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Sample records for surface clay colloidal

  1. Acidity-Facilitated Mobilization of Surface Clay Colloid from Natural Sand Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Wang, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid mobilization and migration in a soil system has attracted increasing scrutiny for its role in facilitating colloid-borne transport of contaminants in the environments. In many previous studies, pH was evoked as a major factor in mobilizing surface colloids through inducing favorable surface charge and electrostatic conditions. The possible direct role of acidity with H+ as a chemical agent has remained largely obscured behind the indirect role of pH. In this study, we demonstrated through column flow-through tests that cyclical elution of natural sand media with weak acid and base solutions can greatly facilitate detachment and transport of surface clay colloids. We found that while elevating pH to an alkaline condition helped release the loosely-attached surface clays, a pretreatment with H+ could facilitate the mobilization of chemically-bonded clay colloids through lysing of labile Ca and Mg ions. A quantitative relation was observed that 1 mmol H+ could lyse about 0.5 mmol Ca2+ and Mg2+ and subsequently resulted in a release of about 1,200 mg clay during base elution when repulsive force between particles dominated. Natural organic acids such as citric acid and acetic acid in environment-relevant low concentrations (pH>5.0) were as effective as HCl with a stronger acidic condition. The small mass ratio of Ca and Mg over colloid released and the nature of weak acid used suggest that the mobilization was less likely due to dissolution of cement casing than lysing of labile interstitial Ca and Mg by H+, which severed Ca and Mg bridging bonds between particles. Natural acidity is generated in abundance from various bio- and geochemical processes; e.g., many plants produce citric acid through citric acid cycle metabolism; biodegradation of dead organic matter forms humic acids. We postulate that natural proton dynamics in tendon with pH oscillation accompanied with various soil biogeochemical processes could play a major role in subsurface clay transport

  2. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  3. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  4. Clay colloid formation and release from MX-80 buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1999-12-01

    Flowing groundwater can tear off clay colloids from buffer clay that has penetrated into fractures and transport them and bring sorbed radionuclides up to the biosphere. The colloids are 2-50 μm particle aggregates that are liberated from expanded, softened buffer if the water flow rate in the fractures exceeds a few centimeters per second. Except for the first few months or years after application of the buffer in the deposition holes the flow rate will not be as high as that. The aperture of the fractures will not hinder transport of colloids but most of the fractures contain clastic fillings, usually chlorite, that attract and immobilize them. This condition and the flow rate criterion combine to reduce the chance of radionuclide-bearing clay colloids to reach the biosphere to practically zero except for certain cases that need to be considered

  5. Surface geochemistry of the clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Garrison; Skipper, Neal T.; Sutton, Rebecca; Park, Sung-ho; Soper, Alan K.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    1999-01-01

    Clay minerals are layer type aluminosilicates that figure in terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, in the buffering capacity of the oceans, and in the containment of toxic waste materials. They are also used as lubricants in petroleum extraction and as industrial catalysts for the synthesis of many organic compounds. These applications derive fundamentally from the colloidal size and permanent structural charge of clay mineral particles, which endow them with significant surface reactivity. Unraveling the surface geochemistry of hydrated clay minerals is an abiding, if difficult, topic in earth sciences research. Recent experimental and computational studies that take advantage of new methodologies and basic insights derived from the study of concentrated ionic solutions have begun to clarify the structure of electrical double layers formed on hydrated clay mineral surfaces, particularly those in the interlayer region of swelling 2:1 layer type clay minerals. One emerging trend is that the coordination of interlayer cations with water molecules and clay mineral surface oxygens is governed largely by cation size and charge, similarly to a concentrated ionic solution, but the location of structural charge within a clay layer and the existence of hydrophobic patches on its surface provide important modulations. The larger the interlayer cation, the greater the influence of clay mineral structure and hydrophobicity on the configurations of adsorbed water molecules. This picture extends readily to hydrophobic molecules adsorbed within an interlayer region, with important implications for clay–hydrocarbon interactions and the design of catalysts for organic synthesis. PMID:10097044

  6. Migration of uranium in the presence of clay colloids in a sandy aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Cointe, P.; Grambow, B.; Piscitelli, A.; Montavon, G.; Van der Lee, J.; Giffaut, E.; Schneider, V.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, low and medium level radioactive waste of short period (nuclides with a half-life less than 31 years and an activity ranging from 100 to 1,000,000 Bq/g) is stored in concrete constructions on a surface site in Soulaines-Dhuys (Aube). The site was chosen for its simple geology: it entirely lays on an aquifer formation, the Upper Aptian sands, above a Lower Aptian impermeable clay formation. The site is surrounded by the Noues d'Amance stream, which serves as the single outlet of the groundwater on the site. The objective of this study is to improve knowledge of radionuclides migration in the aquifer formation to improve safety, using U(VI) as an example and focusing on colloids, capable of transporting U(VI) on long distances. The sediment is composed of two main phases: quartz and clay minerals (glauconite, with a small fraction of kaolinite and smectite), with relative amounts of 91 and 6% in weight, respectively. The aquifer water contains clay colloids, invisible to the eye though observed with SEM and TEM in a non disturbed sample. No signal was measured with usual light diffusion techniques and Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4). Only the Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) technique could characterize the size (between 30 and 70 nm) and the concentration (around 10 ppb) of the clay colloids. Batch experiments were carried out to define U(VI)-Quartz and U(VI)-Clay interactions, with U(VI) concentration, pH and pCO 2 being the studied variables. The data were modelled with the Chess geochemistry code developed at the Paris School of Mines and compared to literature. Davis applied model for U(VI)-Quartz interaction and Bradbury and Baeyens applied model for U(VI)-Illite interaction adequately describe the experimental data. To know if clay colloids can move freely in the groundwater, pore size was measured using X-ray microtomography. Nanoparticles tracing was done with

  7. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... followed by lower and stable colloid and phosphorus concentrations. The mass of particles leached at first flush was independent of clay content and was attributed to the instant release of particles associated with the macropore walls and released upon contact with flowing water. Below a clay content of È...

  9. Technetium migration in Boom Clay - Assessing the role of colloid-facilitated transport in a deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, C.; Martens, E.; Maes, N.; Jacops, E.; Van Gompel, M.; Van Ravestyn, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The role of colloids - mainly dissolved natural organic matter (NOM, 50-150 mg/l) - in the transport of radionuclides in the Boom Clay formation (Mol, Belgium), has long since been a matter of (heavy) debate. For more than 20 years, batch experiments with Boom Clay suspensions showed a pronounced influence of the dissolved organic carbon concentration on the aqueous concentrations of different radionuclides like Tc, Np, Am and U. Moreover, small fractions of these radionuclides were also observed to elute almost un-retarded out of confined clay cores in percolation experiments. In the past years, a new conceptual model for the speciation of the long-lived fission product Technetium- 99 ( 99 Tc) under Boom Clay conditions has been drafted. In brief, the stable oxidation state of 99 Tc in these conditions is +IV, and, therefore, Tc solution concentrations are limited by the solubility of TcO 2 .nH 2 O(s). However, during reduction of TcVII (in the TcO 4 - form) to TcIV, precursor TcO 2 .nH 2 O colloids are formed, which are stabilised by the dissolved organic matter present in Boom Clay interstitial pore water, and in supernatants of Boom Clay batch suspensions. Moreover, this stabilisation process occurs in such a systematic way, that (conditional) interaction constants could be established, and the behaviour was described as a 'hydrophobic sorption', or, more accurately, a 'colloid-colloid' interaction. This conceptual model was implemented into PHREEQC geochemical and Hydrus transport code to come to a reactive transport model that was used to simulate both the outflow and the tracer profile in several long-term running percolation experiments (both in lab and under in situ conditions). To account for slow dissociation kinetics of Tc from the NOM colloid, a first-order kinetic rate equation was also added to the model. In order to describe the migration of colloidal particles (NOM), an

  10. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijneveldt, Jeroen S van; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods

  11. Organic nature of colloidal actinides transported in surface water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, Peter H; Roberts, Kimberly A; Guo, Laodong

    2002-09-01

    Elevated levels of (239,240)Pu and 241Am have been present in surficial soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), CO, since the 1960s, when soils were locally contaminated in the 1960s by leaking drums stored on the 903 Pad. Further dispersion of contaminated soil particles was by wind and water. From 1998 until 2001, we examined actinide ((239,240)Pu and 241Am) concentrations and phase speciation in the surface environment at RFETS through field studies and laboratory experiments. Measurements of total (239,240)Pu and 241Am concentrations in storm runoff and pond discharge samples, collected during spring and summer times in 1998-2000, demonstrate that most of the (239,240)Pu and 241Am transported from contaminated soils to streams occurred in the particulate (> or = 0.45 microm; 40-90%) and colloidal (approximately 2 nm or 3 kDa to 0.45 microm; 10-60%) phases. Controlled laboratory investigations of soil resuspension, which simulated storm and erosion events, confirmed that most of the Pu in the 0.45 microm filter-passing phase was in the colloidal phase (> or = 80%) and that remobilization of colloid-bound Pu during soil erosion events can be greatly enhanced by humic and fulvic acids present in these soils. Most importantly, isoelectric focusing experiments of radiolabeled colloidal matter extracted from RFETS soils revealed that colloidal Pu is in the four-valent state and is mostly associated with a negatively charged organic macromolecule with a pH(IEP) of 3.1 and a molecular weight of 10-15 kDa, rather than with the more abundant inorganic (iron oxide and clay) colloids. This finding has important ramifications for possible remediation, erosion controls, and land-management strategies.

  12. Cotransport of clay colloids and viruses through water-saturated vertically oriented columns packed with glass beads: Gravity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2016-03-01

    The cotransport of clay colloids and viruses in vertically oriented laboratory columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 were used as model viruses, and kaolinite (ΚGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. A steady flow rate of Q=1.5 mL/min was applied in both vertical up (VU) and vertical down (VD) flow directions. In the presence of KGa-1b, estimated mass recovery values for both viruses were higher for VD than VU flow direction, while in the presence of STx-1b the opposite was observed. However, for all cases examined, the produced mass of viruses attached onto suspended clay particles were higher for VD than VU flow direction, suggesting that the flow direction significantly influences virus attachment onto clays, as well as packed column retention of viruses attached onto suspended clays. KGa-1b hindered the transport of ΦX174 under VD flow, while STx-1b facilitated the transport of ΦX174 under both VU and VD flow directions. Moreover, KGa-1b and STx-1b facilitated the transport of MS2 in most of the cases examined except of the case where KGa-1b was present under VD flow. Also, the experimental data were used for the estimation of virus surface-coverages and virus surface concentrations generated by virus diffusion-limited attachment, as well as virus attachment due to sedimentation. Both sedimentation and diffusion limited virus attachment were higher for VD than VU flow, except the case of MS2 and STx-1b cotransport. The diffusion-limited attachment was higher for MS2 than ΦΧ174 for all cases examined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-09

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters.

  14. Introduction to Applied Colloid and Surface Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    Colloid and Surface Chemistry is a subject of immense importance and implications both to our everyday life and numerous industrial sectors, ranging from coatings and materials to medicine and biotechnology. How do detergents really clean? (Why can’t we just use water ?) Why is milk “milky” Why do......, to the benefit of both the environment and our pocket. Cosmetics is also big business! Creams, lotions and other personal care products are really just complex emulsions. All of the above can be explained by the principles and methods of colloid and surface chemistry. A course on this topic is truly valuable...

  15. Active colloidal propulsion over a crystalline surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Udit; Straube, Arthur V.; Fischer, Peer; Gibbs, John G.; Höfling, Felix

    2017-12-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of chemically self-propelled Janus colloids moving atop a two-dimensional crystalline surface. The surface is a hexagonally close-packed monolayer of colloidal particles of the same size as the mobile one. The dynamics of the self-propelled colloid reflects the competition between hindered diffusion due to the periodic surface and enhanced diffusion due to active motion. Which contribution dominates depends on the propulsion strength, which can be systematically tuned by changing the concentration of a chemical fuel. The mean-square displacements (MSDs) obtained from the experiment exhibit enhanced diffusion at long lag times. Our experimental data are consistent with a Langevin model for the effectively two-dimensional translational motion of an active Brownian particle in a periodic potential, combining the confining effects of gravity and the crystalline surface with the free rotational diffusion of the colloid. Approximate analytical predictions are made for the MSD describing the crossover from free Brownian motion at short times to active diffusion at long times. The results are in semi-quantitative agreement with numerical results of a refined Langevin model that treats translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the same footing.

  16. New Insights into Stability of Plutonium Intrinsic Colloids in the Presence of Clay at Elevated Temperatures: Experimental and Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Sun, Y.; Zavarin, M.; Dai, Z.; Carroll, S.; Kersting, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Colloid-facilitated plutonium transport is often found to be the dominant mechanism controlling its migration in the environment. However, the form of Pu (intrinsic versus pseudo-colloid) and its stability is not well understood. Accurate prediction of colloid-facilitated transport requires a deep understanding of the underlying mechanisms and rates that control the stability of colloidal plutonium. In the present study, we examine the stability of Pu intrinsic colloids relative to Pu-montmorillonite pseudo colloids using a novel experimental design and modeling approaches. We gain new insights into mechanisms of interactions between Pu intrinsic colloids and montmorrilonite clay colloids. The results of these efforts provide a clearer understanding of how Pu can migrate over significant temporal and spatial scales. We employ dialysis membranes in an effort to completely segregate Pu intrinsic colloids (2-5 nm) from montmorillonite clay colloids (>100 nm) and allow aqueous Pu to establish equilibrium between both colloidal phases. Using the dialysis membrane approach, we are able to isolate multiple processes, including hydrolysis/precipitation of Pu(IV, aq), dissolution of PuO2 intrinsic colloids in the absence and presence of the clay, and formation of Pu/clay pseudo-colloids. Therefore, the kinetics of these multiple processes that take place either sequentially or simultaneously in our systems can be examined individually. Experiments are conducted in pH 8 solution of 5 mM NaCl/0.7 mM NaHCO3 at both 25 and 80 °C. Pu intrinsic colloids dissolve at a moderate rate in the absence of the clay, and the dissolution is enhanced in the presence of clay. Furthermore, an elevated temperature will increase the solubility of Pu intrinsic colloids. The formation of Pu intrinsic colloid is reversible, though dissolution is kinetically limited. In contrast, Pu pseudo colloids (sorbed Pu on clay) are more stable than Pu intrinsic colloids at both temperatures, and the

  17. Deposition of latex colloids at rough mineral surfaces: an analogue study using nanopatterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Darbha, Gopala; Fischer, Cornelius; Michler, Alex; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten; Heberling, Frank; Schild, Dieter

    2012-04-24

    irrespective of the impact of roughness. For polydisperse solutions, an increase in the polydispersity and flow velocity resulted in a reduction of colloid deposition efficiency due to the resulting enhanced double-layer repulsion. Quantification of surface topography variations of two endmembers of natural grain surfaces showed that half-pore depths and roughness of sedimentary quartz grains are mainly in the micrometer range. Grains with diagenetically formed quartz overgrowths, however, show surface roughness mainly in the submicrometer range. Thus, surface topography features applied in the here presented analogue study and resulting variation in particle retention can serve as quantitative analogue for particle reactions in diagenetically altered quartz sands and sandstones. The reported impact of particle polydispersity can have an important application for quantitative prediction of retention of varying types of minerals, such as different clay minerals in the environment under prevailing unfavorable conditions.

  18. Low frequency dielectric relaxation processes and ionic conductivity of montmorillonite clay nanoparticles colloidal suspension in poly(vinyl pyrrolidone−ethylene glycol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric dispersion behaviour of montmorillonite (MMT clay nanoparticles colloidal suspension in poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-ethylene glycol (PVP-EG blends were investigated over the frequency range 20 Hz to 1 MHz at 30°C. The 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 wt% MMT clay concentration of the weight of total solute (MMT+PVP were prepared in PVP-EG blends using EG as solvent. The complex relative dielectric function, alternating current (ac electrical conductivity, electric modulus and impedance spectra of these materials show the relaxation processes corresponding to the micro-Brownian motion of PVP chain, ion conduction and electrode polarization phenomena. The real part of ac conductivity spectra of these materials obeys Jonscher power law σ′(ω =σdc + Aωn in upper frequency end of the measurement, whereas dispersion in lower frequency end confirms the presence of electrode polarization effect. It was observed that the increase of clay concentration in the PVP-EG blends significantly increases the ac conductivity values, and simultaneously reduces the ionic conductivity relaxation time and electric double layer relaxation time, which suggests that PVP segmental dynamics and ionic motion are strongly coupled. The intercalation of EG structures in clay galleries and exfoliation of clay sheets by adsorption of PVP-EG structures on clay surfaces are discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding interactions between the hydroxyl group (–OH of EG molecules, carbonyl group (C=O of PVP monomer units, and the hydroxylated aluminate surfaces of the MMT clay particles. Results suggest that the colloidal suspension of MMT clay nano particles in the PVP-EG blends provide a convenient way to obtain an electrolyte solution with tailored electrical conduction properties.

  19. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Fachgebiet Theoretische Chemie

    2016-11-01

    This first systematic survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, is currently being extended to neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals, like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we examine if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally to support the interpretation of pertinent experiments. A further facet of these studies is to account also for the dynamic nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamic simulations.

  20. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-01-01

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  1. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  2. Mapping and Quantifying Surface Charges on Clay Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Gaikwad, Ravi; Hande, Aharnish; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas

    2015-09-29

    Understanding the electrical properties of clay nanoparticles is very important since they play a crucial role in every aspect of oil sands processing, from bitumen extraction to sedimentation in mature fine tailings (MFT). Here, we report the direct mapping and quantification of surface charges on clay nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The morphology of clean kaolinite clay nanoparticles shows a layered structure, while the corresponding surface potential map shows a layer-dependent charge distribution. More importantly, a surface charge density of 25 nC/cm(2) was estimated for clean kaolinite layers by using EFM measurements. On the other hand, the EFM measurements show that the clay particles obtained from the tailings demonstrate a reduced surface charge density of 7 nC/cm(2), which may be possibly attributed to the presence of various bituminous compounds residing on the clay surfaces.

  3. The surface modification of clay particles by RF plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Keol

    In this study, the surface coatings of ball clay, organoclay and exfoliated clay prepared by sol-gel process were done by RF plasma polymerization to improve the surface activity of the clay filler. Characterization of the above plasma-treated clays has been carried out by various techniques. The effects of plasma-treated clays as substitute of carbon black in styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) and ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) on the curing and mechanical properties were investigated. After plasma treatment, the tensile properties of organo and exfoliated clay were not unsatisfactory to that of carbon black filler system. Moreover, only 10 phr filler loading of plasma-treated organoclay in EPDM vulcanizates showed better results than 40 phr filler loading of carbon black in EPDM vulcanizates. The main objective of this study was to verify the applicability of the plasma technique for modifying clay surfaces for their use in the tire manufacturing industry. Another purpose was to reveal the advantage of the plasma technique used to obtain modified-clay and improved properties that those materials can display.

  4. Clay Effect in the Electrochemical Stabilization of Colloidal CoO(OH Applied as a Modified Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucéli Roloff

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a mixed material was prepared using a montmorillonite clay (denominated imported sodic, IS modified with colloidal cobalt (Co. The obtained mixed material (ISCo was characterized by X-ray diffractometry and simultaneous thermal analysis and used to modify the surface of a platinum electrode for electrochemical determination of oxalic acid. The electrochemical behavior of the ISCo material was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and the performance as a sensor for oxalic acid was assessed by square wave voltammetry. The platinum electrode showed no response to peak current when the oxalic acid concentration was increased in the range of 4.99 x 10-4 to 4.95 x 10-3 mol L-1. On the other hand, the platinum electrode modified with the mixed material presented a linear response in the studied range with a detection limit of 2.55 × 10-4 mol L-1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v0i0.876

  5. Enhanced adhesion of bioinspired nanopatterned elastomers via colloidal surface assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerboom, Sabine; Appel, Jeroen; Labonte, David; Federle, Walter; Sprakel, Joris; Kamperman, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    We describe a scalable method to fabricate nanopatterned bioinspired dry adhesives using colloidal lithography. Close-packed monolayers of polystyrene particles were formed at the air/water interface, on which polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was applied. The order of the colloidal monolayer and the immersion depth of the particles were tuned by altering the pH and ionic strength of the water. Initially, PDMS completely wetted the air/water interface outside the monolayer, thereby compressing the monolayer as in a Langmuir trough; further application of PDMS subsequently covered the colloidal monolayers. PDMS curing and particle extraction resulted in elastomers patterned with nanodimples. Adhesion and friction of these nanopatterned surfaces with varying dimple depth were studied using a spherical probe as a counter-surface. Compared with smooth surfaces, adhesion of nanopatterned surfaces was enhanced, which is attributed to an energy-dissipating mechanism during pull-off. All nanopatterned surfaces showed a significant decrease in friction compared with smooth surfaces. PMID:25392404

  6. A dynamic model for smectite clay swelling, expansion and colloid generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Longcheng; Neretnieks, Ivars; Moreno, Luis

    2010-01-01

    clay is highly compacted. In developing the dynamic force balance model for colloidal expansion, it is acknowledged that accurate description of the viscous drag force, or equivalently the permeability, is very important to describe the swelling process of compacted bentonite as it expands and eventually turns from a gel into a sol in low ionic strength waters. For this reason, a Kozeny-Carman-like equation is elaborated in order to satisfactorily predict the permeability of the purified and fully Na-exchanged bentonite in dilute homo-ionic solutions, based on a set of permeability measurements. We present the measured versus predicted values of the permeabilities for Na-bentonites in different NaCl solutions. It is seen that the measured values are aligned in a narrow band along the predicted ones, falling well in the range of 1/2 and 2 times the predicted permeabilities. For usual laboratory results of the permeability test, this is definitely within the expected margin of variations. The force balance model, together with a friction model derived from the permeability, is then validated against accurate observations of the expansion process of the Na-exchanged bentonite in a water filled vertical test tube. The expansion is followed in detail over a month, by use of the magnetic resonance imaging technique with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm, as an initially compacted tablet of Na-bentonite expands in water. The model accurately predicts not only the expansion rate, the general features of the expansion but also the basic behaviour at the expanding gel/sol interface, as exemplified for the case of expansion of a purified and fully Na-exchanged bentonite (WyNa) in an initially 0.5 mM CaCl 2 solution. The agreements demonstrate in turn that the Kozeny-Carman-like equation is successful in predicting the permeability of the Na-bentonite in dilute homo-ionic solutions. The model will be used to quantify the release of colloidal particles from an expanding buffer around

  7. Implications of cation exchange on clay release and colloid-facilitated transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Kim, Hyunjung

    2010-01-01

    Column experiments were conducted to study chemical factors that influence the release of clay (kaolinite and quartz minerals) from saturated Ottawa sand of different sizes (710,360, and 240 microm). A relatively minor enhancement of clay release occurred when the pH was increased (5.8 to 10) or the ionic strength (IS) was decreased to deionized (DI) water. In contrast, clay release was dramatically enhanced when monovalent Na+ was exchanged for multivalent cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+) on the clay and sand and then the solution IS was reduced to DI water. This solution chemistry sequence decreased the adhesive force acting on the clay as a result of an increase in the magnitude of the clay and sand zeta potential with cation exchange, and expansion of the double layer thickness with a decrease in IS to DI water. The amount of clay release was directly dependent on the Na+ concentration of the exchanging solution and on the initial clay content of the sand (0.026-0.054% of the total mass). These results clearly demonstrated the importance of the order and magnitude of the solution chemistry sequence on clay release. Column results and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images also indicated that the clay was reversibly retained on the sand, despite predictions of irreversible interaction in the primary minimum. One plausible explanation is that adsorbed cations increased the separation distance between the clay-solid interfaces as a result of repulsive hydration forces. A cleaning procedure was subsequently developed to remove clay via cation exchange and IS reduction; SEM images demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach. The transport of Cu2+ was then shown to be dramatically enhanced by an order of magnitude in peak concentration by adsorption on clays that were released following cation exchange and IS reduction.

  8. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil

    2012-01-01

    adsorption takes place, are largely unknown. In this study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the grain surfaces in offshore and onshore chalk are more heterogeneous than previously assumed. The particles are not simply calcite surfaces but are partially covered by clay that is only 1...... that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  9. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  10. Interaction of surface-modified silica nanoparticles with clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Omurlu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, the adsorption of 5-nm silica nanoparticles onto montmorillonite and illite is investigated. The effect of surface functionalization was evaluated for four different surfaces: unmodified, surface-modified with anionic (sulfonate, cationic (quaternary ammonium (quat, and nonionic (polyethylene glycol (PEG surfactant. We employed ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy to determine the concentration of adsorbed nanoparticles in conditions that are likely to be found in subsurface reservoir environments. PEG-coated and quat/PEG-coated silica nanoparticles were found to significantly adsorb onto the clay surfaces, and the effects of electrolyte type (NaCl, KCl and concentration, nanoparticle concentration, pH, temperature, and clay type on PEG-coated nanoparticle adsorption were studied. The type and concentration of electrolytes were found to influence the degree of adsorption, suggesting a relationship between the interlayer spacing of the clay and the adsorption ability of the nanoparticles. Under the experimental conditions reported in this paper, the isotherms for nanoparticle adsorption onto montmorillonite at 25 °C indicate that adsorption occurs less readily as the nanoparticle concentration increases.

  11. On the mobility of exchangeable cations on clay surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimmi, T.; Kosakowski, G.; Glaus, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The diffusive mobility of radionuclides in buffer materials and potential host rocks is an important topic in the safety analysis for underground waste repositories. Many of the radionuclides are cations. Accordingly, the diffusion and retention of cations in compacted clay minerals and clay rocks is of central interest. The retention properties of the clay minerals originate from their negative surface charges. These are compensated by un-specifically sorbed cations that are located on planar surfaces or in interlayers (exchangeable cations) and by cations that are more specifically sorbed for instance to edge sites. In general, sorbed cations are considered as immobile with respect to diffusive transport. Whereas this may be correct for specifically sorbed cations, this is probably not the case for un-specifically sorbed exchangeable cations. They can easily exchange with cations in the pore solution, even if they are located- at low hydration states-in very narrow interlayers. For such exchange a certain mobility in the sorbed state is required. This is in line with the observations that many experimentally derived cation diffusion coefficients are larger than expected when compared with those of water tracers. This and the dependence of effective diffusion coefficients on the external salt concentration can be explained with so-called surface diffusion, that is, a movement of sorbed cations. Unfortunately, no direct proof of this phenomenon is available, and parameters like surface diffusion coefficients or surface mobilities are largely unknown. We compiled a large number of published cation diffusion coefficients for various clay minerals and clay rocks. We showed that by an appropriate scaling of the cation diffusion coefficients, it is possible to estimate the average surface mobility of the cation in each experiment. We define the surface mobility as the surface diffusion coefficient of a cation on a flat

  12. THE STUDYING OF COLLOIDAL-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY MINERALS DISPERSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Tymchuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The element structure is studied, the microscopic analysis of fine-dispersed min­eral systems (ground sediments of a mouth of the river Danube is carried out. The sedimentation process of clay minerals dispersions in solutions of surfactants and macromolecular substances is studied. Concentration intervals of stabilization of investigating dispersions were defined.

  13. Modified colloidal primitive model as a homogeneous surface charge distribution: ζ-potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanilla-Granados, Héctor M; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2013-10-03

    An integral equations theory is derived and applied to a modified colloidal primitive model (MCPM), for finite concentration colloidal dispersions. In MCPM, the charge on the colloidal particle is assumed to be smeared on its surface. We find important quantitative and qualitative differences of the ζ-potential, induced charge, and the colloid-colloid electric effective force, calculated in the MCPM, with those obtained from the colloidal primitive model (CPM), where the colloidal charge is assumed to be in the center of the particle, in spite of the fact that, due to Gauss's law, both models have the same particle distribution function. In particular, for the same parameters, while the ζ-potential is positive in MCPM, is negative in the CPM, implying opposite electrophoretic mobilities, μ. An inverse μ has been theoretically predicted in the past, for infinite dilution colloidal dispersions. The MCPM could be a better model for some colloidal particles. In both models, the CPM and the MCPM, it is found a very long-range colloid-colloid correlation, in accordance with previous Monte Carlo simulations. The electrostatic, as well as entropic, like-charged colloid-colloid forces are oscillatory, implying a long-range attraction.

  14. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  15. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  16. Colloid transport with wetting fronts: interactive effects of solution surface tension and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Goeppert, Nadine; Tu, Ching; McCarthy, John; Perfect, Edmund; McKay, Larry

    2010-02-01

    Transport of colloids with transient wetting fronts represents an important mechanism of contaminant migration in the vadose zone. The work presented here used steady-state saturated and transient unsaturated flow columns to evaluate the transport of a fluorescent latex microsphere (980 nm in diameter) with capillary wetting fronts of different solution surface tensions and ionic strengths. The saturated transport experiments demonstrated that decreasing solution surface tension and ionic strength decreased colloid deposition at the solid-liquid interface and increased colloid recovery in the column effluent. The effect of solution surface tension on colloid transport and deposition was greater at lower ionic strength, suggesting an interaction between these two factors. Under transient unsaturated flow conditions, the number of colloids retained in sand decreased exponentially with travel distance through the porous media. However, lowering the solution surface tension and ionic strength resulted in a more even distribution of colloids along the column. The measured zeta potentials of colloids in different solutions suggest that both lowering surface tension and ionic strength would enhance the electrostatic repulsion between colloid and sand. The experimental results revealed that the effects are nonlinear, implying the possible existence of critical threshold values, beyond which the effects were not significant. In addition, colloid migration slowed down as solution surface tension decreased due to reduction of capillary forces that drove liquid movement. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-06

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids.

  18. The Effect of 200 MPa Pressure on Specific Surface Area of Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszela-Marek Ewa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of laboratory studies of the 200 MPa pressure effect on specific surface area of clay. The original high-pressure investigation stand was used for the pressure tests. Determination of the specific surface area was performed by the methylene blue adsorption method. The results of the specific surface area test were compared for non-pressurized clays and for clays pressured in a high-pressure chamber. It was found that the specific surface area of pressurized soil clearly increased. This shows that some microstructural changes take place in the soil skeleton of clays.

  19. Haptic Decorating on the Surface of Virtual Clay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel haptic decorating method on the surface of virtual clay model is proposed. The relationship between brush deformation and endured force is researched for the first time by applying the spring-mass model to construct the 3D brush model. Then, the collision detection between virtual hairy brush and virtual clay model is researched based on collision algorithm of weighted average distance. When the hairy brush initially collides with 3D exterior, the tactility is simulated and the interactive virtual painting on the 3D exterior is carried out practically. The 3D brush stroke is formed by superimposing 3D brush footprints along the painting direction and controlling the stress of the brush. The ink quantity in the brush footprint is determined according to the proposed positive correlation between the exerted pressure on brush and outflow ink quantity of the brush. A painting storage method is also presented for storing and displaying 3D stroke painting results. The proposed method has been successfully applied in the 3D virtual painting system based on real-time force feedback technology. With this system, the 3D brush strokes with 3D half-dry and ink diffusion results can be painted with a Phantom Desktop haptic device, which effectively enhance reality to users.

  20. Surface- and tip-enhanced Raman scattering of bradykinin onto the colloidal suspended Ag surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiech, D; Ozaki, Y; Kim, Y; Proniewicz, E

    2015-07-14

    In this paper, surface- (SERS) and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) techniques were used to determine the adsorption mode of bradykinin (BK), a small peptide implicated in, for example, carcinoma growth, onto colloidal suspended Ag surfaces under various environmental conditions, including: peptide concentrations (10(-5)-10(-7) M), excitation wavelengths (514.5 and 785.0 nm), and pH of aqueous sol solutions (from pH = 3 to pH = 11). The metal surface plasmon and rheology of the colloidal suspended Ag surface were explored by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and atomic force/scanning electron microscopy (AFM/SEM). The SERS results indicated that the peptide concentration of 10(-5) M was the optimal peptide concentration for monolayer colloidal coverage. The Phe(5/8) and Arg(9) residues of BK generally participated in the interactions with colloidal suspended Ag surfaces. The amide group appeared to be arranged in the same manner to the Ag surface in the pH range of 3 to 11. At acidic pH of the solution (pH = 3 to 5), the BK -COO(-) terminal group binds to the Ag surface as a bidentate (at pH = 3) or monodentate (at pH = 5) chelating ligand. At pH = 11, the imino group of Arg(9), probably due to its -C[double bond, length as m-dash]N(⊕)H2 protonation state, was not involved in the interaction with Ag. The reduction in the solution alkalinity (pH = 9) produced the deprotonation of the -C=N(⊕)H2 group followed by group rearrangement in a way favoring the interaction between the lone electron pair on N and Ag. The TERS studies confirmed the proposed, on the basis of SERS, behavior of BK onto the colloidal suspended Ag at pH = 7 and showed that in different points of the colloidal suspended Ag surface the same peptide fragments approximately having the same orientations with respect to this surface interact with it.

  1. Temperature-Triggered Colloidal Gelation through Well-Defined Grafted Polymeric Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Maarten van Doorn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sufficiently strong interparticle attractions can lead to aggregation of a colloidal suspension and, at high enough volume fractions, form a mechanically rigid percolating network known as a colloidal gel. We synthesize a model thermo-responsive colloidal system for systematically studying the effect of surface properties, grafting density and chain length, on the particle dynamics within colloidal gels. After inducing an attraction between particles by heating, aggregates undergo thermal fluctuation which we observe and analyze microscopically; the magnitude of the variance in bond angle is larger for lower grafting densities. Macroscopically, a clear increase of the linear mechanical behavior of the gels on both the grafting density and chain length arises, as measured by rheology, which is inversely proportional to the magnitude of local bond angle fluctuations. This colloidal system will allow for further elucidation of the microscopic origins to the complex macroscopic mechanical behavior of colloidal gels including bending modes within the network.

  2. Colloidal organization

    CERN Document Server

    Okubo, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal Organization presents a chemical and physical study on colloidal organization phenomena including equilibrium systems such as colloidal crystallization, drying patterns as an example of a dissipative system and similar sized aggregation. This book outlines the fundamental science behind colloid and surface chemistry and the findings from the author's own laboratory. The text goes on to discuss in-depth colloidal crystallization, gel crystallization, drying dissipative structures of solutions, suspensions and gels, and similar-sized aggregates from nanosized particles. Special emphas

  3. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  4. Colloid filtration in surface dense vegetation: experimental results and theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Gao, Bin; Yang, Wen; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2014-04-01

    Understanding colloid and colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in overland flow through dense vegetation is important to protect water quality in the environment, especially for water bodies receiving agricultural and urban runoff. In previous studies, a single-stem efficiency theory for rigid and clean stem systems was developed to predict colloid filtration by plant stems of vegetation in laminar overland flow. Hence, in order to improve the accuracy of the single-stem efficiency theory to real dense vegetation system, we incorporated the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the filtration of colloids by stems. Laboratory dense vegetation flow chamber experiments and model simulations were used to determine the kinetic deposition (filtration) rate of colloids under various conditions. The results show that, in addition to flow hydrodynamics and solution chemistry, steric repulsion afforded by NOM layer on the plants stem surface also plays a significant role in controlling colloid deposition on vegetation in overland flow. For the first time, a refined single-stem efficiency theory with considerations of the NOM effect is developed that describes the experimental data with good accuracy. This theory can be used to not only help construct and refine mathematical models of colloid transport in real vegetation systems in overland flow, but also inform the development of theories of colloid deposition on NOM-coated surfaces in natural, engineered, and biomedical systems.

  5. Evaluating colloidal phosphorus delivery to surface waters from diffuse agricultural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathwaite, Louise; Haygarth, Phil; Matthews, Rachel; Preedy, Neil; Butler, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated phosphorus (P) delivery from agricultural soils in different hydrological pathways was investigated using a series of laboratory and field experiments. A soil colloidal P test was developed that yields information on the propensity of different soils to release P attached to soil colloids. The relationship between turbidity of soil extracts and total phosphorus (TP) was significant (r2 = 0.996, p 0.45-microm particle-size fractions (p = 0.05), and may be evidence of surface applications of organic and inorganic fertilizers being transferred through the soil either as intact organic colloids or attached to mineral particles. Our results highlight the potential for drainage water to mobilize colloids and associated P during rainfall events.

  6. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  7. The attachment of colloidal particles to environmentally relevant surfaces and the effect of particle shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNew, Coy P; Kananizadeh, Negin; Li, Yusong; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2017-02-01

    Despite the prevalence of nonspherical colloidal particles, the role of particle shape in the transport of colloids is largely understudied. This study investigates the attachment of colloidal particles onto environmentally relevant surfaces while varying particle shape and ionic strength. Using quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy measurements, the role of particle shape was elucidated and possible mechanisms discussed. The attachment of both spherical and stretched polystyrene colloidal particles onto a smooth alginate-coated silica surface showed qualitative agreement with DLVO theory. Attachment onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) surface, however, significantly deviated from DLVO theory due to its high surface heterogeneity and extended confirmation from the silica surface. This extended confirmation provided increased potential for spherical particle entanglement, while the enlarged major axis of the stretched particles hindered their ability to attach. As ionic strength increased, the HHA layer condensed and provided less potential for spherical particle entanglement and therefore the selectivity for spherical particle attachment vanished. The findings presented in this study suggest that colloidal particle shape may play a complex and important role in predicting the transport of colloidal particles, especially in the presence of natural organic matter-coated surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stability and aggregation of nanoscale titanium dioxide particle (nTiO2): Effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Cheng, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Fate and transport of engineered nanoscale titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) have received much attention during the past decade. The aggregation and stability of nTiO 2 in water with complicated components, however, have not been fully examined. The objective of this paper is to determine the individual and synergistic effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids on nTiO 2 stability and aggregation, and elucidate the related mechanisms. We conducted systematic laboratory experiments to determine nTiO 2 stability and aggregation in NaCl and MgCl 2 solutions, both in the absence and presence of humic acid and illite colloids. Results showed that Mg 2+ , in comparison to Na + , could make the zeta potential of nTiO 2 more positive, and shift the point of zero charge of nTiO 2 (pH pzc,TiO2 ) towards higher pH. We also found that nTiO 2 are destabilized by illite colloids at pH < pH pzc,TiO2 through formation of illite-nTiO 2 hetero-aggregates, but are not interfered by illite colloids at higher pH. HA was found to make nTiO 2 stable via electrostatic and steric effects, both in the absence and presence of illite colloids. Calculated interaction energy based on DLVO theory revealed that instability of the nTiO 2 suspensions is mainly caused by primary minima, and that secondary minima normally do not destabilize the suspension, even though they are found to promote aggregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Surface Interactions in the Synergizing Polymer/Clay Flame Retardant Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, S.; Kashiwagi, T; Cao, C; Korach, C; Lewin, M; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The absorption of resorcinol di(phenyl phosphate) (RDP) oligomers on clay surfaces has been studied in detail and is being proposed as an alternative method for producing functionalized clays for nanocomposite polymers. The ability of these clays to be exfoliated or intercalated in different homopolymers was investigated using both transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering results, compared with contact angle measurements on Langmuir-Blodgett clay monolayers, where the interfacial energies were used as predictors of the polymer/clay interactions. We found that the contact angle between PS/RDP clay monolayer substrates was {approx}2.5{sup o}, whereas the angle for polystyrene (PS)/Cloisite 20A clays substrates was {approx}32{sup o}, consistent with the large degree of exfoliation observed in PS for the RDP-coated clays. The interfacial activity of these clays was also measured, and we found that the RDP-coated clays segregated to the interfaces of PC/poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) blends, while they segregated into the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) domain of PS/PMMA blends. This morphology was explained in terms of the relative energy advantage in placing the RDP versus the Cloisite clays at the interfaces. Finally, we demonstrated the effects of the relative surface energies of the clays in segregating to the blend air interface when heated to high temperatures. The segregation was shown to affect the composition and mechanical properties of the resulting chars, which in turn could determine their flame retardant response.

  10. Colloid properties in groundwaters from crystalline formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Colloids are present in all groundwaters. The role they may play in the migration of safety-relevant radionuclides in the geosphere therefore must be studied. Colloid sampling and characterisation campaigns have been carried out in Switzerland. On the bases of the results from studies in the Grimsel area, Northern Switzerland and the Black Forest, as well as those obtained by other groups concerned with crystalline waters, a consistent picture is emerging. The groundwater colloids in crystalline formations are predominantly comprised of phyllosilicates and silica originating from the aquifer rock. Under constant hydrogeochemical conditions, the colloid concentration is not expected to exceed 100 ng.ml -1 when the calcium concentration is greater than 10 -4 . However, under transient chemical or physical conditions, such as geothermal or tectonic activity, colloid generation may be enhanced and the colloid concentration may reach 10 μg.ml -1 or more, if both the calcium and sodium concentrations are low. In the Nagra Crystalline Reference Water the expected colloid concentration is -1 . This can be compared, for example, to a colloid concentration of about 10 ng.ml -1 found in Zurzach water. The small colloid concentration in the reference water is a consequence of an attachment factor for clay colloids (monmorillonite) close to 1. A model indicates that at pH 8, the nuclide partition coefficients between water and colloid (K p ) must be smaller than 10 7 ml.g -1 if sorption takes place by surface complexation on colloids, = AIOH active groups forming the dominant sorption sites. This pragmatic model is based on the competition between the formation of nuclide hydroxo complexes in solution and their sorption on colloids. Experimental nuclide sorption data on colloids are compared with those obtained by applying this model. For a low colloid concentration, a sorption capacity of the order of 10 -9 M and reversible surface complexation, their presence in the

  11. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs

  12. A field study of colloid transport in surface and subsurface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Tang, Xiang-Yu; Xian, Qing-Song; Weisbrod, Noam; Yang, Jae E.; Wang, Hong-Lan

    2016-11-01

    Colloids have been recognized to enhance the migration of strongly-sorbing contaminants. However, few field investigations have examined combined colloid transport via surface runoff and subsurface flows. In a headwater catchment of the upper Yangtze River, a 6 m (L) by 4 m (W) sloping (6°) farmland plot was built by cement walls to form no-flow side boundaries. The plot was monitored in the summer of 2014 for the release and transport of natural colloids via surface runoff and subsurface flows (i.e., the interflow from the soil-mudrock interface and fracture flow from the mudrock-sandstone interface) in response to rain events. The water sources of the subsurface flows were apportioned to individual rain events using a two end-member model (i.e., mobile pre-event soil water extracted by a suction-cup sampler vs. rainwater (event water)) based on δ18O measurements. For rain events with high preceding soil moisture, mobile pre-event soil water was the main contributor (generally >60%) to the fracture flow. The colloid concentration in the surface runoff was 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that in the subsurface flows. The lowest colloid concentration was found in the subsurface interflow, which was probably the result of pore-scale colloid straining mechanisms. The rainfall intensity and its temporal variation govern the dynamics of the colloid concentrations in both surface runoff and subsurface flows. The duration of the antecedent dry period affected not only the relative contributions of the rainwater and the mobile pre-event soil water to the subsurface flows but also the peak colloid concentration, particularly in the fracture flow. The colloid size fraction accounted for more than 80% of the total suspended particles in the surface runoff, while the colloid size distributions of both the interflow and the fracture flow shifted towards larger diameters. These results highlight the need to avoid the application of strongly-sorbing agrochemicals (e

  13. Bioinspired nanopatterned surfaces via colloidal templating; a pathway for tuning wetting and adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    We can learn from nature that, next to chemistry, surface structures can be used for tuning different functions of surfaces. In this thesis we present a novel fabrication method using colloidal templating on the air/water interface. Two distinct ways to obtain nanopatterned surfaces are described,

  14. Surface roughness directed self-assembly of patchy particles into colloidal micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; Ni, Ran; Smallenburg, Frank; Hermes, Michiel; Yoon, Kisun; Weitz, David A; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Groenewold, Jan; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Kegel, Willem K

    2012-07-03

    Colloidal particles with site-specific directional interactions, so called "patchy particles", are promising candidates for bottom-up assembly routes towards complex structures with rationally designed properties. Here we present an experimental realization of patchy colloidal particles based on material independent depletion interaction and surface roughness. Curved, smooth patches on rough colloids are shown to be exclusively attractive due to their different overlap volumes. We discuss in detail the case of colloids with one patch that serves as a model for molecular surfactants both with respect to their geometry and their interactions. These one-patch particles assemble into clusters that resemble surfactant micelles with the smooth and attractive sides of the colloids located at the interior. We term these clusters "colloidal micelles". Direct Monte Carlo simulations starting from a homogeneous state give rise to cluster size distributions that are in good agreement with those found in experiments. Important differences with surfactant micelles originate from the colloidal character of our model system and are investigated by simulations and addressed theoretically. Our new "patchy" model system opens up the possibility for self-assembly studies into finite-sized superstructures as well as crystals with as of yet inaccessible structures.

  15. Supramolecular Surface Photochemistry: Cascade Energy Transfer between Encapsulated Dyes Aligned on a Clay Nanosheet Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takamasa; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-03-29

    Three coumarin derivatives (7-propoxy coumarin, coumarin-480, and coumarin-540a, 2, 3, and 4, respectively) having different absorption and emission spectra were encapsulated within a water-soluble organic capsule formed by the two positively charged ammonium-functionalized cavitand octaamine (OAm, 1). Guests 2, 3, and 4 absorb in ultraviolet, violet, and blue regions and emit in violet, blue, and green regions, respectively. Energy transfer between the above three coumarin@(OAm)2 complexes assembled on the surface of a saponite clay nanosheet was investigated by steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques. Judging from their emission and excitation spectra, we concluded that the singlet-singlet energy transfer proceeded from 2 to 3, from 2 to 4, and from 3 to 4 when OAm-encapsulated 2, 3, and 4 were aligned on a clay surface as two-component systems. Under such conditions, the energy transfer efficiencies for the paths 2* to 3, 2* to 4, and 3* to 4 were calculated to be 33, 36, and 50% in two-component systems. When all three coumarins were assembled on the surface and 2 was excited, the energy transfer efficiencies for the paths 2* to 3, 2* to 4, and 3* to 4 were estimated to be 32, 34, and 33%. A comparison of energy transfer efficiencies of the two-component and three-component systems revealed that excitation of 2 leads to emission from 4. Successful merging of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry by demonstrating novel multi-step energy transfer in a three-component dye encapsulated system on a clay surface opens up newer opportunities for exploring such systems in an artificial light-harvesting phenomenon.

  16. Surface treatment of silica nanoparticles for stable and charge-controlled colloidal silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Tae-il; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Paek, Seung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to control the surface charge of colloidal silica nanoparticles with 20 nm and 100 nm diameters. Untreated silica nanoparticles were determined to be highly negatively charged and have stable hydrodynamic sizes in a wide pH range. To change the surface to a positively charged form, various coating agents, such as amine containing molecules, multivalent metal cation, or amino acids, were used to treat the colloidal silica nanoparticles. Molecules with chelating amine sites were determined to have high affinity with the silica surface to make agglomerations or gel-like networks. Amino acid coatings resulted in relatively stable silica colloids with a modified surface charge. Three amino acid moiety coatings (L-serine, L-histidine, and L-arginine) exhibited surface charge modifying efficacy of L-histidine > L-arginine > L-serine and hydrodynamic size preservation efficacy of L-serine > L-arginine > L-histidine. The time dependent change in L-arginine coated colloidal silica was investigated by measuring the pattern of the backscattered light in a Turbiscan™. The results indicated that both the 20 nm and 100 nm L-arginine coated silica samples were fairly stable in terms of colloidal homogeneity, showing only slight coalescence and sedimentation. PMID:25565824

  17. Synthesis of Ag-coated polystyrene colloids by an improved surface seeding and shell growth technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Chungui; Wang Enbo; Kang Zhenhui; Mao Baodong; Zhang Chao; Lan Yang; Wang Chunlei; Song Yanli

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an improved surface seeding and shell growth technique was developed to prepare Ag-polystyrene core shell composite. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) could act as the linker between Ag ions (Ag nanoparticles) and polystyrene (PS) colloids and the reducing agent in the formation of Ag nanoparticles. Due to the multi-functional characteristic of PEI, Ag seeds formed in-situ and were immobilized on the surface of PEI-modified PS colloids and no free Ag clusters coexist with the Ag 'seeding' PS colloids in the system. Then, the additional agents could be added into the resulting dispersions straightly to produce a thick Ag nanoshell. The Ag nanoshell with controllable thickness was formed on the surface of PS by the 'one-pot' surface seeding and shell growth method. The Ag-coverage increased gradually with the increasing of mass ratio of AgNO 3 /PS. The optical properties of the Ag-PS colloids could be tailored by changing the coverage of Ag. - Graphical abstract: An improved surface seeding and shell growth technique was developed to prepare Ag-polystyrene core shell composite. The optical properties of the Ag-PS colloids could be tailored by changing the coverage of Ag. Display Omitted

  18. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1988-09-01

    The concept of a geological barrier to radionuclide migration from theoretical radioactive waste repositories has drawn attention to the physico-chemical properties of clays, which are traditionally regarded as retarding media. This report addresses the different mechanisms of transport of radionuclides through clay and in particular focuses on the surface diffusion movement of sorbed cations. The relative contributory importance of the different transport mechanisms is governed by the pore size distributions and interconnections within the clay fabric. Surface diffusion data in the literature have been from experiments using compacted montmorillonite and biotite gneiss. A possible programme of laboratory work is outlined, based on diffusion experiments, which describes the way of measuring the effect of surface diffusion more accurately in clays, mudstones and shales. (author)

  19. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  20. State boundary surface of a hypoplastic model for clays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, David; Herle, Ivo

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2005), s. 400-410 ISSN 0266-352X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/04/0672 Grant - others:Evropská komise SSPI-CT-2003-501837 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : hypoplasticity * clay * limit state Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2005

  1. Aqueous suspensions of carbon nanotubes: surface oxidation, colloidal stability and uranium sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierz, A; Zänker, H

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain information on the behaviour of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as potential carriers of pollutants in the case of accidental CNT release to the environment and on the properties of CNTs as a potential adsorbent material in water purification. The effects of acid treatment of CNTs on (i) the surface properties, (ii) the colloidal stability and (iii) heavy metal sorption are investigated, the latter being exemplified by uranium(VI) sorption. There is a pronounced influence of surface treatment on the behaviour of the CNTs in aqueous suspension. Results showed that acid treatment increases the amount of acidic surface groups on the CNTs. Therefore, acid treatment has an increasing effect on the colloidal stability of the CNTs and on their adsorption capacity for U(VI). Another way to stabilise colloids of pristine CNTs in aqueous suspension is the addition of humic acid.

  2. Recycling process of spent bleaching clay: Optimization by response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Hatami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil refining is an inevitable step in production of edible and industrial oil. Bleaching is the most important process among the refining processes. Bleaching adsorption is the most common method and clay is the most widely used adsorbent in this method. Disposal of bleaching clay, as a waste from re-refining plants, makes many environmental problems and economic losses. In the current study, the effects of possible factors such as solvent to clay ratio, temperature, time, aggregation size and rotation speed of the stirrer (degree of mixing on the efficiency of extracted lubricating oil were investigated by solvent extraction method. By conducting experiments at different reaction times and rotation speeds, it was concluded that the most important factor in obtaining the appropriate output was solvent to clay ratio. The tests conducted to investigate the effect of grain size on the efficiency indicated that agglomerates size did not have a positive effect on efficiency. Finally, for the solvent to clay ratios ranging from 2.48-9.53 ml/g and a time period ranging from 5 to 40 minutes, the main tests designed by the response surface methodology. The best efficiency was obtained at the highest level of solvent to clay ratio (9.53 ml/g and at the time of 22.5 minutes that led to 88.60% oil extraction from the clay. The accuracy of the model output was estimated to be 96%.

  3. Color and texture morphing with colloids on multilayered surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziguang; Li, Shumin; Arkebauer, Andrew; Gogos, George; Tan, Li

    2015-05-20

    Dynamic morphing of marine species to match with environment changes in color and texture is an advanced means for surviving, self-defense, and reproduction. Here we use colloids that are placed inside a multilayered structure to demonstrate color and texture morphing. The multilayer is composed of a thermal insulating base layer, a light absorbing mid layer, and a liquid top layer. When external light of moderate intensity (∼0.2 W cm(-2)) strikes the structure, colloids inside the liquid layer will be assembled to locations with an optimal absorption. When this system is exposed to continuous laser pulses, more than 18,000 times of reversible responses are recorded, where the system requests 20 ms to start the response and another 160 ms to complete. The flexibility of our concept further allows the system to be built on a variety of light-absorbing substrates, including dyed paper, gold thin film, and amorphous silicon, with the top layer even a solid.

  4. Speciation of uranium in surface-modified, hydrothermally treated, (UO2)2+-exchanged smectite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaquinta, D.M.; Soderholm, L.; Yuchs, S.E.; Wasserman, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    A successful solution to the problem of disposal and permanent storage of water soluble radioactive species must address two issues: exclusion of the radionuclides from the environment and the prevention of leaching from the storage media into the environment. Immobilization of radionuclides in clay minerals has been studied. In addition to the use of clays as potential waste forms, information about the interactions of radionuclides with clays and how such interactions affect their speciations is crucial for successful modeling of actinide-migration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to determine the uranium speciation in exchanged and surface-modified clays. The XAS data from uranyl-loaded bentonite clay are compared with those obtained after the particle surfaces have been coated with alkylsilanes. These silane films, which render the surface of the clay hydrophobic, are added in order to minimize the ability of external water to exchange with the water in the clay interlayer, thereby decreasing the release rate of the exchanged-uranium species. Mild hydrothermal conditions are used in an effort to mimic potential geologic conditions that may occur during long-term radioactive waste storage. The XAS spectra indicate that the uranyl monomer species remain unchanged in most samples, except in those samples that were both coated with an alkylsilane and hydrothermally treated. When the clay was coated with an organic film, formed by the acidic deposition of octadecyltrimethoxysilane, hydrothermal treatment results in the formation of aggregated uranium species in which the uranium is reduced from U VI to U IV

  5. Quantifying the availability of clay surfaces in soils for adsorption of nitrocyanobenzene and diuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Simone M; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A

    2006-12-15

    Coverage of clay surfaces by soil organic matter (SOM) may limitthe efficacy of the soil mineral fractions for adsorption of organic contaminants and pesticides. Two methods were scrutinized for quantitatively assessing the availability of clay surfaces in a smectitic Webster A-horizon soil for sorption of p-nitrocyanobenzene (p-NCB) and diuron. One method, described previously, involves the summation of independent contributions of SOM and swelling clays to sorption of organic solutes. For this method, several assumptions must be made and/or procedural difficulties overcome in the determination of certain terms in the equation proposed for calculating the fractional availability of mineral surfaces (fa). To alleviate the methodological limitations, we developed an alternative approach for determining fa. Good agreement between fa values was obtained from both methods for p-NCB but not diuron. For p-NCB sorption, fa values varied between 0.55 and 0.71. For diuron sorption, our alternative equation estimated fa values varied between 0.41 and 0.61; the other approach yielded negative values. The results demonstrate that SOM does reduce the availability of clay surfaces, hence, suppressing sorption by the Webster A-horizon soil. Our newly developed method provides more reasonable estimates of the availability of soil-clay surfaces for sorption than an earlier published approach.

  6. Surface modification of synthetic clay aimed at biomolecule adsorption: synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela de Mello Ferreira Guimarães

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the process for functionalization of laponite through the grafting of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS. Laponite is synthetic smectite clay with surface area of 350 m²/g. The samples, prior to and after functionalization, were characterized by chemical analyses, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, x ray diffraction (XRD, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry (MEV/EDS. Infrared spectroscopy and elemental analyses confirmed the presence of organic chains and thiol groups in the modified clay. The immobilized and available thiol group, measured according to the Volhard method, totaled 1.4 meq/g of clay, with approximately 90% accessible for Ag+ trapping. These results represent an improvement as compared to other works concerning the functionalization of smectite-type clays in which the effect produced by functional group blockage limits the access of species to less than 10% of the complexing sites.

  7. Challenges in Teaching "Colloid and Surface Chemistry"--A Danish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; Vigild, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Seven years ago we were asked, as one of our first teaching duties at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), to teach a 5 ECTS point course on "Colloid and Surface Chemistry". The topic is itself at the same time exciting and demanding, largely due to its multidisciplinary nature. Several "local" requirements posed…

  8. Controlled Fabrication of Polypyrrole Surfaces with Overhang Structures by Colloidal Templating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, S.; Pujari, S.P.; Turak, E.; Kamperman, M.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the fabrication of polypyrrole (PPy) surfaces with a controlled overhang structure. Regularly structured PPy films were produced using interfacial polymerization around a sacrificial crystalline colloidal monolayer at the air/water interface. The morphology of the final inverse

  9. Effect of coal mine dust and clay extracts on the biological activity of the quartz surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, V.; Jones, R.; Rollo, K.; Duffin, R.; Donaldson, K.; Brown, D.M. [Napier University, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of Life Science

    2004-04-01

    Modification of the quartz surface by aluminum salts and metallic iron have been shown to reduce the biological activity of quartz. This study aimed to investigate the ability of water soluble extracts of coal mine dust (CMD), low aluminum clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) and high aluminum clays (attapulgite and kaolin) to inhibit the reactivity of the quartz surface. DQ12 induced significant haemolysis of sheep erythrocytes in vitro and inflammation in vivo as indicated by increases in the total cell numbers, neutrophil cell numbers, MIP-2 protein and albumin content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Treatment of DQ12 with CMD extract prevented both haemolysis and inflammation. Extracts of the high aluminum clays (kaolin and attapulgite) prevented inhibition of DQ12 induced haemolysis, and the kaolin extract inhibited quartz driven inflammation. DQ12 induced haemolysis by coal mine dust and kaolin extract could be prevented by pre-treatment of the extracts with a cation chellator. Extracts of the low aluminum clays (montmorillonite and hectorite) did not prevent DQ12 induced haemolysis, although the hectorite extract did prevent inflammation. These results suggest that CMD, and clays both low and rich in aluminum, all contain soluble components (possibly cations) capable of masking the reactivity of the quartz surface.

  10. 52nd colloid and surface science symposium. Proceedings volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Corbett, H.G.

    1978-05-01

    Abstracts are presented under the headings: cell/surface interactions, surface properties and reactions of catalysts, solution chemistry of surfactants, dynamic systems, microorganism/surface interactions, gas-solid interactions, biological surfaces, solid sorbents, lung surfactant and intestinal absorption, pigments, and liquid systems. (DLC)

  11. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Mathilde I; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2008-12-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a time-course experiment was performed under laboratory conditions. Earthworms were incubated in perspex columns filled with sandy soil (2% organic matter, 2.9% clay) or loamy clay soil (15% organic matter, 20% clay), and surface casts were collected after up to 80 days. On the sandy soil, A. caliginosa and L. rubellus brought approximately 7.1-16 g dry wt. casts/g fresh wt. earthworm to the surface, which is significantly more than A. chlorotica and L. terrestris (2.5-5.0 g dry wt./g fresh wt.). A. caliginosa was the only species that produced significantly more surface casts in the sandy soil than in the loamy clay soil. In the loamy clay soil, no differences in biomass-corrected casting rates were found among the species. Surface casting rates tended to decrease after 20 days. Considering the densities of the different species in a Dutch floodplain area Afferdensche and Deestsche Waarden, surface cast production is estimated to amount to 2.0 kg dry soil/m2 after 80 days, which could be extrapolated to 2.7-9.1 kg/m2 per year. These amounts correspond to a surface deposition of a layer of approximately 1.9-6.5 mm/year, which is of the same order or even slightly higher than the sedimentation rate and much higher than the amount of soil brought to the soil surface by bioturbating small mammals.

  12. Chemical processes at the surface of various clays on acid-base titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Park, Y. S.; Jung, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The chemical reaction of radionuclides at the interface between groundwater and geological mineral is an important process determining their retardation of transport through groundwater flow in a nuclear waste disposal. Clay minerals are major components of soil and argillaceous rock, and some of them are considered to be important base materials in the design of high-level nuclear waste repository due to their large swelling, low-permeability, large surface area, and strong and large sorption of radionuclides. Clay materials are phyllosilicates containing accessory minerals such as metal oxides, hydroxides, oxyhydroxides. Their structures are condensed 1:1 or 2:1 layers of tetrahedral SiO 3/2 OH and octahedral Al(OH) 6/2 sheets. An accurate knowledge about the properties of clay surface is required as a parameter for a long-term estimation of radionuclide retardation effects. Electric surface charge is a primary property determining ion exchange and surface complexation of radionuclides on its surface. The sources of electric surface charge are a permanent structural negative charge on a basal plane and a dissociable charge at an edge surface. Investigation of proton sorption is a prerequisite to the understanding of radionuclide sorption. The reactions on a permanently charged site and on an edge site are measured by an electrokinetic measurement and by potentiometric titration, respectively. However, side reactions such as complexation, proton/cation exchange, dissolution, hydrolysis, precipitation and re adsorption, and the reaction of secondary minerals hinder an experimental measurement of accurate acid-base properties. This presentation describes the pH change on dispersing various clays in water and adding acid, base or Eu(III) ion to these solutions, and the effect of Eu(III) ion on acid-base titration of clay solutions

  13. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  14. COLLOID RELEASE FROM DIFFERENT SOIL DEPTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring clay colloidal particles are heavily involved in sediment processes in the subsurface soil. Due to the import ance of these processes in the subsurface environment, the transport of clay colloidal particles has been studied in several disciplines, including soil sciences, petr ology, hydrology, etc. Specifically, in environmental engineering, clay colloid re lease and transport in the sediments have been extensively investigated, which are motiv ated by environmental concerns such as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in groundwater and the subsurface soil. Clay colloid release is resulted from physical alteration of subsurface sediments. Despite the potential importance of clay colloid activiti es, the detailed mechanisms of release and transport of clay colloidal particles with in natural sediments are poorly understood. Pore medium structure, properties and flow dynamics, etc. are factors that affect clay colloid generation, mobilization, and subse quent transport. Possible mechanisms of clay colloid generation in the sediments in clude precipitation, erosion and mobilization by changes in pore water chemistry and clay colloid release depends on a balance of applied hydrodynamic and resisting adhesive torques and forces. The coupled role of pore water chemistry and fluid hydrodynamics thus play key roles in controlling clay colloid release and transport in the sediment s. This paper investigated clay colloidal particle release and transport, especially th e colloidal particle release mechanisms as well as the process modeling in the sediments. In this research, colloidal particle release from intact sediment columns with variable length was examined and colloidal particle release curves were simulated using an im plicit, finite-difference scheme. Colloidal particle release rate coefficient was found to be an exponential function of the sediment depth. The simulated results demonstrated that transport parameters were

  15. Direct measurement of colloidal interactions between polyaniline surfaces in a uv-curable coating formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafarzadeh, Shadi; Claesson, Per M.; Pan, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different characteri......The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different...... cantilever and a pressed pellet of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic polyaniline powders, in resins of various polymer:monomer ratios. A short-range purely repulsive interaction was observed between hydrophilic polyaniline (doped with phosphoric acid) surfaces in polyester acrylate resin. In contrast...

  16. Colloid Surface Chemistry Critically Affects Multiple Particle Tracking Measurements of Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, M. T.; Perlman, Z. E.; Gardel, M. L.; Shin, J. H.; Matsudaira, P.; Mitchison, T. J.; Weitz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of the properties of complex biomaterials using microrheological techniques has the promise of providing fundamental insights into their biomechanical functions; however, precise interpretations of such measurements are hindered by inadequate characterization of the interactions between tracers and the networks they probe. We here show that colloid surface chemistry can profoundly affect multiple particle tracking measurements of networks of fibrin, entangled F-actin solutions, and networks of cross-linked F-actin. We present a simple protocol to render the surface of colloidal probe particles protein-resistant by grafting short amine-terminated methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) to the surface of carboxylated microspheres. We demonstrate that these poly(ethylene glycol)-coated tracers adsorb significantly less protein than particles coated with bovine serum albumin or unmodified probe particles. We establish that varying particle surface chemistry selectively tunes the sensitivity of the particles to different physical properties of their microenvironments. Specifically, particles that are weakly bound to a heterogeneous network are sensitive to changes in network stiffness, whereas protein-resistant tracers measure changes in the viscosity of the fluid and in the network microstructure. We demonstrate experimentally that two-particle microrheology analysis significantly reduces differences arising from tracer surface chemistry, indicating that modifications of network properties near the particle do not introduce large-scale heterogeneities. Our results establish that controlling colloid-protein interactions is crucial to the successful application of multiple particle tracking techniques to reconstituted protein networks, cytoplasm, and cells. PMID:15189896

  17. Surface Assisted Formation of methane Hydrates on Ice and Na Montmorillonite Clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cygan, Randall Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Methane hydrates are extremely important naturally-occurring crystalline materials that impact climate change, energy resources, geological hazards, and other major environmental issues. Whereas significant experimental effort has been completed to understanding the bulk thermodynamics of methane hydrate assemblies, little is understood on heterogeneous nucleation and growth of methane hydrates in clay-rich environments. Controlled synthesis experiments were completed at 265-285 K and 6.89 MPa to examine the impact of montmorillonite surfaces in clay-ice mixtures to nucleate and form methane hydrate. The results suggest that the hydrophilic and methane adsorbing properties of Namontmorillonite reduce the nucleation period of methane hydrate formation in pure ice systems.

  18. Monotonic Loading of Circular Surface Footings on Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate modeling of offshore foundations under monotonic loading is a significant challenge in geotechnical engineering. This paper reports experimental and numerical analyses, specifically investigating the response of circular surface footings during monotonic loading and elastoplastic beha...

  19. Sol-gel network silica/modified montmorillonite clay hybrid nanocomposites for hydrophobic surface coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Murali, Adhigan; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-02-01

    Sol-gel silica/nanoclay composites were prepared through sol-gel polymerization technique using tetraethylorthosilicate precursor and montmorillonite (MMT) clay in aqueous media. In this study, both montmorillonite-K(+) and organically modified MMT (OMMT) clays were used. The prepared composites were coated on glass substrate by making 1 wt% solution in ethyltrichlorosilane. The incorporation of nanoclay does not alter the intensity of characteristic Si-O-Si peak of silica network. Thermogravimetric studies show that increasing clay content increased the degradation temperature of the composites. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results of organically modified MMT nanoclay incorporated composite show a shift in the melting behavior up to 38°C. From DSC thermograms, we observed that the ΔH value decreased with increasing clay loading. X-ray diffraction patterns prove the presence of nanoclay in the composite and increase in the concentration of organically modified nanoclay from 3 to 5 wt% increases the intensity of the peak at 2θ=8° corresponds to OMMT. Morphology of the control silica gel composite was greatly influenced by the incorporation of OMMT. The presence of nanoclay changed the surface of control silica gel composite into cleaved surface with brittle in nature. Contact angle measurements were done for the coatings to study their surface behavior. These hybrid coatings on glass substrate may have applications for hydrophobic coatings on leather substrate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterizing the surface charge of clay minerals with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The engineering properties of clayey soils, including fluid permeability, erosion resistance and cohesive strength, are quite different from those of non-cohesive soils. This is mainly due to their small platy particle shape and the surrounding diffuse double layer structure. By using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, the surface topography and the interaction force between the silicon dioxide tip and the kaolinite/montmorillonite clay minerals have been measured in the 1.0 mM NaCl solution at neutral pH. From this, the surface potential of the clay minerals is determined by mathematical regression analyses using the DLVO model. The length/thickness ratio of kaolinite and montmorillonite particles measured ranges from 8.0 to 15.0. The surface potential and surface charge density vary with particles. The average surface potential of montmorillonite is −62.8 ± 10.6 mV, and the average surface potential of kaolinite is −40.9 ± 15.5 mV. The measured results help to understand the clay sediment interaction, and will be used to develop interparticle force model to simulate sediment transport during erosion process.

  1. Understanding colloidal charge renormalization from surface chemistry: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, T.; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H.; Schurtenberger, P.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stern capacitance) are determined from fits of a Stern layer model to the titration data. We find strong evidence that the dissociation of protons is the only specific adsorption process. Effective particle charges are determined by fits of integral equation calculations of the polydisperse static structure factor to the static light scattering data. A generalization of the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model including the dissociation of the acidic surface groups and the autodissociation of water is used to predict effective particle charges from the surface chemical parameters determined by the titration experiments. We find that the light scattering data are best described by a model where a small fraction of the ionizable surface sites are sulfate groups which are completely dissociated at moderate pH. These effective charges are comparable to the predictions by a basic cell model where charge regulation is absent.

  2. Autocatalytic surface reduction and its role in controlling seed-mediated growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tung-Han; Zhou, Shan; Gilroy, Kyle D; Figueroa-Cosme, Legna; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Xia, Younan

    2017-12-26

    The growth of colloidal metal nanocrystals typically involves an autocatalytic process, in which the salt precursor adsorbs onto the surface of a growing nanocrystal, followed by chemical reduction to atoms for their incorporation into the nanocrystal. Despite its universal role in the synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals, it is still poorly understood and controlled in terms of kinetics. Through the use of well-defined nanocrystals as seeds, including those with different types of facets, sizes, and internal twin structure, here we quantitatively analyze the kinetics of autocatalytic surface reduction in an effort to control the evolution of nanocrystals into predictable shapes. Our kinetic measurements demonstrate that the activation energy barrier to autocatalytic surface reduction is highly dependent on both the type of facet and the presence of twin boundary, corresponding to distinctive growth patterns and products. Interestingly, the autocatalytic process is effective not only in eliminating homogeneous nucleation but also in activating and sustaining the growth of octahedral nanocrystals. This work represents a major step forward toward achieving a quantitative understanding and control of the autocatalytic process involved in the synthesis of colloidal metal nanocrystals.

  3. Modes of surface premelting in colloidal crystals composed of attractive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Han, Yilong

    2016-03-24

    Crystal surfaces typically melt into a thin liquid layer at temperatures slightly below the melting point of the crystal. Such surface premelting is prevalent in all classes of solids and is important in a variety of metallurgical, geological and meteorological phenomena. Premelting has been studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, but the lack of single-particle resolution makes it hard to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Colloids are good model systems for studying phase transitions because the thermal motions of individual micrometre-sized particles can be tracked directly using optical microscopy. Here we use colloidal spheres with tunable attractions to form equilibrium crystal-vapour interfaces, and study their surface premelting behaviour at the single-particle level. We find that monolayer colloidal crystals exhibit incomplete premelting at their perimeter, with a constant liquid-layer thickness. In contrast, two- and three-layer crystals exhibit conventional complete melting, with the thickness of the surface liquid diverging as the melting point is approached. The microstructures of the surface liquids differ in certain aspects from what would be predicted by conventional premelting theories. Incomplete premelting in the monolayer crystals is triggered by a bulk isostructural solid-solid transition and truncated by a mechanical instability that separately induces homogeneous melting within the bulk. This finding is in contrast to the conventional assumption that two-dimensional crystals melt heterogeneously from their free surfaces (that is, at the solid-vapour interface). The unexpected bulk melting that we observe for the monolayer crystals is accompanied by the formation of grain boundaries, which supports a previously proposed grain-boundary-mediated two-dimensional melting theory. The observed interplay between surface premelting, bulk melting and solid-solid transitions challenges existing theories of surface

  4. Understanding colloidal charge renormilization from surface chemistry : experiment and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gisler, Thomas; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, Michal; Sticher, Hans; Schurtenberger, Peter; D'Aguanno, Bruno; Klein, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stem capacitance) are determined from tits of a Stem ...

  5. Surface and mechanical properties of polypropylene/clay nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibaei Asl Husein

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huge consumption of polypropylene in the industries like automotive motivates academic and industrial R&Ds to find new and excellent approaches to improve the mechanical properties of this polymer, which has no degradation effect on other required performance properties like impact resistance, controlled crystallinity, toughness and shrinkage. Nowadays, nanoparticles play a key role in improving the mechanical and surface properties of polypropylene. In this study, three compositions of "Polypropylene/nanoclay", containing 0%, 2% and 5% of nanoclay were prepared in internal mixer. For characterizing the nanoclay dispersion in polymer bulk, TEM and XRD tests were used. For scratch resistance test, scratch lines were created on the load of 900 grain on sheets and SEM images were taken and compared with neat PP scratch image. Crystallinity and mechanical behavior were studied. The results showed that mechanical properties and scratch resistance of the composites have been improved.

  6. Dynamic analysis of the photoenhancement process of colloidal quantum dots with different surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valledor Llopis, Marta; Campo Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Ferrero Martin, Francisco J [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Electronica, C y S Universidad de Oviedo, Campus de Gijon s/n, 33204 Gijon, Asturias, (Spain); Coto, Ana Maria; Fernandez-Argueelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, J M; Sanz-Medel, A [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Campus del Cristo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2011-09-23

    Photoinduced fluorescence enhancement of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) is a hot topic addressed in many studies due to its great influence on the bioanalytical performance of such nanoparticles. However, understanding of this process is not a simple task, and it cannot be explained by a general mechanism as it greatly depends on the QDs' nature, solubilization strategies, surrounding environment, etc. In this vein, we have critically compared the behavior of CdSe QDs (widely used in bioanalytical applications) with different surface modifications (ligand exchange and polymer coating), in different controlled experimental conditions, in the presence-absence of the ZnS layer and in different media when exposed for long times to intense UV irradiation. Thus six different types of colloidal QDs were finally studied. This research was carried out from a novel perspective, based on the analysis of the dynamic behavior of the photoactivation process (of great interest for further applications of QDs as labels in biomedical applications). The results showed a different behavior of the studied colloidal QDs after UV irradiation in terms of their photoluminescence characteristics, potential toxicity due to metal release to the environment, nanoparticle stability and surface coating degradation.

  7. Simulated solar light phototransformation of organophosphorus azinphos methyl at the surface of clays and goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menager, Matthieu; Sarakha, Mohamed

    2013-01-15

    The photochemical behavior of the pesticide azinphos methyl at the surface of clays (kaolinite, bentonite) and goethite was studied using Suntest setup (λ > 300 nm). The quantum yield on the clays was found to be roughly three times lower than that in aqueous solution. However, the photochemical efficiency was much higher at the surface of goethite owing to its photocatalytic activity through the hydroxyl radical production. The added humic substances on kaolonite show an inhibition of azinphos methyl degradation while the incorporation of iron(III) aquacomplexes leads to an important increase of the disappearance together with the formation of iron(II). Hydroxyl radical species were found to be formed either by excitation of goethite or clays. The goethite support acts as a more efficient catalyst for the formation of these reactive oxygen species. The photodecomposition reactions observed were (i) hydrolysis process leading to the formation of benzotriazone and the oxidation of the P = S bond giving rise to the formation of the oxon derivative, and (ii) homolytic cleavage of the N-C and C-S bonds of the organophosphorus bridge leading to the formation of dimers that appear to be specific to the irradiation at the surface of solid supports since they were not observed when the irradiation was performed in aqueous media: a statement that is related to the presence of aggregates at the surface of solid supports.

  8. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We have fabricated aerogels containing gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles for gas catalysis applications. By applying the concept of an average or effective dielectric constant to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to porous or heterogeneous media. Specifically, we apply the predominant effective medium theories for the determination of the average fractional composition of each component in this inhomogeneous layer. Hence, the surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction is determined. The technique is satisfactory for statistically random metal particle distributions but needs further modification for aggregated or surfactant modified systems. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  9. Colloid and surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jeong Jung; Cho, Sun Chae; Ryeo, Su Dong

    1995-08-01

    This book consists of two parts about colloid and surfactant. The first parts has explanations colloid and surface science, which deal with creation and properties of colloidal particles, surfactant and micelle colloid, property of surfactant, membranes, absorption of surface science, electrokinetic phenomenon, emulsion, foam and rheology. The second part mentions surfactant on anionic surfactant with five types, amphoteric surface active agent, non-ionic surface active agent and use of surfactant.

  10. Phase behavior of charged colloids on spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Colm; Guerra, Rodrigo; Chaikin, Paul

    For a broad class of 2D materials, the transition from isotropic fluid to crystalline solid is described by the theory of melting due to Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson and Young. According to this theory, long-range order is achieved via elimination of the topological defects which proliferate in the fluid phase. However, many natural and man-made 2D systems posses spatial curvature and/or non-trivial topology, which require the presence of defects, even at T = 0 . In principle, the presence of these defects could profoundly affect the phase behavior of such a system. In this presentation, we describe experiments and simulations we have performed on repulsive particles which are bound to the surface of a sphere. We observe spatial structures and inhomogeneous dynamics that cannot be captured by the measures traditionally used to describe flat-space phase behavior. We show that ordering is achieved by a novel mechanism: sequestration of topological defects into freely-terminating grain boundaries (``scars''), and simultaneous spatial organization of the scars themselves on the vertices of an icosahedron. The emergence of icosahedral order coincides with the localization of mobility into isolated ``lakes'' of fluid or glassy particles, situated at the icosahedron vertices.

  11. Colloid and surface chemistry a laboratory guide for exploration of the nano world

    CERN Document Server

    Bucak, Seyda

    2013-01-01

    Scientific Research The research processEthics in Science Design of Experiments Fundamentals of Scientific Computing, Nihat Baysal Recording Data: Keeping a Good Notebook Presenting Data: Writing a Laboratory ReportReferencesCharacterization Techniques Surface Tension Measurements, Seyda BucakViscosity/Rheological Measurements, Patrick UnderhillElectrokinetic Techniques, Marek KosmulskiDiffraction (XRD), Deniz RendeScattering, Ulf OlssonMicroscopy, Cem Levent Altan and Nico A.J.M. SommerdijkColloids and Surfaces Experiment 1: SedimentationExperiment 2: Determination of Critical Micelle Concent

  12. Thermal Performance of Hollow Clay Brick with Low Emissivity Treatment in Surface Enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Fioretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available External walls made with hollow clay brick or block are widely used for their thermal, acoustic and structural properties. However, the performance of the bricks frequently does not conform with the minimum legal requirements or the values required for high efficiency buildings, and for this reason, they need to be integrated with layers of thermal insulation. In this paper, the thermal behavior of hollow clay block with low emissivity treatment on the internal cavity surfaces has been investigated. The purpose of this application is to obtain a reduction in the thermal conductivity of the block by lowering the radiative heat exchange in the enclosures. The aims of this paper are to indicate a methodology for evaluating the thermal performance of the brick and to provide information about the benefits that should be obtained. Theoretical evaluations are carried out on several bricks (12 geometries simulated with two different thermal conductivities of the clay, using a finite elements model. The heat exchange procedure is implemented in accordance with the standard, so as to obtain standardized values of the thermal characteristics of the block. Several values of emissivity are hypothesized, related to different kinds of coating. Finally, the values of the thermal transmittance of walls built with the evaluated blocks have been calculated and compared. The results show how coating the internal surface of the cavity provides a reduction in the thermal conductivity of the block, of between 26% and 45%, for a surface emissivity of 0.1.

  13. Clay Mineralogy Studies of Soils Located on Different Geomorphic Surfaces in Jabalbarez-Jiroft Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    naser boroumand

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil and geomorphology are closely related to each other. That is why considering geomorphic concepts in soil genesis and classification studies may cause a better understanding of soil genesis processes. Paleosols with argillic horizons were investigated on stable pediment surfaces in Jiroft area, central Iran, by Sanjari et al. (2011. They found that secondary gypsum and calcium carbonate were accumulated in mantled pediments, but moving down the slope toward lowlands, salts more soluble than gypsum have been accumulated. Clay mineralogy in soil researches helps to better studying soil genesis and development. A quantitative and qualitative study of clay minerals together with their structural composition provides valuable data on the absorption, fixation, and desorption of different cations in soils. Smectite, chlorite, illite, vermiculite, kaolinite, palygorskite, and sepiolite were reported as dominant clay minerals found in arid and semi-arid areas. The objectives of the present study are to evaluate the clay mineralogy of Jabalbarez-Jiroft soils on different geomorphic surfaces. Materials and Methods: The study area was located in Jabalbarez, 200 Km south Kerman, Central Iran. Fig. 1 showed the exact location of study area. Soil temperature and moisture regimes of the area were thermic and aridic, respectively. Hill, rock pediment, mantled pediment and piedmont alluvial plain landforms were identified, using aerial photo interpretation, topography and geological map observation, in addition to detailed field works. Air-dried soil samples were crushed and passed through a 2-mm sieve. Routine physicochemical analyses wereperformed on the samples. Undisturbed soil samples from the Bt horizon of pedons 4, 5 and 6 were chosen for micromorphology investigations. Beside, eight samples including A and C2 horizons of pedon 1, A and Bt horizon of pedon 3, Bt and Bw horizons of pedon 4, and Bt and C horizon of pedon 5 were selected for

  14. Protocol for characterization of clay as a backfill and coverage layers for surface repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daisy M.M.; Tello, Clédola C.O., E-mail: marymarchezini@gmail.com, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management includes the operations since generation of the waste until its storage in repository, ensuring the protection of human beings and the environment from the possible negative impacts. The radioactive waste is segregated, treated, conditioned in suitable packages for posterior storage or disposal in repository. The 'RBMN Project' objective is to implement the repository for the disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes generated by nuclear activities in Brazil, proposing a definitive solution for their storage. Engineered and natural barriers as the backfill and coverage layers will compose the disposal system of a near surface repository, concept proposed by the 'RBMN Project'. The use of these barriers aims to avoid or restrict the release of radionuclides from the waste to the human beings and environment. The waterproofing barriers are composed of clays. Certainly, for the national repository, will be used those clays existing in the place where it will be constructed. Them some basic tests will have to be carried out to verify the suitability of these clays as barriers. These tests were determined and performed with reference clay, a Brazilian bentonite constituted of 67.2% montmorillonite. The results were compared with national and international literature of materials with similar mineralogical features. The values found with 95% of confidence interval were 9.73±0,35 μm for granulometric size; 13,3±0,6% for the moisture content and 816±9 mmol.kg{sup -1} for the capacity of cationic exchange. A protocol for characterization of clay was elaborated presenting these tests for it future use. (author)

  15. In situ spectroscopy of ligand exchange reactions at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, Rebecca; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles with their tunable optical and electronic properties are of great interest for a wide range of applications. Often the ligands at the surface of the nanoparticles have to be exchanged in a second step after particle formation in order to obtain a desired surface functionalization. For many techniques, this process is not accessible in situ . In this review, we present second-harmonic scattering (SHS) as an inherently surface sensitive and label-free optical technique to probe the ligand exchange at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles in situ and in real time. First, a brief introduction to SHS and basic features of the SHS of nanoparticles are given. After that, we demonstrate how the SHS intensity decrease can be correlated to the thiol coverage which allows for the determination of the Gibbs free energy of adsorption and the surface coverage. (topical review)

  16. Part II: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy investigation of methionine containing heterodipeptides adsorbed on colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podstawka, Edyta; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Proniewicz, Leonard M

    2004-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of methionine (Met) containing dipeptides: Met-X and X-Met, where X is: L-glycine (Gly), L-leucine (Leu), L-proline (Pro), and L-phenylalanine (Phe) are reported. Using pre-aggregated Ag colloid we obtained high-quality SERS spectra of these compounds spontaneously adsorbed on colloidal silver. Additionally, we measured Raman spectra (RS) of these heterodipeptides in a solid state as well as in acidic and basic solutions. The RS and SERS spectra of Met-X and X-Met presented in this work appear to be different. One of the most prominent and common features in the SERS spectra of all these dipeptides is a band in the 660-690 cm(-1) range that is due to the C-S stretching, v(CS), vibration of Met. This suggests that all the abovementioned compounds adsorb on the silver surface through a thioether atom. On the other hand, the SERS spectra of X-Met show clearly that not only the S atom but also the carboxylate group interact with the colloid surface as manifested by the enhancement of bands in the 920-930 and 1380-1396 cm(-1) regions. These bands are ascribed to the v(C-COO(-)) and v(sym)(COO(-)) vibrations, respectively. Additionally, a SERS spectrum of Phe-Met indicates that the interaction of the thioether atom, amine group, and aromatic side chain with the silver surface is favorable and may dictate the orientation and conformation of adsorbed peptide.

  17. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    column at a flow rate of ~ 6 mL/hr. Despite that the Pu intrinsic colloids are positively charged while the alluvium grain surfaces are negatively charged under the current experimental conditions, about 30% of the Pu colloids population transported through the column and broke through earlier than trillium. Our previous experiments in the same column have shown a highly unretarded transport of the negatively charged pseudo Pu colloids (Pu sorbed onto smectite colloids) and complete retardation of the dissolved Pu. The enhanced transport of Pu colloids was explained by the effective pore volume concept. Combining the results of these two experiments, it is concluded that the intrinsic Pu colloids transported in the column by adsorbing onto the background clay colloids due to electrostatic repulsion.

  18. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy of quinomethionate adsorbed on silver colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mak Soon; Kang, Jae Soo; Park, Si Bum; Lee, Mu Sang

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectrum of quinomethionate (6-methyl-1,3-dithiolo(4,5-b)quinoxalin-2-one), which is an insecticide or fungicide used on vegetables and wheat. We observed no signals in the ordinary Raman spectra of solid-state quinomethionate, but when it was adsorbed on a colloidal silver surface, strong vibrational signals were obtained at a very low concentration. The SERS spectra were obtained by silver colloids prepared by the Creighton et al. method. The influence of pH and the aggregation inductors (Cl - , Br - , I - , F - ) on the adsorption mechanism was investigated. Two different adsorption mechanisms were deduced, depending on the experimental conditions: The one N atom or two N atoms are chemisorbed on an Ag surface. An important contribution of the chemical mechanism was inferred when the one N atom was perpendicularly adsorbed on a surface. It is possible that quinomethionate can be detected to about 10 -5 M

  20. Experimental investigation of virus and clay particles cotransport in partially saturated columns packed with glass beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, Vasiliki I; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2015-02-15

    Suspended clay particles in groundwater can play a significant role as carriers of viruses, because, depending on the physicochemical conditions, clay particles may facilitate or hinder the mobility of viruses. This experimental study examines the effects of clay colloids on the transport of viruses in variably saturated porous media. All cotransport experiments were conducted in both saturated and partially saturated columns packed with glass beads, using bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX174 as model viruses, and kaolinite (KGa-1b) and montmorillonite (STx-1b) as model clay colloids. The various experimental collision efficiencies were determined using the classical colloid filtration theory. The experimental data indicated that the mass recovery of viruses and clay colloids decreased as the water saturation decreased. Temporal moments of the various breakthrough concentrations collected, suggested that the presence of clays significantly influenced virus transport and irreversible deposition onto glass beads. The mass recovery of both viruses, based on total effluent virus concentrations, was shown to reduce in the presence of suspended clay particles. Furthermore, the transport of suspended virus and clay-virus particles was retarded, compared to the conservative tracer. Under unsaturated conditions both clay particles facilitated the transport of ΦX174, while hindered the transport of MS2. Moreover, the surface properties of viruses, clays and glass beads were employed for the construction of classical DLVO and capillary potential energy profiles, and the results suggested that capillary forces play a significant role on colloid retention. It was estimated that the capillary potential energy of MS2 is lower than that of ΦX174, and the capillary potential energy of KGa-1b is lower than that of STx-1b, assuming that the protrusion distance through the water film is the same for each pair of particles. Moreover, the capillary potential energy is several orders of

  1. High-resolution surface chemical analysis of a trifunctional pattern made by sequential colloidal shadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaki, Ryosuke; Lyckegaard, Folmer; Kingshott, Peter

    2010-12-03

    We present a new method for creating surface chemical patterns where three chemistries can be periodically arranged at alternate positions on a single substrate without the use of top-down approaches. High-resolution chemical imaging by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), with nanometer spatial resolution, is used to prove the success of the patterning and subsequent chemical modification steps. We use a combination of colloidal self-assembly, plasma etching, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and physical vapour deposition (PVD). The method utilizes a double colloid assembly process in which a first layer of close-packed colloids is created, followed by plasma etching, coating with gold and deposition of a first SAM layer. A second particle layer is deposited on top of the first layer masking the interstitial spaces containing the first SAM. A second gold layer is deposited followed by a second SAM. After particle removal the surface consists of the pattern containing two different SAMs and a SiO(2) layer that can be readily functionalized with silanes. The possibility in the replacement of the two different thiols is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and it was found that no replacement is taking place. ToF-SIMS imaging is used to show the periodicity of the chemical patterns by tracking unique fragment ions from the different surface regions. The patterning method is adaptable to create smaller or larger chemical patterns by appropriate choice of particle sizes. The patterns are useful for immobilizing biomolecules for cell studies or as multiplexed biosensors.

  2. The sorption behavior of Cs and Cd onto oxide and clay surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, H.R.; Cygan, R.T.; Brady, P.V.; Nagy, K.L.; Anderson, H.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption of Cs and Cd on model soil minerals was examined by complementary analytical and experimental procedures. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to characterize the chemical and physical nature of Cs-reacted soil minerals. Cd and Cs adsorption isotherms for kaolinite were also measured at variable pH and temperature to establish likely reaction stoichiometries, while atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the microtopography of the clay surface. XPS analyses of Cs-exchanged samples show that Cs is sorbed at mineral surfaces and at the interlayer site of smectite clays, although the spectral resolution of XPS analyses is insufficient to differentiate between basal, edge or interlayer sites. 133 Cs MAS-NMR results also show that Cs is adsorbed primarily in an interlayer site of montmorillonite and on edge and basal sites for kaolinite. Cd adsorption isotherms on kaolinite were found to be additive using Al 2 0 3 + Si0 2 Cd binding constants. AFM quantification of kaolinite crystallites suggest that edges comprise up to 50% of the BET surface area, and are consistent with NMR and surface charge results that Cs an Cd adsorption occur primarily at edge sites

  3. Elaboration of protocol for characterization of clay as a filling material and coverage for surface repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daisy Mary Marchezini dos

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear energy in its various applications generates wastes that must be properly treated. The Radioactive Waste Management covers operations since generation of the waste until to its storage in repository ensuring the protection of man and of environment of the possible negative impacts. The radioactive waste are segregated, treated, conditioned in suitable packaging and posteriorly are stored or disposal in repository. The “RBMN Project” is a priority project of CNEN to implementation the repository for the deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated by nuclear energy activities in Brazil, proposing a definitive solution for its storage. Engineered and natural barriers as the filling layer and coverage layer will compose the disposal system of a near surface repository, concept proposed by the “RBMN Project”. The use these barriers views to avoid or restrict the release of radionuclides present in waste for the humans beings and environment. The waterproofing barriers are composed of clays. Certainly, for the national repository, will be used those clays existing in the place where it will be implanted it. So some fundamentals tests will have to be carried for to verify the suitability of these clays as barriers. These tests were determined and realized with a reference clay, a brazilian bentonite constituted of 67.2% montmorillonite. The results were compared with national and international literature of materials with similar mineralogical features. The values found with 95% reliance were 9.73±0,35 μm for granulometric size. For the moisture content were 13,3±0,6% and for capacity of cationic exchange were , 816±9 mmol.kg -1 . For the hydraulic conductivity, without the use of internal pressure, it was obtained maximum value of 59.0% saturated. In addition, during the observed period, there was no percolation in the test specimen submitted to internal pressure of 200 kPa. This result leads to the conclusion that the

  4. A desk study of surface diffusion and mass transport in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Research into the properties of clays as barrier materials for nuclear waste disposal has led to the realization that they have important transport properties which are relatively insignificant in most other geological materials. Sorption has always been regarded as a purely retarding mechanism, but laboratory experiments over the past decade have indicated that surface diffusion of sorbed cations is a potentially significant transport mechanism in both compacted montmorillonite, and biotite gneiss. The present desk study about these issues was part of the CEC coordinated project Mirage-Second phase, research area Natural analogues

  5. Effects of acid treatment on the clay palygorskite: XRD, surface area, morphological and chemical composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Katiane Cruz Magalhaes; Santos, Maria do Socorro Ferreira dos; Santos, Maria Rita Morais Chaves; Oliveira, Marilia Evelyn Rodrigues; Osajima, Josy Antevelli; Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti da [Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Carvalho, Maria Wilma Nunes Cordeiro, E-mail: edsonfilho@ufpi.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The palygorskite is an aluminum-magnesium silicate that has a fibrous morphology. Their physicochemical characteristics are the result of high surface area, porosity and thermal resistance which make it an attractive adsorbent. Its adsorption capacity can be increased through chemical reactions and/or heat treatments. The objective of this work is to verify the effects of acid activation on the palygorskite, treated with HCl at 90 °C at concentrations of 2, 4 and 6 mol L{sup -1} in 2 and 4 hours, with clay/acid solution ratio 1 g 10 mL{sup -1} and characterized by techniques: XRF, XRD and surface area. A significant increase in specific surface area was observed in the sample treated with HCl at the concentration 6 mol L{sup -1}. The changes were more pronounced at stricter concentrations of acidity, with decreasing intensity of reflection of the clay indicated in the XRD. These changes were confirmed in the XRF with the leaching of some oxides and with increasing concentration of SiO{sub 2}. (author)

  6. Stability of nano-metric colloidal dispersions of titanium: effect of surface complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyre, Veronique

    1996-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the adsorption of small organic molecules at the surface of nano-particles of mineral oxides (zirconia), and of its effects on the stability of the colloidal dispersion. Adsorption has been quantified by adsorption isotherms and surface titrations. Processes and mechanisms are thus discussed with respect to pH. The influence of various protecting molecules (acetyl acetone, but also acetic acid, citric acid and diethanolamine) has been studied, and notably highlighted the role of the outer face of the complexing agent in the assessment of reactions between particles which govern the compression and re-dispersability properties of protected dispersions. This study is performed by osmotic pressure measurements and by X-ray diffusion at small angles, completed by statistical mechanics calculations [fr

  7. Photoluminescence enhancement of dye-doped nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance effects of gold colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Tran, Hong Nhung; Fort, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Due to the energy transfer from surface plasmons, the fluorescence of fluorophores near metallic nanostructures can be enhanced. This effect has been intensively studied recently for biosensor applications. This work reports on the luminescence enhancement of 100 nm Cy3 dye-doped polystyrene nanoparticles by energy transfer from surface plasmons of gold colloidal nanoparticles with sizes of 20 and 100 nm. Optimal luminescence enhancement of the fluorophores has been observed in the mixture with 20 nm gold nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the resonance energy transfer from gold nanoparticles to the fluorophore beads. The interaction between the fluorophores and gold particles is attributed to far-field interaction

  8. Essentially Trap-Free CsPbBr3 Colloidal Nanocrystals by Postsynthetic Thiocyanate Surface Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscher, Brent A; Swabeck, Joseph K; Bronstein, Noah D; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2017-05-17

    We demonstrate postsynthetic modification of CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals by a thiocyanate salt treatment. This treatment improves the quantum yield of both freshly synthesized (PLQY ≈ 90%) and aged nanocrystals (PLQY ≈ 70%) to within measurement error (2-3%) of unity, while simultaneously maintaining the shape, size, and colloidal stability. Additionally, the luminescence decay kinetics transform from multiexponential decays typical of nanocrystalline semiconductors with a distribution of trap sites, to a monoexponential decay, typical of single energy level emitters. Thiocyanate only needs to access a limited number of CsPbBr 3 nanocrystal surface sites, likely representing under-coordinated lead atoms on the surface, in order to have this effect.

  9. Use of Clay Deposits in Water Management of Calcareous Sandy Soils Under-surface and Sub-surface Drip Irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Omran, A.; Falatah, A.; Sheta, A.; Al-Harbi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of irrigation (levels and methods) and type of clay deposits on lettuce yield, water use efficiency WUE and the distributions of soil moisture and salts in the root zone of sandy calcareous soils. A field experiment was conducted at the college experimental station in 2002-2003. It consists of three clay deposits, three rates (0, 1.0 and 2.0%), and four total irrigation applied water levels, 360 mm (T1), 520 mm (T2), 635 mm (T3) and 822 mm (T4), using surface and subsurface drip irrigation. Results indicated that yield was significantly increased with the increase of irrigation level, whereas WUE significantly decreased with increase of irrigation level. The average yield increased by 9.30% in a high irrigation level compared to a moderate irrigation level, and decreased by 14.2% at the more stressed irrigation level. WUE decreased by 49.0% at a moderate irrigation level and yield was significantly affected by amendment rates. The difference between surface and subsurface drip on yields and WUE were also significant. Results indicated that the moisture content of the subsurface treated layer increased dramatically, while salts were accumulated at the surface and away from the emitters in subsurface drip irrigation. The advantages of surface drip irrigation were related to the relative decrease in salt accumulation in the root zone area where the plant roots were active and the water content was relatively high. (author)

  10. Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Role of Colloids on the Radionuclide Migration in a Crystalline Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; Alonso, Ursula; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Mingarro, Manuel; Lopez, Trinidad [CIEMAT, Departamento de Medioambiente, Avenida Complutense, 22 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    In a deep geological repository (DGR) of high level radioactive waste, all the possible phenomena affecting radionuclide migration have to be studied to assess its security over time. Colloids can play an important role for contaminant transport if the following conditions are fulfilled: colloids exist in a non negligible concentration, they are mobile and stable in the environment of interest, and they are able to adsorb radionuclides irreversibly. In this study, different transport experiments where performed to improve the knowledge on the main mechanisms affecting the radionuclide migration in the presence of colloids in a crystalline medium. Firstly, colloid stability was analysed and then transport experiments in an artificial granite longitudinal fracture were carried out. Synthetic colloids of different size and bentonite clay colloids were used to evaluate the effects of colloid size, charge, and water flow rate on their mobility. Results showed that both major importance of the water flow rate on the mobility of colloids and their recovery and a higher interaction of smaller particles with the surface. Finally, the migration behaviour of Sr, and Sr adsorbed onto bentonite colloids was compared. The elution curves of Sr adsorbed onto colloid were significantly different from the ones of Sr alone, pointing out that sorption/desorption mechanisms must be taken into account to understand the radionuclide migration in the fracture in the presence of colloids. (authors)

  11. Photochemical properties of mono-, tri-, and penta-cationic antimony(V) metalloporphyrin derivatives on a clay layer surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takamasa; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke

    2013-08-22

    Three types of mono-, tri-, and penta-cationic antimony(V) porphyrin derivatives (Sb(V)Pors) were synthesized, and their photochemical properties on the anionic clay were systematically investigated. Sb(V)Por derivatives are dihydroxo(5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato)antimony(V) chloride ([Sb(V)(TPP)(OH)2](+)Cl(-)), dihydroxo[5,10-diphenyl-15,20-di(N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl)porphyrinato]antimony(V) trichloride ([Sb(V)(DMPyP)(OH)2](3+)3Cl(-)), and dihydroxo[5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl)porphyrinato]antimony(V) pentachloride ([Sb(V)(TMPyP)(OH)2](5+)5Cl(-)). The photochemical behaviors of three cationic Sb(V)Pors with and without clay were examined in aqueous solution. For all Sb(V)Por, aggregation behaviors were not observed in the clay complexes even at high density adsorption conditions. The transition probabilities and fluorescence quantum yields of Sb(V)Por showed a tendency to be increased by the complex formation with clay. The less cationic Sb(V)Por/clay complex showed the larger fluorescence quantum yield. The more cationic Sb(V)Por/clay complex showed the longer fluorescence lifetime. These effects of complex formation with clay on the photochemical properties of Sb(V)Pors were discussed using the molecular potential energy curves of the porphyrin ground state and excited state. It is concluded that two types of effects work in the Sb(V)Por/clay system: effect i (structure resembling effect) is that the most stable structure becomes relatively similar between the ground and excited states, mainly by hydrophobic interactions between the porphyrin molecule and the clay surface, and effect ii (structure fixing effect) is that sharpened potential energy curves of clay complexes can lead to the increase of activation energy for the internal conversion from excited state to a high vibration level of ground state, mainly by electrostatic interactions between cationic porphyrin and anionic clay. Like this, the unique effects of the clay surface on

  12. Fabrication and application of responsive polymer surfaces on planar substrates and colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupitskyy, Robert

    2009-11-01

    In the present dissertation, the problem of controlling interactions of material surfaces with the environment was addressed. Using chemical modification of surfaces with responsive polymers, it is possible to use external stimuli to regulate surface wettability, protein adsorption, stability, and interfacial properties of colloidal particles. The research work presented in this dissertation consists of four independent parts. In the first part (Chapter II), the responsive behavior of a novel heteroarm star-copolymer, poly(2-vinylpyridine)-star-poly(styrene) (PS7-P2VP7), was investigated. For grafted layers of PS7-P2VP7,surface composition, morphology, and wettability can be reversibly changed by treatment with solvents of different thermodynamic quality. Grafted layers of the star-copolymer exhibit a pronounced solvent-dependent phase segregation characteristic and behave similarly to mixed polymer brushes with incompatible components. In the second part (Chapter III), the regulation of fibrinogen adsorption by changing surface composition and microstructure of a mixed polymer brush was explored. The brush is a combination of a protein-repelling component, poly(ethylene glycol), and a protein-attracting component, poly(acrylic acid)-b-polystyrene. Treatment with different organic solvents changes the degree of adsorption of a test protein, fibrinogen, whereas treatment with calcium chloride solution results in virtually no protein adsorption at all. Studies of brush morphology and brush extension in aqueous medium revealed that treatment with different solvents results in different size and distribution of polystyrene domains, which in turn affects the adsorption of fibrinogen. In the third part (Chapter IV), a responsive colloidal system was developed by grafting poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine-b-ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer onto the surface of 200 nm silica particles. This type of grafted polymer layer is both pH- and solvent-sensitive. These properties

  13. AFM Colloidal Probe Measurements Implicate Capillary Condensation in Punch-Particle Surface Interactions during Tableting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal Tejedor, Maria; Nordgren, Niklas; Schuleit, Michael; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna; Rutland, Mark W

    2017-11-21

    Adhesion of the powders to the punches is a common issue during tableting. This phenomenon is known as sticking and affects the quality of the manufactured tablets. Defective tablets increase the cost of the manufacturing process. Thus, the ability to predict the tableting performance of the formulation blend before the process is scaled-up is important. The adhesive propensity of the powder to the tableting tools is mostly governed by the surface-surface adhesive interactions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is a surface characterization technique that allows the measurement of the adhesive interactions between two materials of interest. In this study, AFM steel colloidal probe measurements were performed on ibuprofen, MCC (microcrystalline cellulose), α-lactose monohydrate, and spray-dried lactose particles as an approach to modeling the punch-particle surface interactions during tableting. The excipients (lactose and MCC) showed constant, small, attractive, and adhesive forces toward the steel surface after a repeated number of contacts. In comparison, ibuprofen displayed a much larger attractive and adhesive interaction increasing over time both in magnitude and in jump-in/jump-out separation distance. The type of interaction acting on the excipient-steel interface can be related to a van der Waals force, which is relatively weak and short-ranged. By contrast, the ibuprofen-steel interaction is described by a capillary force profile. Even though ibuprofen is not highly hydrophilic, the relatively smooth surfaces of the crystals allow "contact flooding" upon contact with the steel probe. Capillary forces increase because of the "harvesting" of moisture-due to the fast condensation kinetics-leaving a residual condensate that contributes to increase the interaction force after each consecutive contact. Local asperity contacts on the more hydrophilic surface of the excipients prevent the flooding of the contact zone, and there is no such adhesive

  14. Experimental evidence for ternary colloid-facilitated transport of Th(IV) with hematite (α-Fe2O3) colloids and Suwannee River fulvic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Hilary P; Hickok, Katherine A; Powell, Brian A

    2016-12-01

    Previous field experiments have suggested colloid-facilitated transport via inorganic and organic colloids as the primary mechanism of enhanced actinide transport in the subsurface at former nuclear weapons facilities. In this work, research was guided by the hypothesis that humic substances can enhance tetravalent actinide (An(IV)) migration by coating and mobilizing natural colloids in environmental systems and increasing An(IV) sorption to colloids. This mechanism is expected to occur under relatively acidic conditions where organic matter can sorb and coat colloid surfaces and facilitate formation of ternary colloid-ligand-actinide complexes. The objective of this work was to examine Th transport through packed columns in the presence of hematite colloids and/or Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). In the presence of SRFA, with or without hematite colloids, significant transport (>60% recovery within the effluent) of thorium occurred through quartz columns. It is notable that the SRFA contributed to increased transport of both Th and hematite colloids, while insignificant transport occurred in the absence of fulvic acid. Further, in the presence of a natural sandy sediment (as opposed to pure quartz), transport is negligible in the presence of SRFA due to interactions with natural, clay-sized sediment coatings. Moreover, this data shows that the transport of Th through quartz columns is enhanced in ternary Th-colloid-SRFA and binary Th-SRFA systems as compared to a system containing only Th. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of residual impurities in hydroxylamine-reduced silver colloid and the effects of anions on the colloid activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao; Gu, Huaimin; Liu, Fangfang

    2012-03-01

    The paper investigated the residual ions in hydroxylamine-reduced silver colloid (HRSC) and the relationship between the condition of HRSC and the enhanced mechanisms of this colloid. We also detected the SERS of MB and studied the effects of anions on the Raman signal. In the case of HRSC, the bands of residual ions diminish while the bands of Ag-anions increase gradually with increasing the concentrations of Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). It means the affinity of residual ions on the silver surface is weaker than that of Cl(-) and NO(3)(-) and the residual ions are replaced gradually by the added Cl(-) or NO(3)(-). The Raman signal of residual ions can be detected by treatment with anions that do not bind strongly to the silver surface, such as SO(4)(2-). The most intense band of Ag-anions bonds can be also observed when adding weakly binding anions to the colloid. However, the anions which make up the Ag-anions bonds are residual Cl(-) and the effect of weakly binding anions is only to aggregate the silver particles. Residual Cl(-) can be replaced by I(-) which has the highest affinity. From the detection of methylene blue (MB), the effects of anions on the enhancement of Raman signal are discussed in detail, and these findings could make the conditions suitable for detecting analytes in high efficiency. This study will have a profound implication to SERS users about their interpretation of SERS spectra when obtaining these anomalous bands. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Micropatterned surfaces through moisture-induced phase-separation of polystyrene-clay nanocomposite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bindu P; Pavithran, Chorappan

    2010-08-03

    We report micropatterned polystyrene-clay nanocomposite (PCN) surfaces with concavities by moisture-induced phase separation of PCN particles. Micropatterned film with concavity size of 800 nm to 1.3 microm and a high number density of 2 x 10(8) features/cm(2) was obtained by drop-casting PCN solution (20 mg/mL PCN/THF) under ambient relative humidity of 70-80%. It is proposed that water droplets were channeled through the hydrophilic interfaces between the PCN particles, and the two-dimensional array of concavities was formed by spontaneous phase separation due to the presence of rigid clay platelets. The concavity size and number density can be tuned by varying the solvent for PCN. Micropatterned film with concavity size in the range of 650 nm to 1.1 microm with a number density of 5 x 10(7) features/cm(2) was obtained using chloroform as solvent, whereas a concavity size of 150-740 nm and number density of 10(8) features/cm(2) were obtained using carbon disulfide.

  17. Surface self-assembly of fluorosurfactants during film formation of MMA/nBA colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, W R; Urban, M W

    2004-11-23

    These studies focus on the behavior of fluorosurfactants (FS) containing hydrophobic and ionic entities in the presence of methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal dispersions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The presence of FS significantly not only alters the mobility of SDS in MMA/nBA films, but their hydrophobic and ionic nature results in self-assembly near the film-air (F-A) interface leading to different surface morphologies. Spherical islands and rodlike morphologies are formed which diminish the kinetic coefficient of friction of films by at least 3 orders of magnitude, and the presence of dual hydrophobic tails and an anionic head appears to have the largest effect on the surface friction. Using internal reflection IR imaging, these studies show that structural and chemical features of FS are directly related to their ability to migrate to the F-A interface and self-assemble to form specific morphological features. While the anionic nature of FS allows for SDS migration to the F-A interface and the formation of stable domains across the surface, intermolecular cohesion of nonionic FS allows for the formation of rodlike structures due to inability to form mixed micelles with SDS. These studies also establish the relationship between surface morphologies, kinetic coefficient of friction, and structural features of surfactants in the complex environments.

  18. Electrophoresis of a polarizable charged colloid with hydrophobic surface: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Majee, Partha Sarathi

    2017-04-01

    We consider the electrophoresis of a charged colloid for a generalized situation in which the particle is considered to be polarizable and the surface exhibits hydrophobicity. The dielectric polarization of the particle creates a nonlinear dependence of the electrophoretic velocity on the applied electric field, and the core hydrophobicity amplifies the fluid convection in the Debye layer. Thus, a linear analysis is no longer applicable for this situation. The present analysis is based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear electrokinetic equations based on the Navier-Stokes-Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations coupled with the Laplace equation for the electric field within the dielectric particle. The hydrophobicity of the particle may influence its electric polarization by enhancing the convective transport of ions. The nonlinear effects, such as double-layer polarization and relaxation, are also influenced by the hydrophobicity of the particle surface. The present results compare well for a lower range of the applied electric field and surface charge density with the existing results for a perfectly dielectric particle with a hydrophobic surface based on the first-order perturbation analysis due to Khair and Squires [Phys. Fluids 21, 042001 (2009), 10.1063/1.3116664]. Dielectric polarization creates a reduction in particle electrophoretic velocity, and its impact is strong for a moderate range of Debye length. A quantitative measure of the nonlinear effects is demonstrated by comparing the electrophoretic velocity with an existing linear model.

  19. Field Scale Variation in Water Dispersible Colloids from Aggregates and Intact Soil Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, Ty P A

    . It is, however, difficult to quantify the amount of colloids ready available to participate in colloid-facilitated transport. In literature, the part of the colloidal fraction that readily disperses into suspension is referred to as water-dispersible clay (WDC). In this study we used two methods......Colloid-facilitated transport can play an important role in the transport of chemicals through the soil profile. The negative surface charge and large surface area makes colloids perfect carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals, like phosphorus and certain pesticides, in highly structured soils...... for measuring the amount of WDC (soil sampled from an agricultural 1.69 ha field in a 15 x 15 m grid (65 points). In method no. 1 laser diffraction was applied to continuously measure the particle size distribution of 1-2 mm intact soil aggregates at two initial moisture...

  20. Forsmark site investigation. Granitic groundwater colloids sampling and characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.C.; Degueldre, C.

    2007-08-01

    Natural ground water colloids were sampled by micro-filtration of water samples collected from a granitic groundwater and maintained at the in situ thermodynamic conditions. The methodology avoids the generation of artefacts produced by pH changes due to CO 2 exchange, yielding potential carbonate precipitation, or by O 2 contaminations yielding oxidized insoluble phases. The enhanced pressure and the anoxic conditions are maintained also through the filtering procedure. In situ groundwater sampling followed by micro-filtration of the colloids were carried out after a period of regular sampling of groundwater pumped to the ground surface and continuous on-line long-term measurements (weeks, months) of chemical and physical parameters in the unbroken sample water both at the ground surface and at depth down-hole. Colloid samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. At deep granitic groundwater conditions, natural colloids occur sparsely. The colloid concentration was determined C col ∼1 μg/L for sizes ranging from 50 to 500 nm or N col ∼10 8 /L for sizes larger than 100 nm. These colloids are clay with an average size smaller than 200 nm. For the Na-Ca-Cl groundwater (pH 7.53, ionic strength ∼0.1M), the colloid concentration values are comparable with values reported earlier in the literature

  1. Modeling of adsorption of toxic chromium on natural and surface modified lightweight expanded clay aggregate (LECA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalhori, Ebrahim Mohammadi, E-mail: zarrabi62@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box No: 31485/561, Alborz, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yetilmezsoy, Kaan, E-mail: yetilmez@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34220 Davutpasa, Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Uygur, Nihan, E-mail: uygur.n@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Adiyaman University, 02040 Altinsehir, Adiyaman (Turkey); Zarrabi, Mansur, E-mail: mansor62@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box No: 31485/561, Alborz, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shmeis, Reham M. Abu, E-mail: r.abushmeis@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Isra University, PO Box 140753, code 11814, Amman (Jordan)

    2013-12-15

    Lightweight Expanded Clay Aggregate (LECA) modified with an aqueous solution of magnesium chloride MgCl{sub 2} and hydrogen peroxide H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was used to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption properties of the used adsorbents were investigated through batch studies, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effect created by magnesium chloride on the modification of the LECA surface was greater than that of hydrogen peroxide solution and showed a substantial increase in the specific surface area which has a value of 76.12 m{sup 2}/g for magnesium chloride modified LECA while the values of 53.72 m{sup 2}/g, and 11.53 m{sup 2}/g were found for hydrogen peroxide modified LECA and natural LECA, respectively. The extent of surface modification with enhanced porosity in modified LECA was apparent from the recorded SEM patterns. XRD and FTIR studies of themodified LECA surface did not show any structural distortion. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the modified Freundlich kinetic model and the equilibrium data fitted the Sips and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations better than other models. Maximum sorption capacities were found to be 198.39, 218.29 and 236.24 mg/g for natural LECA, surface modified LECA with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and surface modified LECA with MgCl{sub 2}, respectively. Adsorbents were found to have only a weak effect on conductivity and turbidity of aqueous solutions. Spent natural and surface modified LECA with MgCl{sub 2} was best regenerated with HCl solution, while LECA surface modified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was best regenerated with HNO{sub 3} concentrated solution. Thermal method showed a lower regeneration percentage for all spent adsorbents.

  2. Porous silicon photoluminescence modification by colloidal gold nanoparticles: Plasmonic, surface and porosity roles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, M.B. de la; Bornacelli, J.; Nava, R.; Zanella, R.; Reyes-Esqueda, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles on semiconductors are of interest because of the tunable effect of the surface plasmon resonance on the physical properties of the semiconductor. In this work, colloidal gold nanoparticles obtained by two different methods, with an average size of 6.1±2.0 nm and 5.0±2.0 nm, were added to luminescent porous silicon by drop casting. The gold nanoparticles interact with porous silicon by modifying its optical properties such as photoluminescence. That being said, plasmon effects are not the only to be taken into account; as shown in this work, surface chemical modification and porosity also play a key role in the final performance of photoluminescence of a porous silicon–gold nanoparticle hybrid system. -- Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of porous silicon and gold nanoparticles was fabricated. • Porous silicon/gold nanoparticle hybrid material was made by drop casting. • Influence of plasmonics, surface chemical modification and porosity on the optical behavior of our material was analyzed. • Porosity is proposed as a parameter control to obtain the best effects on luminescence of the hybrid plasmonic material

  3. Porous silicon photoluminescence modification by colloidal gold nanoparticles: Plasmonic, surface and porosity roles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, M.B. de la; Bornacelli, J. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Nava, R. [Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico); Zanella, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Reyes-Esqueda, J.A., E-mail: betarina@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    Metal nanoparticles on semiconductors are of interest because of the tunable effect of the surface plasmon resonance on the physical properties of the semiconductor. In this work, colloidal gold nanoparticles obtained by two different methods, with an average size of 6.1±2.0 nm and 5.0±2.0 nm, were added to luminescent porous silicon by drop casting. The gold nanoparticles interact with porous silicon by modifying its optical properties such as photoluminescence. That being said, plasmon effects are not the only to be taken into account; as shown in this work, surface chemical modification and porosity also play a key role in the final performance of photoluminescence of a porous silicon–gold nanoparticle hybrid system. -- Highlights: • A hybrid material consisting of porous silicon and gold nanoparticles was fabricated. • Porous silicon/gold nanoparticle hybrid material was made by drop casting. • Influence of plasmonics, surface chemical modification and porosity on the optical behavior of our material was analyzed. • Porosity is proposed as a parameter control to obtain the best effects on luminescence of the hybrid plasmonic material.

  4. Continuous agglomerate model for identifying the solute- indifferent part of colloid nanoparticle's surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfimov, A V; Aryslanova, E M; Chivilikhin, S A

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes an explicit analytical model for the surface potential of a colloidal nano-agglomerate. The model predicts that when an agglomerate reaches a certain critical size, its surface potential becomes independent of the agglomerate radius. The model also provides a method for identifying and quantifying the solute-indifferent charge in nanocolloids, that allows to assess the stability of toxicologically significant parameters of the system. (paper)

  5. A pore-scale approach to colloid-surface interaction in liquid using lattice Boltzmann models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J. D.; Schaap, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of colloid transport and collection efficiency is important for understanding the transport of some contaminants of emerging concern (CEC) and for developing environmental remediation systems such as geologic filters. The interaction forces between colloids and soil materials are central to colloid transport and retention or immobilization. In this study a physical modeling approach to represent colloidal transport through porous media has been developed, using the lattice Boltzmann methodology. Lattice Boltzmann models have the uncanny ability to represent pore scale fluid flow through complex structures such as geological material. A cellular approach to computing colloid forces is applied for computational efficiency, and colloids are tracked continuously through the model. Grid refinement effects are quantified to balance computational efficiency with discretization effects. Representation of physical forces including DLVO create a natural fluid solid boundary condition for colloid transport. Collector efficiencies of geologic materials and colloid distribution curves can be produced. The present work focuses on simple porous media with a single wetting fluid phase, but the approach can be extended to heterogeneous geologic materials and multiphase systems.

  6. Semi-quantitative analysis of indigo by surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) using silver colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadi, I. T.; Chowdhry, B. Z.; Snowden, M. J.; Withnall, R.

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we report for the first time semi-quantitative analysis of indigo using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and surface enhance resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS). Indigo, a dye widely used today in the textile industry, has been used, historically, both as a dye and as a pigment; the latter in both paintings and in printed material. The molecule is uncharged and largely insoluble in most solvents. The application of SERS/SERRS to the semi-quantitative analysis of indigo has been examined using aggregated citrate-reduced silver colloids with appropriate modifications to experimental protocols to both obtain and maximise SERRS signal intensities. Good linear correlations are observed for the dependence of the intensities of the SERRS band at 1151 cm -1 using laser exciting wavelengths of 514.5 nm ( R=0.9985) and 632.8 nm ( R=0.9963) on the indigo concentration over the range 10 -7-10 -5 and 10 -8-10 -5 mol dm -3, respectively. Band intensities were normalised against an internal standard (silver sol band at 243 cm -1). Resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of aqueous solutions of indigo could not be collected because of its low solubility and the presence of strong fluorescence. It was, however, possible to obtain RS and RRS spectra of the solid at each laser excitation wavelength. The limits of detection (L.O.D.) of indigo by SERS and SERRS using 514.5 and 632.8 nm were 9 ppm at both exciting wavelengths. Signal enhancement by SERS and SERRS was highly pH dependent due to the formation of singly protonated and possibly doubly protonated forms of the molecule at acidic pH. The SERS and SERRS data provide evidence to suggest that an excess of monolayer coverage of the dye at the surface of silver colloids is observed at concentrations greater than 7.85×10 -6 mol dm -3 for each exciting wavelength. The data reported herein also strongly suggest the presence of multiple species of the indigo molecule.

  7. Tuning colloidal quantum dot band edge positions through solution-phase surface chemistry modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Daniel M.; Vörös, Márton; Brawand, Nicholas P.; McNichols, Brett W.; Miller, Elisa M.; Gu, Jing; Nozik, Arthur J.; Sellinger, Alan; Galli, Giulia; Beard, Matthew C.

    2017-05-01

    Band edge positions of semiconductors determine their functionality in many optoelectronic applications such as photovoltaics, photoelectrochemical cells and light emitting diodes. Here we show that band edge positions of lead sulfide (PbS) colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots (QDs), can be tuned over 2.0 eV through surface chemistry modification. We achieved this remarkable control through the development of simple, robust and scalable solution-phase ligand exchange methods, which completely replace native ligands with functionalized cinnamate ligands, allowing for well-defined, highly tunable chemical systems. By combining experiments and ab initio simulations, we establish clear relationships between QD surface chemistry and the band edge positions of ligand/QD hybrid systems. We find that in addition to ligand dipole, inter-QD ligand shell inter-digitization contributes to the band edge shifts. We expect that our established relationships and principles can help guide future optimization of functional organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures for diverse optoelectronic applications.

  8. Preparation of Robust Superhydrophobic Halloysite Clay Nanotubes via Mussel-Inspired Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Meng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel and convenient bio-inspired modification strategy was used to create stable superhydrophobic structures on halloysite clay nanotubes (HNTs surfaces. The polydopamine (PDA nanoparticles can firmly adhere on HNTs surfaces in a mail environment of pH 8.5 via the oxidative self-polymerization of dopamine and synthesize a rough nano-layer assisted with vitamin M, which provides a catechol functional platform for the secondary reaction to graft hydrophobic long-chain alkylamine for preparation of hierarchical micro/nano structures with superhydrophobic properties. The micromorphology, crystal structure, and surface chemical composition of the resultant superhydrophobic HNTs were characterized by field emission scanning electron (FE-SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The as-formed surfaces exhibited outstanding superhydrophobicity with a water contact angle (CA of 156.3 ± 2.3°, while having little effect on the crystal structures of HNTs. Meanwhile, the resultant HNTs also showed robust stability that can conquer various harsh conditions including strong acidic/alkaline solutions, organic solvents, water boiling, ultrasonic cleaning, and outdoor solar radiation. In addition, the novel HNTs exhibited excellent packaged capabilities of phase change materials (PCMs for practical application in thermal energy storage, which improved the mass fractions by 22.94% for stearic acid and showed good recyclability. These HNTs also exhibited good oil/water separation ability. Consequently, due to the superior merits of high efficiency, easy operation, and non-toxicity, this bionic surface modification approach may make HNTs have great potentials for extensive applications.

  9. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Surface and enzyme effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2015-12-01

    The use of non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs) as a support for enzyme immobilisation was investigated. Formulation required the mixing of an aqueous-surfactant solution with a relatively non-polar solvent-surfactant solution, forming a solvent droplet surrounded by a thin stabilised aqueous film (soapy shell). Studies utilising anionic surfactants have showed increased retention, however, very little have been understood about the forces governing immobilisation. This study seeks to determine the effects of enzyme properties on CLA immobilisation by examining a non-ionic/non-polar solvent system comprised of two non-ionic surfactants, Tween 20 and 80, mineral oil and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. From these results it was deduced that hydrophobic interactions strongly governed immobilisation. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) revealed that immobilisation was predominantly achieved by surface adsorption attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the enzyme and the CLA surface. Enzyme surface affinity was found to increase when added directly to the formulation (pre-manufacture addition), as opposed to the bulk continuous phase (post-manufacture addition), with α-chymotrypsin and aprotinin being the most perturbed, while lipase was relatively unaffected. The effect of zeta potential on immobilisation showed that enzymes adsorbed better closer to their pI, indicating that charge minimisation was necessary for immobilisation. Finally, the effect of increasing enzyme concentration in the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in adsorption for all enzymes due to cooperativity between protein molecules, with saturation occurring faster at higher adsorption rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  11. Hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface modification impact on colloid lithography: Schottky-like defects, dislocation, and ideal distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtsev, Vasilii; Marchuk, Valentina; Kugaevskiy, Artem; Guselnikova, Olga; Elashnikov, Roman; Miliutina, Elena; Postnikov, Pavel; Svorcik, Vaclav; Lyutakov, Oleksiy

    2018-03-01

    Nano-spheres lithography is actually considered as a powerful tool to manufacture various periodic structures with a wide potential in the field of nano- and micro-fabrication. However, during self-assembling of colloid microspheres, various defects and mismatches can appear. In this work the size and quality of single-domains of closed-packed polystyrene (PS), grown up on thin Au layers modified by hydrophilic or hydrophobic functional groups via diazonium chemistry was studied. The effects of the surface modification on the quality and single-domain size of polystyrene (PS) microspheres array were investigated and discussed. Modified surfaces were characterized using the AFM and wettability tests. PS colloidal suspension was deposited using the drop evaporation method. Resulted PS microspheres array was characterized using the SEM, AFM and confocal microscopy technique.

  12. Determination of histamine in fish by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy using silver colloid SERS substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janči, Tibor; Valinger, Davor; Gajdoš Kljusurić, Jasenka; Mikac, Lara; Vidaček, Sanja; Ivanda, Mile

    2017-06-01

    This study was focused on development of a rapid and sensitive method for histamine determination in fish based on Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) using simple and widely available silver colloid SERS substrate. Extraction of histamine with 0.4M perchloric acid and purification with 1-butanol significantly shortened sample preparation (30min) and provided clear SERS spectra with characteristic Raman bands of histamine. Principal component analysis effectively distinguished SERS spectra of fish samples with different histamine content. Partial least square (PLS) regression models confirmed reliability of detection and spectral analysis of histamine with SERS. In histamine concentration range 0-200mgkg -1 , significant in legislative and fish quality control aspects, PLS regression model based on spectral range 1139.9-1643.7cm -1 showed linear trend with R 2 pred =0.962, RPD=7.250. Presented protocol for histamine extraction and purification followed by SERS analysis coupled with chemometric approach, enabled development of rapid and inexpensive method for histamine determination in fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. From superamphiphobic to amphiphilic polymeric surfaces with ordered hierarchical roughness fabricated with colloidal lithography and plasma nanotexturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinas, K; Tserepi, A; Gogolides, E

    2011-04-05

    Ordered, hierarchical (triple-scale), superhydrophobic, oleophobic, superoleophobic, and amphiphilic surfaces on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA polymer substrates are fabricated using polystyrene (PS) microparticle colloidal lithography, followed by oxygen plasma etching-nanotexturing (for amphiphilic surfaces) and optional subsequent fluorocarbon plasma deposition (for amphiphobic surfaces). The PS colloidal microparticles were assembled by spin-coating. After etching/nanotexturing, the PMMA plates are amphiphilic and exhibit hierarchical (triple-scale) roughness with microscale ordered columns, and dual-scale (hundred nano/ten nano meter) nanoscale texture on the particles (top of the column) and on the etched PMMA surface. The spacing, diameter, height, and reentrant profile of the microcolumns are controlled with the etching process. Following the design requirements for superamphiphobic surfaces, we demonstrate enhancement of both hydrophobicity and oleophobicity as a result of hierarchical (triple-scale) and re-entrant topography. After fluorocarbon film deposition, we demonstrate superhydrophobic surfaces (contact angle for water 168°, compared to 110° for a flat surface), as well as superoleophobic surfaces (153° for diiodomethane, compared to 80° for a flat surface).

  14. Surface Traps in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells, their Mitigation and Impact on Manufacturability

    KAUST Repository

    Kirmani, Ahmad R.

    2017-07-30

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are potentially low-cost, solution-processable semiconductors which are endowed, through their nanoscale dimensions, with strong absorption, band gap tunability, high dielectric constants and enhanced stability. CQDs are contenders as a standalone PV technology as well as a potential back layer for augmenting established photovoltaic (PV) technologies, such as Si. However, owing to their small size (ca. few nanometers), CQDs are prone to surface trap states that inhibit charge transport and threaten their otherwise wonderful optoelectronic properties. Surface traps have also, indirectly, impeded scalable and industry-compatible fabrication of these solar cells, as all of the reports, to date, have relied on spin-coating with sophisticated and tedious ligand exchange schemes, some of which need to be performed in low humidity environments. In this thesis, we posit that an in-depth understanding of the process-structure-property-performance relationship in CQDs can usher in fresh insights into the nature and origin of surface traps, lead to novel ways to mitigate them, and finally help achieve scalable fabrication. To this end, we probe the CQD surfaces and their interactions with process solvents, linkers, and ambient environment employing a suite of spectroscopic techniques. These fundamental insights help us develop facile chemical and physical protocols to mitigate surface traps such as solvent engineering, remote molecular doping, and oxygen doping, directly leading to better-performing solar cells. Our efforts finally culminate in the realization of >10% efficient, air-stable CQD solar cells scalably fabricated in an ambient environment of high, uncontrolled R.H. (50-65%). As-prepared solar cells fabricated in high humidity ambient conditions are found to underperform, however, an oxygen-doping recipe is devised to mitigate the moisture-induced surface traps and recover device performances. Importantly, these solar cells are

  15. Stochastic Dynamics of Clay Translocation and Formation of Argillic Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, S.; Richter, D. D., Jr.; Porporato, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of argillic horizons in vertical soil profiles is mainly attributed to lessivage, namely the transport of clay from an upper E horizon to a deeper illuviated horizon. Because of the long timescales involved in this phenomenon, quantitative modeling is useful to explore the role of clay lessivage on soil formation and sub-surface clay accumulation. The limitations of detailed models of colloidal transport to short timescales make it necessary to resort to simple models. Here, we present a parsimonious model of clay transport in which lessivage is interpreted stochastically. Clay particles approach the soil surface at a speed equal to the erosion rate and are intermittently transported to deeper soil layers when percolation events occur or removed by erosion. Along with the evolution of clay particles trajectories, the model predicts the vertical clay profile, the depth of the B horizon, and the mean time to erosion. Dimensional analysis reveals the two dimensionless parameters governing the dynamics, leading to a new classification of soil types based on erosion rates and intensity of lessivage.

  16. Fractures as Carriers for Colloid and Nano-Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, N.; Cohen, M.; Tang, X.; Zvikelsky, O.; Meron, H.

    2013-12-01

    One of the major questions in studies in which transport of colloids and nano particles (NPs) is being explored is whether or not they will be mobile on large scales and in large conduits such as fractures and cracks. While many studies explore the migration on a small scale and mostly in ideal porous media, less is known about this topic on larger scales and in fractured rocks or cracked soils. Fractures are likely to be favorable carriers for colloids and NPs due to their large aperture, enabling relatively high flow velocity and smaller tortuosity of the flow path. Transport of various colloids including microspheres, clay particles and viruses, as well as colloid-facilitated transport of lead and cesium was explored in a naturally discrete fractured chalk cores. Preliminary work exploring the transport of NZVIs and TiO2 NPs is being carried out through these cores as well. Our results indicate very high recovery of large microspheres (0.2 and 1 micron) and lower recovery of the small spheres (0.02 micron). It was observed that clay particles, with similar surface properties and sizes to that of the microspheres, show significantly lower recoveries (50 vs over 90%), probably due to the high density of clay particles in respect to the microspheres (2.65 vs. 1.05 g/cm3). High recovery of bacteriophages was also observed, but they exhibit some differences in respect to microspheres with similar properties. In all cases, including the 0.02 micron colloids exhibiting lower recovery rates, arrival times were earlier than that of the bromide that was used as a reference. It was found that colloid-facilitated transport played a major role in the migration of lead and cesium through the fracture. In practice, lead was found to be mobile only in a colloidal form. The on-going work on NP transport through fractures is still in a preliminary phase. Nevertheless, TiO2 recovery was found to be very low. In conclusion, it was observed that in many cases fractures are favorable

  17. Controlling the Transient Interface Shape and Deposition Profile Left by Desiccation of Colloidal Droplets on Multiple Polymer Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Peter David

    . Implementation of this technique requires that the colloidal droplet be separated from the active electrode by a dielectric layer to prevent electrolysis. A variety of polymer layers have been used in EWOD devices for a variety of applications. In applications that involve desiccation of colloidal suspensions, the material for this layer should be chosen carefully as it can play an important role in the resulting deposition pattern. An experimental method to monitor the transient evolution of the shape of an evaporating colloidal droplet and optically quantify the resultant deposition pattern is presented. Unactuated colloidal suspensions will be desiccated on a variety of substrates commonly used in EWOD applications. Transient image profiles and particle deposition patterns are examined for droplets containing fluorescent micro-particles. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of these results will be used to compare multiple different cases in an effort to provide insight into the effects of polymer selection on the drying dynamics and resultant deposition patterns of desiccated colloidal materials. It was found that the equilibrium and receding contact angles between the surface and the droplet play a key role in the evaporation dynamics and the resulting deposition patterns left by a desiccated colloidal suspension. The equilibrium contact angle controls the initial contact diameter for a droplet of a given volume. As a droplet on a surface evaporates, the evolution of the interface shape and the contact diameter can generally be described by three different regimes. The Constant Contact Radius (CCR) regime occurs when the contact line is pinned while the contact angle decreases. The Constant Contact Angle (CCA) regime occurs when the contact line recedes while the contact angle remains constant. The Mixed regime occurs when the contact radius and angle both reduce over time. The presence of the CCA regime allows the contact line to recede creating a more uniform

  18. Analysis of lipophilic compounds of tea coated on the surface of clay teapots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse-Yu Chung

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface of a clay teapot tends to be coated with a waterproof film after constant use for tea preparation. The waterproof films of two kinds of teapots (zisha and zhuni used for preparing oolong tea and old oolong tea were extracted and subjected to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. The results showed that comparable constituents were detected in these films; they were primarily fatty acids and linear hydrocarbons that were particularly rich in palmitic acid and stearic acid. To explore the source of these two abundant fatty acids, the fatty acid compositions of fresh tea leaves, granules, infusion, and vapor of infusion were analyzed by gas chromatography. Fresh tea leaves were rich in palmitic acid (C-16:0, unsaturated linolenic acid (C-18:3, linoleic acid (C-18:2, and oleic acid (C-18:1, which were presumably from the phospholipid membrane. During the process of manufacturing oolong tea, the three unsaturated fatty acids may be substantially degraded or oxidized to stearic acid (C-18:0, which was enriched with palmitic acid in the tea granules and in the infusion. The vapor of the tea infusion is primarily composed of palmitic acid and stearic acid. Thus, the coated films of teapots mostly originated from the lipophilic compounds of the tea infusions.

  19. Analysis of lipophilic compounds of tea coated on the surface of clay teapots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tse-Yu; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liao, Zih-Hui; Shih, Yu-En; Yang, Mei-Lin; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Wu, Chia-Chang; Tzen, Jason T C

    2015-03-01

    The surface of a clay teapot tends to be coated with a waterproof film after constant use for tea preparation. The waterproof films of two kinds of teapots (zisha and zhuni) used for preparing oolong tea and old oolong tea were extracted and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The results showed that comparable constituents were detected in these films; they were primarily fatty acids and linear hydrocarbons that were particularly rich in palmitic acid and stearic acid. To explore the source of these two abundant fatty acids, the fatty acid compositions of fresh tea leaves, granules, infusion, and vapor of infusion were analyzed by gas chromatography. Fresh tea leaves were rich in palmitic acid (C-16:0), unsaturated linolenic acid (C-18:3), linoleic acid (C-18:2), and oleic acid (C-18:1), which were presumably from the phospholipid membrane. During the process of manufacturing oolong tea, the three unsaturated fatty acids may be substantially degraded or oxidized to stearic acid (C-18:0), which was enriched with palmitic acid in the tea granules and in the infusion. The vapor of the tea infusion is primarily composed of palmitic acid and stearic acid. Thus, the coated films of teapots mostly originated from the lipophilic compounds of the tea infusions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boggs, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment

  1. Molecular-scale model for the mass density of electrolyte solutions bound by clay surfaces: application to bentonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalvès, J; Rousseau-Gueutin, P

    2008-04-15

    A model to simulate the density of solutions adsorbed onto clay mineral surfaces is proposed. In this model, the alteration of the ionic distribution caused by the electric field associated with the surface charge of clay platelets is accounted for using an electrical triple-layer model with an overlapping diffuse layer. The combined effects of ion hydration and the electric field on the structure of water are introduced through their influence on the partial molar volume of water. This model, applied to Na-montmorillonite, simulates the distribution of the interplatelet solution density as a function of the distance to the mineral surface. High densities in the direct vicinity of the surface and slightly lower density (a few percent) than the normal density in the diffuse layer are obtained. These results show good consistency with the available data on bentonite and with the densities that can be inferred from molecular dynamics simulations. This model shows that the interplatelet distance plays an important role in the distribution of the mass density of the solution in the pore space of clay rocks.

  2. Global Distribution of Clay-Size Minerals and Soil Carbon on Land Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.; Wagai, R.

    2017-12-01

    Clay-size minerals play important roles in terrestrial biogeochemistry and atmospheric physics, but their data have been only partially compiled at global scale. We developed a global dataset of clay-size minerals in the topsoil and subsoil and used for an analysis of soil carbon distribution. The data of soil clay and its mineralogical composition were gathered through a literature survey and aggregated by soil orders of the Soil Taxonomy for each of the ten groups: gibbsite, kaolinite, illite/mica, smectite, vermiculite, chlorite, iron oxide, quartz, non-crystalline, and others. Using a global soil map, a global dataset of soil clay-size mineral distribution was developed at resolutions of 2-min to 2-deg grid cells. The data uncertainty associated with data variability and assumption was evaluated using a Monte Carlo method, and validity of the clay-size mineral distribution obtained in this study was examined by comparing with other datasets. The global soil clay data offer spatially explicit studies on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles such as soil carbon dynamics, dust emission to the atmosphere, and other interdisciplinary earth sciences.

  3. Global distribution of clay-size minerals on land surface for biogeochemical and climatological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akihiko; Wagai, Rota

    2017-08-01

    Clay-size minerals play important roles in terrestrial biogeochemistry and atmospheric physics, but their data have been only partially compiled at global scale. We present a global dataset of clay-size minerals in the topsoil and subsoil at different spatial resolutions. The data of soil clay and its mineralogical composition were gathered through a literature survey and aggregated by soil orders of the Soil Taxonomy for each of the ten groups: gibbsite, kaolinite, illite/mica, smectite, vermiculite, chlorite, iron oxide, quartz, non-crystalline, and others. Using a global soil map, a global dataset of soil clay-size mineral distribution was developed at resolutions of 2' to 2° grid cells. The data uncertainty associated with data variability and assumption was evaluated using a Monte Carlo method, and validity of the clay-size mineral distribution obtained in this study was examined by comparing with other datasets. The global soil clay data offer spatially explicit studies on terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, dust emission to the atmosphere, and other interdisciplinary earth sciences.

  4. Adsorptive removal of crystal violet dye by a local clay and process optimization by response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loqman, Amal; El Bali, Brahim; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Weidler, Peter G.; Kherbeche, Abdelhak

    2017-11-01

    The current study relates to the removal of a dye [crystal violet (CV)] from aqueous solutions through batch adsorption experiment onto a local clay from Morocco. The clay was characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscope, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and Fraunhofer diffraction method. The influence of independent variables on the removal efficiency was determined and optimized by response surface methodology using the Box-Behnken surface statistical design. The model predicted maximum adsorption of 81.62% under the optimum conditions of operational parameters (125 mg L-1 initial dye concentration, 2.5 g L-1 adsorbent dose and time of 43 min). Practically, the removal ranges in 27.4-95.3%.

  5. Colloid release from soil aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    The content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) has a major impact on soil functions and structural stability. In addition, the presence of mobile colloids may increase the risk of colloid-facilitated transport of strongly sorbing environmental contaminants. The WDC content was measured in 39 soils......, using laser diffraction, by agitating the samples using a wet-dispersion unit. This approach eliminated the need for long sedimentation times required by the more classical end-over-end shaking approach and provided information about the time-dependent release of WDC. The total clay content of the soils...... ranged from 0.1 to 0.44 kg kg−1. The WDC content was measured on air-dry and moist 1- to 2-mm aggregates. The WDC content at a reference time was highly correlated to the total clay content (r > 0.91, P soils. Only for two sites was the WDC content correlated to the content of clay...

  6. Effect of energy source, salt concentration and loading force on colloidal interactions between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans cells and mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengxue; Nguyen, Tuan A H; Taran, Elena; Mahler, Stephen M; Nguyen, Anh V

    2015-08-01

    The surface appendages and extracellular polymeric substances of cells play an important role in the bacterial adhesion process. In this work, colloidal forces and nanomechanical properties of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. f) interacted with silicon wafer and pyrite (FeS2) surfaces in solutions of varying salt concentrations were quantitatively examined using the bacterial probe technique with atomic force microscopy. A. f cells were cultured with either ferrous sulfate or elemental sulfur as key energy sources. Our results show that A. f cells grown with ferrous ion and elemental sulfur exhibit distinctive retraction force vs separation distance curves with stair-step and saw tooth shapes, respectively. During the approach of bacterial probes to the substrate surfaces, surface appendages and biopolymers of cells are sequentially compressed. The conformations of surface appendages and biopolymers are significantly influenced by the salt concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of ball clay in 2009 and presents an outlook for its 2010 performance. Several companies mined ball call in the country including Old Hickey Clay Co., Kentucky-Tennessee Clay Co., and H.C. Spinks Clay Co. Information on the decline in ball clay imports and exports is also presented.

  8. Stabilization of plutonium nano-colloids by epitaxial distortion on mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brian A; Dai, Zurong; Zavarin, Mavrik; Zhao, Pihong; Kersting, Annie B

    2011-04-01

    The subsurface migration of Pu may be enhanced by the presence of colloidal forms of Pu. Therefore, complete evaluation of the risk posed by subsurface Pu contamination needs to include a detailed physical/chemical understanding of Pu colloid formation and interactions of Pu colloids with environmentally relevant solid phases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize Pu nanocolloids and interactions of Pu nanocolloids with goethite and quartz. We report that intrinsic Pu nanocolloids generated in the absence of goethite or quartz were 2-5 nm in diameter, and both electron diffraction analysis and HRTEM confirm the expected Fm3m space group with the fcc, PuO2 structure. Plutonium nanocolloids formed on goethite have undergone a lattice distortion relative to the ideal fluorite-type structure, fcc, PuO2, resulting in the formation of a bcc, Pu4O7 structure. This structural distortion results from an epitaxial growth of the plutonium colloid on goethite, leading to stronger binding of plutonium to goethite compared with other minerals such as quartz, where the distortion was not observed. This finding provides new insight for understanding how molecular-scale behavior at the mineral-water interface may facilitate transport of plutonium at the field scale.

  9. Colloids in ultra-low dielectric media : surface forces and self-assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aims at gaining fundamental insight on colloidal interactions in two types of apolar media, namely, liquid CO2 and (as a model for liquid CO2) n-hexane. The other components playing major roles are surfactants and water. The background of the work was

  10. Modeling the co-transport of viruses and colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N; Mohan Kumar, M S; Majid Hassanizadeh, S

    2015-10-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the co-transport of viruses and colloids in unsaturated porous media under steady-state flow conditions. The virus attachment to the mobile and immobile colloids is described using a linear reversible kinetic model. Colloid transport is assumed to be decoupled from virus transport; that is, we assume that colloids are not affected by the presence of attached viruses on their surface. The governing equations are solved numerically using an alternating three-step operator splitting approach. The model is verified by fitting three sets of experimental data published in the literature: (1) Syngouna and Chrysikopoulos (2013) and (2) Walshe et al. (2010), both on the co-transport of viruses and clay colloids under saturated conditions, and (3) Syngouna and Chrysikopoulos (2015) for the co-transport of viruses and clay colloids under unsaturated conditions. We found a good agreement between observed and fitted breakthrough curves (BTCs) under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. Then, the developed model was used to simulate the co-transport of viruses and colloids in porous media under unsaturated conditions, with the aim of understanding the relative importance of various processes on the co-transport of viruses and colloids in unsaturated porous media. The virus retention in porous media in the presence of colloids is greater during unsaturated conditions as compared to the saturated conditions due to: (1) virus attachment to the air-water interface (AWI), and (2) co-deposition of colloids with attached viruses on its surface to the AWI. A sensitivity analysis of the model to various parameters showed that the virus attachment to AWI is the most sensitive parameter affecting the BTCs of both free viruses and total mobile viruses and has a significant effect on all parts of the BTC. The free and the total mobile viruses BTCs are mainly influenced by parameters describing virus attachment to the AWI, virus interaction

  11. Colloidal stability of gold nanorod solution upon exposure to excised human skin: Effect of surface chemistry and protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Nouf N; Al-Qaoud, Khaled M; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Khalil, Enam A

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the colloidal stability of gold nanorods (with positive, negative and neutral surface charge) in solution upon contact with excised human skin. UV-vis absorption, plasmon peak broadening index (PPBI%) and transmission electron microscope analysis were used to follow nanoparticles aggregation in solution. Our results show that positively charged gold nanorods aggregate extensively upon exposure to excised human skin compared to negatively and neutrally charged gold nanorods. Skin-induced aggregation of cationic gold nanorods was linked to the adsorption of proteins released from the dermis layer to the surface of gold nanorods. Protein adsorption significantly screen nanorod's effective surface charge and induce their aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the presence of polyethylene glycol polymer on the surface of cationic gold nanorods minimize this aggregation significantly by providing steric repulsion (non-electrostatic stabilization mechanism). This work highlights the importance of evaluating the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution upon contact with skin, which is a "usually overlooked" parameter when studying the nanoparticle-skin interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-12

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.

  13. Surface clay formation during short-term warmer and wetter conditions on a largely cold ancient Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Fairén, Alberto G.; Michalski, Joseph R.; Gago-Duport, Luis; Baker, Leslie L.; Velbel, Michael A.; Gross, Christoph; Rampe, Elizabeth B.

    2018-03-01

    The ancient rock record for Mars has long been at odds with climate modelling. The presence of valley networks, dendritic channels and deltas on ancient terrains points towards running water and fluvial erosion on early Mars1, but climate modelling indicates that long-term warm conditions were not sustainable2. Widespread phyllosilicates and other aqueous minerals on the Martian surface3-6 provide additional evidence that an early wet Martian climate resulted in surface weathering. Some of these phyllosilicates formed in subsurface crustal environments5, with no association with the Martian climate, while other phyllosilicate-rich outcrops exhibit layered morphologies and broad stratigraphies7 consistent with surface formation. Here, we develop a new geochemical model for early Mars to explain the formation of these clay-bearing rocks in warm and wet surface locations. We propose that sporadic, short-term warm and wet environments during a generally cold early Mars enabled phyllosilicate formation without requiring long-term warm and wet conditions. We conclude that Mg-rich clay-bearing rocks with lateral variations in mixed Fe/Mg smectite, chlorite, talc, serpentine and zeolite occurrences formed in subsurface hydrothermal environments, whereas dioctahedral (Al/Fe3+-rich) smectite and widespread vertical horizonation of Fe/Mg smectites, clay assemblages and sulphates formed in variable aqueous environments on the surface of Mars. Our model for aluminosilicate formation on Mars is consistent with the observed geological features, diversity of aqueous mineralogies in ancient surface rocks and state-of-the-art palaeoclimate scenarios.

  14. Preferential adsorption and surface precipitation of lead(II) ions onto anatase in artificially contaminated Dixie clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Okita, Miyu; Kakoyama, Satoshi; Niinae, Masakazu; Nakata, Hideki; Fujii, Hiroshi; Tasaka, Yukio

    2017-09-15

    During TEM-EDS (transmission electron microscopy coupled with an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer) analysis of Dixie clay artificially contaminated with Pb(II), we observed that Pb(II) was preferentially adsorbed and precipitated on the surface of TiO 2 . To deepen the understanding of the mechanism and importance of this phenomenon, batch sorption experiments, XANES (X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy) analysis, and sequential extraction analysis were performed. The TiO 2 in Dixie clay was found to be anatase, and anatase showed a higher Pb(II) sorption propensity than rutile, α-FeOOH, and one of two MnO 2 investigated in this study. Our experimental results indicated that the Pb precipitates preferentially formed on the surface of anatase was Pb(II) hydroxide or Pb(II) oxide. Additionally, sequential extraction analysis showed that at least 32% and 42% of Pb(II) was sorbed onto anatase in the Dixie clay contaminated with a Pb content of 736mg Pb/kg and 1,958mg Pb/kg, respectively. These results demonstrated that in addition to Fe and Mn oxides that are well-known metal oxides that serve as sinks for Pb(II) in the soil environment, TiO 2 is also a metal oxide that controls the behavior and fate of Pb(II) in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio, E-mail: ogino-toshio-rx@ynu.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Local hydrophobicity of phase-separated sapphire (0001) surfaces was investigated. • These surfaces are featured by coexistence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. • Each domain was characterized by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy in water. • Both domains can be distinguished by adhesive forces of the probe to the surfaces. • Characterization in aqueous environment is important in bio-applications of sapphire. - Abstract: Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  16. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Magnetic and microscopic characterization of magnetite nanoparticles adhered to clay surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galindo-Gonzalez, C; Feinberg, JM; Kasama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    When suspended in solution, clay platelets coated with nanometer-scale magnetite particles behave as magnetorheologic fluids that are important to a variety of industrial applications. Such dual-phase assemblages are also similar to natural aggregates that record the direction and intensity of th...

  18. Rapid nutrient leaching to groundwater and surface water in clay soil areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, J.J.B.; Hamminga, W.; Oostindie, K.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism and magnitude of nitrate leaching from grassland on a heavy clay soil were investigated by measuring nitrogen input, and nitrate concentrations in groundwater and drain discharge for two years. A bromide tracer was applied to study solute transport mechanisms. Nitrate transport in the

  19. The increase of surface area of a Brazilian palygorskite clay activated with sulfuric acid solutions using a factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palygorskite is fibrous clay in which the structural tetrahedral and octahedral layers are organized in a way that structural channels are formed, leading to high surface area. However, impurities inside the channels and aggregated ones considerably reduce the available area. In order to increase the surface area, an activation treatment can be considered useful. The goal of this work is the activation of palygorskite from Guadalupe, Piauí, via sulfuric acid treatment using a two-level factorial design. The influence of three parameters (solution molarity, temperature and time on BET surface area was determined. Moreover, samples were characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD and fluorescence (XRF, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The largest surface area (282 m²/g without considerable changes in clay structure and morphology was found in a sample treated with 5M H2SO4 at 70°C for 1h. The main parameters that favored the improvement of the surface area were the solution's molarity, temperature and their interaction.

  20. Surface Modification, Characterization and Photocatalytic Performance of Nano-Sized Titania Modified with Silver and Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetu Divya

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In many textile industries dyes are used as coloring agents. Advanced oxidation processes are used for degrading or removing color from dye baths. Catalysts play a key role in these industries for the treatment of water. Solid catalysts are usually composed of metals that form supports onto the surface and create metal particles with high surface areas. TiO2 composites containing transition metal ions (silver and/or bentonite clay were prepared. Photocatalytic efficiencies have been investigated for the degradation of Orange G an azo dye. Various analytical techniques were used to characterize the surface properties of nano-sized titania modified using silver and/or bentonite clay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and FTIR analyses showed that TiO2 (10 ± 2 nm and Ag (2 to 3 nm particles were supported on the surface of the bentonite clay and the size was in the range of 100 ± 2 nm. The modified catalysts P-25 TiO2/Bentonite/Ag and P-25 TiO2/Ag were found to be very active for the photocatalytic decomposition of Orange G. The percent decolorization in 60 min was 98% with both P-25 TiO2/Ag and P-25 TiO2/Bentonite/Ag modified catalysts. Whereas mineralization achieved in 9 hr were 68% and 71% with P-25 TiO2/Bentonite/Ag and P-25 TiO2/Ag catalyst respectively. © 2009 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved[Received: 30 October 2009, Revised: 20 November 2009, Accepted: 21 November 2009][How to Cite: N. Divya, A. Bansal, A. K. Jana. (2009. Surface Modification, Characterization and Photocatalytic Performance of Nano-Sized Titania Modified with Silver and Bentonite Clay. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(2: 43-53.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.2.1249.43-53][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.2.1249.43-53 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/1249

  1. Semi-quantitative analysis of indigo carmine, using silver colloids, by surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadi, I. T.; Chowdhry, B. Z.; Snowden, M. J.; Withnall, R.

    2003-08-01

    The application of surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) to the semi-quantitative analysis of the dye, indigo carmine, has been examined using citrate-reduced silver colloids. Good linear correlations are observed for the dye band at 1580 cm -1 in the concentration range 10 -7-10 -5 and 10 -9-10 -5 mol dm -3, using laser exciting wavelengths of 514.5 [( R=0.9983)] and 632.8 nm [( R=0.9978)], respectively. At concentrations of dye above 10 -6 M the concentration dependence of the SERRS signals is non-linear due to the coverage of the surface of the colloidal particles by the dye being in excess of a full monolayer. At concentrations above 10 -6 M resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) can be employed for the quantitative analysis of the dye. An internal standard was used and a good linear correlation ( R=0.997) was observed for the dependence of dye signal intensities at 1580 cm -1 in the concentration range 10 -5-10 -4 M using a laser exciting wavelength of 514.5 nm. The limits of detection of indigo carmine by SERRS (514.5 nm), SERRS (632.8 nm) and solution RRS (514.5 nm) are found to be 0.9, 1 and 38 ppm, respectively.

  2. Colloids in Biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Fanun, Monzer

    2010-01-01

    Colloids have come a long way from when Thomas Graham coined the term colloid to describe 'pseudo solutions'. This book enables scientists to close the gap between extensive research and translation into commercial options in biomedicine and biotechnology. It covers biosurfactants and surface properties, phase behavior, and orientational change of surfactant mixtures with peptides at the interface. It also covers adsorption of polymers and biopolymers on the surface and interface, discusses colloidal nanoparticles and their use in biotechnology, and delves into bioadhesion and microencapsulati

  3. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  4. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  5. Grain surface features and clay mineralogy of the quaternary sediments from Western Deccan Trap Region, India, and their palaeoclimatic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena U. Joshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Quartz sand grains obtained from a deeply gullied topography along the banks of two tributaries of River Pravara in Maharashtra (India have been examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Quartz grains have been selected after a heavy mineral separation and micro-photographs of each grain were taken at various angles and magnifications. The sediments reveal features resulting from mechanical grinding as well as from chemical alteration. Conchoidal fractures, cleavage planes, grooves, v-shaped indentations etc. are the mechanical features documented on the grains whereas solution pits of varying sizes and intensity, precipitation surfaces, oriented v-pits, solution crevasses and etching are the features of chemical origin. Several evidences indicate that the samples have undergone digenetic changes. Few grains show the features of intense chemical breakdown. The overall assemblages of the grain surface features suggest that the samples have been subjected to subaqueous transport for a considerable period of time. The minor chemical features such as solution pits or semi circular arcuate steps found in abundance on these grains are due to the dissolution of the sediments in a low energy fluviatile environment. For clay mineralogy, fractions between <2 and <0.2 mm were separated out from the sediments. The clay fractions were then subjected to examination by X-ray diffraction (XRD of oriented K/Ca saturated samples using a Philips Diffractometer and Ni-filtered Cu Ka radiation with the scanning speed of 10 2Ө min -1. The main clay minerals for all the samples are identical and show the presence of hydroxy-interlayered smectites with minor quantities of mica, kaolinite, smectites, quartz and feldspar. The first weathering product of the Deccan Basalt (DB is the dioctahedral smectite. Since the present semi aridic climatic condition of the study area can not transform a smectite to HIS and either smectite to kaolin, it is quite likely that

  6. Sub-Surface and Bulk Creep Behaviour of Polyurethane/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Yusoh, K; Zhang, H X; Song, M

    2016-03-01

    A series of exfoliated and intercalated polyurethane organoclay nanocomposites were prepared by in situ polymerization of polyol/organoclay mixture, chain extender and diisocyanate. The creep behaviour of subsurface and bulk of the polyurethane coatings was investigated by nanoindentation technique and uniaxial conventional creep testing method, respectively. The results showed that the creep resistance of the nanocomposites was significantly improved by incorporation of organoclay. The enhancement of creep resistance was dependent on clay content as well as organoclay structure (exfoliation or intercalation) in the polymer matrix. With 1 wt% organoclay, the creep resistance increased by about 50% for the intercalated organoclay and 6% for the exfoliated organoclay systems, respectively, compared to the pristine polyurethane. Viscoelastic model was employed to investigate the effect of organoclay loadings on the creep performance of the polyurethane. Results showed the model was in good agreement with the experimental data. Incorporation of clay leads to an increase in elastic deformation especially in exfoliated polyurethane nanocomposites and induces a higher initial displacement at the early stage of creep.

  7. Synthesis and surface control of colloidal Cr3+-doped SnO2 transparent magnetic semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, N; Pautler, B G; Farvid, S S; Radovanovic, P V

    2010-04-02

    The synthesis of colloidal Cr(3+)-doped SnO(2) nanocrystals prepared under mild conditions via a hydrolysis method is described. We show by means of nanocrystal surface ligand exchange that even under mild reaction conditions a significant fraction of the dopant ions reside on the nanocrystal surfaces. Two different approaches aimed at achieving internal dopant incorporation-surface-bound dopant complexation and isocrystalline shell growth-are described and compared. While free-standing nanocrystals are paramagnetic, the films prepared from the same nanocrystals exhibit ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature. The measured magnetization is associated with structural defects formed at the interfaces of nanocrystals in their films, and discussed in terms of the defect-related itinerant-electron-mediated mechanism. The observed ferromagnetism is compared to ferromagnetism in Cr(3+)-doped In(2)O(3) nanocrystalline films. These results demonstrate the possibility of controlling surface structure and composition of doped oxide nanocrystals using different approaches. Furthermore, this work emphasizes the importance of surface structure and composition in tailoring properties of doped multifunctional transparent conducting oxide nanostructures.

  8. Enhancing optoelectronic properties of SiC-grown graphene by a surface layer of colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarovsky, Oleg; Turyanska, Lyudmila; Mori, Nobuya; Greenaway, Mark; Eaves, Laurence; Patané, Amalia; Fromhold, Mark; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Kubatkin, Sergey; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2017-09-01

    We report a simultaneous increase of carrier concentration, mobility and photoresponsivity when SiC-grown graphene is decorated with a surface layer of colloidal PbS quantum dots, which act as electron donors. The charge on the ionised dots is spatially correlated with defect charges on the SiC-graphene interface, thus enhancing both electron carrier density and mobility. This charge-correlation model is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport and used to explain the unexpected 3-fold increase of mobility with increasing electron density. The enhanced carrier concentration and mobility give rise to Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance, which provide an estimate of the electron cyclotron mass in graphene at high densities and Fermi energies up to 1.2  ×  1013 cm-2 and 400 meV, respectively.

  9. Nanoscale size dependence in the conjugation of amyloid beta and ovalbumin proteins on the surface of gold colloidal particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K; Briglio, N M; Hartati, D Sri; Tsang, S M W; MacCormac, J E; Welchons, D R [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York College at Geneseo, One College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454 (United States)], E-mail: yokoyama@geneseo.edu

    2008-09-17

    Absorption spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the conjugation of amyloid {beta} protein solution (A{beta}{sub 1-40}) and chicken egg albumin (ovalbumin) with various sizes of gold colloidal nanoparticles for various pHs, ranging from pH 2 to pH 10. The pH value that indicates the colour change, pH{sub o}, exhibited colloidal size dependence for both A{beta}{sub 1-40} and ovalbumin coated particles. In particular, A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated gold colloidal particles exhibited non-continuous size dependence peaking at 40 and 80 nm, implying that their corresponding cage-like structures provide efficient net charge cancellation at these core sizes. Remarkably, only the pH{sub o} value for ovalbumin coated 80 nm gold colloid was pH>7, and a specific cage-like structure is speculated to have a positive net charge facing outward when ovalbumin self-assembles over this particular gold colloid. The previously reported reversible colour change between pH 4 and 10 took place only with A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated 20 nm gold colloids; this was also explored with ovalbumin coated gold colloids. Interestingly, gold colloidal nanoparticles showed a quasi-reversible colour change when they were coated with ovalbumin for all test sizes. The ovalbumin coated gold colloid was found to maintain reversible properties longer than A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated gold colloid.

  10. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotova, O

    2013-01-01

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features

  11. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    N W 2002 Nature 416 811 [9] Borsboom M et al 1998 J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5 518 [10] Zernike F and Prins J A 1927 Z. Phys. 41 184 Colloidal suspensions contents How much does the core structure of a three-phase contact line contribute to the line tension near a wetting transition? J O Indekeu, K Koga and B Widom A systematic coarse-graining strategy for semi-dilute copolymer solutions: from monomers to micelles Barbara Capone, Ivan Coluzza and Jean-Pierre Hansen Structural searches using isopointal sets as generators: densest packings for binary hard sphere mixtures Toby S Hudson and Peter Harrowell The theory of delamination during drying of confined colloidal suspensions K J Wallenstein and W B Russel Electrostatics Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics Ethayaraja Mani, Jan Groenewold and Willem K Kegel The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state A Philipse and A Vrij Colloidal rods and platelets Cholesteric order in systems of helical Yukawa rods H H Wensink and G Jackson Magnetic-field-induced nematic-nematic phase separation and droplet formation in colloidal goethite E van den Pol, A A Verhoeff, A Lupascu, M A Diaconeasa, P Davidson, I Dozov, B W M Kuipers, D M E Thies-Weesie and G J Vroege Structure of colloidal sphere-plate mixtures N Doshi, G Cinacchi, J S van Duijneveldt, T Cosgrove, S W Prescott, I Grillo, J Phipps and D I Gittins 3D structure of nematic and columnar phases of hard colloidal platelets A B G M Leferink op Reinink, J M Meijer, D Kleshchanok, D V Byelov, G J Vroege, A V Petukhov and H N W Lekkerkerker Phase behaviour of binary mixtures of diamagnetic colloidal platelets in an external magnetic field Jonathan Phillips and Matthias Schmidt Rheo-SAXS investigation of shear-thinning behaviour of very anisometric repulsive disc-like clay suspensions A M Philippe, C Baravian, M Imperor-Clerc, J De Silva, E Paineau, I Bihannic, P Davidson, F Meneau, P Levitz and L J Michot

  12. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies — H.C. Spinks Clay Co., Inc., Imerys, Old Hickory Clay Co. and Unimin Corp. — mined ball clay in five U.S. states in 2012. Production, on the basis of preliminary data, was 900 kt (992,000 st), with an estimated value of $42.3 million. This was a slight increase in tonnage from 886 kt (977,000 st), with a value of $40.9 million in 2011. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producing state, with 63 percent of domestic production, followed by Texas, Mississippi, Kentucky and Indiana. Reported ball clay production from Indiana probably was fire clay rather than ball clay. About 69 percent of total ball clay production was airfloat, 20 percent was crude and 11 percent was water-slurried.

  13. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  14. Metal redistribution by surface casting of four earthworm species in sandy and loamy clay soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zorn, M.I.; van Gestel, C.A.M.; Eijsackers, H.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Bioturbation of metal contaminated soils contributes considerably to redistribution and surfacing of contaminated soil from deeper layers. To experimentally measure the contribution of Allolobophora chlorotica, Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus and L. terrestris to soil surface casting, a

  15. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manera, M G; Spadavecchia, J; Taurino, A; Rella, R

    2010-01-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV–vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA–Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA–DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T) 15 ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality

  16. Colloid migration in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, J.R. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  17. The influence of shale depositional fabric on the kinetics of hydrocarbon generation through control of mineral surface contact area on clay catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur M.; Kennedy, Martin; Löhr, Stefan; Dewhurst, David N.; Sherwood, Neil; Yang, Shengyu; Horsfield, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Accurately assessing the temperature and hence the depth and timing of hydrocarbon generation is a critical step in the characterization of a petroleum system. Clay catalysis is a potentially significant modifier of hydrocarbon generation temperature, but experimental studies of clay catalysis show inconsistent or contradictory results. This study tests the hypothesis that source rock fabric itself is an influence on clay mineral catalysis as it controls the extent to which organic matter and clay minerals are physically associated. Two endmember clay-organic fabrics distinguish the source rocks studied: (1) a particulate fabric where organic matter is present as discrete, >5 μm particles and (2) a nanocomposite fabric in which amorphous organic matter is associated with clay mineral surfaces at sub-micron scale. High-resolution electron imaging and bulk geochemical characterisation confirm that samples of the Miocene Monterey Formation (California) are representative of the nanocomposite source rock endmember, whereas samples from the Permian Stuart Range Formation (South Australia) represent the particulate source rock endmember. Kinetic experiments are performed on paired whole rock and kerogen isolate samples from these two formations using open system, non-isothermal pyrolysis at three different heating rates (0.7, 2 and 5 K/min) to determine the effects of the different shale fabrics on hydrocarbon generation kinetics. Extrapolation to a modelled geological heating rate shows a 20 °C reduction in the onset temperature of hydrocarbon generation in Monterey Formation whole rock samples relative to paired kerogen isolates. This result is consistent with the Monterey Formations's nanocomposite fabric where clay catalysis can proceed because reactive clay minerals are intimately associated with organic matter. By contrast, there is no significant difference in the modelled hydrocarbon generation temperature of paired whole rock and kerogen isolates from the

  18. Ab-Initio Modelling Of Surface Site Reactivity And Fluid Transport In Clay Minerals Case Study: Pyrophyllite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churakov, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    Pyrophyllite, Al 2 [Si 4 O 10 ](OH) 2 , is the simplest structural prototype for 2:1 dioctahedral phyllosilicate. Because the net electric charge in pyrophyllite is zero, it is the best candidate for investigating the non electrostatic contribution to sorption and transport phenomena in clays. Using ab-initio simulations, we have investigated the reactivity and structure of the water-solid interface on the basal plane and edge sites of pyrophyllite. The calculations predict slightly hydrophobic behaviour of the basal plane. For the high water coverage (100), (110) and (-110), lateral facets have a lower energy than for the (010), (130) and (-130) surfaces. Analysis of the surface reactivity reveals that the =Al-OH groups are most easily protonated on the (010), (130) and (-130) facets. The =Al-O-Si= sites will be protonated on the (100), (130), (110), (-110) and (-130) surfaces. The =Al-OH 2 complexes are more easily de-protonated than the =Si-OH and =Al-OH sites. A spontaneous, reversible exchange of the protons between the solution and the edge sites has been observed in ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K. Such near-surface proton diffusion may result in a significant contribution to the diffusion coefficients measured in neutron scattering experiments. (author)

  19. Atomic models for anionic ligand passivation of cation-rich surfaces of IV-VI, II-VI, and III-V colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Yoo, Dongsuk; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2016-12-22

    We formulated atomic models of cation-rich surfaces passivated with anionic ligands for IV-VI, II-VI, and III-V colloidal quantum dots, employing electron counting models and quantum mechanical calculations. We found that the fractional dangling bonds of cation-rich (100) and (111) surfaces could be greatly stabilized by dimerization-anion passivation and amine-anion co-passivation.

  20. Neutron scattering from colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebula, D.J.; Thomas, R.K.; Harris, N.M.; Tabony, J.; White, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper appraises the usefulness of neutron diffraction and small angle scattering for determining the structure of dilute and concentrated sols. For monodisperse polystyrene latex, the particle size and density can be readily determined and an upper limit to density fluctuations within the colloid particle set. For the polystyrene latex peptized by the adsorption of laurate, the physical dimensions and packing density of the adsorbed phase can be determined. The effects of polydispersity for unpeptized and peptized graphite sols, and the effects of extreme particle anisotropy using sols of montmorillonite clay minerals have been studied. (author)

  1. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  2. Phase behavior of charged hydrophobic colloids on flat and spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Colm P.

    For a broad class of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the transition from isotropic fluid to crystalline solid is described by the theory of melting due to Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson and Young (KTHNY). According to this theory, long-range order is achieved via elimination of the topological defects which proliferate in the fluid phase. However, many natural and man-made 2D systems posses spatial curvature and/or non-trivial topology, which require the presence of topological defects, even at T=0. In principle, the presence of these defects could profoundly affect the phase behavior of such a system. In this thesis, we develop and characterize an experimental system of charged colloidal particles that bind electrostatically to the interface between an oil and an aqueous phase. Depending on how we prepare the sample, this fluid interface may be flat, spherical, or have a more complicated geometry. Focusing on the cases where the interface is flat or spherical, we measure the interactions between the particles, and probe various aspects of their phase behavior. On flat interfaces, this phase behavior is well-described by KTHNY theory. In spherical geometries, however, we observe spatial structures and inhomogeneous dynamics that cannot be captured by the measures traditionally used to describe flat-space phase behavior. We show that, in the spherical system, ordering is achieved by a novel mechanism: sequestration of topological defects into freely-terminating grain boundaries ("scars"), and simultaneous spatial organization of the scars themselves on the vertices of an icosahedron. The emergence of icosahedral order coincides with the localization of mobility into isolated "lakes" of fluid or glassy particles, situated at the icosahedron vertices. These lakes are embedded in a rigid, connected "continent" of locally crystalline particles.

  3. Fabricating colloidal crystals and construction of ordered nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColloidal crystals of polymeric or inorganic microspheres are of extensive interest due to their potential applications in such as sensing, optics, photonic bandgap and surface patterning. The article highlights a set of approaches developed in our group, which are efficient to prepare colloidal crystals with ordered voids, patterned colloidal crystals on non-planar surfaces, heterogeneous colloidal crystals of different building blocks, colloidal crystals composed of non-spherical polyhedrons, and colloidal crystals of non-close-packed colloidal microspheres in particular. The use of these colloidal crystals as templates for different microstructures range from nanoscale to micron-scale is also summarized.

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering by colloidal CdSe nanocrystal submonolayers fabricated by the Langmuir–Blodgett technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Milekhin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs homogeneously deposited on both arrays of Au nanoclusters and Au dimers using the Langmuir–Blodgett technique. The coverage of the deposited NCs was less than one monolayer, as determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe nanocrystals showed a significant enhancement that depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster and dimer size, and thus on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe nanocrystals on the Au dimer nanocluster arrays enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. The maximal SERS signal was observed for light polarization parallel to the dimer axis. The polarization ratio of the SERS signal parallel and perpendicular to the dimer axis was 20. The SERS signal intensity was also investigated as a function of the distance between nanoclusters in a dimer. Here the maximal SERS enhancement was observed for the minimal distance studied (about 10 nm, confirming the formation of SERS “hot spots”.

  5. Colloidal glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Colloidal glasses. Glassy state is attained when system fails to reach equilibrium due to crowding of constituent particles. In molecular glasses, glassy state is reached by rapidly lowering the temperature. In colloidal glasses, glassy state is reached by increasing the ...

  6. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Akkari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP dispersed in 2-propanol were incorporated under ultrasound irradiation to the silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures dispersed in 2-propanol, and finally, the resulting solids were calcinated to eliminate the organic matter and to produce ZnO nanoparticles (NP homogeneously assembled to the clay–SiO2 framework. In the case of montmorillonite the resulting materials were identified as delaminated clays of ZnO/SiO2-clay composition, whereas for sepiolite, the resulting heterostructure is constituted by the assembling of ZnO NP to the sepiolite–silica substrate only affecting the external surface of the clay. The structural and morphological features of the prepared heterostructures were characterized by diverse physico-chemical techniques (such as XRD, FTIR, TEM, FE-SEM. The efficiency of these new porous ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures as potential photocatalysts in the degradation of organic dyes and the removal of pharmaceutical drugs in water solution was tested using methylene blue and ibuprofen compounds, respectively, as model of pollutants.

  7. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, L.; Schut, H.; Schaarenburg, L. C. van; Eijt, S. W. H., E-mail: S.W.H.Eijt@tudelft.nl [Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL-2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Al-Sawai, W.; Barbiellini, B.; Bansil, A. [Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Gao, Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, NL-2628 BL Delft (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Houtepen, A. J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 136, NL-2628 BL Delft (Netherlands); Mijnarends, P. E. [Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, NL-2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Huis, M. A. van [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Ravelli, L.; Egger, W. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85579 Neubiberg (Germany); Kaprzyk, S. [Physics Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Academy of Mining and Metallurgy AGH, PL-30059 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-08-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD) studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs), supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  8. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  9. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated martian surface ultraviolet radiation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Jaber, Maguy; Stalport, Fabien; Nowak, Sophie; Georgelin, Thomas; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-03-01

    Most of the phyllosilicates detected at the surface of Mars today are probably remnants of ancient environments that sustained long-term bodies of liquid water at the surface or subsurface and were possibly favorable for the emergence of life. Consequently, phyllosilicates have become the main mineral target in the search for organics on Mars. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea, and adenine in interaction with the Fe(3+)-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K), and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We tested organic-rich samples that were representative of the evaporation of a small, warm pond of liquid water containing a high concentration of organics. For each molecule, we observed how the nontronite influences its quantum efficiency of photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine; their efficiencies of photodecomposition were reduced by a factor of 5 when mixed at a concentration of 2.6 × 10(-2) mol of molecules per gram of nontronite. Moreover, when the amount of nontronite in the sample of glycine was increased by a factor of 2, the gain of photoprotection was multiplied by a factor of 5. This indicates that the photoprotection provided by the nontronite is not a purely mechanical shielding effect but is also due to stabilizing interactions. No new evolution product was firmly identified, but the results obtained with urea suggest a particular reactivity in the presence of nontronite, leading to an increase of its dissociation rate.

  10. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  11. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The state of the ball clay industry in 1999 is presented. Record highs in the sales and use of ball clay were attained in 1999 due to the continued strength of the U.S. economy. U.S. production was estimated at 1.25 million st for the year, with more than half of that amount mined in Tennessee. Details of the consumption, price, imports, and exports of ball clay in 1999 and the outlook for ball clay over the next few years are provided.

  12. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  13. Colloids and Radionuclide Transport: A Field, Experimental and Modeling Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.; Sylwester, E. E.; Allen, P. G.; Williams, R. W.; Kersting, A. B.

    2002-05-01

    Natural inorganic colloids (colloid-facilitated transport to the transport of low-solubility actinides, such as Pu, is still not well understood. In an effort to better understand the dominant geochemical mechanisms that control Pu transport, we have performed a series of sorption/desorption experiments using mineral colloids. We focused on natural colloidal minerals present in water samples collected from both saturated and vadose zone waters at the Nevada Test Site. These minerals include zeolites, clays, silica, Mn-oxides, Fe-oxides, and calcite. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy ( both XANES and EXAFS) was performed in order to characterize the speciation of sorbed plutonium. The XANES spectra show that only Pu(IV) was detected (within experimental error) on these mineral surfaces when the starting Pu oxidation state was +5, indicating that Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) during sorption. The EXAFS detected Pu-M and Pu-C interactions (where M=Fe, Mn, or Si) indicating Pu(IV) surface complexation along with carbonate ternary complex formation on most of the minerals tested. Although the plutonium sorption as Pu(IV) species is mineral independent, the actual sorption paths are different for different minerals. The sorption rates were compared to the rates of plutonium disproportionation under similar conditions. The batch sorption/desorption experiments of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) onto colloidal zeolite (clinoptilolite, colloids particle size 171 ñ 25 nm) were conducted in synthetic groundwater (similar to J-13, Yucca Mountain standard) with a pH range from 4 to 10 and initial plutonium concentration of 10-9 M. The results show that Pu(IV) sorption takes place within an hour, while the rates of Pu(V) sorption onto the colloids is much slower and mineral dependent. The kinetic results from the batch sorption/desorption experiments, coupled with redox kinetics of plutonium in solution will be used in geochemical modeling of Pu surface complexation to colloids and

  14. 9TH International Conference on Surface and Colloid Science, 6-12 July, 1997, Sofia, Bulgaria. Book of Abstracts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toshev, Borislav

    1997-01-01

    ...), Sofia, 6 - 12 July 1997. The conference seems to be the greatest worldwide forum in this scientific field and it is organized every three years under the auspices of the International Association of Colloid and Interface Scientists (ACIS...

  15. Clay properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Wit, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this report an overview will be given of the basic properties of (suspended) clay particles. In section 2 the structure of clay minerals will be described. The forces between suspended particles (section 3) and the possible consequences of them, flocculation or deflocculation (sections 4 and 5)

  16. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability - Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  17. Interaction of insulin with colloidal ZnS quantum dots functionalized by various surface capping agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Ghader; Maghari, Ali; Farniya, Seyed Morteza Famil; Keihan, Amir Homayoun; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A

    2017-08-01

    Interaction of quantum dots (QDs) and proteins strongly influenced by the surface characteristics of the QDs at the protein-QD interface. For a precise control of these surface-related interactions, it is necessary to improve our understanding in this field. In this regard, in the present work, the interaction between the insulin and differently functionalized ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were studied. The ZnS QDs were functionalized with various functional groups of hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), amine (NH 2 ), and amino acid (COOH and NH 2 ). The effect of surface hydrophobicity was also studied by changing the alkyl-chain lengths of mercaptocarboxylic acid capping agents. The interaction between insulin and the ZnS QDs were investigated by fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and thermal aggregation techniques. The results reveal that among the studied QDs, mercaptosuccinic acid functionalized QDs has the strongest interaction (∆G ° =-51.50kJ/mol at 310K) with insulin, mercaptoethanol functionalized QDs destabilize insulin by increasing the beta-sheet contents, and only cysteine functionalized QDs improves the insulin stability by increasing the alpha-helix contents of the protein, and. Our results also indicate that by increasing the alkyl-chain length of capping agents, due to an increase in hydrophobicity of the QDs surface, the beta-sheet contents of insulin increase which results in the enhancement of insulin instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Broadband enhancement of photoluminance from colloidal metal halide perovskite nanocrystals on plasmonic nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si; Liang, Yuzhang; Jing, Qiang; Lu, Zhenda; Lu, Yanqing; Xu, Ting

    2017-11-07

    Metal halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) as a new kind of promising optoelectronic material have attracted wide attention due to their high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield, narrow emission linewidth and wideband color tunability. Since the PL intensity always has a direct influence on the performance of optoelectronic devices, it is of vital importance to improve the perovskite NCs' fluorescence emission efficiency. Here, we synthesize three inorganic perovskite NCs and experimentally demonstrate a broadband fluorescence enhancement of perovskite NCs by exploiting plasmonic nanostructured surface consisting of nanogrooves array. The strong near-field optical localization associated with surface plasmon polariton-coupled emission effect generated by the nanogrooves array can significantly boost the absorption of perovskite NCs and tailor the fluorescence emissions. As a result, the PL intensities of perovskite NCs are broadband enhanced with a maximum factor higher than 8-fold achieved in experimental demonstration. Moreover, the high efficiency PL of perovskite NCs embedded in the polymer matrix layer on the top of plasmonic nanostructured surface can be maintained for more than three weeks. These results imply that plasmonic nanostructured surface is a good candidate to stably broadband enhance the PL intensity of perovskite NCs and further promote their potentials in the application of visible-light-emitting devices.

  19. Adsorption of plasma proteins : adsorption behaviour on apolar surfaces and effect on colloid stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Albert

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis the adsorption of some plasma proteins (human albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (HFb)) on non polar surfaces is studied, together with the influence of these proteins on the stability of polystyrene latices. The aim of these investigations is a better understanding of the processes

  20. Direct measurement of colloidal interactions between polyaniline surfaces in a UV-curable coating formulation: the effect of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity and resin composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Shadi; Claesson, Per M; Pan, Jinshan; Thormann, Esben

    2014-02-04

    The interactions between polyaniline particles and polyaniline surfaces in polyester acrylate resin mixed with 1,6-hexanediol diacrylate monomer have been investigated using contact angle measurements and the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. Polyaniline with different characteristics (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) were synthesized directly on spherical polystyrene particles of 10 μm in diameter. Surface forces were measured between core/shell structured polystyrene/polyaniline particles (and a pure polystyrene particle as reference) mounted on an atomic force microscope cantilever and a pressed pellet of either hydrophilic or hydrophobic polyaniline powders, in resins of various polymer:monomer ratios. A short-range purely repulsive interaction was observed between hydrophilic polyaniline (doped with phosphoric acid) surfaces in polyester acrylate resin. In contrast, interactions between hydrophobic polyaniline (doped with n-decyl phosphonic acid) were dominated by attractive forces, suggesting less compatibility and higher tendency for aggregation of these particles in liquid polyester acrylate compared to hydrophilic polyaniline. Both observations are in agreement with the conclusions from the interfacial energy studies performed by contact angle measurements.

  1. Photooxidation of arsenic(III) to arsenic(V) on the surface of kaolinite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Li, Jinjun; Wu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    As one of the most toxic heavy metals, the oxidation of inorganic arsenic has drawn great attention among environmental scientists. However, little has been reported on the solar photochemical behavior of arsenic species on top-soil. In the present work, the influencing factors (pH, relative humidity (RH), humic acid (HA), trisodium citrate, and additional iron ions) and the contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mainly HO and HO2/O2(-)) to photooxidation of As(III) to As(V) on kaolinite surfaces under UV irradiation (λ=365nm) were investigated. Results showed that lower pH facilitated photooxidation, and the photooxidation efficiency increased with the increase of RH and trisodium citrate. Promotion or inhibition of As(III) photooxidation by HA was observed at low or high dosages, respectively. Additional iron ions greatly promoted the photooxidation, but excessive amounts of Fe(2+) competed with As(III) for oxidation by ROS. Experiments on scavengers indicated that the HO radical was the predominant oxidant in this system. Experiments on actual soil surfaces proved the occurrence of As(III) photooxidation in real topsoil. This work demonstrates that the photooxidation process of As(III) on the soil surface should be taken into account when studying the fate of arsenic in natural soil newly polluted with acidic wastewater containing As(III). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Effect of nontronite smectite clay on the chemical evolution of several organic molecules under simulated Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Olivier; Dequaire, Tristan; Stalport, Fabien; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    The search for organic carbon-containing molecules at the surface of Mars, as clues of past habitability or remnants of life, is a major scientific goal for Mars exploration. Several lines of evidence, including the detection of phyllosilicates, suggest that early Mars offered favorable conditions for long-term sustaining of water. As a consequence, we can assume that in those days, endogenous chemical processes, or even primitive life, may have produced organic matter on Mars. Moreover, exogenous delivery from small bodies or dust particles is likely to have brought fresh organic molecules to the surface of Mars up today. Organic matter is therefore expected to be present at the surface/subsurface of the planet. But the current environmental conditions at the surface - UV radiation, oxidants and energetic particles - generate physico-chemical processes that may affect organic molecules. On the other hand, on Earth, phyllosilicates are known to accumulate and preserve organic matter. But are phyllosilicates efficient at preserving organic molecules under the current environmental conditions at the surface of Mars? We have monitored the qualitative and quantitative evolutions of glycine, urea and adenine interacting with the Fe3+-smectite clay nontronite, one of the most abundant phyllosilicates present at the surface of Mars, under simulated Martian surface ultraviolet light (190-400 nm), mean temperature (218 ± 2 K) and pressure (6 ± 1 mbar) in a laboratory simulation setup. We have tested organic-rich samples which may be representative of the evaporation of a warm little pond of liquid water having concentrated organics on Mars. For each molecule, we have observed how the nontronite influences the quantum efficiency of its photodecomposition and the nature of its solid evolution products. The results reveal a pronounced photoprotective effect of nontronite on the evolution of glycine and adenine: their efficiencies of photodecomposition are reduced by a factor

  3. Colloids from the aqueous corrosion of uranium nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Mertz, C. J.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids may enhance the subsurface transport of radionuclides and potentially compromise the long-term safe operation of the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Little data is available on colloid formation for the many different waste forms expected to be buried in the repository. This work expands the sparse database on colloids formed during the corrosion of metallic uranium nuclear fuel. We characterized spherical UO 2 and nickel-rich montmorilonite smectite-clay colloids formed during the corrosion of uranium metal fuel under bathtub conditions at 90 °C. Iron and chromium oxides and calcium carbonate colloids were present but were a minor population. The estimated upper concentration of the UO 2 and clays was 4 × 10 11 and 7 × 10 11-3 × 10 12 particles/L, respectively. However, oxygen eventually oxidized the UO 2 colloids, forming long filaments of weeksite K 2(UO 2) 2Si 6O 15 · 4H 2O that settled from solution, reducing the UO 2 colloid population and leaving predominantly clay colloids. The smectite colloids were not affected by oxygen. Plutonium was not directly observed within the UO 2 colloids but partitioned completely to the colloid size fraction. The plutonium concentration in the colloidal fraction was slightly higher than the value used in the viability assessment model, and does not change in concentration with exposure to oxygen. This paper provides conclusive evidence for single-phase radioactive colloids composed of UO 2. However, its impact on repository safety is probably small since oxygen and silica availability will oxidize and effectively precipitate the UO 2 colloids from concentrated solutions.

  4. Charge reversal of the rodlike colloidal fd virus through surface chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenkun; Buitenhuis, Johan; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael; Dhont, Jan K G

    2010-07-06

    There is increasing interest in the use of viruses as model systems for fundamental research and as templates for nanomaterials. In this work, the rodlike fd virus was subjected to chemical modifications targeting different solvent-exposed functional groups in order to tune its surface properties, especially reversing the surface charge from negative to positive. The carboxyl groups of fd were coupled with different kinds of organic amines by carbodiimide chemistry, resulting in modified viruses that are positively charged over a wide range of pH. Care was taken to minimize intervirus cross linking, which often occurs because of such modifications. The surface amino groups were also grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) end-functionalized with an active succinimidyl ester in order to introduce a steric stabilization effect. By combining charge reversal with PEG grafting, a reversible attraction between positively and negatively charged PEG-grafted fd viruses could be realized, which was tuned by the ionic strength of the solution. In addition, a charge-reversed fd virus forms only a pure nematic phase in contrast to the cholesteric phase of the wild type. These modified viruses might be used as model systems in soft condensed matter physics, for example, in the study of polyelectrolyte complexes or lyotropic liquid-crystalline phase behavior.

  5. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on nucleic acids and related compounds adsorbed on colloidal silver particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, K.; Pohle, W.; Fabian, H.

    1991-04-01

    Various nucleic acids and related compounds have been investigated by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on silver sol. The time delay between the addition of the various nucleic acids to the silver sol and the appearance of their SER spectra, i.e. the time needed by the various molecules to adsorb on an active site of the silver surface with an adsorption geometry which allows a SERS enhancement, shows strong differences. For instance, an immediate appearance of SER spectra has been found for DNA, whereas ribonucleic acids (RNAs) demonstrated a strong time delay (up to days) of the appearance of their SER spectra. This delay can be tentatively explained by the higher rigidity of RNA molecules compared with DNA. The more flexible DNA molecules are better adaptable to adsorption on silver than RNAs. The SER spectra of RNAs and DNAs showed strong changes within their relative line intensities as a function of time before they achieved stationary conditions, which indicates a protracted re-arrangement of the large molecules on the silver surface.

  6. Reactivity of surface of metal oxide particles: from adsorption of ions to deposition of colloidal particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    In this Accreditation to supervise research (HDR), the author proposes an overview of his research works in the field of chemistry. These works more particularly addressed the understanding of the surface reactivity of metal oxide particles and its implication on sorption and adherence processes. In a first part, he addresses the study of surface acidity-alkalinity: measurement of surface reactivity by acid-base titration, stability of metal oxides in suspension, effect of morphology on oxide-hydroxide reactivity. The second part addresses the study of sorption: reactivity of iron oxides with selenium species, sorption of sulphate ions on magnetite, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). Adherence effects are addressed in the third part: development of an experimental device to study adherence in massive substrates, deposition of particles under turbulent flow. The last part presents a research project on the effect of temperature on ion sorption at solids/solutions interfaces, and on the adherence of metal oxide particles. The author gives his detailed curriculum, and indicates his various publications, teaching activities, research and administrative responsibilities

  7. Particle Trapping and Banding in Rapid Colloidal Solidification

    KAUST Repository

    Elliott, J. A. W.

    2011-10-11

    We derive an expression for the nonequilibrium segregation coefficient of colloidal particles near a moving solid-liquid interface. The resulting kinetic phase diagram has applications for the rapid solidification of clay soils, gels, and related colloidal systems. We use it to explain the formation of bandlike defects in rapidly solidified alumina suspensions. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  8. Dynamic shear rheology of colloidal suspensions of surface-modified silica nanoparticles in PEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarna; Pattanayek, Sudip Kumar; Ghosh, Anup Kumar

    2018-03-01

    The present work illustrates the effect of surface modification of silica nanoparticles (500 nm) with 3-(glycidoxypropyl)trimethoxy silane which was carried out at different reaction times. The suspensions prepared from modified and unmodified silica nanoparticles were evaluated for their shear rate-dependent viscosity and strain-frequency-dependent modulus. The linear viscoelastic moduli, viz., storage modulus and loss modulus, were compared with those of nonlinear moduli. The shear-thickened suspensions displayed strain thinning at low-frequency smaller strains and a strong strain overshoot at higher strains, characteristics of a continuous shear thickening fluids. The shear-thinned suspension, conversely, exhibited a strong elastic dominance at smaller strains, but at higher strains, its strain softened observed in the steady shear viscosity plot indicating characteristics of yielding material. Considering higher order harmonic components, the decomposed elastic and viscous stress revealed a pronounced elastic response up to 10% strain and a high viscous damping at larger strains. The current work is one of a kind in demonstrating the effect of silica surface functionalization on the linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of suspensions showing a unique rheological fingerprint. The suspensions can thus be predicted through rheological studies for their applicability in energy absorbing and damping materials with respect to their mechanical properties.

  9. Laboratory observations and mathematical modeling of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in chemically heterogeneous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiers, James E.

    2002-04-01

    In the work reported here, I examine colloid-facilitated solute transport through a natural porous medium that exhibits grain-scale heterogeneity in chemical composition. I conducted six column experiments using the contaminant hydroxyatrazine (HA) and either homogeneous clay-colloid suspensions or mixtures of clay colloids and dissolved organic matter. The transport of colloids composed of illite and montmorillonite, although not conservative, is only slightly affected by rate-limited mass transfer reactions with the oxide-coated aquifer material. Coinjection of HA with monomineralogic suspensions of illite colloids produces modest increases in effluent concentrations of HA relative to experiments performed with colloid-free influent solutions. Montmorillonite colloids have a much higher capacity to bind HA than illite colloids and substantially increase the transport rate of HA in the column experiments. Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) does not strongly complex aqueous phase HA, but its addition to column influent mixtures that contain HA and montmorillonite suppresses HA adsorption to the clay colloids and promotes a decline in HA mobility. A model for colloid-facilitated transport, formulated to account for nonuniformity in the kinetics of colloid deposition and HA adsorption, closely describes HA transport in experiments performed with monomineralogic clay-colloid suspensions, heterogeneous suspensions made of both illite and montmorillonite, and mixtures of montmorillonite and SRHA.

  10. Silica encapsulation of fluorescent nanodiamonds for colloidal stability and facile surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumb, Ambika; Sarkar, Susanta K; Billington, Neil; Brechbiel, Martin W; Neuman, Keir C

    2013-05-29

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) emit in the near-IR and do not photobleach or photoblink. These properties make FNDs better suited for numerous imaging applications compared with commonly used fluorescence agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. However, nanodiamonds do not form stable suspensions in aqueous buffer, are prone to aggregation, and are difficult to functionalize. Here we present a method for encapsulating nanodiamonds with silica using an innovative liposome-based encapsulation process that renders the particle surface biocompatible, stable, and readily functionalized through routine linking chemistries. Furthermore, the method selects for a desired particle size and produces a monodisperse agent. We attached biotin to the silica-coated FNDs and tracked the three-dimensional motion of a biotinylated FND tethered by a single DNA molecule with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  11. Surface Modification of Nanoclay for the Synthesis of Polycaprolactone (PCL – Clay Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusoh Kamal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new modification method to modify the surface of nanoclay (Na-MMT to increase its d-spacing using Aminopropylisooctyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (AP-POSS and the fabrication of Polycaprolactone (PCL nanocomposite through solution intercalation technique. The structure and morphology of pure nanoclay, modified nanoclay (POSS-MMT and the PCL nanocomposite were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM. XRD revealed that the d-spacing of the POSS-MMT is increased by 0.64 nm as compared to pure nanoclay. FTIR and FESEM results also showed that AP-POSS were well dispersed and intercalated throughout the interlayer space of Na-MMT. An exfoliated structure was also observed for PCL/POSS-MMT nanocomposite. Thermal properties of the nanocomposite were investigated using Thermal Gravimetry Analysis (TGA which recorded highest degradation temperature for PCL/POSS-MMT 1% nanocomposite which is 394.1°C at 50% weight loss (T50% but a decrease in degradation temperature when POSS-MMT content is increased and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC analysis which showed highest melting and crystallization temperature for PCL/POSS-MMT 5% nanocomposite which is 56.6°C and 32.7°C respectively whereas a decrease in degree of crystallinity for PCL/POSS-MMT nanocomposite as compared to PCL/Na-MMT nanocomposite. This study affords an efficient modification method to obtain organoclay with larger interlayer d-spacing to enhance the properties of polymer nanocomposite.

  12. Colloid properties of hydrophobic modified alginate: Surface tension, ζ-potential, viscosity and emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zongmei; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Ruling; Yuan, Shichao; Lu, Qingliang; Yu, Yueqin

    2018-02-01

    Micelle properties of hydrophobic modified alginate (HM-alginate) in various dispersion media have been studied by surface tension, ζ-potential, and viscosity measurements. Effect of salt on micelle properties showed that the presence of counter ion weakened the repulsive interaction between surfactant ions, decreased the critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of the HM-alginate, reduced the effective volume dimensions of HM-alginate and hence viscosity, which coincide with the corresponding ζ-potential values. Soy oil-in-water emulsions, stabilized solely by HM-alginate, were produced in high speed homogenization conditions and their stability properties were studied by visual inspection, optical microscopy and droplet size measurements. The results showed that emulsions (oil-water ratio was 1:7) containing 15mg/mL HM-alginate presented better stability during 15days storage, which stating clearly that HM-alginate is an effective emulsifier to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions. The herein presented homogeneous method for preparation of emulsion has the potential to be used in food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: c.degueldre@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, University of Lancaster, LA1 4YW Lancaster (United Kingdom); ChiAM & Institute of Environment, University of Geneva, 1211 Genève 4, Swizerland (Switzerland); Earlier, NES, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Cloet, Veerle [NAGRA, Hardstrasse 73, 5430 Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  14. Characterization of Metal Ion ­ Colloid Interaction: Impact On Colloid-facilitated Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, C. H.; Schmitt, D.; Kaulisch, E.-M.; Frimmel, F. H.

    It is generally accepted, that metal transport in natural aquatic systems strongly de- pends on the metal binding form. Besides complex formation with well defined inor- ganic and organic ligands, the interaction with colloidal particles and soil material is one of the most important reactions of metal ions in aquatic systems. Mobile colloids compete with the stationary soil matrix for binding of metal ions and might facili- tate their transport. Important representatives for mineral and organic colloids are clay minerals and natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. In this work, the interaction of metal ions with clay minerals and NOM is characterized by coupling of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation AF4 to inductively coupled plasma ­ mass spectrometry (ICPMS). A method for separating mineral from organic colloids is presented, which allows to quantify the amount of metals being bound to either colloid. For different metal ions (Cu, Zn, Pb, Pt) and a metalloid (As) a different extent of binding to either colloid was found.The information obtained from the AF4-ICPMS measurements was useful for the understanding of the observations from column experiments which were conducted to quantify the colloid-facilitated metal transport. In column experiments, the transport of the mineral colloids itself and the influence of NOM onto the colloid transport were investigated. Furthermore, the dependance of colloid transport from the ionic strength and the pH value was elucidated. In order to get information about the co-transport of metal ions by organic and mineral colloids, metal ions were adsorbed onto the colloidal material and a distribution coef- ficient of the metal ions between the colloidal phase and the solution was determined. The colloidal suspension containing both, "free" and adsorbed metal ions were then injected onto the column. The direct metal breakthrough caused by colloidal trans- port was detected at the column outlet. The results clearly

  15. Organoclays from several Latvian clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freimanis, J.; Actins, A.; Stinkule, A.; Svinka, R.; Svinka, V.

    2003-01-01

    Vermiculite of the Kalkupite deposit (North-Western part of Latvia) differs significantly from its classical analogs possessing a well-known capability to form volume organo clays. This Latvian vermiculite hitherto could be used only in non-swelling surface organo clays synthesis the practical use of which is obscure. Therefore, any further organo clay investigations of Latvian vermiculites seem undesirable. On the other hand, the present study reveals the usefulness of Latvian Triassic Vadakste smectite (Western part of Latvia) in preparing of lipophilic, swelling organo clays by means of common standard procedures. For this purpose the Latvian smectite regarding its real cation exchange capacity is only slightly inferior to its arbitrary standard - Lithuanian Shaltishkiai smectite - believed to be the smectite-richest clay mineral in Baltic region. The present study also enables a prognosis of further possible organo clay investigations in Latvia. First, the quaternary ammonium cations should be varied to get Vadaksteitype organo clays possessing different rheological properties. Then, the most suited ammonium surfactants should tested also with other Latvian Triassic smectite clays compromising their commercial availability with the corresponding organo clays maximally possible practical value. As an independent theoretical investigations of the other physicochemical properties, parallel with the detailed X-ray diffractometry of the prepared organo clays. (authors)

  16. Analysis of surface structure and hydrogen/deuterium exchange of colloidal silica suspension by contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takuya; Endo, Hitoshi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2008-05-06

    The microscopic surface structure and hydrogen/deuterium exchange effect were investigated by contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (CV-SANS) for three different-sized amorphous colloidal silica aqueous suspensions. The results show that the fraction of hydrogen/deuterium exchange per nanoparticle, phiH/D, strongly depends on the size of silica nanoparticles. This finding supports that the hydrogen/deuterium exchange occurs exclusively within a finite surface layer of silica nanoparticles, while the inner component remained unchanged. Detailed analyses of the scattering intensity functions led to the estimation of (1) phiH/D and (2) the thickness of the surface layer as functions of the particle radius. The surface layer thickness was found to increase from 18 to 35 A with decreasing the particle radius from 165 to 71.2 A. The surface area per unit weight of silica estimated with the CV-SANS results are comparable to those reported in the literature.

  17. Water and clay: MD simulations and their relevance to solute migration in argillaceous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Ian C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of document follows: Clay minerals play important roles in regulating the migration of water and ions near high-level radioactive waste repositories, both in engineered clay barriers and in natural geologic formations such as clay shales. In particular, because of their high surface area and high cation exchange capacity, clay minerals impose conditions where molecular diffusion is a key transport process and where aquatic geochemistry is strongly influenced by interfacial phenomena. Here, we discuss how molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide insights into the behavior of solutes in water and near clay surfaces (on length scales of a few nano-meters) that are directly relevant to solute migration in argillaceous media. We focus on three examples: noble gas diffusion in lacustrine sediments [1,2], ion adsorption in the electrical double layer on clay surfaces [3], and water and ion diffusion in clay interlayer nano-pores [4]. [1] Bourg IC and Sposito G (2008) Isotopic fractionation of noble gases by diffusion in liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulations and hydrologic applications. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 2237-2247. [2] Bourg IC, Richter FM, Christensen JN and Sposito G (2010) Isotopic mass dependence of metal cation diffusion coefficients in liquid water. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 2249-2256. [3] Bourg IC and Sposito G (2011) Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl 2 ) solutions. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 360, 701-715. [4] Bourg IC and Sposito G (2010) Connecting the molecular scale to the continuum scale for diffusion processes in smectite-rich porous media. Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 2085-2091. (authors)

  18. Differences in the Activities of Eight Enzymes from Ten Soil Fungi and Their Possible Influences on the Surface Structure, Functional Groups, and Element Composition of Soil Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3–4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11–60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9–22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11–49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance. PMID:25398013

  19. Hollow-core magnetic colloidal nanocrystal clusters with ligand-exchanged surface modification as delivery vehicles for targeted and stimuli-responsive drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dian; Tang, Jing; Guo, Jia; Wang, Shilong; Chaudhary, Deeptangshu; Wang, Changchun

    2012-12-14

    The fabrication of hierarchical magnetic nanomaterials with well-defined structure, high magnetic response, excellent colloidal stability, and biocompatibility is highly sought after for drug-delivery systems. Herein, a new kind of hollow-core magnetic colloidal nanocrystal cluster (HMCNC) with porous shell and tunable hollow chamber is synthesized by a one-pot solvothermal process. Its novelty lies in the "tunability" of the hollow chamber and of the pore structure within the shell through controlled feeding of sodium citrate and water, respectively. Furthermore, by using the ligand-exchange method, folate-modified poly(acrylic acid) was immobilized on the surface of HMCNCs to create folate-targeted HMCNCs (folate-HMCNCs), which endowed them with excellent colloidal stability, pH sensitivity, and, more importantly, folate receptor-targeting ability. These assemblages exhibited excellent colloidal stability in plasma solution. Doxorubicin (DOX), as a model anticancer agent, was loaded within the hollow core of these folate-HMCNCs (folate-HMCNCs-DOX), and drug-release experiments proved that the folate-HMCNCs-DOX demonstrated pH-dependent release behavior. The folate-HMCNCs-DOX assemblages also exhibited higher potent cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free doxorubicin. Moreover, folate-HMCNCs-DOX showed rapid cell uptake apart from the enhanced cytotoxicity to HeLa cells. Experimental results confirmed that the synthesized folate-HMCNCs are smart nanovehicles as a result of their improved folate receptor-targeting abilities and also because of their combined pH- and magnetic-stimuli response for applications in drug delivery. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Radioactive colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, L.

    1987-01-01

    Different techniques for the characterization of radioactive colloids, used in nuclear medicine, have been evaluated and compared. Several radioactive colloids have been characterized in vitro and in vivo and tested experimentally. Colloid biokinetics following interstitial or intravenous injection were evaluated with a scintillation camera technique. Lymphoscintigraphy with a Tc-99-labelled antimony sulphur colloid was performed in 32 patients with malignant melanoma in order to evaluate the technique. Based on the biokinetic results, absorbed doses in tissues and organs were calculated. The function of the reticuloendothelial system has been evaluated in rats after inoculation with tumour cells. Microfiltration and photon correlation spectroscopy were found to be suitable in determining activity-size and particle size distributions, respectively. Maximal lymph node uptake following subcutaneous injection was found to correspond to a colloid particle size between 10 and 50 nm. Lymphoscintigraphy was found to be useful in the study of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumour site in patients with malignant melanoma on the trunk. Quantitative analysis of ilio-inguinal lymph node uptake in patients with malignant melanoma on the lower extremities was, however, found to be of no value for the detection of metastatic disease in lymph nodes. High absorbed doses may be received in lymph nodes (up to 1 mGy/MBq) and at the injection site (about 10 mGy/MBq). In an experimental study it was found that the relative colloid uptake in bone marrow and spleen depended on the total number of intravenously injected particles. This may considerably affect the absorbed dose in these organs. (author)

  1. Colloidal nematostatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Pergamenshchik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a review of the theory of large distance colloidal interaction via the nematic director field. The new area of nematic colloidal systems (or nematic emulsions has been guided by the analogy between the colloidal nematostatics and electrostatics. The elastic charge density representation of the colloidal nematostatics [V.M. Pergamenshchik, V.O. Uzunova, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2007, 23, 161; Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 011707] develops this analogy at the level of charge density and Coulomb interaction. The analogy is shown to lie in common mathematics based on the solutions of Laplace equation. However, the 3d colloidal nematostatics substantially differs from electrostatics both in its mathematical structure and physical implications. The elastic charge is a vector fully determined by the torque exerted upon colloid, the role of Gauss' theorem is played by conservation of the torque components. Elastic multipoles consist of two tensors (dyads. Formulas for the elastic multipoles, the Coulomb-like, dipole-dipole, and quadrupole-quadrupole pair interaction potentials are derived and illustrated by particular examples. Based on the tensorial structure, we list possible types of elastic dipoles and quadrupoles. An elastic dipole is characterized by its isotropic strength, anisotropy, chirality, and its longitudinal component. An elastic quadrupole can be uniaxial and biaxial. Relation between the multipole type and its symmetry is discussed, sketches of some types of multipoles are given. Using the mirror image method of electrostatics as a guiding idea, we develop the mirror image method in nematostatics for arbitrary director tilt at the wall. The method is applied to the charge-wall and dipole-wall interaction.

  2. Hydraulic Functions for Swelling Soils: Clay Fabric Hydration and Flow in Textural Pore Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, D.; Tuller, M.

    2001-12-01

    Changes in pore space with hydration state of swelling soils present a challenge to predictive modeling of their hydraulic properties. We developed a pore scale model considering the soil clay fabric as an assembly of idealized colloidal-size tactoids characterized by large surface area associated with the lamellar nature of clays. The arrangement of clay tactoids and the spacing between individual lamellas are functions of clay hydration state quantifiable via the disjoining pressure formalism (DLVO theory) as dominated by a large electrostatic repulsive component. Silt and sand textural components are represented by rigid spheres interspaced by clay fabric in two basic configurations of "expansive" and "reductive" unit cells. Bulk soil properties such as porosity and surface area serve as constraints for the idealized geometry. Total volumetric expansion as a function of water content was constrained by experimentally based universal relationships developed by Giraldez and Sposito. Calculations of mass-volume relationships and soil water characteristics show favorable agreement with measured values. Calculated saturated hydraulic conductivity is within an order of magnitude of experimental data. Work is underway to estimate unsaturated hydraulic conductivity.

  3. Colloidal superballs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is organized in four parts as follows. Part 1 focuses on the synthetic aspects of the colloidal model systems that will be used throughout the work described in this thesis. In Chapter 2 we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of polycrystalline hematite superballs and

  4. Colloidal polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  5. Experimental study of MS2 and ΦX174 interactions with clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngouna, V. I.; Chrysikopoulos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The transport and fate of viruses in subsurface formations are mainly governed by virus attachment onto the solid matrix and inactivation. Furthermore, virus attachment onto clay colloids is primarily controlled by electrostatic interactions between surfaces. Bacteriophage MS2 and ΦX174 were used as surrogates for human viruses in order to investigate the interaction between viruses and clay particles. The selected phyllosilicate clays were kaolinite and bentonite. Numerous reactor vessels were filled with 0.5 g of clay and 50 mL of sterile phosphate buffered at pH 7.0. A series of static and dynamic experiments for various bacteriophage concentrations were conducted at two different temperatures. Half of the reactor vessels were placed in a refrigerator at 4°C and the rest in a constant temperature room at 25°C. The dynamic batch experiments were performed with the reactor vessels attached to a small bench-top tube rotator. Appropriate adsorption isotherms were determined. Subsequently, the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory was applied in order to determine the interaction energies between the bacteriophage and clay surfaces. The electric properties of the viral surfaces were also obtained at different pH values and ionic strength levels. The experimental results show that virus adsorption increases linearly with suspended virus concentration. The observed distribution coefficient (Kd) was higher for MS2 than ΦX174. Also, the observed Kd values were higher for the dynamic than static experiments, and increased with temperature. Moreover, the results indicate that the electrostatic interactions between viruses and the clays are significantly influenced by the solution’s ionic strength and pH. At pH 7, bacteriophage-clay energy barriers were higher for MS2 than ΦX174.

  6. generalized constitutive model for stabilized quick clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QUICK CLAY. PANCRAS MUGISHAGWE BUJULU AND GUSTAV GRIMSTAD. ABSTRACT. An experimentally-based two yield surface constitutive model for cemented quick clay has been ... Clay Model, the Koiter Rule and two Mapping Rules. .... models, where a mobilization formulation is used, this is independent of q.

  7. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray ...

  8. Geographically distributed classification of surface water chemical parameters influencing fate and behavior of nanoparticles and colloid facilitated contaminant transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Julia; Gallego-Urrea, Julián A; Hassellöv, Martin

    2013-09-15

    The current production and use of nanomaterials in consumer products have increased the concern about the possibility that these enter the rivers during their entire life cycle. Further, many aquatic contaminants undergo partitioning to the ubiquitous aquatic colloids. Here is presented the development of a set of European water types for environmental risk assessment of chemicals transported as nanovectors as is the case of environmental fate of manufactured nanoparticles and colloid-bound contaminants. A compilation of river quality geochemical data with information about multi-element composition for near 800 rivers in Europe was used to perform a principal component analysis (PCA) and define 6 contrasting water classes. With the aid of geographical information system algorithms, it was possible to analyse how the different sampling locations were predominantly represented within each European water framework directive drainage basin. These water classes and their associated Debye-Hückel parameter are determining factors to evaluate the large scale fate and behaviour of nanomaterials and other colloid-transported pollutants in the European aquatic environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Moth eye-inspired anti-reflective surfaces for improved IR optical systems & visible LEDs fabricated with colloidal lithography and etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lesley W; Morse, Daniel E; Gordon, Michael J

    2018-03-16

    Near- and sub-wavelength photonic structures are used by numerous organisms (e.g., insects, cephalopods, fish, birds) to create vivid and often dynamically-tunable colors, as well as create, manipulate, or capture light for vision, communication, crypsis, photosynthesis, and defense. This review introduces the physics of moth eye (ME)-like, biomimetic nanostructures and discusses their application to reduce optical losses and improve efficiency of various optoelectronic devices, including photodetectors, photovoltaics, imagers, and light emitting diodes. Light-matter interactions at structured and heterogeneous surfaces over different length scales are discussed, as are the various methods used to create ME-inspired surfaces. Special interest is placed on a simple, scalable, and tunable method, namely colloidal lithography with plasma dry etching, to fabricate ME-inspired nanostructures in a vast suite of materials. Anti-reflective surfaces and coatings for IR devices and enhancing light extraction from visible light emitting diodes (LEDs) are highlighted. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  11. Adsorption, Desorption, Surface Diffusion, Lattice Defect Formation, and Kink Incorporation Processes of Particles on Growth Interfaces of Colloidal Crystals with Attractive Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Suzuki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Good model systems are required in order to understand crystal growth processes because, in many cases, precise incorporation processes of atoms or molecules cannot be visualized easily at the atomic or molecular level. Using a transmission-type optical microscope, we have successfully observed in situ adsorption, desorption, surface diffusion, lattice defect formation, and kink incorporation of particles on growth interfaces of colloidal crystals of polystyrene particles in aqueous sodium polyacrylate solutions. Precise surface transportation and kink incorporation processes of the particles into the colloidal crystals with attractive interactions were observed in situ at the particle level. In particular, contrary to the conventional expectations, the diffusion of particles along steps around a two-dimensional island of the growth interface was not the main route for kink incorporation. This is probably due to the number of bonds between adsorbed particles and particles in a crystal; the number exceeds the limit at which a particle easily exchanges its position to the adjacent one along the step. We also found novel desorption processes of particles from steps to terraces, attributing them to the assistance of attractive forces from additionally adsorbing particles to the particles on the steps.

  12. Effect of mechanical and chemical clay removals by hydrocyclone and dispersants on coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oats, W.J.; Ozdemir, O.; Nguyen, A.V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2010-04-15

    Fine minerals, mostly clays, are known to have a detrimental effect on coal flotation. This paper focuses on the effect of mechanical and chemical removals of fine minerals by hydrocyclone and dispersants on coal flotation. The experimental results showed that the flotation recovery slightly increased from medium acidic to medium alkaline ranges. The flotation experiments carried out with dispersants at different dosages showed that the dispersants did not enhance the flotation recovery significantly. However, the removal of the fine fraction from the feed using a hydrocyclone significantly increased the flotation recovery. The bubble-particle attachment tests also indicated that the attachment time between an air bubble and the coal particles increased in the presence of clay particles. These attachment time results clearly showed that the clay particles adversely affected the flotation of coal particles by covering the coal surfaces which reduced the efficiency of bubble-coal attachment. An analysis based on the colloid stability theory showed that the clay coating was governed by the van der Waals attraction and that the double-layer interaction played a secondary role. It was also concluded that the best way to increase the flotation recovery in the presence of clays was to remove these fine minerals by mechanical means such as hydrocylones.

  13. The colloid investigations conducted at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory during 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksoharju, Marcus [Geopoint AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry] (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    In 2000, SKB decided to initiate an international colloid project at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The objectives of the colloid project are to: (i) study the role of bentonite as a colloid source, (ii) verify the background colloid concentration at Aespoe HRL and, (iii) investigate the potential for colloid formation/transport in natural groundwater concentrations. The experimental concepts for the colloid project are: laboratory experiments with bentonite, background field measurements of natural colloids, borehole specific bentonite colloid stability experiments and a fracture specific transport experiment. The activities concerning the laboratory experiments and background field measurements are described in this work; the other activities are ongoing or planned. The following conclusions were made: The bentonite colloid stability is strongly dependent on the groundwater ionic strength. Natural colloids are organic degradation products such as humic and fulvic acids, inorganic colloids (clay, calcite, iron hydroxide) and microbes. Microbes form few but large particles and their concentration increase with increasing organic carbon concentrations. The small organic colloids are present in very low concentrations in deep granitic groundwater. The concentrations can be rather high in shallow waters. The colloid concentration decreases with depth and salinity, since colloids are less stable in saline waters. The colloid content at Aespoe is less than 300 ppb. The colloid content at repository level is less than 50 ppb. The groundwater variability obtained in the boreholes reflects well the natural groundwater variability along the whole HRL tunnel.

  14. Colloid-Mediated Transport of PPCPs through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xijuan; Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter the soil through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land application. Colloids, such as clays that are present in soil, may interact with PPCPs to affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses how soil colloids mediate the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. The affinities of PPCPs for colloids as well as the influence factors were investigated. For PPCPs that have high sorption (e.g., ciprofloxacin with Kd ˜104-5 L/kg) on soil colloids, the transport is dominantly controlled by colloids, with a higher extent of colloid-facilitated effect at lower ionic strength. For PPCPs that have intermediate sorption (e.g., tetracycline with Kd ˜103-4 L/kg) on soil colloids, the mobility of dissolved and colloid-bound PPCPs respond oppositely to the effect of changes in solution ionic strength, making the net effect of soil colloids on PPCP transport variable with soil solution chemistry. For PPCPs with low sorption (e.g., ibuprofen with Kd ˜102-3 L/kg) on soil colloids, other measures (such as pre-filtration) must be taken. This study suggested that colloids are significant carriers of PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  15. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    should be analyzed for colloid size and concentration shortly after they have been collected. A prolonged waiting period after sampling will affect the colloid size distribution as well as colloid concentration resulting from the changes of water chemical properties. The data also shows that sample containers, filter materials, and labware that are used for colloid analyses should be cleaned by specially treated low-colloid-containing water. Water used for sample dilution should be verified for total colloidal particle concentration. They then analyzed freshly collected groundwater from NTS wells ER-20-5{number_sign}1 and {number_sign}3. Results show that these groundwater samples have similar colloid concentrations and particle size distributions. For the particle size range between 50- and 200-nm, about ten trillion (1E10) colloidal particles per liter are present in these water samples. Most of these colloidal particles are less than 100 mm in size. For example, more than 98% of the colloids are smaller than 100 nm in size in the ER-20-5 {number_sign}1 sample. Furthermore, it was found that the smaller the sizes of colloid, the higher the colloid concentration present in the water. For another site at NTS, Cheshire, they had analyzed two zones of groundwater samples. For water samples collected from the lower water zone (near the underground detonation cavity about 3,700 feet of slanted depth from the surface), the colloid concentration was about 5E12 particles per liter. About 20 times less than the lower zone of total colloids was found in water samples collected from the upper aquifer (around 2,511 feet of slanted depth), although colloid size distributions from these two zones appear to be rather similar.

  16. Liquid crystal boojum-colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasinkevych, M; Silvestre, N M; Telo da Gama, M M

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal particles dispersed in a liquid crystal (LC) lead to distortions of the director field. The distortions are responsible for long-range effective colloidal interactions whose asymptotic behaviour is well understood. The short-distance behaviour depends on the structure and dynamics of the topological defects nucleated near the colloidal particles and a full nonlinear theory is required to describe it. Spherical colloidal particles with strong planar degenerate anchoring nucleate a pair of antipodal surface topological defects, known as boojums. We use the Landau-de Gennes theory to resolve the mesoscopic structure of the boojum cores and to determine the pairwise colloidal interactions. We compare the results in three (3D) and two (2D) spatial dimensions for spherical and disc-like colloidal particles, respectively. The corresponding free energy functionals are minimized numerically using finite elements with adaptive meshes. Boojums are always point-like in 2D, but acquire a rather complex structure in 3D, which depends on the combination of the anchoring potential, the radius of the colloid, the temperature and the LC elastic anisotropy. We identify three types of defect cores in 3D that we call single, double and split-core boojums, and investigate the associated structural transitions. The split-core structure is favoured by low temperatures, strong anchoring and small twist to splay or bend ratios. For sufficiently strong anchoring potentials characterized by a well-defined uniaxial minimum, the split-core boojums are the only stable configuration. In the presence of two colloidal particles, we observe substantial re-arrangements of the inner defects in both 3D and 2D. These re-arrangements lead to qualitative changes in the force-distance profile when compared to the asymptotic quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. In line with the experimental results, the presence of the defects prevents coalescence of the colloidal particles in 2D, but not in 3D

  17. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    OpenAIRE

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Fossum, Jon Otto

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-fieldassisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a...

  18. Early Jurassic clay authigenesis in the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge province; infiltration of surface-derived fluids during Pangean rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, E. A.; van der Pluijm, B.; Vennemann, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    The eastern margin of North America has a protracted and intricate tectonic history. The terminal collision of Gondwana and Laurentia in the late Paleozoic formed the Appalachian mountain belt, a trans-continental orogen that persisted for almost 100 million years until Mesozoic break-up of the supercontinent Pangea. A host of studies have targeted the evolution and migration of fluids through Appalachian crust in an effort to understand how fluid promotes mass and heat redistribution, and mediates crustal deformation, particularly during the assembly of Pangea. Folded clay units from the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge province were sampled for stable and radiogenic isotope analysis. Separation of samples into different grain-size fractions characterizes detrital (host) and authigenic (neomineralized) clays. Stable H-isotope compositions reveal a systematic pattern with varying proportions of illite polytypes—the finer, younger fraction is D-depleted compared to the coarser, primarily detrital fraction. For each individual location, the H-isotopic composition of the fluid from which the authigenic population was grown is calculated. δDVSMOW of these fluids has a range from -77 to -52 ± 2 ‰, consistent with a surface-derived fluid source. The notably negative values for several samples indicates a meteoric composition of moderate to high elevation origin, suggesting that they are not connate waters, but instead preserve infiltration of fluids due to fracture-induced permeability. Key to this interpretation is 40Ar/39Ar-dating of a subset of these samples that reveals a post-orogenic age for authigenic clay mineralization in the Early Jurassic ( 180 Ma). These ages are evidence that surface fluid infiltration was unrelated to the Appalachian orogeny, but coeval with (upper) crustal extension from the initial break-up of Pangea and the emplacement of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province.

  19. Biogeochemical Factors Influencing the Transport and Fate of Colloids and Colloid-Associated Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    The vadose zone exhibits large spatial and temporal variability in many physical, chemical, and biological factors that strongly influence the transport and fate of colloids (e.g., microbes, nanoparticles, clays, and dissolved organic matter) and colloid-associated contaminants (e.g., heavy metals, radionuclides, pesticides, and antibiotics). This presentation highlights our research activities to better understand and predict the influence of specific biogeochemical processes on colloid and colloid-facilitated transport. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of colloid transport, retention, release, and clogging to transients in solution chemistry (e.g., ionic strength, pH, cation and anion type, and surfactants), water velocity and saturation, and preferential flow. Mathematical modeling at interface-, pore-, and continuum-scales is shown to be a critical tool to quantify the relative importance and coupling of these biogeochemical factors on colloid and contaminant transport and fate, which otherwise might be experimentally intractable. Existing gaps in knowledge and model limitations are identified.

  20. A colloid-facilitated transport model with variable colloid transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Wolfsberg, Andrew V.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Reimus, Paul W.

    2007-05-01

    Anomalous contaminant transport velocities in groundwater for species generally considered to be immobile are often attributed to the mechanism of colloid-facilitated transport. In some of the field observations attributed to colloid facilitation, an extremely small fraction of the total contaminant mass introduced to the groundwater is detected downstream. In this study, a new model of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport is proposed that explains this phenomenon as the variability of mobility of individual colloids in the population. The process of retardation via attachment and detachment of colloids on immobile surfaces is often modeled with time and space invariant parameters; here it is modeled assuming a diverse population of transport properties that account for the inherent variability of colloid size, surface charge and chemical properties, mineralogy, and the concomitant impact on colloid mobility. When the contaminant is assumed to irreversibly attach to or form colloids, the migration of the contaminant plume exhibits extremely non-Fickian behavior. The plume's center of mass travels with a velocity governed by the groundwater velocity divided by the mean colloid retardation factor. However, small quantities of contaminant attached to a few highly mobile colloids travel at velocities up to the groundwater velocity, far exceeding the velocity of the centroid of the plume. This paper introduces the colloid diversity model, presents some sensitivity calculations for an idealized case, and discusses the implications of such a model on data needs, simulation of field observations, and model scaling.

  1. Fractal nematic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  2. H51E-1535: Biogeochemical factors influencing the transport and fate of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants in the vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vadose zone exhibits large spatial and temporal variability in many physical, chemical, and biological factors that strongly influence the transport and fate of colloids (e.g., microbes, nanoparticles, clays, and dissolved organic matter) and colloid-associated contaminants (e.g., heavy metals, ...

  3. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  4. Colloidal Electrolytes and the Critical Micelle Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, L. G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods for determining the Critical Micelle Concentration of Colloidal Electrolytes; methods described are: (1) methods based on Colligative Properties, (2) methods based on the Electrical Conductivity of Colloidal Electrolytic Solutions, (3) Dye Method, (4) Dye Solubilization Method, and (5) Surface Tension Method. (BR)

  5. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions ...

  6. The impacts of pore-scale physical and chemical heterogeneities on the transport of radionuclide-carrying colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WU, Ning

    2018-04-24

    Independent of the methods of nuclear waste disposal, the degradation of packaging materials could lead to mobilization and transport of radionuclides into the geosphere. This process can be significantly accelerated due to the association of radionuclides with the backfill materials or mobile colloids in groundwater. The transport of these colloids is complicated by the inherent coupling of physical and chemical heterogeneities (e.g., pore space geometry, grain size, charge heterogeneity, and surface hydrophobicity) in natural porous media that can exist on the length scale of a few grains. In addition, natural colloids themselves are often heterogeneous in their surface properties (e.g., clay platelets possess opposite charges on the surface and along the rim). Both physical and chemical heterogeneities influence the transport and retention of radionuclides under various groundwater conditions. However, the precise mechanisms how these coupled heterogeneities influence colloidal transport are largely elusive. This knowledge gap is a major source of uncertainty in developing accurate models to represent the transport process and to predict distribution of radionuclides in the geosphere.

  7. Anisotropic Model Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kats, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The driving forces for fundamental research in colloid science are the ability to manage the material properties of colloids and to unravel the forces that play a role between colloids to be able to control and understand the processes where colloids play an important role. Therefore we are

  8. Purification technologies for colloidal nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Gee, Megan Y; Greytak, A B

    2017-01-10

    Almost all applications of colloidal nanocrystals require some type of purification or surface modification process following nanocrystal growth. Nanocrystal purification - the separation of nanocrystals from undesired solution components - can perturb the surface chemistry and thereby the physical properties of colloidal nanocrystals due to changes in solvent, solute concentrations, and exposure of the nanocrystal surface to oxidation or hydrolysis. For example, nanocrystal quantum dots frequently exhibit decreased photoluminescence brightness after precipitation from the growth solvent and subsequent redissolution. Consequently, purification is an integral part of the synthetic chemistry of colloidal nanocrystals, and the effect of purification methods must be considered in order to accurately compare and predict the behavior of otherwise similar nanocrystal samples. In this Feature Article we examine established and emerging approaches to the purification of colloidal nanoparticles from a nanocrystal surface chemistry viewpoint. Purification is generally achieved by exploiting differences in properties between the impurities and the nanoparticles. Three distinct properties are typically manipulated: polarity (relative solubility), electrophoretic mobility, and size. We discuss precipitation, extraction, electrophoretic methods, and size-based methods including ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration, diafiltration, and size-exclusion chromatography. The susceptibility of quantum dots to changes in surface chemistry, with changes in photoluminescence decay associated with surface chemical changes, extends even into the case of core/shell structures. Accordingly, the goal of a more complete description of quantum dot surface chemistry has been a driver of innovation in colloidal nanocrystal purification methods. We specifically examine the effect of purification on surface chemistry and photoluminescence in quantum dots as an example of the challenges associated with

  9. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  10. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Otto Fossum, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-field-assisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a two-dimensional surface and spinning colloidal domains on that surface. In addition, we demonstrate the size control of ‘pupil’-like openings in colloidal shells. We anticipate that electric field manipulation of colloids in leaky dielectrics can lead to new routes of colloidosome assembly and design for ‘smart armoured’ droplets.

  11. A review on colloidal systems in general and in respect of nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, Ulla

    1987-04-01

    Recently the possible importance of colloids in connection with nuclear waste disposal, especially in radionuclide migration has been emphasized. Several studies have been or are going to be initiated to investigate the occurrence of natural groundwater colloids and their properties as well as formation and properties of radiocolloids, especially pseudoradiocolloids. If colloids are found to be important, they also have to considered in the safety assessments of nuclear waste disposal. In order to do so, additional theory and equations have to be added to present codes and models. This study is a literature survey consisting first a general approach on colloidal systems and their properties. Then a review on natural groundwater colloids (clays and organs) is given following descriptions of several methods to study colloids. Lastly the role of colloids in nuclear waste disposal is discussed including especially some information about possible actinide colloids and some current research going on in this field. 96 refs

  12. The radiation chemistry of colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1976-08-01

    One of the most important problems associated with water cooled reactors is the accumulation on the pipework of radio-active deposits. These are formed from corrosion products which become activated during their passage through the reactor core. The first step of the activation process involves the deposition of the corrosion products, which are present as either colloidal or particulate matter, onto surfaces in the reactor core, i.e. within the radiation zone. A review of the literature on the effect of radiation on colloids is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the dependence of colloidal parameters such as particle size, turbidity and electrophoretic mobility on radiation dose. Most of the data available is of a qualitative nature only. Evidence is presented that colloids of iron are affected (in some cases precipitated) by radiation, and it is suggested that this process plays a part in the deposition of corrosion products in nuclear reactor cores. The bulk of the information available can be rationalized in terms of the radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions, and the interaction of the radicals produced with the atoms or molecules at the surface of the colloidal particles. This approach is very successful in explaining the variation of the mean particle size of monodisperse sulphur hydrosols with dose, for which quantitative experimental data are available. (author)

  13. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30-40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  14. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-13

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30-40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  15. Preparation and characterization compatible pellets for immobilization of colloidal sulphur nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlim, M.; Zarlaida, F.; Khaldun, I.; Dewi, R.; Jamilah, M.

    2018-03-01

    Mercury pollution in atmosphere is dominated by mercury vapour release from coal burning and gold-amalgam separation in gold mining. The initial steps in formulating a compatible mercury absorbent for mercury stabilization was fabrication of pellet supported colloidal sulphur. Sulphur is used to stabilize mercury vapour by formation of metacinnabar that has much lower toxicity. The sulphur reactivity toward mercury vapour can be enhanced by using colloidal sulphur nanoparticles immobilized on compatible pellets. Clay pellets would have heat resistance but in fact, they were less stable in aqueous solution although their stability increased with inclusion of rice husk ash and sawdust or pineapple leaf fibre in the composite. Pellets made of rice husk ash and polyvinyl acetate were stable in water at least for 24 hours. Sulphur from thiosulfate precursor that immobilized onto surface of pellet using chitosan as the stabilizer and the binding agent gave lower sulphur content compared to sulphur from other precursors (sulphur powder and sulphur-CS2). Sulphur from thiosulfate precursor was in form of colloid, has nanosize, and disperse particles on the surface of rice husk ash pellets. Sulphur immobilization methods affect on sulphur particles exposure on the pellet surface.

  16. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained “irreversibly” when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained “irreversibly” upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  17. Interpretation of colloidal dyeing of polyester fabrics pretreated with ethyl xanthogenate in terms of zeta potential and surface free energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Jiménez, M; Padilla-Weigand, R; Ontiveros-Ortega, A; Ramos-Tejada, M M; Perea-Carpio, R

    2003-09-15

    Data are presented on the adsorption of the colloidal dye Disperse Blue 3 onto polyester fabric (Dacron 54, Stile 777), the fabric being pretreated with different amounts of the surfactant potassium ethyl xanthogenate (PEX). This study has been made by means of both the evolution of the zeta potential of the fiber/dye interface and the behaviour of the surface free energy components of the above systems. The kinetics of adsorption of the process of dyeing, using 10(-4) M of PEX in the pretreatment of the fabric, shows that increasing temperature of adsorption decrease the amount of colloidal dye adsorbed onto the fabric. This fact shows that the principal mechanism involved in this adsorption process is physical in nature. The adsorption isotherms of the colloidal dye onto polyester pretreated with different amounts of PEX, shows that the adsorption of the dye is favored with the increase in the concentration of the surfactant used in the pretreatment. This fact shows that the pretreatment with PEX is a very interesting aspect of interest in textile industry. The zeta potential of the system fabric/surfactant shows that this parameter is negative (about -25 mV) for the untreated fiber and decreases in absolute value for increasing concentration of the surfactant on the fiber, the value of the zeta potential of the system being -5 mV for 10(-2) M of PEX. This behavior can be explained for the chemical reaction nucleophilic attack between the carboxyl groups of polyester, ionized at pH 8, and the thiocarbonyl group of the xanthogenate ion. On the other hand, the zeta potential of the system polyester pretreated with PEX/Disperse Blue 3 at increasing concentrations of the surfactant and the dye shows that this parameter increases its negative value strongly with increasing concentration of the surfactant used in the treatment. This can be explained for the hydrogen bonds between the hydroxy groups of the dye and the S- ions of the thiocarbonyl group of the surfactant

  18. Killer clays! Natural antibacterial clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L.B.; Holland, M.; Eberl, D.D.; Brunet, T.; De Courrsou, L. B.

    2004-01-01

    The clay chemical properties that may be important in medicine were investigated. It was found that natural clay minerals can have striking and very specific effects on microbial populations. The effects can range from potentially enhanced microbial growth to complete sterilization. This paper presents evidence that natural clay minerals can be effective antimicrobial agents.

  19. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  20. Towards true 3-dimensional BCC colloidal crystals with controlled lattice orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, N.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2009-01-01

    A fabrication method of colloidal crystals possessing the BCC crystal structure is described. BCC colloidal crystals with a thickness of up to seven colloidal layers were grown in the direction of the (100) crystal plane. Defect free colloidal crystals with a homogeneous surface coverage were

  1. Writing on Nanocrystals: Patterning Colloidal Inorganic Nanocrystal Films through Irradiation-Induced Chemical Transformations of Surface Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazon, Francisco; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2017-09-27

    In the past couple of decades, colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) and, more specifically, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as crucial materials for the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, with applications in very diverse areas such as optoelectronics and biotechnology. Films made of inorganic NCs deposited on a substrate can be patterned by e-beam lithography, altering the structure of their capping ligands and thus allowing exposed areas to remain on the substrate while non-exposed areas are redispersed in a solvent, as in a standard lift-off process. This methodology can be described as a "direct" lithography process, since the exposure is performed directly on the material of interest, in contrast with conventional lithography which uses a polymeric resist as a mask for subsequent material deposition (or etching). A few reports from the late 1990s and early 2000s used such direct lithography to fabricate electrical wires from metallic NCs. However, the poor conductivity obtained through this process hindered the widespread use of the technique. In the early 2010s, the same method was used to define fluorescent patterns on QD films, allowing for further applications in biosensing. For the past 2-3 years, direct lithography on NC films with e-beams and X-rays has gone through an important development as it has been demonstrated that it can tune further transformations on the NCs, leading to more complex patternings and opening a whole new set of possible applications. This Perspective summarizes the findings of the past 20 years on direct lithography on NC films with a focus on the latest developments on QDs from 2014 and provides different potential future outcomes of this promising technique.

  2. The colloid fraction and cation-exchange capacity in the soils of Vojvodina, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The colloidal complex of soil consists of humus and clay, the most important acidoids which are able to create the bonds between oppositely charged ions (cations through the forces strong enough to provide protection from leaching, and also weak enough to enable absorption through the plant root. This ability becomes more pronounced if the degree of dispersity is higher, i.e. if particles have smaller diameters. Total of 435 soil samples were collected from the surface horizon in 2011, for the purpose of soil fertility control in Vojvodina and prevention of its possible degradation in broader terms. This paper presents a part of study through selected representative soil samples, related to the research results of mechanical composition, basic chemical properties, and cation-exchange capacity in the most frequent types of soils in North Bačka and Banat (chernozem, fluvisol, semiglay, humoglay, solonchak, solonetz, due to the fact that soil fertility and its ecological function in environment protection largely depend on the studied properties. The average content of clay was 25.26%, ranging from 5.76 to 49.44%, the average content of humus was 3.10%, ranging between 1.02 and 4.30%, while the average value of CEC was 27.30 cmol/kg, ranging between 12.03 and 46.06 cmol/kg. Soils with higher content of clay and humus have greater cation-exchange capacity. According to the established average values of CEC in cmol/kg, the order of soil types is as follows: solonetz (40.06, semiglay (31.98, humoglay (30.98, solonchak (26.62, chernozem (22.72, and fluvisol (22.40. Research results have shown that cation-exchange capacity depends on clay fraction and humus content. Higher correlation coefficient between CEC and clay, compared to CEC and humus, indicates that clay content compared to humus content has greater effect on cation-exchange capacity.

  3. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-15

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes1, 2, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other2. Electrostatic stabilization3, 4 of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains2, 5. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  4. Influence of heteroaggregation processes between intrinsic colloids and carrier colloids on cerium(III) mobility through fractured carbonate rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2016-09-01

    Colloid facilitated transport of radionuclides has been implicated as a major transport vector for leaked nuclear waste in the subsurface. Sorption of radionuclides onto mobile carrier colloids such as bentonite and humic acid often accelerates their transport through saturated rock fractures. Here, we employ column studies to investigate the impact of intrinsic, bentonite and humic acid colloids on the transport and recovery of Ce(III) through a fractured chalk core. Ce(III) recovery where either bentonite or humic colloids were added was 7.7-26.9% Ce for all experiments. Greater Ce(III) recovery was observed when both types of carrier colloids were present (25.4-37.4%). When only bentonite colloids were present, Ce(III) appeared to be fractionated between chemical sorption to the bentonite colloid surfaces and heteroaggregation of bentonite colloids with intrinsic carbonate colloids, precipitated naturally in solution. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and colloid stability experiments reveal that in suspensions of humic acid colloids, colloid-facilitated Ce(III) migration results only from the latter attachment mechanism rather than from chemical sorption. This observed heteroaggregation of different colloid types may be an important factor to consider when predicting potential mobility of leaked radionuclides from geological repositories for spent fuel located in carbonate rocks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  6. Enhanced Transport of Colloid And Metal Cations by Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, S. K.; Ryan, J. N.; Saiers, J. E.; Laboratory experiment

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of colloid mobilization is essential to predicting the importance of colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the mobilization of colloids and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in intact soil cores. The soil cores were collected from a watershed in Tennessee, USA, where the soils are weathered from limey shale with fractured saprolite subsoils that have illite as the primary clay mineral. Each freeze-thaw cycle involved freezing the contaminated soil at -15 °C for 36 h followed by thawing at 25 °C for 24 h and infiltration of rainwater for 6 h. An 18-port grid was used to collect water sample from preferential flow paths. The amount of colloids mobilized by the freeze-thaw process was compared with the amount of colloids mobilized from a control soil-core at room temperature. The colloids mobilized during freeze-thaw were characterized using x-ray diffraction analysis. Results of current study indicated an enhanced mobilization of colloids from frozen soil compared to unfrozen soil. Colloids mobilized after five freeze-thaw cycles were two times higher than the amount of colloids mobilized from unfrozen soil. The duration of freezing had no significant impact on the amount of colloids mobilized. Results of XRD analysis indicated an increase in clay mineral and iron-containing minerals and a decrease in quartz fractions in the mobilized colloids compared to the soil from which colloids were mobilized. The soil consisted of 35.7% clay minerals, 43.3% quartz, and 1.5% iron-containing minerals including ferruginous smectite, goethite, and amphibole. In contrast, colloids mobilized from the soil by freeze-thaw cycles had 64.3% clay minerals, 21.7% quartz, and 5.5% of iron-containing minerals. The colloids mobilized in control soil had 73.7% clay minerals, 3.5% quartz, and 4.6% iron-containing minerals. The colloidal

  7. Nano-hydroxyapatite colloid suspension coated on chemically modified porous silicon by cathodic bias: a suitable surface for cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Alejandra [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Electroquimica y Energia Quimica de la Universidad de Costa Rica (CELEQ), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Gonzalez, Jerson [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Garcia-Pineres, Alfonso [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Investigacion en Biologia Celular y Molecular (CIBCM), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Montero, Mavis L. [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Electroquimica y Energia Quimica de la Universidad de Costa Rica (CELEQ), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Ciencia e Ingenieria en Materiales (CICIMA), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica)

    2011-06-15

    The properties of porous silicon make it an interesting material for biological applications. However, porous silicon is not an appropriate surface for cell growth. Surface modification is an alternative that could afford a bioactive material. In this work, we report a method to yield materials by modification of the porous silicon surface with hydroxyapatite of nanometric dimensions, produced using an electrochemical process and coated on macroporous silicon substrates by cathodic bias. The chemical nature of the calcium phosphate deposited on the substrates after the experimental process and the amount of cell growth on these surfaces were characterized. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Semi-Analysis for the Pseudo-Colloid Migration of Multi-member Decay Chains in the Fractured Porous Medium with the Flux Boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Mi Seon; Hwang, Yong Soo; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Far-field modeling of radionuclide transport is an important component of general safety assessment studies carried out within the framework of storage of high-level radioactive waste in underground repositories. After a canister failure, radionuclides are leached from the backfilling and penetrate the surrounding bedrock, the final barrier between pollutant and Man's environment. Migration by pure diffusion through a hard tock or clay barrier is a rather slow process. In Fractured porous media, all of the groundwater flow occur within the fractures because fractures have permeabilities of several orders of magnitude larger than those of the rock matrix, if the geological layers are fully saturated with water. So radionuclides dissolved in groundwater will be transported along a fracture with molecular diffusion from the fracture to the rock matrix. Molecular diffusion from the fractures into the porous matrix constitutes an attenuation mechanism that can be highly order to prepare for extreme cases, it is assumed that the pollutants arrive rapidly in a fractured zone where transport takes place at much higher velocities. The specific problem of radionuclide transport through a fractured medium has been tackled by many scientists.According to the electromagnetic interaction between the solute and the colloid, solutes are absorbed by the colloid, and then we are called the pseudo-colloid. The natural colloid can exist inside a fracture with a density of 105 particles per one liter of a liquid. When the radionuclide migrates through a fractured rock, solutes sorb on natural colloids as well as the stationary fracture wall solid surface. Due to natural colloids, whose particle size is larger than that of solutes, colloids can migrate faster than solutes. Therefore, these pseudo-colloids, which are the sorbed solute molecules on the natural colloids, can also migrate faster than the solute. Both the solute and the pseudocolloid are sorbed onto and desorbed from

  9. Liquid Crystalline Behavior and Related Properties of Colloidal Systems of Inorganic Oxide Nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Miyamoto

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic layered crystals exemplified by clay minerals can be exfoliated in solvents to form colloidal dispersions of extremely thin inorganic layers that are called nanosheets. The obtained “nanosheet colloids” form lyotropic liquid crystals because of the highly anisotropic shape of the nanosheets. This system is a rare example of liquid crystals consisting of inorganic crystalline mesogens. Nanosheet colloids of photocatalytically active semiconducting oxides can exhibit unusual photoresponses that are not observed for organic liquid crystals. This review summarizes experimental work on the phase behavior of the nanosheet colloids as well as photochemical reactions observed in the clay and semiconducting nanosheets system.

  10. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  11. Removal of colloidal particles from quartz collector surfaces as stimulated by the passage of liquid-air interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarez, CG; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Micron-sized particles adhering to collector surfaces can be detached by passing a liquid-air interface over the adhering particles. Theoretically, the efficiency of particle detachment depends on the interface velocity, the liquid surface tension, the viscosity, and the particle-substratum

  12. Histochemical evidence for the differential surface labeling, uptake, and intracellular transport of a colloidal gold-labeled insulin complex by normal human blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, G.A.; Wolken, K.W.

    1981-01-01

    A colloidal gold-labeled insulin-bovine serum albumin (GIA) reagent has been developed for the ultrastructural visualization of insulin binding sites on the cell surface and for tracing the pathway of intracellular insulin translocation. When applied to normal human blood cells, it was demonstrated by both visual inspection and quantitative analysis that the extent of surface labeling, as well as the rate and degree of internalization of the insulin complex, was directly related to cell type. Further, the pathway of insulin (GIA) transport via round vesicles and by tubulo-vesicles and saccules and its subsequent fate in the hemic cells was also related to cell variety. Monocytes followed by neutrophils bound the greatest amount of labeled insulin. The majority of lymphocytes bound and internalized little GIA, however, between 5-10% of the lymphocytes were found to bind considerable quantities of GIA. Erythrocytes rarely bound the labeled insulin complex, while platelets were noted to sequester large quantities of the GIA within their extracellular canalicular system. GIA uptake by the various types of leukocytic cells appeared to occur primarily by micropinocytosis and by the direct opening of cytoplasmic tubulo-vesicles and saccules onto the cell surface in regions directly underlying surface-bound GIA. Control procedures, viz., competitive inhibition of GIA labeling using an excess of unlabeled insulin in the incubation medium, preincubation of the GIA reagent with an antibody directed toward porcine insulin, and the incorporation of 125I-insulin into the GIA reagent, indicated the specificity and selectivity of the GIA histochemical procedure for the localization of insulin binding sites

  13. Organoclay hybrid materials as precursors of porous ZnO/silica-clay heterostructures for photocatalytic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Akkari, Marwa; Aranda, Pilar; Ben Haj Amara, Abdessalem; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ZnO/SiO2-clay heterostructures were successfully synthesized by a facile two-step process applied to two types of clays: montmorillonite layered silicate and sepiolite microfibrous clay mineral. In the first step, intermediate silica–organoclay hybrid heterostructures were prepared following a colloidal route based on the controlled hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane in the presence of the starting organoclay. Later on, pre-formed ZnO nanoparticles (NP) dispersed in 2-propanol we...

  14. Colloid Transport and Retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Book Description: Colloidal science and technology is one of the fastest growing research and technology areas. This book explores the cutting edge research in colloidal science and technology that will be usefull in almost every aspect of modern society. This book has a depth of information...... related to historical prospective, synthesis, characterization, theoretical modeling and application of unique class of colloidal materials starting from colloidal gold to coated silica colloid and platinum, titania colloids. This book is unique in its design, content, providing depth of science about...... different colloidal materials and their applications in chemistry, physics, biological, medical sciences and environment. Graduate students, academic and industrial researchers and medical professionals will discover recently developed colloidal materials and their applications in many areas of human...

  15. generalized constitutive model for stabilized quick clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimentally-based two yield surface constitutive model for cemented quick clay has been developed at NTNU, Norway, to reproduce the mechanical behavior of the stabilized quick clay in the triaxial p'-q stress space. The model takes into account the actual mechanical properties of the stabilized material, such as ...

  16. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange properties together with surface basicity making them materials of importance ...

  17. Adsorption of lecithin liposomes to acid clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Naoki; Kato, An-Na; Murase, Norio

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between lecithin liposomes and acid clay was investigated to clarify the mechanism for liposome adsorption to the clay. It was found that the multilamellar vesicular structure of the liposomes was broken as a result of primary adsorption. The acid clay particles aggregated and were eventually covered by the lecithin layer structure. In the case of kaolin, on the other hand, the liposomes were weakly adsorbed to the clay and maintained the vesicular structure. The amount of primary adsorption to the clay surface, which was estimated from the adsorption isotherm, was more for acid clay than for kaolin, and the total amount adsorbed to the acid clay was also more than to kaolin. This result can be explained by the much higher density of the negative charge on the acid clay surface than that for kaolin. The liposomes are therefore considered to be adsorbed to the acid clay mainly by the choline positive charge residing at the end of the lecithin molecule, although this is of no net charge as a whole.

  18. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  19. The Effects of Subsurface Bioremediation on Soil Structure, Colloid Formation, and Contaminant Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Liang, X.; Zhuang, J.; Radosevich, M.

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic bioremediation is widely applied to create anaerobic subsurface conditions designed to stimulate microorganisms that degrade organic contaminants and immobilize toxic metals in situ. Anaerobic conditions that accompany such techniques also promotes microbially mediated Fe(III)-oxide mineral reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) could potentially cause soil structure breakdown, formation of clay colloids, and alternation of soil surface chemical properties. These processes could then affect bioremediation and the migration of contaminants. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of anaerobic bioreduction on soil structure, hydraulic properties, colloid formation, and transport of three tracers (bromide, DFBA, and silica shelled silver nanoparticles). Columns packed with inoculated water stable soil aggregates were placed in anaerobic glovebox, and artificial groundwater media was pumped into the columns to simulate anaerobic bioreduction process for four weeks. Decent amount of soluble Fe(II) accompanied by colloids were detected in the effluent from bioreduction columns a week after initiation of bioreduction treatment, which demonstrated bioreduction of Fe(III) and formation of colloids. Transport experiments were performed in the columns before and after bioreduction process to assess the changes of hydraulic and surface chemical properties through bioreduction treatment. Earlier breakthrough of bromide and DFBA after treatment indicated alterations in flow paths (formation of preferential flow paths). Less dispersion of bromide and DFBA, and less tailing of DFBA after treatment implied breakdown of soil aggregates. Dramatically enhanced transport and early breakthrough of silica shelled silver nanoparticles after treatment supported the above conclusion of alterations in flow paths, and indicated changes of soil surface chemical properties.

  20. Characterization of Complex Colloidal Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, J. C.; Guerin, M.; Jackson, B. P.; Ranville, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Surface chemical reactions play a major role in controlling contaminant fate and transport in the subsurface environment. Recent field and laboratory evidence suggests that mobile soil and groundwater colloids may facilitate the migration of sparingly soluble groundwater contaminants. Colloidal suspensions collected in the field or generated in laboratory column experiments tend to be fairly dilute in nature and comprised of relatively small particulates (reserved for studying ideal systems to the characterization of mobile colloids. However, many of these analytical techniques, including total/selective dissolution methods, dynamic light scattering, micro-electrophoresis, streaming potential, and even scanning electron microscopy (SEM), can be biased in of larger size fractions, and therefore, extremely sensitive to sampling, storage, and fractionation artifacts. In addition, surface modifiers such as sorbed oxides or organics can alter particulate appearance, composition, and behavior when compared to synthetic analogues or mineral standards. The current presentation will discuss the limitations and inherent biases associated with a number of analytical characterization techniques that are commonly applied to the study of mobile soil and groundwater colloids, including field flow fractionation (FFF) and acoustic based methods that have only recently become available.

  1. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  2. Colloid release and clogging in porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Vanderzalm, Joanne L; Patterson, Bradley M; Harris, Brett; Prommer, Henning

    2015-10-01

    The release and retention of in-situ colloids in aquifers play an important role in the sustainable operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes. The processes of colloid release, retention, and associated permeability changes in consolidated aquifer sediments were studied by displacing native groundwater with reverse osmosis-treated (RO) water at various flow velocities. Significant amounts of colloid release occurred when: (i) the native groundwater was displaced by RO-water with a low ionic strength (IS), and (ii) the flow velocity was increased in a stepwise manner. The amount of colloid release and associated permeability reduction upon RO-water injection depended on the initial clay content of the core. The concentration of released colloids was relatively low and the permeability reduction was negligible for the core sample with a low clay content of about 1.3%. In contrast, core samples with about 6 and 7.5% clay content exhibited: (i) close to two orders of magnitude increase in effluent colloid concentration and (ii) more than 65% permeability reduction. Incremental improvement in the core permeability was achieved when the flow velocity increased, whereas a short flow interruption provided a considerable increase in the core permeability. This dependence of colloid release and permeability changes on flow velocity and colloid concentration was consistent with colloid retention and release at pore constrictions due to the mechanism of hydrodynamic bridging. A mathematical model was formulated to describe the processes of colloid release, transport, retention at pore constrictions, and subsequent permeability changes. Our experimental and modeling results indicated that only a small fraction of the in-situ colloids was released for any given change in the IS or flow velocity. Comparison of the fitted and experimentally measured effluent colloid concentrations and associated changes in the core permeability showed good agreement, indicating that the

  3. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  4. Fracture in Kaolinite clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2017-11-01

    Clay minerals are involved in many natural (landslides, river channels) and industrial processes (ceramics, cosmetics, oil recovery). They are plate shaped charged colloids and exhibit different flow properties than simpler colloids when suspended in a liquid such as thixotropy and shear-banding. kaolinite platelets are non-swelling, meaning that the stacks formed by the platelets do not have water layers, and thus the suspension does not have a sol-gel transition. However, it has been shown that kaolinite suspensions possesses a non-zero yield stress even at low concentrations, indicating that the particles arrange themselves in a structure through attractive interactions. Here, we experimentally investigate the sedimentation of kaolinite suspensions in a Hele-Shaw cell. The sedimentation of these dilute suspensions can display solid behavior like fracture, revealed in cross-polarized light, which is linked to the failure of the weakly-bonded structure (typical yield stress 10-2 Pa). By changing the interaction potential of the particles (by sonication or introducing salts), we show through these sedimentation experiments, how the fracture pattern can be avoided. Research was sponsored by the Army Research Laboratory and was accomplished under Grant Number 569074.

  5. Multi-functional biomimetic surfaces of PLA based biomaterials created by printing of functional PLA-b-PEO colloids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Knotek, P.; Yang, Y.; Zárubová, Jana; Machová, Luďka; Janoušková, Olga; Proks, Vladimír; Kučka, Jan; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František; Kubies, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, 2 (Suppl) (2016), s. 74 ISSN 2157-7552. [International Conference on Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine /5./. 12.09.2016-14.09.2016, Berlin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : biomimetic surfaces * RGD * PLA-b-PEO copolymer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (FGU-C)

  6. Surface Properties and Photocatalytic Activities of the Colloidal ZnS:Mn Nanocrystals Prepared at Various pH Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jungho; Hwang, Cheong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Water-dispersible ZnS:Mn nanocrystals (NC) were synthesized by capping the surface with mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) molecules at three different pH conditions. The obtained ZnS:Mn-MAA NC products were physically and optically characterized by corresponding spectroscopic methods. The UV-Visible absorption spectra and PL emission spectra showed broad peaks at 310 and 590 nm, respectively. The average particle sizes measured from the HR-TEM images were 5 nm, which were also supported by the Debye-Scherrer calculations using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Moreover, the surface charges and the degrees of aggregation of the ZnS:Mn-MAA NCs were determined by electrophoretic and hydrodynamic light scattering methods, indicating formation of agglomerates in water with various sizes (50–440 nm) and different surface charge values accordingly the preparation conditions of the NCs (−7.59 to −24.98 mV). Finally, the relative photocatalytic activities of the ZnS:Mn-MAA NCs were evaluated by measuring the degradation rate of methylene blue (MB) molecule in a pseudo first-order reaction condition under the UV-visible light irradiation. As a result, the ZnS:Mn-MAA NC prepared at the pH 7 showed the best photo-degradation efficiency of the MB molecule with the first-order rate constant (kobs) of 2.0 × 10−3·min−1. PMID:28347105

  7. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline [University of Puerto Rico, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [University of Florida, J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle-cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine-silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33-45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nanoparticles ranged from -50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle-cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions.

  8. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  9. Particle size distributions in waters from a karstic aquifer: from particles to colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteia, O.; Kozel, R.

    1997-12-01

    Waters from the surface hydrologic network and the spring of a karstic aquifer in Switzerland were sampled to analyse their colloidal content. The measurements were done weekly with a single particle counter and were verified by other techniques. The particle size distribution (PSD) was modelled in two portions, below and above 5 μm, using two types of equation: a power law (Pareto distribution) and an exponential law. The model results matched well with the entire PSD data set by varying the parameter values. The parameters obtained from fitting the measured PSD curves were then interpreted in relation to environmental factors. It appears that the two parts of the curves vary independently. The first part of the PSD curve, relating to the smallest particles, is dependent on the pH value of the spring or the temperature of the surface brook. In contrast, the second part of the curve depends mostly on the spring discharge volume. During high flow events, the major effect of the discharge on particle size occurs during the rising limb of the hydrograph, interpreted as clays deposited in the aquifer and resuspended due to high water velocity. The contrasted behaviour of the two parts of the PSD curves suggested that the break point in the curves represents the limit between colloidal and particulate behaviour. Knowing these dependencies, and the characteristics of the particulate matter, allowed the estimation of the role of the colloids in contaminant transport. Large fluxes of suspended matter, specific to karstic aquifers, demonstrate the critical role of colloids in contaminant transport, which is markedly different from what typically occurs in porous media.

  10. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  11. Control of mesogen configuration in colloids of liquid crystalline polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haseloh, S.; van der Schoot, P. P. A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102140618; Zentel, R.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a method to chemically predetermine the surface anchoring of mesogens in liquid crystalline colloids formed by different types of dispersion polymerization, and hence to achieve control over the mesogen configuration in such colloids. The surface anchoring is controlled by the chemical

  12. The Immobilization of a Transfer Hydrogenation Catalyst on Colloidal Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338806008; Schild, Dirk Jan; Kegel, Willem K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113729464; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/166032646

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report a new synthetic procedure to immobilize a transfer hydrogenation catalyst on the surface of colloidal polystyrene particles. Using supports of colloidal dimensions allows for combining a relatively high surface area for catalyst binding, mobility of the catalyst, and facile

  13. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  14. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-06-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N‧-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH 7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  15. Improved yield of high molecular weight DNA coincides with increased microbial diversity access from iron oxide cemented sub-surface clay environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Despite over three decades of progress, extraction of high molecular weight (HMW DNA from high clay soils or iron oxide cemented clay has remained challenging. HMW DNA is desirable for next generation sequencing as it yields the most comprehensive coverage. Several DNA extraction procedures were compared from samples that exhibit strong nucleic acid adsorption. pH manipulation or use of alternative ion solutions offered no improvement in nucleic acid recovery. Lysis by liquid N2 grinding in concentrated guanidine followed by concentrated sodium phosphate extraction supported HMW DNA recovery from clays high in iron oxides. DNA recovered using 1 M sodium phosphate buffer (PB as a competitive desorptive wash was 15.22±2.33 µg DNA/g clay, with most DNA consisting of >20 Kb fragments, compared to 2.46±0.25 µg DNA/g clay with the Powerlyzer system (MoBio. Increasing PB concentration in the lysis reagent coincided with increasing DNA fragment length during initial extraction. Rarefaction plots of 16S rRNA (V1-V3 region pyrosequencing from A-horizon and clay soils showed an ∼80% and ∼400% larger accessed diversity compared to the Powerlyzer soil DNA system, respectively. The observed diversity from the Firmicutes showed the strongest increase with >3-fold more operational taxonomic units (OTU recovered.

  16. Improved Yield of High Molecular Weight DNA Coincides with Increased Microbial Diversity Access from Iron Oxide Cemented Sub-Surface Clay Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A.; Robeson, Michael S.; Shakya, Migun; Moberly, James G.; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Gu, Baohua; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite over three decades of progress, extraction of high molecular weight (HMW) DNA from high clay soils or iron oxide cemented clay has remained challenging. HMW DNA is desirable for next generation sequencing as it yields the most comprehensive coverage. Several DNA extraction procedures were compared from samples that exhibit strong nucleic acid adsorption. pH manipulation or use of alternative ion solutions offered no improvement in nucleic acid recovery. Lysis by liquid N2 grinding in concentrated guanidine followed by concentrated sodium phosphate extraction supported HMW DNA recovery from clays high in iron oxides. DNA recovered using 1 M sodium phosphate buffer (PB) as a competitive desorptive wash was 15.22±2.33 µg DNA/g clay, with most DNA consisting of >20 Kb fragments, compared to 2.46±0.25 µg DNA/g clay with the Powerlyzer system (MoBio). Increasing PB concentration in the lysis reagent coincided with increasing DNA fragment length during initial extraction. Rarefaction plots of 16S rRNA (V1–V3 region) pyrosequencing from A-horizon and clay soils showed an ∼80% and ∼400% larger accessed diversity compared to the Powerlyzer soil DNA system, respectively. The observed diversity from the Firmicutes showed the strongest increase with >3-fold more operational taxonomic units (OTU) recovered. PMID:25033199

  17. Contributions of nanoscale roughness to anomalous colloid retention and stability behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    All natural surfaces exhibit nanoscale roughness (NR) and chemical heterogeneity (CH) to some extent. Expressions were developed to determine the mean interaction energy between a colloid and a solid-water interface (SWI), as well as for colloid-colloid interactions, when both surfaces contain binar...

  18. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  19. Colloid Facilitated Transport of Plutonium in Fractured Volcanic Tuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, A. B.; Zhao, P.; Walensky, J. R.; Roberts, S. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Zavarin, M.; Ramon, E. C.

    2004-12-01

    The transport of low-solubility radionuclides in a colloidal- or colloidal bound state is frequently suspected or observed. Groundwater contaminated with radionuclides associated with underground nuclear tests was collected from several different well locations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In each case, the low-levels of plutonium detected in the groundwater were overwhelmingly (>95percent) associated with the colloidal and not the dissolved fraction of the groundwater. The colloidal fractions consisted of secondary minerals such as clays and zeolites. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the potential colloidal transport of plutonium, colloid-facilitated fracture flow laboratory experiments are being conducted. Pseudocolloids consisting of Pu(IV) sorbed to clinoptilolite were combined with a radionuclide solution cocktail consisting of Np, U, Cs, Sr, Sm and 3H and Re (analog to Tc) tracers in NTS-type synthetic groundwater (4.5mM NaHCO3-). The cocktail was injected into a smooth fracture in a volcanic tuff rock core from the NTS and the effluent analyzed. Autoradiography and secondary ion mass spectrometry will be used to understand the mineral -colloid-radionuclide interactions in the fracture volcanic tuff.

  20. Analysis of colloid transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  2. Colloid process engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Peukert, Wolfgang; Rehage, Heinz; Schuchmann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with colloidal systems in technical processes and the influence of colloidal systems by technical processes. It explores how new measurement capabilities can offer the potential for a dynamic development of scientific and engineering, and examines the origin of colloidal systems and its use for new products. The future challenges to colloidal process engineering are the development of appropriate equipment and processes for the production and obtainment of multi-phase structures and energetic interactions in market-relevant quantities. The book explores the relevant processes and for controlled production and how they can be used across all scales.

  3. Some Tests on Heather Field Moraine Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Jacobsen, Moust

    This report deals with oedometer tests on three samples of moraine clay from the Heather Field in the English part of the North Sea. The tests have been carried out in the very unelastic apparatus used in Denmark and with special test procedures differing from the ones used elsewhere. In Denmark...... Moraine Clay covers a large part of the surface, and it has therefore been investigated extensively in the field and in the laboratories during the last 25 years. It is to day - from a geotechnical point of view - the best known clay in Denmark. It could therefore be of some interest to compare...... the English North Sea moraine clays with the corresponding Danish Moraine Clays. The Danish test procedures are explained in details and some comments are given in the hope that they may not be banalities all of them....

  4. Surface speciation of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate adsorbed on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and its impact on their colloidal stability in aqueous suspension: A comparative study with orthophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Biao; Yan, Yupeng; Liu, Fan; Tan, Wenfeng; He, Jiajie; Feng, Xionghan, E-mail: fxh73@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Despite extensive research demonstrating the influence of organic matter and inorganic phosphate on the stability of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs), far less research has assessed the impact of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP), a common organic phosphate widely present in the environment. In this study, the adsorption of IHP on TiO{sub 2} NPs and its impact on their colloidal stability were investigated using batch experiments, dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and solid-state {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Inorganic orthophosphate (P{sub i}) adsorption was run for comparison. The ratio of the P{sub i}/IHP adsorption density (1.528: 0.453) at pH 5.0 suggested that IHP may complex on the TiO{sub 2} surface through three of its six phosphate groups. Zeta potential measurements, ATR-FTIR and NMR spectra indicated that IHP/P{sub i} adsorbed onto TiO{sub 2} NPs by forming inner-sphere complexes and modified the surface charge of these NPs, which exerted a great impact on their colloidal stability. Interactions between NPs measured by sedimentation and aggregation size highly depended on the pH, surface phosphorus coverage, and surface phosphorus species. The impact of IHP on the aggregation and dispersion of TiO{sub 2} NPs was significantly larger than that of P{sub i}, in agreement with the calculation from the DLVO theory. This study highlighted the impact of IHP relative to P{sub i} on the colloidal stability of TiO{sub 2} NPs in phosphorus-enriched environments. - Highlights: • IHP/P{sub i} plays a significant role in the colloidal stability of TiO{sub 2} NPs. • The effect of IHP is much greater than P{sub i}. • TiO{sub 2} surface charge is modified by the formed inner-sphere P complexes. • IHP binds on TiO{sub 2} by 3 of its 6 P groups leaving the other 3 dissociated and ionized. • Interaction between NPs depends on pH, surface P coverage, and

  5. Role of air-water interfaces in colloid transport in porous media: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Markus; Aramrak, Surachet

    2017-07-01

    Air-water interfaces play an important role in unsaturated porous media, giving rise to phenomena like capillarity. Less recognized and understood are interactions of colloids with the air-water interface in porous media and the implications of these interactions for fate and transport of colloids. In this review, we discuss how colloids, both suspended in the aqueous phase and attached at pore walls, interact with air-water interfaces in porous media. We discuss the theory of colloid/air-water interface interactions, based on the different forces acting between colloids and the air-water interface (DLVO, hydrophobic, capillary forces) and based on thermodynamic considerations (Gibbs free energy). Subsurface colloids are usually electrostatically repelled from the air-water interface because most subsurface colloids and the air-water are negatively charged. However, hydrophobic interactions can lead to attraction to the air-water interface. When colloids are at the air-water interface, capillary forces are usually dominant over other forces. Moving air-water interfaces are effective in mobilizing and transporting colloids from surfaces. Thermodynamic considerations show that, for a colloid, the air-water interface is the favored state as compared with the suspension phase, except for hydrophilic colloids in the nanometer size range. Experimental evidence indicates that colloid mobilization in soils often occurs through macropores, although matrix transport is also prevalent in absence of macropores. Moving air-water interfaces, e.g., occurring during infiltration, imbibition, or drainage, have been shown to scour colloids from surfaces and translocate colloids. Colloids can also be pinned to surfaces by thin water films and capillary menisci at the air-water-solid interface line, causing colloid retention and immobilization. Air-water interfaces thus can both mobilize or immobilize colloids in porous media, depending on hydrodynamics and colloid and surface

  6. Linear Optical Properties of Gold Colloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin XIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold colloid was prepared by reducing HAuCl4·4H2O with Na3C6H5O7·2H2O. The morphology, size of gold nanoparticles and the optical property of colloid were characterized by transmission electron microscope and UV-Vis spectrophotometer, respectively. It shows that the gold nanoparticles are in the shape of spheres with diameters less than 8 nm, and the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak is located at about 438 nm. As the volume fraction of gold particles increases, the intensity of absorption peak strengthens. The optical property of gold colloid was analyzed by Maxwell-Garnett (MG effective medium theory in the company of Drude dispersion model. The results show that the matrix dielectric constant is a main factor, which influences the optical property of gold colloid.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.4.9558

  7. Characteristics of Natural Colloids in the Saturated Alluvium South of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, S.; Chipera, S. J.; Reimus, P. W.

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 3 years, the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) has installed several wells in the saturated alluvium south of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV. Los Alamos National Laboratory has collected groundwater samples from these wells and analyzed the waters for natural colloid concentrations, size distributions, and colloid mineralogy. These efforts are helping the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project assess the potential for colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the saturated alluvium that lies down-gradient of the potential repository. To date, colloid samples have been collected from 12 different wells at 9 different locations, including one well in which samples were collected from 4 different depth intervals screened in the alluvium. Colloid concentrations have varied over three orders of magnitude (1E6 to 1E9/mL), with the concentrations tending to be inversely correlated with divalent cation concentrations in the waters. This result is generally consistent with colloid stability theory. Colloid-facilitated transport of strongly-sorbing radionuclides could be a significant radionuclide transport mechanism at the upper end of the measured colloid concentration range. Colloid size distributions (between 50 and 1000 nm diameter) varied somewhat from location to location, but they consistently tended to be skewed toward the lower end of the size range, with the mode of the distributions occurring at less than 100 nm diameter. Using a field filtration apparatus, a sufficiently large mass of colloids was collected at one location that the mineralogy of the colloids could be analyzed by XRD. The colloids consisted of 95 percent smectite clay and 4 percent zeolite, both of which tend to have relatively high sorption capacities for sorbing radionuclides. Transmission electron micrographs of the colloids indicated that they had a predominantly crystalline morphology. Future plans include

  8. Feasibility of Plasma Treated Clay in Clay/Polymer Nanocomposites Powders for use Laser Sintering (LS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansoori, Alaa; Seabright, Ryan; Majewski, C.; Rodenburg, C.

    2017-05-01

    The addition of small quantities of nano-clay to nylon is known to improve mechanical properties of the resulting nano-composite. However, achieving a uniform dispersion and distribution of the clay within the base polymer can prove difficult. A demonstration of the fabrication and characterization of plasma-treated organoclay/Nylon12 nanocomposite was carried out with the aim of achieving better dispersion of clay platelets on the Nylon12 particle surface. Air-plasma etching was used to enhance the compatibility between clays and polymers to ensure a uniform clay dispersion in composite powders. Downward heat sintering (DHS) in a hot press is used to process neat and composite powders into tensile and XRD specimens. Morphological studies using Low Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) were undertaken to characterize the fracture surfaces and clay dispersion in powders and final composite specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) testing performed that the etched clay (EC) is more stable than the nonetched clay (NEC), even at higher temperatures. The influence of the clay ratio and the clay plasma treatment process on the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites was studied by tensile testing. The composite fabricated from (3% EC/N12) powder showed ~19 % improvement in elastic modulus while the composite made from (3% NEC/N12) powder was improved by only 14%). Most notably however is that the variation between tests is strongly reduced when etch clay is used in the composite. We attribute this to a more uniform distribution and better dispersion of the plasma treated clay within polymer powders and ultimately the composite.

  9. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  10. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO 2 geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  11. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The meeting covers all topics concerning natural argillaceous geological barriers and the clay material based engineered barrier systems, investigated by means of: laboratory experiments on clay samples (new analytical developments), in situ experiments in underground research laboratories, mock-up demonstrations, natural analogues, as well as numerical modelling and global integration approaches (including up-scaling processes and treatment of uncertainties). The works presented deal with: examples of broad research programs (national or international) on the role of natural and artificial clay barriers for radionuclide confinement; clay-based repository concepts: repository designs, including technological and safety issues related to the use of clay for nuclear waste confinement; geology and clay characterisation: mineralogy, sedimentology, paleo-environment, diagenesis, dating techniques, discontinuities in rock clay, fracturing, self sealing processes, role of organic matter and microbiological processes; geochemistry: pore water geochemistry, clay thermodynamics, chemical retention, geochemical modelling, advanced isotopic geochemistry; mass transfer: water status and hydraulic properties in low permeability media, pore space geometry, water, solute and gas transfer processes, colloid mediated transport, large scale movements, long-term diffusion; alteration processes: oxidation effects, hydration-dehydration processes, response to thermal stress, iron-clay interactions, alkaline perturbation; geomechanics: thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of clay, rheological models, EDZ characterisation and evolution, coupled behaviour and models (HM, THM, THMC). A particular interest is given to potential contributions coming from fields of activities other than radioactive waste management, which take advantage of the confinement properties of the clay barrier (oil and gas industries, gas geological storage, CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, chemical waste isolation

  12. XPS and contact angle study of cotton surface oxidation by catalytic bleaching, Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 296

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topalovic, T.; Nierstrasz, Vincent; Bautista, J.; Bautista, Lorenzo; Jocic, Dragan; Jocic, D.; Navarro, Antonio; Warmoeskerken, Marinus

    2007-01-01

    Surface chemistry and wetting properties of cotton fibres as affected by catalytic bleaching have been investigated. Two types of cotton fabric have been analysed: the regular and a model cotton fabric. In the regular – double scoured cotton fabric, cellulose was contaminated with both non-removable

  13. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-04-24

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site.

  14. Zero-tension lysimeters: An improved design to monitor colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in the vadose zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.L.; Scharf, R.L.; Shang, C.

    1995-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that mobile colloids facilitate the long-distance transport of contaminants. The mobility of fine particles and macromolecules has been linked to the movement of actinides, organic contaminants, and heavy metals through soil. Direct evidence for colloid mobility includes the presence of humic materials in deep aquifers as well as coatings of accumulated clay, organic matter, or sesquioxides on particle or aggregate surfaces in subsoil horizons of many soils. The potential for colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants from hazardous-waste sites requires adequate monitoring before, during, and after in-situ remediation treatments. Zero-tension lysimeters (ZTLs) are especially appropriate for sampling water as it moves through saturated soil, although some unsaturated flow events may be sampled as well. Because no ceramic barrier or fiberglass wick is involved to maintain tension on the water (as is the case with other lysimeters), particles suspended in the water as well as dissolved species may be sampled with ZTLs. In this report, a ZTL design is proposed that is more suitable for monitoring colloid-facilitated contaminant migration. The improved design consists of a cylinder made of polycarbonate or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) that is placed below undisturbed soil material. In many soils, a hydraulically powered tube may be used to extract an undisturbed core of soil before placement of the lysimeter. In those cases, the design has significant advantages over conventional designs with respect to simplicity and speed of installation. Therefore, it will allow colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants to be monitored at more locations at a given site

  15. Clay and oxide destabilization induced by mixed alum/macromolecular flocculation aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefferkorn, E

    2006-06-30

    The review points out typical differences and analogies of the bulk characteristics of aluminum ion complexed polyelectrolytes and of their adsorption behaviors when such systems were supplied to inorganic colloids such as oxides and clays. It reports some particular investigations that were carried out in aqueous media to determine (i) the nature of the interactions existing between clay or oxides, aluminum ions and polyelectrolytes and (ii) the effects on the interfacial characteristics and the colloid stability related to the relative concentrations of these different constituents. The investigations concerned the synthetic alumina/polyacrylic acid systems and the natural kaolinite/humic acid systems, as well as partly the mixed alumina/humic acid systems. Different adsorption features and destabilization kinetics were determined to develop within these systems. One of the main constraints of the investigation arose from the presence of three interacting components which developed amphoteric and amphipatic interactions, the latter being generated by the hydrophobic moieties induced by the aluminum ions/carboxylic acid groups ion-pairing. The investigations concerned the extent and the rate of transfer of hydrogen, aluminum ions and polyelectrolytes from the bulk solution to the solid surface. Electrical surface charge characteristics were expressed in terms of the zeta potential of the colloid/polymer complexes. The colloid stability of the systems was determined as a function of time at short and long terms. The variation as a function of time of the number and weight average masses was correlated with the variation with time of the zeta potential. All these systems were determined to reach the kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium only slowly. Despite the fact that the supply of mixed coagulants provoked the initial aggregation and the subsequent fragmentation processes for both systems, the mechanisms responsible for the two processes were found to be

  16. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  17. Effect of concentration and pH on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering of captopril on nano-colloidal silver surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junxiang; Gu, Huaimin; Liu, Fangfang; Dong, Xiao; Xie, Min; Hu, Yongjun

    2011-07-01

    In this report, Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of captopril are studied in detail. Herein, the Raman bands are assigned by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations and potential energy distributions (PED) based on internal coordinates of the molecule, which are found to be in good agree with the experimental values. Furthermore, the concentration and pH dependence of the SERS intensity of the molecule is discussed. By analyzing the intensities variation of SERS bands of the different concentrations of captopril solution, it can be concluded that the molecules orientation adsorbed on the silver nanoparticles surface change with the change of the concentrations. The variation of SERS spectra of captopril with the change of pH suggests that the interaction among the adsorbates with Ag cluster depend on the protonated state of the adsorbate and the aggregation of silver nanoparticles.

  18. Morphological deformation during evaporation induced assembly of mixed colloidal suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, D.; Melo, J. S.; Bahadur, J.; Mazumder, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; D'Souza, S. F.

    2010-12-01

    Sphere to deformed doughnut type transformation of colloidal droplets during evaporation induced assembly of colloidal silica and E. coli was observed. Distortion modulations get amplified with increase in volume fraction of anisotropic soft colloidal component. Reduction in elastic constants of formed shell, at the boundary of a drying droplet, and the anisotropic nature of bacterial component facilitate the deformation process. The charge modification of E. coli surface by Poly cationic Polytheleneimine ceases the morphological transformation and results spherical assembled grains. Hierarchical structures of these assembled colloidal grains have been probed using electron microscopy and small- angle neutron scattering techniques.

  19. Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor

  20. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  1. Nanomechanical properties of polymer brushes by colloidal AFM probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutnyanszky, E.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of end grafted polymer layers were studied by AFM based, colloidal probe compression measurements. Zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) brush was grafted from planar Si surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA) brush was grown on colloidal probe by

  2. Optical properties of spherical and oblate spheroidal gold shell colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninkhof, J.J.; Moroz, A.; van Blaaderen, A.; Polman, A.

    2008-01-01

    The surface plasmon modes of spherical and oblate spheroidal core−shell colloids composed of a 312 nm diameter silica core and a 20 nm thick Au shell are investigated. Large arrays of uniaxially aligned core−shell colloids with size aspect ratios ranging from 1.0 to 1.7 are fabricated using a novel

  3. Adsorption of dyes using different types of clay: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemo, Aderonke Ajibola; Adeoye, Idowu Olatunbosun; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-05-01

    Increasing amount of dyes in the ecosystem particularly in wastewater has propelled the search for more efficient low-cost adsorbents. The effective use of the sorption properties (high surface area and surface chemistry, lack of toxicity and potential for ion exchange) of different clays as adsorbents for the removal of different type of dyes (basic, acidic, reactive) from water and wastewater as potential alternatives to activated carbons has recently received widespread attention because of the environmental-friendly nature of clay materials. Insights into the efficiencies of raw and modified/activated clay adsorbents and ways of improving their efficiencies to obtain better results are discussed. Acid-modified clay resulted in higher rate of dye adsorption and an increased surface area and porosity (49.05 mm2 and 53.4 %). Base-modified clay has lower adsorption capacities, while ZnCl2-modified clay had the least rate of adsorption with a surface area of 44.3 mm2 and porosity of 43.4 %. This review also explores the grey areas of the adsorption properties of the raw clays and the improved performance of activated/modified clay materials with particular reference to the effects of pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption capacities of the clays. Various challenges encountered in using clay materials are highlighted and a number of future prospects for the adsorbents are proposed.

  4. Colloidal Plasmas: Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various ...

  5. Transport of the colloid matter of riverine runoff through estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasareva, E. V.; Parfenova, A. M.; Demina, T. S.; Romanova, N. D.; Belyaev, N. A.; Romankevich, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    A procedure for separating the colloid component of natural waters is proposed. It was shown that this component is the main form of matter transfer in Ob River runoff, because the mass of colloid substance is two orders of magnitude higher than that of particulate matter in the outer part of the estuary. Simulation and field experiments revealed the influence of nature and concentration of organic matter on their ability to stabilize or flocculate clay particles with an increase in salinity, thus affecting the range of transfer of riverine runoff matter. It was shown that the interaction of humic acids and clay particles, as well as the increase in hydrophobic properties of a flocculant, improve flocculation efficiency. Criteria are proposed to recognize in the estuarine region areas of pronounced contribution of flocculation processes to sedimentation of fine particles. It is shown that the newly formed organic matter produced by biota under saline stress might be flocculants of fine particulate matter.

  6. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrou, Gnanli; Brumaud, Coralie; Habert, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  7. Clay particles as binder for earth buildings materials: a fresh look into rheology of dense clay suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landrou Gnanli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ceramic industry and in many sectors, clay minerals are widely used. In earthen construction technique, clay plays a crucial role in the processing. The purpose of this research is to understand and modify the clay properties in earth material to propose an innovative strategy to develop a castable earth-based material. To do so, we focused on the modification of clay properties at fresh state with inorganic additives. As the rheological behaviour of clays is controlled by their surface charge, the addition of phosphate anion allows discussing deep the rheology of concentrated clay suspensions. We highlighted the thixotropic and shear thickening behaviour of a dispersed kaolinite clay suspensions. Indeed, by adding sodium hexametaphosphate the workability of clay paste increases and the behaviour is stable during time after a certain shear is applied. Moreover, we stress that the aging and the shift in critical strain in clay system are due to the re-arrangement of clay suspension and a decrease of deformation during time. The understanding of both effect: thixotropy and aging are crucial for better processing of clay-based material and for self-compacting clay concrete. Yet, studies need to pursue to better understand the mechanism.

  8. Patchy particles made by colloidal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhe; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Patches on the surfaces of colloidal particles provide directional information that enables the self-assembly of the particles into higher-order structures. Although computational tools can make quantitative predictions and can generate design rules that link the patch motif of a particle to its internal microstructure and to the emergent properties of the self-assembled materials, the experimental realization of model systems of particles with surface patches (or `patchy' particles) remains a challenge. Synthetic patchy colloidal particles are often poor geometric approximations of the digital building blocks used in simulations and can only rarely be manufactured in sufficiently high yields to be routinely used as experimental model systems. Here we introduce a method, which we refer to as colloidal fusion, for fabricating functional patchy particles in a tunable and scalable manner. Using coordination dynamics and wetting forces, we engineer hybrid liquid-solid clusters that evolve into particles with a range of patchy surface morphologies on addition of a plasticizer. We are able to predict and control the evolutionary pathway by considering surface-energy minimization, leading to two main branches of product: first, spherical particles with liquid surface patches, capable of forming curable bonds with neighbouring particles to assemble robust supracolloidal structures; and second, particles with a faceted liquid compartment, which can be cured and purified to yield colloidal polyhedra. These findings outline a scalable strategy for the synthesis of patchy particles, first by designing their surface patterns by computer simulation, and then by recreating them in the laboratory with high fidelity.

  9. Modeling colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media under unfavorable attachment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A mathematical model is presented for colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media under unfavorable attachment conditions. The model accounts for colloid transport in the bulk aqueous phase and adjacent to the solid surface, and rates of colloid collision, interaction, release and imm...

  10. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  11. Colloid-templated multisectional porous polymeric fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jung Hun; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2008-10-07

    A fabrication method for porous polymeric fibers (PPFs) is reported. We show that a multisectional colloidal crystal can be assembled within a microcapillary by alternating dipping into colloidal solutions of varying size. Subsequent infiltration with curable polymer and washing with suitable solvents results in porous fibers with a cylindrical cross section. Along the length of the fiber, alternating sections of controlled length, pore size, and pore size distribution exist. These fibers present interesting materials for neural scaffolding, catalysis, and possibly photonics if produced with a high degree of crystallinity. The surface pores and bulk porosity of the fibers are characterized by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (vp-SEM). Careful analysis shows that the surface pores vary with the colloidal template diameter and polymer infiltration time.

  12. Molecular Recognition in the Colloidal World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Zheng, Xiaolong; Shillingford, Cicely; Liu, Mingzhu; Weck, Marcus

    2017-11-21

    Colloidal self-assembly is a bottom-up technique to fabricate functional nanomaterials, with paramount interest stemming from programmable assembly of smaller building blocks into dynamic crystalline domains and photonic materials. Multiple established colloidal platforms feature diverse shapes and bonding interactions, while achieving specific orientations along with short- and long-range order. A major impediment to their universal use as building blocks for predesigned architectures is the inability to precisely dictate and control particle functionalization and concomitant reversible self-assembly. Progress in colloidal self-assembly necessitates the development of strategies that endow bonding specificity and directionality within assemblies. Methodologies that emulate molecular and polymeric three-dimensional (3D) architectures feature elements of covalent bonding, while high-fidelity molecular recognition events have been installed to realize responsive reconfigurable assemblies. The emergence of anisotropic 'colloidal molecules', coupled with the ability to site-specifically decorate particle surfaces with supramolecular recognition motifs, has facilitated the formation of superstructures via directional interactions and shape recognition. In this Account, we describe supramolecular assembly routes to drive colloidal particles into precisely assembled architectures or crystalline lattices via directional noncovalent molecular interactions. The design principles are based upon the fabrication of colloidal particles bearing surface-exposed functional groups that can undergo programmable conjugation to install recognition motifs with high fidelity. Modular and versatile by design, our strategy allows for the introduction and integration of molecular recognition principles into the colloidal world. We define noncovalent molecular interactions as site-specific forces that are predictable (i.e., feature selective and controllable complementary bonding partners

  13. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  14. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  15. Spatial moment analysis of colloid facilitated radionuclide transport in a coupled fracture-matrix system

    OpenAIRE

    N. Natarajan, G. Suresh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    A numerical model is developed for studying the transport of colloid facilitated radionuclide transport in a coupled fracture-matrix system. The radionuclides and the colloids are assumed to decay, sorb on the fracture surface, as well as diffuse into the rock matrix. The sorption of the radionuclides onto the mobile and immobile colloids within the fracture is assumed to be linear. The governing equations describing the radionuclide and colloidal transport along the fracture axis and diffusi...

  16. A binomial modeling approach for upscaling colloid transport under unfavorable conditions: organic prediction of extended tailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Rasmuson, Anna; Johnson, William

    2017-04-01

    Transport of colloids in saturated porous media is significantly influenced by colloidal interactions with grain surfaces. Near-surface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag and relatively strong colloidal forces that slow their down-gradient translation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near surface fluid domain colloids may re-enter into the bulk fluid via diffusion (nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, they may immobilize (attach) via strong primary minimum interactions, or they may move along a grain-to-grain contact to the near surface fluid domain of an adjacent grain. We introduce a simple model that accounts for all possible permutations of mass transfer within a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena thereby represented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between the bulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization onto grain surfaces. Colloid movement is described by a sequence of trials in a series of unit cells, and the binomial distribution is used to calculate the probabilities of each possible sequence. Pore-scale simulations provide mechanistically-determined likelihoods and timescales associated with the above pore-scale colloid mass transfer processes, whereas the network-scale model employs pore and grain topology to determine probabilities of transfer from up-gradient bulk and near-surface fluid domains to down-gradient bulk and near-surface fluid domains. Inter-grain transport of colloids in the near surface fluid domain can cause extended tailing.

  17. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  18. Elaboration of protocol for characterization of clay as a filling material and coverage for surface repository; Elaboracao de protocolo para caracterizacao de argilas como material de recheio e de cobertura para repositorio de superficie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daisy Mary Marchezini dos

    2017-04-01

    The nuclear energy in its various applications generates wastes that must be properly treated. The Radioactive Waste Management covers operations since generation of the waste until to its storage in repository ensuring the protection of man and of environment of the possible negative impacts. The radioactive waste are segregated, treated, conditioned in suitable packaging and posteriorly are stored or disposal in repository. The “RBMN Project” is a priority project of CNEN to implementation the repository for the deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated by nuclear energy activities in Brazil, proposing a definitive solution for its storage. Engineered and natural barriers as the filling layer and coverage layer will compose the disposal system of a near surface repository, concept proposed by the “RBMN Project”. The use these barriers views to avoid or restrict the release of radionuclides present in waste for the humans beings and environment. The waterproofing barriers are composed of clays. Certainly, for the national repository, will be used those clays existing in the place where it will be implanted it. So some fundamentals tests will have to be carried for to verify the suitability of these clays as barriers. These tests were determined and realized with a reference clay, a brazilian bentonite constituted of 67.2% montmorillonite. The results were compared with national and international literature of materials with similar mineralogical features. The values found with 95% reliance were 9.73±0,35 μm for granulometric size. For the moisture content were 13,3±0,6% and for capacity of cationic exchange were , 816±9 mmol.kg{sup -1}. For the hydraulic conductivity, without the use of internal pressure, it was obtained maximum value of 59.0% saturated. In addition, during the observed period, there was no percolation in the test specimen submitted to internal pressure of 200 kPa. This result leads to the conclusion that the

  19. Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization,stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    zzuoping@lbl.gov

    2004-04-10

    Waste forms of U such as those in the United States Department of Energy's Hanford Site often contain high concentrations of Na and P. Low solubility sodium uranyl phosphates such as sodium meta-autunite have the potential to form mobile colloids that can facilitate transport of this radionuclide. In order to understand the geochemical behavior of uranyl phosphate colloids, we synthesized sodiummeta-autunite colloids, and characterized their morphology, chemical composition, structure, dehydration, and surface charge. The stability of these synthetic plate-shaped colloids was tested with respect to time and pH. The highest aggregation rate was observed at pH 3, and the rate decreases as pH increases, indicating that higher stability of colloid dispersion under neutral and alkaline pH conditions. The synthetic colloids are all negatively charged and no isoelectric points were found over a pH range of 3 to 9. The zeta-potentials of the colloids in the phosphate solution show a strong pH-dependence in the more acidic range over time, but are relatively constant in the neutral and alkaline pH range. The geochemical behavior of the synthetic colloids can be interpreted using DLVO theory. The results suggest that formation of mobile sodium meta-autunite colloids can enhance the transport of U in some contaminated sediments.

  20. Colloids or artefacts?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, M.; Vuorinen, U.; Allard, B.; Pettersson, C.; Hinkkanen, H.

    1994-01-01

    TVO (Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Finland) initiated a co-operative task with SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) to critically evaluate colloid sampling methods at the test site in Olkiluoto, SW Finland. Three different colloid sampling methods were compared when sampling at 613-618 m depth. The colloid sampling consisted of ordinary filtering (cross-flow filtering, 20-450 nm) in open air, inert filtering (cross-flow filtering, prefilter=2500 nm, separate filtration to three fractions 50,200 and 400 nm) by using N 2 and ultrafiltration (tangential filtering, prefilter=1000 nm concentration to a single fraction 2-1000 nm) using N 2 . Two samples per method were taken with an interval of three weeks. For organic determination one sample was collected. Care was taken to avoid possible known artefacts in connection with the colloid sampling. (27 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.)

  1. Liquid crystal colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together the many concepts and discoveries in liquid crystal colloids contributed over the last twenty years and scattered across numerous articles and book chapters. It provides both a historical overview of the development of the field and a clear perspective on the future applications in photonics. The book covers all phenomena observed in liquid crystal colloids with an emphasis on experimental tools and applications of topology in condensed matter, as well as practical micro-photonics applications. It includes a number of spectacular manifestations of new topological phenomena not found or difficult to observe in other systems. Starting from the early works on nematic colloids, it explains the basics of topological defects in ordered media, charge and winding, and the elastic forces between colloidal particles in nematics. Following a detailed description of experimental methods, such as optical tweezing and particle tracking, the book eases the reader into the theoretical part, which de...

  2. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A., E-mail: ferelenakq@gmail.co [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones para la Industria Quimica; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Profa. Eloisa Mano

    2009-07-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  3. HDPE/clay hybrids: the effect of clay modified with poly(diphenyl siloxanes) on thermal and rheological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monasterio, Fernanda E.; Carrera, Maria C.; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo A.; Pita, Victor J.R.R.; Dias, Marcos L.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(diphenyl siloxanes) (PDPhS) were synthesized in presence of organophilic clay in order to modify its nano structure. Two silane monomers were used: dimethoxydiphenylsilane and dichlorodiphenylsilane. The following characterizations were performed for all clays: XRD, FTIR and TGA/DTG. These siloxane-modified clays were more hydrophobic and had enhanced thermal stability. Solvent extraction was carried out in the siloxane-modified clays and the PDPhS soluble fraction analyzed according the molecular weight via GPC. The presence of free and grafted oligomers on clay surface was identified. The modified clays were added to HDPE by melt processing to obtain HDPE/clay hybrids which exhibited marked differences in the rheological behavior when compared with neat HDPE. (author)

  4. Waveguides in colloidal nanosuspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Peña, Luis A.; Salazar-Romero, Yadira; Terborg, Roland A.; Hernández-Cordero, Juan; Torres, Juan P.; Volke-Sepúlveda, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present and discuss a set of experiments based on the application of the nonlinear properties of colloidal nanosuspensions to induce waveguides with a high-power CW laser beam (wavelength 532nm) and its use for controlling an additional probe beam. The probe is a CW laser of a different wavelength (632nm), whose power is well below the critical value to induce nonlinear effects in the colloidal medium. We also discuss a technique for the characterization of the induced waveguides.

  5. Water diffusion in clays with added organic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda-Pinon, J; Mendoza-Lopez, M L; Manzano-RamIrez, A; Perez-Robles, J F; Vega-Duran, J T

    2007-01-01

    Tensoactive agents may decrease water absorption in clay products like adobes. They modify the characteristics of the surface of clay particles. Characterization of water diffusion through the pores of modified clays is important to apply appropriate surface modifiers and to improve their performance. We established a simple model for water diffusion in test samples of defined dimensions to estimate real physical parameters and their effect on water absorption. Adsorption mechanisms are examined based on experimental results. The fitting of the experimental data to the model provides a deep understanding of water adsorption in chemically modified clays. A better agreement between the model and the experimental data is achieved for complex molecules

  6. Thermally modified bentonite clay for copper removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bentonite clay coming from Pernambuco was thermally modified in order to increase its affinity and capacity in the copper removal in porous bed. The application of this procedure is justified by the low cost of clay, their abundance and affinity for various metal ions. Thermally treatment modifies the clay adsorption properties enables its use in porous bed system, with the increase in surface area and mechanical strength. The material was characterized by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and N 2 physisorption. Then tests were carried out for adsorption of copper in various experimental conditions and evaluated the mass transfer zone, useful and total adsorbed removal amounts and total copper removal percentage. The results showed that the clay treated at higher temperature showed higher copper removal. (author)

  7. Transport and Deposition of Variably Charged Soil Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anu; Kawmoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    A series of column experiments was conducted to investigate the transport and deposition of variably charged colloids in saturated porous media. Soil colloids with diameters ... Okinawa (RYS colloids) in Japan. The VAS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with a high pH dependency, whereas the RYS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with less pH dependency. The soil colloids were applied as colloidal suspensions to 10-cm-long saturated sand columns packed...... with either Narita sand (mean diameter = 0.64 mm) or Toyoura sand (mean diameter = 0.21 mm) at different flow rates, suspension concentrations, and pH conditions. Both sands exhibited a negative surface charge in the measured pH range, but the pH dependency was more pronounced for the Toyoura sand...

  8. Measurements of the streaming potential of clay soils from tropical and subtropical regions using self-made apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Yi; Li, Jiu-Yu; Liu, Yuan; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2014-09-01

    The streaming potential has been wildly used in charged parallel plates, capillaries, and porous media. However, there have been few studies involving the ζ potential of clay soils based on streaming potential measurements. A laboratory apparatus was developed in this study to measure the streaming potential (ΔE) of bulk clay soils' coupling coefficient (C) and cell resistance (R) of saturated granular soil samples. Excellent linearity of ΔE versus liquid pressure (ΔP) ensured the validity of measurements. The obtained parameters of C and R can be used to calculate the ζ potential of bulk soils. The results indicated that the ζ potentials measured by streaming potential method were significantly correlated with the ζ potentials of soil colloids determined by electrophoresis (r (2) = 0.960**). Therefore, the streaming potential method can be used to study the ζ potentials of bulk clay soils. The absolute values of the ζ potentials of four soils followed the order: Ultisol from Jiangxi > Ultisol from Anhui > Oxisol from Guangdong > Oxisol from Hainan, and this was consistent with the cation exchange capacities of these soils. The type and concentration of electrolytes affected soil ζ potentials. The ζ potential became less negative with increased electrolyte concentration. The ζ potentials were more negative in monovalent than in divalent cationic electrolyte solutions because more divalent cations were distributed in the shear plane of the diffuse layer as counter-cations on the soil surfaces than monovalent cations at the same electrolyte concentration.

  9. Elastic and viscous bond components in the adhesion of colloidal particles and fibrillated streptococci to QCM-D crystal surfaces with different hydrophobicities using Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Westen, Rebecca; Sharma, Prashant K; De Raedt, Hans; Vermue, Ijsbrand; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2017-09-27

    A quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) can measure molecular mass adsorption as well as register adhesion of colloidal particles. However, analysis of the QCM-D output to quantitatively analyze adhesion of (bio)colloids to obtain viscoelastic bond properties is still a subject of debate. Here, we analyze the QCM-D output to analyze the bond between two hydrophilic streptococcal strains 91 nm long and without fibrillar surface appendages and micron-sized hydrophobic polystyrene particles on QCM-D crystal surfaces with different hydrophobicities, using the Kelvin-Voigt model and the Maxwell model. A Poisson distribution was implemented in order to determine the possible virtues of including polydispersity when fitting model parameters to the data. The quality of the fits did not indicate whether the Kelvin-Voigt or the Maxwell model is preferable and only polydispersity in spring-constants improved the fit for polystyrene particles. The Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell models both yielded higher spring-constants for the bald streptococcus than for the fibrillated one. In both models, the drag coefficients increased for the bald streptococcus with the ratio of electron-donating over electron-accepting parameters of the crystal surface, while for the fibrillated strain the drag coefficient was similar on all crystal surfaces. Combined with the propensity of fibrillated streptococci to bind to the sensor crystal as a coupled-resonator above the crystal surface, this suggests that the drag experienced by resonator-coupled, hydrophilic particles is more influenced by the viscosity of the bulk water than by interfacial water adjacent to the crystal surface. Hydrophilic particles that lack a surface tether are mass-coupled just above the crystal surface and accordingly probe the drag due to the thin layer of interfacial water that is differently structured on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. Hydrophobic particles without a surface tether are also mass

  10. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  11. Characterisation of Fe-bearing particles and colloids in the Lena River basin, NE Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Catherine; Andersson, Per S.; Shaw, Samuel; Burke, Ian T.; Kutscher, Liselott; Murphy, Melissa J.; Maximov, Trofim; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Porcelli, Don

    2017-09-01

    Rivers are significant contributors of Fe to the ocean. However, the characteristics of chemically reactive Fe remain poorly constrained, especially in large Arctic rivers, which drain landscapes highly susceptible to climate change and carbon cycle alteration. The aim of this study was a detailed characterisation (size, mineralogy, and speciation) of riverine Fe-bearing particles (>0.22 μm) and colloids (1 kDa-0.22 μm) and their association with organic carbon (OC), in the Lena River and tributaries, which drain a catchment almost entirely underlain by permafrost. Samples from the main channel and tributaries representing watersheds that span a wide range in topography and lithology were taken after the spring flood in June 2013 and summer baseflow in July 2012. Fe-bearing particles were identified, using Transmission Electron Microscopy, as large (200 nm-1 μm) aggregates of smaller (20-30 nm) spherical colloids of chemically-reactive ferrihydrite. In contrast, there were also large (500 nm-1 μm) aggregates of clay (illite) particles and smaller (100-200 nm) iron oxide particles (dominantly hematite) that contain poorly reactive Fe. TEM imaging and Scanning Transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) indicated that the ferrihydrite is present as discrete particles within networks of amorphous particulate organic carbon (POC) and attached to the surface of primary produced organic matter and clay particles. Together, these larger particles act as the main carriers of nanoscale ferrihydrite in the Lena River basin. The chemically reactive ferrihydrite accounts for on average 70 ± 15% of the total suspended Fe in the Lena River and tributaries. These observations place important constraints on Fe and OC cycling in the Lena River catchment area and Fe-bearing particle transport to the Arctic Ocean.

  12. Actinide colloid generation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1990-05-01

    The progress made in the investigation of actinide colloid generation in groundwaters is summarized and discussed with particular examples relevant to an understanding of the migration behaviour of actinides in natural aquifer systems. The first part deals with the characterization of colloids: groundwater colloids, actinide real-colloids and actinide pseudocolloids. The second part concentrates on the generation processes and migration behaviour of actinide pseudocolloids, which are discussed with some notable experimental examples. Importance is stressed more on the chemical aspects of the actinide colloid generation in groundwater. This work is a contribution to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly, to research area: complexation and colloids. (orig.)

  13. Study on the colloids generated from testing of high-level nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.; Chaiko, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The generation of colloids in the interaction of high-level nuclear waste glasses with groundwater at 90 degrees C has been investigated. The stability of the colloidal suspensions has been characterized with respect to salt concentration, pH time, particle size, and zeta potential. The compositions and the morphology of the colloids have also been determined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From ourtest results combined with earlier ones, we conclude that the waste glass may contribute to the colloid formation by increasing ion concentration in groundwater, which causes nucleation of colloids; by releasing radionuclides that adsorb onto existing groundwater colloids; and by spalling colloidal-size fragments from the surface layer of the reacted glass. The colloids are silicon-rich particles, such as smectites and uranium silicates. When the salt concentration in the solution is high the colloidal suspensions agglomerate. However, the agglomerated particles can be resuspended if the salt concentration is lowered by dilution with groundwater. The colloids agglomerate quickly after the leachate is cooled to room temperature. Most of the colloids settle out of the solution within a few days at ambient temperature. The isoelectric point is at a pH of approximately 1.0. Between pH 1 and 10.5, the colloids are negatively charged, which suggests that they will deposit readily on, positively charged surfaces. The average particle size islargest at the isoelectric point and is smallest around pH 6

  14. Blocking effect of colloids on arsenate adsorption during co-transport through saturated sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Guo, Huaming; Lei, Mei; Wan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hanzhi; Feng, Xiaojuan; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Transport of environmental pollutants through porous media is influenced by colloids. Co-transport of As(V) and soil colloids at different pH were systematically investigated by monitoring breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated sand columns. A solute transport model was applied to characterize transport and retention sites of As(V) in saturated sand in the presence of soil colloids. A colloid transport model and the DLVO theory were used to reveal the mechanism and hypothesis of soil colloid-promoted As(V) transport in the columns. Results showed that rapid transport of soil colloids, regulated by pH and ionic strength, promoted As(V) transport by blocking As(V) adsorption onto sand, although soil colloids had low adsorption for As(V). The promoted transport was more significant at higher concentrations of soil colloids (between 25 mg L(-1) and 150 mg L(-1)) due to greater blocking effect on As(V) adsorption onto the sand surfaces. The blocking effect of colloids was explained by the decreases in both instantaneous (equilibrium) As adsorption and first-order kinetic As adsorption on the sand surface sites. The discovery of this blocking effect improves our understanding of colloid-promoted As transport in saturated porous media, which provides new insights into role of colloids, especially colloids with low As adsorption capacity, in As transport and mobilization in soil-groundwater systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Colloid-probe AFM studies of the interaction forces of proteins adsorbed on colloidal crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurvinder; Bremmell, Kristen E; Griesser, Hans J; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-04-28

    In recent years, colloid-probe AFM has been used to measure the direct interaction forces between colloidal particles of different size or surface functionality in aqueous media, as one can study different forces in symmerical systems (i.e., sphere-sphere geometry). The present study investigates the interaction between protein coatings on colloid probes and hydrophilic surfaces decorated with hexagonally close packed single particle layers that are either uncoated or coated with proteins. Controlled solvent evaporation from aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles (coated with or without lysozyme and albumin) produces single layers of close-packed colloidal crystals over large areas on a solid support. The measurements have been carried out in an aqueous medium at different salt concentrations and pH values. The results show changes in the interaction forces as the surface charge of the unmodified or modified particles, and ionic strength or pH of the solution is altered. At high ionic strength or pH, electrostatic interactions are screened, and a strong repulsive force at short separation below 5 nm dominates, suggesting structural changes in the absorbed protein layer on the particles. We also study the force of adhesion, which decreases with an increment in the salt concentration, and the interaction between two different proteins indicating a repulsive interaction on approach and adhesion on retraction.

  16. Graphical Synthesis of Colloid Transport Results on Quirk-Schofield Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, D. C.

    2008-05-01

    The degree of colloid dispersion, or conversely the degree of flocculation, is crucial for understanding colloid transport in natural porous media, since it determines whether colloids are mobile or immobile. Additionally, in porous media containing more than a few percent fines, the degree of colloid dispersion also influences the permeability, and consequently the practicality of fluid extraction or injection. Colloid dispersion is largely determined by the aqueous chemistry, specifically pH, ionic strength, and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). In the soil science literature, the effects of these three variables on colloid dispersion are commonly illustrated on Quirk-Schofield diagrams. In contrast, Quirk-Schofield diagrams appear to have been overlooked in the contaminant hydrology literature. This presentation will demonstrate the usefulness of Quirk-Schofield diagrams for presenting and interpreting a diversity of published colloid transport results, ranging from microbial pathogens to engineered nanoparticles to colloid-facilitated transport of metals. In particular, a quantitative analysis of published findings is presented using new Quirk-Schofield diagrams for kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite, three clay minerals that are common in natural porous media. Additionally, because there is a relationship between colloid dispersion and permeability, this presentation will also show how Quirk-Schofield diagrams can provide insight into permeability changes, with applications to aquifer hydraulics and reservoir damage. The common aspects of all these results will be apparent, demonstrating that Quirk-Schofield diagrams are a simple, graphical technique that can be used to synthesize findings across the diverse applications where colloids play a central role. This study also suggests a framework for consistent reporting of colloid transport results: (1) measure the effects of pH, ionic strength, and SAR on colloid dispersion; (2) report results on Quirk

  17. CTAB as a soft template for modified clay as filler in active packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajonpop Rittirong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of modified clay has been employed in many areas of engineering research. Structure of clay was mainly focused on alumino-silicate layer and its form was presented as pillar layer. It composed of many ion exchanges inside. In industry, in order to use clay with higher efficiency, modification on surface and porosity has been developed. CTAB, one of the most effective cationic surfactant, was employed to modify the surface and porosity of clay.

  18. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-12-25

    This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of k B T per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology.

  19. Colloid retention in porous media: mechanistic confirmation of wedging and retention in zones of flow stagnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W P; Li, Xiqing; Yal, Gozde

    2007-02-15

    A three-dimensional particle tracking model for colloid transport in porous media was developed that predicts colloid retention in porous media in the presence of an energy barrier via two mechanisms: (1) wedging of colloids within grain to grain contacts; (2) retention of colloids (without attachment) in flow stagnation zones. The model integrates forces experienced by colloids during transport in porous media, i.e., fluid drag, gravity, diffusion, and colloid-surface Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek interactions. The model was implemented for a fluid flow field that explicitly represented grain to grain contacts. The model utilized a variable time stepping routine to allow finer time steps in zones of rapid change in fluid velocity and colloid-surface interaction forces. Wedging was favored by colloid: collector ratios greater than about 0.005, with this threshold ratio increasing with decreasing fluid velocity. Retention in flow stagnation zones was demonstrated for colloid: collector ratios less than about 0.005, with this threshold decreasing with increasing fluid velocity. Both wedging and retention in flow stagnation zones were sensitive to colloid-surface interaction forces (energy barrier height and secondary energy minimum depth). The model provides a mechanistic basis for colloid retention in the presence of an energy barrier via processes that were recently hypothesized to explain experimental observations.

  20. Absorption characteristics of Kupravas deposit clays modified by phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruplis, A.; Mezinskis, G.; Chaghuri, M.

    1998-01-01

    Literature data suggested that clays may be used as sorbents for waste water treatment. The surface and sorption properties of minerals changes due to the influence of acid rains. The process of recession of clay properties has been modeled in laboratory by treatment of clays with mineral acids at higher temperature that in natural conditions. The present paper is devoted to the study of influence of phosphoric acid on the sorption properties of Kupravas deposit clays. Natural clay samples and samples treated with phosphoric acid were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction an differential thermal analysis (DTA) methods These methods were used also to identify the sample of Lebanese clays. X-ray diffraction analysis data show that the samples of clays from the deposit of Kuprava contain illite and kaolinite while sample of Lebanese clay contains quartz, calcite, and montmorillonite. DTA results show characteristic features of Kuprava clays described in reference with DTA of Lebanese clay clearly demonstrate the presence of large quantity of calcite

  1. Secondary and Primary Energy Minimum Interactions of Colloids in Porous Media: A Novel Binomial Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, M.; Rasmuson, J. A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2016-12-01

    Aqueous transport of colloids in porous media is significantlyaffected by interactions with grain surfaces associated with theprimary and secondary energy minimum at colloid-surface separationdistances within a few to hundreds of nanometers, respectively. Nearsurface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag andrelatively strong colloidal forces that slow their down-gradienttranslation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near surface fluiddomain colloids may re-enter into the bulk fluid via diffusion(nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, or theymay immobilize (attach) via strong primary minimum interactions.Our new model accounts for all possible permutations of mass transferwithin a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena therebyrepresented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between thebulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization. A previouslydeveloped pore-scale model provides likelihoods and time scalesassociated with the above pore-scale colloid mass transfer processes,whereas the network-scale model employs fluid flow field and graintopology to determine probabilities of transfer from up-gradient bulkand near-surface fluid domains to down-gradient bulk and near-surfacefluid domains. We used the model to make predictions of colloid fateand transport at the column scale based on independently determinedpore-scale parameterizations. The models allows separating theeffects of hydrodynamic dispersion and colloid attachment anddetachment on breakthrough elution curves.

  2. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  3. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Progress report on colloid-facilitated transport at Yucca Mountain: Yucca Mountain site characterization program milestone 3383

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Degueldre, C.; Wistrom, A.O.; Cotter, C.R.; Lemons, W.W.

    1996-06-01

    To assess colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in groundwaters at the potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, it is very important to understand the generation and stability of colloids, including naturally occurring colloids. To this end, we measured the colloid concentration in waters from Well J-13, which is on the order of 106 particles per milliliter (for particle sizes larger than 100 manometers). At this low particle loading, the sorption of radionuclides to colloids would have to be extremely high before the colloids could carry a significant amount of radionuclides from the repository to the accessible environment. We also performed aggregation experiments to evaluate the stability of silica (particle diameter: 85 nm) and clay colloids (particle diameter: 140 nm) as a function of ionic strength in a carbonate-rich synthetic groundwater. When the concentration of electrolyte is increased to induce aggregation, the aggregation is irreversible and the rate of aggregation increases with increasing electrolyte strength. We used autocorrelation photon spectroscopy to estimate the rate of particle aggregation for both types of colloids. By relating the measured aggregation rate to the Smoluchowski rate expression, we determined the stability ratio, W. Aggregation of silica particles and kaolinite clay particles decreased dramatically for an electrolyte concentration, C NaCl , below 300 mM and 200 mM, respectively

  5. Encapsulation of clay within polymer particles in a high-solids content aqueous dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Yuri; Peruzzo, Pablo J; Fernández, Mercedes; Paulis, Maria; Leiza, Jose R

    2013-08-06

    By using a two-step polymerization process, it was possible to encapsulate clay platelets within polymer particles dispersed in water. First, seed polymer particles with chemically bonded clay were obtained by batch miniemulsion polymerization. Then, the clay was buried within the particles by the addition of neat monomer in a second step. The final stable dispersions can have a solids content of up to 50 wt %. Transmission electron microscopy images clearly show the presence of clay platelets inside the polymer colloids, although they are not totally exfoliated. The obtained nanocomposites showed an increase in both the storage modulus in the rubbery state and the water resistance as the clay content increases. The approach presented here might be useful for encapsulating other high-aspect ratio nanofillers.

  6. Real-Time Fluorescence Detection in Aqueous Systems by Combined and Enhanced Photonic and Surface Effects in Patterned Hollow Sphere Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kuo; Wang, Ling; Li, Jiaqi; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Bartic, Carmen; Song, Kai; Clays, Koen

    2017-05-16

    Hollow sphere colloidal photonic crystals (HSCPCs) exhibit the ability to maintain a high refractive index contrast after infiltration of water, leading to extremely high-quality photonic band gap effects, even in an aqueous (physiological) environment. Superhydrophilic pinning centers in a superhydrophobic environment can be used to strongly confine and concentrate water-soluble analytes. We report a strategy to realize real-time ultrasensitive fluorescence detection in patterned HSCPCs based on strongly enhanced fluorescence due to the photonic band-edge effect combined with wettability differentiation in the superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic pattern. The orthogonal nature of the two strategies allows for a multiplicative effect, resulting in an increase of two orders of magnitude in fluorescence.

  7. Generalized Constitutive Model for Stabilized Quick Clay | Bujulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimentally-based two yield surface constitutive model for cemented quick clay has been developed at NTNU, Norway, to reproduce the mechanical behavior of the stabilized quick clay in the triaxial p'-q stress space. The model takes into account the actual mechanical properties of the stabilized material, such as ...

  8. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly water-dispersible anatase nanocrystals from transparent aqueous sols of titanate colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Takayuki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Ohya, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Transparent colloidal aqueous solutions of anatase nanocrystals were hydrothermally synthesized from aqueous transparent sols with tetramethylammonium titanate colloids, the surfaces of which were modified with citric acid, by structural conversion of the titanate to anatase. This modification hindered coalescence of the titanate colloids during the hydrothermal synthesis. Although the amount of citric acid adsorbed on the colloids was reduced during hydrothermal treatment, a small amount of citric acid was adsorbed on the resulting anatase nanocrystals. Moreover, the use of the titanate colloids as a precursor was compared with the use of a citrato Ti complex, tetramethylammonium citratotitanate. The hydrothermal treatment of the transparent aqueous solutions of the Ti complex yielded opaque solutions with large anatase colloids, suggesting that the titanate colloids were useful for preparing transparent anatase colloidal solutions. Because the shape and size of resulting colloids may be dependent on the size and shape of starting colloids, the use of titanate colloids as a precursor may make it easy to control size and shape of anatase colloids.

  10. The corrosion of copper in compacted clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Ryan, S.R.; Litke, C.D

    1997-12-01

    The uniform corrosion behaviour of copper has been investigated in the presence of compacted clay under simulated disposal vault conditions. The compacted clay is used to simulate the buffer material that would surround copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault. The effect of the speciation of dissolved Cu has been investigated using three synthetic groundwaters of different salinity and various dissolved [O{sub 2}]. The formation of cuprous species is favoured by low [O{sub 2}] and high [C1{sup -}], with Cu(II) species formed at high [O{sub 2}] and low [C1{sup -}]. Because the Na-bentonite clay is a cation-exchange material, positively charged Cu(II) species are found to adsorb more strongly than negatively charged CuC1{sup -} complexes. The impact of the Cu speciation on four experimental parameters is reported: the corrosion rate, the interfacial [Cu] in the clay, the [Cu] profile through the clay layer, and the Cu(l):Cu(ll) ratio in the precipitated corrosion products. In agreement with previous studies, the overall rate-controlling process is believed to be the diffusion of dissolved Cu away from the corroding surface. Adsorption acts as a driving force for corrosion by immobilizing dissolved Cu. Under the conditions used in these experiments, the diffusion of dissolved O{sub 2} to the Cu surface was not rate controlling. (author)

  11. Comparing uranyl sorption complexes on soil and reference clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Berg, J.M.; Conradson, S.D.; Morris, D.E.; McKinley, J.P.; Zachara, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Clay minerals and other components in natural soils may play a key role in limiting the mobility of uranium in the environment through the formation of sorption complexes. Reference clays are frequently used as models to study sorption processes because they have well-known chemical and physical properties, but they may differ chemically and morphologically from clays derived from natural soils. Therefore, inferences based on reference clay data have been questioned. The authors have used luminescence and x-ray absorption spectroscopies to characterize the sorption complexes of aqueous uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) species on two soil smectites from the Kenoma and Ringold formations, and compared these results to those obtained on reference smectite clays. The pH dependence of uptake suggests that the ratio of sorption on amphoteric edge sites is greater for the soil smectites than for reference clays such as Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-1). The luminescence spectra for uranyl sorbed to the soil clays are very similar to those for uranyl sorbed principally to the edge sites of SWy-1. This observation supports the solution data suggesting that adsorption to amphoteric sites is a more important mechanism for soil clays. However, the spectral data indicate that the sorption complexes on natural and reference clays are quite similar. Furthermore, as with the reference clays, the authors have found that the chemistry of the solution plays a greater role in defining the sorption complex than does the clay matrix. Thus, if differences in surface properties are adequately taken into account, the reference clays may serve as useful analogs for soil clays in investigations of metal-ion sorption

  12. Bead-Based Microfluidic Sediment Analogues: Fabrication and Colloid Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Huang, Jingwei; Xiao, Feng; Yin, Xiaolong; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Neeves, Keith B; Wu, Ning

    2016-09-13

    Mobile colloids can act as carriers for low-solubility contaminants in the environment. However, the dominant mechanism for this colloid-facilitated transport of chemicals is unclear. Therefore, we developed a bead-based microfluidic platform of sediment analogues and measured both single and population transport of model colloids. The porous medium is assembled through a bead-by-bead injection method. This approach has the versatility to build both electrostatically homogeneous and heterogeneous media at the pore scale. A T-junction at the exit also allowed for encapsulation and enumeration of colloids effluent at single particle resolution to give population dynamics. Tortuosity calculated from pore-scale trajectory analysis and its comparison with lattice Boltzmann simulations revealed that transport of colloids was influenced by the size exclusion effect. The porous media packed by positively and negatively charged beads into two layers showed distinctive colloidal particle retention and significant remobilization and re-adsorption of particles during water flushing. We demonstrated the potential of our method to fabricate porous media with surface heterogeneities at the pore scale. With both single and population dynamics measurement, our platform has the potential to connect pore-scale and macroscale colloid transport on a lab scale and to quantify the impact of grain surface heterogeneities that are natural in the subsurface environment.

  13. The use of expanded clay aggregate for the pretreatment of surface waters on the example of a tributary of Lake Klasztorne Górne in Strzelce Krajeńskie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łopata Michał

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a proposal for the treatment of river water based on expanded clay (ceramsite. It is a lightweight mineral aggregate containing components relative to phosphorus adsorption (calcium, iron, manganese, aluminum. A pilot plant on a fractional technical scale was built on a nutrient rich (phosphorus up to 0.4 mg dm−3, nitrogen up to 10.0 mg dm−3, small (mean annual flow about 0.04 m3 s−1, natural watercourse (Młynówka River, a tributary of the Otok Channel, Noteć basin, the municipality of Strzelce Krajeńskie. The monitoring included quantitative and qualitative measurements of the water stream in 2014-2015. On the basis of the examinations, the calculated effectiveness of ceramsite filters in removing major contaminants from water was: for total nitrogen 5-6%, phosphorus 12-16%, and for suspensions 17-29%. The effectiveness of the treatment is highly influenced by hydraulic load, so this type application on a full-scale should occupy a sufficiently large volume. Taking into account simplicity of performance, ease of operation and low cost of construction and maintenance, such pretreatment plants based on expanded clay would seem to be a promising tool for the protection of surface waters in catchments of small rivers and streams.

  14. Medical applications of colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Matijevic, Egon

    2008-01-01

    The first book of its type on the medical and biomedical applications of colloids, although there are some related titles on different topicsDiscusses the effects of uniform particles in drug formulations and releaseEvaluates particle transport and deposition in the human body.

  15. Binary colloidal crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christova-Zdravkova, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Binary crystals are crystals composed of two types of particles having different properties like size, mass density, charge etc. In this thesis several new approaches to make binary crystals of colloidal particles that differ in size, material and charge are reported We found a variety of crystal

  16. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  17. The Use of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites in Wastewater Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytwo, Giora

    2012-01-01

    Some agricultural effluents are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants: their pretreatment is necessary to avoid clogging of the filtering devices by colloidal matter. The colloidal stability of the effluents is mainly due to mutual repulsive forces that keep charged particles in suspension. Pretreatment processes are based on two separate stages: (a) neutralization of the charges (“coagulation”) and (b) bridging between several small particles to form larger aggregates that sink, leaving clarified effluent (“flocculation”). The consequent destabilization of the colloidal suspension lowers total suspended solids (TSSs), turbidity, and other environmental quality parameters, making the treatments that follow more efficient. Clay-based materials have been widely used for effluent pretreatment and pollutant removal. This study presents the use of nanocomposites, comprised of an anchoring particle and a polymer, as “coagoflocculants” for the efficient and rapid reduction of TSS and turbidity in wastewater with a high organic load. The use of such particles combines the advantages of coagulant and flocculant by neutralizing the charge of the suspended particles while bridging between them and anchoring them to a denser particle (the clay mineral), enhancing their precipitation. Very rapid and efficient pretreatment is achieved in one single treatment step. PMID:22454607

  18. The Use of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites in Wastewater Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giora Rytwo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Some agricultural effluents are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants: their pretreatment is necessary to avoid clogging of the filtering devices by colloidal matter. The colloidal stability of the effluents is mainly due to mutual repulsive forces that keep charged particles in suspension. Pretreatment processes are based on two separate stages: (a neutralization of the charges (“coagulation” and (b bridging between several small particles to form larger aggregates that sink, leaving clarified effluent (“flocculation”. The consequent destabilization of the colloidal suspension lowers total suspended solids (TSSs, turbidity, and other environmental quality parameters, making the treatments that follow more efficient. Clay-based materials have been widely used for effluent pretreatment and pollutant removal. This study presents the use of nanocomposites, comprised of an anchoring particle and a polymer, as “coagoflocculants” for the efficient and rapid reduction of TSS and turbidity in wastewater with a high organic load. The use of such particles combines the advantages of coagulant and flocculant by neutralizing the charge of the suspended particles while bridging between them and anchoring them to a denser particle (the clay mineral, enhancing their precipitation. Very rapid and efficient pretreatment is achieved in one single treatment step.

  19. Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrdad shokrieh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite materials have recently attracted increasing interests in the field of modelling. Finite element modelling can be used for computation of bulk properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites. In this study, by   considering the structure of a nano-composite material, a quasi real model is proposed. The model has been used to predict the elastic constants by selection of suitable elements and boundary conditions. The effects of nano-structural parameters on the mechanical properties of a polymer/clay nano-composite are studied. The geometrical overlap of particles, horizontal distance between particles, length of particles and nano-clay volume fraction are defined as functions of the nano-structural parameters and their effects on mechanical properties of nano-composites are studied by a finite element modelling technique.

  20. Nafion–clay hybrids with a network structure

    KAUST Repository

    Burgaz, Engin

    2009-05-01

    Nafion-clay hybrid membranes with a unique microstructure were synthesized using a fundamentally new approach. The new approach is based on depletion aggregation of suspended particles - a well-known phenomenon in colloids. For certain concentrations of clay and polymer, addition of Nafion solution to clay suspensions in water leads to a gel. Using Cryo-TEM we show that the clay particles in the hybrid gels form a network structure with an average cell size in the order of 500 nm. The hybrid gels are subsequently cast to produce hybrid Nafion-clay membranes. Compared to pure Nafion the swelling of the hybrid membranes in water and methanol is dramatically reduced while their selectivity (ratio of conductivity over permeability) increases. The small decrease of ionic conductivity for the hybrid membranes is more than compensated by the large decrease in methanol permeability. Lastly the hybrid membranes are much stiffer and can withstand higher temperatures compared to pure Nafion. Both of these characteristics are highly desirable for use in fuel cell applications, since a) they will allow the use of a thinner membrane circumventing problems associated with the membrane resistance and b) enable high temperature applications. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An evaporation model of colloidal suspension droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Silvana; Li\\ Nán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2009-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of polymers in water or other solvents are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry to coat tablets with different agents. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or physical appearance. The coating is performed by simultaneously spraying and drying the tablets with the colloidal suspension at moderately high temperatures. The spreading of the coating on the pills surface depends on the droplet Webber and Reynolds numbers, angle of impact, but more importantly on the rheological properties of the drop. We present a model for the evaporation of a colloidal suspension droplet in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the carrier fluid. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface, a compacting front advances into the droplet faster than the liquid surface regresses, forming a shell of a porous medium where the particles reach their maximum packing density. While the surface regresses, the evaporation rate is determined by both the rate at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and the rate at which liquid vapor is diffused away from it. This regime continues until the compacting front reaches the center of the droplet, at which point the evaporation rate is drastically reduced.

  2. Concentrations and compositions of colloidal particles in groundwater near the ICPP, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, M.; McCurry, M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of colloidal material is being investigated in groundwater near the ICPP to determine whether the concentrations and chemical compositions are suitable to have an impact on the transport of Sr-90. Colloids are proposed as a viable transport mechanism, and may have an influence on the chemical trends observed in three wells near the ICPP. Ultrafiltration of groundwater samples has been performed on difFerent intervals in USGS wells 45, 46, and Site 14, has provided filtrate samples, for analyses by ICP-MS, and filters for analyses by SEM/EDS. Preliminary results indicate that concentrations of colloids are from 2.1-0.8 ppm for the >0.45 μm size fraction, and 2.3-9.8 ppm for the <0.45 μm size fractions. Compositions consist of calcite, silicic acid, ferrihydrite, clay, and possibly dolomite. Calcium was shown to have the largest contribution from both EDS and ICP-MS. Magnesium and silicon were also found to filter out in large concentrations. Iron and aluminum are minor constituents of the colloidal mass and contain concentrations of <10ppb and <1ppb, respectively. These results indicate that if colloids are going to have a major impact on contaminant migration then the coprecipitation of Sr-90 with calcite and dolomite would have to be a sorption mechanism. Sorption onto Fe and Al colloids probably does not have a major impact because of the low concentrations. Clay colloids were noted to be relatively abundant and may also have an impact on Sr-90 migration, due to the exchange of Sr with other cations in the clay structure. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Characterization and analysis of epoxy/clay nanotubes composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sene, Tarcisio S.; Kock, Thyago; Coelho, Luiz A.F.; Becker, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    An DGEBA epoxy matrix was used aiming to achieve a nanocomposite material, through the dispersion of (CNT) via mechanical stirring followed by sonication. In this work the following characterization were performed: mechanical characterization, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of CNT and modified clays promoted the increase of modulus of the epoxy matrix, and a synergistic effect between CNT and both clays could be presumed. SEM images of the fracture surface show the difference between the fracture surface area and the presence of clusters among the samples, allowing a correlation with the modulus of elasticity. X-ray diffractograms from 2Θ = 5 deg showed no peaks for modified clay samples, however it is possible to affirm that modified clay platelets are forming a less organized structure compared to the structure of the clay as natural in epoxy. (author)

  4. Clays and Clay Minerals and their environmental application in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen; Cuéllar Antequera, Jorge; Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Solange Lozano García, Marina; Cutillas Díez, Raul

    2013-04-01

    The clay materials have led to numerous applications in the field of public health (del Hoyo, 2007; Volzone, 2007) having been demonstrated its effectiveness as adsorbents of all contaminants. Some biodegradable materials are used for for adsorption of chemical contaminants: lignins (Valderrabano et al., 2008) and also clays and clay minerals, whose colloidal properties, ease of generating structural changes, abundance in nature, and low cost make them very suitable for this kind of applications. Among the strategies used at present to preserve the quality of the water and this way to diminish the environmental risk that supposes the chemical pollution, stands out the use of adsorbents of under cost, already they are natural or modified, to immobilize these compounds and to avoid the pollution of the water with the consequent reduction of environmental and economic costs Thanks to the development of the science and the technology of the nourishment in the last 50 years, there have revealed itself several new substances that can fulfill beneficial functions in the food, and these substances, named food additives, are today within reach of all. The food additives recover a very important role in the complex nourishing supply. The additives fulfill several useful functions in the food, which often we give for sat. Nevertheless the widespread use of food additives in the food production also influences the public health. The food industries, which are very important for the economy, spill residues proved from its activity that they have to be controlled to evaluate the environmental impact and to offer the necessary information about the quantitative evaluation of the chemical risk of the use of food additives for the public health. We have studied the adsorption of several contaminants by natural or modified clays, searching their interaction mechanisms and the possible recycling of these materials for environmental purposes and prevention of the health. References

  5. Colloidal motion under the action of a thermophoretic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burelbach, Jerome; Zupkauskas, Mykolas; Lamboll, Robin; Lan, Yang; Eiser, Erika

    2017-09-07

    We present thermophoretic measurements in aqueous suspensions of three different polystyrene (PS) particles of varying negative charge, size, and surface coating. Our measurement technique is based on the observation of the colloidal steady-state distribution using conventional bright-field microscopy, which avoids undesirable effects such as laser-induced convection or local heating. We find that the colloids with the weakest zeta potential exhibit the strongest thermophoretic effect, suggesting that the Soret coefficient has a more intricate dependence on surface functionality than predicted by existing theoretical approaches. We also study the relaxation of the colloids to steady-state and propose a model to quantify the relaxation speed, based on the time evolution of the colloidal center of mass. Our observations are well described by this model and show that the relaxation speed tends to increase with the magnitude of the thermophoretic force.

  6. Bulk synthesis of polymer-inorganic colloidal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perro, Adeline; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2010-12-21

    We describe a procedure to synthesize colloidal clusters with polyhedral morphologies in high yield (liter quantities at up to 70% purity) using a combination of emulsion polymerization and inorganic surface chemistry. We show that the synthesis initially used for silica-polystyrene hybrid clusters can be generalized to create clusters from other inorganic and polymer particles. We also show that high yields of particular morphologies can be obtained by precise control of the inorganic seed particle size, a finding that can be explained using a hard-sphere packing model. These clusters can be further chemically modified for a variety of applications. Introducing a cross-linker leads to colloidal clusters that can be index matched in an appropriate solvent, allowing them to be used for particle tracking or optical studies of colloidal self-assembly. Also, depositing a thin silica layer on these colloids allows the surface properties to be controlled using silane chemistry.

  7. Unraveling the size distributions of surface properties for purple soil and yellow soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Zhu, Hualing; Tian, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Soils contain diverse colloidal particles whose properties are pertinent to ecological and human health, whereas few investigations systematically analyze the surface properties of these particles. The objective of this study was to elucidate the surface properties of particles within targeted size ranges (i.e. >10, 1-10, 0.5-1, 0.2-0.5 and soil (Entisol) and a yellow soil (Ultisol) using the combined determination method. The mineralogy of corresponding particle-size fractions was determined by X-ray diffraction. We found that up to 80% of the specific surface area and 85% of the surface charge of the entire soil came from colloidal-sized particles (soil had a larger specific surface area, stronger electrostatic field, and higher surface charge than the yellow soil due to differences in mineralogy. Likewise, the differences in surface properties among the various particle-size fractions can also be ascribed to mineralogy. Our results indicated that soil surface properties were essentially determined by the colloidal-sized particles, and the soil properties. The composition of clay minerals within the diverse particle-size fractions could fully explain the size distributions of surface properties. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Sorption of water vapour by the Na+-exchanged clay-sized fractions of some tropical soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yormah, T.B.R.; Hayes, M.H.B.

    1993-09-01

    Water vapour sorption isotherms at 299K for the Na + -exchanged clay-sized (≤ 2μm e.s.d.) fraction of two sets of samples taken at three different depths from a tropical soil profile have been studied. One set of samples was treated (with H 2 O 2 ) for the removal of much of the organic matter (OM); the other set (of the same samples) was not so treated. The isotherms obtained were all of type II and analyses by the BET method yielded values for the Specific Surface Areas (SSA) and for the average energy of adsorption of the first layer of adsorbate (E a ). OM content and SSA for the untreated samples were found to decrease with depth. Whereas removal of organic matter made negligible difference to the SSA of the top/surface soil, the same treatment produced a significant increase in the SSA of the samples taken from the middle and from the lower depths in the profile; the resulting increase was more pronounced for the subsoil. It has been deduced from these results that OM in the surface soil was less involved with the inorganic soil colloids than that in the subsoil. The increase in surface area which resulted from the removal of OM from the subsoil was most probably due to disaggregation. Values of E a obtained show that for all the samples the adsorption of water vapour became more energetic after the oxidative removal of organic matter; the resulting ΔE a also increased with depth. This suggests that in the dry state, the ''cleaned'' surface of the inorganic soil colloids was more energetic than the ''organic-matter-coater surface''. These data provide strong support for the deduction that OM in the subsoil was in a more ''combined'' state than that in the surface soil. (author). 21 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Enhanced transport of ferrihydrite colloid by chain-shaped humic acid colloid in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Guo, Huaming; Lei, Mei; Li, Yongtao; Weng, Liping; Chen, Yali; Ma, Yuling; Deng, Yingxuan; Feng, Xiaojuan; Xiu, Wei

    2018-04-15

    Both humic acid and colloid particle size effectively regulate colloid transport. However, little is known about effect of particle size and configuration of humic acid colloid (HA colloid ) on enhanced-transport of ferrihydrite colloid (FH colloid ) in porous media. Co-transport of HA colloid and FH colloid at different pH was systematically investigated by monitoring breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated sand columns. The colloid transport model and the (X)DLVO theory were used to reveal the mechanism of HA colloid -enhanced FH colloid transport in the columns. Results showed that HA colloid enhanced FH colloid transport in neutral and alkaline conditions. In neutral conditions, small HA colloid (F-HA colloid ) with chain-shaped structure enhanced FH colloid transport more prominently than pristine granular HA colloid . The chain-shaped F-HA colloid caused osmotic repulsion and elastic-steric repulsion between colloids and sand, leading to enhanced transport. However, the granular HA colloid readily occurred as deposition due to attachment and straining, which decreased the enhanced transport of FH colloid . In alkaline conditions, both HA colloid and F-HA colloid were chain-shaped, with longer chains of HA colloid than F-HA colloid . Ferrihydrite colloid transport was enhanced by HA colloid more significantly than F-HA colloid due to stronger repulsion between mixed HA colloid -FH colloid and sand. It suggested that regulation of particle size and morphology of HA colloid would enhance FH colloid transport and further help in understanding FH colloid -facilitated contaminants transport in porous media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clays as dietary supplements for swine: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mohana Devi; Kim, In Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clays are crystalline, hydrated aluminosilicate molecules composed of alkali and alkaline earth cations along with small amounts of various other elements. The best-known are montmorillonite, smectite, illite, kaolinite, biotite and clinoptilolite. The molecules in these clays are arranged in three-dimensional structures creating internal voids and channels capable of trapping a wide variety of molecules. As a result of this structure, clay minerals are regarded as a simple and effective tool for the prevention of the negative effects of many toxic compounds. Dietary supplementation with clays has been shown to improve weight gain and feed conversion in pigs. Where improvements in performance have been noted, one of the most likely explanations for the improvement is the fact clays increase nutrient digestibility. Clays reduce the speed of passage of feed along the digestive tract which allows more time for digestion. Feeding clays also causes morphological changes in the intestinal mucosa such as an increase in villus height and an increase in the villus height to crypt depth ratio. These changes increase the surface area of the gastrointestinal tract thus increasing nutrient digestibility. Several studies have indicated that feeding clay reduces the incidence, severity and duration of diarrhea in pigs. The mechanism for the reduction in diarrhea is likely due to increases in the numbers of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus and decreases in Clostridia and E. coli in the small intestine of pigs fed clays. In addition, the numbers of pigs born alive and weaned, birth weight and weaning weight have been shown to be higher for sows fed clays. Several studies have indicated that clays can help mitigate the effects of mycotoxins. The aim of the present review is to focus on the various clays which have been given attention in recent research and to discuss their potential to improve pig performance.

  11. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  12. Designing Zirconium Coated Polystyrene Colloids and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Chira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple technique has been developed to prepare core colloids that are modified using zirconium oxychloride, based on heating a solution of core colloid composites, consisting of poly (ethylenimine (PEI and zirconium oxychloride. The interaction of zirconium oxychloride with the polystyrene (PS core colloids has been investigated using Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM data. FT-IR studies confirm the occurrence of amine groups present in PEI which are oxidized to carboxyl groups after the reaction. The EDX data and the SEM images confirm the presence of zirconium particles immobilized on the polystyrene surfaces. Demeton, a highly toxic nerve agent, was used due to its ability to easily bind through its organophosphate group illustrating a practical application of the PS-PEI-Zr particles. Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR Spectroscopy was used to assess the interactions between the toxic nerve agent demeton-S and the PS-PEI-Zr particles. The results show that the presented technique for coating polystyrene core colloids with zirconium was successfully accomplished, and the newly formed particles easily bond with demeton agents through the P=O functional group.

  13. Colloidal photonic crystals: from lasing to microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clays, Koen; Zhong, Kuo; Song, Kai

    2017-08-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals are photonic crystals made by bottom-up physical chemistry strategies from monodisperse colloidal particles. The self-assembly process is automatically leading to inherently three-dimensional structures with their optical properties determined by the periodicity, induced by this ordering process, in the dielectric properties of the colloidal material. The best-known optical effect is the photonic band gap, the range of energies, or wavelengths, that is forbidden for photons to exist in the structure. This photonic band gap is similar to the electronic band gap of electronic semiconductor crystals. We have previously shown how with the proper photonic band gap engineering, we can insert allowed pass band defect modes and use the suppressing band gap in combination with the transmitting pass band to induce spectral narrowing of emission. We show now how with a high-quality narrow pass band in a broad stop band, it is possible to achieve photonic crystal lasing in self-assembled colloidal photonic crystals with a planar defect. In addition, with proper surface treatment in combination with patterning, we prepare for addressable integrated photonics. Finally, by incorporating a water in- and outlet, we can create optomicrofluidic structures on a photonic crystal allowing the optical probing of microreactors or micro-stopped-flow in the lab-on-an-optical-chip.

  14. Growth and Interaction of Colloid Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael-Angelo; Khusid, Boris; Meyer, William; Kondic, Lou

    2017-11-01

    We study evolution of colloid systems under zero-gravity conditions. In particular, we focus on the regime where there is a coexistence between a liquid and a solid state. Under zero gravity, the dominating process in the bulk of the fluid phase and the solid phase is diffusion. At the moving solid/liquid interface, osmotic pressure is balanced by surface tension, as well as balancing fluxes (conservation of mass) with the kinematics of nuclei growth (Wilson-Frenkel law). Due to the highly nonlinear boundary condition at the moving boundary, care has to be taken when performing numerical simulations. In this work, we present a nonlinear model for colloid nuclei growth. Numerical simulations using a finite volume method are compared with asymptotic analysis of the governing equation and experimental results for nuclei growth. Novel component in our numerical simulations is the inclusion of nonlinear (collective) diffusion terms that depend on the chemical potentials of the colloid in the solid and fluid phase. The results include growth and dissolution of a single colloidal nucleus, as well as evolution of multiple interacting nuclei. Supported by NASA Grant No. NNX16AQ79G.

  15. Visualization of Colloid Deposition and Mobilization During Unsteady and Steady Porewater Flow Through Unsaturated Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiers, J. E.; Gao, B.; Ryan, J. N.

    2004-12-01

    Mineral colloids that are mobilized from near-surface soils during infiltration events may carry sorptive contaminants through the vadose zone and into drinking-water aquifers. The vadose-zone flux of colloid-associated contaminants depends, in part, on the difference between colloid mobilization rates and deposition rates. Our research is aimed at improving current understanding of colloid effects on subsurface-contaminant transport by identifying the mechanisms that govern colloid mobilization and deposition in unsaturated porous media. We present pore-scale observations of the transport of fluorescent microspheres through transparent flow cells packed with a thin layer of partially saturated sand. These visualization experiments were conducted under steady-flow and transient-flow conditions. In experiments in which the air phase was discontinuous and occurred as insular air bubbles, the negatively charged microspheres accumulated at the air-bubble surface and moved freely about this air-water interface. A fraction of these colloids eventually migrated from the air-water interface to the air-water-solid interface, whereupon their motion stopped. Destruction of the air bubbles during imbibition led to the release of colloids retained previously by the air-water interface, but not to the release of colloids held at the air-water-solid interface. Colloids were also trapped upon entry into dead-end water conduits that split from the primary flow channels. The exchange of colloids and water between a dead zone and primary flow channel was slow under steady flow; however, the reconnection of dead-end zones as moisture content increased during imbibition resulted in the mobilization of large concentrations of colloids. Our findings show that multiple mechanisms govern the deposition and mobilization of colloids in unsaturated porous media and provide direction for refining mathematical models for colloid and colloid-facilitated contaminant transport within the vadose

  16. Modeling of simultaneous exchange of colloids and sorbing contaminants between streams and streambeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianhong; Packman, Aaron I

    2004-05-15

    Contaminant transport in streams can be significantly modified by both stream-subsurface exchange and the presence of colloidal particles, but the interaction of these effects is notwell understood. Exchange with the hyporheic zone exposes contaminants to surface-chemical reactions with streambed sediments, while colloidal particles have a large reactive surface area that allows them to carry pollutants that would otherwise be transported primarily as dissolved species. A new theoretical model is developed to predict the role of colloids in mediating advective contaminant exchange between streams and streambeds. Bedform-induced pumping theory is applied to model physical transport, and colloid filtration and reversible contaminant sorption are used to calculate the local distributions of colloids and contaminants within the streambed. Residence time functions of both colloids and contaminants in the bed are then used to link contaminant concentrations in the pore water and streamwater. Model simulations indicate that, under conditions of low colloid filtration and strong contaminant sorption to colloids, contaminants are mobilized by colloids and there is less retention of contaminants in the streambed. This is the case of "colloid-facilitated contaminant transport" commonly considered in groundwater transport. On the other hand, when colloid filtration is high and contaminants still sorb strongly to colloids, contaminant mobility decreases and there is greater contaminant retention in the streambed. We term this case "colloid-impeded contaminant transport". Thus, we find that a variety of contaminanttransport behavior can occur depending on the concentration and mobility of suspended particles in the system and the relative affinity of contaminants for colloids and other solid phases.

  17. Clarification of olive mill and winery wastewater by means of clay-polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytwo, Giora; Lavi, Roy; Rytwo, Yuval; Monchase, Hila; Dultz, Stefan; König, Tom N

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted effluents from olive mills and wineries, among others, are unsuitable for discharge into standard sewage-treatment plants due to the large amounts of organic and suspended matter. Efficiency of all management practices for such effluents depends on an effective pretreatment that lowers the amount of suspended solids. Such pretreatments are usually based on three separate stages, taking a total of 2 to 6h: coagulation-neutralizing the colloids, flocculation-aggregating the colloids into larger particles, and separation via filtration or decanting. Previous studies have presented the concept of coagoflocculation based on the use of clay-polymer nanocomposites. This process adds a higher density clay particle to the flocs, accelerating the process to between 15 and 60 min. This study examined suitable nanocomposites based on different clays and polymers. The charge of the compounds increased proportionally to the polymer-to-clay ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that in sepiolite-based nanocomposites there is no change in the structure of the mineral, whereas in smectite-based nanocomposites, the polymer intercalates between the clay layers and increases the spacing depending on the polymer-to-clay ratio. Efficiency of the coagoflocculation process was studied with a dispersion analyzer. Sequential addition of olive mill or winery effluents with a boosting dose of nanocomposites may yield a very efficient and rapid clarification pretreatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Clay that Cures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Hydrotalcite - The Clay that Cures. N Bejoy. General Article Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 57-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0057-0061. Author Affiliations.

  19. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brick is one of the most used and versatile building materials in use today. Bricks can be defined as modular units connected by mortar in the formation of a building system or product. Commonly the word brick is used to refer to clay bricks, which...

  20. Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbasuney, Sherif

    2017-07-01

    A route to produce a stable colloidal suspension is essential if mono-dispersed particles are to be successfully synthesized, isolated, and used in subsequent nanocomposite manufacture. Dispersing nanoparticles in fluids was found to be an important approach for avoiding poor dispersion characteristics. However, there is still a great tendency for colloidal nanoparticles to flocculate over time. Steric stabilization can prevent coagulation by introducing a thick adsorbed organic layer which constitutes a significant steric barrier that can prevent the particle surfaces from coming into direct contact. One of the main features of hydrothermal synthesis technique is that it offers novel approaches for sustainable nanoparticle surface modification. This manuscript reports on the sustainable steric stabilization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle surface modification was performed via two main approaches including post-synthesis and in situ surface modification. The tuneable hydrothermal conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure, flow rates, and surfactant addition) were optimized to enable controlled steric stabilization in a continuous fashion. Effective post synthesis surface modification with organic ligand (dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA)) was achieved; the optimum surface coating temperature was reported to be 180-240 °C to ensure DDSA ring opening and binding to titania nanoparticles. Organic-modified titania demonstrated complete change in surface properties from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and exhibited phase transfer from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. Exclusive surface modification in the reactor was found to be an effective approach; it demonstrated surfactant loading level 2.2 times that of post synthesis surface modification. Titania was also stabilized in aqueous media using poly acrylic acid (PAA) as polar polymeric dispersant. PAA-titania nanoparticles demonstrated a durable amorphous polymeric layer of 2 nm thickness. This

  1. Retention and loss of water extractable carbon in soils: effect of clay properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung-Ta; Marschner, Petra

    2014-02-01

    Clay sorption is important for organic carbon (C) sequestration in soils, but little is known about the effect of different clay properties on organic C sorption and release. To investigate the effect of clay content and properties on sorption, desorption and loss of water extractable organic C (WEOC), two experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, a loamy sand alone (native) or mixed with clay isolated from a surface or subsoil (78 and 96% clay) resulting in 90, 158 and 175 g clay kg(-1) soil. These soil treatments were leached with different WEOC concentrations, and then CO2 release was measured for 28 days followed by leaching with reverse osmosis water at the end of experiment. The second experiment was conducted to determine WEOC sorption and desorption of clays isolated from the loamy sand (native), surface soil and subsoil. Addition of clays isolated from surface and subsoil to sandy loam increased WEOC sorption and reduced C leaching and cumulative respiration in percentage of total organic C and WEOC added when expressed per g soil and per g clay. Compared to clays isolated from the surface and subsoil, the native clay had higher concentrations of illite and exchangeable Ca(2+), total organic C and a higher CEC but a lower extractable Fe/Al concentration. This indicates that compared to the clay isolated from the surface and the subsoil, the native clay had fewer potential WEOC binding sites because it had lower Fe/Al content thus lower number of binding sites and the existing binding sites are already occupied native organic matter. The results of this study suggest that in the soils used here, the impact of clay on WEOC sorption and loss is dependent on its indigenous organic carbon and Fe and/or Al concentrations whereas clay mineralogy, CEC, exchangeable Ca(2+) and surface area are less important. © 2013.

  2. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  3. Impact of Redox Reactions on Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: An Example of Ferrihydrite Colloids Transport in the Presence of Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Peng; Yuan, Songhu; Wang, Dengjun

    2016-10-18

    Transport of colloids in the subsurface is an important environmental process with most research interests centered on the transport in chemically stable conditions. While colloids can be formed under dynamic redox conditions, the impact of redox reactions on their transport is largely overlooked. Taking the redox reactions between ferrihydrite colloids and sulfide as an example, we investigated how and to what extent the redox reactions modulated the transport of ferrihydrite colloids in anoxic sand columns over a range of environmentally relevant conditions. Our results reveal that the presence of sulfide (7.8-46.9 μM) significantly decreased the breakthrough of ferrihydrite colloids in the sand column. The estimated travel distance of ferrihydrite colloids in the absence of sulfide was nearly 7-fold larger than that in the presence of 46.9 μM sulfide. The reduced breakthrough was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite colloids by sulfide in parallel with formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) particles from sulfide oxidation. Reductive dissolution decreased the total mass of ferrihydrite colloids, while the negatively charged S(0) decreased the overall zeta potential of ferrihydrite colloids by attaching onto their surfaces and thus enhanced their retention in the sand. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical role of redox reactions on the transport of redox-sensitive colloids in saturated porous media.

  4. Model simulations of particle aggregation effect on colloid exchange between streams and streambeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepitak, Trachu; Ren, Jianhong

    2011-07-01

    Colloids found in natural streams have large reactive surface areas, which makes them significant absorbents and carriers for pollutants. Stream-subsurface exchange plays a critical role in regulating the transport of colloids and contaminants in natural streams. Previous process-based multiphase exchange models were developed without consideration of colloid-colloid interaction. However, many studies have indicated that aggregation is a significant process and needs to be considered in stream process analysis. Herein, a new colloid exchange model was developed by including particle aggregation in addition to colloid settling and filtration. Self-preserving size distribution concepts and classical aggregation theory were employed to model the aggregation process. Model simulations indicate that under conditions of low filtration and high degree of particle-particle interaction, aggregation could either decrease or increase the amount of colloids retained in streambeds, depending on the initial particle size. Thus, two possible cases may occur including enhanced colloid deposition and facilitated colloid transport. Also, when the aggregation rate is high and filtration increases, more particles are retained by bed sediments due to filtration, and fewer are aggregated, which reduces the extent of aggregation effect on colloid deposition. The work presented here will contribute to a better understanding and prediction of colloid transport phenomena in natural streams.

  5. Stability of iron in clays under different leaching conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doušová, B.; Fuitová, L.; Koloušek, D.; Lhotka, M.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Spurná, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, 1-2 (2014), s. 145-152 ISSN 0009-8604 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Clays * Iron * Leaching Stability * Structure * Surface Properties Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.228, year: 2014

  6. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  7. Producing colloids with microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannacci, Nicolas; Willaime, Herve; Tabeling, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    Submicronic emulsions are commonly used in pharmaceutical, food, cosmetic and material industries. Standard microfluidic tool is particularly convenient to produce in a very controlled way either droplets of typical diameter ranging from 10 to 300 microns with a perfect monodispersity (nanodrops in a way that is slightly dependent on the fluids used. The control on such a flow authorizes the adjustment of the diameter of the colloids formed. We will show brownian particles from 860 nm to 1.3 μm in diameter obtained in such way and their clustering into crystals thanks to their high monodispersity. These first experimental results are very promising and make evident the great potential of micro and nano-fluidics to produce nano-emulsions or colloids with very controlled size that metamaterials can require.

  8. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  9. Elastic and viscous bond components in the adhesion of colloidal particles and fibrillated streptococci to QCM-D crystal surfaces with different hydrophobicities using Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Westen, Rebecca; Sharma, Prashant K; De Raedt, Hans; Vermue, Ijsbrand; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2017-01-01

    A quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) can measure molecular mass adsorption as well as register adhesion of colloidal particles. However, analysis of the QCM-D output to quantitatively analyze adhesion of (bio) colloids to obtain viscoelastic bond properties is still a subject of

  10. Colloidal capsules: nano- and microcapsules with colloidal particle shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollhorst, Tobias; Rezwan, Kurosch; Maas, Michael

    2017-04-18

    Utilizing colloidal particles for the assembly of the shell of nano- and microcapsules holds great promise for the tailor-made design of new functional materials. Increasing research efforts are devoted to the synthesis of such colloidal capsules, by which the integration of modular building blocks with distinct physical, chemical, or morphological characteristics in a capsule's shell can result in novel properties, not present in previous encapsulation structures. This review will provide a comprehensive overview of the synthesis strategies and the progress made so far of bringing nano- and microcapsules with shells of densely packed colloidal particles closer to application in fields such as chemical engineering, materials science, or pharmaceutical and life science. The synthesis routes are categorized into the four major themes for colloidal capsule formation, i.e. the Pickering-emulsion based formation of colloidal capsules, the colloidal particle deposition on (sacrificial) templates, the amphiphilicity driven self-assembly of nanoparticle vesicles from polymer-grafted colloids, and the closely related field of nanoparticle membrane-loading of liposomes and polymersomes. The varying fields of colloidal capsule research are then further categorized and discussed for micro- and nano-scaled structures. Finally, a special section is dedicated to colloidal capsules for biological applications, as a diverse range of reports from this field aim at pharmaceutical agent encapsulation, targeted drug-delivery, and theranostics.

  11. Thermal Jamming of a Colloidal Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Agarwal, Praveen

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature on structure and dynamics of a colloidal glass created by tethering polymers to the surface of inorganic nanoparticles. Contrary to the conventional assumption, an increase in temperature slows down glassy dynamics of the material, yet causes no change in its static structure factor. We show that these findings can be explained within the soft glassy rheology framework if the noise temperature X of the glass phase is correlated with thermodynamic temperature. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  12. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  13. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  14. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-01

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy to prepare, cost-effective, and versatile with regards to modification and functionalization. Patterned colloidal PCs contribute a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate-induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification, is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, improved detection sensitivity and response speed of the sensors, control over the flow direction and wicking rate of microfluidic channels, recognition of cross-reactive molecules through an array-patterned microchip, fabrication of display devices with tunable patterns, well-arranged RGB units, and wide viewing-angles, and the ability to construct anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2017-02-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks).

  16. Silica-coated titania and zirconia colloids for subsurface transport field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Elimelech, Menachem; Baeseman, Jenny L.; Magelky, Robin D.

    2000-01-01

    Silica-coated titania (TiO2) and zirconia (ZrO2) colloids were synthesized in two sizes to provide easily traced mineral colloids for subsurface transport experiments. Electrophoretic mobility measurements showed that coating with silica imparted surface properties similar to pure silica to the titania and zirconia colloids. Measurements of steady electrophoretic mobility and size (by dynamic light scattering) over a 90-day period showed that the silica-coated colloids were stable to aggregation and loss of coating. A natural gradient field experiment conducted in an iron oxide-coated sand and gravel aquifer also showed that the surface properties of the silica-coated colloids were similar. Colloid transport was traced at μg L-1 concentrations by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy measurement of Ti and Zr in acidified samples.

  17. Determination of the surface sorption properties of talc, different salts, and clay minerals at various relative humidities using adsorption data of a diverse set of organic vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Kai-Uwe; Buschmann, Johanna; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2003-11-01

    Adsorption constants of a diverse set of organic vapors have been measured on NaCl, KNO3, (NH4)2SO4, NH4Cl, kaolinite, bentonite. and talc at different relative humidities at 15 degrees C. Together with the earlier studied quartz (SiO2), CaCO3, and alpha-Al2O3, these surfaces represent relevant sorbents for organic vapors in the environment. An equation that describes the van der Waals and H-bond interactions between the sorbate and the surface can be used to describe the sorbate and sorbent variability in the measured data and to predict sorption constants of organic compounds that have not been tested on the respective surface. The unknown properties of the sorbent surfaces are used as fitting parameters in this equation. These data provide important insights into the variability of sorption properties of natural, inorganic surfaces as a function of relative humidity.

  18. Bentonite as a colloid source in groundwaters at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Hirvonen, H.

    2005-02-01

    addition to the ultrafiltrations some Nuclepore filter membranes with different cut-off values (0.4 μm, 0.2 μm, 0.1 μm and 0.05 μm) were prepared for SEM/EDS examination. The results of the groundwater samples collected before interaction with bentonite indicated that iron and aluminium were also associated with colloidal species, for example with SiO 2 , clay mineral or/and calcite colloids. The estimated size range of the colloids was from 50nm up to 400nm in PVA1 and in the more saline PVA3 up to 300nm (SEM). The estimate of Fe-associated colloids in PVA1 was 0.8mg/L and Alassociated colloids 0.004mg/L, whereas, in PVA3 the corresponding concentrations were clearly lower, 0.07mg/L and 0.001mg/L, respectively. After bentonite interaction bentonite colloids were detected (EDS) only in PVA1 groundwater. The size of the colloids varied from about 50nm up to about 200nm (SEM). However, the upper size limit was difficult to estimate due to large aggregates. No clear indication of bentonite colloids was obtained in PVA3 samples, but the element composition (EDS) indicated that minor amounts could be present. In PVA1 the estimated amount of Fe-associated colloids was 0.4mg/L and the amount of Al associated colloids was 0.001mg/L, whereas, in PVA3 the contents were 0.06mg/L and 0.001mg/L, respectively. Overall, the estimated concentrations of colloids in the studied size range (<0.45 μm) were small in both groundwaters and interaction with bentonite somewhat decreased the amount of Fe- and Al-associated colloids. However, the decrease in the colloid amount was more prominent in the case of the fresh PVA1 groundwater, which contained a little more to begin with. The salinity of groundwater affected the amount of colloids; more saline - less colloids. Bentonite colloids released from the bentonite source were detected only in the fresh PVA1 groundwater, but the amount was too small for obtaining an assessment of the concentration. (orig.)

  19. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Andra organised an International Symposium on the use of Natural and Engineered Clay-based Barriers for the Containment of Radioactive Waste hold at the Congress Centre of Tours, France, in March 2005. The symposium provided an opportunity to take stock of the potential properties of the clay-based materials present in engineered or natural barriers in order to meet the containment specifications of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. It was intended for specialists working in the various disciplines involved with clays and clay based minerals, as well as scientists from agencies and organisations dealing with investigations on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The themes of the Symposium included geology, geochemistry, transfers of materials, alteration processes, geomechanics, as well as the recent developments regarding the characterisation of clays, as well as experiments in surface and underground laboratories. The symposium consisted of plenary sessions, parallel specialized sessions and poster sessions. (author)

  20. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research

  1. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  2. Swelling and sedimentation of bentonite clays in bulk and in slits: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, S.V.; Furo, I.; Neretnieks, I.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite clay is currently attracting attention as a promising 'self-sealing' buffer material to build in-ground barriers for the encapsulation of radioactive waste. It is expected to fill up the space between waste canister and surrounding ground by swelling and thus delay flow and migration from the host rock to the canister. Evaluation and understanding of the swelling properties of pre-compacted bentonite are of uttermost importance for designing such buffers. The major goal of our studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during different physical processes in an aqueous environment such as swelling, dissolution, and sedimentation on the time scale from minutes to years. The propagation of the swelling front during clay expansion depending on the geometry of the confining space was also studied. To characterize the state of colloids that form after/during clay swelling the water self-diffusion coefficient was measured on a spatially resolved manner. The distribution and displacement within the bentonite systems of foreign particles, either natural ones (sand or quartz) or artificially admixed model particles of controlled size were also monitored. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were adapted and used as main experimental techniques. With this approach, spatially resolved movement of the clay/water interface as well as clay particle distributions in gel phase can be monitored. Bulk samples with swelling in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated and clay content distribution profiles in the concentration range over five orders of magnitude and with sub-millimetre spatial resolution were

  3. Synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid gel with acid activated clay after γ-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hoik; Sohn, Daewon

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid gel was prepared from acid activated clay (AA clay) and acrylic acid by gamma ray irradiation. Irradiated inorganic particles which have peroxide groups act as initiator because it generates oxide radicals by increasing temperature. Inorganic nanoparticles which are rigid part in hybrid gel also contribute to increase the mechanical property as a crosslinker. We prepared two hybrid gels to compare the effect of acid activated treatment of clay; one is synthesized with raw clay particles and another is synthesized with AA clay particles. The composition and structure of AA clay particles and raw clay particles were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence instrument and surface area analyzer. And chemical and physical property of hybrid gel with different ratios of acrylic acid and clay particle was tested by Raman spectroscope and universal testing machine (UTM). The synthesized hydrogel with 76% gel contents can elongated approximately 1000% of its original size.

  4. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using

  5. Strontium migration in a crystalline medium: effects of the presence of bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula; Mingarro, Manuel

    2011-03-25

    The effects of bentonite colloids on strontium migration in fractured crystalline medium were investigated. We analyzed first the transport behaviour of bentonite colloids alone at different flow rates; then we compared the transport behaviour of strontium as solute and of strontium previously adsorbed onto stable bentonite colloids at a water velocity of approximately 7.1·10(-6)m/s-224m/yr. Experiments with bentonite colloids alone showed that - at the lowest water flow rate used in our experiments (7.1·10(-6)m/s) - approximately 70% of the initially injected colloids were retained in the fracture. Nevertheless, the mobile colloidal fraction, moved through the fracture without retardation, at any flow rate. Bentonite colloids deposited over the fracture surface were identified during post-mortem analyses. The breakthrough curve of strontium as a solute, presented a retardation factor, R(f)~6, in agreement with its sorption onto the granite fracture surface. The breakthrough curve of strontium in the presence of bentonite colloids was much more complex, suggesting additional contributions of colloids to strontium transport. A very small fraction of strontium adsorbed on mobile colloids moved un-retarded (R(f)=1) and this fraction was much lower than the expected, considering the quantity of strontium initially adsorbed onto colloids (90%). This behaviour suggests the hypothesis of strontium sorption reversibility from colloids. On the other hand, bentonite colloids retained within the granite fracture played a major role, contributing to a slower strontium transport in comparison with strontium as a solute. This was shown by a clear peak in the breakthrough curve corresponding to a retardation factor of approximately 20. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Colloid facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutsch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the internationally agreed-upon, long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. Eventually, corrosion of the waste canisters may lead to leakage of their hazardous contents, and the radionuclides can ultimately make their way into groundwater and pose a threat to the biosphere. Engineered bentonite barriers placed around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their storage location to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles eroding from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. In addition, the presence of organic matter in groundwater has been shown to additionally facilitate the uptake of radionuclides by the clay colloids. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of radionuclides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative of the Negev desert, Israel. Lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute to actinides for research on radionuclide transportation due to their similar chemical behavior. In this study, the migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide). Tracer solutions containing known concentrations of Ce, bentonite colloids, humic acid and bromide were prepared in a matrix solution containing salt concentrations representative of that of the average rain water found in the Negev. These solutions were then injected into a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Samples were analyzed for Ce and Br using ICP-MS, and colloid concentrations were determined using spectrophotographic analysis. Breakthrough curves comparing the rates of transportation of each tracer were obtained, allowing for comparison of

  7. A binomial modeling approach for upscaling colloid transport under unfavorable conditions: Emergent prediction of extended tailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus; Rasmuson, Anna; Johnson, William P.

    2017-07-01

    Colloid transport in saturated porous media is significantly influenced by colloidal interactions with grain surfaces. Near-surface fluid domain colloids experience relatively low fluid drag and relatively strong colloidal forces that slow their downgradient translation relative to colloids in bulk fluid. Near-surface fluid domain colloids may reenter into the bulk fluid via diffusion (nanoparticles) or expulsion at rear flow stagnation zones, they may immobilize (attach) via primary minimum interactions, or they may move along a grain-to-grain contact to the near-surface fluid domain of an adjacent grain. We introduce a simple model that accounts for all possible permutations of mass transfer within a dual pore and grain network. The primary phenomena thereby represented in the model are mass transfer of colloids between the bulk and near-surface fluid domains and immobilization. Colloid movement is described by a Markov chain, i.e., a sequence of trials in a 1-D network of unit cells, which contain a pore and a grain. Using combinatorial analysis, which utilizes the binomial coefficient, we derive the residence time distribution, i.e., an inventory of the discrete colloid travel times through the network and of their probabilities to occur. To parameterize the network model, we performed mechanistic pore-scale simulations in a single unit cell that determined the likelihoods and timescales associated with the above colloid mass transfer processes. We found that intergrain transport of colloids in the near-surface fluid domain can cause extended tailing, which has traditionally been attributed to hydrodynamic dispersion emanating from flow tortuosity of solute trajectories.

  8. Experimental and modeling studies of clay/polydicyclopentadiene resin nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonessi, Mitra

    the same samples to obtain the average numbers of clay layers per tactoid. Two finite element models, one for the intercalated clay/polyDCPD nanocomposite and one for the exfoliated clay/polyDCPD nanocomposite, were developed. The effects of these different dispersion geometries for seven platelets in the polyDCPD matrix on the stress distributions were examined. The exfoliated platelet model showed reduced deformations and uniform stress distributions. The highest stress concentrations were found on the platelets' surfaces and where platelets were in close proximity.

  9. Crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removal via clay-microbe-oil interactions: Effect of acid activated clay minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Uzochukwu C; Fialips, Claire I

    2017-07-01

    Acid treatment of clay minerals is known to modify their properties such as increase their surface area and surface acidity, making them suitable as catalysts in many chemical processes. However, the role of these surface properties during biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is only known for mild acid (0.5 M Hydrochloric acid) treated clays. Four different clay minerals were used for this study: a montmorillonite, a saponite, a palygorskite and a kaolinite. They were treated with 3 M hydrochloric acid to produce acid activated clay minerals. The role of the acid activated montmorillonite, saponite, palygorskite and kaolinite in comparison with the unmodified clay minerals in the removal of PAHs during biodegradation was investigated in microcosm experiments. The microcosm experiments contained micro-organisms, oil, and clays in aqueous medium with a hydrocarbon degrading microorganism community predominantly composed of Alcanivorax spp. Obtained results indicated that acid activated clays and unmodified kaolinite did not enhance the biodegradation of the PAHs whereas unmodified montmorillonite, palygorskite and saponite enhanced their biodegradation. In addition, unmodified palygorskite adsorbed the PAHs significantly due to its unique channel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  11. Crust formation in drying colloidal suspensions

    KAUST Repository

    Style, R. W.

    2010-06-30

    During the drying of colloidal suspensions, the desiccation process causes the suspension near the air interface to consolidate into a connected porous matrix or crust. Fluid transport in the porous medium is governed by Darcy\\'s law and the equations of poroelasticity, while the equations of colloid physics govern processes in the suspension. We derive new equations describing this process, including unique boundary conditions coupling the two regions, yielding a moving-boundary model of the concentration and stress profiles during drying. A solution is found for the steady-state growth of a nedimensional crust during constant evaporation rate from the surface. The solution is used to demonstrate the importance of the system boundary conditions on stress profiles and diffusivity in a drying crust. © 2011 The Royal Society.

  12. Particles with changeable topology in nematic colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    We show that nematic colloids can serve as a highly variable and controllable platform for studying inclusions with changeable topology and their effects on the surrounding ordering fields. We explore morphing of toroidal and knotted colloidal particles into effective spheres, distinctively changing their Euler characteristic and affecting the surrounding nematic field, including topological defect structures. With toroidal particles, the inner nematic defect eventually transitions from a wide loop to a point defect (a small loop). Trefoil particles become linked with two knotted defect loops, mutually forming a three component link, that upon tightening transform into a two-component particle-defect loop link. For more detailed topological analysis, Pontryagin-Thom surfaces are calculated and visualised, indicating an interesting cascade of defect rewirings caused by the shape morphing of the knotted particles. (paper)

  13. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  14. Polymers and colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schurtenberger, P. [ETH Zurich, Inst. fuer Polymere, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    A wealth of structural information from colloid and polymer solutions on a large range of length scales can be obtained using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments. After a general introduction to the field of soft condensed matter, I shall give a few selected examples on how SANS combined with suitable contrast variation schemes can be used to extract information on the size and conformation of polymer coils in solution and in the melt, and on the local structure and flexibility of polymerlike micelles and microemulsions. (author) 8 figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  15. The effect of flow heterogeneity on the mobilization of colloids from metal-contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denovio, N. M.; Ryan, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    In vadose zone soils, colloid-facilitated transport has been shown to play a significant role in contaminant transport because colloids are abundant and the kinetics of contaminant desorption are likely to be slow relative to the time scale for colloid transport through the unsaturated zone. Understanding the rate of colloid generation and transport with respect to the surface area available for contaminant sorption and chemical composition of these colloids is critical for predicting colloid-facilitated transport. Soil cores (approximately 20 cm3)obtained from the Arkansas River Valley in Leadville, Colorado, where there is significant metal contamination, were leached at three rainfall rates corresponding to 10-, 20-, and 100-year storm events. Effluent water samples were collected with a 2.5 cm spatial resolution at the base of the column. Samples were analyzed for colloid concentration, size and metal elements (Pb, Zn, Cu) in addition to Al, Si, and other metals. Despite significant variability in the spatial distribution of water flow, there was little to no variability in the rate of colloid generation, size of the colloids, or heavy metal generation within a time step. Generally, colloid size appeared to increase during the course of the experiments and greater concentrations of heavy metals were generated with increasing duration of each rainfall event.

  16. Cholesteric colloidal liquid crystals from phytosterol rod-like particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, L.; Sacanna, S.; Velikov, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first observation of chiral colloidal liquid crystals of rod-like particles from a low molecular weight organic compound— phytosterols. Based on the particles shape and crystal structure, we attribute this phenomenon to chiral distribution of surface charge on the surface of

  17. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of kBT per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology. PMID:29295574

  18. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Muševič

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of kBT per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology.

  19. Proceedings of the NEA Clay Club Workshop on Clay characterisation from nanoscopic to microscopic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    and electrostatics of experimentalists and molecular / Monte Carlo modeling groups providing valuable information on a lattice (1 clay surface; Angstrom-scale)

  20. Catalyzed Synthesis of Zinc Clays by Prebiotic Central Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixin; Basu, Kaustuv; Hartman, Hyman; Matocha, Christopher J; Sears, S Kelly; Vali, Hojatollah; Guzman, Marcelo I

    2017-04-03

    How primordial metabolic networks such as the reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and clay mineral catalysts coevolved remains a mystery in the puzzle to understand the origin of life. While prebiotic reactions from the rTCA cycle were accomplished via photochemistry on semiconductor minerals, the synthesis of clays was demonstrated at low temperature and ambient pressure catalyzed by oxalate. Herein, the crystallization of clay minerals is catalyzed by succinate, an example of a photoproduced intermediate from central metabolism. The experiments connect the synthesis of sauconite, a model for clay minerals, to prebiotic photochemistry. We report the temperature, pH, and concentration dependence on succinate for the synthesis of sauconite identifying new mechanisms of clay formation in surface environments of rocky planets. The work demonstrates that seeding induces nucleation at low temperatures accelerating the crystallization process. Cryogenic and conventional transmission electron microscopies, X-ray diffraction, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and measurements of total surface area are used to build a three-dimensional representation of the clay. These results suggest the coevolution of clay minerals and early metabolites in our planet could have been facilitated by sunlight photochemistry, which played a significant role in the complex interplay between rocks and life over geological time.

  1. Polyethersulfone/clay membranes and its water permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalho, Thamyres Cardoso de; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Araujo, Edcleide Maria de; Lira, Helio Lucena; Leite, Amanda Melissa Damiao

    2017-01-01

    Membranes can be considered polymeric or inorganic films that function as a semipermeable barrier to filtration on a molecular scale, separating two phases and restricting, totally or partially, the transportation of one or more chemical species (solute) present in the solution. Therefore, the aim of this work is to produce polyethersulfone membranes (PES) and polyethersulfone/clay by phase inversion technique and evaluate the presence of clay in obtaining membranes for wastewater treatment. The used solvent was dimethylformamide (DMF) and clays were Brasgel PA (MMT) and Cloisite Na (CL Na) in the proportion of 3 to 5% (wt.). By Xray diffraction (XRD), the membranes with 3% of MMT and CL Na clays apparently had partially exfoliated structures. For the composition with 5% of CL Na a small peak was observed, which indicates that this is possibly an intercalated structure or microcomposite. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visualizes that the pure surface of the pure PES membrane a structure apparently without pores was observed in the used magnification and without roughness surface when compared to membranes with clay. The measurements of contact angle indicated that the inclusion of clay altered the wetting ability of the membranes. The flow with distilled water for all membranes started high and over time reached a stabilization level. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence and the content of clay altered the morphology of the membrane, contributing to an increase in water flow. (author)

  2. To the Problem of the Clay Particles Energy Potential Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Seredin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay is a natural material, which surface of the particles is energetically active. This clay property is widely used in the industry as sorbents. However, clay sorption activity is different for various pollutants, and work aimed to increase their sorption activity is still under way. This work objective was to study the pressure influences on the activity of the clay particles surface. The experiments showed that increase of pressure results in the decrease in the content of clay minerals, while other minerals change in different manner. It has been statistically proved that pressures P = 125 MPa and P = 750 MPa are bounding values that allows identifying the three classes. The first class is related to the pressures under 125 MPa, the second comprises the range from 125 MPa to 750 MPa, and the third class is for the pressures above 750 MPa. In each class, the intensity and direction of the proceeding of processes of mineral clay composition alteration have specific features. Based on theoretical and experimental studies it was established that the less the value of indicator Mk, the higher the energy potential of the particle surface. It achieves the maximum values (Mk = 14.7 in montmorillonite clay under pressure of 125 MPa, and, conversely, with an increase in pressure up to 2200 MPa the Mk value decreases (Mk = 17.7. A different behavior was observed in kaolinite clay. The energy potential on the particle surface increases with an increase in pressure from Mk = 26.3 to Mk = 18.8 (P = 2000 MPa. Mathematical models, which make it possible to predict energy potential on the surface of montmorillonite and kaolinite particles depending on the pressure, have been developed based on the found statistical relations

  3. Deformation mechanisms in experimentally deformed Boom Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Guillaume; Schuck, Bernhard; Urai, Janos

    2016-04-01

    Bulk mechanical and transport properties of reference claystones for deep disposal of radioactive waste have been investigated since many years but little is known about microscale deformation mechanisms because accessing the relevant microstructure in these soft, very fine-grained, low permeable and low porous materials remains difficult. Recent development of ion beam polishing methods to prepare high quality damage free surfaces for scanning electron microscope (SEM) is opening new fields of microstructural investigation in claystones towards a better understanding of the deformation behavior transitional between rocks and soils. We present results of Boom Clay deformed in a triaxial cell in a consolidated - undrained test at a confining pressure of 0.375 MPa (i.e. close to natural value), with σ1 perpendicular to the bedding. Experiments stopped at 20 % strain. As a first approximation, the plasticity of the sample can be described by a Mohr-Coulomb type failure envelope with a coefficient of cohesion C = 0.117 MPa and an internal friction angle ϕ = 18.7°. After deformation test, the bulk sample shows a shear zone at an angle of about 35° from the vertical with an offset of about 5 mm. We used the "Lamipeel" method that allows producing a permanent absolutely plane and large size etched micro relief-replica in order to localize and to document the shear zone at the scale of the deformed core. High-resolution imaging of microstructures was mostly done by using the BIB-SEM method on key-regions identified after the "Lamipeel" method. Detailed BIB-SEM investigations of shear zones show the following: the boundaries between the shear zone and the host rock are sharp, clay aggregates and clastic grains are strongly reoriented parallel to the shear direction, and the porosity is significantly reduced in the shear zone and the grain size is smaller in the shear zone than in the host rock but there is no evidence for broken grains. Comparison of microstructures

  4. Magnetic nanocarriers of doxorubicin coated with poly(ethylene glycol) and folic acid: relation between coating structure, surface properties, colloidal stability, and cancer cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaki, Karine; Hervé-Aubert, Katel; Chiper, Manuela; Shkilnyy, Andriy; Soucé, Martin; Benoit, Roland; Paillard, Archibald; Dubois, Pierre; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Chourpa, Igor

    2012-01-17

    We report the efficient one-step synthesis and detailed physicochemical evaluation of novel biocompatible nanosystems useful for cancer therapeutics and diagnostics (theranostics). These systems are the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) carrying the anticancer drug doxorubicin and coated with the covalently bonded biocompatible polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), native and modified with the biological cancer targeting ligand folic acid (PEG-FA). These multifunctional nanoparticles (SPION-DOX-PEG-FA) are designed to rationally combine multilevel mechanisms of cancer cell targeting (magnetic and biological), bimodal cancer cell imaging (by means of MRI and fluorescence), and bimodal cancer treatment (by targeted drug delivery and by hyperthermia effect). Nevertheless, for these concepts to work together, the choice of ingredients and particle structure are critically important. Therefore, in the present work, a detailed physicochemical characterization of the organic coating of the hybrid nanoparticles is performed by several surface-specific instrumental methods, including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). We demonstrate that the anticancer drug doxorubicin is attached to the iron oxide surface and buried under the polymer layers, while folic acid is located on the extreme surface of the organic coating. Interestingly, the moderate presence of folic acid on the particle surface does not increase the particle surface potential, while it is sufficient to increase the particle uptake by MCF-7 cancer cells. All of these original results contribute to the better understanding of the structure-activity relationship for hybrid biocompatible nanosystems and are encouraging for the applications in cancer theranostics. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Centrifuge modelling of rigid piles in soft clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, R.T.; Poder, M.; Truong, P.

    2016-01-01

    of this study is to employ centrifuge modelling in order to derive experimental p-y curves for rigid piles embedded in over-consolidated soft clay. A kaolin clay sample was prepared and pre-consolidated by applying a constant pressure at the soil surface, while different over-consolidation ratios were achieved...... within the clay sample by carrying out the experiments at different g fields. The findings suggest that the normalised shape of the p-y curves can be predicted within a sufficient accuracy using the current methodology but that the ultimate lat-eral resistance is underestimated at shallow depths...

  6. Influences of Flow Transients and Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Colloid-Associated Contaminant Transport in the Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James Saiers

    2006-01-01

    Radionuclides, metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids have contaminated about six billion cubic meters of soil at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The subsurface transport of many of these contaminants is facilitated by colloids (i.e., microscopic, waterborne particles). The first step in the transport of contaminants from their sources to off-site surface water and groundwater is migration through the vadose zone. Developing our understanding of the migration of colloids and colloid-associated contaminants through the vadose zone is critical to assessing and controlling the release of contaminants from DOE sites. In this study, we examined the mobilization, transport, and filtration (retention) of mineral colloids and colloid-associated radionuclides within unsaturated porous media. This investigation involved laboratory column experiments designed to identify properties that affect colloid mobilization and retention and pore-scale visualization experiments designed to elucidate mechanisms that govern these colloid-mass transfer processes. The experiments on colloid mobilization and retention were supplemented with experiments on radionuclide transport through porous media and on radionuclide adsorption to mineral colloids. Observations from all of these experiments--the column and visualization experiments with colloids and the experiments with radionuclides--were used to guide the development of mathematical models appropriate for describing colloids and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through the vadose zone

  7. Sustainable steric stabilization of colloidal titania nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbasuney, Sherif, E-mail: sherif_basuney2000@yahoo.com

    2017-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Controlled surface properties of titania nanoparticles via surface modification, flocculation from aqueous phase (a), stabilization in aqueous phase (b), extraction to organic phase (c). - Highlights: • Complete change in surface properties of titania nanoparticles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. • Harvesting the formulated nanoparticles from the aqueous phase to the organic phase. • Exclusive surface modification in the reactor during nanoparticle synthesis. • Sustainable stabilization of titania nanoparticles in aqueous media with polar polymeric dispersant. - Abstract: A route to produce a stable colloidal suspension is essential if mono-dispersed particles are to be successfully synthesized, isolated, and used in subsequent nanocomposite manufacture. Dispersing nanoparticles in fluids was found to be an important approach for avoiding poor dispersion characteristics. However, there is still a great tendency for colloidal nanoparticles to flocculate over time. Steric stabilization can prevent coagulation by introducing a thick adsorbed organic layer which constitutes a significant steric barrier that can prevent the particle surfaces from coming into direct contact. One of the main features of hydrothermal synthesis technique is that it offers novel approaches for sustainable nanoparticle surface modification. This manuscript reports on the sustainable steric stabilization of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Nanoparticle surface modification was performed via two main approaches including post-synthesis and in situ surface modification. The tuneable hydrothermal conditions (i.e. temperature, pressure, flow rates, and surfactant addition) were optimized to enable controlled steric stabilization in a continuous fashion. Effective post synthesis surface modification with organic ligand (dodecenyl succinic anhydride (DDSA)) was achieved; the optimum surface coating temperature was reported to be 180–240 °C to ensure DDSA ring opening

  8. Humic colloid-borne migration of uranium in sand columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artinger, R.; Rabung, T.; Kim, J.I.; Sachs, S.; Schmeide, K.; Heise, K.H.; Bernhard, G.; Nitsche, H.

    2002-09-01

    Column experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of humic colloids on subsurface uranium migration. The columns were packed with well-characterized aeolian quartz sand and equilibrated with groundwater rich in humic colloids (dissolved organic carbon (DOC): 30 mg dm -3 ). U migration was studied under an Ar/1% CO 2 gas atmosphere as a function of the migration time, which was controlled by the flow velocity or the column length. In addition, the contact time of U with groundwater prior to introduction into a column was varied. U(VI) was found to be the dominant oxidation state in the spiked groundwater. The breakthrough curves indicate that U was transported as a humic colloid-borne species with a velocity up to 5% faster than the mean groundwater flow. The fraction of humic colloid-borne species increases with increasing prior contact time and also with decreasing migration time. The migration behavior was attributed to a kinetically controlled association/dissociation of U onto and from humic colloids and also a subsequent sorption of U onto the sediment surface. The column experiments provide an insight into humic colloid-mediated U migration in subsurface aquifers

  9. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  10. Influence of clay organic modifier on morphology and performance of poly(ε-caprolactone/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Marija S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two series of poly(e-caprolactone nanocomposites with different organo-modified clays (1 to 8 wt% were prepared by the solution casting method. Organoclays with polar (Cloisite®C30B and nonpolar (Cloisite®C15A organic modifier and with different miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix, were chosen. Exfoliated and/or intercalated nanocomposite’s structures were obtained by using high dilution and an ultrasonic treatment for the composite preparation. The effect of the surface modification and clay content on the morphology, mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites was studied. Scanning electron microscopy excluded the formation of microcomposite. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the tendency toward exfoliated structure is higher for the Cloisite®C30B, which had better miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix. Differences in spherulites’ sizes and morphology between two series of the nanocomposites were observed by the optical microscopy performed on as-casted films. Enthalpies of fusion and degrees of crystallinity were higher for nanocomposites than for neat poly(e-caprolactone and increase with the clay loading in both series, as a consequence of the clay nucleating effect. Decreased thermal stability of nanocomposites was ascribed to thermal instability of organic modifiers of the clays. The Halpin-Tsai model was used to compare the theoretically predicted values of the Young’s modulus with experimentally obtained ones in tensile tests.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062

  11. Colloid transport in a geochemically heterogeneous porous medium: aquifer tank experiment and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Jonathan P; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Ryan, Joseph N; Elimelech, Menachem

    2003-09-01

    To examine colloid transport in geochemically heterogeneous porous media at a scale comparable to field experiments, we monitored the migration of silica-coated zirconia colloids in a two-dimensional layered porous media containing sand coated to three different extents by ferric oxyhydroxides. Transport of the colloids was measured over 1.65 m and 95 days. Colloid transport was modeled by an advection-dispersion-deposition equation incorporating geochemical heterogeneity and colloid deposition dynamics (blocking). Geochemical heterogeneity was represented as favorable (ferric oxyhydroxide-coated) and unfavorable (uncoated sand) deposition surface areas. Blocking was modeled as random sequential adsorption (RSA). Release of deposited colloids was negligible. The time to colloid breakthrough after the onset of blocking increased with increasing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated surface area. As the ferric oxyhydroxide surface area increased, the concentration of colloids in the breakthrough decreased. Model-fits to the experimental data were made by inverse solutions to determine the fraction of surface area favorable for deposition and the deposition rate coefficients for the favorable (ferric oxyhydroxide-coated) and unfavorable sites. The favorable deposition rate coefficient was also calculated by colloid filtration theory. The model described the time to colloid breakthrough and the blocking effect reasonably well and estimated the favorable surface area fraction very well for the two layers with more than 1% ferric oxyhydroxide coating. If mica edges in the uncoated sand were considered as favorable surface area in addition to the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings, the model predicted the favorable surface area fraction accurately for the layer with less than 1% ferric oxyhydroxide coating.

  12. Detachment of colloidal particles from collector surfaces with different electrostatic charge and hydrophobicity by attachment to air bubbles in a parallel plate flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarez, CG; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    The detachment of polystyrene particles adhering to collector surfaces with different electrostatic charge and hydrophobicity by attachment to a passing air bubble has been studied in a parallel plate flow chamber. Particle detachment decreased linearly with increasing air bubble velocity and

  13. Characterization of natural attapulgite clay and treated attapulgite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, L.G.; Silva, A.C. da; Ito, E.N.; Acchar, W.

    2012-01-01

    The attapulgite clay is a particular having high surface area, because of its fibrous structure and high aspect ratio. Because they are natural materials, in the case of attapulgite and having channels in its structure may have aggregated impurities and organic matter. For cleaning of such channels is carried out at acid activation. This study aimed to activate the clay with hydrogen peroxide and a solution of 5M sulfuric acid on a magnetic stirrer for 1 hour at 70 ° C. The clay was characterized by SEM/ EDS and XRD surface area measured by BET method. The treatment was effective in the removal of dolomite, clay aggregate impurity, and a decrease in quartz content. (author)

  14. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  15. Experimental analysis of colloid capture by a cylindrical collector in laminar overland flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Bin; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2011-09-15

    Although colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in water flow is a well-known contamination process, little research has been conducted to investigate the transport of colloidal particles through emergent vegetation in overland flow. In this work, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the single-collector contact efficiency (η(0)) of colloid capture by a simulated plant stem in laminar lateral flow. Fluorescent microspheres of various sizes were used as experimental colloids. The colloid suspensions were applied to a glass cylinder installed in a small size flow chamber at different flow rates. Two cylinder sizes were tested in the experiment and silicone grease was applied to the cylinder surface to make it favorable for colloid deposition. Our results showed that increases in flow rate and collector size reduced the value of η(0) and a minimum value of η(0) might exist for a colloid size. The experimental data were compared to theoretical predictions of different single-collector contact efficiency models. The results indicated that existing single-collector contact efficiency models underestimated the η(0) of colloid capture by the cylinders in laminar overland flow. A regression equation of η(0) as a function of collector Reynolds number (Re(c)) and Peclet number (N(Pe)) was developed and fit the experimental data very well (R(2) > 0.98). This regression equation can be used to help construct and refine mathematical models of colloid transport and filtration in laminar overland flow on vegetated surfaces.

  16. Transport of synthetic colloids through single saturated fractures: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1995-07-01

    Colloids having the same surface charge sign as the bulk of the geologic media in a groundwater system may be able to travel through the system faster than soluble species because they will follow fluid streamlines more closely and they should have less tendency to diffuse into pores or dead spaces in the media than soluble species. Synthetic colloids with uniform, controlled properties may be ideal for serving as open-quotes worst-caseclose quotes tracers that provide lower-bound estimates of contaminant travel times in hydrologic systems. This report discusses a review of the literature pertaining to colloid transport in single saturated natural fractures. After a brief background discussion to put the literature review in perspective, the phenomenon of colloid transport in saturated fractures is divided into three major topics, each of which is reviewed in detail: (1) saturated fluid flow through fractures; (2) colloid transport by convection, diffusion, and force fields; and (3) colloid interactions with surfaces. It is suggested that these phenomena be accounted for in colloid transport models by using (1) lubrication theory to describe water flow through fractures, (2) particle tracking methods to describe colloid transport in fractures, and (3) a kinetic boundary layer approximation to describe colloid interactions with fracture walls. These methods offer better computational efficiency and better experimental accessibility to model parameters than rigorously solving the complete governing equations

  17. Spectroscopic studies on colloid-borne uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, K.U.; Weiss, S.; Foerstendorf, H.; Brendler, V.; Zaenker, H.; Rossberg, A.; Scheinost, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Information on molecular speciation provides a basis for the reliable assessment of actinide migration in the environment. We use several methods for the separation of colloids from liquids (e.g. ultracentrifugation, ultrafiltration) in combination with spectroscopic techniques (EXAFS, ATR-FTIR, Moessbauer) and modeling of surface complexation reactions. This enables us to investigate the speciation of colloid-borne uranium in waters occurring in or escaping from abandoned uranium mines during the remediation process. Mine flooding was simulated on a 100 L scale by mixing acid mine water of elevated U concentration with oxic, near-neutral groundwater until pH ∼ 5.5 was reached. The freshly formed colloids adsorbed 95% of the total uranium and consisted mainly of 2-line ferri-hydrite (Fh) besides traces of aluminum, sulfur, silica, and carbon compounds. EXAFS analysis at the U-LIII absorption edge suggested a bidentate surface complex of UO 2 2+ on FeO 6 octahedra, but two minor backscattering contributions in close vicinity to the absorber remained unexplained. Since only Al could be excluded as backscattering atom, we studied U sorption on Fh at pH 5.5 in presence and in absence of sulfate, silicate, and atmospheric CO 2 to clarify the bond structure. EXAFS showed the unknown backscattering contributions in all the sorption samples regardless of the presence or absence of the tested components. Contrary to structural models proposed in the literature, bi-dentately complexed carbonate ligands do not explain our experimental EXAFS data. But ATR-IR spectra showed that U-carbonato complexes must be involved in the sorption of uranyl on Fh. These results are not contradictory if the carbonate ligands were bound mono-dentately. Nevertheless, carbon cannot act as backscattering atom in carbonate-free samples prepared in N 2 atmosphere. We propose a new structural model including exclusively Fe, H, and O atoms in which the bi

  18. Charge inversion and colloidal stability of carbon black in battery electrolyte solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yan; Narayanan, Aditya; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Cohen Stuart, Martinus Abraham; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects is an international journal devoted to the science of the fundamentals, engineering fundamentals, and applications of colloidal and interfacial phenomena and processes. The journal aims at publishing research papers of high quality and

  19. Order-to-Disorder Transition in Ring-Shaped Colloidal Stains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Marin, Alvaro; Gelderblom, Hanneke; Lohse, Detlef; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus

    2011-01-01

    A colloidal dispersion droplet evaporating from a surface, such as a drying coffee drop, leaves a distinct ring-shaped stain. Although this mechanism is frequently used for particle self-assembly, the conditions for crystallization have remained unclear. Our experiments with monodisperse colloidal

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  1. Colloidal assemblies on patterned silane layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Ulrich; del Campo, Aránzazu; Krüger, Christian; Glasser, Gunnar; Boos, Diana

    2002-01-01

    The site-selective assembly of colloidal polymer particles onto laterally patterned silane layers was studied as a model system for the object assembly process at mesoscale dimensions. The structured silane monolayers on silicon oxide substrates were fabricated by a combination of liquid- and gas-phase deposition of different trialkoxysilanes with a photolithographic patterning technique. By using this method various types of surface functionalizations such as regions with amino functions next to areas of the bare silica surface or positively charged regions of a quaternary ammonium silane surrounded by a hydrophobic octadecylsilane film could be obtained. Furthermore, a triethoxysilane with a photoprotected amino group was synthesized, which allowed direct photopatterning after monolayer preparation, leading to free NH2 groups at the irradiated regions. The different silane monolayer patterns were used to study the surface assembly behavior of carboxylated methacrylate particles by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In dependence of the assembly conditions (different surface functionalizations, pH, and drying conditions), a selective preference of the particles for a specific surface type versus others was found. Site-specific colloid adsorption could be observed also on the photosensitive silane layers after local deprotection with light. From the photosensitive silane and positively charged ammonium silane, molecularly mixed monolayers were prepared, which allowed particle adsorption and photoactivation within the same monolayer as shown by fluorescence labeling. PMID:11959954

  2. Tracking colloid transport in porous media using discrete flow fields and sensitivity of simulated colloid deposition to space discretization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhelong; Zhang, Dongxiao; Li, Xiqing

    2010-02-15

    Advances in pore structure characterization and lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations of flow fields in pore spaces are making mechanistic simulations of colloid transport in real porous media a realistic goal. The primary challenge to reach this goal may be the computational demand of LB flow simulations in discretized porous medium domains at an assemblage scale. In this work, flow fields in simple cubic and dense packing systems were simulated at different discretization resolutions using the LB method. The simulated flow fields were incorporated into to a three-dimensional particle tracking model to simulate colloid transport in the two systems. The simulated colloid deposition tended to become asymptotic at a critical discretization resolution (voxel-grain size ratio = 0.01) at groundwater flow regimes for colloids down to submicrometer level under favorable conditions and down to around 1 microm under unfavorable conditions. The average simulated fluid velocities near grain surfaces were extracted to explain the sensitivities of simulated depositions to space discretization under both conditions. At the critical discretization resolution, current computation capacity would allow flow simulations and particle tracking in assemblage porous medium domains. In addition, particle tracking simulations revealed that colloids may be retained in flow vortices under conditions both favorable and unfavorable for deposition. Colloid retention in flow vortices has been proposed only very recently. Here we provide a mechanistic confirmation to this novel retention process.

  3. Enhancement of the adsorption capacity of the light-weight expanded clay aggregate surface for the metronidazole antibiotic by coating with MgO nanoparticles: Studies on the kinetic, isotherm, and effects of environmental parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Ebrahim Mohammadi; Al-Musawi, Tariq J; Ghahramani, Esmaeil; Kazemian, Hossein; Zarrabi, Mansur

    2017-05-01

    The synthesized MgO nanoparticles were used to coat the light-weight expanded clay aggregates (LECA) and as a metronidazole (MNZ) adsorbent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques were employed to study the surface morphology and characteristics of the adsorbents. MgO/LECA clearly revealed the advantages of the nanocomposite particles, showing high specific surface area (76.12 m 2 /g), significant adsorption sites and functional groups. Between pH 5 and 9, the MNZ sorption was not significantly affected. Kinetic studies revealed that the MNZ adsorption closely followed the Avrami model, with no dominant process controlling the sorption rate. The study of the effects of foreign ions revealed that the addition of carbonate raised the MNZ removal efficiency of LECA by 8% and the total removal of MNZ by MgO/LECA. Furthermore, nitrate and hardness only marginally influenced the MNZ removal efficiency and their effects can be ranked in the order of carbonate>nitrate>hardness. The isotherm adsorption of MNZ was best fitted with the Langmuir model enlighten the monolayer MNZ adsorption on the homogeneous LECA and MgO/LECA surfaces. The maximum adsorption capacity under optimum conditions was enhanced from 56.31 to 84.55 mg/g for LECA and MgO/LECA, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the MgO/LECA nanocomposite showed potential as an efficient adsorbent for MNZ removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, A.; Grobet, P.; Keung, M.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.; Toufar, H.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  5. Colloidal forming of metal/ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Gutierrez, C.A.; Millan, A.J.; Nieto, M.I.; Moreno, R. [Inst. de Ceramica y Vidrio, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Metal/Ceramic composites have very attractive properties as either structural or electronic materials. For certain applications, complex microstructures and shapes are required. Colloidal processing of ceramics has proved to provide better properties and allows to obtain near net complex shaped parts. However colloidal processing has not received a similar attention in powder metallurgy. This work deals with the colloidal approach to the forming of metallic and metal/ceramic composites in an aqueous medium. Rheological behavior of concentrated pure nickel, nickel/alumina and nickel/zirconia suspensions is studied and optimized for obtaining flat surfaces or near net shaped parts by tape casting and gel casting respectively. In each case the influence of the processing additives (acrylic binders for tape casting and carrageenans for gel casting) on the rheological behavior of the slurries is determined. Pure nickel and nickel/ceramic composites with different compositions have been prepared. Static and dynamic sintering studies were performed at different conditions in order to control the porosity and microstructure of the final bodies, which were characterized by optical microscopy. (orig.)

  6. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  7. Nanocomposites of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and montmorillonite (MMT Brazilian clay: A tribological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites of PMMA+MMT Brazilian clays were developed by mechanical mixing in co-rotational twinscrew extrusion and injection molding with varying weight fraction of MMT Brazilian clays. The clays were purchased in crude form and then washed and purified to extract the organic materials and contaminants. Dynamic friction and wear rate of these composites were studied as a function of concentration of the Brazilian clay. With an increase in the amount of MMT Brazilian clay, the dynamic friction of the nanocomposites increases, a clear but not large effect. It can be explained by sticky nature of clay; clay in the composite is also on the surface and sticks to the partner surface. The wear rate as a function of the clay concentration passes through a minimum at 1 wt% MMT; at this concentration the clay provides a reinforcement against abrasion. At higher clay concentrations we see a dramatic increase in wear – a consequence of clay agglomeration and increased brittleness. The conclusions are confirmed by microscopy results.

  8. Morphological instability of a non-equilibrium ice-colloid interface

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, S. S. L.

    2009-10-02

    We assess the morphological stability of a non-equilibrium ice-colloidal suspension interface, and apply the theory to bentonite clay. An experimentally convenient scaling is employed that takes advantage of the vanishing segregation coefficient at low freezing velocities, and when anisotropic kinetic effects are included, the interface is shown to be unstable to travelling waves. The potential for travelling-wave modes reveals a possible mechanism for the polygonal and spiral ice lenses observed in frozen clays. A weakly nonlinear analysis yields a long-wave evolution equation for the interface shape containing a new parameter related to the highly nonlinear liquidus curve in colloidal systems. We discuss the implications of these results for the frost susceptibility of soils and the fabrication of microtailored porous materials. © 2009 The Royal Society.

  9. Water-clay interactions. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Clay minerals contribute to the chemical composition of soil and sediment groundwaters via surface and dissolution/precipitation reactions. The understanding of those processes is still today fragmentary. In this context, our experimental purpose is to identify the contribution of each reaction in the chemical composition of water in a water/clay System. Kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite are the reference clays. After a fine mineralogical study, the exchange equilibria between K + and H + are characterised. Different exchange sites are identified and the exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients are quantified. Then, mixtures of the three clays are equilibrated with acidic and basic (I≤10 -2 M) solutions at 25 deg. C, 60 deg. C, 80 deg. C, during 320 days. The System evolution is observed by chemical analysis of the solutions and mineralogical analysis by TEM. We show that montmorillonite is unstable compared to the kaolinite/amorphous silica assemblage for solutions of pH<7. Aqueous silica is probably controlled by the kinetics of dissolution of the montmorillonite in moderate pH media. In more acidic solutions, amorphous silica precipitates. Al is under control of 'kaolinite' neo-formations. The use of the selectivity coefficients in a numerical simulation shows that K + concentration depends on exchange reactions. The pH has a more complicated evolution, which is not completely understood. This evolution depends on both exchange equilibria and organic acid occurrence. In this type of experiments, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium equations between smectite and kaolinite are inexact. The problem of the thermodynamic nature of clays remains and is not resolved by these solubility experiments. (author) [fr

  10. Colloids or artefacts? A TVO/SKB cooperation project in Olkiluoto, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksoharju, M.; Vuorinen, U.; Snellman, M.; Helenius, J.; Allard, B.; Pettersson, C.; Hinkkanen, H.

    1993-12-01

    TVO (Teollisuuden Voima Oy, Finland) initiated a co-operative task with SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) to critically evaluate colloid sampling methods at the test site in Olkiluoto, SW Finland. Three different colloid sampling methods were compared when sampling borehole OL-KR1 at 613-618 m depth. One possible way to make a conservative in-situ colloid estimation is to omit the contribution from calcite precipitation which is considered to be the main artefact. When this is made the inorganic colloid content (size 1-1000 nm) in Olkiluoto is 184 ±177 ppb consisting of clay minerals, silica, pyrite, goethite and magnesium oxide; the concentration of organic substances are around 100 ppb. The in-situ colloid concentration seems to be low which is in good agreement with experiences from years of sampling in similar environment and depths. The exercise shows the many difficulties encountered when sampling colloids. Small error in the planning, pump rate selection, a lack of precautionary measures, artefact sensitivity of the method etc have a tendency to affect significantly the results on the measured ppb colliod level

  11. Microrheology of colloidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puertas, A M; Voigtmann, T

    2014-01-01

    Microrheology was proposed almost twenty years ago as a technique to obtain rheological properties in soft matter from the microscopic motion of colloidal tracers used as probes, either freely diffusing in the host medium, or subjected to external forces. The former case is known as passive microrheology, and is based on generalizations of the Stokes–Einstein relation between the friction experienced by the probe and the host-fluid viscosity. The latter is termed active microrheology, and extends the measurement of the friction coefficient to the nonlinear-response regime of strongly driven probes. In this review article, we discuss theoretical models available in the literature for both passive and active microrheology, focusing on the case of single-probe motion in model colloidal host media. A brief overview of the theory of passive microrheology is given, starting from the work of Mason and Weitz. Further developments include refined models of the host suspension beyond that of a Newtonian-fluid continuum, and the investigation of probe-size effects. Active microrheology is described starting from microscopic equations of motion for the whole system including both the host-fluid particles and the tracer; the many-body Smoluchowski equation for the case of colloidal suspensions. At low fluid densities, this can be simplified to a two-particle equation that allows the calculation of the friction coefficient with the input of the density distribution around the tracer, as shown by Brady and coworkers. The results need to be upscaled to agree with simulations at moderate density, in both the case of pulling the tracer with a constant force or dragging it at a constant velocity. The full many-particle equation has been tackled by Fuchs and coworkers, using a mode-coupling approximation and the scheme of integration through transients, valid at high densities. A localization transition is predicted for a probe embedded in a glass-forming host suspension. The

  12. Retention of contaminants Cd and Hg adsorbed and intercalated in aluminosilicate clays: A first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto de Lima, F D; Miwa, R H; Miranda, Caetano R

    2017-11-07

    Layered clay materials have been used to incorporate transition metal (TM) contaminants. Based on first-principles calculations, we have examined the energetic stability and the electronic properties due to the incorporation of Cd and Hg in layered clay materials, kaolinite (KAO) and pyrophyllite (PYR). The TM can be (i) adsorbed on the clay surface as well as (ii) intercalated between the clay layers. For the intercalated case, the contaminant incorporation rate can be optimized by controlling the interlayer spacing of the clay, namely, pillared clays. Our total energy results reveal that the incorporation of the TMs can be maximized through a suitable tuning of vertical distance between the clay layers. Based on the calculated TM/clay binding energies and the Langmuir absorption model, we estimate the concentrations of the TMs. Further kinetic properties have been examined by calculating the activation energies, where we found energy barriers of ∼20 and ∼130 meV for adsorbed and intercalated cases, respectively. The adsorption and intercalation of ionized TM adatoms were also considered within the deprotonated KAO surface. This also leads to an optimal interlayer distance which maximizes the TM incorporation rate. By mapping the total charge transfers at the TM/clay interface, we identify a net electronic charge transfer from the TM adatoms to the topmost clay surface layer. The effect of such a charge transfer on the electronic structure of the clay (host) has been examined through a set of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) simulations, characterizing the changes of the XANES spectra upon the presence of the contaminants. Finally, for the pillared clays, we quantify the Cd and Hg K-edge energy shifts of the TMs as a function of the interlayer distance between the clay layers and the Al K-edge spectra for the pristine and pillared clays.

  13. Retention of contaminants Cd and Hg adsorbed and intercalated in aluminosilicate clays: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasto de Lima, F. D.; Miwa, R. H.; Miranda, Caetano R.

    2017-11-01

    Layered clay materials have been used to incorporate transition metal (TM) contaminants. Based on first-principles calculations, we have examined the energetic stability and the electronic properties due to the incorporation of Cd and Hg in layered clay materials, kaolinite (KAO) and pyrophyllite (PYR). The TM can be (i) adsorbed on the clay surface as well as (ii) intercalated between the clay layers. For the intercalated case, the contaminant incorporation rate can be optimized by controlling the interlayer spacing of the clay, namely, pillared clays. Our total energy results reveal that the incorporation of the TMs can be maximized through a suitable tuning of vertical distance between the clay layers. Based on the calculated TM/clay binding energies and the Langmuir absorption model, we estimate the concentrations of the TMs. Further kinetic properties have been examined by calculating the activation energies, where we found energy barriers of ˜20 and ˜130 meV for adsorbed and intercalated cases, respectively. The adsorption and intercalation of ionized TM adatoms were also considered within the deprotonated KAO surface. This also leads to an optimal interlayer distance which maximizes the TM incorporation rate. By mapping the total charge transfers at the TM/clay interface, we identify a net electronic charge transfer from the TM adatoms to the topmost clay surface layer. The effect of such a charge transfer on the electronic structure of the clay (host) has been examined through a set of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) simulations, characterizing the changes of the XANES spectra upon the presence of the contaminants. Finally, for the pillared clays, we quantify the Cd and Hg K-edge energy shifts of the TMs as a function of the interlayer distance between the clay layers and the Al K-edge spectra for the pristine and pillared clays.

  14. Nano-colloid printing of functionalized PLA-b-PEO copolymers: tailoring the surface pattern of adhesive motif and its effect on cell attachment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Knotek, P.; Yang, Y.; Machová, Luďka; Proks, Vladimír; Kučka, Jan; Popelka, Štěpán; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; El Haj, A.; Kubies, Dana; Rypáček, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, Suppl. 1 (2015), S61-S73 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP108/12/P624; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08336S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : tissue engineering * surface pattern * AFM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/64%20Suppl%201/64_S61.pdf

  15. High-spatial and high-mass resolution imaging of surface metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry using colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J; Yeung, Edward S; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-04-15

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of approximately 12 mum was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 mum core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  16. High-Spatial and High-Mass Resolution Imaging of Surface Metabolites of Arabidopsis thaliana by Laser Desorption-Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Colloidal Silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Hyun; Song, Zhihong; Liu, Zhenjiu; Nikolau, Basil J.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-17

    High-spatial resolution and high-mass resolution techniques are developed and adopted for the mass spectrometric imaging of epicuticular lipids on the surface of Arabidopsis thaliana. Single cell level spatial resolution of {approx}12 {micro}m was achieved by reducing the laser beam size by using an optical fiber with 25 {micro}m core diameter in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer and improved matrix application using an oscillating capillary nebulizer. Fine chemical images of a whole flower were visualized in this high spatial resolution showing substructure of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anthers. The LTQ-Orbitrap with a MALDI ion source was adopted to achieve MS imaging in high mass resolution. Specifically, isobaric silver ion adducts of C29 alkane (m/z 515.3741) and C28 aldehyde (m/z 515.3377), indistinguishable in low-resolution LTQ, can now be clearly distinguished and their chemical images could be separately constructed. In the application to roots, the high spatial resolution allowed molecular MS imaging of secondary roots and the high mass resolution allowed direct identification of lipid metabolites on root surfaces.

  17. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p...

  18. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His work includes orga