre a superfície escarificada há um mês, embora com o solo mais mobilizado de todos e descoberto, praticamente não apresentou perdas de solo e água, contrariando o que se esperava.Soil structure plays a prominent role in plant growth and erosion control, and consequently in food production and soil and water conservation. This research was developed with the objective of implementing and accompanying the restoration process of the structure of a degraded soil, by planting crop sequences under no-tillage (autumn-winter and spring-summer, grass and legume, in single and intercropped systems, and later verifying the relations with water and soil losses caused by rainfall erosion, under distinct surface physical conditions (untilled soil, with and without crust; freshly-tilled soil by chiseling and by chiseling followed by disking after one month, and crop residue covering 100, 18, and 0 %. The field study was developed under simulated rainfall, at the Agriculture Experimental Station of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (EEA/UFRGS, in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, from May 2004 to Decembe

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface soil across the Tibetan Plateau: Spatial distribution, source and air–soil exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuanfei; Wang, Xiaoping; Gong, Ping; Yao, Tandong

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in both the atmosphere and soil of the Tibetan Plateau (TP). Concentrations of PAHs were therefore measured in 13 XAD resin-based passive air samplers and 41 surface (0–5 cm) soil samples across the TP. The average concentration of atmospheric PAHs was 5.55 ng/m 3 , which was lower than that reported for other background areas, but higher than the Arctic. Concentrations in the soils fell in a wide range from 5.54 to 389 ng/g, with an average of 59.9 ng/g. Elevation was found to play an important role in determining the spatial distribution of soil PAHs. The air–soil exchange state showed that the soils of the TP will likely remain as a sink for high molecular weight PAHs, but may become a potential “secondary source” for low molecular weight PAHs. Highlights: • The levels of PAHs in air and soil of the Tibetan Plateau were relatively lower than other background region of world. • The soil PAHs concentration decreased with the increase of elevation. • The Tibetan Plateau will likely remain as a sink for high molecular weight PAHs. • The Tibetan Plateau may become a potential “secondary source” for low molecular weight PAHs. -- The Tibetan soil will likely remain as a sink for high molecular weight PAHs, but may become a potential “secondary source” for low molecular weight PAHs

  4. Impacts of biomass harvesting on soil disturbance and surface soil erosion at Seller Creek in interior British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commandeur, P.R.; Walmsley, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the soil disturbance effects of ground-based harvesting systems. Biomass harvesting, in the form of recovering woody materials normally left on the site, has the potential to increase the level of soil disturbance. A study was carried out to document the impact of biomass harvesting by rubber-tired skidders on soils, namely soil disturbance and surface soil erosion. An increase in soil disturbance in the form of skid trails, skidroads, and deep and very deep gouges was observed on the biomass harvested plots compared to the conventionally harvested plots. Erosion bridges indicated more soil movement on the biomass than the conventional plots. Soil erosion volumes trapped behind sediment dams located at the base of plots were greater on the biomass plots (average 0.38 m 3 over 1.77 y) than on the conventional plots (average 0.22 m 3 ). However, the unharvested plots also recorded accumulations of material where in fact no mineral soil erosion occurred (average of 0.15 m 3 ) as a result of vegetation growth and decay. Adjusted erosion values of 0.78 m 3 /hectare/y for biomass plots and 0.37 m 3 /hectare/y for the conventional plots are comparable to data obtained on clearcut and burnt sites in the Oregon Cascades. 16 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  5. [Effects of soil crusts on surface hydrology in the semiarid Loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wen, Zhi; Chen, Li-Ding; Chen, Jin; Wu, Dong-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Soil crusts are distributed extensively in the Chinese Loess Plateau and play key roles in surface hydrological processes. In this study, a typical loess hilly region in Anjiagou catchment, Dingxi city, Gansu province was selected as the study region, and soil crusts in the catchment were investigated. Then, the hydrological effect of soil crusts was studied by using multi-sampling and hydrological monitoring experiments. Several key results were shown as follows. Firstly, compared with bared soil without crust cover, soil crusts can greatly reduce the bulk density, improve the porosity of soil, and raise the holding capacity of soil moisture which ranges from 1.4 to 1.9 times of that of bared soil. Secondly, the role of soil crust on rainfall interception was very significant. Moss crust was found to be strongest on rainfall interception, followed by synantectic crusts and lichen crusts. Bared soil without covering crusts was poorest in resisting rainfall splash. Thirdly, hydrological simulation experiments indicate that soil crusts play a certain positive role in promoting the water infiltration capacity, and the mean infiltration rate of the crusted soil was 2 times higher than that of the no-crust covered soils. While the accumulated infiltrated water amounts was also far higher than that of the bared soil.

  6. Bacteria increase arid-land soil surface temperature through the production of sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couradeau, Estelle; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nunes da Rocha, Ulisses; Northen, Trent; Brodie, Eoin; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-20

    Soil surface temperature, an important driver of terrestrial biogeochemical processes, depends strongly on soil albedo, which can be significantly modified by factors such as plant cover. In sparsely vegetated lands, the soil surface can be colonized by photosynthetic microbes that build biocrust communities. Here we use concurrent physical, biochemical and microbiological analyses to show that mature biocrusts can increase surface soil temperature by as much as 10 °C through the accumulation of large quantities of a secondary metabolite, the microbial sunscreen scytonemin, produced by a group of late-successional cyanobacteria. Scytonemin accumulation decreases soil albedo significantly. Such localized warming has apparent and immediate consequences for the soil microbiome, inducing the replacement of thermosensitive bacterial species with more thermotolerant forms. These results reveal that not only vegetation but also microorganisms are a factor in modifying terrestrial albedo, potentially impacting biosphere feedbacks on past and future climate, and call for a direct assessment of such effects at larger scales.

  7. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions.

  8. Soil microbial community as a proxy for the ecological service condition in karst soils of SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sophie M.; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.; Zhang, Xinyu; Hawkes, Simon; Donovan, Neil; Barrows, Tim; Buss, Heather; Liu, Taoze; Evershed, Richard; Wen, Xuefa; Hartley, Iain; Song, Zhaoliang; Liu, Hongyan; Tu, Chenglong; Johnes, Penny J.; Meersmans, Jeroen; Guo, Dali; Quine, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Karst is a key landscape covering extensive areas of Southwest China that has undergone rapid intensive land use change and degradation over the last 50 years. Clear evidence of environmental degradation and its damaging consequences for the reduction of intrinsic value of the land for local human populations has led to an increasing focus on landscape rehabilitation. This has included unmanaged abandonment and attempts to re-vegetate denuded surfaces. However, this has achieved limited success and there is a clear need to develop restoration strategies underpinned by robust quantitative and mechanistic understanding of critical zone (CZ) functioning. Thus, a karst Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) was established in June 2016 in Chenqi, Guizhou Province, along a gradient through three levels of human perturbed landscapes: sloping farmland; recovery phase 1 (recently abandoned, within 5 years); and, recovery phase 2 (secondary forest, abandoned > 5 years). We hypothesise that there is a tipping point along the degradation gradient beyond which key biological controls over CZ function are lost, resulting in declining nutrient cycling and rock weathering rates, and increased soil erosion rates. This paper will present preliminary data from the application of the CZ approach using space-for-time substitution. We characterised soil microbial community dynamics along the degradation gradient using geochemical biomarkers and soil properties measured in soil profiles (<1.5 m depth; n = 3) at three slope positions at contrasting topographical aspects around the Chenqi catchment. We integrate measurements of mycorrhizal fungi and free-living soil microbes, and pools of soil carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), with estimations of soil erosion rates using radionuclide 137Cs/Pb210, within the karst ecosystem to evaluate the status of key ecosystem functions (e.g. nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, soil stabilisation).

  9. A standardized approach for estimating the permeability of plastic films to soil fumigants under various field and environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R; Chellemi, Daniel O

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing atmospheric emissions of soil fumigants is critical for protecting human and environmental health. Covering the soil surface with a plastic tarp is a common approach to restrict fumigant emissions. The mass transfer of the fumigant vapors through the tarp is often the rate-limiting factor in fumigant emissions. An approach for standardizing measurements of film permeability is proposed that is based on determining the resistance (R) of films to diffusion of fumigants. Using this approach, values were determined for more than 200 film-chemical combinations under a range of temperature, relative humidity, and film handling conditions. Resistance to diffusion was specific for each fumigant/film combination, with the largest range of values observed for the fumigant chloropicrin. For each fumigant, decreased with increasing temperature. Changes in film permeability due to increases in temperature or field installation were generally less than a factor of five. For one film, values determined under conditions of very high relative humidity (approximately 100%) were at least 100 times lower than when humidity was very low (approximately 2%). This approach simplifies the selection of appropriate films for soil fumigation by providing rapid, reproducible, and precise measurements of their permeability to specific fumigants and application conditions. by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Surface Complexation Modeling in Variable Charge Soils: Prediction of Cadmium Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Marchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intrinsic equilibrium constants for 22 representative Brazilian Oxisols were estimated from a cadmium adsorption experiment. Equilibrium constants were fitted to two surface complexation models: diffuse layer and constant capacitance. Intrinsic equilibrium constants were optimized by FITEQL and by hand calculation using Visual MINTEQ in sweep mode, and Excel spreadsheets. Data from both models were incorporated into Visual MINTEQ. Constants estimated by FITEQL and incorporated in Visual MINTEQ software failed to predict observed data accurately. However, FITEQL raw output data rendered good results when predicted values were directly compared with observed values, instead of incorporating the estimated constants into Visual MINTEQ. Intrinsic equilibrium constants optimized by hand calculation and incorporated in Visual MINTEQ reliably predicted Cd adsorption reactions on soil surfaces under changing environmental conditions.

  11. Cooling the vertical surface by conditionally single pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpov Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available You Sprays with periodic supply of the droplet phase have great opportunities to control the heat exchange processes. Varying pulse duration and frequency of their repetition, we can achieve the optimal conditions of evaporative cooling with minimization of the liquid flow rate. The paper presents experimental data on studying local heat transfer on a large subcooled surface, obtained on the original setup with multinozzle controlled system of impact irrigation by the gas-droplet flow. A contribution to intensification of the spray parameters (flow rate, pulse duration, repetition frequency per a growth of integral heat transfer was studied. Data on instantaneous distribution of the heat flux value helped us to describe the processes occurring on the studied surface. These data could describe the regime of “island” film cooling.

  12. Cooling the vertical surface by conditionally single pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Pavel; Nazarov, Alexander; Serov, Anatoly; Terekhov, Victor

    2017-10-01

    You Sprays with periodic supply of the droplet phase have great opportunities to control the heat exchange processes. Varying pulse duration and frequency of their repetition, we can achieve the optimal conditions of evaporative cooling with minimization of the liquid flow rate. The paper presents experimental data on studying local heat transfer on a large subcooled surface, obtained on the original setup with multinozzle controlled system of impact irrigation by the gas-droplet flow. A contribution to intensification of the spray parameters (flow rate, pulse duration, repetition frequency) per a growth of integral heat transfer was studied. Data on instantaneous distribution of the heat flux value helped us to describe the processes occurring on the studied surface. These data could describe the regime of "island" film cooling.

  13. Boundary conditions for free surface inlet and outlet problems

    KAUST Repository

    Taroni, M.

    2012-08-10

    We investigate and compare the boundary conditions that are to be applied to free-surface problems involving inlet and outlets of Newtonian fluid, typically found in coating processes. The flux of fluid is a priori known at an inlet, but unknown at an outlet, where it is governed by the local behaviour near the film-forming meniscus. In the limit of vanishing capillary number Ca it is well known that the flux scales with Ca 2/3, but this classical result is non-uniform as the contact angle approaches π. By examining this limit we find a solution that is uniformly valid for all contact angles. Furthermore, by considering the far-field behaviour of the free surface we show that there exists a critical capillary number above which the problem at an inlet becomes over-determined. The implications of this result for the modelling of coating flows are discussed. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  14. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuerlein, C; Hilleret, Noël; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis resu...

  15. Modeling Bacteria-Water Interactions in Soil: EPS Dynamics Under Evaporative Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, J.; Hinestroza, H. F.; Guo, Y. S.; Gage, D. J.; Cho, Y. K.; Shor, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    The soil habitat represents a major linkage between the water and carbon cycles: the ability of soils to sequester or release carbon is determined primarily by soil moisture. Water retention and distribution in soils controls the abundance and activity of soil microbes. Microbes in turn impact water retention by creating biofilms, composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). We model the effects of bacterial EPS on water retention at the pore scale. We use the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), a well-established fluid dynamics modeling platform, and modify it to include the effects of water uptake and release by the swelling/shrinking EPS phase. The LB model is implemented in 2-D, with a non-ideal gas equation of state that allows condensation and evaporation of fluid in pore spaces. Soil particles are modeled according to experimentally determined particle size distributions and include realistic pore geometries, in contrast to many soil models which use spherical soil particles for simplicity. Model results are compared with evaporation experiments in soil micromodels and other simpler experimental systems, and model parameters are tuned to match experimental results. Drying behavior and solid-gel contact angle of EPS produced by the soil bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti has been characterized and compared to the behavior of deionized water under the same conditions. The difference in behavior between the fluids is used to parameterize the model. The model shows excellent qualitative agreement for soil micromodels with both aggregated and non-aggregated particle arrangements under no-EPS conditions, and reproduces realistic drying behavior for EPS. This work represents a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding microbe-soil interactions at the pore scale.

  16. Impact of alkaline alterations to a Brazilian soil on cesium retention under low temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calábria, Jaqueline Alves de Almeida; Cota, Stela Dalva Santos; de Morais, Gustavo Ferrari; Ladeira, Ana Cláudia Queiroz

    2017-11-01

    To be used as backfilling materials in radioactive waste disposal facilities, a natural material must have a suitable permeability, mechanical properties and a high sorption capacity for radionuclides. Also important when considering a material as a backfill is the effect of its interaction with the alkaline solution generated from concrete degradation. This solution promotes mineralogical alterations that result in significant changes in the material key properties influencing its performance as a safety component of the repository. This paper presents results of an investigation on the effect of alkaline interaction under a low temperature on cesium retention properties of a local soil being considered suitable as a backfill for the Brazilian near surface disposal facility. A sample of the Brazilian soil was mixed with an alkaline solution, simulating the pore water leached in the first stage of cement degradation, during 1, 7, 14 and 28 days. The experiments were conducted under low temperature (25 °C) aiming to evaluate similar conditions found on a low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal installation. A non-classical isotherm sorption model was fitted to sorption data obtained from batch experiments, for unaltered and altered samples, providing parameters that allowed us to assess the effect of the interaction on material quality as Cs sorbent. The sorption parameters obtained from the data-fitted isotherm were used then to estimate the corresponding retardation factor (R). Alkaline interaction significantly modified the soil sorption properties for Cs. The parameter Q, related to the maximum sorption capacity, as well as the affinity parameter (K) and the retardation coefficients became significantly smaller (about 1000 times for the R coefficient) after pretreatment with the simulated alkaline solutions. Moreover, the increase in n-values, which is related with the energy distribution width and heterogeneity of surface site energies

  17. The Soil Characteristic Curve at Low Water Contents: Relations to Specific Surface Area and Texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resurreccion, Augustus; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    Accurate description of the soil-water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics, plant-water relations, and microbial processes in surface soil. Soil-water retention at soil-water matric potential of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate...... that measurements by traditional pressure plate apparatus generally overestimated water contents at -1.5 MPa (plant wilting point). The 41 soils were classified into four textural classes based on the so-called Dexter index n (= CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing the water film...... thickness at a given soil-water matric potential (low organic soils with n > 10, the estimated SA from the dry soil-water retention was in good agreement with the SA measured using ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME). A strong relationship between the ratio...

  18. Conditions for mould growth on typical interior surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Eva B.; Andersen, Birgitte; Rode, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of the risk for mould growth is an important parameter for the analysis and design of the hygrothermal performance of building constructions. However, in practice the mould growth does not always follow the predicted behavior described by the mould growth models. This is often explained...... by uncertainty in the real conditions of exposure. In this study, laboratory experiments were designed to determine mould growth at controlled transient climate compared to growth at constant climate. The experiment included three building materials with four different surface treatments. The samples were...

  19. Impact of Soil Moisture Assimilation on Land Surface Model Spin-Up and Coupled LandAtmosphere Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Lawston, P.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in satellite monitoring of the terrestrial water cycle have led to a concerted effort to assimilate soil moisture observations from various platforms into offline land surface models (LSMs). One principal but still open question is that of the ability of land data assimilation (LDA) to improve LSM initial conditions for coupled short-term weather prediction. In this study, the impact of assimilating Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) soil moisture retrievals on coupled WRF Model forecasts is examined during the summers of dry (2006) and wet (2007) surface conditions in the southern Great Plains. LDA is carried out using NASAs Land Information System (LIS) and the Noah LSM through an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) approach. The impacts of LDA on the 1) soil moisture and soil temperature initial conditions for WRF, 2) land-atmosphere coupling characteristics, and 3) ambient weather of the coupled LIS-WRF simulations are then assessed. Results show that impacts of soil moisture LDA during the spin-up can significantly modify LSM states and fluxes, depending on regime and season. Results also indicate that the use of seasonal cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) is more advantageous compared to the traditional annual CDF bias correction strategies. LDA performs consistently regardless of atmospheric forcing applied, with greater improvements seen when using coarser, global forcing products. Downstream impacts on coupled simulations vary according to the strength of the LDA impact at the initialization, where significant modifications to the soil moisture flux- PBL-ambient weather process chain are observed. Overall, this study demonstrates potential for future, higher-resolution soil moisture assimilation applications in weather and climate research.

  20. The soil sulphate effect and maize plant (Zea mays L.) growth of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) inoculation in acid sulfate soils with the different soil water condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmarlaili, S.; Rauf, A.; Hanafiah, D. S.; Sudarno, Y.; Abdi, P.

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the potential application of sulphate reducing bacteria on acid sulfate soil with different water content in the green house. The research was carried out in the Laboratory and Green House, Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Sumatera Utara. This research used Randomized Block Design with two treatments factors, ie sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) isolate (control, LK4, LK6, TSM4, TSM3, AP4, AP3, LK4 + TSM3, LK4 + AP4, LK4 + AP3, LK6 + TSM3, LK6 + AP4, LK6 + AP3, TSM4 + TSM3, TSM4 + AP4, TSM4 + AP3) and water condition (100% field capacity and 110% field capacity). The results showed that application of isolate LK4 + AP4 with water condition 110% field capacity decreased the soil sulphate content (27.38 ppm) significantly after 6 weeks. Application of isolate LK4 + AP3 with water condition 110% field capacity increased soil pH (5.58) after-week efficacy 6. Application of isolate LK4 with water condition 110% field capacity increased plant growth (140 cm; 25.74 g) significantly after week 6. The best treatment was application isolate LK4 with water condition 110% field Capacity (SRB population 2.5x108; soil sulphate content 29.10ppm; soil acidity 4.78; plant height 140cm; plant weight 25.74g).

  1. The persistence of human DNA in soil following surface decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Alexandra L; DeBruyn, Jennifer M; Mundorff, Amy Z; Cobaugh, Kelly L; Cabana, Graciela S

    2017-09-01

    Though recent decades have seen a marked increase in research concerning the impact of human decomposition on the grave soil environment, the fate of human DNA in grave soil has been relatively understudied. With the purpose of supplementing the growing body of literature in forensic soil taphonomy, this study assessed the relative persistence of human DNA in soil over the course of decomposition. Endpoint PCR was used to assess the presence or absence of human nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, while qPCR was used to evaluate the quantity of human DNA recovered from the soil beneath four cadavers at the University of Tennessee's Anthropology Research Facility (ARF). Human nuclear DNA from the soil was largely unrecoverable, while human mitochondrial DNA was detectable in the soil throughout all decomposition stages. Mitochondrial DNA copy abundances were not significantly different between decomposition stages and were not significantly correlated to soil edaphic parameters tested. There was, however, a significant positive correlation between mitochondrial DNA copy abundances and the human associated bacteria, Bacteroides, as estimated by 16S rRNA gene abundances. These results show that human mitochondrial DNA can persist in grave soil and be consistently detected throughout decomposition. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A field evaluation of soil moisture modelling with the Soil, Vegetation, and Snow (SVS) land surface model using evapotranspiration observations as forcing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Audrey; Anctil, François; Gaborit, Étienne; Fortin, Vincent; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Therrien, René

    2018-03-01

    To address certain limitations with their current operational model, Environment and Climate Change Canada recently developed the Soil, Vegetation, and Snow (SVS) land surface model and the representation of subsurface hydrological processes was targeted as an area for improvement. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of HydroSVS, the component of SVS responsible for the vertical redistribution of water, to simulate soil moisture under snow-free conditions when using flux-tower observations of evapotranspiration as forcing data. We assessed (1) model fidelity by comparing soil moisture modelled with HydroSVS to point-scale measurements of volumetric soil water content and (2) model complexity by comparing the performance of HydroSVS to that of HydroGeoSphere, a state-of-the-art integrated surface and subsurface hydrologic model. To do this, we performed one-dimensional soil column simulations at four sites of the AmeriFlux network. Results indicate that under Mediterranean and temperate climates, HydroSVS satisfactorily simulated soil moisture (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency between 0.26 and 0.70; R2 ≥ 0.80), with a performance comparable to HydroGeoSphere (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency ≥0.60; R2 ≥ 0.80). However, HydroSVS performed weakly under a semiarid climate while HydroGeoSphere performed relatively well. By decoupling the magnitude and sourcing of evapotranspiration, this study proposes a powerful diagnostic tool to evaluate the representation of subsurface hydrological processes in land surface models. Overall, this study highlights the potential of SVS for hydrological applications.

  3. Effects of vegetation types on soil moisture estimation from the normalized land surface temperature versus vegetation index space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dianjun; Zhou, Guoqing

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) is a key variable that has been widely used in many environmental studies. Land surface temperature versus vegetation index (LST-VI) space becomes a common way to estimate SM in optical remote sensing applications. Normalized LST-VI space is established by the normalized LST and VI to obtain the comparable SM in Zhang et al. (Validation of a practical normalized soil moisture model with in situ measurements in humid and semiarid regions [J]. International Journal of Remote Sensing, DOI: 10.1080/01431161.2015.1055610). The boundary conditions in the study were set to limit the point A (the driest bare soil) and B (the wettest bare soil) for surface energy closure. However, no limitation was installed for point D (the full vegetation cover). In this paper, many vegetation types are simulated by the land surface model - Noah LSM 3.2 to analyze the effects on soil moisture estimation, such as crop, grass and mixed forest. The locations of point D are changed with vegetation types. The normalized LST of point D for forest is much lower than crop and grass. The location of point D is basically unchanged for crop and grass.

  4. THE GEOLOGICAL CONDITIONING OF HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS RESULTING FROM SOIL CONTAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa J. Lipińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization economy of oil mining and mineral waters is associated with planning the functions of spa treatment. Environmental protection of the spa areas also applies to preserve their technical and cultural heritage. This article attempts to determine the places of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon pollution substances. Their presence in the soil affects the quality of the environment. As a result, maps are produced showing directions of research: (1 the natural background of biodiversity, and (2 potential anthropogenic pollution. They are assessed in the context of the health and human life, protection of the environment and the possibility of damage to the environment. Research is conducted in communes of the status of the spa – for special protection.

  5. Micromorphometric analysis of porosity changes in the surface crusts of three soils in the Piracicaba region, São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Pierri Castilho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to micromorphologically analyze modifications in soil porosity due to the occurrence of erosive rainfall events. Three types of soils, Typic Hapludox, Typic Hapludult and Rhodic Kandiudalf, were analyzed to determine their total porosity and the distribution and number of pores. The soils were tilled with a heavy disk and leveling harrow to ensure homogeneity of surface conditions at the beginning of the trial period and to simulate cropping conditions. The soils were kept uncovered during the trial period, and rainfall events with intensities greater than 25 mm h-1 were recorded. The results showed that all of the soils presented crust formation, influenced by the soil texture. NVef showed significant changes in total porosity, pore numbers and pore morphology, while LVAd and PVAd did not display marked modifications in these attributes.

  6. Critical analysis of the thermal inertia approach to map soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Corbari, Chiara; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo; Sobrino, José Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The paper reports a critical analysis of the thermal inertia approach to map surface soil water content on bare and sparsely vegetated soils by means of remotely sensed data. The study area is an experimental area located in Barrax (Spain). Field data were acquired within the Barrax 2011 research project. AHS airborne images including VIS/NIR and TIR bands were acquired both day and night time by the INTA (Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) between the 11th and 13rd of June 2011. Images cover a corn pivot surrounded by bare soil, where a set of in situ data have been collected previously and simultaneously to overpasses. To validate remotely sensed estimations, a preliminary proximity sensing set up has been arranged, measuring spectra and surface temperatures on transects by means of ASD hand-held spectroradiometer and an Everest Interscience radiometric thermometer respectively. These data were collected on two transects: the first one on bare soil and the second from bare to sparsely vegetated soil; soil water content in both transects ranged approximately between field and saturation values. Furthermore thermal inertia was measured using a KD2Pro probe, and surface water content of soil was measured using FDR and TDR probes. This ground dataset was used: 1) to verify if the thermal inertia method can be applied to map water content also on soil covered by sparse vegetation, and 2) to quantify a correction factor of the downwelling shortwave radiation taking into account sky cloudiness effects on thermal inertia assessment. The experiment tests both Xue and Cracknell approximation to retrieve the thermal inertia from a dumped value of the phase difference and the three-temperature approach of Sobrino to estimate the phase difference spatial distribution. Both methods were then applied on the remotely sensed airborne images collected during the following days, in order to obtain the spatial distribution of the surface soil moisture on bare soils and

  7. Surface and subsurface conditions in permafrost areas - a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidstrand, Patrik

    2003-02-01

    This report contains a summary of some of the information within existing technical and scientific literature on permafrost. Permafrost is viewed as one of the future climate driven process domains that may exist in Scandinavia, and that may give rise to significantly different surface and subsurface conditions than the present. Except for changes in the biosphere, permafrost may impact hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical subsurface processes and conditions. Permafrost and its influences on the subsurface conditions are thus of interest for the performance and safety assessments of deep geological waste repositories. The definition of permafrost is 'ground that stays at or below 0 deg C for at least two consecutive years'. Permafrost will effect the geological subsurface to some depth. How deep the permafrost may grow is a function of the heat balance, thermal conditions at the surface and within the ground, and the geothermal heat flux from the Earth's inner parts. The main chapters of the report summaries the knowledge on permafrost evolution, occurrence and distribution, and extracts information concerning hydrology and mechanical and chemical impacts due to permafrost related conditions. The results of a literature review are always dependent on the available literature. Concerning permafrost there is some literature available from investigations in the field of long-term repositories and some from mining industries. However, reports of these investigations are few and the bulk of permafrost literature comes from the science departments concerned with surficial processes (e.g. geomorphology, hydrology, agriculture, etc) and from engineering concerns, such as foundation of constructions and pipeline design. This focus within the permafrost research inevitably yields a biased but also an abundant amount of information on localised surficial processes and a limited amount on regional and deep permafrost characteristics. Possible conclusions are that there is

  8. Surface and subsurface conditions in permafrost areas - a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidstrand, Patrik [Bergab, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2003-02-01

    This report contains a summary of some of the information within existing technical and scientific literature on permafrost. Permafrost is viewed as one of the future climate driven process domains that may exist in Scandinavia, and that may give rise to significantly different surface and subsurface conditions than the present. Except for changes in the biosphere, permafrost may impact hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical subsurface processes and conditions. Permafrost and its influences on the subsurface conditions are thus of interest for the performance and safety assessments of deep geological waste repositories. The definition of permafrost is 'ground that stays at or below 0 deg C for at least two consecutive years'. Permafrost will effect the geological subsurface to some depth. How deep the permafrost may grow is a function of the heat balance, thermal conditions at the surface and within the ground, and the geothermal heat flux from the Earth's inner parts. The main chapters of the report summaries the knowledge on permafrost evolution, occurrence and distribution, and extracts information concerning hydrology and mechanical and chemical impacts due to permafrost related conditions. The results of a literature review are always dependent on the available literature. Concerning permafrost there is some literature available from investigations in the field of long-term repositories and some from mining industries. However, reports of these investigations are few and the bulk of permafrost literature comes from the science departments concerned with surficial processes (e.g. geomorphology, hydrology, agriculture, etc) and from engineering concerns, such as foundation of constructions and pipeline design. This focus within the permafrost research inevitably yields a biased but also an abundant amount of information on localised surficial processes and a limited amount on regional and deep permafrost characteristics. Possible conclusions are that

  9. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  10. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  11. Field dissipation of oxyfluorfen in onion and its dynamics in soil under Indian tropical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaki, P; Sathya Priya, R; Chinnusamy, C

    2013-01-01

    Oxyfluorfen, a diphenyl-ether herbicide is being used to control annual and perennial broad-leaved weeds and sedges in a variety of field crops including onion. The present study was aimed to investigate the dynamics and field persistence of oxyfluorfen in onion plant, bulb and soil under Indian tropical conditions. Application of four rates of oxyfluorfen viz., 200, 250, 300 and 400 g AI ha(-1) as pre-emergence gave good weed control in field experiment with onion. The oxyfluorfen residue dissipated faster in plant than in soil respectively, with a mean half-life of 6.1 and 11.2 days. Dissipation followed first-order kinetics. In laboratory column leaching experiments, 17 percent of the applied oxyfluorfen was recovered from the soil and indicates its solubility in water and mobility in sandy clay loam soil was low. A sorption study revealed that the adsorption of oxyfluorfen to the soil was highly influenced by the soil organic carbon with the Koc value of 5450. The study concludes that the dissipation of oxyfluorfen in soil and onion was dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the soil and environmental conditions.

  12. Variability of soil moisture and its relationship with surface albedo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Continuous observation data collected over the year 2008 at Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram in south Kerala (76° 59′E longitude and 8° 30′N latitude) are used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal soil moisture variations. The effect of rainfall on diurnal and seasonal soil moisture is discussed.

  13. Effects of artificial soil surface management on changes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies of size distribution, stability of the aggregates, and other soil properties are very important due to their influence on tilth, water infiltration, and nutrient ... Data measured for eight years on induced erosion experiments on a Ferralsol covered by artificial soil netting locally called sombrite at Campinas, Brazil, were used ...

  14. Spatial and temporal monitoring of soil moisture using surface electrical resistivity tomography in Mediterranean soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alamry, Abdulmohsen S.; van der Meijde, Mark; Noomen, Marleen; Addink, Elisabeth A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/224281216; van Benthem, Rik; de Jong, Steven M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120221306

    2017-01-01

    ERT techniques are especially promising in (semi-arid) areas with shallow and rocky soils where other methods fail to produce soil moisture maps and to obtain soil profile information. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was performed in the Peyne catchment in southern France at four sites

  15. Assessment of Mesotrione Leaching Applied Alone and Mixed in Seven Tropical Soils Columns under Laboratory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassio F. Mendes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herbicide leaching is influenced by soil physical and chemical properties as well as the prevailing climatic conditions. However, little is known about leaching of mixture of herbicides in the soil, especially in tropical regions like Brazil. The objective of this study is to evaluate the leaching of 14C-mesotrione (cyclohexane-2-14C-mesotrione alone and in a mixture with S-metolachlor and terbuthylazine in seven tropical soil columns under laboratory conditions. These soils represented a wide range of properties with varying textures, cation exchange capacity (44 to 154 mmolc kg−1, pH (6.0 to 7.7, organic carbon content (0.58 to 27.32 g kg−1 and clay mineral contents (50 to 605 g kg−1, which are typical of tropical soils. Mesotrione residues were observed across all soil column layers (0–30 cm in all evaluated soils by simulating 200 mm of water for 48 h. The application of mesotrione, alone or in a mixture, does not influence the leaching of this herbicide. Leaching of mesotrione ranged from low (up 15 cm to very high (up 30 cm and leachate in the tropical soils and may pose a potential groundwater contamination risk. In sand and loamy sand soil, the mesotrione was quantified in the leachate at all sampling times as above 80% of the amount initially applied. Thus, mesotrione application without the prior knowledge of the soil physical and chemical properties can result in inefficient weed control on field condition due to high leaching potentials.

  16. Bacteria transport and retention in intact calcareous soil columns under saturated flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokhian Firouzi Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study of bacterial transport and retention in soil is important for various environmental applications such as groundwater contamination and bioremediation of soil and water. The main objective of this research was to quantitatively assess bacterial transport and deposition under saturated conditions in calcareous soil. A series of leaching experiments was conducted on two undisturbed soil columns. Breakthrough curves of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Cl were measured. After the leaching experiment, spatial distribution of bacteria retention in the soil columns was determined. The HYDRUS-1D one- and two-site kinetic models were used to predict the transport and deposition of bacteria in soil. The results indicated that the two-site model fits the observed data better than one-site kinetic model. Bacteria interaction with the soil of kinetic site 1 revealed relatively fast attachment and slow detachment, whereas attachment to and detachment of bacteria from kinetic site 2 was fast. Fast attachment and slow detachment of site 1 can be attributed to soil calcium carbonate that has favorable attachment sites for bacteria. The detachment rate was less than 0.02 of the attachment rate, indicating irreversible attachment of bacteria. High reduction rate of bacteria was also attributed to soil calcium carbonate.

  17. Low Nitrogen Retention in Soil and Litter under Conditions without Plants in a Subtropical Pine Plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil acts as a major sink for added nitrogen (N in forests, but it remains unclear about the capacity of soil to immobilize N under conditions without plant roots and whether added N interacts with ecosystem N to affect N retention. We added 15NH415NO3 to in situ soil columns (with leaching and leaf litter (without leaching of two tree species in a subtropical Pinus elliottii plantation. Soil and litter were collected three or eight months after N addition to measure concentrations of indigenous and exogenous N. About 70% of exogenous N was retained in soil three months after N addition, of which 65.9% were in inorganic forms. Eight months after N addition, 16.0% of exogenous N was retained in soil and 9.8%–13.6% was immobilized in litter. N addition increased the mineral release and nitrification of soil indigenous N. Loss of litter indigenous N was also increased by N addition. Our results suggest that N deposition on lands with low root activities or low soil carbon (C contents may lead to increased N output due to low N immobilization. Moreover, the effects of added N on ecosystem indigenous N may decrease the capacity of soil and litter in N retention.

  18. Influence of different land surfaces on atmospheric conditions measured by a wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, Katharina; Ament, Felix

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric conditions close to the surface, like temperature, wind speed and humidity, vary on small scales because of surface heterogeneities. Therefore, the traditional measuring approach of using a single, highly accurate station is of limited representativeness for a larger domain, because it is not able to determine these small scale variabilities. However, both the variability and the domain averages are important information for the development and validation of atmospheric models and soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) schemes. Due to progress in microelectronics it is possible to construct networks of comparably cheap meteorological stations with moderate accuracy. Such a network provides data in high spatial and temporal resolution. The EPFL Lausanne developed such a network called SensorScope, consisting of low cost autonomous stations. Each station observes air and surface temperature, humidity, wind direction and speed, incoming solar radiation, precipitations, soil moisture and soil temperature and sends the data via radio communication to a base station. This base station forwards the collected data via GSM/GPRS to a central server. Within the FLUXPAT project in August 2009 we deployed 15 stations as a twin transect near Jülich, Germany. One aim of this first experiment was to test the quality of the low cost sensors by comparing them to more accurate reference measurements. It turned out, that although the network is not highly accurate, the measurements are consistent. Consequently an analysis of the pattern of atmospheric conditions is feasible. For example, we detect a variability of ± 0.5K in the mean temperature at a distance of only 2.3 km. The transect covers different types of vegetation and a small river. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of different land surfaces and the distance to the river on meteorological conditions. On the one hand, some results meet our expectations, e.g. the relative humidity decreases with increasing

  19. Protection performance of some polyurethane surface systems on wood surface in outdoor conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özgenc

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different surface system applied oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L. were investigated resistance to the outdoor conditions of the test and control wood. Surface systems were compared as two different property polyurethane-based materials. Outdoor test has been implemented in Sürmene coastal, Uzungol and Hıdırnebi plateaus. Oriental spruce samples were compared based on the discoloration and reduction in fiber to parallel compressive strength in outdoor conditions. The weathering test in Hıdırnebi plateau was found at the lowest discoloration and reduction rate on compressive strength. According to the obtained results; polyester-based material, the oriental spruce wood against discoloration and reduction in compressive strength was determined at outdoor conditions is relatively well preserved

  20. An AES Study of the Room Temperature Surface Conditioning of Technological Metal Surfaces by Electron Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Taborelli, M; Brown, A; Baker, M A

    2002-01-01

    The modifications to technological copper and niobium surfaces induced by 2.5 keV electron irradiation have been investigated in the context of the conditioning process occurring in particle accelerator ultra high vacuum systems. Changes in the elemental surface composition have been found using Scanning Auger Microscopy (SAM) by monitoring the carbon, oxygen and metal Auger peak intensities as a function of electron irradiation in the dose range 10-6 to 10-2 C mm-2. The surface analysis results are compared with electron dose dependent secondary electron and electron stimulated desorption yield measurements. Initially the electron irradiation causes a surface cleaning through electron stimulated desorption, in particular of hydrogen. During this period both the electron stimulated desorption and secondary electron yield decrease as a function of electron dose. When the electron dose exceeds 10-4 C mm-2 electron stimulated desorption yields are reduced by several orders of magnitude and the electron beam indu...

  1. Quantifying the effects of wildfire on changes in soil properties by surface burning of soils from the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, Celeste; Ebel, Brian A.; Singha, Kamini

    2017-01-01

    Study regionThis study used intact soil cores collected at the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory near Boulder, Colorado, USA to explore fire impacts on soil properties.Study focusThree soil scenarios were considered: unburned control soils, and low- and high-temperature burned soils. We explored simulated fire impacts on field-saturated hydraulic conductivity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, and infiltration processes during rainfall simulations.New hydrological insights for the regionSoils burned to high temperatures became more homogeneous with depth with respect to total organic carbon and bulk density, suggesting reductions in near-surface porosity. Organic matter decreased significantly with increasing soil temperature. Tension infiltration experiments suggested a decrease in infiltration rates from unburned to low-temperature burned soils, and an increase in infiltration rates in high-temperature burned soils. Non-parametric statistical tests showed that field-saturated hydraulic conductivity similarly decreased from unburned to low-temperature burned soils, and then increased with high-temperature burned soils. We interpret these changes result from the combustion of surface and near-surface organic materials, enabling water to infiltrate directly into soil instead of being stored in the litter and duff layer at the surface. Together, these results indicate that fire-induced changes in soil properties from low temperatures were not as drastic as high temperatures, but that reductions in surface soil water repellency in high temperatures may increase infiltration relative to low temperatures.

  2. Soil surface protection by Biocrusts: effects of functional groups on textural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Martínez, Isabel; Flores Flores, José Luis; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    In drylands, where vegetation cover is commonly scarce, soil surface is prone to wind and water soil erosion, with the subsequent loss of topsoil structure and chemical properties. These processes are even more pronounced in ecosystems subjected to extra erosive forces, such as grasslands and rangelands that support livestock production. However, some of the physiological and functional traits of biocrusts (i.e., complex association of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, fungi and soil particles) make them ideal to resist in disturbed environments and at the same time to protect soil surface from mechanical perturbations. In particular, the filaments and exudates of soil cyanobacteria and the rhizines of lichen can bind together soil particles, forming soil aggregates at the soil surface and thus enhancing soil stability. Also, they act as "biological covers" that preserve the most vulnerable soil layer from wind and runoff erosion and raindrop impact, maintaining soil structure and composition. In this work, we evaluated soil textural properties and organic matter content under different functional groups of biocrusts (i.e., cyanobacteria crust, 3 lichen species, 1 moss species) and in bare soil. In order to assess the impact of livestock trampling on soil properties and on Biocrust function, we sampled three sites conforming a disturbance gradient (low, medium and high impact sites) and a long-term livestock exclusion as control site. We found that the presence of biocrusts had little effects on soil textural properties and organic matter content in the control site, while noticeable differences were found between bare soil and soil under biocrusts (e.g., up to 16-37% higher clay content, compared to bare soil and up to 10% higher organic matter content). In addition, we found that depending on morphological traits and grazing regime, the effects of biocrusts changed along the gradient. For example, soil under the lichen Diploschistes diacapsis, with thick thallus

  3. Influence of Conditioned Surface Textures on Plain Journal Bearing Performance Working on HL Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vélez-Restrepo J.M.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As an answer to the need for reducing friction losses on bearings, dynamic seals, piston rings, cutting tools and others, a lot of work has been dedicated to mechanical systems study whose surfaces have been textured in a controlled way. Theoretical models and experimental results have shown improvements on the tribological performance of these systems regarding untextured systems, working under the same conditions. This paper presents a numerical model for getting relationships among the operational conditions (load, speed, and dynamic viscosity, the minimum lubricate film thickness, the friction coefficient and the conditioned micro-topography of a plain sliding bearing working under a hydrodynamic regime. Moreover, regarding other similar works the constructed model allows studying the combined effect of the micro-wedges that work as micro-bearings, and the typical convergent macro-wedge of these study elements.

  4. Soil particle tracing using RFID tags for elucidating the behavior of radiocesium on bare soil surfaces in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manome, Ryo; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Stefani, Chiara; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Parsons, Tony; Cooper, James

    2014-05-01

    Radioactive materials are generally associated with soil particles in terrestrial environment and therefore the better understanding soil erosion processes is expected to improve the mitigation of radioactive risks. Spatial variability in soil erosion has been one of critical issues for soil erosion management. This study attempts to track soil particle movement on soil surfaces by employing Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags for the better understanding radiocesium behavior. A RFID tag contains a specific electronically identifier and it permits tracing its movement by reading the identifier. In this study, we made artificial soil particles by coating the RFID tags with cement material. The particle diameters of the artificial soil particles approximately ranged from 3 to 5 mm. The artificial soil particles were distributed in a reticular pattern on a soil erosion plot (bare soil surface, 22.13 m length × 5 m width, 4.4° slope) in Kawamata town where radiocesium deposited because of the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant accident. After their distribution on October 2012, we had read the identifiers of RFID tags and recorded their locations on the plot for 14 times by September 2013. Moving distance (MD) was calculated based on the difference of the location for each sampling date. The topographical changes on the plot were also monitored with a laser scanner to describe interrill erosion and rill erosion area on 11occasions. Median MD is 10.8cm for all the observations. Median MD on interrill and rill erosion areas were 9.8 cm and 20.7 cm, respectively. Seasonal variation in MD was observed; an extremely large MD was found in May 2013, at the first reading after the winter season. This large MD after winter suggests that snowmelt runoff was the dominant process which transported the soil particles. Comparing the MD with the observed amounts of rainfall, sediment and runoff on the plot, significant positive correlation were found if the data of May, 2013

  5. Modeling surface energy fluxes from a patchwork of fields with different soils and crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Heinlein, Florian; Priesack, Eckart

    2017-04-01

    soil-plant-atmosphere interface. The simulated energy fluxes were compared with eddy flux tower measurements between the respective fields at the research farm Scheyern, North-West of Munich, Germany. These simulations were done by coupling the ecosystem model Expert-N to an analytical footprint model [Mauder & Foken 2011] . The coupled model system has the ability to calculate the mixing ratio of the surface energy fluxes at the flux tower position. The approach accounts for the temporarily and spatially changing contributions of the patchwork of environmental land surface conditions (land use, management, soil properties) which influence the energy flux tower measurements due to the footprint dynamics. The statistical evaluation between simulation and measurements showed that the mixed approach improved the comparability in most cases. Furthermore, the management impact on single patches can be clearly detected, both in the measurements and the simulation. We conclude that reasonable simulations of energy and matter fluxes can be obtained if the heterogeneity of the land surfaces is taken into account.

  6. High Quality Acquisition of Surface Electromyography - Conditioning Circuit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Khan, Sheroz; Nurashikin, Anis; Haider, Samnan; Larbani, Sofiane; Arshad, Atika; Tasnim, Rumana

    2013-12-01

    The acquisition of Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signals is used for many applications including the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases, and prosthesis control. The diagnostic quality of the SEMG signal is highly dependent on the conditioning circuit of the SEMG acquisition system. This paper presents the design of an SEMG conditioning circuit that can guarantee to collect high quality signal with high SNR such that it is immune to environmental noise. The conditioning circuit consists of four stages; consisting of an instrumentation amplifier that is used with a gain of around 250; 4th order band pass filter in the 20-500Hz frequency range as the two initial stages. The third stage is an amplifier with adjustable gain using a variable resistance; the gain could be changed from 1000 to 50000. In the final stage the signal is translated to meet the input requirements of data acquisition device or the ADC. Acquisition of accurate signals allows it to be analyzed for extracting the required characteristic features for medical and clinical applications. According to the experimental results, the value of SNR for collected signal is 52.4 dB which is higher than the commercial system, the power spectrum density (PSD) graph is also presented and it shows that the filter has eliminated the noise below 20 Hz.

  7. Does relatedness of natives used for soil conditioning influence plant-soil feedback of exotics?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Petr; Plačková, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2011), s. 331-340 ISSN 1387-3547 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600050713 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : phylogenetic relatedness * plant invasions * soil microbiota Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2011

  8. Copper dynamics under alternating redox conditions is influenced by soil properties and contamination source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Ramona; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of soil redox conditions on contaminant dynamics is of significant importance for evaluating their lability, mobility and potential transfer to other environmental compartments. Under changing redox conditions, soil properties and constituents such as Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and organic matter (OM) may influence the behavior of associated metallic elements (MEs). In this work, the redox-driven release and redistribution of Cu between different soil pools was studied in three soils having different contamination sources. This was achieved by subjecting soil columns to a series of alternating reducing and oxidizing cycles under non-limiting C conditions, and assessing their influence on soil pore water, leachate and solid phase composition. Results showed that, in all soils, alternating redox conditions led to an increase in the distribution of Cu in the more labile fractions, consequently enhancing its susceptibility to loss. This was generally linked to the redox-driven cycling of Fe, Mn and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In fact, results suggested that the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and subsequent reprecipitation as poorly-ordered phases under oxic conditions contributed to the release and mobilization of Cu and/or Cu-containing organometallic complexes. However, the behavior of Cu, as well as the mechanisms controlling Cu release and loss with redox cycling, was influenced by both soil properties (e.g. pH, contents of easily reducible Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides) and source of Cu contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterizing near-surface CO2 conditions before injection - Perspectives from a CCS project in the Illinois Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, R.A.; Krapac, I.G.; Lewicki, J.L.; Curtis-Robinson, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is conducting a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in Decatur, Illinois, USA to demonstrate the ability of a deep saline formation to store one million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) from an ethanol facility. Beginning in early 2011, CO2 will be injected at a rate of 1,000 tonnes/day for three years into the Mount Simon Sandstone at a depth of approximately 2,100 meters. An extensive Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program has been undertaken for the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) and is focused on the 0.65 km2 project site. Goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. MVA efforts are being conducted pre-, during, and post- CO2 injection. Soil and net CO2 flux monitoring has been conducted for more than one year to characterize near-surface CO2 conditions. More than 2,200 soil CO2 flux measurements have been manually collected from a network of 118 soil rings since June 2009. Three ring types have been evaluated to determine which type may be the most effective in detecting potential CO 2 leakage. Bare soil, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm into the ground and were prepared to minimize surface vegetation in and near the rings. Bare soil, deep-depth rings were prepared similarly, but were driven 46 cm. Natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm and are most representative of typical vegetation conditions. Bare-soil, shallow-depth rings had the smallest observed mean flux (1.78 ??mol m-2 s-1) versus natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings (3.38 ??mol m-2 s-1). Current data suggest bare ring types would be more sensitive to small CO2 leak signatures than natural ring types because of higher signal to noise ratios. An eddy covariance (EC) system has been in use since June

  10. Mulching type-induced soil moisture and temperature regimes and water use efficiency of soybean under rain-fed condition in central Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Kader

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max is a high water-demand crop and grown under moderate temperature in Japan. To protect the crop from hot summer and to utilize rainfall for its cultivation, selection of appropriate mulching material(s is crucial. For optimum production of the crop, soil moisture and temperature regimes as well as water use efficiency (WUE of the crop were investigated under straw, grass, paper, plastic and bare soil (control mulching under rain-fed condition at Gifu university farm in Japan. The mulching treatments, compared to the control, lowered soil temperature by 2 °C at 5 cm depth and 0.5 °C at 15 and 25 cm depths. The plastic and straw mulching stored the highest quantity of soil moisture at 5 and 15 cm depths; the bare soil stored the lowest quantity. At 25 cm depth, soil-moisture content was the highest under paper mulch but invariable under the other mulches. Plastic mulching reduced evaporation rate from the soil surface and, consequently, the reduced soil-water consumption (SWC from the root zone augmented WUE of soybean. The paper mulching, by conserving soil-moisture and reducing soil temperature, provided better crop growth attributes, while the plastic mulching improved WUE of green soybean. Therefore, the plastic mulch performed best in reducing soil-water consumption and increasing WUE, while the paper mulch was good for soil-moisture conservation and temperature modification that increased soybean yield. Keywords: Mulching, Soil-water consumption, Soil temperature, Water use efficiency

  11. Dynamic interplay between microbial denitrification and antibiotic resistance under enhanced anoxic denitrification condition in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Liu, Kuan; Schwab, Arthur P; Liu, Manqiang; Jiao, Jiaguo; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Tian, Da; Wu, Jun; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Mixed contamination of nitrate and antibiotics/antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) is an emerging environmental risk to farmland soil. This is the first study to explore the role of excessive anthropogenic nitrate input in the anoxic dissipation of soil antibiotic/ARGs. During the initial 10 days of incubation, the presence of soil antibiotics significantly inhibited NO 3 - dissipation, N 2 O production rate, and denitrifying genes (DNGs) abundance in soil (p antibiotic contents and ARG abundance. Significantly negative correlations were detected between DNGs and ARGs, suggesting that the higher the DNG activity, the more dramatic is the denitrification and the greater are the antibiotic dissipation and ARG abundance. This study provides crucial knowledge for understanding the mutual interaction between soil DNGs and ARGs in the enhanced anoxic denitrification condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptional plasticity of a soil arthropod across different ecological conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, T.E.; Birlutiu, A.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Timmermans, M.J.T.N.; Dijkstra, T.M.H.; van Straalen, N.M.; Ylstra, B.; Roelofs, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ecological functional genomics, dealing with the responses of organisms to their natural environment is confronted with a complex pattern of variation and a large number of confounding environmental factors. For gene expression studies to provide meaningful information on conditions deviating from

  13. Mixture and method for simulating soiling and weathering of surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Destaillats, Hugo; Levinson, Ronnen; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem

    2018-01-02

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to simulated soiling and weathering of materials. In one aspect, a soiling mixture may include an aqueous suspension of various amounts of salt, soot, dust, and humic acid. In another aspect, a method may include weathering a sample of material in a first exposure of the sample to ultraviolet light, water vapor, and elevated temperatures, depositing a soiling mixture on the sample, and weathering the sample in a second exposure of the sample to ultraviolet light, water vapor, and elevated temperatures.

  14. Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Surface Soil Properties in Alabama Ultisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Dana G.; Shaw, Joey N.; Rickman, Doug; Mask, Paul L.; Luvall, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of surface soil properties via remote sensing could facilitate soil survey mapping, erosion prediction and allocation of agrochemicals for precision management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between soil spectral signature and surface soil properties in conventionally managed row crop systems. High-resolution RS data were acquired over bare fields in the Coastal Plain, Appalachian Plateau, and Ridge and Valley provinces of Alabama using the Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor multispectral scanner. Soils ranged from sandy Kandiudults to fine textured Rhodudults. Surface soil samples (0-1 cm) were collected from 163 sampling points for soil organic carbon, particle size distribution, and citrate dithionite extractable iron content. Surface roughness, soil water content, and crusting were also measured during sampling. Two methods of analysis were evaluated: 1) multiple linear regression using common spectral band ratios, and 2) partial least squares regression. Our data show that thermal infrared spectra are highly, linearly related to soil organic carbon, sand and clay content. Soil organic carbon content was the most difficult to quantify in these highly weathered systems, where soil organic carbon was generally less than 1.2%. Estimates of sand and clay content were best using partial least squares regression at the Valley site, explaining 42-59% of the variability. In the Coastal Plain, sandy surfaces prone to crusting limited estimates of sand and clay content via partial least squares and regression with common band ratios. Estimates of iron oxide content were a function of mineralogy and best accomplished using specific band ratios, with regression explaining 36-65% of the variability at the Valley and Coastal Plain sites, respectively.

  15. Surface layer conditions of the atmosphere over western Bay of Bengal during Monex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anto, A.F.; Rao, L.V.G.; Somayajulu, Y.K.

    Based on surface meteorological data and wave data collected from 2 stations in the western Bay of Bengal in July 1979, surface layer (SL) conditions of the atmosphere for different situations of surface circulations and the associated sea surface...

  16. Studying soil organic carbon in Mediterranean soils. Different techniques and the effects of land management and use, climatic and topographic conditions, organic waste addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important component of global carbon cycle, and the changes of its accumulation and decomposition directly affect terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage and global carbon balance. The ability of soil to store SOC depends to a great extent on climate and some soil properties, in addition to the cultivation system in agricultural soils. Soils in Mediterranean areas are very poor in organic matter and are exposed to progressive degradation processes. Therefore, a lot of actions are conducted to improve soil quality and hence mitigate the negative environmental and agronomic limitations of these soils. Improved cultivation systems (conversion of cropland to pastoral and forest lands, conventional tillage to conservation tillage, no manure use to regular addition of manure) have been introduced in recent years, increasing the contents in SOC and therefore, enhancing the soil quality, reducing soil erosion and degradation, improving surface water quality and increasing soil productivity. Moreover, the organic waste addition to the soils is especially useful in Mediterranean regions, where the return of organic matter to soil not only does it help soils store SOC and improve soil structure and soil fertility but also it allows to reuse a wide range of agro-industrial wastes.

  17. Sensing technologies to measure metabolic activities in soil and assess its health conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Soil is a complex ecosystem comprised of several and mutually interacting components, both abiotic (organo-mineral associations) and biotic (microbial and pedofaunal populations and plants), where a single parameter depends on other factors and affects the same and other factors, so that a network of influences among organisms coexists with the reciprocal actions between organisms and their environment. Therefore, it is difficult to undoubtedly determine what is the cause and what the effect within relationships between factors and processes. Soil is commonly studied through the evaluation and measurement of single parameters (e.g. the content of soil organic matter (SOM), microbial biomass, enzyme activities, pH, etc.), events (e.g. soil erosion, compaction, etc.) and processes (e.g. soil respiration, carbon fluxes, nitrification/denitrification, etc.), often carried out in laboratory conditions in order to limit the number of factors acting within the ecosystem under study, but missing the information about the global soil environment that way. In the last decade, several scientists have proposed and suggested the need for a holistic approach to soil ecosystems in different contexts. Recently, we have applied a sensing system developed in the last decades and capable of analysing complex mixtures of gases and volatiles (odours or aromas) in atmospheres, namely called electronic nose (EN). Typically, ENs are devices consisting of an array of differentially and partially specific, despite selective, sensors upon diverse coatings of sensitive films, i.e. interacting with single analytes of the same chemical class, despite not highly specific for a single substance, only, but showing also lower extent of cross-selectivity towards compounds of other chemical classes. ENs can be used in the classifications of odours by processing the collected responses of all sensors in the array through pattern recognition analyses, in order to obtain a chemical fingerprint

  18. Distribution of near-surface permafrost in Alaska: estimates of present and future conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nield, Shawn J.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Finley, Andrew O.

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude regions are experiencing rapid and extensive changes in ecosystem composition and function as the result of increases in average air temperature. Increasing air temperatures have led to widespread thawing and degradation of permafrost, which in turn has affected ecosystems, socioeconomics, and the carbon cycle of high latitudes. Here we overcome complex interactions among surface and subsurface conditions to map nearsurface permafrost through decision and regression tree approaches that statistically and spatially extend field observations using remotely sensed imagery, climatic data, and thematic maps of a wide range of surface and subsurface biophysical characteristics. The data fusion approach generated medium-resolution (30-m pixels) maps of near-surface (within 1 m) permafrost, active-layer thickness, and associated uncertainty estimates throughout mainland Alaska. Our calibrated models (overall test accuracy of ~85%) were used to quantify changes in permafrost distribution under varying future climate scenarios assuming no other changes in biophysical factors. Models indicate that near-surface permafrost underlies 38% of mainland Alaska and that near-surface permafrost will disappear on 16 to 24% of the landscape by the end of the 21st Century. Simulations suggest that near-surface permafrost degradation is more probable in central regions of Alaska than more northerly regions. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for potential remobilization of frozen soil carbon pools under warmer temperatures. Additionally, warmer and drier conditions may increase fire activity and severity, which may exacerbate rates of permafrost thaw and carbon remobilization relative to climate alone. The mapping of permafrost distribution across Alaska is important for land-use planning, environmental assessments, and a wide-array of geophysical studies.

  19. Organic matter composition of soil macropore surfaces under different agricultural management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Leue, Marin; Magid, Jacob; Gerke, Horst H.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the heterogeneous nature of soil, i.e. properties and processes occurring specifically at local scales is essential for best managing our soil resources for agricultural production. Examination of intact soil structures in order to obtain an increased understanding of how soil systems operate from small to large scale represents a large gap within soil science research. Dissolved chemicals, nutrients and particles are transported through the disturbed plow layer of agricultural soil, where after flow through the lower soil layers occur by preferential flow via macropores. Rapid movement of water through macropores limit the contact between the preferentially moving water and the surrounding soil matrix, therefore contact and exchange of solutes in the water is largely restricted to the surface area of the macropores. Organomineral complex coated surfaces control sorption and exchange properties of solutes, as well as availability of essential nutrients to plant roots and to the preferentially flowing water. DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance infrared Fourier Transform) Mapping has been developed to examine composition of organic matter coated macropores. In this study macropore surfaces structures will be determined for organic matter composition using DRIFT from a long-term field experiment on waste application to agricultural soil (CRUCIAL, close to Copenhagen, Denmark). Parcels with 5 treatments; accelerated household waste, accelerated sewage sludge, accelerated cattle manure, NPK and unfertilized, will be examined in order to study whether agricultural management have an impact on the organic matter composition of intact structures.

  20. Contributions of groundwater conditions to soil and water salinization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ramsis B.; Otto, Claus J.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.

    Salinization is the process whereby the concentration of dissolved salts in water and soil is increased due to natural or human-induced processes. Water is lost through one or any combination of four main mechanisms: evaporation, evapotranspiration, hydrolysis, and leakage between aquifers. Salinity increases from catchment divides to the valley floors and in the direction of groundwater flow. Salinization is explained by two main chemical models developed by the authors: weathering and deposition. These models are in agreement with the weathering and depositional geological processes that have formed soils and overburden in the catchments. Five soil-change processes in arid and semi-arid climates are associated with waterlogging and water. In all represented cases, groundwater is the main geological agent for transmitting, accumulating, and discharging salt. At a small catchment scale in South and Western Australia, water is lost through evapotranspiration and hydrolysis. Saline groundwater flows along the beds of the streams and is accumulated in paleochannels, which act as a salt repository, and finally discharges in lakes, where most of the saline groundwater is concentrated. In the hummocky terrains of the Northern Great Plains Region, Canada and USA, the localized recharge and discharge scenarios cause salinization to occur mainly in depressions, in conjunction with the formation of saline soils and seepages. On a regional scale within closed basins, this process can create playas or saline lakes. In the continental aquifers of the rift basins of Sudan, salinity increases along the groundwater flow path and forms a saline zone at the distal end. The saline zone in each rift forms a closed ridge, which coincides with the closed trough of the groundwater-level map. The saline body or bodies were formed by evaporation coupled with alkaline-earth carbonate precipitation and dissolution of capillary salts. Résumé La salinisation est le processus par lequel la

  1. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselská, Veronika, E-mail: veselskav@fzp.czu.cz [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Fajgar, Radek [Department of Analytical and Material Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, v.v.i., Rozvojová 135/1, CZ-16502, Prague (Czech Republic); Číhalová, Sylva [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Bolanz, Ralph M. [Institute of Geosciences, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, DE-07745, Jena (Germany); Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph [ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, DE-76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Siddique, Jamal A.; Komárek, Michael [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Study of Cr(VI) adsorption on soil minerals over a large range of conditions. • Combined surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic techniques. • Diffuse-layer and triple-layer models used to obtain fits to experimental data. • Speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was assessed. - Abstract: This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3–10), ionic strengths (0.001–0.1 M KNO{sub 3}), sorbate concentrations (10{sup −4}, 10{sup −5}, and 10{sup −6} M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50–500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  2. Conditions for mould growth on typical interior surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Eva B.; Andersen, Birgitte; Rode, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of the risk for mould growth is an important parameter for the analysis and design of the hygrothermal performance of building constructions. However, in practice the mould growth does not always follow the predicted behavior described by the mould growth models. This is often explained...... by uncertainty in the real conditions of exposure. In this study, laboratory experiments were designed to determine mould growth at controlled transient climate compared to growth at constant climate. The experiment included three building materials with four different surface treatments. The samples were...... inoculated with 8 common indoor moulds. Even after 40 weeks no growth was observed on any sample. The paper describes different hypotheses for the missing growth, and how these have been tested....

  3. Surface chemistry of tribochemical reactions explored in ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-Romero, Javier; Maya-Yescas, Rafael; Rico-Cerda, Jose Luis; Rivera-Rojas, Jose Luis; Castillo, Fernando Chinas; Kaltchev, Matey; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of model extreme-pressure lubricant additives on clean iron was studied in ultrahigh vacuum conditions using molecular beam strategies. Methylene chloride and chloroform react to deposit a solid film consisting of FeCl 2 and carbon, and evolve only hydrogen into the gas phase. No gas-phase products and less carbon on the surface are detected in the case of carbon tetrachloride. Dimethyl and diethyl disulfide react on clean iron to deposit a saturated sulfur plus carbon layer at low temperatures (∼600 K) and an iron sulfide film onto a Fe + C underlayer at higher temperatures (∼950 K). Methane is the only gas-phase product when dimethyl disulfide reacts with iron. Ethylene and hydrogen are detected when diethyl disulfide is used

  4. SMEX02 Land Surface Information: Soils Database, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes soil moisture data for the following 10 Iowa counties: Boone, Dallas, Franklin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jasper, Marshall, Polk, Story, and Wright....

  5. Investigation of the pathway of contaminated soil transported to plant surfaces by raindrop splash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Hakonson, T.E.; Whicker, F.W.; White, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The environmental transport pathway of soil-borne radioisotopes to vegetation surfaces via raindrop splash was studied. The data show that soil can significantly contribute to the contamination found on plants. Further detailed study is needed to calculate the rate constant for the raindrop splash and retention pathways. 8 references, 1 figure

  6. Role of subsurface physics in the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture controls the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly time scales. Though spatially distributed observations of soil moisture are increasingly becoming available from remotely sense...

  7. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  8. Groundwater control of mangrove surface elevation: shrink and swell varies with soil depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, K.R.T.; Smith, T. J.; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Anderson, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    We measured monthly soil surface elevation change and determined its relationship to groundwater changes at a mangrove forest site along Shark River, Everglades National Park, Florida. We combined the use of an original design, surface elevation table with new rod-surface elevation tables to separately track changes in the mid zone (0?4 m), the shallow root zone (0?0.35 m), and the full sediment profile (0?6 m) in response to site hydrology (daily river stage and groundwater piezometric pressure). We calculated expansion and contraction for each of the four constituent soil zones (surface [accretion and erosion; above 0 m], shallow zone [0?0.35 m], middle zone [0.35?4 m], and bottom zone [4?6 m]) that comprise the entire soil column. Changes in groundwater pressure correlated strongly with changes in soil elevation for the entire profile (Adjusted R2 5 0.90); this relationship was not proportional to the depth of the soil profile sampled. The change in thickness of the bottom soil zone accounted for the majority (R2 5 0.63) of the entire soil profile expansion and contraction. The influence of hydrology on specific soil zones and absolute elevation change must be considered when evaluating the effect of disturbances, sea level rise, and water management decisions on coastal wetland systems.

  9. Polygenetic oxisols on tertiary surfaces, Minas Gerais, Brazil : soil genesis and landscape development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muggler, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    Unravelling the genesis of polygenetic soils is a complex task because of overprinting and mixing of various phases of soil formation. Large areas of polygenetic Oxisols occur in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. They developed on surfaces exposed since the Tertiary or longer, which have

  10. Long-term changes in the surface conditions of PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Dylla, H.F.; Rossnagel, S.M.; Picraux, S.T.; Borders, J.A.; Magee, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    Long-term changes in the surface conditions of the PLT vacuum vessel wall have been monitoried by the periodic analysis of a variety of sample substrates (stainless steel, alumina, silicon), exposed to PLT discharges for periods of up to several months and subsequently removed for analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), ion backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and scanning electron microscopy. Samples exposed for extended time periods (2 to 6 months) showed deposited films containing limiter (W) and liner constituent metals (Fe, Cr, and Ni) and C and O. The film thicknesses ranged between 100 to 200 A with 2 to 15 atomic percent W and 5 to 40 percent Fe as determined by sputter-AES and ion backscattering measurements. Increased deposition of metallic impurities (W, Fe) was noted following the first extensive application of low power discharge cleaning. We discuss possible mechanisms responsible for the deposition of metals onto the sample surfaces. Deuterium retention was observed in all the exposed samples with the deuterium depth profiles restricted primarily to the deposited films on the stainless steel substrates and extending deeper for Si. The deuterium retained in the exposed samples shows a saturation at (1 to 11) x 10 15 D atoms/cm 2 for an estimated variation in the deuterium fluence of 10 17 to 10 19 D atoms/cm 2

  11. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; De Schepper, Stijn; McClymont, Erin L.

    2017-09-01

    The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial-interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST) and ice-rafted debris (IRD) in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  12. Root growth in field-grown winter wheat: Some effects of soil conditions, season and genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, L; Dodd, I C; Binley, A; Ashton, R W; White, R P; Watts, C W; Whalley, W R

    2017-11-01

    This work compared root length distributions of different winter wheat genotypes with soil physical measurements, in attempting to explain the relationship between root length density and soil depth. Field experiments were set up to compare the growth of various wheat lines, including near isogenic lines (Rht-B1a Tall NIL and Rht-B1c Dwarf NIL) and wheat lines grown commercially (cv. Battalion, Hystar Hybrid, Istabraq, and Robigus). Experiments occurred in two successive years under rain fed conditions. Soil water content, temperature and penetrometer resistance profiles were measured, and soil cores taken to estimate vertical profiles of pore distribution, and root number with the core-break method and by root washing. Root length distributions differed substantially between years. Wetter soil in 2014/2015 was associated with shallower roots. Although there was no genotypic effect in 2014/2015, in 2013/2014 the dwarf wheat had the most roots at depth. In the shallower layers, some wheat lines, especially Battalion, seemed better at penetrating non-structured soil. The increase in penetrometer resistance with depth was a putative explanation for the rapid decrease in root length density with depth. Differences between the two years in root profiles were greater than those due to genotype, suggesting that comparisons of different genotypic effects need to take account of different soil conditions and seasonal differences. We also demonstrate that high yields are not necessarily linked to resource acquisition, which did not seem to be limiting in the low yielding dwarf NIL.

  13. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  14. Soil surface moisture estimation over a semi-arid region using ENVISAT ASAR radar data for soil evaporation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zribi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the evaluation of soil evaporation, using soil moisture estimations based on radar satellite measurements. We present firstly an approach for the estimation and monitoring of soil moisture in a semi-arid region in North Africa, using ENVISAT ASAR images, over two types of vegetation covers. The first mapping process is dedicated solely to the monitoring of moisture variability related to rainfall events, over areas in the "non-irrigated olive tree" class of land use. The developed approach is based on a simple linear relationship between soil moisture and the backscattered radar signal normalised at a reference incidence angle. The second process is proposed over wheat fields, using an analysis of moisture variability due to both rainfall and irrigation. A semi-empirical model, based on the water-cloud model for vegetation correction, is used to retrieve soil moisture from the radar signal. Moisture mapping is carried out over wheat fields, showing high variability between irrigated and non-irrigated wheat covers. This analysis is based on a large database, including both ENVISAT ASAR and simultaneously acquired ground-truth measurements (moisture, vegetation, roughness, during the 2008–2009 vegetation cycle. Finally, a semi-empirical approach is proposed in order to relate surface moisture to the difference between soil evaporation and the climate demand, as defined by the potential evaporation. Mapping of the soil evaporation is proposed.

  15. Impervious Surfaces Alter Soil Bacterial Communities in Urban Areas: A Case Study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinhong; Dou, Xiaolin; Li, Juanyong; Li, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The rapid expansion of urbanization has caused land cover change, especially the increasing area of impervious surfaces. Such alterations have significant effects on the soil ecosystem by impeding the exchange of gasses, water, and materials between soil and the atmosphere. It is unclear whether impervious surfaces have any effects on soil bacterial diversity and community composition. In the present study, we conducted an investigation of bacterial communities across five typical land cover types, including impervious surfaces (concrete), permeable pavement (bricks with round holes), shrub coverage ( Buxus megistophylla Levl. ), lawns ( Festuca elata Keng ex E. Alexeev ), and roadside trees ( Sophora japonica Linn. ) in Beijing, to explore the response of bacteria to impervious surfaces. The soil bacterial communities were addressed by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that Proteobacteria , Actinobacteria , Acidobacteria , Bacteroidetes , Chloroflexi , and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla in urban soils. Soil from impervious surfaces presented a lower bacterial diversity, and differed greatly from other types of land cover. Soil bacterial diversity was predominantly affected by Zn, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil moisture content (SMC). The composition of the bacterial community was similar under shrub coverage, roadside trees, and lawns, but different from beneath impervious surfaces and permeable pavement. Variance partitioning analysis showed that edaphic properties contributed to 12% of the bacterial community variation, heavy metal pollution explained 3.6% of the variation, and interaction between the two explained 33% of the variance. Together, our data indicate that impervious surfaces induced changes in bacterial community composition and decrease of bacterial diversity. Interactions between edaphic properties and heavy metals were here found to change the composition of the bacterial community and diversity

  16. Impervious Surfaces Alter Soil Bacterial Communities in Urban Areas: A Case Study in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhong Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid expansion of urbanization has caused land cover change, especially the increasing area of impervious surfaces. Such alterations have significant effects on the soil ecosystem by impeding the exchange of gasses, water, and materials between soil and the atmosphere. It is unclear whether impervious surfaces have any effects on soil bacterial diversity and community composition. In the present study, we conducted an investigation of bacterial communities across five typical land cover types, including impervious surfaces (concrete, permeable pavement (bricks with round holes, shrub coverage (Buxus megistophylla Levl., lawns (Festuca elata Keng ex E. Alexeev, and roadside trees (Sophora japonica Linn. in Beijing, to explore the response of bacteria to impervious surfaces. The soil bacterial communities were addressed by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We found that Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Firmicutes were the predominant phyla in urban soils. Soil from impervious surfaces presented a lower bacterial diversity, and differed greatly from other types of land cover. Soil bacterial diversity was predominantly affected by Zn, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and soil moisture content (SMC. The composition of the bacterial community was similar under shrub coverage, roadside trees, and lawns, but different from beneath impervious surfaces and permeable pavement. Variance partitioning analysis showed that edaphic properties contributed to 12% of the bacterial community variation, heavy metal pollution explained 3.6% of the variation, and interaction between the two explained 33% of the variance. Together, our data indicate that impervious surfaces induced changes in bacterial community composition and decrease of bacterial diversity. Interactions between edaphic properties and heavy metals were here found to change the composition of the bacterial community and

  17. New methods to quantify NH3 volatilization from fertilized surface soil with urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Alves

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous N losses from soil are considerable, resulting mostly from ammonia volatilization linked to agricultural activities such as pasture fertilization. The use of simple and accessible measurement methods of such losses is fundamental in the evaluation of the N cycle in agricultural systems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate quantification methods of NH3 volatilization from fertilized surface soil with urea, with minimal influence on the volatilization processes. The greenhouse experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with 13 treatments and five replications, with the following treatments: (1 Polyurethane foam (density 20 kg m-3 with phosphoric acid solution absorber (foam absorber, installed 1, 5, 10 and 20 cm above the soil surface; (2 Paper filter with sulfuric acid solution absorber (paper absorber, 1, 5, 10 and 20 cm above the soil surface; (3 Sulfuric acid solution absorber (1, 5 and 10 cm above the soil surface; (4 Semi-open static collector; (5 15N balance (control. The foam absorber placed 1 cm above the soil surface estimated the real daily rate of loss and accumulated loss of NH3N and proved efficient in capturing NH3 volatized from urea-treated soil. The estimates based on acid absorbers 1, 5 and 10 cm above the soil surface and paper absorbers 1 and 5 cm above the soil surface were only realistic for accumulated N-NH3 losses. Foam absorbers can be indicated to quantify accumulated and daily rates of NH3 volatilization losses similarly to an open static chamber, making calibration equations or correction factors unnecessary.

  18. Interfacial stability of soil covers on lined surface impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.H.; Gates, T.E.

    1986-04-01

    The factors affecting the interfacial stability of soil covers on geomembranes were examined to determine the maximum stable slopes for soil cover/geomembrane systems. Several instances of instability of soil covers on geomembranes have occurred at tailings ponds, leaving exposed geomembranes with the potential for physical ddamage and possibly chemical and ultraviolet degradation. From an operator's viewpoint, it is desirable to maximize the slope of lined facilities in order to maximize the volume-to-area ratio; however, the likelihood for instability also increases with increasing slope. Frictional data obtained from direct shear tests are compared with stability data obtained using a nine-square-meter (m 2 ) engineering-scale test stand to verify that direct shear test data are valid in slope design calculations. Interfacial frictional data from direct shear tests using high-density polyethylene and a poorly graded sand cover agree within several degrees with the engineering-scale tests. Additional tests with other soils and geomembranes are planned. The instability of soil covers is not always an interfacial problem; soil erosion and limited drainage capacity are additional factors that must be considered in the design of covered slopes. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Qualitative characterization by x-ray diffraction from soils: mineralogy conditions to benefit the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyama, Bruna Sayuri; Tavares, Mauricio de Moraes

    2010-01-01

    Four samples were collected from four soil profiles located in the Rural Federal University of Amazonia. These, were analyzed parameters such as color, texture, consistency, granulometry, porosity and water absorption. We identified the following soil types: Distrofic Yellow Latosoil; Lateritic Concretionary; distrofic Low Humic Gley. The work was to continue the qualitative analysis by X-rays diffraction, identifying the mineralogical composition of each sample. Explaining the mineralogical conditions that affect or benefit the environment. (author)

  20. An Opto-Electronic Sensor for Detecting Soil Microarthropods and Estimating Their Size in Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csongor I. Gedeon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Methods to estimate density of soil-dwelling arthropods efficiently, accurately and continuously are critical for investigating soil biological activity and evaluating soil management practices. Soil-dwelling arthropods are currently monitored manually. This method is invasive, and time- and labor-consuming. Here we describe an infrared opto-electronic sensor for detection of soil microarthropods in the size range of 0.4–10 mm. The sensor is built in a novel microarthropod trap designed for field conditions. It allows automated, on-line, in situ detection and body length estimation of soil microarthropods. In the opto-electronic sensor the light source is an infrared LED. Two plano-convex optical lenses are placed along the virtual optical axis. One lens on the receiver side is placed between the observation space at 0.5–1 times its focal length from the sensor, and another emitter side lens is placed between the observation space and the light source in the same way. This paper describes the setup and operating mechanism of the sensor and the control unit, and through basic tests it demonstrates its potential in automated detection of soil microarthropods. The sensor may be used for monitoring activities, especially for remote observation activities in soil and insect ecology or pest control.

  1. Chromate Adsorption on Selected Soil Minerals: Surface Complexation Modeling Coupled with Spectroscopic Investigation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselská, V.; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, S.; Bolanz, R.M.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.; Siddique, J.A.; Komárek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 318, NOV 15 (2016), s. 433-442 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : surface complexation modeling * chromate * soil minerals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.065, year: 2016

  2. ubaegesi@yahoo.co.uk Effects of oil spillage on Soil and Surface

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    FEPA) standards. ... The effect of pollution studies on surface water and soil are ... Untied Nations body, the Group of Experts on. Scientific Aspects of. Marine. Pollution. (GESAMP 1990), pollution is the introduction by man directly or indirectly of ...

  3. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  4. Soil water dynamics and evapotranspiration of forage cactus clones under rainfed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thieres George Freire da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The objective of this work was to evaluate soil water dynamics in areas cultivated with forage cactus clones and to determine how environmental conditions and crop growth affect evapotranspiration. The study was conducted in the municipality of Serra Talhada, in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Crop growth was monitored through changes in the cladode area index (CAI and through the soil cover fraction, calculated at the end of the cycle. Real evapotranspiration (ET of the three evaluated clones was obtained as the residual term in the soil water balance method. No difference was observed between soil water balance components, even though the evaluated clones were of different genus and had different CAI increments. Accumulated ET was of 1,173 mm during the 499 days of the experiment, resulting in daily average of 2.35 mm. The CAI increases the water consumption of the Orelha de Elefante Mexicana clone. In dry conditions, the water consumption of the Miúda clone responds more slowly to variation in soil water availability. The lower evolution of the CAI of the IPA Sertânia clone, during the rainy season, leads to a higher contribution of the evaporation component in ET. The atmospheric demand controls the ET of clones only when there is higher soil water availability; in this condition, the water consumption of the Miúda clone decreases more rapidly with the increase of atmospheric demand.

  5. Sensitivity of a model projection of near-surface permafrost degradation to soil column depth and representation of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Lawrence; Andrew G. Slater; Vladimir E. Romanovsky; Dmitry J. Nicolsky

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity of a global land-surface model projection of near-surface permafrost degradation is assessed with respect to explicit accounting of the thermal and hydrologic properties of soil organic matter and to a deepening of the soil column from 3.5 to 50 or more m. Together these modifications result in substantial improvements in the simulation of near-surface...

  6. A Monte Carlo reflectance model for soil surfaces with three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. D.; Smith, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo soil reflectance model has been developed to study the effect of macroscopic surface irregularities larger than the wavelength of incident flux. The model treats incoherent multiple scattering from Lambertian facets distributed on a periodic surface. Resulting bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are non-Lambertian and compare well with experimental trends reported in the literature. Examples showing the coupling of the Monte Carlo soil model to an adding bidirectional canopy of reflectance model are also given.

  7. Definition and experimental determination of a soil-water retention surface

    OpenAIRE

    Salager, S.; El Youssoufi, M. S.; Saix, C.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the definition and determination methods of the soil-water retention surface (SWRS), which is the tool used to present the hydromechanical behaviour of soils to highlight both the effect of suction on the change in water and total volumes and the effect of deformation with respect to the water retention capability. An experimental method is introduced to determine the SWRS and applied to a clayey silty sand. The determination of this surface is ba...

  8. Soil surface roughness modeling: limit of global characterization in remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi-Chiadjeu, O.; Vannier, E.; Dusséaux, R.; Taconet, O.

    2013-10-01

    Many scientists use a global characterization of bare soil surface random roughness. Surface roughness is often characterized by statistical parameters deduced from its autocorrelation function. Assuming an autocorrelation model and a Gaussian height distribution, some authors have developed algorithms for numerical generation of soil surfaces that have the same statistical properties. This approach is widespread and does not take into account morphological aspects of the soil surface micro-topography. Now a detail surface roughness analysis reveals that the micro-topography is structured by holes, aggregates and clods. In the present study, we clearly show that when describing surface roughness as a whole, some information related to morphological aspects is lost. Two Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of a same natural seedbed surface were recorded by stereo photogrammetry. After estimating global parameters of these natural surfaces, we generated numerical surfaces of the same average characteristics by linear filtering. Big aggregates and clods were then captured by a contour-based approach. We show that the two-dimensional autocorrelation functions of generated surfaces and of the two agricultural surfaces are close together. Nevertheless, the number and shape of segmented object contours change from generated surfaces to the natural surfaces. Generated surfaces show fewer and bigger segmented objects than in the natural case. Moreover, the shape of some segmented objects is unrealistic in comparison to real clods, which have to be convex and of low circularity.

  9. How do soil physical conditions for crop growth vary over time under established contrasting tillage regimes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Paul; Stobart, Ron; Valentine, Tracy; George, Timothy; Morris, Nathan; Newton, Adrian; McKenzie, Blair

    2014-05-01

    When plant breeders develop modern cereal varieties for the sustainable intensification of agriculture, insufficient thought is given to the impact of tillage on soil physical conditions for crop production. In earlier work, we demonstrated that barley varieties that perform best in ploughed soil (the approach traditionally used for breeding trials) were not the same as those performing best under shallow non-inversion or zero-tillage. We also found that the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) associated with improved phosphorus uptake, and hence useful for marker assisted breeding, were not robust between different tillage regimes. The impact of the soil environment had greater impact than the genetics in GxE interactions. It is obvious that soil tillage should be considered when breeding the next generation of crops. Tillage may also have important impacts on carbon storage, but we found that despite greater soil carbon at shallow depths under non-inversion tillage, the carbon stored throughout the soil profile was not affected by tillage. Studies on soil tillage impacts to crop productivity and soil quality are often performed in one season, on single sites that have had insufficient time to develop. Our current research explores multiple sites, on different soils, with temporal measurements of soil physical conditions under contrasting tillage regimes. We use the oldest established contemporary tillage experiments in the United Kingdom, with all sites sharing ploughed and shallow (7cm) non-inversion tillage treatments. In eastern Scotland (Mid Pilmore), the site also has zero tillage and deep ploughing (40 cm) treatments, and was established 11 years ago. In east England there are two sites, both also having a deep non-inversion tillage treatment, and they were established 6 (New Farm Systems) and 8 (STAR) years ago. We measure a range of crop and soil properties at sowing, one month after sowing and post-harvest, including rapid lab based assays that allow high

  10. Concentrations and geographic distribution of selected organic pollutants in Scottish surface soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhind, S.M.; Kyle, C.E.; Kerr, C.; Osprey, M.; Zhang, Z.L.; Duff, E.I.; Lilly, A.; Nolan, A.; Hudson, G.; Towers, W.; Bell, J.; Coull, M.; McKenzie, C.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) representing three chemical classes (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and the organic pollutant diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), were determined in surface soil samples (0–5 cm) collected at 20 km grid intersects throughout Scotland over a three-year period. Detectable amounts of all chemical classes and most individual congeners were present in all samples. There were no consistent effects of soil or vegetation type, soil carbon content, pH, altitude or distance from centres of population on concentrations which exhibited extreme variation, even in adjacent samples. It is concluded that soil POPs and DEHP concentrations and associated rates of animal and human exposure were highly variable, influenced by multiple, interacting factors, and not clearly related to local sources but possibly related to wet atmospheric deposition and the organic carbon content of the soil. -- Highlights: •Concentrations of selected organic pollutants in Scottish soils were determined. •Concentrations were highly variable. •There were few effects of soil or vegetation type, soil carbon, pH or altitude. •Distance from cities was not an important determinant of concentrations. •Atmospheric deposition and soil organic carbon content may affect concentrations. -- Soil concentrations of anthropogenic persistent organic pollutants are not clearly related to soil type or pH, vegetation, altitude, or distance from pollutant sources

  11. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  12. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Mapping Soil Surface Macropores Using Infrared Thermography: An Exploratory Laboratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, João L. M. P.; Abrantes, João R. C. B.; Silva, Valdemir P.; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Montenegro, Abelardo A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Macropores and water flow in soils and substrates are complex and are related to topics like preferential flow, nonequilibrium flow, and dual-continuum. Hence, the quantification of the number of macropores and the determination of their geometry are expected to provide a better understanding on the effects of pores on the soil's physical and hydraulic properties. This exploratory study aimed at evaluating the potential of using infrared thermography for mapping macroporosity at the soil surface and estimating the number and size of such macropores. The presented technique was applied to a small scale study (laboratory soil flume). PMID:25371915

  14. Mapping soil surface macropores using infrared thermography: an exploratory laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, João L M P; Abrantes, João R C B; Silva, Valdemir P; de Lima, M Isabel P; Montenegro, Abelardo A A

    2014-01-01

    Macropores and water flow in soils and substrates are complex and are related to topics like preferential flow, nonequilibrium flow, and dual-continuum. Hence, the quantification of the number of macropores and the determination of their geometry are expected to provide a better understanding on the effects of pores on the soil's physical and hydraulic properties. This exploratory study aimed at evaluating the potential of using infrared thermography for mapping macroporosity at the soil surface and estimating the number and size of such macropores. The presented technique was applied to a small scale study (laboratory soil flume).

  15. The Impact of Microwave-Derived Surface Soil Moisture on Watershed Hydrological Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeill, P. E.; Hsu, A. Y.; Jackson, T. J.; Wood, E. F.; Zion, M.

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of incorporating microwave-derived soil moisture information in a semi-distributed hydrological model was demonstrated for the Washita '92 experiment in the Little Washita River watershed in Oklahoma. Initializing the hydrological model with surface soil moisture fields from the ESTAR airborne L-band microwave radiometer on a single wet day at the start of the study period produced more accurate model predictions of soil moisture than a standard hydrological initialization with streamflow data over an eight-day soil moisture drydown.

  16. Effects of climatic conditions and soil properties on Cabernet Sauvignon berry growth and anthocyanin profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guo; He, Yan-Nan; Yue, Tai-Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2014-09-02

    Climatic conditions and soil type have significant influence on grape ripening and wine quality. The reported study was conducted in two "Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.V)" vineyards located in Xinjiang, a semiarid wine-producing region of China during two vintages (2011 and 2012). The results indicate that soil and climate affected berry growth and anthocyanin profiles. These two localities were within a distance of 5 km from each other and had soils of different physical and chemical composition. For each vineyard, the differences of anthocyanin concentrations, and parameters concerning berry growth and composition between the two years could be explained by different climatic conditions. Soil effect was studied by investigation of differences in berry composition and anthocyanin profiles between the two vineyards in the same year, which could be explained mainly by the different soil properties, vine water and nitrogen status. Specifically, the soils with less water and organic matter produced looser clusters, heavier berry skins and higher TSS, which contributed to the excellent performance of grapes. Compared with 2011, the increases in anthocyanin concentrations for each vineyard in 2012 could be attributed to smaller number of extreme temperature (>35 °C) days and rainfall, lower vine water status and N level. The explanation for higher anthocyanin concentrations in grape skins from the soils with less water and organic matter could be the vine status differences, lighter berry weight and heavier skin weight at harvest. In particular, grapes from the soils with less water and organic matter had higher levels of 3'5'-substituded, O-methylated and acylated anthocyanins, which represented a positive characteristic conferring more stable pigmentation to the corresponding wine in the future. The present work clarifies the effects of climate and soil on berry growth and anthocyanin profiles, thus providing guidance for production of high-quality wine grapes

  17. Effects of Climatic Conditions and Soil Properties on Cabernet Sauvignon Berry Growth and Anthocyanin Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Cheng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Climatic conditions and soil type have significant influence on grape ripening and wine quality. The reported study was conducted in two “Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.V” vineyards located in Xinjiang, a semiarid wine-producing region of China during two vintages (2011 and 2012. The results indicate that soil and climate affected berry growth and anthocyanin profiles. These two localities were within a distance of 5 km from each other and had soils of different physical and chemical composition. For each vineyard, the differences of anthocyanin concentrations, and parameters concerning berry growth and composition between the two years could be explained by different climatic conditions. Soil effect was studied by investigation of differences in berry composition and anthocyanin profiles between the two vineyards in the same year, which could be explained mainly by the different soil properties, vine water and nitrogen status. Specifically, the soils with less water and organic matter produced looser clusters, heavier berry skins and higher TSS, which contributed to the excellent performance of grapes. Compared with 2011, the increases in anthocyanin concentrations for each vineyard in 2012 could be attributed to smaller number of extreme temperature (>35 °C days and rainfall, lower vine water status and N level. The explanation for higher anthocyanin concentrations in grape skins from the soils with less water and organic matter could be the vine status differences, lighter berry weight and heavier skin weight at harvest. In particular, grapes from the soils with less water and organic matter had higher levels of 3′5′-substituded, O-methylated and acylated anthocyanins, which represented a positive characteristic conferring more stable pigmentation to the corresponding wine in the future. The present work clarifies the effects of climate and soil on berry growth and anthocyanin profiles, thus providing guidance for production of

  18. About condition of soil ground at locations of the former Azgir nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetov, E.Z.; Adymov, Zh.I.; Ermatov, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Soil condition after underground nuclear explosions at locations of the test sites is considered. The region is situated in the zone of northern deserts and characterized by prevalence of greyish-brown soils in conditions of sharply continental climate and presence of salt in soil-formative complex including tertiary clays, loess-like loam, loam sands and sands. There are small quantity of humus in such soil. During investigation of soil characteristics and ability of soil particles to form conglomerates, possessing of different properties, it is necessary to know both element and phase composition, determining, in the most extent, such physical and mechanical macro-characteristics as: density, stickiness, air and water penetrability, solubility, chemical resistance, granulometric set and others. Phase composition of soil samples can be, to a sufficient extent, determined by the X-ray diffractometry methods using ordinary X-ray experimental facilities. Phase composition of soil includes gypsum, quartz, calcium, potash feldspar hematite, kaolin, peach and mica in different quantities. Data on element composition of soil samples were obtained from the territory of technological locations of test site using the method of X-ray-fluorescent analysis. Granulometric composition of soil ground has been investigated using the methods of dry sieving and wet sieving for determination of radionuclide distribution in different fractions of soil particles. By the method of the dry sieving of soil ground samples there are taken place a sticking the small together of fine fractions and an adhesion of stuck-together particles to more large ones. Therefore, fine fractions cannot be separate completely at dry sieving. As distinct from the dry sieving an use of water jet in the sieving allows to overcome defects of the dry method and, by a sufficiently effective separation of granulometric fractions, to obtain more precise results of investigations of granulometric

  19. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  20. Studies of 65Zn movement in soil columns under laboratory conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Shukla, U.C.

    1976-01-01

    Zinc movement was studied in relation to moisture regime, element source, and method of application in soil columns constructed from samples of surface layers of Begu loamy sand and Gurgaon sandy loam. Maximum movement was only 10 mm laterally and 40 mm downward. The amount of zinc and the distance moved were greatest under the wettest regime. Movement was also greater in loamy sand than sandy loam columns, with Zn-EDTA rather than sulphate as the source, and when the amount of zinc was greater for a given volume of soil material. The effect of urea, monocalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, and farmyard manure on the movement of zinc was determined at one moisture level in columns constructed from samples of surface layers of Begu loamy sand and Thana loam. The movement of zinc within the soil columns was reduced by all four treatments

  1. Environmental conditions and soils of natural oases in the Alashan Gobi Desert, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, E. I.

    2008-08-01

    Environmental conditions and soils of nine natural oases in the Alashan Gobi Desert of Mongolia are characterized. All these oases are allocated to the zones of tectonic faults, where the discharge of slightly saline groundwater takes place. The absolute heights are about 1500 m a.s.l. The oases are found on piedmont plains or in hilly areas occupied by true deserts with fragments of extremely arid deserts. With respect to geomorphological conditions, four types of oases can be distinguished: isolated (isle-type) oases, oases in large mesodepressions, oases formed in naturally ponded areas, and oases within terraced valleys. Each of these types is characterized by specific soil cover patterns controlled by the geomorphological features of the territory, the character of parent materials, and the groundwater depth. At the same time, some common soil properties are typical of all the oases. Hydromorphic soils—peat meadow-swampy soils, dark-colored nonsaline meadow soils, oasis solonchaks that developed in areas with shallow nonsaline groundwater, solonchaks with different degrees of hydromorphism that developed from mottled-colored salt-bearing Cretaceous and Paleogene deposits, and soddy alluvial (floodplain) soils—predominate in the central parts of the oases. Under conditions of deep groundwater, takyric and sandy desert soils are formed. The oases are encircled by desert ecosystems with gray-brown desert and extremely arid soils and with poorly developed stony soils that formed on the low residual mounts. In the period of the study (1991), irrigated farming was only developed within one of the studied oases. The main part of the land was used for pasturing. In some cases, the high grazing pressure led to degradation (desertification) of oasis ecosystems. A comparison of the oases studied in the Alashan Gobi with the Ekhiin-Gol oasis in the Transaltai Gobi attests to the similarity of their nature.

  2. Land surface model evaluation using a new soil moisture dataset from Kamennaya Steppe, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, T.; Robock, A.; Speranskaya, N.

    2004-12-01

    The land surface affects the atmosphere through the transfer of energy and moisture and serves as the lower boundary in numerical weather prediction and climate models. To obtain good forecasts, these models must therefore accurately portray the land surface. Actual in situ measurements are vital for testing and developing these models. It is with this in mind that we have obtained a dataset of soil moisture, soil temperature and meteorological measurements from Kamennaya Steppe, Russia. The meteorological dataset spans the time period 1965-1991, while the soil moisture dataset runs from 1956-1991. The soil moisture dataset contains gravimetric volumetric total soil moisture measurements for 10 layers taken from forest, agricultural and grassland soils. The meteorological dataset contains 3-hourly measurements of precipitation, temperature, wind speed, pressure and relative humidity. We obtained longwave and shortwave radiation data from standard formulae. The data will be made available to the public via the Rutgers University Center for Environmental Prediction Global Soil Moisture Data Bank. Soil temperature is important in determining the timing, duration and intensity of runoff and snowmelt, particularly at the beginning and end of the winter when the ground is only partially frozen. Soil temperature can in turn be affected by the vertical distribution of roots. The soil temperature data are for 1969-1991. The data are daily averaged for every 20 cm to 1.2 meters in depth. These data are used to investigate the natural sensitivity of soil temperature to vegetation type and root distribution. We also use the temperature data, as well as water balance and snowfall data to test the sensitivity of the Noah land surface model (LSM) soil temperature to vertical root distribution, and what effect that has on the hydrology of the site. In addition to soil temperature data, we also have soil moisture data for several vegetation types. We compare the soil moisture time

  3. Low Biotoxicity of Mars Analog Soils Suggests that the Surface of Mars May be Habitable for Terrestrial Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the interactive effects of hypobaria, low temperatures, and CO2-enriched anoxic atmospheres on the growth of 37 species of mesophilic bacteria identified 14 potential biocidal agents that might affect microbial survival and growth on the martian surface. Biocidal or inhibitory factors include (not in priority): (1) solar UV irradiation, (2) low pressure, (3) extreme desiccating conditions, (4) extreme diurnal temperature fluctuations, (5) solar particle events, (6) galactic cosmic rays, (7) UV-glow discharge from blowing dust, (8) solar UV-induced volatile oxidants [e.g., O2(-), O(-), H2O2, O3], (9) globally distributed oxidizing soils, (10) extremely high salts levels [e.g., MgCl2, NaCl, FeSO4, and MgSO4] in surficial soils at some sites on Mars, (11) high concentrations of heavy metals in martian soils, (12) likely acidic conditions in martian fines, (13) high CO2 concentrations in the global atmosphere, and (14) perchlorate-rich soils. Despite these extreme conditions several studies have demonstrated that dormant spores or vegetative cells of terrestrial microorganisms can survive simulated martian conditions as long as they are protected from UV irradiation. What has not been explored in depth are the effects of potential biotoxic geochemical components of the martian regolith on the survival and growth of microorganisms. The primary objectives of the research included: (1) prepare and characterize Mars analog soils amended with potential biotoxic levels of sulfates, salts, acidifying minerals, etc.; and (2) use the simulants to conduct biotoxicity assays to determine if terrestrial microorganisms from spacecraft can survive direct exposure to the analog soils.

  4. The impact of forest use and reforestation on soil hydraulic conductivity in the Western Ghats of India: Implications for surface and sub-surface hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, M.; Purandara, B. K.; Venkatesh, B.; Krishnaswamy, Jagdish; Acharya, H. A. K.; Singh, U. V.; Jayakumar, R.; Chappell, N.

    2010-09-01

    K∗, irrespective of land cover, so that IOF likely prevails. Overall, the Laterites are the most variable in K∗ when compared to the other soil groups. Thus when compared to other studies, IOF is probably more prevalent in this region. More especially so, when taking into account the marked reduction in surface K∗ during the wet season when compared to dry season measurements. In addition, we have demonstrated the potential for the 'infiltration - trade-off' hypothesis to be realized in this landscape under certain conditions of land degradation and restoration. It is most relevant to the combination of degraded sites and A. auriculiformes plantations on Red or Laterite soils using the less disturbed forests as the baseline. The intensity of forest use and effects of monoculture plantations on soil ecology (relative to native, mixed forests) is likely to be the critical factor in affecting surface K∗ over time. Predicted changes in the intensity of rain events in the future is likely to enhance overland flow on degraded sites on all soils and especially on Black soils, and restoration efforts by all stake-holders, preferably using native or non-invasive species, are needed to address this concern.

  5. Behavior of Ag nanoparticles in soil: Effects of particle surface coating, aging and sewage sludge amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, Annie R.; Levard, Clément; Oostveen, Emily; Bertsch, Paul M.; Matocha, Chris J.; Kammer, Frank von der; Unrine, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the relative importance of particle coating, sewage sludge amendment, and aging on aggregation and dissolution of manufactured Ag nanoparticles (Ag MNPs) in soil pore water. Ag MNPs with citrate (CIT) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coatings were incubated with soil or municipal sewage sludge which was then amended to soil (1% or 3% sludge (w/w)). Pore waters were extracted after 1 week and 2 and 6 months and analyzed for chemical speciation, aggregation state and dissolution. Ag MNP coating had profound effects on aggregation state and partitioning to pore water in the absence of sewage sludge, but pre-incubation with sewage sludge negated these effects. This suggests that Ag MNP coating does not need to be taken into account to understand fate of AgMNPs applied to soil through biosolids amendment. Aging of soil also had profound effects that depended on Ag MNP coating and sludge amendment. -- Highlights: •Silver nanoparticle coating affects fate in unamended soils. •Citrated coated silver nanoparticles could be found in pore water for up to six months. •Pre-incubation of silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge negated effects of surface coating. •Weathered or reprecipitated particles found in pore water for up to two months in sludge amended soils. •Particle surface coating, sewage sludge amendment and aging all have important impacts. -- Behavior of manufactured silver nanoparticles in soil depends on surface coating, contact with sewage sludge, and aging

  6. Fixation of soil surface contamination using natural polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Natural polysaccharides were evaluated as alternatives to commercially available dust-control agents for application in buried-waste and contaminated-soil remediation situations. Materials were identified and evaluated with specific criteria in mind: the materials must be environmentally benign and must not introduce any additional hazardous materials; they must be effective for at least 2 or 3 days, but they do not necessarily have to be effective for more than 2 to 3 weeks; they should be relatively resistant to light traffic; they must not interfere with subsequent soil treatment techniques, especially soil washing; and they must be relatively inexpensive. Two products, a pregelled potato starch and a mixture of carbohydrates derived from sugar beets, were selected for evaluation. Testing included small- and large-scale field demonstrations, laboratory physical property analyses, and wind-tunnel evaluations.

  7. Fixation of soil surface contamination using natural polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Natural polysaccharides were evaluated as alternatives to commercially available dust-control agents for application in buried-waste and contaminated-soil remediation situations. Materials were identified and evaluated with specific criteria in mind: the materials must be environmentally benign and must not introduce any additional hazardous materials; they must be effective for at least 2 or 3 days, but they do not necessarily have to be effective for more than 2 to 3 weeks; they should be relatively resistant to light traffic; they must not interfere with subsequent soil treatment techniques, especially soil washing; and they must be relatively inexpensive. Two products, a pregelled potato starch and a mixture of carbohydrates derived from sugar beets, were selected for evaluation. Testing included small- and large-scale field demonstrations, laboratory physical property analyses, and wind-tunnel evaluations

  8. Mapping Surface Soil Organic Carbon for Crop Fields with Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Kissel, David E.; West, Larry T.; Rickman, Doug; Luvall, J. C.; Adkins, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The organic C concentration of surface soil can be used in agricultural fields to vary crop production inputs. Organic C is often highly spatially variable, so that maps of soil organic C can be used to vary crop production inputs using precision farming technology. The objective of this research was to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping soil organic C on three fields, using remotely sensed images of the fields with a bare surface. Enough soil samples covering the range in soil organic C must be taken from each field to develop a satisfactory relationship between soil organic C content and image reflectance values. The number of soil samples analyzed in the three fields varied from 22 to 26. The regression equations differed between fields, but gave highly significant relationships with R2 values of 0.93, 0.95, and 0.89 for the three fields. A comparison of predicted and measured values of soil organic C for an independent set of 2 soil samples taken on one of the fields gave highly satisfactory results, with a comparison equation of % organic C measured + 1.02% organic C predicted, with r2 = 0.87.

  9. Sorption of polar and nonpolar aromatic compounds to four surface soils of eastern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping; Zhu Dongqiang; Zhang Hua; Shi Xin; Sun Huiyu; Dang Fei

    2008-01-01

    Improved predictions on the fate of organic pollutants in surface environments require a better understanding of the underlying sorption mechanisms that control their uptake by soils. In this study, we monitored sorption of nine aromatic compounds with varying physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity, electron-donor/acceptor ability and polarity), including two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, two chlorobenzenes, two nitroaromatic compounds, dichlobenil, carbaryl and 2,4-dichlorophenol in aqueous suspension of four surface soils of eastern China. The tested soils were characterized with respect to organic carbon (OC) content, black carbon content, mineralogy, morphology and size fraction to assess the role of the diverse soil characteristics in sorption. The results of this study show that not only the solute hydrophobicity and the OC content of soil are important to the retention of organic pollutants, but also the solute molecular structure and the soil nature. - In addition to the hydrophobicity of solute and the organic carbon content of soil, the solute molecular structure and the soil nature also determine the retention of organic pollutants by soils

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyls in Nepalese surface soils: Spatial distribution, air-soil exchange, and soil-air partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Devi, Ningombam Linthoingambi; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2017-10-01

    Regardless of the ban on the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) decade ago, significant measures of PCBs are still transmitted from essential sources in cities and are all inclusive ecological contaminants around the world. In this study, the concentrations of PCBs in soil, the air-soil exchange of PCBs, and the soil-air partitioning coefficient (K SA ) of PCBs were investigated in four noteworthy urban areas in Nepal. Overall, the concentrations of ∑ 30 PCBs ranged from 10 to 59.4ng/g dry weight; dw (mean 12.2ng/g ±11.2ng/g dw). The hexa-CBs (22-31%) was most dominant among several PCB-homologues, followed by tetra-CBs (20-29%), hepta-CBs (12-21%), penta-CBs (15-17%) and tri-CBs (9-19%). The sources of elevated level of PCBs discharge in Nepalese soil was identified as emission from transformer oil, lubricants, breaker oil, cutting oil and paints, and cable insulation. Slightly strong correlation of PCBs with TOC than BC demonstrated that amorphous organic matter (AOM) assumes a more critical part in holding of PCBs than BC in Nepalese soil. The fugacity fraction (ff) results indicated the soil being the source of PCB in air through volatilization and net transport from soil to air. The soil-air partitioning coefficient study suggests the absorption by soil organic matter control soil-air partitioning of PCBs. Slightly weak but positive correlation of measured Log K SA with Log K OA (R 2 = 0.483) and Log K BC-A (R 2 = 0.438) suggests that both Log K OA and Log K BC-A can predict soil-air partitioning to lesser extent for PCBs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Bachem

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial–interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST and ice-rafted debris (IRD in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  12. Using advanced surface complexation models for modelling soil chemistry under forests: Solling forest, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonten, Luc T.C.; Groenenberg, Jan E.; Meesenburg, Henning; Vries, Wim de

    2011-01-01

    Various dynamic soil chemistry models have been developed to gain insight into impacts of atmospheric deposition of sulphur, nitrogen and other elements on soil and soil solution chemistry. Sorption parameters for anions and cations are generally calibrated for each site, which hampers extrapolation in space and time. On the other hand, recently developed surface complexation models (SCMs) have been successful in predicting ion sorption for static systems using generic parameter sets. This study reports the inclusion of an assemblage of these SCMs in the dynamic soil chemistry model SMARTml and applies this model to a spruce forest site in Solling Germany. Parameters for SCMs were taken from generic datasets and not calibrated. Nevertheless, modelling results for major elements matched observations well. Further, trace metals were included in the model, also using the existing framework of SCMs. The model predicted sorption for most trace elements well. - Highlights: → Surface complexation models can be well applied in field studies. → Soil chemistry under a forest site is adequately modelled using generic parameters. → The model is easily extended with extra elements within the existing framework. → Surface complexation models can show the linkages between major soil chemistry and trace element behaviour. - Surface complexation models with generic parameters make calibration of sorption superfluous in dynamic modelling of deposition impacts on soil chemistry under nature areas.

  13. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  14. Upscaling of Surface Soil Moisture Using a Deep Learning Model with VIIRS RDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In current upscaling of in situ surface soil moisture practices, commonly used novel statistical or machine learning-based regression models combined with remote sensing data show some advantages in accurately capturing the satellite footprint scale of specific local or regional surface soil moisture. However, the performance of most models is largely determined by the size of the training data and the limited generalization ability to accomplish correlation extraction in regression models, which are unsuitable for larger scale practices. In this paper, a deep learning model was proposed to estimate soil moisture on a national scale. The deep learning model has the advantage of representing nonlinearities and modeling complex relationships from large-scale data. To illustrate the deep learning model for soil moisture estimation, the croplands of China were selected as the study area, and four years of Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS raw data records (RDR were used as input parameters, then the models were trained and soil moisture estimates were obtained. Results demonstrate that the estimated models captured the complex relationship between the remote sensing variables and in situ surface soil moisture with an adjusted coefficient of determination of R ¯ 2 = 0.9875 and a root mean square error (RMSE of 0.0084 in China. These results were more accurate than the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP active radar soil moisture products and the Global Land data assimilation system (GLDAS 0–10 cm depth soil moisture data. Our study suggests that deep learning model have potential for operational applications of upscaling in situ surface soil moisture data at the national scale.

  15. The effects of soil conditions and crop types on diversity of weed communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ługowska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the diversity of weed communities growing in different crops (winter cereals, spring cereals, and tuber plants and in diverse soil conditions. To determine weed diversity, phytosociological relevés were made. Simpson’s index of dominance and the Shannon index of biodiversity for weed communities in different crops growing in different soil conditions were calculated and compared. The highest values of the Shannon index and the lowest values of Simspon’s index of dominance were obtained for weed communities noted on compacted and semi-compacted soil with the following granulometric composition: silty loam with underlying sand at a depth of 100 cm, heavy silty sandy loam, silt with underlying sand at a depth of 50 cm, and silt with underlying sand at a depth of 100 cm. The highest index of dominance and low species diversity were determined for weed communities in light soils. The Shannon index of biodiversity was moderately positively correlated with soil pH and granulometric composition. Simpson’s index of dominance was moderately negatively correlated with granulometric composition and was weakly correlated with soil pH.

  16. Evaluating road surface conditions using dynamic tire pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yubo; Wu, H. Felix; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2014-03-01

    In order to best prioritize road maintenance, the level of deterioration must be known for all roads in a city's network. Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and International Roughness Index (IRI) are two standard methods for obtaining this information. However, IRI is substantially easier to measure. Significant time and money could be saved if a method were developed to estimate PCI from IRI. This research introduces a new method to estimate IRI and correlate IRI with PCI. A vehicle-mounted dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS) system is used. The DTPS measures the signals generated from the tire/road interaction while driving. The tire/road interaction excites surface waves that travel through the road. DTPS, which is mounted on the tire's valve stem, measures tire/road interaction by analyzing the pressure change inside the tire due to the road vibration, road geometry and tire wall vibration. The road conditions are sensible to sensors in a similar way to human beings in a car. When driving on a smooth road, tire pressure stays almost constant and there are minimal changes in the DTPS data. When driving on a rough road, DTPS data changes drastically. IRI is estimated from the reconstructed road profile using DTPS data. In order to correlate IRI with PCI, field tests were conducted on roads with known PCI values in the city of Brockton, MA. Results show a high correlation between the estimated IRI values and the known PCI values, which suggests that DTPS-based IRI can provide accurate predictions of PCI.

  17. Land surface and atmospheric conditions associated with heat waves in the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eungul; Bieda, Rahama; Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Richter, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Exposure to extreme heat was reconstructed based on regional land-atmosphere processes from 1979 to 2010 in the South Central U.S. The study region surrounds the Chickasaw Nation (CN), a predominantly Native American population with a highly prevalent burden of climate-sensitive chronic diseases. Land surface and atmospheric conditions for summer heat waves were analyzed during spring (March-April-May, MAM) and summer (June-July-August, JJA) based on the Climate and Ocean: Variability, Predictability, and Change maximum temperature definition for heat wave frequency (HWF). The spatial-temporal pattern of HWF was determined using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and the corresponding principle component time series of the first EOF of HWF. Statistically significant analyses of observed conditions indicated that sensible heat increased and latent heat fluxes decreased with high HWF in the South Central U.S. The largest positive correlations of sensible heat flux to HWF and the largest negative correlations of latent heat flux to HWF were specifically observed over the CN. This is a significantly different energy transfer regime due to less available soil moisture during the antecedent MAM and JJA. The higher sensible heat from dry soil could cause significant warming from the near surface (> 2.0°C) to the lower troposphere (> 1.5°C), and accumulated boundary layer heat could induce the significant patterns of higher geopotential height and enhance anticyclonic circulations (negative vorticity anomaly) at the midtroposphere. Results suggested a positive land-atmosphere feedback associated with heat waves and called attention to the need for region-specific climate adaptation planning.

  18. Revegetation of Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) Producing Slope Surface Using Phosphate Microencapsulation and Artificial Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Gon

    2017-04-01

    Oxidation of sulfides produces acid rock drainage (ARD) upon their exposure to oxidation environment by construction and mining activities. The ARD causes the acidification and metal contamination of soil, surface water and groundwater, the damage of plant, the deterioration of landscape and the reduction of slope stability. The revegetation of slope surface is one of commonly adopted strategies to reduce erosion and to increase slope stability. However, the revegetation of the ARD producing slope surface is frequently failed due to its high acidity and toxic metal content. We developed a revegetation method consisting of microencapsualtion and artificial soil in the laboratory. The revegetation method was applied on the ARD producing slope on which the revegetation using soil coverage and seeding was failed and monitored the plant growth for one year. The phosphate solution was applied on sulfide containing rock to form stable Fe-phosphate mineral on the surface of sulfide, which worked as a physical barrier to prevent contacting oxidants such as oxygen and Fe3+ ion to the sulfide surface. After the microencapsulation, two artificial soil layers were constructed. The first layer containing organic matter, dolomite powder and soil was constructed at 2 cm thickness to neutralize the rising acidic capillary water from the subsurface and to remove the dissolved oxygen from the percolating rain water. Finally, the second layer containing seeds, organic matter, nutrients and soil was constructed at 3 cm thickness on the top. After application of the method, the pH of the soil below the artificial soil layer increased and the ARD production from the rock fragments reduced. The plant growth showed an ordinary state while the plant died two month after germination for the previous revegetation trial. No soil erosion occurred from the slope during the one year field test.

  19. A simple field method to measure the hydrodynamic properties of soil surface crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Alagna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic resistance of the surface crust was determined by a combination of two infiltrometric techniques: first, a surface measurement of steady-state infiltration rate is conducted by a mini-disk tension infiltrometer (MDI; then, the surface crust is removed, its thickness is measured, and a ponded infiltration test is performed at the same site. The Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer parameters (BEST method is applied to estimate the hydraulic properties of the underlying soil provided the particlesize distribution and the bulk density are known. Under the assumption of a unit gradient of hydraulic head below the soil crust, the pressure head at the interface crust-soil is derived. Finally, the hydraulic conductivity of the crust is calculated from the steady-state water flow measured by the MDI and the Darcy law. The method was tested in a sandy loam and a clay soil. In the sandy loam soil, a 2-3 mm thick slaking crust was visually observed, but no increased surface hydraulic resistance was detected in 10 out of 11 cases. In the clay soil, a 5-7 mm thick crust was formed by gradual coalescence of the plastic, wet aggregates by rainfall compaction. In 10 out of 15 tests, the steady-state infiltration rate with the crust was lower than the underlying soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, denoting an increased hydraulic resistance of the surface crust. For the clay soil, the mean value of the hydraulic resistance was practically independent of the crust thickness and varied between 78 and 81 min.

  20. Effect of the soil's redox conditions on the mobility of Se

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darcheville, O.; Fevrier, L.; Martin-Garin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 79 Se is a long-life fission product found in the nuclear wastes. Understanding its behaviour in soils is of major concern because of its bioavailability with almost all living organisms (plants and animals). This study is part of a wider multi-disciplinary program that aims at studying 'the effect of the geochemical transformations and the microbial activities on the fate of Se in soils' [1]. The first part of this program is focused on the interactions between Se and the organic compartment of soils, including both biotic (microorganisms, plants,...) and abiotic (humic, fulvic substances,...) components. Special attention is paid to their consequence on the mobility of Se. The second part of the study, presented here, aims specifically at understanding the effect of the soil's redox status on the mobility of Se and at identifying the nature of the processes involved (microbiological vs chemical). Different types of experiments are performed under laboratory controlled conditions. They consist in mixing a 2 mm-sieved sandy soil from the Rhone borders (France) with radio-labelled selenite ( 75 SeIV). In batch experiments, the soil is incubated in a closed vessel under various atmospheres (O 2 or N 2 ) and amended with specific nutrients in order to create contrasted redox conditions and to stimulate specific microbial communities. These conditions are also used in column experiments to determine their impact on Se mobility. They are completed by varying the degree of water saturation in the column and the structure of the soil. The percolation front of Se is followed in-situ with a mobile gamma detector without disturbing the system. In both experimental designs, mass recoveries of 75 Se are precisely determined in the soil-solution systems thanks to the quantification of Se concentrations in the aqueous, solid and gaseous phases. In addition, the non reversibly sorbed Se fraction is assessed by performing sequential extractions

  1. Observations of flow path interactions with surface structures during initial soil development stage using irrigation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Steffen; Biemelt, Detlef; Badorreck, Annika; Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Structures and processes are dynamically linked especially during initial stages of soil and ecosystem development. Here we assume that soil pore structures and micro topography determine the flow paths and water fluxes as well as further structure changes. Reports about flow path developments at the soil surface are still limited because of an insufficient knowledge of the changing micro topography at the surface. The objective of this presentation is to evaluate methods for parameterisation of surface micro topography for analysing interactions between infiltration and surface runoff. Complex irrigation experiments were carried out at an experimental site in the neighbourhood of the artificially created water catchment "Chicken Creek". The irrigation rates between 160 mm/h and 250 mm/h were held constant over a time period of 20 minutes. The incoming intensities were measured as well as the raindrop-velocity and -size distributions. The surface runoff was continuously registered, soil samples were taken, and soil water potential heads were monitored using tensiometers. Surface and subsurface flow paths were identified using different tracers. The soil surface structures were recorded using a high resolution digital camera before, during, and after irrigation. Micro topography was surveyed using close-range photogrammetry. With this experimental design both, flow paths on the surface and in the soil as well as structure and texture changes could be observed simultaneously. In 2D vertical cross-sections, the effect of initial sediment deposition structure on infiltration and runoff was observed. Image analysis of surface pictures allowed identifying structural and soil textural changes during the runoff process. Similar structural changes related to surface flow paths were found with the photogrammetric surface analysis. We found evidence for the importance of the initial structures on the flow paths as well as a significant influence of the system development

  2. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas

  3. Soil surface searching and transport of Euphorbia characias seeds by ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadaler, Xavier; Gómez, Crisanto

    The intensity of exploring the soil surface by ants was studied for the four species involved in the dispersal and predation of seeds of the West-Mediterranean myrmecochorous plant Euphorbia characias. During the dehiscence period (June) the whole soil surface is sccanned in 43 minutes. Not all ants that find a seed take it to the nest. For the four ant species studied ( Pheidole pallidula, Aphaenogaster senilis, Tapinoma nigerrimum, Messor barbarus) the proportion of ants that finally take the seed is 67.6%. In spite of this, the high level of soil surface searching explains the rather short time that seeds remain on the soil before being removed. The presence of an elaiosome is a key element in the outcome of the ant-seed interaction: a seed with elaiosome has a seven-fold increase in probability of being taken to the nest if found by a non-granivorous ant. The predator-avoidance hypothesis for myrmecochory is supported.

  4. USING MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING INFORMATION FOR THE RETRIEVAL OF SOIL SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marzahn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this Paper the potential of multi parametric polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data for soil surface roughness estimation is investigated and its potential for hydrological modeling is evaluated. The study utilizes microwave backscatter collected from the Demmin testsite in the North-East Germany during AgriSAR 2006 campaign using fully polarimetric L-Band airborne SAR data. For ground truthing extensive soil surface roughness in addition to various other soil physical properties measurements were carried out using photogrammetric image matching techniques. The correlati