WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface chemistry differences

  1. Genotoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles with different surface chemistry on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Jiang, Pengfei; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles (NPs) is one of the critical factors determining their cellular responses. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of copper oxide (CuO) NPs with a similar size but different surface chemistry to rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were in...

  2. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  3. Substantial difference in target surface chemistry between reactive dc and high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M.; Hultman, L.

    2018-02-01

    The nitride layer formed in the target race track during the deposition of stoichiometric TiN thin films is a factor 2.5 thicker for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), compared to conventional dc processing (DCMS). The phenomenon is explained using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the as-operated Ti target surface chemistry supported by sputter depth profiles, dynamic Monte Carlo simulations employing the TRIDYN code, and plasma chemical investigations by ion mass spectrometry. The target chemistry and the thickness of the nitride layer are found to be determined by the implantation of nitrogen ions, predominantly N+ and N2+ for HIPIMS and DCMS, respectively. Knowledge of this method-inherent difference enables robust processing of high quality functional coatings.

  4. Surface chemistry of methanol on different ZnO surfaces studied by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lanying; Wang, Yuemin

    2017-05-24

    The adsorption and reactions of CH 3 OH on nonpolar mixed-terminated ZnO(101[combining macron]0), polar O-ZnO(0001[combining macron]) and Zn-ZnO(0001) surfaces have been studied systematically using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) in conjunction with temperature programmed desorption (TPD). For all three ZnO surfaces, exposure to methanol at room temperature leads to (partially) dissociative adsorption resulting in the formation of hydroxyl and methoxy species. Upon heating to higher temperatures, the dissociated and intact methanol species on ZnO(101[combining macron]0) predominantly undergo molecular desorption releasing CH 3 OH at 370 and 440 K. The Zn-O dimer vacancies are responsible for the decomposition of a small fraction of methanol yielding H 2 , CH 2 O and CO at 540 and 565 K. The interaction of methanol with polar O-ZnO and Zn-ZnO surfaces is dominated by thermal decomposition of CH 3 OH to produce CH 2 O, H 2 , CO, CO 2 and H 2 O at elevated temperatures. The high chemical reactivity of both polar surfaces is related to the high abundance of different types of surface defects formed via massive restructuring. Importantly, the reconstructed Zn-ZnO surface exhibits high selectivity for hydrogen production at 520 K, which was not observed for the polar O-ZnO surface. The HREELS data revealed that this low-temperature hydrogen evolution on Zn-ZnO results from methoxy oxidation to a formate species occurring at O-terminated step-edge sites.

  5. DNA damage response to different surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Karns, Michael; Goodson, Michael; Rowe, John; Hussain, Saber M.; Schlager, John J.; Hong Yiling

    2008-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have recently received much attention for their possible applications in biotechnology and life sciences. Ag NPs are of interest to defense and engineering programs for new material applications as well as for commercial purposes as an antimicrobial. However, little is known about the genotoxicity of Ag NPs following exposure to mammalian cells. This study was undertaken to examine the DNA damage response to polysaccharide surface functionalized (coated) and non-functionalized (uncoated) Ag NPs in two types of mammalian cells; mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Both types of Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51 and phosphorylated-H2AX expression. Furthermore both of them induced cell death as measured by the annexin V protein expression and MTT assay. Our observations also suggested that the different surface chemistry of Ag NPs induce different DNA damage response: coated Ag NPs exhibited more severe damage than uncoated Ag NPs. The results suggest that polysaccharide coated particles are more individually distributed while agglomeration of the uncoated particles limits the surface area availability and access to membrane bound organelles

  6. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures

  7. Study of Hexane Adsorption on Activated Carbons with Differences in Their Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Monje, Diana; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2018-02-22

    The study of aliphatic compounds adsorption on activated carbon can be carried out from the energetic change involved in the interaction; the energy values can be determined from isotherms or by the immersion enthalpy. Vapor phase adsorption isotherms of hexane at 263 K on five activated carbons with different content of oxygenated groups and the immersion enthalpy of the activated carbons in hexane and water were determined in order to characterize the interactions in the solid-liquid system, and for calculating the hydrophobic factor of the activated carbons. The micropore volume and characteristic energy from adsorption isotherms of hexane, the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area from the adsorption isotherms of N₂, and the area accessible to the hexane from the immersion enthalpy were calculated. The activated carbon with the lowest content of oxygenated groups (0.30 µmolg - ¹) and the highest surface area (996 m²g - ¹) had the highest hexane adsorption value: 0.27 mmol g - ¹; the values for E o were between 5650 and 6920 Jmol - ¹ and for ΔH im were between -66.1 and -16.4 Jg - ¹. These determinations allow us to correlate energetic parameters with the surface area and the chemical modifications that were made to the solids, where the surface hydrophobic character of the activated carbon favors the interaction.

  8. Surface chemistry theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bikerman, J J

    2013-01-01

    Surface Chemistry Theory and Applications focuses on liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-gas, solid-liquid, and solid-solid surfaces. The book first offers information on liquid-gas surfaces, including surface tension, measurement of surface tension, rate of capillarity rise, capillary attraction, bubble pressure and pore size, and surface tension and temperature. The text then ponders on liquid-liquid and solid-gas surfaces. Discussions focus on surface energy of solids, surface roughness and cleanness, adsorption of gases and vapors, adsorption hysteresis, interfacial tension, and interfacial t

  9. Surface Chemistry of Gold Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nathan D; Lin, Wayne; Hinman, Joshua G; Dennison, Jordan M; Vartanian, Ariane M; Abadeer, Nardine S; Grzincic, Elissa M; Jacob, Lisa M; Li, Ji; Murphy, Catherine J

    2016-10-04

    Gold nanorods have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique optical properties, and they have the potential to greatly impact many areas of science and technology. Understanding the structure and chemical makeup of their surfaces as well as how to tailor them is of paramount importance in the development of their successful applications. This Feature Article reviews the current understanding of the surface chemistry of as-synthesized gold nanorods, methods of tailoring the surface chemistry of gold nanorods with various inorganic and organic coatings/ligands, and the techniques employed to characterize ligands on the surface of gold nanorods as well as the associated measurement challenges. Specifically, we address the challenges of determining how thick the ligand shell is, how many ligands per nanorod are present on the surface, and where the ligands are located in regiospecific and mixed-ligand systems. We conclude with an outlook on the development of the surface chemistry of gold nanorods leading to the development of a synthetic nanoparticle surface chemistry toolbox analogous to that of synthetic organic chemistry and natural product synthesis.

  10. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Jürgen; Wittstock, Arne; Baumann, Theodore F.; Weissmüller, Jörg; Bäumer, Marcus; Hamza, Alex V.

    2009-01-01

    Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  11. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  12. Surface chemistry in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollinger, Mikkel; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    the usual single surface ('2D') process because indirect adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in the transition state are absent in the '3D' case. The prospects for STM-induced single molecule chemistry and for '3D' catalysts are discussed. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......Based on self-consistent density functional calculations it is shown that a new dissociation process for CO adsorbed on a Ru(0001) surface is made possible when the distance to a second Ru(0001) surface placed just above it is below some critical value. This '3D' process is more facile than...

  13. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Stephanie E.; Vanselous, Heather; Petersen, Poul B.

    2018-03-01

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in natural environments, spanning atmospheric, geological, oceanographic, and biological systems, as well as in technical applications, such as fuel cells and membrane filtration. Where liquid water terminates at a surface, an interfacial region is formed, which exhibits distinct properties from the bulk aqueous phase. The unique properties of water are governed by the hydrogen-bonded network. The chemical and physical properties of the surface dictate the boundary conditions of the bulk hydrogen-bonded network and thus the interfacial properties of the water and any molecules in that region. Understanding the properties of interfacial water requires systematically characterizing the structure and dynamics of interfacial water as a function of the surface chemistry. In this review, we focus on the use of experimental surface-specific spectroscopic methods to understand the properties of interfacial water as a function of surface chemistry. Investigations of the air-water interface, as well as efforts in tuning the properties of the air-water interface by adding solutes or surfactants, are briefly discussed. Buried aqueous interfaces can be accessed with careful selection of spectroscopic technique and sample configuration, further expanding the range of chemical environments that can be probed, including solid inorganic materials, polymers, and water immiscible liquids. Solid substrates can be finely tuned by functionalization with self-assembled monolayers, polymers, or biomolecules. These variables provide a platform for systematically tuning the chemical nature of the interface and examining the resulting water structure. Finally, time-resolved methods to probe the dynamics of interfacial water are briefly summarized before discussing the current status and future directions in studying the structure and dynamics of interfacial water.

  14. Recent advances in quantum dot surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Douglas A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2014-03-12

    Quantum dot (QD) surface chemistry is an emerging field in semiconductor nanocrystal related research. Along with size manipulation, the careful control of QD surface chemistry allows modulation of the optical properties of a QD suspension. Even a single molecule bound to the surface can introduce new functionalities. Herein, we summarize the recent advances in QD surface chemistry and the resulting effects on optical and electronic properties. Specifically, this review addresses three main issues: (i) how surface chemistry affects the optical properties of QDs, (ii) how it influences the excited state dynamics, and (iii) how one can manipulate surface chemistry to control the interactions between QDs and metal oxides, metal nanoparticles, and in self-assembled QD monolayers.

  15. Operando chemistry of catalyst surfaces during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian; Sun, Zaicheng; Opalade, Adedamola A; Wang, Nan; Fu, Wensheng; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2017-04-03

    Chemistry of a catalyst surface during catalysis is crucial for a fundamental understanding of mechanism of a catalytic reaction performed on the catalyst in the gas or liquid phase. Due to the pressure- or molecular density-dependent entropy contribution of gas or liquid phase of the reactants and the potential formation of a catalyst surface during catalysis different from that observed in an ex situ condition, the characterization of the surface of a catalyst under reaction conditions and during catalysis can be significant and even necessary for understanding the catalytic mechanism at a molecular level. Electron-based analytical techniques are challenging for studying catalyst nanoparticles in the gas or liquid phase although they are necessary techniques to employ. Instrumentation and further development of these electron-based techniques have now made in situ/operando studies of catalysts possible. New insights into the chemistry and structure of catalyst nanoparticles have been uncovered over the last decades. Herein, the origin of the differences between ex situ and in situ/operando studies of catalysts, and the technical challenges faced as well as the corresponding instrumentation and innovations utilized for characterizing catalysts under reaction conditions and during catalysis, are discussed. The restructuring of catalyst surfaces driven by the pressure of reactant(s) around a catalyst, restructuring in reactant(s) driven by reaction temperature and restructuring during catalysis are also reviewed herein. The remaining challenges and possible solutions are briefly discussed.

  16. The impact of different nanoparticle surface chemistry and size on uptake and toxicity in a murine macrophage cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clift, Martin J.D.; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Brown, David M.; Duffin, Rodger; Donaldson, Ken; Proudfoot, Lorna; Guy, Keith; Stone, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the uptake, kinetics and cellular distribution of different surface coated quantum dots (QDs) before relating this to their toxicity. J774.A1 cells were treated with organic, COOH and NH 2 (PEG) surface coated QDs (40 nM). Model 20 nm and 200 nm COOH-modified coated polystyrene beads (PBs) were also examined (50 μg ml -1 ). The potential for uptake of QDs was examined by both fixed and live cell confocal microscopy as well as by flow cytometry over 2 h. Both the COOH 20 nm and 200 nm PBs were clearly and rapidly taken up by the J774.A1 cells, with uptake of 20 nm PBs being relatively quicker and more extensive. Similarly, COOH QDs were clearly taken up by the macrophages. Uptake of NH 2 (PEG) QDs was not detectable by live cell imaging however, was observed following 3D reconstruction of fixed cells, as well as by flow cytometry. Cells treated with organic QDs, monitored by live cell imaging, showed only a small amount of uptake in a relatively small number of cells. This uptake was insufficient to be detected by flow cytometry. Imaging of fixed cells was not possible due to a loss in cell integrity related to cytotoxicity. A significant reduction (p 2 (PEG) QDs, 20 nm and 200 nm PBs at pH 4.0 (indicative of an endosome) after 2 h, suggesting reduced stability. No evidence of exocytosis was found over 2 h. These findings confirm that surface coating has a significant influence on the mode of NP interaction with cells, as well as the subsequent consequences of that interaction

  17. Surface Coordination Chemistry of Metal Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengxin; Qin, Ruixuan; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2017-02-15

    Surface coordination chemistry of nanomaterials deals with the chemistry on how ligands are coordinated on their surface metal atoms and influence their properties at the molecular level. This Perspective demonstrates that there is a strong link between surface coordination chemistry and the shape-controlled synthesis, and many intriguing surface properties of metal nanomaterials. While small adsorbates introduced in the synthesis can control the shapes of metal nanocrystals by minimizing their surface energy via preferential coordination on specific facets, surface ligands properly coordinated on metal nanoparticles readily promote their catalysis via steric interactions and electronic modifications. The difficulty in the research of surface coordination chemistry of nanomaterials mainly lies in the lack of effective tools to characterize their molecular surface coordination structures. Also highlighted are several model material systems that facilitate the characterizations of surface coordination structures, including ultrathin nanostructures, atomically precise metal nanoclusters, and atomically dispersed metal catalysts. With the understanding of surface coordination chemistry, the molecular mechanisms behind various important effects (e.g., promotional effect of surface ligands on catalysis, support effect in supported metal nanocatalysts) of metal nanomaterials are disclosed.

  18. Enhancement of atom transfer in different surface chemistry of hydrogenated vs. fluorinated tribromobenzene on Ag(111) and Cu(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecily mary glory, D.; Sambathkumar, K.; Madivanane, R.; Rajkamal, N.; Venkatachalapathy, M.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic interactions of hydrogenated & fluorinated tribromobenzene on Ag and Cu surfaces. First bromine dehalogenation takes place right upon adsorption due to catalytic properties of Ag. Different adsorption geometries of monomers and dimmers of 1,3,5-tribromo-2,4,6-trifluoro-benzene(TBFB) and 1,3,5-tribromobenzene(TBB). DFT calculations of the Csbnd Br binding energy dependent on the amount of remaining bromine atoms for both TBFB and TBB were performed. The experiments were performed at low temperature of 80 K.STM measurements where performed for of TBFB and TBB. STM show adsorbed molecules in a loose arrangement of molecules. NBO analysis the stability of the molecule arising within hyper-conjugative interactions. The HOMO and LUMO energies and electronic charge transfer (ECT) confirms that electronic transition. High field indicates that this molecule exhibit considerable electrical conductivity in atomic charges. The ESP map is found to be positive within the molecule. The negative charges have a tendency to drift from left to right. The computed thermodynamic parameters like heat capacities (Cºp,m), entropies (Sºm) and enthalpies changes (Hºm) are used for various electrical field.

  19. Switching surface chemistry with supramolecular machines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, Timothy D.; Kelly, Michael James; Jeppesen, Jan O. (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Huber, Dale L.; Kushmerick, James G.; Flood, Amar H. (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Perkins, Julie (University of California, Los Angeles, CA); Cao, Jianguo (University of California, Los Angeles, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Tethered supramolecular machines represent a new class of active self-assembled monolayers in which molecular configurations can be reversibly programmed using electrochemical stimuli. We are using these machines to address the chemistry of substrate surfaces for integrated microfluidic systems. Interactions between the tethered tetracationic cyclophane host cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) and dissolved {pi}-electron-rich guest molecules, such as tetrathiafulvalene, have been reversibly switched by oxidative electrochemistry. The results demonstrate that surface-bound supramolecular machines can be programmed to adsorb or release appropriately designed solution species for manipulating surface chemistry.

  20. Introduction to Applied Colloid and Surface Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    Colloid and Surface Chemistry is a subject of immense importance and implications both to our everyday life and numerous industrial sectors, ranging from coatings and materials to medicine and biotechnology. How do detergents really clean? (Why can’t we just use water ?) Why is milk “milky” Why do......, to the benefit of both the environment and our pocket. Cosmetics is also big business! Creams, lotions and other personal care products are really just complex emulsions. All of the above can be explained by the principles and methods of colloid and surface chemistry. A course on this topic is truly valuable...

  1. Covalent-Bond Formation via On-Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2017-05-02

    In this Review article pioneering work and recent achievements in the emerging research area of on-surface chemistry is discussed. On-surface chemistry, sometimes also called two-dimensional chemistry, shows great potential for bottom-up preparation of defined nanostructures. In contrast to traditional organic synthesis, where reactions are generally conducted in well-defined reaction flasks in solution, on-surface chemistry is performed in the cavity of a scanning probe microscope on a metal crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The metal first acts as a platform for self-assembly of the organic building blocks and in many cases it also acts as a catalyst for the given chemical transformation. Products and hence success of the reaction are directly analyzed by scanning probe microscopy. This Review provides a general overview of this chemistry highlighting advantages and disadvantages as compared to traditional reaction setups. The second part of the Review then focuses on reactions that have been successfully conducted as on-surface processes. On-surface Ullmann and Glaser couplings are addressed. In addition, cyclodehydrogenation reactions and cycloadditions are discussed and reactions involving the carbonyl functionality are highlighted. Finally, the first examples of sequential on-surface chemistry are considered in which two different functionalities are chemoselectively addressed. The Review gives an overview for experts working in the area but also offers a starting point to non-experts to enter into this exciting new interdisciplinary research field. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Grain surface chemistry in protoplanetary disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboussin, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Planetary formation occurs in the protoplanetary disks of gas and dust. Although dust represents only 1% of the total disk mass, it plays a fundamental role in disk chemical evolution since it acts as a catalyst for the formation of molecules. Understanding this chemistry is therefore essential to determine the initial conditions from which planets form. During my thesis, I studied grain-surface chemistry and its impact on the chemical evolution of molecular cloud, initial condition for disk formation, and protoplanetary disk. Thanks to numerical simulations, using the gas-grain code Nautilus, I showed the importance of diffusion reactions and gas-grain interactions for the abundances of gas-phase species. Model results combined with observations also showed the effects of the physical structure (in temperature, density, AV) on the molecular distribution in disks. (author)

  3. Criegee Chemistry on Aqueous Organic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Shinichi; Colussi, A J

    2017-04-06

    In the troposphere, the fate of gas-phase Criegee intermediates (CIs) is deemed to be determined by their reactions with water molecules. Here it is shown that CIs produced in situ on the surface of water/acetonitrile (W/AN) solutions react competitively with millimolar carboxylic acids. Present experiments probe, via online electrospray mass spectrometry, CIs' chemistry on the surface of α-humulene and β-caryophyllene in W/AN microjets exposed to O 3 (g) for competitiveness being an increasing function of n. Present findings demonstrate that CIs can react with species other than H 2 O on the surface of aqueous organic aerosols due to the low water concentrations prevalent in the outermost interfacial layers.

  4. From helical to planar chirality by on-surface chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Švec, Martin; Vacek, Jaroslav; Vacek Chocholoušová, Jana; Jančařík, Andrej; Rybáček, Jiří; Kośmider, K.; Stará, Irena G.; Jelínek, Pavel; Starý, Ivo

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2017), s. 213-218 ISSN 1755-4330 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29667S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : chirality * AFM * STM * helicene * on surface chemistry * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Organic chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 25.870, year: 2016

  5. Magmatic and fragmentation controls on volcanic ash surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayris, Paul M.; Diplas, Spyros; Damby, David E.; Hornby, Adrian J.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Delmelle, Pierre; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The chemical effects of silicate ash ejected by explosive volcanic eruptions on environmental systems are fundamentally mediated by ash particle surfaces. Ash surfaces are a composite product of magmatic properties and fragmentation mechanisms, as well as in-plume and atmospheric alteration processes acting upon those surfaces during and after the eruption. Recent attention has focused on the capacity of alteration processes to shape ash surfaces; most notably, several studies have utilised X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a technique probing the elemental composition and coordination state of atoms within the top 10 nm of ash surfaces, to identify patterns of elemental depletions and enrichments relative to bulk ash chemical composition. Under the presumption of surface and bulk equivalence, any disparities have been previously attributed to surface alteration processes, but the ubiquity of some depletions (e.g., Ca, Fe) across multiple ash studies, irrespective of eruptive origin, could suggest these to be features of the surface produced at the instant of magma fragmentation. To investigate this possibility further, we conducted rapid decompression experiments at different pressure conditions and at ambient and magmatic temperature on porous andesitic rocks. These experiments produced fragmented ash material untouched by secondary alteration, which were compared to particles produced by crushing of large clasts from the same experiments. We investigated a restricted size fraction (63-90 μm) from both fragmented and crushed materials, determining bulk chemistry and mineralogy via XRF, SEM-BSE and EPMA, and investigated the chemical composition of the ash surface by XPS. Analyses suggest that fragmentation under experimental conditions partitioned a greater fraction of plagioclase-rich particles into the selected size fraction, relative to particles produced by crushing. Trends in surface chemical composition in fragmented and crushed particles mirror that

  6. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  7. The physics of water droplets on surfaces: exploring the effects of roughness and surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, K. F.; Panth, M.; Sommers, A. D.

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores the fluid property commonly called surface tension, its effect on droplet shape and contact angle, and the major influences of contact angle behaviour (i.e. surface roughness and surface chemistry). Images of water droplets placed on treated copper surfaces are used to measure the contact angles between the droplets and the surface. The surface wettability is manipulated either by growing a self-assembled monolayer on the surface to make it hydrophobic or by changing the surface roughness. The main activities in this experiment, then, are (1) preparing and studying surfaces with different surface wettability and roughness; (2) determining the shape and contact angles of water droplets on these surfaces; and (3) demonstrating the spontaneous motion of water droplets using surface tension gradients.

  8. Characterisation of the inorganic chemistry of surface waters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of this study was to determine a simple inorganic chemistry index that can be used for all surface waters in South Africa, in order to characterise the inorganic chemistry of surface waters. Water quality data collected up until 1999 from all sample monitoring stations (2 068 monitoring stations, 364 659 ...

  9. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  10. Surface chemistry: Key to control and advance myriad technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, John T.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field. PMID:21245359

  11. Variability in chemistry of surface and soil waters of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water chemistry is important for the maintenance of wetland structure and function. Interpreting ecological patterns in a wetland system therefore requires an in-depth understanding of the water chemistry of that system. We investigated the spatial distribution of chemical solutes both in soil pore water and surface water, ...

  12. Sex Differences in the Mental Rotation of Chemistry Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieff, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Mental-rotation ability modestly predicts chemistry achievement. As such, sex differences in mental-rotation ability have been implicated as a causal factor that can explain sex differences in chemistry achievement and degree attainment. Although there is a correlation between mental-rotation ability and chemistry achievement, laboratory and field…

  13. Liquid flow along a solid surface reversibly alters interfacial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Dan; Backus, Ellen H G; Hunger, Johannes; Parekh, Sapun H; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-06-06

    In nature, aqueous solutions often move collectively along solid surfaces (for example, raindrops falling on the ground and rivers flowing through riverbeds). However, the influence of such motion on water-surface interfacial chemistry is unclear. In this work, we combine surface-specific sum frequency generation spectroscopy and microfluidics to show that at immersed calcium fluoride and fused silica surfaces, flow leads to a reversible modification of the surface charge and subsequent realignment of the interfacial water molecules. Obtaining equivalent effects under static conditions requires a substantial change in bulk solution pH (up to 2 pH units), demonstrating the coupling between flow and chemistry. These marked flow-induced variations in interfacial chemistry should substantially affect our understanding and modeling of chemical processes at immersed surfaces. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    KAUST Repository

    Pramana, Stevin S.

    2017-03-02

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10−10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10−6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  15. Electrical conductivity of conductive carbon blacks: influence of surface chemistry and topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantea, Dana; Darmstadt, Hans; Kaliaguine, Serge; Roy, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Conductive carbon blacks from different manufacturers were studied in order to obtain some insight into the relation between their electrical conductivity and their surface properties. The surface chemistry was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), whereas the topology of the carbon black surface was investigated using low-pressure nitrogen adsorption. All these techniques yield information on the graphitic character of the surface. In general, the electrical conductivity of the conductive blacks increases with the graphitic character of the surface. For low surface area conductive blacks, the electrical conductivity correlates well with the surface chemistry. In the case of the XPS and SIMS data, this correlation is also valid when other types of carbon blacks such as thermal and furnace blacks are included, confirming the determining influence of the carbon black surface chemistry on the electrical conductivity

  16. Molecular dynamics study on mechanism of preformed particle gel transporting through nanopores: Surface chemistry and heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng; Zhang, Heng; Ma, Ying; Hao, Qingquan; Liu, Gang; Sun, Jichao; Yuan, Shiling

    2017-10-01

    The translocation behavior of preformed particle gel (PPG) in porous media is crucial for its application in enhanced oil recovery. By means of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, the translocation mechanism of PPG confined in different silica nanopores were investigated. The influence of surface chemistry and chemical heterogeneity of silica nanopore on the translocation process was revealed. As the degree of surface hydroxylation increases and the heterogeneity decreases, the pulling force needed to drive PPG decreases. We infer that the nanopore's surface (i.e. surface chemistry and heterogeneity) affects the translocation of PPG indirectly by forming different hydration layers.

  17. Models of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar cloud cores with a stochastic approach to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantcheva, T.; Herbst, E.

    2004-08-01

    We present a gas-grain model of homogeneous cold cloud cores with time-independent physical conditions. In the model, the gas-phase chemistry is treated via rate equations while the diffusive granular chemistry is treated stochastically. The two phases are coupled through accretion and evaporation. A small network of surface reactions accounts for the surface production of the stable molecules water, formaldehyde, methanol, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and methane. The calculations are run for a time of 107 years at three different temperatures: 10 K, 15 K, and 20 K. The results are compared with those produced in a totally deterministic gas-grain model that utilizes the rate equation method for both the gas-phase and surface chemistry. The results of the different models are in agreement for the abundances of the gaseous species except for later times when the surface chemistry begins to affect the gas. The agreement for the surface species, however, is somewhat mixed. The average abundances of highly reactive surface species can be orders of magnitude larger in the stochastic-deterministic model than in the purely deterministic one. For non-reactive species, the results of the models can disagree strongly at early times, but agree to well within an order of magnitude at later times for most molecules. Strong exceptions occur for CO and H2CO at 10 K, and for CO2 at 20 K. The agreement seems to be best at a temperature of 15 K. As opposed to the use of the normal rate equation method of surface chemistry, the modified rate method is in significantly better agreement with the stochastic-deterministic approach. Comparison with observations of molecular ices in dense clouds shows mixed agreement.

  18. Comparative Study of Surface Temperature Behavior of Commercial Li-Ion Pouch Cells of Different Chemistries and Capacities by Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shovon Goutam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-uniform surface temperature distribution of a battery cell results from complex reactions inside the cell and makes efficient thermal management a challenging task. This experimental work attempts to determine the evolution of surface temperature distribution of three pouch type commercial cells: Nickel Manganese Cobalt oxide (NMC-based 20 Ah cell, Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP 14 Ah, and Lithium Titanate Oxide (LTO 5 Ah battery cell by using contact thermistor and infrared (IR thermography. High current (up to 100 A continuous charge/discharge and high current (80 A micro pulse cycling profile were applied on the cells. It was found that thermistor based temperature profile varied cell to cell, especially the LTO cell. Among the investigated cells, the NMC cell shows highest temperature rise and the LTO cell the lowest rise. IR (Infrared images revealed the spatial distribution of surface temperature, in particular the location of the hottest region varies depending not only on the geometrical and material properties of the cell, but also the type of loads applied on the cells. Finally, a modeling perspective of the cell temperature non-uniformity is also discussed.

  19. Surface chemistry: Single handedness in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Planar molecules may break mirror symmetry when aligned on a surface, but both right- and left-handed forms will be created. Starting with a single-handed precursor, chiral adsorbates of planar hydrocarbons with a single handedness are formed in on-surface reactions.

  20. Chemistry - Toward efficient hydrogen production at surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Christensen, Claus H.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations are providing a molecular picture of hydrogen production on catalytic surfaces and within enzymes, knowledge that may guide the design of new, more efficient catalysts for the hydrogen economy.......Calculations are providing a molecular picture of hydrogen production on catalytic surfaces and within enzymes, knowledge that may guide the design of new, more efficient catalysts for the hydrogen economy....

  1. Anisotropic surface chemistry properties and adsorption behavior of silicate mineral crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longhua; Tian, Jia; Wu, Houqin; Fang, Shuai; Lu, Zhongyuan; Ma, Caifeng; Sun, Wei; Hu, Yuehua

    2018-03-07

    Anisotropic surface properties of minerals play an important role in a variety of fields. With a focus on the two most intensively investigated silicate minerals (i.e., phyllosilicate minerals and pegmatite aluminosilicate minerals), this review highlights the research on their anisotropic surface properties based on their crystal structures. Four surface features comprise the anisotropic surface chemistry of minerals: broken bonds, energy, wettability, and charge. Analysis of surface broken bond and energy anisotropy helps to explain the cleavage and growth properties of mineral crystals, and understanding surface wettability and charge anisotropy is critical to the analysis of minerals' solution behavior, such as their flotation performance and rheological properties. In a specific reaction, the anisotropic surface properties of minerals are reflected in the adsorption strengths of reagents on different mineral surfaces. Combined with the knowledge of mineral crushing and grinding, a thorough understanding of the anisotropic surface chemistry properties and the anisotropic adsorption behavior of minerals will lead to the development of effective relational models comprising their crystal structure, surface chemistry properties, and targeted reagent adsorption. Overall, such a comprehensive approach is expected to firmly establish the connection between selective cleavage of mineral crystals for desired surfaces and designing novel reagents selectively adsorbed on the mineral surfaces. As tools to characterize the anisotropic surface chemistry properties of minerals, DLVO theory, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clean Air Markets - Monitoring Surface Water Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about how EPA uses Long Term Monitoring (LTM) and Temporily Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) to track the effect of the Clean Air Act Amendments on acidity of surface waters in the eastern U.S.

  3. Influence of the carbon fiber surface microstructure on the surface chemistry generated by a thermo-chemical surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautard, F.; Ozcan, S.; Paulauskas, F.; Spruiell, J.E.; Meyer, H.; Lance, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Continuous thermo-chemical surface treatment used to functionalize different types of carbon fibers. ► Surface density of functional groups directly correlated to the size of the surface microstructure. ► Preferential creation of hydroxyls and carboxylic acids confirmed regardless of the type of carbon fiber. ► Effective surface treatment regardless of the fiber surface microstructure. ► Potential alternative to electro-chemical surface treatment. - Abstract: Carbon fibers made of textile and aerospace grade polyacrylonitrile precursor fibers were surface treated by a continuous gas phase thermochemical treatment. The surface chemistry generated by the surface treatment was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface and the average entire microstructure of the fibers were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Depending on the grade of the precursor, the final surface concentration of oxygen was comprised between 14% and 24%, whereas the typical commercial electrochemical surface treatments led to concentrations of around 8% with the same fibers. The final concentration of oxygen was directly correlated to the size of the crystallites which was a function of the grade of the polyacrylonitrile precursor and to the corresponding surface microstructure. The thermochemical surface treatment enabled a better control of the nature of the oxygen-containing functionalities as well. Whatever the grade of the precursor, desired hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid functionalities were preferably generated, which is observed to be difficult with electrochemical surface treatments.

  4. Surface chemistry governs cellular tropism of nanoparticles in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eric; Gaudin, Alice; King, Amanda R.; Seo, Young-Eun; Suh, Hee-Won; Deng, Yang; Cui, Jiajia; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Huttner, Anita; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles are of long-standing interest for the treatment of neurological diseases such as glioblastoma. Most past work focused on methods to introduce nanoparticles into the brain, suggesting that reaching the brain interstitium will be sufficient to ensure therapeutic efficacy. However, optimized nanoparticle design for drug delivery to the central nervous system is limited by our understanding of their cellular deposition in the brain. Here, we investigated the cellular fate of poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles presenting different surface chemistries, after administration by convection-enhanced delivery. We demonstrate that nanoparticles with `stealth' properties mostly avoid internalization by all cell types, but internalization can be enhanced by functionalization with bio-adhesive end-groups. We also show that association rates measured in cultured cells predict the extent of internalization of nanoparticles in cell populations. Finally, evaluating therapeutic efficacy in an orthotopic model of glioblastoma highlights the need to balance significant uptake without inducing adverse toxicity.

  5. Manganese phospate physical chemistry and surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najera R, N.; Romero G, E. T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for the manganese phosphate (III) synthesis (MnP0 4 H 2 0) from manganese chloride. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by: X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, infrared analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The surface characterization is obtained through the determination of surface area, point of zero charge and kinetics of moisture. As a phosphate compound of a metal with low oxidation state is a promising compound for removal pollutants from water and soil, can be used for the potential construction of containment barriers for radioactive wastes. (Author)

  6. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  7. Surface chemistry and microscopy of food powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgain, Jennifer; Petit, Jeremy; Scher, Joël; Rasch, Ron; Bhandari, Bhesh; Gaiani, Claire

    2017-12-01

    Despite high industrial and scientific interest, a comprehensive review of the surface science of food powders is still lacking. There is a real gap between scientific concerns of the field and accessible reviews on the subject. The global description of the surface of food powders by multi-scale microscopy approaches seems to be essential in order to investigate their complexity and take advantage of their high innovation potential. Links between these techniques and the interest to develop a multi-analytical approach to investigate scientific questions dealing with powder functionality are discussed in the second part of the review. Finally, some techniques used in others fields and showing promising possibilities in the food powder domain will be highlighted.

  8. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  9. Flame Treatment of Low-Density Polyethylene: Surface Chemistry Across the Length Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jing; Gunst, Ullrich; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between surface chemistry and morphology of flame treated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was studied by various characterization techniques across different length scales. The chemical composition of the surface was determined on the micrometer scale by X-ray photoelectron

  10. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørskov, Jens K.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future challenges. PMID:21220337

  11. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future...

  12. Density Functional Theory in Surface Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norskov, Jens

    2011-05-19

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. Current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling between theory and experiment and future challenges.

  13. Smart Surface Chemistries of Conducting Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Johan Ulrik

    In this thesis we investigate post-polymerization covalent modifications of poly(3,4-dioxythiophene (PEDOT)-type conducting polymers. The aim of the modifications is to gain specific control of the interaction between the material and living mammalian cells. The use of “click-chemistry” to modify...... film substrates. Complementing these findings, we introduce a novel technique for fabricating surface chemical gradients on PEDOT-N3 substrates. The technique is based on applying “electro-click chemistry” to locally induce covalent modifications. Further supplementing these results, we develop......-ethylene-glycol-coatings of the conducting polymer substrates. These coatings render the substrates resistant to protein adsorption. Hence, the choice of solvent is found to be a key parameter for achieving functional post-polymerization modifications of PEDOT-N3. The methods developed in this thesis are highly generic, and can therefore...

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  15. Deconvoluting the effects of surface chemistry and nanoscale topography: Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm nucleation on Si-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Huang, Jinglin; Say, Carmen; Dorit, Robert L; Queeney, K T

    2018-06-01

    The nucleation of biofilms is known to be affected by both the chemistry and topography of the underlying substrate, particularly when topography includes nanoscale (topography vs. chemistry is complicated by concomitant variation in both as a result of typical surface modification techniques. Analyzing the behavior of biofilm-forming bacteria exposed to surfaces with systematic, independent variation of both topography and surface chemistry should allow differentiation of the two effects. Silicon surfaces with reproducible nanotopography were created by anisotropic etching in deoxygenated water. Surface chemistry was varied independently to create hydrophilic (OH-terminated) and hydrophobic (alkyl-terminated) surfaces. The attachment and proliferation of Psuedomonas aeruginosa to these surfaces was characterized over a period of 12 h using fluorescence and confocal microscopy. The number of attached bacteria as well as the structural characteristics of the nucleating biofilm were influenced by both surface nanotopography and surface chemistry. In general terms, the presence of both nanoscale features and hydrophobic surface chemistry enhance bacterial attachment and colonization. However, the structural details of the resulting biofilms suggest that surface chemistry and topography interact differently on each of the four surface types we studied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent advances in study of uranium surface chemistry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Lizhu; Lai, Xinchun; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is very important in nuclear energy industry; however, uranium and its alloys corrode seriously in various atmospheres because of their chemical reactivities. In China, continuous investigations focused on surface chemistry have been carried out for a thorough understanding of uranium in order to provide technical support for its engineering applications. Oxidation kinetics of uranium and its alloys in oxidizing atmospheres are in good agreement with those in the literature. In addition to the traditional techniques, non-traditional methods have been applied for oxidation kinetics of uranium, and it has been verified that spectroscopic ellipsometry and X-ray diffraction are effective and nondestructive tools for in situ kinetic studies. The inhibition efficiency of oxidizing gas impurities on uranium hydrogenation is found to follow the order CO 2 > CO > O 2 , and the broadening of XPS shoulders with temperature in depth profile of hydrogenated uranium surface is discussed, which is not mentioned in the literature. Significant progress on surface chemistry of alloyed uranium (U-Nb and U-Ti) in hydrogen atmosphere is reported, and it is revealed that the hydrating nucleation and subsequent growth of alloyed uranium are closely connected with the surface states, underlying metal matrix, and it is microstructure-dependent. In this review, the recent advances in uranium surface chemistry in China, published so far mostly in Chinese language, are briefly summarized. Suggestions for further study are made. (orig.)

  17. The Impact of Nanoparticle Surface Chemistry on Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Angie Sue Morris

    The unique properties of nanomaterials, such as their small size and large surface area-to-volume ratios, have attracted tremendous interest in the scientific community over the last few decades. Thus, the synthesis and characterization of many different types of nanoparticles has been well defined and reported on in the literature. Current research efforts have redirected from the basic study of nanomaterial synthesis and their properties to more application-based studies where the development of functionally active materials is necessary. Today such nanoparticle-based systems exist for a range of biomedical applications including imaging, drug delivery and sensors. The inherent properties of the nanomaterial, although important, aren't always ideal for specific applications. In order to optimize nanoparticles for biomedical applications it is often desirable to tune their surface properties. Researchers have shown that these surface properties (such as charge, hydrophobicity, or reactivity) play a direct role in the interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems can be altered by attaching molecules to the surface of nanoparticles. In this work, the effects of physicochemical properties of a wide variety of nanoparticles was investigated using in vitro and in vivo models. For example, copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles were of interest due to their instability in biological media. These nanoparticles undergo dissolution when in an aqueous environment and tend to aggregate. Therefore, the cytotoxicity of two sizes of CuO NPs was evaluated in cultured cells to develop a better understanding of how these propertied effect toxicity outcomes in biological systems. From these studies, it was determined that CuO NPs are cytotoxic to lung cells in a size-dependent manner and that dissolved copper ions contribute to the cytotoxicity however it is not solely responsible for cell death. Moreover, silica nanoparticles are one of the most commonly used nanomaterials

  18. Influence of surface structure and chemistry on water droplet splashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kerstin; Grichnik, Roland

    2016-08-06

    Water droplet splashing and aerosolization play a role in human hygiene and health systems as well as in crop culturing. Prevention or reduction of splashing can prevent transmission of diseases between animals and plants and keep technical systems such as pipe or bottling systems free of contamination. This study demonstrates to what extent the surface chemistry and structures influence the water droplet splashing behaviour. Smooth surfaces and structured replicas of Calathea zebrina (Sims) Lindl. leaves were produced. Modification of their wettability was done by coating with hydrophobizing and hydrophilizing agents. Their wetting was characterized by contact angle measurement and splashing behaviour was observed with a high-speed video camera. Hydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces generally showed fewer tendencies to splash than hydrophobic ones. Structuring amplified the underlying behaviour of the surface chemistries, increasing hydrophobic surfaces' tendency to splash and decreasing splash on hydrophilic surfaces by quickly transporting water off the impact point by capillary forces. The non-porous surface structures found in C. zebrina could easily be applied to technical products such as plastic foils or mats and coated with hydrophilizing agents to suppress splash in areas of increased hygiene requirements or wherever pooling of liquids is not desirable.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. The Chemistry and Physics of Molecular Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldor, A.; Cox, D. M.; Trevor, D. J.; Zakin, M. R.

    1986-06-01

    This article reviews the results of several recent experiments performed in our laboratory designed to elucidate the fundamental chemical and physical properties of clusters of both transition metals and other refractory elements containing from one to several hundred atoms. The gas-phase reactivity of clusters towards a variety of reagents is explored using a fast-flow reactor system. Strong cluster size-dependent variations in reactivity are observed, especially for the case of hydrogen chemisorption. Measurement of cluster photoionization thresholds (IPs) provides a sensitive probe of the evolution of cluster electronic structure as a function of the number of constituent atoms. Cluster ionization potentials are observed to exhibit fluctuations about the smooth global falloff predicted by the classical drop model, indicating the non-bulk-like behavior of small clusters. Measurement of shifts in IP induced by chemisorption of different reagents provides insight into the nature of adsorbate-cluster bonding. The formation and properties of bare and metal-doped carbon clusters are explored, with particular emphasis on elucidating the photophysics and photochemistry of the postulated ultrastable larger clusters. The results suggest that further work is required to prove soccer ball-like structures for C50, C60, etc. Finally, infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IR-MPD) is demonstrated to be a viable technique for obtaining infrared spectra of absorbate-cluster complexes. This technique is an important new tool for obtaining information about the molecularity of gas-phase reactions beyond that currently available from mass spectrometric analysis. As an illustration of the method, IR-MPD spectra of methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters are obtained.

  20. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Uddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs. The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH 7. In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  1. Next Steps Forward in Understanding Martian Surface and Subsurface Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Brandi L.

    2017-09-01

    The presence of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and perchlorate (ClO4-), which have been detected on Mars, has significant implications for chemistry and astrobiology. These oxidants can increase the reactivity of the Martian soil, accelerate the decomposition of organic molecules, and depress the freezing point of water. The study by Crandall et al. "Can Perchlorates be Transformed to Hydrogen Peroxide Products by Cosmic Rays on the Martian Surface" reveals a new formation mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide and other potential oxidants can be generated via irradiation of perchlorate by cosmic rays. This study represents an important next step in developing a full understanding of Martian surface and subsurface chemistry, particularly with respect to degradation of organic molecules and potential biosignatures.

  2. Surface Chemistry of CWAs for Decon Enabling Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Ultraviolet and Visible Photochemistry of Methanol at 3D Mesoporous Networks: TiO, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, (07 2013): 15035. doi...A for none) Presentations since most recent interim report for this project: " Photochemistry of Methanol at 3-D Networked Aerogels of TiO2 and...evaporation • Studied the uptake, thermal, and photochemistry of agent simulants on TiO2 surfaces • Initiated experiments on the uptake and

  3. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  4. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T.; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors. PMID:26985910

  5. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-03-14

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  6. Recyclable surfaces for amine conjugation chemistry via redox reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Inseong; Yeo, Woon Seok [Dept. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio/Molecular Informatics Center, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Se Won [Green Materials and Process Group, Research Institute of Sustainable Manufacturing System, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, we extended this strategy to present a switchable surface that allows surface functionalization and removal of functional groups repeatedly. The substrate presenting a benzoquinone acid group is first used to immobilize with an amine-containing (bio)molecule using well-known conjugation chemistry. The benzoquinone group is then converted to the corresponding hydroquinone by treating with a reducing agent. We have described a strategy for the dynamic control of surface properties with recyclability via a simple reduction/ oxidation reaction. A stimuli-responsive quinone derivative was harnessed for the repeated immobilization and release of (bio)molecules, and thus, for the repeated dynamic change of the surface properties according to the characteristics of the immobilized (bio)molecules.

  7. Stereotype Threat and Gender Differences in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunny, Cijy Elizabeth; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Clark, Lauren; Marchand, Gwen

    2017-01-01

    Stereotype threat theory (STT) offers one explanation for achievement differences in math and science for both women and minority students. Specifically, STT posits that the perceived risk of confirming a negative stereotype about an individual's identity group acts as a psychological burden that negatively impacts performance. This study examined…

  8. What makes urban atmospheric chemistry different and special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-04-01

    atmospheres, most NOx is present as nitrogen dioxide with modest concentrations of NO arising from photolysis. Direct emissions of NO in the urban atmosphere can suppress ozone concentrations to the point where nocturnal ozone can be unmeasurable. Generally, concentrations of ozone are considerably lower in the urban atmosphere than in surrounding rural areas. The co-existence of nitrogen dioxide and ozone at night in rural areas is conducive to the formation of the NO3 radical, whereas in urban areas it is often the case that nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide (an NO3 sink) are abundant close to the surface where ozone is highly depleted. Consequently, formation of NO3 is likely to occur at a greater altitude where NO2-rich air from the surface meets ozone-rich air from above. These are but a few examples of the many differences prevailing between urban and non-urban atmospheres which argue for a more specialised treatment of urban atmospheric chemistry than is typically applied at present.

  9. Interaction between carbon fibers and polymer sizing: Influence of fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Bauer, Matthias; Laukmanis, Eva; Horny, Robert; Wetjen, Denise; Manske, Tamara; Schmidt-Stein, Felix; Töpker, Jochen; Horn, Siegfried

    2018-05-01

    Different aspects of the interaction of carbon fibers and epoxy-based polymer sizings are investigated, e.g. the wetting behavior, the strength of adhesion between fiber and sizing, and the thermal stability of the sizing layer. The influence of carbon fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity is investigated using fibers of different degree of anodic oxidation and sizings with different number of reactive epoxy groups per molecule. Wetting of the carbon fibers by the sizing dispersion is found to be specified by both, the degree of fiber activation and the sizing reactivity. In contrast, adhesion strength between fibers and sizing is dominated by the surface chemistry of the carbon fibers. Here, the number of surface oxygen groups seems to be the limiting factor. We also find that the sizing and the additional functionalities induced by anodic oxidation are removed by thermal treatment at 600 °C, leaving the carbon fiber in its original state after carbonization.

  10. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  11. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan, E-mail: Jayasheelan.Vaithilingam@nottingham.ac.uk [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Prina, Elisabetta [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Goodridge, Ruth D.; Hague, Richard J.M. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Additive Manufacturing, School of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Edmondson, Steve [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Rose, Felicity R.A.J. [School of Pharmacy, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Christie, Steven D.R. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM–AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6 ± 3.7 μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of selective laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V parts was compared with conventionally forged Ti6Al4V parts. • The surface elemental compositions of the SLM as-fabricated surfaces were significantly different to the forged surface. • Surface oxide-layer of the SLM as-fabricated was thicker than the polished SLM surfaces and the forged Ti6Al4V surfaces.

  12. Colloid Surface Chemistry Critically Affects Multiple Particle Tracking Measurements of Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, M. T.; Perlman, Z. E.; Gardel, M. L.; Shin, J. H.; Matsudaira, P.; Mitchison, T. J.; Weitz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of the properties of complex biomaterials using microrheological techniques has the promise of providing fundamental insights into their biomechanical functions; however, precise interpretations of such measurements are hindered by inadequate characterization of the interactions between tracers and the networks they probe. We here show that colloid surface chemistry can profoundly affect multiple particle tracking measurements of networks of fibrin, entangled F-actin solutions, and networks of cross-linked F-actin. We present a simple protocol to render the surface of colloidal probe particles protein-resistant by grafting short amine-terminated methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) to the surface of carboxylated microspheres. We demonstrate that these poly(ethylene glycol)-coated tracers adsorb significantly less protein than particles coated with bovine serum albumin or unmodified probe particles. We establish that varying particle surface chemistry selectively tunes the sensitivity of the particles to different physical properties of their microenvironments. Specifically, particles that are weakly bound to a heterogeneous network are sensitive to changes in network stiffness, whereas protein-resistant tracers measure changes in the viscosity of the fluid and in the network microstructure. We demonstrate experimentally that two-particle microrheology analysis significantly reduces differences arising from tracer surface chemistry, indicating that modifications of network properties near the particle do not introduce large-scale heterogeneities. Our results establish that controlling colloid-protein interactions is crucial to the successful application of multiple particle tracking techniques to reconstituted protein networks, cytoplasm, and cells. PMID:15189896

  13. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood-plastic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migneault, Sébastien; Koubaa, Ahmed; Perré, Patrick; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Because wood-plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same conclusions were found with FTIR where WPC strength decreases as lignin peaks intensity increases. Esterification reaction of fibers with MAPE occurs on polar sites of carbohydrates, such as hydroxyls (Osbnd H). Thus, fibers with carbohydrates-rich surface, such as cellulose pulp, produced stronger WPC samples. Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfered with the effects of fiber surface chemistry.

  14. Statistical methodology for exploring elevational differences in precipitation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.G.; Boehm, M.; Link, D.

    1992-01-01

    A statistical methodology for exploring the relationships between elevation and precipitation chemistry is outlined and illustrated. The methodology utilizes maximum likelihood estimates and likelihood ratio tests with contour ellipses of assumed bivariate lognormal distributions used to assist in interpretation. The approach was illustrated using 12 NADP/NTN sites located in six study areas in the Wyoming and Colorado Rockies. These sites are part of the Rocky Mountain Deposition Monitoring Project (RMDMP), which was initiated in 1986 to investigate the relationships between elevation and the chemistry of precipitation. The results indicate differences in sulfate concentrations between airsheds, between snow and rain, and between higher and lower elevations. In general, sulfate concentrations in snow are greater at lower elevations and this difference is independent of concentration. A similar relationship for rain was not well established. In addition there is evidence that, overall, the sulfate concentrations differed between the six study areas, although pairwise differences were not always significant

  15. Cancer cell proliferation controlled by surface chemistry in its microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Lin; He, Jin; Wang, Juan; Chen, Shuang-Feng; Lee, In-Seop; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2011-12-01

    Hepatoma cells (Hepg2s) as typical cancer cells cultured on hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) group surfaces were shown to exhibit different proliferation and morphological changes. Hepg2s cells on -OH surfaces grew much more rapidly than those on -CH3 surfaces. Hepg2s cells on -OH surfaces had the larger contact area and the more flattened morphology, while those on -CH3 surfaces exhibited the smaller contact area and the more rounded morphology. After 7 days of culture, the migration of Hepg2s cells into clusters on the -CH3 surfaces behaved significantly slower than that on the -OH surfaces. These chemically modified surfaces exhibited regulation of Hepg2s cells on proliferation, adhesion, and migration, providing a potential treatment of liver cancer.

  16. Effect of non-equilibrium flow chemistry and surface catalysis on surface heating to AFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Henline, William D.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    1991-01-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium flow chemistry on the surface temperature distribution over the forebody heat shield on the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle was investigated using a reacting boundary-layer code. Computations were performed by using boundary-layer-edge properties determined from global iterations between the boundary-layer code and flow field solutions from a viscous shock layer (VSL) and a full Navier-Stokes solution. Surface temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield was calculated for two flight conditions during a nominal AFE trajectory. This study indicates that the surface temperature distribution is sensitive to the nonequilibrium chemistry in the shock layer. Heating distributions over the AFE forebody calculated using nonequilibrium edge properties were similar to values calculated using the VSL program.

  17. Surface chemistry of Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Prina, Elisabetta; Goodridge, Ruth D; Hague, Richard J M; Edmondson, Steve; Rose, Felicity R A J; Christie, Steven D R

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) has previously been shown to be a viable method for fabricating biomedical implants; however, the surface chemistry of SLM fabricated parts is poorly understood. In this study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the surface chemistries of (a) SLM as-fabricated (SLM-AF) Ti6Al4V and (b) SLM fabricated and mechanically polished (SLM-MP) Ti6Al4V samples and compared with (c) traditionally manufactured (forged) and mechanically polished Ti6Al4V samples. The SLM-AF surface was observed to be porous with an average surface roughness (Ra) of 17.6±3.7μm. The surface chemistry of the SLM-AF was significantly different to the FGD-MP surface with respect to elemental distribution and their existence on the outermost surface. Sintered particles on the SLM-AF surface were observed to affect depth profiling of the sample due to a shadowing effect during argon ion sputtering. Surface heterogeneity was observed for all three surfaces; however, vanadium was witnessed only on the mechanically polished (SLM-MP and FGD-MP) surfaces. The direct and indirect 3T3 cell cytotoxicity studies revealed that the cells were viable on the SLM fabricated Ti6Al4V parts. The varied surface chemistry of the SLM-AF and SLM-MP did not influence the cell behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of surface microstructure and chemistry on osteoinduction and osteoclastogenesis by biphasic calcium phosphate discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, N L; Su, J; Yuan, H; van den Beucken, J J J P; de Bruijn, J D; Barrère-de Groot, F

    2015-06-20

    It has been reported that surface microstructural dimensions can influence the osteoinductivity of calcium phosphates (CaPs), and osteoclasts may play a role in this process. We hypothesised that surface structural dimensions of ≤ 1 μm trigger osteoinduction and osteoclast formation irrespective of macrostructure (e.g., concavities, interconnected macropores, interparticle space) or surface chemistry. To test this, planar discs made of biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP: 80% hydroxyapatite, 20% tricalcium phosphate) were prepared with different surface structural dimensions - either ~ 1 μm (BCP1150) or ~ 2-4 μm (BCP1300) - and no macropores or concavities. A third material was made by sputter coating BCP1150 with titanium (BCP1150Ti), thereby changing its surface chemistry but preserving its surface structure and chemical reactivity. After intramuscular implantation in 5 dogs for 12 weeks, BCP1150 formed ectopic bone in 4 out of 5 samples, BCP1150Ti formed ectopic bone in 3 out of 5 samples, and BCP1300 formed no ectopic bone in any of the 5 samples. In vivo, large multinucleated osteoclast-like cells densely colonised BCP1150, smaller osteoclast-like cells formed on BCP1150Ti, and osteoclast-like cells scarcely formed on BCP1300. In vitro, RAW264.7 cells cultured on the surface of BCP1150 and BCP1150Ti in the presence of osteoclast differentiation factor RANKL (receptor activator for NF-κB ligand) proliferated then differentiated into multinucleated osteoclast-like cells with positive tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. However, cell proliferation, fusion, and TRAP activity were all significantly inhibited on BCP1300. These results indicate that of the material parameters tested - namely, surface microstructure, macrostructure, and surface chemistry - microstructural dimensions are critical in promoting osteoclastogenesis and triggering ectopic bone formation.

  19. The influence of surface nanoroughness, texture and chemistry of TiZr implant abutment on oral biofilm accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Rui; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Ellingsen, Jan Eirik; Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien; Haugen, Håvard J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine surface nanoroughness, texture and chemistry of dental implant abutment and to investigate how these parameters influence oral biofilm formation in healthy subjects. Eight different nanorough TiZr surfaces were produced by polishing, machining, cathodic polarization and acid etching. Surface topography was examined using field emission scanning electron microscope and a blue light laser profilometer. Surface chemistry was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface hydrophilicity was tested by measuring contact angle on the surfaces. A human in vivo study using a splint model was employed to evaluate oral biofilm accumulation on these surfaces. Different surface textures (flat, grooved and irregular) were created with nanoroughness from 29 to 214 nm. Some test surfaces were incorporated with hydrogen by cathodic polarization and/or acid etching with HCl/H(2)SO(4). Nanoroughness (S(a)) positively correlated with microbial adhesion. Biofilm accumulation was less pronounced on flat and grooved than on irregular surfaces. No significant association between hydrogen content or hydrophilicity of the surface and biofilm accumulation was observed. Nanoroughness (< 214 nm) and surface texture influence oral biofilm accumulation independent of surface chemistry and hydrophilicity. Surface hydrogen, which has previously been shown to promote fibroblast growth, does not affect biofilm formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Surface microstructure and chemistry of polyimide by single pulse ablation of picosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qifeng; Chen, Ting; Liu, Jianguo; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-03-01

    Polyimide (PI) surface was ablated by the single pulse of picosecond laser, and the effects of laser wavelength (λ= 355 nm and 1064 nm) and fluence on surface microstructure and chemistry were explored. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis found that different surface microstructures, i.e., the concave of concentric ring and the convex of porous circular disk, were generated by 355 nm and 1064 nm picosecond laser ablation, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicated that due to the high peak energy density of picosecond laser, oxygen and nitrogen from the ambient were incorporated into the PI surface mainly in the form of Cdbnd O and Csbnd Nsbnd C groups. Thus, both of the O/C and N/C atomic content ratios increased, but the increase caused by 1064 nm wavelength laser was larger. It inferred that the differences of PI surface microstructures and chemistry resulted from different laser parameters were related to different laser-matter interaction effects. For 355 nm picosecond laser, no obvious thermal features were observed and the probable ablation process of PI was mainly governed by photochemical effect; while for 1064 nm picosecond laser, obvious thermal feature appeared and photothermal effect was thought to be dominant.

  1. Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Q.; Cuppen, H. M.; Herbst, E.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. Methods: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. Results: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2 × 105 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

  2. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  3. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood–plastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migneault, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.migneault@uqat.ca [University of Quebec in Abitibi-Temiscamingue (UQAT), 445 boulevard de l’Université, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec J9X 5E4 (Canada); Koubaa, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.koubaa@uqat.ca [UQAT (Canada); Perré, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.perre@ecp.fr [École centrale de Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92 295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Riedl, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Riedl@sbf.ulaval.ca [Université Laval, 2425 rue de la Terrasse, Québec City, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed variations of surface chemical characteristics according to fiber origin. • Surface chemical characteristics of fibers could partly explain the differences in mechanical properties of the wood–plastic composites. • Fibers with carbohydrate rich surface led to stronger wood–plastic composites because the coupling between the matrix and fibers using coupling agent is achieved with polar sites mostly available on carbohydrates. • Conversely, lignin or extractives rich surface do not have oxidized functions for the esterification reaction with coupling agent and thus led to wood–plastic composites with lower mechanical properties. • Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfere with the effects of fiber surface chemistry. - Abstract: Because wood–plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same

  4. Surface chemistry of a hydrogenated mesoporous p-type silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Media, El-Mahdi, E-mail: belhadidz@tahoo.fr; Outemzabet, Ratiba, E-mail: oratiba@hotmail.com

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Due to its large specific surface porous silicon is used as substrate for drug therapy and biosensors. • We highlight the evidency of the contribution of the hydrides (SiHx) in the formation of the porous silicon. • The responsible species in the porous silicon formation are identified and quantified at different conditions. • By some chemical treatments we show that silicon surface can be turn from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. - Abstract: The finality of this work is devoted to the grafting of organic molecules on hydrogen passivated mesoporous silicon surfaces. The study would aid in the development for the formation of organic monolayers on silicon surface to be exploited for different applications such as the realisation of biosensors and medical devices. The basic material is silicon which has been first investigated by FTIR at atomistic plane during the anodic forward and backward polarization (i.e. “go” and “return”). For this study, we applied a numerical program based on least squares method to infrared absorbance spectra obtained by an in situ attenuated total reflection on p-type silicon in diluted HF electrolyte. Our numerical treatment is based on the fitting of the different bands of IR absorbance into Gaussians corresponding to the different modes of vibration of molecular groups such as siloxanes and hydrides. An adjustment of these absorbance bands is done systematically. The areas under the fitted bands permit one to follow the intensity of the different modes of vibration that exist during the anodic forward and backward polarization in order to compare the reversibility of the phenomenon of the anodic dissolution of silicon. It permits also to follow the evolution between the hydrogen silicon termination at forward and backward scanning applied potential. Finally a comparison between the states of the initial and final surface was carried out. We confirm the presence of clearly four and three distinct vibration modes

  5. Surface chemistry controls crystallinity of ZnS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Huang, Feng; Lin, Zhang; Goodell, Carmen; Zhang, Hengzhong; Banfield, Jillian F

    2006-04-01

    Combined small-angle and high energy wide-angle X-ray scattering measurements of nanoparticle size and structure permit interior strain and disorder to be observed directly in the real-space pair distribution function (PDF). PDF analysis showed that samples of ZnS nanoparticles with similar mean diameters (3.2-3.6 nm) but synthesized and treated with different low-temperature procedures possess a dramatic range of interior disorder. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to detect the surface species and the nature of surface chemical interactions. Our results suggest that there is a direct correlation between the strength of surface-ligand interactions and interior crystallinity.

  6. Don Quixote Pond Sediments: Surface and Subsurface Chemistry and Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, P. A. J.; Bishop, J. L.; Patel, S.; Gibson, E. K.; Koeberl, C.

    2014-12-01

    Don Quixote Pond, like Don Juan Pond in the South Fork of Wright Valley, Antarctica, is a model for calcium and chlorine weathering and distribution on Mars. It is located in the western part of the North Fork about 100 m above Mean Seawater Level; its brine is seasonally frozen [1]. Field observations show zones of discoloration which grow lighter with distance from the pond edges. Four sediment cores, a set of radial surface samples, special surface samples, and samples of local rocks were obtained [2]. We report on chemical and mineral analyses of traverse samples and on two cores. Core DQ20 is a northeastern shoreline core. Its soluble salt concentration exceeds 200 micromoles/g in the top 5 cm, and then falls to less than 70 micromoles/g at the permafrost depth of 15 cm. These concentrations are low when compared to similarly positioned locations at Don Juan Pond and to cores from Prospect Mesa close to Lake Vanda, Wright Valley. Halite, soda niter, tachyhydrite and/bischovite are suggested from the ionic molar relationships Measured halite concentrations of surface samples, collected along a traverse of 35 m from the pond outwards, range from over 5% to trace amounts, decreasing with distance. Gypsum is also present in almost all of these samples ranging from 0.2% to 2.6%, but does not exhibit a trend. However, in core DQ35, located at a distance of 15 m along the traverse, gypsum decreases from 2.5% to 0.6% from the surface to the permafrost depth of 12 cm. While DQ35 and radial samples show high quartz and albite abundance, samples that contained visible encrustations and evaporites are low in these minerals and rich in highly diverse alteration products. Don Juan Basin ponds may have formed by a complex surface water mobilization of weathering products [3] and local groundwater action [4,5]. In contrast, Don Quixote pond mineralogy and chemistry may be consistent with a less complex shallow and deep groundwater system origin [1]. [1] Harris H

  7. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-22

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C 18 H 12 ) on a Gd 2 O 3 . Our study evidences a novel effect - oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  8. Pyridine coordination chemistry for molecular assemblies on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Graham; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Since the first description of coordination complexes, many types of metal-ligand interactions have creatively been used in the chemical sciences. The rich coordination chemistry of pyridine-type ligands has contributed significantly to the incorporation of diverse metal ions into functional materials. Here we discuss molecular assemblies (MAs) formed with a variety of pyridine-type compounds and a metal containing cross-linker (e.g., PdCl2(PhCN2)). These MAs are formed using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition from solution that allows for precise fitting of the assembly properties through molecular programming. The position of each component can be controlled by altering the assembly sequence, while the degree of intermolecular interactions can be varied by the level of π-conjugation and the availability of metal coordination sites. By setting the structural parameters (e.g., bond angles, number of coordination sites, geometry) of the ligand, control over MA structure was achieved, resulting in surface-confined metal-organic networks and oligomers. Unlike MAs that are constructed with organic ligands, MAs with polypyridyl complexes of ruthenium, osmium, and cobalt are active participants in their own formation and amplify the growth of the incoming molecular layer. Such a self-propagating behavior for molecular systems is rare, and the mechanism of their formation will be discussed. These exponentially growing MAs are capable of storing metal salts that can be used during the buildup of additional molecular layers. Various parameters influencing the film growth mechanism will be presented, including (i) the number of binding sites and geometry of the organic ligands, (ii) the metal and the structure of the polypyridyl complexes, (iii) the influence of the metal cross-linker (e.g., second or third row transition metals), and (iv) the deposition conditions. By systematic variation of these parameters, switching between linear and exponential growth could

  9. The Chemistry of Inorganic Precursors during the Chemical Deposition of Films on Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Seán T; Teplyakov, Andrew V; Zaera, Francisco

    2018-03-20

    The deposition of thin solid films is central to many industrial applications, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods are particularly useful for this task. For one, the isotropic nature of the adsorption of chemical species affords even coverages on surfaces with rough topographies, an increasingly common requirement in microelectronics. Furthermore, by splitting the overall film-depositing reactions into two or more complementary and self-limiting steps, as it is done in atomic layer depositions (ALD), film thicknesses can be controlled down to the sub-monolayer level. Thanks to the availability of a vast array of inorganic and metalorganic precursors, CVD and ALD are quite versatile and can be engineered to deposit virtually any type of solid material. On the negative side, the surface chemistry that takes place in these processes is often complex, and can include undesirable side reactions leading to the incorporation of impurities in the growing films. Appropriate precursors and deposition conditions need to be chosen to minimize these problems, and that requires a proper understanding of the underlying surface chemistry. The precursors for CVD and ALD are often designed and chosen based on their known thermal chemistry from inorganic chemistry studies, taking advantage of the vast knowledge developed in that field over the years. Although a good first approximation, however, this approach can lead to wrong choices, because the reactions of these precursors at gas-solid interfaces can be quite different from what is seen in solution. For one, solvents often aid in the displacement of ligands in metalorganic compounds, providing the right dielectric environment, temporarily coordinating to the metal, or facilitating multiple ligand-complex interactions to increase reaction probabilities; these options are not available in the gas-solid reactions associated with CVD and ALD. Moreover, solid surfaces act as unique "ligands", if these reactions are to be

  10. A dynamic duo: pairing click chemistry and postpolymerization modification to design complex surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Rachelle M; Patton, Derek L; Popik, Vladimir V; Locklin, Jason

    2014-10-21

    Advances in key 21st century technologies such as biosensors, biomedical implants, and organic light-emitting diodes rely heavily on our ability to imagine, design, and understand spatially complex interfaces. Polymer-based thin films provide many advantages in this regard, but the direct synthesis of polymers with incompatible functional groups is extremely difficult. Using postpolymerization modification in conjunction with click chemistry can circumvent this limitation and result in multicomponent surfaces that are otherwise unattainable. The two methods used to form polymer thin films include physisorption and chemisorption. Physisorbed polymers suffer from instability because of the weak intermolecular forces between the film and the substrate, which can lead to dewetting, delamination, desorption, or displacement. Covalent immobilization of polymers to surfaces through either a "grafting to" or "grafting from" approach provides thin films that are more robust and less prone to degradation. The grafting to technique consists of adsorbing a polymer containing at least one reactive group along the backbone to form a covalent bond with a complementary surface functionality. Grafting from involves polymerization directly from the surface, in which the polymer chains deviate from their native conformation in solution and stretch away from the surface because of the high density of chains. Postpolymerization modification (PPM) is a strategy used by our groups over the past several years to immobilize two or more different chemical functionalities onto substrates that contain covalently grafted polymer films. PPM exploits monomers with reactive pendant groups that are stable under the polymerization conditions but are readily modified via covalent attachment of the desired functionality. "Click-like" reactions are the most common type of reactions used for PPM because they are orthogonal, high-yielding, and rapid. Some of these reactions include thiol-based additions

  11. The surface chemistry determines the spatio-temporal interaction dynamics of quantum dots in atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Bernd; Hirn, Stephanie; Mildner, Karina; Coletti, Raffaele; Massberg, Steffen; Reichel, Christoph A; Rehberg, Markus; Zeuschner, Dagmar; Krombach, Fritz

    2018-03-01

    To optimize the design of nanoparticles for diagnosis or therapy of vascular diseases, it is mandatory to characterize the determinants of nano-bio interactions in vascular lesions. Using ex vivo and in vivo microscopy, we analyzed the interactive behavior of quantum dots with different surface functionalizations in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice. We demonstrate that quantum dots with different surface functionalizations exhibit specific interactive behaviors with distinct molecular and cellular components of the injured vessel wall. Moreover, we show a role for fibrinogen in the regulation of the spatio-temporal interaction dynamics in atherosclerotic lesions. Our findings emphasize the relevance of surface chemistry-driven nano-bio interactions on the differential in vivo behavior of nanoparticles in diseased tissue.

  12. New Concept of C–H and C–C Bond Activation via Surface Organometallic Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Samantaray, Manoja

    2015-08-18

    In this chapter we describe the recent applications of well-defined oxidesupported metal alkyls/alkylidenes/alkylidynes and hydrides of group IV, V, and VI transition metals in the field of C–H and C–C bond activation. The activation of ubiquitous C–H and C–C bonds of paraffin is a long-standing challenge because of intrinsic low reactivity. There are many concepts derived from surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC): surface organometallic fragments are always intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis. The study of their synthesis and reactivity is a way to rationalize mechanism of heterogeneous catalysis and to achieve structure activity relationship. By surface organometallic chemistry one can enter any catalytic center by a reaction intermediate leading in fine to single site catalysts. With surface organometallic chemistry one can coordinate to the metal which can play a role in different elementary steps leading for example to C–H activation and Olefin metathesis. Because of the development of SOMC there is a lot of space for the improvement of homogeneous catalysis. After the 1997 discovery of alkane metathesis using silica-supported tantalum hydride by Basset et al. at low temperature (150ºC) the focus in this area was shifted to the discovery of more and more challenging surface complexes active in the application of C–H and C–C bond activation. Here we describe the evolution of well-defined metathesis catalyst with time as well as the effect of support on catalysis. We also describe here which metal–ligand combinations are responsible for a variety of C–H and C–C bond activation.

  13. Chemistry and catalysis at the surface of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian Edward

    This thesis will delve into three main areas of nanomaterials research: (I) Designing, building, and utilizing a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system for the growth of CNTs; (II) Aqueous suspensions of carbon nanotubes (CNT) solubilized by various surfactants, and the oxidative chemistry that can occur at CNT surfaces; (III) Catalytic CO oxidation over supported Cu2O nanoparticle systems. An introduction to nanomaterials in general, with a particular emphasis on carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles will be given in Chapter one. Chapter two provides a summary of common techniques used to grow carbon nanotubes, and introduces a new method we have developed. This method is based on previous chemical vapor deposition techniques, but uses liquids, specifically ethanol, as the carbon source. Using ethanol has several advantages, including ease of use and safety, as well as chemical benefits. Our new process affords long, aligned, single-walled nanotubes, with a relatively narrow diameter distribution. This method can also be used to grow CNTs across slits, which can then be studied spectroscopically. In Chapter three CNT-surfactant aqueous suspensions will be discussed in depth, including a new robust polymer surfactant. Poly(maleic acid/octyl vinyl ether) (PMAOVE) is stable over a large range of temperatures and pH values, and is well suited for the study of the oxidative chemistry that can occur on SWNT surfaces. Our aqueous suspensions were found to be quite stable by zeta potential studies and their emissive properties exhibited a pH dependence, quenching at higher concentrations of H+. We attribute this dependence to chemisorbed oxygen and its protonation at lower pH values. By heating the suspensions of SWNTs, O2 can be driven off, thus eliminating the dependence on pH. We also reproducibly add oxygen back into the system in the form of 1DeltaO2 , obtained from an endoperoxide. This method allows us to calculate the number of oxygen molecules needed for

  14. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes.

  15. The influence of the surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles on cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Ilknur; Altunbek, Mine; Kahraman, Mehmet; Culha, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on p53 mediated cell death was evaluated using human dermal fibroblast (HDF) and lung cancer (A549) cells. The citrate reduced AgNPs (C-AgNPs) were modified with either lactose (L-AgNPs) or a 12-base long oligonucleotide (O-AgNPs). Both unmodified and modified AgNPs showed increased concentration and time dependent cytotoxicity and genotoxicity causing an increased p53 up-regulation within 6 h and led to apoptotic or necrotic cell deaths. The C-AgNPs induced more cytotoxicity and cellular DNA damage than the surface modified AgNPs. Modifying the C-AgNPs with lactose or the oligonucleotide reduced both necrotic and apoptotic cell deaths in the HDF cells. The C-AgNPs caused an insignificant necrosis in A549 cells whereas the modified AgNPs caused necrosis and apoptosis in both cell types. Compared to the O-AgNPs, the L-AgNPs triggered more cellular DNA damage, which led to up-regulation of p53 gene inducing apoptosis in A549 cells compared to HDF cells. This suggests that the different surface chemistries of the AgNPs cause different cellular responses that may be important not only for their use in medicine but also for reducing their toxicity. (paper)

  16. Do organic surface films on sea salt aerosols influence atmospheric chemistry? ─ a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic material from the ocean's surface can be incorporated into sea salt aerosol particles often producing a surface film on the aerosol. Such an organic coating can reduce the mass transfer between the gas phase and the aerosol phase influencing sea salt chemistry in the marine atmosphere. To investigate these effects and their importance for the marine boundary layer (MBL we used the one-dimensional numerical model MISTRA. We considered the uncertainties regarding the magnitude of uptake reduction, the concentrations of organic compounds in sea salt aerosols and the oxidation rate of the organics to analyse the possible influence of organic surfactants on gas and liquid phase chemistry with a special focus on halogen chemistry. By assuming destruction rates for the organic coating based on laboratory measurements we get a rapid destruction of the organic monolayer within the first meters of the MBL. Larger organic initial concentrations lead to a longer lifetime of the coating but lead also to an unrealistically strong decrease of O3 concentrations as the organic film is destroyed by reaction with O3. The lifetime of the film is increased by assuming smaller reactive uptake coefficients for O3 or by assuming that a part of the organic surfactants react with OH. With regard to tropospheric chemistry we found that gas phase concentrations for chlorine and bromine species decreased due to the decreased mass transfer between gas phase and aerosol phase. Aqueous phase chlorine concentrations also decreased but aqueous phase bromine concentrations increased. Differences for gas phase concentrations are in general smaller than for liquid phase concentrations. The effect on gas phase NO2 or NO is very small (reduction less than 5% whereas liquid phase NO2 concentrations increased in some cases by nearly 100%. We list suggestions for further laboratory studies which are needed for improved model studies.

  17. Bactericidal effects of plasma-modified surface chemistry of silicon nanograss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrikov, Kola; Macgregor-Ramiasa, Melanie; Cavallaro, Alex; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2016-08-01

    The surface chemistry and topography of biomaterials regulate the adhesion and growth of microorganisms in ways that are still poorly understood. Silicon nanograss structures prepared via inductively coupled plasma etching were coated with plasma deposited nanometer-thin polymeric films to produce substrates with controlled topography and defined surface chemistry. The influence of surface properties on Staphylococcus aureus proliferation is demonstrated and explained in terms of nanograss substrate wetting behaviour. With the combination of the nanograss topography; hydrophilic plasma polymer coatings enhanced antimicrobial activity while hydrophobic coatings reduced it. This study advances the understanding of the effects of surface wettability on the bactericidal properties of reactive nano-engineered surfaces.

  18. Bactericidal effects of plasma-modified surface chemistry of silicon nanograss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrikov, Kola; Macgregor-Ramiasa, Melanie; Cavallaro, Alex; Ostrikov, Kostya; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2016-01-01

    The surface chemistry and topography of biomaterials regulate the adhesion and growth of microorganisms in ways that are still poorly understood. Silicon nanograss structures prepared via inductively coupled plasma etching were coated with plasma deposited nanometer-thin polymeric films to produce substrates with controlled topography and defined surface chemistry. The influence of surface properties on Staphylococcus aureus proliferation is demonstrated and explained in terms of nanograss substrate wetting behaviour. With the combination of the nanograss topography; hydrophilic plasma polymer coatings enhanced antimicrobial activity while hydrophobic coatings reduced it. This study advances the understanding of the effects of surface wettability on the bactericidal properties of reactive nano-engineered surfaces. (paper)

  19. On-Surface Synthesis by Click Chemistry Investigated by STM and XPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadapoo, Sundar Raja

    2014-01-01

    such as molecular electronics and surface functionalization. In this thesis, a well-defined click chemistry approach is followed, with the study of azide-alkyne cycloaddition on Cu(111) surface in UHV environment. A successful achievement of the click reaction product via on-surface synthesis has been shown, which...

  20. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  1. Seventh BES [Basic Energy Sciences] catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  2. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez G, H.

    1989-01-01

    A brief description about the development and activities executed in chemistry, in the Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares, during the last years is presented. The plans and feasibility of nuclear techniques in Colombia are also described

  3. Functional surface chemistry of carbon-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdula, Daner

    The recently discovered abilities to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes and prepare single layer graphene have spurred interest in these sp2-bonded carbon nanostructures. In particular, studies of their potential use in electronic devices are many as silicon integrated circuits are encountering processing limitations, quantum effects, and thermal management issues due to rapid device scaling. Nanotube and graphene implementation in devices does come with significant hurdles itself. Among these issues are the ability to dope these materials and understanding what influences defects have on expected properties. Because these nanostructures are entirely all-surface, with every atom exposed to ambient, introduction of defects and doping by chemical means is expected to be an effective route for addressing these issues. Raman spectroscopy has been a proven characterization method for understanding vibrational and even electronic structure of graphene, nanotubes, and graphite, especially when combined with electrical measurements, due to a wealth of information contained in each spectrum. In Chapter 1, a discussion of the electronic structure of graphene is presented. This outlines the foundation for all sp2-bonded carbon electronic properties and is easily extended to carbon nanotubes. Motivation for why these materials are of interest is readily gained. Chapter 2 presents various synthesis/preparation methods for both nanotubes and graphene, discusses fabrication techniques for making devices, and describes characterization methods such as electrical measurements as well as static and time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. Chapter 3 outlines changes in the Raman spectra of individual metallic single-walled carbon nantoubes (SWNTs) upon sidewall covalent bond formation. It is observed that the initial degree of disorder has a strong influence on covalent sidewall functionalization which has implications on developing electronically selective covalent chemistries and

  4. Early osseointegration driven by the surface chemistry and wettability of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartoretto, Suelen Cristina; Alves, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; Resende, Rodrigo Figueiredo Britto; Calasans-Maia, José; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Calasans-Maia, Mônica Diuana

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of two different commercially available dental implants on osseointegration. The surfaces were sandblasting and acid etching (Group 1) and sandblasting and acid etching, then maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (Group 2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed for surface chemistry analysis. Surface morphology and topography was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy (CM), respectively. Contact angle analysis (CAA) was employed for wetting evaluation. Bone-implant-contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) analysis were performed on thin sections (30 μm) 14 and 28 days after the installation of 10 implants from each group (n=20) in rabbits' tibias. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA at the 95% level of significance considering implantation time and implant surface as independent variables. Group 2 showed 3-fold less carbon on the surface and a markedly enhanced hydrophilicity compared to Group 1 but a similar surface roughness (p>0.05). BIC and BAFO levels in Group 2 at 14 days were similar to those in Group 1 at 28 days. After 28 days of installation, BIC and BAFO measurements of Group 2 were approximately 1.5-fold greater than in Group 1 (pimplants of Group 2 accelerate osseointegration and increase the area of the bone-to-implant interface when compared to those of Group 1.

  5. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  6. The Materials Chemistry of Atomic Oxygen with Applications to Anisotropic Etching of Submicron Structures in Microelectronics and the Surface Chemistry Engineering of Porous Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steve L.; Leger, Lubert J.; Wu, Corina; Cross, Jon B.; Jurgensen, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    Neutral atomic oxygen is the most abundant component of the ionospheric plasma in the low Earth orbit environment (LEO; 200 to 700 kilometers altitude) and can produce significant degradation of some spacecraft materials. In order to produce a more complete understanding of the materials chemistry of atomic oxygen, the chemistry and physics of O-atom interactions with materials were determined in three radically different environments: (1) The Space Shuttle cargo bay in low Earth orbit (the EOIM-3 space flight experiment), (2) a high-velocity neutral atom beam system (HVAB) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and (3) a microwave-plasma flowing-discharge system at JSC. The Space Shuttle and the high velocity atom beam systems produce atom-surface collision energies ranging from 0.1 to 7 eV (hyperthermal atoms) under high-vacuum conditions, while the flowing discharge system produces a 0.065 eV surface collision energy at a total pressure of 2 Torr. Data obtained in the three different O-atom environments referred to above show that the rate of O-atom reaction with polymeric materials is strongly dependent on atom kinetic energy, obeying a reactive scattering law which suggests that atom kinetic energy is directly available for overcoming activation barriers in the reaction. General relationships between polymer reactivity with O atoms and polymer composition and molecular structure have been determined. In addition, vacuum ultraviolet photochemical effects have been shown to dominate the reaction of O atoms with fluorocarbon polymers. Finally, studies of the materials chemistry of O atoms have produced results which may be of interest to technologists outside the aerospace industry. Atomic oxygen 'spin-off' or 'dual use' technologies in the areas of anisotropic etching in microelectronic materials and device processing, as well as surface chemistry engineering of porous solid materials are described.

  7. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  8. Impact of Gobi desert dust on aerosol chemistry of Xi'an, inland China during spring 2009: differences in composition and size distribution between the urban ground surface and the mountain atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Composition and size distribution of atmospheric aerosols from Xi'an city (~400 m, altitude in inland China during the spring of 2009 including a massive dust event on 24 April were measured and compared with a parallel measurement at the summit (2060 m, altitude of Mt. Hua, an alpine site nearby Xi'an. EC (elemental carbon, OC (organic carbon and major ions in the city were 2–22 times higher than those on the mountaintop during the whole sampling period. Compared to that in the non-dust period a sharp increase in OC was observed at both sites during the dust period, which was mainly caused by an input of biogenic organics from the Gobi desert. However, adsorption/heterogeneous reaction of gaseous organics with dust was another important source of OC in the urban, contributing 22% of OC in the dust event. In contrast to the mountain atmosphere where fine particles were less acidic when dust was present, the urban fine particles became more acidic in the dust event than in the non-dust event, mainly due to enhanced heterogeneous formation of nitrate and diluted NH3. Cl and NO3 in the urban air during the dust event significantly shifted toward coarse particles. Such redistributions were further pronounced on the mountaintop when dust was present, resulting in both ions almost entirely staying in coarse particles. On the contrary, no significant spatial difference in size distribution of SO42− was found between the urban ground surface and the mountain atmosphere, which dominated in the fine mode (<2.1 μm during the nonevent and comparably distributed in the fine (<2.1 μm and coarse (>2.1 μm modes during the dust event.

  9. Fog Chemistry at Different Altitudes in the Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michna, P.; Eugster, W.; Wanner, H.

    2010-07-01

    During two extended summer seasons in 2006 and 2007, we installed two battery driven versions of the Caltech active strand cloud water collector (MiniCASCC) at the Niesen mountain in the northern Swiss Alps. Along, we measured air temperature, relative humidity, wind, and visibility. During these two field operation phases we gained weekly samples of fogwater, where we analysed the major anions and cations, and the stable water isotopes δD and δ18O. The fog collectors were installed at an altitude of 2300 and 1600 m asl to resolve altitudinal differences in fog chemistry. We found a large variability between the events, but no clear altitudinal gradient. At both sites, the most important ions were nitrate, ammonium, and sulphate. Higher concentrations occured preferably in late spring (start of sampling period) and in autumn (end of sampling). Compared to previous studies at lower elevations in the Swiss Plateau during wintertime, our measurements showed considerable lower ion loads in the fogwater. The combination of these results suggest that lowest ion loads are found in convective clouds with a short lifetime and that the highest ion loads occur during radiation fog events at lower elevations.

  10. Radiofrequency electric field hyperthermia with gold nanostructures: role of particle shape and surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Gilani, Kambiz

    2017-09-10

    Hyperthermia treatment of cancerous cells has been recently developed drastically with the help of nanostructures. Heating of gold nanoparticles in non-invasive radiofrequency electric field (RF-EF) is a promising and unique technique for cancer hyperthermia. However, because of differences between particles (i.e. their surface chemistry and dispersion medium) and between RF-EF sources, the research community has not reached a consensus yet. Here, we report the results of investigations on heating of gold nanoparticles and gold nanorods under RF-EF and feasibility of in-vitro cancer hyperthermia. The heating experiments were performed to investigate the role of particle shape and surface chemistry (CTAB, citrate and PEG molecules). In-vitro hyperthermia was performed on human pancreatic cancer cell (MIA Paca-2) with PEG-coated GNPs and GNRs at concentrations that were found non-toxic based on the results of cytotoxicity assay. Application of RF-EF on cells treated with PEG-GNPs and PEG-GNRs proved highly effective in killing cells.

  11. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part III. Ion Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamentals of two surface techniques--secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and ion-scattering spectrometry (ISS)--are discussed. Examples of how these techniques have been applied to surface problems are provided. (JN)

  12. Review: Impacts of permafrost degradation on inorganic chemistry of surface fresh water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Nicola; Salerno, Franco; Gruber, Stephan; Freppaz, Michele; Williams, Mark; Fratianni, Simona; Giardino, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that climate change is impacting the inorganic chemical characteristics of surface fresh water in permafrost areas and affecting aquatic ecosystems. Concentrations of major ions (e.g., Ca2 +, Mg2 +, SO42 -, NO3-) can increase following permafrost degradation with associated deepening of flow pathways and increased contributions of deep groundwater. In addition, thickening of the active layer and melting of near-surface ground ice can influence inorganic chemical fluxes from permafrost into surface water. Permafrost degradation has also the capability to modify trace element (e.g., Ni, Mn, Al, Hg, Pb) contents in surface water. Although several local and regional modifications of inorganic chemistry of surface fresh water have been attributed to permafrost degradation, a comprehensive review of the observed changes is lacking. The goal of this paper is to distil insight gained across differing permafrost settings through the identification of common patterns in previous studies, at global scale. In this review we focus on three typical permafrost configurations (pervasive permafrost degradation, thermokarst, and thawing rock glaciers) as examples and distinguish impacts on (i) major ions and (ii) trace elements. Consequences of warming climate have caused spatially-distributed progressive increases of major ion and trace element delivery to surface fresh water in both polar and mountain areas following pervasive permafrost degradation. Moreover, localised releases of major ions and trace elements to surface water due to the liberation of soluble materials sequestered in permafrost and ground ice have been found in ice-rich terrains both at high latitude (thermokarst features) and high elevation (rock glaciers). Further release of solutes and related transport to surface fresh water can be expected under warming climatic conditions. However, complex interactions among several factors able to influence the timing and magnitude of the impacts

  13. The surface chemistry of metal-oxygen interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Baroni, Stefano

    1997-01-01

    We report on a computational study of the clean and oxygen-covered Rh(110) surface, based on density-functional theory within the local-density approximation. We have used plane-wave basis sets and Vanderbilt ultra-soft pseudopotentials. For the clean surface, we present results for the equilibrium...... structure, surface energy and surface stress of the unreconstructed and (1 x 2) reconstructed structures. For the oxygen-covered surface we have performed a geometry optimization at 0.5, 1, and 2 monolayer oxygen coverages, and we present results for the equilibrium configurations, workfunctions and oxygen...

  14. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  15. Surface chemistry of polyacrylonitrile- and rayon-based activated carbon fibers after post-heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang Yuchun; Lee, C.-Y.; Lee, H.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile- and rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs) subject to heat treatment were investigated by means of elemental analyzer, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The total ash content of all ACFs was also analyzed. The adsorption of benzene, carbon tetrachloride and water vapor on ACFs was determined to shed light on the role of surface chemistry on gas adsorption. Results show that different precursors resulted in various elemental compositions and imposed diverse influence upon surface functionalities after heat treatment. The surface of heat-treated ACFs became more graphitic and hydrophobic. Three distinct peaks due to C, N, and O atoms were identified by XPS, and the high-resolution revealed the existence of several surface functionalities. The presence of nitride-like species, aromatic N-imines, or chemisorbed nitrogen oxides was found to be of great advantage to adsorption of water vapor or benzene, but the pyridine-N was not. Unstable complexes on the surface would hinder the fibers from adsorption of carbon tetrachloride. The rise in total ash content or hydrogen composition was of benefit to the access of water vapor. Modifications of ACFs by heat treatment have effectively improved adsorption performance

  16. Using advanced surface complexation models for modelling soil chemistry under forests: Solling forest, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonten, Luc T.C.; Groenenberg, Jan E.; Meesenburg, Henning; Vries, Wim de

    2011-01-01

    Various dynamic soil chemistry models have been developed to gain insight into impacts of atmospheric deposition of sulphur, nitrogen and other elements on soil and soil solution chemistry. Sorption parameters for anions and cations are generally calibrated for each site, which hampers extrapolation in space and time. On the other hand, recently developed surface complexation models (SCMs) have been successful in predicting ion sorption for static systems using generic parameter sets. This study reports the inclusion of an assemblage of these SCMs in the dynamic soil chemistry model SMARTml and applies this model to a spruce forest site in Solling Germany. Parameters for SCMs were taken from generic datasets and not calibrated. Nevertheless, modelling results for major elements matched observations well. Further, trace metals were included in the model, also using the existing framework of SCMs. The model predicted sorption for most trace elements well. - Highlights: → Surface complexation models can be well applied in field studies. → Soil chemistry under a forest site is adequately modelled using generic parameters. → The model is easily extended with extra elements within the existing framework. → Surface complexation models can show the linkages between major soil chemistry and trace element behaviour. - Surface complexation models with generic parameters make calibration of sorption superfluous in dynamic modelling of deposition impacts on soil chemistry under nature areas.

  17. Complex Surface Concentration Gradients by Stenciled "Electro Click Chemistry"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Steen; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2010-01-01

    Complex one- or two-dimensional concentration gradients of alkynated molecules are produced on azidized conducting polymer substrates by stenciled "electro click chemistry". The latter describes the local electrochemical generation of catalytically active Cu(I) required to complete a "click...... reaction" between alkynes and azides at room temperature. A stencil on the counter electrode defines the shape and multiplicity of the gradient(s) on the conducting polymer substrate, while the specific reaction conditions control gradient steepness and the maximum concentration deposited. Biologically...

  18. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev, E-mail: dcc@unr.edu

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Mixtures of oxides containing Ni, Fe, Cr and Nb formed on the surface. • Short term exposure tests observed breakdown of native film. • Formation of a Fe rich oxide layer on Inconel 718 prevents mass loss. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−} based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFe{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFe{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  19. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  20. NOx Binding and Dissociation: Enhanced Ferroelectric Surface Chemistry by Catalytic Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    NOx molecules are regulated air pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design viable catalysts for NOx decomposition operating at higher temperatures that would allow for improved fuel efficiency, we examine NOx chemistry on ferroelectric perovskite surfaces. Changing the direction of ferroelectric polarization can modify surface electronic properties and may lead to switchable surface chemistry. Here, we describe our recent work on potentially enhanced surface chemistry using catalytic RuO2 monolayers on perovskite ferroelectric substrates. In addition to thermodynamic stabilization of the RuO2 layer, we present results on the polarization-dependent binding of NO, O2, N2, and atomic O and N. We present results showing that one key problem with current catalysts, involving the difficulty of releasing dissociation products (especially oxygen), can be ameliorated by this method. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  1. Investigations of nitrogen oxide plasmas: Fundamental chemistry and surface reactivity and monitoring student perceptions in a general chemistry recitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechle, Joshua M.

    Part I of this dissertation focuses on investigations of nitrogen oxide plasma systems. With increasing concerns over the environmental presence of NxOy species, there is growing interest in utilizing plasma-assisted conversion techniques. Advances, however, have been limited because of the lack of knowledge regarding the fundamental chemistry of these plasma systems. Understanding the kinetics and thermodynamics of processes in these systems is vital to realizing their potential in a range of applications. Unraveling the complex chemical nature of these systems, however, presents numerous challenges. As such, this work serves as a foundational step in the diagnostics and assessment of these NxOy plasmas. The partitioning of energy within the plasma system is essential to unraveling these complications as it provides insight into both gas and surface reactivity. To obtain this information, techniques such as optical emission spectroscopy (OES), broadband absorption spectroscopy (BAS), and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) were utilized to determine species energetics (vibrational, rotational, translational temperatures). These temperature data provide mechanistic insight and establish the relationships between system parameters and energetic outcomes. Additionally, these data are also correlated to surface reactivity data collected with the Imaging of Radicals Interacting with Surfaces (IRIS) technique. IRIS data demonstrate the relationship between internal temperatures of radicals and their observed surface scatter coefficients (S), the latter of which is directly related to surface reactivity (R) [R = 1-S]. Furthermore, time-resolved (TR) spectroscopic techniques, specifically TR-OES, revealed kinetic trends in NO and N2 formation from a range of precursors (NO, N2O, N2/O2). By examining the rate constants associated with the generation and destruction of various plasma species we can investigate possible mechanistic implications. All told, such data provides

  2. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  3. The role of electron scattering in electron-induced surface chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, Willem F.

    2012-01-01

    Electron-induced chemistry on surfaces plays a key role in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP), a single-step lithography technique that has increasingly gained interest in the past decade. It is crucial for the understanding and modelling of this process to know the role of the surface

  4. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    origins of this phenomenon is therefore needed for designing cathode materials with optimal surface chemistry. We quantitatively assessed the elastic and electrostatic interactions of the dopant with the surrounding lattice as the key driving forces for segregation on model perovskite compounds, LnMnO3 (host cation Ln=La, Sm). Our approach combines surface chemical analysis with X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy on model dense thin films, and computational analysis with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and analytical models. Elastic energy differences were systematically induced in the system by varying the radius of the selected dopants (Ca, Sr, Ba) with respect to the host cations (La, Sm) while retaining the same charge state. Electrostatic energy differences were introduced by varying the distribution of charged oxygen and cation vacancies in our models. Varying the oxygen chemical potential in our experiments induced changes in both the elastic energy and electrostatic interactions. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that the mechanism of dopant segregation on perovskite oxides includes both the elastic and electrostatic energy contributions. A smaller size mismatch between the host and dopant cations and a chemically expanded lattice were found to reduce the segregation level of the dopant and to enable more stable cathode surfaces. Ca-doped LaMnO3 was found to have the most stable surface composition with the least cation segregation among the compositions surveyed. The diffusion kinetics of the larger dopants, Ba and Sr, was found to be slower, and can kinetically trap the segregation at reduced temperatures despite the larger elastic energy driving force. Lastly, scanning probe image-contrast showed that the surface chemical heterogeneities made of dopant oxides upon segregation were electronically insulating. The consistency between the results obtained from experiments, DFT calculations and analytical theory in this work

  5. Geochemistry and Organic Chemistry on the Surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Beauchamp, P.; Beauchamp, J.; Dougherty, D.; Welch, C.; Raulin, F.; Shapiro, R.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere produces a wealth of organic products from methane and nitrogen. These products, deposited on the surface in liquid and solid form, may interact with surface ices and energy sources to produce compounds of exobiological interest. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  7. Sampling procedure for lake or stream surface water chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Musselman

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters collected in the field for chemical analyses are easily contaminated. This research note presents a step-by-step detailed description of how to avoid sample contamination when field collecting, processing, and transporting surface water samples for laboratory analysis.

  8. Surface chemistry interventions to control boiler tube fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W.; Guzonas, D.A.; Klimas, S.J

    2000-06-01

    The adsorption of ammonia, morpholine, ethanolamine, and dimethylamine onto the surfaces of colloidal magnetite and hematite was measured at 25{sup o}C. The effect of the adsorption on the surface potential was quantified by measuring the resulting shift in the isoelectric point of the corrosion products and by the direct measurement of the surface interaction force between the corrosion products and Inconel 600. These measurements have served to support the hypothesis that adsorption of amine affects the magnetite deposition rate by lowering the force of repulsion between magnetite and the surface of Inconel 600. The deposition rate of hematite increased as the oxygen concentration increased. A mechanism to account for enhanced deposition rates at high mixture qualities (> 0.35) has been identified and shown to predict behaviour that is consistent with both experimental and plant data. As a result of this investigation, several criteria are proposed to reduce the extent of corrosion product deposition on the tube bundle. Low hematite deposition is favoured by a low concentration of dissolved oxygen, and low magnetite deposition is favoured by choosing an amine for pH control that has little tendency to adsorb onto the surface of magnetite. To minimize adsorption the amine should have a high base strength and a large 'footprint' on the surface of magnetite. To prevent enhanced deposition at high mixture qualities, it is proposed that a modified amine be used that will reduce the surface tension or the elasticity of the steam-water interface or both.

  9. Surface chemistry interventions to control boiler tube fouling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.W.; Guzonas, D.A.; Klimas, S.J.

    2000-06-01

    The adsorption of ammonia, morpholine, ethanolamine, and dimethylamine onto the surfaces of colloidal magnetite and hematite was measured at 25 o C. The effect of the adsorption on the surface potential was quantified by measuring the resulting shift in the isoelectric point of the corrosion products and by the direct measurement of the surface interaction force between the corrosion products and Inconel 600. These measurements have served to support the hypothesis that adsorption of amine affects the magnetite deposition rate by lowering the force of repulsion between magnetite and the surface of Inconel 600. The deposition rate of hematite increased as the oxygen concentration increased. A mechanism to account for enhanced deposition rates at high mixture qualities (> 0.35) has been identified and shown to predict behaviour that is consistent with both experimental and plant data. As a result of this investigation, several criteria are proposed to reduce the extent of corrosion product deposition on the tube bundle. Low hematite deposition is favoured by a low concentration of dissolved oxygen, and low magnetite deposition is favoured by choosing an amine for pH control that has little tendency to adsorb onto the surface of magnetite. To minimize adsorption the amine should have a high base strength and a large 'footprint' on the surface of magnetite. To prevent enhanced deposition at high mixture qualities, it is proposed that a modified amine be used that will reduce the surface tension or the elasticity of the steam-water interface or both

  10. Plasma Processing with Fluorine Chemistry for Modification of Surfaces Wettability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Satulu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using plasma in conjunction with fluorinated compounds is widely encountered in material processing. We discuss several plasma techniques for surface fluorination: deposition of fluorocarbon thin films either by magnetron sputtering of polytetrafluoroethylene targets, or by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using tetrafluoroethane as a precursor, and modification of carbon nanowalls by plasma treatment in a sulphur hexafluoride environment. We showed that conformal fluorinated thin films can be obtained and, according to the initial surface properties, superhydrophobic surfaces can be achieved.

  11. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev

    2017-05-01

    Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO42- based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFexCr2-xO4 spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFexCr2-xO4 spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe2O4 when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  12. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  13. Attachment chemistry of aromatic compounds on a Silicon(100) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Anders; Nishiori, Daiki; Maeda, Hiroaki; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    A mild method was developed for the chemical attachment of aromatic compounds directly onto a hydrogen-terminated Si(100) (H-Si(100)) surface. In the presence of palladium catalyst and base, 4-iodophenylferrocene and a π-conjugated iron complex were attached to H-Si(100) electrodes and hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs), both of which have predominant dihydride species on their surfaces. The reactions were conducted in 1,4-dioxane at 100 °C and the immobilization of both 4-ferrocenylphenyl group and π-conjugated molecular wires were confirmed and quantified by XPS and electrochemical measurements. We reported densely packed monolayer whose surface coverage (Γ), estimated from the electrochemical measurements are in analogue to similar monolayers prepared via thermal or light induced hydrosilylation reactions with alkenes or alkynes. The increase in electrochemical response observed on nanostructured silicon surfaces corresponds well to the increase in surface area, those strongly indicating that this method may be applied for the functionalization of electrodes with a variety of surface topographies.

  14. Preparation and application of a novel electrochemical sensing material based on surface chemistry of polyhydroquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, Xueping; Wang, Yingkai; Hu, Chengguo; Huang, Jianlin; Chen, Huaixia; Wang, Shengfu; Hu, Shengshui

    2014-01-01

    A new analogue of polydopamine (PDA), i.e., polyhydroquinone (PH 2 Q), was polymerized and its surface chemistry was studied by different ways of characterization. PH 2 Q was produced by the self-polymerization of H 2 Q mediated by dissolved oxygen, and the self-polymerization process was strongly dependent on the type and the pH value of the buffer solutions. PH 2 Q can not only achieve surface hydrophilization of different substrates like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, graphite strip, C 12 SH/Au and wax slice, but also possess several unique properties like reversible adsorption, good solubility and low cost. These properties made PH 2 Q an ideal polymeric modifier for the noncovalent functionalization of some nanomaterials. By simply grinding with PH 2 Q, pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can be readily dispersed in water with high solubility and good stability. The resulting MWNT–PH 2 Q composite exhibited excellent electrochemical performance, which was employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). - Highlights: • Polyhydroquinone (PH 2 Q) was produced by the self-polymerization of hydroquinone (H 2 Q) mediated by dissolved oxygen. • PH 2 Q can achieve surface hydrophilization of a variety of substrates. • PH 2 Q is an ideal polymeric modifier for the functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). • The MWNT–PH 2 Q composite can be employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA)

  15. Affinity Induced Surface Functionalization of Liposomes Using Cu-Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Eliasen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    be used for functionalization of other nanoparticles or solid surfaces. The method exploits a synergistic effect of having both affinity and covalent anchoring tags on the surface of the liposome. This was achieved by synthesizing a peptide linker system that uses Cu-free strain-promoted click chemistry.......2%. The reaction kinetics and overall yield were quantified by HPLC. The results presented here open new possibilities for constructing complex nanostructures and functionalized surfaces....

  16. Surface chemistry and morphology in single particle optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz-Kanik, Fulya; Sevenler, Derin Deniz; Ünlü, Neşe Lortlar; Chiari, Marcella; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-05-01

    Biological nanoparticles such as viruses and exosomes are important biomarkers for a range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases to cancer. Biological sensors that detect whole viruses and exosomes with high specificity, yet without additional labeling, are promising because they reduce the complexity of sample preparation and may improve measurement quality by retaining information about nanoscale physical structure of the bio-nanoparticle (BNP). Towards this end, a variety of BNP biosensor technologies have been developed, several of which are capable of enumerating the precise number of detected viruses or exosomes and analyzing physical properties of each individual particle. Optical imaging techniques are promising candidates among broad range of label-free nanoparticle detectors. These imaging BNP sensors detect the binding of single nanoparticles on a flat surface functionalized with a specific capture molecule or an array of multiplexed capture probes. The functionalization step confers all molecular specificity for the sensor's target but can introduce an unforeseen problem; a rough and inhomogeneous surface coating can be a source of noise, as these sensors detect small local changes in optical refractive index. In this paper, we review several optical technologies for label-free BNP detectors with a focus on imaging systems. We compare the surface-imaging methods including dark-field, surface plasmon resonance imaging and interference reflectance imaging. We discuss the importance of ensuring consistently uniform and smooth surface coatings of capture molecules for these types of biosensors and finally summarize several methods that have been developed towards addressing this challenge.

  17. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH 2 ) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  18. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  19. An Ab Initio Approach Towards Engineering Fischer-Tropsch Surface Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Neurock

    2006-09-11

    One of the greatest societal challenges over the next decade is the production of cheap, renewable energy for the 10 billion people that inhabit the earth. This will require the development of various energy sources which will likely include fuels derived from methane, coal, and biomass and alternatives sources such as solar, wind and nuclear energy. One approach will be to synthesize gasoline and other fuels from simpler hydrocarbons such as CO derived from methane or other U.S. based sources such as coal. Syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) can be readily converted into higher molecular weight hydrocarbons through Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis involves the adsorption and the activation of CO and H{sub 2}, the subsequent propagation steps including hydrogenation and carbon-carbon coupling, followed by chain termination reactions. The current commercial catalysts are supported Co and Co-alloys particles. This project set out with the following objectives in mind: (1) understand the reaction mechanisms that control FT kinetics, (2) predict how the intrinsic metal-adsorbate bond affects the sequence of elementary steps in FT, (3) establish the effects of the reaction environment on catalytic activity and selectivity, (4) construct a first-principles based algorithm that can incorporate the detailed atomic surface structure and simulate the kinetics for the myriad of elementary pathways that make up FT chemistry, and (5) suggest a set of optimal features such as alloy composition and spatial configuration, oxide support, distribution of defect sites. As part of this effort we devoted a significant portion of time to develop an ab initio based kinetic Monte Carlo simulation which can be used to follow FT surface chemistry over different transition metal and alloy surfaces defined by the user. Over the life of this program, we have used theory and have developed and applied stochastic Monte Carlo simulations in order to establish the fundamental

  20. Importance of the carbon surface chemistry: methods of characterization; Importance de la chimie de surface des materiaux carbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, Ph. [Universite Paul Verlaine, Lab. de Chimie et Applications, UFR Sciences, 57 - Metz (France); Vix-Guterl, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces (ICSI) UPR CNRS 9069, 68 - Mulhouse (France)

    2006-03-15

    The diversity of the carbonaceous materials in terms of chemical composition and porous texture explains their large field of applications. The performances of such materials are often influenced by their surface chemistry that is not easy to investigate. Thus a large range of complementary analytical methods is necessary. (authors)

  1. Understanding colloidal charge renormalization from surface chemistry: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, T.; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H.; Schurtenberger, P.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stern capacitance) are determined from fits of a Stern layer model to the titration data. We find strong evidence that the dissociation of protons is the only specific adsorption process. Effective particle charges are determined by fits of integral equation calculations of the polydisperse static structure factor to the static light scattering data. A generalization of the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model including the dissociation of the acidic surface groups and the autodissociation of water is used to predict effective particle charges from the surface chemical parameters determined by the titration experiments. We find that the light scattering data are best described by a model where a small fraction of the ionizable surface sites are sulfate groups which are completely dissociated at moderate pH. These effective charges are comparable to the predictions by a basic cell model where charge regulation is absent.

  2. Understanding colloidal charge renormilization from surface chemistry : experiment and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gisler, Thomas; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, Michal; Sticher, Hans; Schurtenberger, Peter; D'Aguanno, Bruno; Klein, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stem capacitance) are determined from tits of a Stem ...

  3. Polyspecies biofilm formation on implant surfaces with different surface characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. SCHMIDLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the microbial adherence and colonization of a polyspecies biofilm on 7 differently processed titanium surfaces. Material and Methods Six-species biofilms were formed anaerobically on 5-mm-diameter sterilized, saliva-preconditioned titanium discs. Material surfaces used were either machined, stained, acid-etched or sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA. Samples of the latter two materials were also provided in a chemically modified form, with increased wettability characteristics. Surface roughness and contact angles of all materials were determined. The discs were then incubated anaerobically for up to 16.5 h. Initial microbial adherence was evaluated after 20 min incubation and further colonization after 2, 4, 8, and 16.5 h using non-selective and selective culture techniques. Results at different time points were compared using ANOVA and Scheffé post hoc analysis. Results The mean differences in microorganisms colonizing after the first 20 min were in a very narrow range (4.5 to 4.8 log CFU. At up to 16.5 h, the modified SLA surface exhibited the highest values for colonization (6.9±0.2 log CFU, p<0.05 but increasing growth was observed on all test surfaces over time. Discrepancies among bacterial strains on the differently crafted titanium surfaces were very similar to those described for total log CFU. F. nucleatum was below the detection limit on all surfaces after 4 h. Conclusion Within the limitations of this in vitro study, surface roughness had a moderate influence on biofilm formation, while wettability did not seem to influence biofilm formation under the experimental conditions described. The modified SLA surface showed the highest trend for bacterial colonization.

  4. Learning and Studying Strategies Used by General Chemistry Students with Different Affective Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julia Y. K.; Bauer, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    Students in general chemistry were partitioned into three groups by cluster analysis of six affective characteristics (emotional satisfaction, intellectual accessibility, chemistry self-concept, math self-concept, self-efficacy, and test anxiety). The at-home study strategies for exam preparation and in-class learning strategies differed among the…

  5. Surface modification of model hydrogel contact lenses with hyaluronic acid via thiol-ene "click" chemistry for enhancing surface characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korogiannaki, Myrto; Zhang, Jianfeng; Sheardown, Heather

    2017-10-01

    Discontinuation of contact lens wear as a result of ocular dryness and discomfort is extremely common; as many as 26% of contact lens wearers discontinue use within the first year. While patients are generally satisfied with conventional hydrogel lenses, improving on-eye comfort continues to remain a goal. Surface modification with a biomimetic, ocular friendly hydrophilic layer of a wetting agent is hypothesized to improve the interfacial interactions of the contact lens with the ocular surface. In this work, the synthesis and characterization of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) surfaces grafted with a hydrophilic layer of hyaluronic acid are described. The immobilization reaction involved the covalent attachment of thiolated hyaluronic acid (20 kDa) on acrylated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) via nucleophile-initiated Michael addition thiol-ene "click" chemistry. The surface chemistry of the modified surfaces was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The appearance of N (1s) and S (2p) peaks on the low resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra confirmed successful immobilization of hyaluronic acid. Grafting hyaluronic acid to the poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) surfaces decreased the contact angle, the dehydration rate, and the amount of nonspecific sorption of lysozyme and albumin in comparison to pristine hydrogel materials, suggesting the development of more wettable surfaces with improved water-retentive and antifouling properties, while maintaining optical transparency (>92%). In vitro testing also showed excellent viability of human corneal epithelial cells with the hyaluronic acid-grafted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) surfaces. Hence, surface modification with hyaluronic acid via thiol-ene "click" chemistry could be useful in improving contact lens surface properties, potentially alleviating symptoms of contact lens related dryness and discomfort during

  6. Block copolymer-templated chemistry on Si, Ge, InP, and GaAs surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Masato; Buriak, Jillian M

    2005-06-29

    Patterning of semiconductor surfaces is an area of intense interest, not only for technological applications, such as molecular electronics, sensing, cellular recognition, and others, but also for fundamental understanding of surface reactivity, general control over surface properties, and development of new surface reactivity. In this communication, we describe the use of self-assembling block copolymers to direct semiconductor surface chemistry in a spatially defined manner, on the nanoscale. The proof-of-principle class of reactions evaluated here is galvanic displacement, in which a metal ion, M+, is reduced to M0 by the semiconductor, including Si, Ge, InP, and GaAs. The block copolymer chosen has a polypyridine block which binds to the metal ions and brings them into close proximity with the surface, at which point they undergo reaction; the pattern of resulting surface chemistry, therefore, mirrors the nanoscale structure of the parent block copolymer. This chemistry has the added advantage of forming metal nanostructures that result in an alloy or intermetallic at the interface, leading to strongly bound metal nanoparticles that may have interesting electronic properties. This approach has been shown to be very general, functioning on a variety of semiconductor substrates for both silver and gold deposition, and is being extended to organic and inorganic reactions on a variety of conducting, semiconducting, and insulating substrates.

  7. Color and surface chemistry changes of extracted wood flour after heating at 120 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Nicole M. Stark

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of heat on color and surface chemistry of wood flour (WF), unextracted, extracted and delignified samples of commercial WF were heated at 120 °C for 24 h and analyzed by colorimetry, diffuse reflectance visible (DRV), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopies....

  8. Challenges in Teaching "Colloid and Surface Chemistry"--A Danish Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; Vigild, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Seven years ago we were asked, as one of our first teaching duties at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), to teach a 5 ECTS point course on "Colloid and Surface Chemistry". The topic is itself at the same time exciting and demanding, largely due to its multidisciplinary nature. Several "local" requirements posed…

  9. Surface Geometry and Chemistry of Hydrothermally Synthesized Single Crystal Thorium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Member Alex G. Li, PhD Member iv AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-87 Abstract The surface chemistry and geometry of hydrothermally grown, single...Interactions with Materials and Atoms 268(9), pp. 1482-1485. 2010. . DOI: 10.1016/j.nimb.2010.01.027. [4] J. A. Felix , D. M. Fleetwood, R. D. Schrimpf, J. G

  10. On surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using diazonium chemistry to introduce the initiator layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iruthayaraj, Joseph; Chernyy, Sergey; Lillethorup, Mie

    2011-01-01

    This work features the controllability of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate, initiated by a multilayered 2-bromoisobutyryl moiety formed via diazonium chemistry. The thickness as a function of polymerization time has been studied by varying...

  11. Laboratory Activity Worksheet to Train High Order Thinking Skill of Student on Surface Chemistry Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonata, B.; Nasrudin, H.

    2018-01-01

    A worksheet has to be a set with activity which is help students to arrange their own experiments. For this reason, this research is focused on how to train students’ higher order thinking skills in laboratory activity by developing laboratory activity worksheet on surface chemistry lecture. To ensure that the laboratory activity worksheet already contains aspects of the higher order thinking skill, it requires theoretical and empirical validation. From the data analysis results, it shows that the developed worksheet worth to use. The worksheet is worthy of theoretical and empirical feasibility. This conclusion is based on the findings: 1) Assessment from the validators about the theoretical feasibility aspects in the category is very feasible with an assessment range of 95.24% to 97.92%. 2) students’ higher thinking skill from N Gain values ranges from 0.50 (enough) to 1.00 (high) so it can be concluded that the laboratory activity worksheet on surface chemistry lecture is empirical in terms of worth. The empirical feasibility is supported by the responses of the students in very reasonable categories. It is expected that the laboratory activity worksheet on surface chemistry lecture can train students’ high order thinking skills for students who program surface chemistry lecture.

  12. Surface chemistry of tribochemical reactions explored in ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara-Romero, Javier; Maya-Yescas, Rafael; Rico-Cerda, Jose Luis; Rivera-Rojas, Jose Luis; Castillo, Fernando Chinas; Kaltchev, Matey; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of model extreme-pressure lubricant additives on clean iron was studied in ultrahigh vacuum conditions using molecular beam strategies. Methylene chloride and chloroform react to deposit a solid film consisting of FeCl 2 and carbon, and evolve only hydrogen into the gas phase. No gas-phase products and less carbon on the surface are detected in the case of carbon tetrachloride. Dimethyl and diethyl disulfide react on clean iron to deposit a saturated sulfur plus carbon layer at low temperatures (∼600 K) and an iron sulfide film onto a Fe + C underlayer at higher temperatures (∼950 K). Methane is the only gas-phase product when dimethyl disulfide reacts with iron. Ethylene and hydrogen are detected when diethyl disulfide is used

  13. Surface Chemistry Involved in Epitaxy of Graphene on 3C-SiC(111)/Si(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Abe Shunsuke; Handa Hiroyuki; Takahashi Ryota; Imaizumi Kei; Fukidome Hirokazu; Suemitsu Maki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Surface chemistry involved in the epitaxy of graphene by sublimating Si atoms from the surface of epitaxial 3C-SiC(111) thin films on Si(111) has been studied. The change in the surface composition during graphene epitaxy is monitored by in situ temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy using deuterium as a probe (D2-TPD) and complementarily by ex situ Raman and C1s core-level spectroscopies. The surface of the 3C-SiC(111)/Si(111) is Si-terminated before the graphitization, and ...

  14. Increasing the Detection Limit of the Parkinson Disorder through a Specific Surface Chemistry Applied onto Inner Surface of the Titration Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Poncin-Epaillard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper was to illustrate the enhancement of the sensitivity of ELISA titration for neurodegenerative proteins by reducing nonspecific adsorptions that could lead to false positives. This goal was obtained thanks to the association of plasma and wet chemistries applied to the inner surface of the titration well. The polypropylene surface was plasma-activated and then, dip-coated with different amphiphilic molecules. These molecules have more or less long hydrocarbon chains and may be charged. The modified surfaces were characterized in terms of hydrophilic—phobic character, surface chemical groups and topography. Finally, the coated wells were tested during the ELISA titration of the specific antibody capture of the α-synuclein protein. The highest sensitivity is obtained with polar (Θ = 35°, negatively charged and smooth inner surface.

  15. Evaluation of the In Vitro Effect of Gold Nanorod Aspect Ratio, Surface Charge and Chemistry on Cellular Association and Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Nanorods. Analytical Chemistry , 79(2), 572-579. doi: 10.1021/ac061730d 22 LIST OF ACRONYMS ATCC American Type Culture Collection AR Aspect...EVALUATION OF THE IN VITRO EFFECTOF GOLD NANOROD ASPECT RATIO, SURFACE CHARGE AND CHEMISTRY ON CELLULAR ASSOCIATION AND CYTOTOXICITY...July 2012 – Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF THE IN VITRO EFFECT OF GOLD NANOROD ASPECT RATIO, SURFACE CHARGE AND CHEMISTRY ON

  16. Modular "click" chemistry for electrochemically and photoelectrochemically active molecular interfaces to tin oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Michelle C; Ruther, Rose E; Gerken, James B; Rigsby, Matthew L; Bishop, Lee M; Tan, Yizheng; Stahl, Shannon S; Hamers, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of "click" chemistry to form electrochemically and photoelectrochemically active molecular interfaces to SnO(2) nanoparticle thin films. By using photochemical grafting to link a short-chain alcohol to the surface followed by conversion to a surface azide group, we enable use of the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne [3 + 2] cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction, a form of "click" chemistry, on metal oxide surfaces. Results are shown with three model compounds to test the surface chemistry and subsequent ability to achieve electrochemical and photoelectrochemical charge transfer. Surface-tethered ferrocene groups exhibit good electron-transfer characteristics with thermal rates estimated at >1000 s(-1). Time-resolved surface photovoltage measurements using a ruthenium terpyridyl coordination compound demonstrate photoelectron charge transfer on time scales of nanoseconds or less, limited by the laser pulse width. The results demonstrate that the CuAAC "click" reaction can be used to form electrochemically and photoelectrochemically active molecular interfaces to SnO(2) and other metal oxide semiconductors.

  17. Improving surface and defect center chemistry of fluorescent nanodiamonds for imaging purposes--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, Andreas; Hemelaar, Simon Robert; Schirhagl, Romana

    2015-10-01

    Diamonds are widely used for jewelry owing to their superior optical properties accounting for their fascinating beauty. Beyond the sparkle, diamond is highly investigated in materials science for its remarkable properties. Recently, fluorescent defects in diamond, particularly the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) center, have gained much attention: The NV(-) center emits stable, nonbleaching fluorescence, and thus could be utilized in biolabeling, as a light source, or as a Förster resonance energy transfer donor. Even more remarkable are its spin properties: with the fluorescence intensity of the NV(-) center reacting to the presence of small magnetic fields, it can be utilized as a sensor for magnetic fields as small as the field of a single electron spin. However, a reproducible defect and surface and defect chemistry are crucial to all applications. In this article we review methods for using nanodiamonds for different imaging purposes. The article covers (1) dispersion of particles, (2) surface cleaning, (3) particle size selection and reduction, (4) defect properties, and (5) functionalization and attachment to nanostructures, e.g., scanning probe microscopy tips.

  18. Preparation and application of a novel electrochemical sensing material based on surface chemistry of polyhydroquinone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Xueping [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080 (China); Wang, Yingkai [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hu, Chengguo, E-mail: cghu@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080 (China); Huang, Jianlin; Chen, Huaixia; Wang, Shengfu [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Hu, Shengshui, E-mail: sshu@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 10080 (China)

    2014-07-01

    A new analogue of polydopamine (PDA), i.e., polyhydroquinone (PH{sub 2}Q), was polymerized and its surface chemistry was studied by different ways of characterization. PH{sub 2}Q was produced by the self-polymerization of H{sub 2}Q mediated by dissolved oxygen, and the self-polymerization process was strongly dependent on the type and the pH value of the buffer solutions. PH{sub 2}Q can not only achieve surface hydrophilization of different substrates like polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, graphite strip, C{sub 12}SH/Au and wax slice, but also possess several unique properties like reversible adsorption, good solubility and low cost. These properties made PH{sub 2}Q an ideal polymeric modifier for the noncovalent functionalization of some nanomaterials. By simply grinding with PH{sub 2}Q, pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) can be readily dispersed in water with high solubility and good stability. The resulting MWNT–PH{sub 2}Q composite exhibited excellent electrochemical performance, which was employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA). - Highlights: • Polyhydroquinone (PH{sub 2}Q) was produced by the self-polymerization of hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) mediated by dissolved oxygen. • PH{sub 2}Q can achieve surface hydrophilization of a variety of substrates. • PH{sub 2}Q is an ideal polymeric modifier for the functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). • The MWNT–PH{sub 2}Q composite can be employed for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA)

  19. Atom-resolved surface chemistry using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avouris, P.

    1989-01-01

    The author shows that by using STM and STS one can study chemistry with atomic resolution. The author uses two examples: the reaction of Si(111)-(7x7) with (a) NH 3 and (b) decaborane (DB). In case (a) the authors can directly observe the spatial distribution of the reaction. He determined which surface atoms have reacted and how the products of the reaction are distributed. He found that the different dangling-bond sites have significantly different reactivities and explain these differences in terms of the local electronic structure. In case (b) the 7x7 reconstruction is eliminated and at high temperatures, (√3 x √3) R30 degree reconstructions are observed. Depending on the amount of DB and the annealing temperature the √3 structures contain variable numbers of B and Si adatoms on T 4 -sites. Calculations show that the structure involving B adatoms, although kinetically favored, is not the lowest energy configuration. The lowest energy state involves B in a substitutional site under a Si adatom

  20. Through the looking glass of a chemistry video game: Evaluating the effects of different MLEs presenting identical content material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Dustin S.

    The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of different media-based learning environments (MLEs) that present identical chemistry content material. This is done with four different MLEs that utilize some or all components of a chemistry-based media-based prototype video game. Examination of general chemistry student volunteers purposefully randomized to one of four different MLEs did not provide evidence that the higher the level of interactivity resulted in a more effective MLE for the chemistry content. Data suggested that the cognitive load to play the chemistry-based video game may impaired the chemistry content being presented and recalled by the students while the students watching the movie of the chemistry-based video game were able to recall the chemistry content more efficiently. Further studies in this area need to address the overall cognitive load of the different MLEs to potentially better determine what the most effective MLE may be for this chemistry content.

  1. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  2. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  3. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-04

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  4. Effects of different representations of transport in the new EMAC-SWIFT chemistry climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Janice; Langematz, Ulrike; Wohltmann, Ingo; Kreyling, Daniel; Rex, Markus

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the representation of atmospheric ozone chemistry in weather and climate models is essential for a realistic simulation of the atmospheric state. Interactively coupled chemistry climate models (CCMs) provide a means to realistically simulate the interaction between atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. The calculation of chemistry in CCMs, however, is computationally expensive which renders the use of complex chemistry models not suitable for ensemble simulations or simulations with multiple climate change scenarios. In these simulations ozone is therefore usually prescribed as a climatological field or included by incorporating a fast linear ozone scheme into the model. While prescribed climatological ozone fields are often not aligned with the modelled dynamics, a linear ozone scheme may not be applicable for a wide range of climatological conditions. An alternative approach to represent atmospheric chemistry in climate models which can cope with non-linearities in ozone chemistry and is applicable to a wide range of climatic states is the Semi-empirical Weighted Iterative Fit Technique (SWIFT) that is driven by reanalysis data and has been validated against observational satellite data and runs of a full Chemistry and Transport Model. SWIFT has been implemented into the ECHAM/MESSy (EMAC) chemistry climate model that uses a modular approach to climate modelling where individual model components can be switched on and off. When using SWIFT in EMAC, there are several possibilities to represent the effect of transport inside the polar vortex: the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of EMAC and a transport parameterisation that can be useful when using SWIFT in models not having transport of their own. Here, we present results of equivalent simulations with different handling of transport, compare with EMAC simulations with full interactive chemistry and evaluate the results with observations.

  5. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  6. Surface Modification of Nanoporous 1,2-Polybutadiene by Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization or Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Fengxiao; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Schulte, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and click chemistry were used to obtain functional nanoporous polymers based oil nanoporous 1,2-polybutadiene (PB) with gyroid morphology. The ATRP monolith initiator was prepared by immobilizing bromoester initiators onto the pore walls...... ATRP-grafting of hydrophilic polyacrylates and click of MPEG, the originally hydrophobic samples transformed into hydrophilic nanoporous materials. The successful modification was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, contact angle measurements and measurements of spontaneous water uptake, while...

  7. Attachment and proliferation of neonatal rat calvarial osteoblasts on Ti6Al4V: effect of surface chemistries of the alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T M; Chang, E; Yang, C Y

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the cell attachment and proliferation of neonatal rat calvarial osteoblasts on Ti6Al4V alloy as affected by the surface modifications. The modifications could alter simultaneously the surface chemistries of the alloy (elemental difference of Ti, Al, V, Cu and Ni about 300-600mum thick examined by EDS) as well as the XPS nano-surface characteristics of oxides on the metal surface (chemistries of oxides, amphoteric OH group adsorbed on oxides, and oxide thickness). Three materials including two from modifications and a control were examined. It is argued that a slight change of the nano-surface characteristics of oxides as a result of the modifications neither alters the in vitro capability of Ca and P ion adsorption nor affects the metal ion dissolution behavior of the alloy. This implies that any influence on the cytocompatibility of the materials should only be correlated to the effect of surface chemistries of the alloy and the associated metal ion dissolution behavior of the alloy. The experimental results suggest that the cell response of neonatal rat calvarial osteoblasts on the Ti6Al4V alloy should neither be affected by the variation of surface chemistries of the alloy in a range studied.

  8. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  9. Adsorption of Dyes in Studying the Surface Chemistry of Ultradispersed Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, T. D.; Yunusova, G. R.; Lanin, S. N.

    2018-05-01

    The effect the surface chemistry of ultradispersed diamond (UDD) has on the adsorption of watersoluble dyes is considered. A comparison is made to adsorption on graphitized thermal carbon black (GTCB), which has a homogeneous and nonporous surface. The adsorption isotherms of dyes and the dependence of the adsorption on the pH of solutions are measured. It is found that UDD adsorbs acid (anionic) dyes—acid orange (AO) and acid anthraquinone blue (AAB)—but barely adsorbs a basic (cationic) dye, methylene blue (MB), because of the predominance of positively charged basic groups on the surface of UDD. The maximum adsorption of AO is much lower on UDD than on GTCB, while the maximum adsorption of AAB is similar for both surfaces. The adsorption of AO on UDD depends strongly on the pH of the solution, while the adsorption of AAB is independent of this parameter. It is suggested that the adsorption of AAB is determined not only by ionic and hydrophobic interactions but also by coordination interactions with impurity metal ions on a UDD surface. It is concluded that the adsorption of dyes characterizes the chemistry of a UDD surface with high sensitivity.

  10. The contribution of inflammasome components on macrophage response to surface nanotopography and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, Susan; Bachhuka, Akash; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Implantable devices have become an established part of medical practice. However, often a negative inflammatory host response can impede the integration and functionality of the device. In this paper, we interrogate the role of surface nanotopography and chemistry on the potential molecular role of the inflammasome in controlling macrophage responses. To achieve this goal we engineered model substrata having precisely controlled nanotopography of predetermined height and tailored outermost surface chemistry. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were harvested from genetically engineered mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2. These cells were then cultured on these nanoengineered substrata and assessed for their capacity to attach and express pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our data provide evidence that the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2 play a role in regulating macrophage adhesion and activation in response to surface nanotopography and chemistry. The findings of this paper are important for understanding the inflammatory consequences caused by biomaterials and pave the way to the rational design of future implantable devices having controlled and predictable inflammatory outcomes.

  11. The role of surface chemistry in the cytotoxicity profile of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Waqar; Bourdo, Shawn; Petibone, Dayton M; Saini, Viney; Vang, Kieng Bao; Nima, Zeid A; Alghazali, Karrer M; Darrigues, Emilie; Ghosh, Anindya; Watanabe, Fumiya; Casciano, Daniel; Ali, Syed F; Biris, Alexandru S

    2017-04-01

    Graphene and its derivative, because of their unique physical, electrical and chemical properties, are an important class of nanomaterials being proposed as foundational materials in nanomedicine as well as for a variety of industrial applications. A major limitation for graphene, when used in biomedical applications, is its poor solubility due to its rather hydrophobic nature. Therefore, chemical functionalities are commonly introduced to alter both its surface chemistry and biochemical activity. Here, we show that surface chemistry plays a major role in the toxicological profile of the graphene structures. To demonstrate this, we chemically increased the oxidation level of the pristine graphene and compared the corresponding toxicological effects along with those for the graphene oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that pristine graphene had the lowest amount of surface oxygen, while graphene oxide had the highest at 2.5% and 31%, respectively. Low and high oxygen functionalized graphene samples were found to have 6.6% and 24% surface oxygen, respectively. Our results showed a dose-dependent trend in the cytotoxicity profile, where pristine graphene was the most cytotoxic, with decreasing toxicity observed with increasing oxygen content. Increased surface oxygen also played a role in nanomaterial dispersion in water or cell culture medium over longer periods. It is likely that higher dispersity might result in graphene entering into cells as individual flakes ~1 nm thick rather than as more cytotoxic aggregates. In conclusion, changes in graphene's surface chemistry resulted in altered solubility and toxicity, suggesting that a generalized toxicity profile would be rather misleading. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Surface chemistry, microstructure and friction properties of some ferrous-base metallic glasses at temperatures to 750 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, transmission electron microscopy, diffraction studies, and sliding friction experiments were conducted with ferrous-base metallic glasses in sliding contact with aluminum oxide at temperatures from room to 750 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on the friction properties, surface chemistry, and microstructure of metallic glasses. The relative concentrations of the various constituents at the surface of the sputtered specimens were very different from the normal bulk compositions. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the material to the surface upon heating and impart boric oxide and silicon oxide at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The coefficient of friction increased with increasing temperature to 350 C. Above 500 C the coefficient of friction decreased rapidly. The segregation of contaminants may be responsible for the friction behavior.

  13. Bioadhesion of mussels and geckos: Molecular mechanics, surface chemistry, and nanoadhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeshin

    The adhesive strategies of living creatures are diverse, ranging from temporary to permanent adhesions with various functions such as locomotion, self-defense, communication, colony formation, and so on. The classic example of temporary adhesion is the gecko, which is known for its ability to walk along vertical and even inverted surfaces; this remarkable adhesion arises from the interfacial weak interactions of van der Waals and capillary forces. In contrast, a celerbrated example of permanent adhesion is found in marine mussels which secrete protein adhesives that function in aqueous environments without mechanical failure against turbulent conditions on the seashore. In addition, mussel adhesives stick to virtually all inorganic and organic surfaces. However, most commonly used man-made adhesives lack such unique adhesion properties compared to their natural counterparts. For example, many commercial adhesives quickly lose their adhesive strength when exposed to solvents, particularly water. The first part of this thesis focused on adhesion mechanics of mussels at a single-molecule level, in which the adhesive molecule showed surprisingly strong yet reversible adhesion on inorganic surfaces but exhibited irreversible covalent bond formation on organic surfaces. Strong and reversible adhesion on mucin surfaces was found, indicating potential application for drug delivery via mucus layers. Next, inspired by the mussel's versatile adhesion on a wide variety of material surfaces, a material-independent surface modification chemistry called 'polydopamine coating' is described. This concept was subsequently adapted to develop a surface-independent polymeric primer for layer-by-layer assembly of multifunctional coatings. Finally, a new bio-hybrid adhesive 'geckel' was developed by the functional combination of adhesion strategies of geckos and mussels. The new bio-inspired adhesive and material-independent surface chemistry can revolutionize the research areas such as

  14. The Influence of Surface Chemistry on the Optoelectronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rachel Dory

    This dissertation describes the relationship between the surface chemistry of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, QDs) and their optoelectronic properties, such as photoluminescence and degree of quantum confinement. We primarily focus our efforts on one particular subset of ligands known to couple strongly to the inorganic core of the QD to decrease its quantum confinement, phenyldithiocarbamates (PTCs). We focus first on the development of quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques to characterize the identity and quantity of ligands (such as PTCs and oleic acid) bound to nanocrystal surfaces. When we correlate the surface chemistry information obtained from NMR with the optical spectra of our QDs, we find that for strongly-delocalizing ligands like PTC, the spatial distribution of ligands on the QD surface affects the overall degree of delocalization. In the later chapters of this thesis, we describe two avenues for exploiting the relationship between surface coverage of exciton-delocalizing ligands and quantum confinement to design strongly coupled, hierarchical nanomaterials for efficient charge transport in films or in solution. We explore the treatment of thin lead sulfide QD films with a PTC derivative to improve their overall conductivity relative to benzoic acid, a similar molecule that does not affect confinement. Finally, we describe a potential strategy to improve the yield and rate of hole transfer to a tethered phthalocyanine molecule using dithiocarbamate and thiolate linkers.

  15. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 107 molecules cm-2 s-1 sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  16. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens: Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Jacqueline Wilhelmien

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  17. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens : Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  18. Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen Doped Graphene Oxide from Graphite Flakes and Powders: A Comparison of Their Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokwana, Kholiswa; Ray, Sekhar C; Khenfouch, Mohammad; Kuvarega, Alex T; Mamba, Bhekie B; Mhlanga, Sabelo D; Nxumalo, Edward N

    2018-08-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxide (NGO) nanosheets were prepared via a facile one-pot modified Hummer's approach at low temperatures using graphite powder and flakes as starting materials in the presence of a nitrogen precursor. It was found that the morphology, structure, composition and surface chemistry of the NGO nanosheets depended on the nature of the graphite precursor used. GO nanosheets doped with nitrogen atoms exhibited a unique structure with few thin layers and wrinkled sheets, high porosity and structural defects. NGO sheets made from graphite powder (NGOp) exhibited excellent thermal stability and remarkably high surface area (up to 240.53 m2 ·g-1) compared to NGO sheets made from graphite flakes (NGOf) which degraded at low temperatures and had an average surface area of 24.70 m2 ·g-1. NGOf sheets had a size range of 850 to 2200 nm while NGOp sheets demonstrated obviously small sizes (460-1600 nm) even when exposed to different pH conditions. The NGO nanosheets exhibited negatively charged surfaces in a wide pH range (1 to 12) and were found to be stable above pH 6. In addition, graphite flakes were found to be more suitable for the production of NGO as they produced high N-doping levels (0.65 to 1.29 at.%) compared to graphite powders (0.30 to 0.35 at.%). This study further demonstrates that by adjusting the amount of N source in the host GO, one can tailor its thermal stability, surface morphology, surface chemistry and surface area.

  19. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, J.P.; Rokusek, D.L.; Harilal, S.S.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.W.; Heim, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  20. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  1. Pretreatment-dependent surface chemistry of wood nanocellulose for pH-sensitive hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Syverud, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    Nanocellulose from wood is a promising material with potential in various technological areas. Within biomedical applications, nanocellulose has been proposed as a suitable nano-material for wound dressings. This is based on the capability of the material to self-assemble into 3D micro-porous structures, which among others have an excellent capacity of maintaining a moist environment. In addition, the surface chemistry of nanocellulose is suitable for various applications. First, OH-groups are abundant in nanocellulose materials, making the material strongly hydrophilic. Second, the surface chemistry can be modified, introducing aldehyde and carboxyl groups, which have major potential for surface functionalization. In this study, we demonstrate the production of nanocellulose with tailor-made surface chemistry, by pre-treating the raw cellulose fibres with carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The pre-treatments yielded a highly nanofibrillated material, with significant amounts of aldehyde and carboxyl groups. Importantly, the poly-anionic surface of the oxidized nanocellulose opens up for novel applications, i.e. micro-porous materials with pH-responsive characteristics. This is due to the swelling capacity of the 3D micro-porous structures, which have ionisable functional groups. In this study, we demonstrated that nanocellulose gels have a significantly higher swelling degree in neutral and alkaline conditions, compared to an acid environment (pH 3). Such a capability can potentially be applied in chronic wounds for controlled and intelligent release of antibacterial components into biofilms. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Surface Chemistry Involved in Epitaxy of Graphene on 3C-SiC(111/Si(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Shunsuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surface chemistry involved in the epitaxy of graphene by sublimating Si atoms from the surface of epitaxial 3C-SiC(111 thin films on Si(111 has been studied. The change in the surface composition during graphene epitaxy is monitored by in situ temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy using deuterium as a probe (D2-TPD and complementarily by ex situ Raman and C1s core-level spectroscopies. The surface of the 3C-SiC(111/Si(111 is Si-terminated before the graphitization, and it becomes C-terminated via the formation of C-rich (6√3 × 6√3R30° reconstruction as the graphitization proceeds, in a similar manner as the epitaxy of graphene on Si-terminated 6H-SiC(0001 proceeds.

  3. The Role of Controlled Surface Topography and Chemistry on Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Attachment, Growth and Self-Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Melanie; Williams, Rachel; Downes, Joni; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2017-09-14

    The success of stem cell therapies relies heavily on our ability to control their fate in vitro during expansion to ensure an appropriate supply. The biophysical properties of the cell culture environment have been recognised as a potent stimuli influencing cellular behaviour. In this work we used advanced plasma-based techniques to generate model culture substrates with controlled nanotopographical features of 16 nm, 38 nm and 68 nm in magnitude, and three differently tailored surface chemical functionalities. The effect of these two surface properties on the adhesion, spreading, and self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were assessed. The results demonstrated that physical and chemical cues influenced the behaviour of these stem cells in in vitro culture in different ways. The size of the nanotopographical features impacted on the cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation, while the chemistry influenced the cell self-renewal and differentiation.

  4. Dynamics of soil chemistry in different serpentine habitats from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicić Dražen D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance understanding of edaphic conditions in serpentine habitats, a thorough investigation of chemical and mechanical properties of three soils from disjunct ultramafic outcrops in the central Balkans was undertaken. Soil from a nearby chemically-contrasting limestone habitat was also analyzed. Three plant species differently associated with serpentine (Halacsya sendtneri, Cheilanthes marantae, and Seseli rigidum were references for site and soil selection. Twenty elements were scanned for, and fourteen were measured in seven sequentially-extracted soil fractions. Quantified soil properties also included: pH, levels of free CaCO3, organic matter, P2O5, K2O, N, C, S, cation exchange capacity, total organic carbon, field capacity and soil mechanical composition. The usual harsh components for plant growth in serpentine soil such as elevated Mg:Ca ratio, high levels of Ni, Cr, or Co, were significantly lower in the available fractions. There was a significant positive correlation of organic matter and field capacity, with most available Ca (70-80% found in the mobile, rather than the organically-bound fraction. This showed that a more favorable Mg:Ca ratio is highly dependent upon a higher field capacity, which is also in accordance with a more developed vegetation. Increasing the availability of metals (Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Mg, Ni, Zn in a more developed serpentine grassland and forest vegetation, occurred only simultaneously with decrease of the Mg:Ca ratio and rise in other factors of fertility (N, P, K. Progressive development of ecosystem complexity therefore raised the availability of metals, but also reduced harsh Mg:Ca ratio disproportion, boosted levels of nutrients and raised soil field capacity. Principal components analysis confirmed that the main differences among serpentine habitats lay primarily in factors of fertility. The common habitat which hosts all three reference species offers intermediate conditions in a plant habitat

  5. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa

    2017-09-15

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  6. Control and Characterization of Titanium Dioxide Morphology: Applications in Surface Organometallic Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Jeantelot, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Surface Organometallic Chemistry leads to the combination of the high activity and specificity of homogeneous catalysts with the recoverability and practicality of heterogeneous catalysts. Most metal complexes used in this chemistry are grafted on metal oxide supports such as amorphous silica (SiO2) and γ-alumina (Al2O3). In this thesis, we sought to enable the use of titania (TiO2) as a new support for single-site well-defined grafting of metal complexes. This was achieved by synthesizing a special type of anatase-TiO2, bearing a high density of identical hydroxyl groups, through hydrothermal synthesis then post-treatment under high vacuum followed by oxygen flow, and characterized by several analytical techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. Finally, as a proof of concept, the grafting of vanadium oxychloride (VOCl3) was successfully attempted.

  7. Assessment of the surface chemistry of carbon blacks by TGA-MS, XPS and inverse gas chromatography using statistical chemometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzemiecka, Beata; Voelkel, Adam; Donate-Robles, Jessica; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon blacks with lower specific surface area had basic character (electron donor) due to C=O and C-O groups. • Carbon blacks with higher specific surface area had acidic character (acceptor electron) due to OH groups. • Total surface energy and its dispersive component of carbon blacks increased by increasing their specific surface area. (table) - Abstract: Four carbon blacks with different specific surface areas and surface chemistries (C32, C71, C159 and C178) were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K. Their surface chemistries were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry (TGA-MS) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The carbon blacks contained 2.7–5.8 wt% volatiles corresponding to -OH, C-O, C=O and COO groups. The surface chemistry parameters obtained with the different experimental techniques were inter-related by using chemometric statistical analysis tools. The application of this methodology showed that the carbon blacks with lower specific surface area (C32 and C71) had basic character (electron donor) mainly due to C=O and C-O groups, whereas the carbon black with the highest specific surface area (C178) showed acidic character (acceptor electron) due to its high content of OH groups. Moreover, the total surface energy and the dispersive component of the surface energy of the carbon blacks increased with the increase of their specific surface area. In general the specific interactions of the carbon blacks also increased with the increase of their specific surface area although C71 is exceptional due to higher oxygen content corresponding to C-O groups

  8. Roles of surface chemistry on safety and electrochemistry in lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Tae; Jeong, Sookyung; Cho, Jaephil

    2013-05-21

    Motivated by new applications including electric vehicles and the smart grid, interest in advanced lithium ion batteries has increased significantly over the past decade. Therefore, research in this field has intensified to produce safer devices with better electrochemical performance. Most research has focused on the development of new electrode materials through the optimization of bulk properties such as crystal structure, ionic diffusivity, and electric conductivity. More recently, researchers have also considered the surface properties of electrodes as critical factors for optimizing performance. In particular, the electrolyte decomposition at the electrode surface relates to both a lithium ion battery's electrochemical performance and safety. In this Account, we give an overview of the major developments in the area of surface chemistry for lithium ion batteries. These ideas will provide the basis for the design of advanced electrode materials. Initially, we present a brief background to lithium ion batteries such as major chemical components and reactions that occur in lithium ion batteries. Then, we highlight the role of surface chemistry in the safety of lithium ion batteries. We examine the thermal stability of cathode materials: For example, we discuss the oxygen generation from cathode materials and describe how cells can swell and heat up in response to specific conditions. We also demonstrate how coating the surfaces of electrodes can improve safety. The surface chemistry can also affect the electrochemistry of lithium ion batteries. The surface coating strategy improved the energy density and cycle performance for layered LiCoO2, xLi2MnO3·(1 - x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co, and their combinations), and LiMn2O4 spinel materials, and we describe a working mechanism for these enhancements. Although coating the surfaces of cathodes with inorganic materials such as metal oxides and phosphates improves the electrochemical performance and safety properties of

  9. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  10. Unravelling the surface chemistry of metal oxide nanocrystals, the role of acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van den Broeck, Freya; De Keukeleere, Katrien; Martins, José C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Hens, Zeger

    2014-07-09

    We synthesized HfO2 nanocrystals from HfCl4 using a surfactant-free solvothermal process in benzyl alcohol and found that the resulting nanocrystals could be transferred to nonpolar media using a mixture of carboxylic acids and amines. Using solution (1)H NMR, FTIR, and elemental analysis, we studied the details of the transfer reaction and the surface chemistry of the resulting sterically stabilized nanocrystals. As-synthesized nanocrystals are charge-stabilized by protons, with chloride acting as the counterion. Treatment with only carboxylic acids does not lead to any binding of ligands to the HfO2 surface. On the other hand, we find that the addition of amines provides the basic environment in which carboxylic acids can dissociate and replace chloride. This results in stable, aggregate-free dispersions of HfO2 nanocrystals, sterically stabilized by carboxylate ligands. Moreover, titrations with deuterated carboxylic acid show that the charge on the carboxylate ligands is balanced by coadsorbed protons. Hence, opposite from the X-type/nonstoichiometric nanocrystals picture prevailing in literature, one should look at HfO2/carboxylate nanocrystals as systems where carboxylic acids are dissociatively adsorbed to bind to the nanocrystals. Similar results were obtained with ZrO2 NCs. Since proton accommodation on the surface is most likely due to the high Brønsted basicity of oxygen, our model could be a more general picture for the surface chemistry of metal oxide nanocrystals with important consequences on the chemistry of ligand exchange reactions.

  11. Influence of solution chemistry on the deposition and detachment kinetics of RNA on silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yun; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping; Li, Qingyun

    2011-02-01

    The deposition kinetics of RNA extracted from both virus and bacteria on silica surfaces were examined in both monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) solutions under a wide range of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). To better understand the RNA deposition mechanisms, QCM-D data were complemented by diffusion coefficients and zeta potentials of RNA as a function of examined solution chemistry conditions. Favorable deposition of RNA on poly-l-lysine-coated (positively charged) silica surfaces was governed by the convective-diffusive transport of RNA to the surfaces. The deposition kinetics of RNA on bare silica surfaces were controlled by classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions. The presence of divalent cations (Ca(2+)) in solutions greatly enhanced the deposition kinetics of RNA on silica surfaces. Solution pH also affected the deposition behavior of RNA on silica surfaces. Release experiments showed that detachment of RNA from silica surfaces was significant in NaCl solutions, whereas, the deposited RNA on silica surfaces in CaCl(2) solutions was more likely to be irreversible. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  13. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Platforms: Engineered Surface Chemistry and Structure for Optical Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kumeria

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical anodization of pure aluminum enables the growth of highly ordered nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA structures. This has made NAA one of the most popular nanomaterials with applications including molecular separation, catalysis, photonics, optoelectronics, sensing, drug delivery, and template synthesis. Over the past decades, the ability to engineer the structure and surface chemistry of NAA and its optical properties has led to the establishment of distinctive photonic structures that can be explored for developing low-cost, portable, rapid-response and highly sensitive sensing devices in combination with surface plasmon resonance (SPR and reflective interference spectroscopy (RIfS techniques. This review article highlights the recent advances on fabrication, surface modification and structural engineering of NAA and its application and performance as a platform for SPR- and RIfS-based sensing and biosensing devices.

  14. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopic Study of a Cholera Toxin B Langmuir Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiv K; Seven, Elif S; Micic, Miodrag; Li, Shanghao; Leblanc, Roger M

    2018-02-20

    In this article, we explored the surface chemistry properties of a cholera toxin B (CTB) monolayer at the air-subphase interface and investigated the change in interfacial properties through in situ spectroscopy. The study showed that the impact of the blue shift was negligible, suggesting that the CTB molecules were minimally affected by the subphase molecules. The stability of the CTB monolayer was studied by maintaining the constant surface pressure for a long time and also by using the compression-decompression cycle experiments. The high stability of the Langmuir monolayer of CTB clearly showed that the driving force of CTB going to the amphiphilic membrane was its amphiphilic nature. In addition, no major change was detected in the various in situ spectroscopy results (such as UV-vis, fluorescence, and IR ER) of the CTB Langmuir monolayer with the increase in surface pressure. This indicates that no aggregation occurs in the Langmuir monolayer of CTB.

  15. Investigation of silicate surface chemistry and reaction mechanisms associated with mass transport in geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.F.; Perry, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The concentration and rate of transport of radionuclides through geologic media can be strongly influenced by the extent of sorption on aquifer surfaces. Over time intervals relevant to such transport processes, rock and mineral surfaces cannot be considered as inert, unreactive substrates but rather as groundwater/solidphase interfaces which are commonly in a state of natural or artificially induced disequilibrium. The goal of the present research is to define experimentally the type of water/rock interactions that will influence surface chemistry and hence sorption characteristics and capacities of natural aquifers. As wide a range of silicate minerals as possible was selected for study to represent rock-forming minerals in basalt, tuff, and granite. The minerals include K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, olivine, hornblende, biotite, and volcanic glass

  16. Surface chemistry of K-montmorillonite: ionic strength, temperature dependence and dissolution kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozalén, Marisa; Brady, Patrick V; Huertas, F Javier

    2009-05-15

    The surface chemistry of K-montmorillonite was investigated by potentiometric titrations conducted at 25, 50 and 70 degrees C and at ionic strengths of 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 M KNO(3). Proton adsorption decreases with electrolyte concentration at all pHs. The pH of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) decreases from 8.1 to 7.6 when the ionic strength increases from 0.001 to 0.1 M. Temperature has a very small effect on surface charge. A constant capacitance model that accounts for protonation/deprotonation of aluminol and silanol edge sites and basal plane H(+)/K(+) exchange is used to fit the experimental data. H(+) and OH(-) adsorption to specific surface sites appear to account for the pH-dependence of the K-montmorillonite dissolution.

  17. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakraborty, S.; Vudamala, K.; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B.N.

    binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments. Materials and Methods: Study area: The sediment samples were collected from the Vembanad Lake in Kerala, west coast of India. It is the longest (stretching about 90 km) and largest brackish-water lake... of the European Communities. International journal of environmental analytical chemistry, 51(1-4), 135-151. Verma, A., & Subramanian, V. (2002). Organic matter and amino acid concentrations in surface sediments of Vembanad Lake–a tropical estuary, west coast...

  18. Coordination chemistry of weathering: Kinetics of the surface-controlled dissolution of oxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumm, Werner; Wollast, Roland

    1990-02-01

    Chemical weathering processes, essentially caused by the interaction of water and the atmosphere with the Earth's crust, transform primary minerals into solutes and clays and, eventually, into sedimentary rocks; these processes participate in controlling the global hydrogeochemical cycles of many elements. Many mineral dissolution processes are controlled by a chemical mechanism at the solid-water interface. The reaction-controlling steps can be interpreted in terms of a surface coordination model. The tendency of a mineral to dissolve is influenced by the interaction of solutes—H+, OH-, ligands, and metal ions—with its surface. The surface reactivity is shown to depend on the surface species and their structural identity; specifically, the dependence of dissolution rates on pH and on dissolved ligand concentrations can be explained in terms of surface protonation (and deprotonation) and of ligand surface complexes. A general rate law for the dissolution of minerals is derived by considering, in addition to the surface coordination chemistry, established models of lattice statistics and activated complex theory.

  19. Effect of solution chemistry on the adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate onto mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuyang Y; Shiang Fu, Q; Gao, Dawen; Criddle, Craig S; Leckie, James O

    2010-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an emergent contaminant of substantial environmental concerns, yet very limited information has been available on PFOS adsorption onto mineral surfaces. PFOS adsorption onto goethite and silica was investigated by batch adsorption experiments under various solution compositions. Adsorption onto silica was only marginally affected by pH, ionic strength, and calcium concentration, likely due to the dominance of non-electrostatic interactions. In contrast, PFOS uptake by goethite increased significantly at high [H+] and [Ca2+], which was likely due to enhanced electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and positively charged goethite surface. The effect of pH was less significant at high ionic strength, likely due to electrical double layer compression. PFOS uptake was reduced at higher ionic strength for a strongly positively charged goethite surface (pH 3), while it increased for a weakly charged surface (pH 7 and 9), which could be attributed to the competition between PFOS-surface electrostatic attraction and PFOS-PFOS electrostatic repulsion. A conceptual model that captures PFOS-surface and PFOS-PFOS electrostatic interactions as well as non-electrostatic interaction was also formulated to understand the effect of solution chemistry on PFOS adsorption onto goethite and silica surfaces. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface chemistry manipulation of gold nanorods preserves optical properties for bio-imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polito, Anthony B.; Maurer-Gardner, Elizabeth I.; Hussain, Saber M., E-mail: saber.hussain@us.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Due to their anisotropic shape, gold nanorods (GNRs) possess a number of advantages for biosystem use including, enhanced surface area and tunable optical properties within the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide-related cytotoxicity, overall poor cellular uptake following surface chemistry modifications, and loss of NIR optical properties due to material intracellular aggregation in combination remain as obstacles for nanobased biomedical GNR applications. In this article, we report that tannic acid-coated 11-mercaptoundecyl trimethylammonium bromide (MTAB) GNRs (MTAB-TA) show no significant decrease in either in vitro cell viability or stress activation after exposures to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. In addition, MTAB-TA GNRs demonstrate a substantial level of cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern. This clustering pattern significantly reduces intracellular aggregation, preserving the GNRs NIR optical properties, vital for biomedical imaging applications. These results demonstrate how surface chemistry modifications enhance biocompatibility, allow for higher rate of internalization with low intracellular aggregation of MTAB-TA GNRs, and identify them as prime candidates for use in nanobased bio-imaging applications.Graphical Abstract.

  1. Surface chemistry manipulation of gold nanorods preserves optical properties for bio-imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Anthony B.; Maurer-Gardner, Elizabeth I.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to their anisotropic shape, gold nanorods (GNRs) possess a number of advantages for biosystem use including, enhanced surface area and tunable optical properties within the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide-related cytotoxicity, overall poor cellular uptake following surface chemistry modifications, and loss of NIR optical properties due to material intracellular aggregation in combination remain as obstacles for nanobased biomedical GNR applications. In this article, we report that tannic acid-coated 11-mercaptoundecyl trimethylammonium bromide (MTAB) GNRs (MTAB-TA) show no significant decrease in either in vitro cell viability or stress activation after exposures to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. In addition, MTAB-TA GNRs demonstrate a substantial level of cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern. This clustering pattern significantly reduces intracellular aggregation, preserving the GNRs NIR optical properties, vital for biomedical imaging applications. These results demonstrate how surface chemistry modifications enhance biocompatibility, allow for higher rate of internalization with low intracellular aggregation of MTAB-TA GNRs, and identify them as prime candidates for use in nanobased bio-imaging applications.

  2. Dielectric properties of nanosilica/low-density polyethylene composites: The surface chemistry of nanoparticles and deep traps induced by nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ju

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four kinds of nanosilica particles with different surface modification were employed to fabricate low-density polyethylene (LDPE composites using melt mixing and hot molding methods. The surface chemistry of modified nanosilica was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All silica nanoparticles were found to suppress the space charge injection and accumulation, increase the volume resistivity, decrease the permittivity and dielectric loss factor at low frequencies, and decrease the dielectric breakdown strength of the LDPE polymers. The modified nanoparticles, in general, showed better dielectric properties than the unmodified ones. It was found that the carrier mobility, calculated from J–V curves using the Mott-Gurney equation, was much lower for the nanocomposites than for the neat LDPE.

  3. Multifunctionality of organometallic quinonoid metal complexes: surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Bok; Pike, Robert D; Sweigart, Dwight A

    2013-11-19

    Quinonoid metal complexes have potential applications in surface chemistry, coordination polymers, and catalysts. Although quinonoid manganese tricarbonyl complexes have been used as secondary building units (SBUs) in the formation of novel metal-organometallic coordination networks and polymers, the potentially wider applications of these versatile linkers have not yet been recognized. In this Account, we focus on these diverse new applications of quinonoid metal complexes, and report on the variety of quinonoid metal complexes that we have synthesized. Through the use of [(η(6)-hydroquinone)Mn(CO)3](+), we are able to modify the surface of Fe3O4 and FePt nanoparticles (NPs). This process occurs either by the replacement of oleylamine with neutral [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface, or by the binding of anionic [(η(4)-quinone)Mn(CO)3](-) upon further deprotonation of [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] at the NP surface. We have demonstrated chemistry at the intersection of surface-modified NPs and coordination polymers through the growth of organometallic coordination polymers onto the surface modified Fe3O4 NPs. The resulting magnetic NP/organometallic coordination polymer hybrid material exhibited both the unique superparamagnetic behavior associated with Fe3O4 NPs and the paramagnetism attributable to the metal nodes, depending upon the magnetic range examined. By the use of functionalized [(η(5)-semiquinone)Mn(CO)3] complexes, we attained the formation of an organometallic monolayer on the surface of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). The resulting organometallic monolayer was not simply a random array of manganese atoms on the surface, but rather consisted of an alternating "up and down" spatial arrangement of Mn atoms extending from the HOPG surface due to hydrogen bonding of the quinonoid complexes. We also showed that the topology of metal atoms on the surface could be controlled through the use of quinonoid metal complexes. A quinonoid

  4. Carbon key-properties for microcystin adsorption in drinking water treatment: structure or surface chemistry?

    OpenAIRE

    Júlio, Maria de Fátima de Jesus Leal

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação para Obtenção de Grau de Mestre em Engenharia Química e Bioquímica The carbon key-properties (structure and surface chemistry) for microcystin-LR (MC-LR) adsorption onto activated carbon were investigated. Waters with an inorganic background matrix approaching that of the soft natural water (2.5 mM ionic strength) were used. Also, model waters with controlled ionic make-up and NOM surrogate with similar size of MC-LR (tannic acid - TA) with MC-LR extracts were tested with activ...

  5. Surface Chemistry Dependence of Mechanochemical Reaction of Adsorbed Molecules-An Experimental Study on Tribopolymerization of α-Pinene on Metal, Metal Oxide, and Carbon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Kim, Seong H

    2018-02-20

    Mechanochemical reactions between adsorbate molecules sheared at tribological interfaces can induce association of adsorbed molecules, forming oligomeric and polymeric products often called tribopolymers). This study revealed the role or effect of surface chemistry of the solid substrate in mechanochemical polymerization reactions. As a model reactant, α-pinene was chosen because it was known to readily form tribopolymers at the sliding interface of stainless steel under vapor-phase lubrication conditions. Eight different substrate materials were tested-palladium, nickel, copper, stainless steel, gold, silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). All metal substrates and DLC were initially covered with surface oxide species formed naturally in air or during the oxidative sample cleaning. It was found that the tribopolymerization yield of α-pinene is much higher on the substrates that can chemisorb α-pinene, compared to the ones on which only physisorption occurs. From the load dependence of the tribopolymerization yield, it was found that the surfaces capable of chemisorption give a smaller critical activation volume for the mechanochemical reaction, compared to the ones capable of physisorption only. On the basis of these observations and infrared spectroscopy analyses of the adsorbed molecules and the produced polymers, it was concluded that the mechanochemical reaction mechanisms might be different between chemically reactive and inert surfaces and that the chemical reactivity of the substrate surface greatly influences the tribochemical polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules.

  6. Controls on surface water chemistry in the upper Merced River basin, Yosemite National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.; Campbell, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Surface water draining granitic bedrock in Yosemite National Park exhibits considerable variability in chemical composition, despite the relative homogeneity of bedrock chemistry. Other geological factors, including the jointing and distribution of glacial till, appear to exert strong controls on water composition. Chemical data from three surface water surveys in the upper Merced River basin conducted in August 1981, June 1988 and August 1991 were analysed and compared with mapped geological, hydrological and topographic features to identify the solute sources and processes that control water chemistry within the basin during baseflow. Water at most of the sampling sites was dilute, with alkalinities ranging from 26 to 77 ??equiv. 1-1. Alkalinity was much higher in two subcatchments, however, ranging from 51 to 302 ??equiv. 1-1. Base cations and silica were also significantly higher in these two catchments than in the rest of the watershed. Concentrations of weathering products in surface water were correlated to the fraction of each subcatchment underlain by surficial material, which is mostly glacial till. Silicate mineral weathering is the dominant control on concentrations of alkalinity, silica and base cations, and ratios of these constituents in surface water reflect the composition of local bedrock, Chloride concentrations in surface water samples varied widely, ranging from Merced River at the Happy Isles gauge from 1968 to 1990 was 26 ??equiv. 1-1, which was five times higher than in atmospheric deposition (4-5 ??equiv. 1-1), suggesting that a source of chloride exists within the watershed. Saline groundwater springs, whose locations are probably controlled by vertical jointing in the bedrock, are the most likely source of the chloride. Sulphate concentrations varied much less than most other solutes, ranging from 3 to 14 ??equiv. 1-1. Concentrations of sulphate in quarterly samples collected at the watershed outlet also showed relatively little variation

  7. DIFFERENCES IN LEARNING OUTCOMES BETWEEN A NEW AND A TRADITIONAL CHEMISTRY COURSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARKS, RONALD L.

    ASSESSED WERE COGNITIVE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WHO WERE TAUGHT CONVENTIONAL CHEMISTRY AND THOSE WHO WERE TAUGHT CHEMICAL BOND APPROACH (CBA). FOUR COGNITIVE PREFERENCES WERE CHOSEN FOR STUDY--(1) RECALL OF FACTS AND TERMS, (2) PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS, (3) CRITICAL QUESTIONING OF INFORMATION, AND (4) IDENTIFICATION OF A FUNDAMENTAL…

  8. Use of Representation Mapping to Capture Abstraction in Problem Solving in Different Courses in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevian, H.; Bernholt, S.; Szteinberg, G. A.; Auguste, S.; Pérez, L. C.

    2015-01-01

    A perspective is presented on how the representation mapping framework by Hahn and Chater (1998) may be used to characterize reasoning during problem solving in chemistry. To provide examples for testing the framework, an exploratory study was conducted with students and professors from three different courses in the middle of the undergraduate…

  9. The Effect of Different Metacognitive Skill Levels on Preservice Chemistry Teachers' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Senol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the metacognitive skill levels and motivation of preservice chemistry teachers and to investigate the effect of different metacognitive skill levels on their motivation. The study was conducted during 2014-2015 spring semester. In this research, survey method was used to reveal the effect of different…

  10. Tuning colloidal quantum dot band edge positions through solution-phase surface chemistry modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Daniel M.; Vörös, Márton; Brawand, Nicholas P.; McNichols, Brett W.; Miller, Elisa M.; Gu, Jing; Nozik, Arthur J.; Sellinger, Alan; Galli, Giulia; Beard, Matthew C.

    2017-05-01

    Band edge positions of semiconductors determine their functionality in many optoelectronic applications such as photovoltaics, photoelectrochemical cells and light emitting diodes. Here we show that band edge positions of lead sulfide (PbS) colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots (QDs), can be tuned over 2.0 eV through surface chemistry modification. We achieved this remarkable control through the development of simple, robust and scalable solution-phase ligand exchange methods, which completely replace native ligands with functionalized cinnamate ligands, allowing for well-defined, highly tunable chemical systems. By combining experiments and ab initio simulations, we establish clear relationships between QD surface chemistry and the band edge positions of ligand/QD hybrid systems. We find that in addition to ligand dipole, inter-QD ligand shell inter-digitization contributes to the band edge shifts. We expect that our established relationships and principles can help guide future optimization of functional organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures for diverse optoelectronic applications.

  11. Surface chemistry and microstructure of metallic biomaterials for hip and knee endoprostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenko, Monika; Gorenšek, Matevž; Godec, Matjaž; Hodnik, Maxinne; Batič, Barbara Šetina; Donik, Črtomir; Grant, John T.; Dolinar, Drago

    2018-01-01

    The surface chemistry and microstructures of titanium alloys (both new and used) and CoCrMo alloys used for hip and knee endoprostheses were determined using SEM (morphology), EBSD (phase analysis), AES and XPS (surface chemistry). Two new and two used endoprostheses were studied. The SEM SE and BE images showed their microstructures, while the EBSD provided the phases of the materials. During the production of the hip and knee endoprostheses, these materials are subject to severe thermomechanical treatments and physicochemical processes that are decisive for CoCrMo alloys. The AES and XPS results showed that thin oxide films on (a) Ti6Al4V are primarily a mixture of TiO2 with a small amount of Al2O3, while the V is depleted, (b) Ti6Al7Nb is primarily a mixture of TiO2 with a small amount of Al2O3 and Nb2O5, and (c) the CoCrMo alloy is primarily a mixture of Cr2O3 with small amounts of Co and Mo oxides. The thin oxide film on the CoCrMo alloy should prevent intergranular corrosion and improve the biocompatibility. The thin oxide films on the Ti alloys prevent further corrosion, improve the biocompatibility, and affect the osseointegration.

  12. PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhan Nady

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled “green surface modification”. This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone (PES membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers—ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid—is presented.

  13. PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nady, Norhan

    2016-04-18

    A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme) and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled "green surface modification". This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface) are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers-ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid)-is presented.

  14. Tuning Surface Chemistry of Polyetheretherketone by Gold Coating and Plasma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, Zdeňka; Rimpelová, Silvie; Juřík, Petr; Veselý, Martin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hubáček, Tomáš; Borovec, Jakub; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has good chemical and biomechanical properties that are excellent for biomedical applications. However, PEEK exhibits hydrophobic and other surface characteristics which cause limited cell adhesion. We have investigated the potential of Ar plasma treatment for the formation of a nanostructured PEEK surface in order to enhance cell adhesion. The specific aim of this study was to reveal the effect of the interface of plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices on adhesion and spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The surface characteristics (polarity, surface chemistry, and structure) before and after treatment were evaluated by various experimental techniques (gravimetry, goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrokinetic analysis). Further, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine PEEK surface morphology and roughness. The biological response of cells towards nanostructured PEEK was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Detailed cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compared to plasma treatment, gold coating improved PEEK wettability. The XPS method showed a decrease in the carbon concentration with increasing time of plasma treatment. Cell adhesion determined on the interface between plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices was directly proportional to the thickness of a gold layer on a sample. Our results suggest that plasma treatment in a combination with gold coating could be used in biomedical applications requiring enhanced cell adhesion.

  15. Tuning Surface Chemistry of Polyetheretherketone by Gold Coating and Plasma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotná, Zdeňka; Rimpelová, Silvie; Juřík, Petr; Veselý, Martin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hubáček, Tomáš; Borovec, Jakub; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has good chemical and biomechanical properties that are excellent for biomedical applications. However, PEEK exhibits hydrophobic and other surface characteristics which cause limited cell adhesion. We have investigated the potential of Ar plasma treatment for the formation of a nanostructured PEEK surface in order to enhance cell adhesion. The specific aim of this study was to reveal the effect of the interface of plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices on adhesion and spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The surface characteristics (polarity, surface chemistry, and structure) before and after treatment were evaluated by various experimental techniques (gravimetry, goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrokinetic analysis). Further, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine PEEK surface morphology and roughness. The biological response of cells towards nanostructured PEEK was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Detailed cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compared to plasma treatment, gold coating improved PEEK wettability. The XPS method showed a decrease in the carbon concentration with increasing time of plasma treatment. Cell adhesion determined on the interface between plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices was directly proportional to the thickness of a gold layer on a sample. Our results suggest that plasma treatment in a combination with gold coating could be used in biomedical applications requiring enhanced cell adhesion.

  16. Investigations of Nitrogen Oxide Plasmas: Fundamental Chemistry and Surface Reactivity and Monitoring Student Perceptions in a General Chemistry Recitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechle, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Part I of this dissertation focuses on investigations of nitrogen oxide plasma systems. With increasing concerns over the environmental presence of NxOy species, there is growing interest in utilizing plasma-assisted conversion techniques. Advances, however, have been limited because of the lack of knowledge regarding the fundamental chemistry of…

  17. Multiparametric Assessment of Gold Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity in Cancerous and Healthy Cells: The Role of Size, Shape, and Surface Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidipati, Manjari; Fabris, Laura

    2017-02-15

    In recent years, we and others have become interested in evaluating the use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags for early cancer detection and in designing new approaches to demonstrate the applicability of this spectroscopic technique in the clinic. SERS-based imaging in particular offers ultra sensitivity up to the single molecule, multiplexing capability, and increased photostability and has been shown to outperform fluorescence. However, to employ SERS tags for early cancer detection, it is important to understand their interaction with cells and determine their cytotoxicity. We have been particularly interested for quite some time in determining if and how gold nanostars, which have been demonstrated as outstanding SERS enhancing substrates, can be safely employed in living systems and translated to the clinic. In this study, we carried out a multiparametric in vitro study to look at the cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles on human glioblastoma and human dermal fibroblast cell lines. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by incubating cells with three different morphologies of AuNPs, namely nanospheres, nanorods, and nanostars, each having three different surface chemistries (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and human serum albumin (HSA)). Our results showed that the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles had predominant effects on cytotoxicity, and the morphology and size of the nanoparticles only slightly affected cell viability. CTAB-coated particles were found to be the most toxic to cells, and PEGylated nanostars were determined to be the least toxic. Caspase-3 assay and LDH assay revealed that cell death occurs via apoptosis for cancerous cells and via necrosis for healthy ones. Cellular uptake studies carried out via TEM showed that the particles retain their shape even at long incubation times, which may be beneficial for in vivo SERS-based disease detection. Overall, this study provides valuable

  18. Surface chemistry and moisture sorption properties of wood coated with multifunctional alkoxysilanes by sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandla A. Tshabalala; Peter Kingshott; Mark R. VanLandingham; David Plackett

    2003-01-01

    Sol-gel surface deposition of a hydrophobic polysiloxane coating on wood was accomplished by using a mixture of a low molecular weight multifunctional alkoxysilane, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS), and a high molecular weight multifunctional alkoxysilane, hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMOS). Investigation of the surface chemistry and morphology of the wood specimens by...

  19. The synergy of ultrasonic treatment and organic modifiers for tuning the surface chemistry and conductivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Omastová, M.; Mičušík, M.; Fedorko, P.; Pionteck, J.; Kovářová, Jana; Chehimi, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, 10-11 (2014), s. 940-944 ISSN 0142-2421. [European Conference on Applications of Surface and Interface Analysis /15./ - ECASIA 2013. Cagliari, 13.10.2013-18.10.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * surface modification * surfactant Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.245, year: 2014

  20. Simple preparation of thiol-ene particles in glycerol and surface functionalization by thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) and surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Chiaula, Valeria; Pinelo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    functionalization of excess thiol groups via photochemical thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) resulting in a functional monolayer. In addition, surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP) was used for the first time to introduce a thicker polymer layer on the particle surface. The application potential...

  1. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-05-19

    In Part I, Surface Chemistry of Coal Pyrite the mechanisms responsible for the inefficient rejection of coal pyrite were investigated using a number of experimental techniques. The test results demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of coal pyrite is related to the surface products formed during oxidation in aqueous solutions. During oxidation, a sulfur-rich surface layer is produced in near neutral pH solutions. This surface layer is composed mainly of sulfur species in the form of an iron-polysulfide along with a smaller amount of iron oxide/hydroxides. The floatability coal pyrite increases dramatically in the presence of frothers and hydrocarbon collectors. These reagents are believed to absorb on the weakly hydrophobic pyrite surfaces as a result of hydrophobic interaction forces. In Part III, Developing the Best Possible Rejection Schemes, a number of pyrite depressants were evaluated in column and conventional flotation tests. These included manganese (Mn) metal, chelating agents quinone and diethylenetriamine (DETA), and several commercially-available organic depressants. Of these, the additives which serve as reducing agents were found to be most effective. Reducing agents were used to prevent pyrite oxidation and/or remove oxidation products present on previously oxidized surfaces. These data show that Mn is a significantly stronger depressant for pyrite than quinone or DETA. Important factors in determining the pyrite depression effect of Mn include the slurry solid content during conditioning, the addition of acid (HCl), and the amount of Mn. The acid helps remove the oxide layer from the surface of Mn and promotes the depression of pyrite by Mn.

  2. Photografting of perfluoroalkanes onto polyethylene surfaces via azide/nitrene chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegmann, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.siegmann@zhaw.ch [Institute of Materials and Process Engineering (IMPE), School of Engineering (SoE), Zurich University of Applied Sciences - ZHAW, Technikumstrasse 9, CH-8401 Winterthur (Switzerland); Inauen, Jan, E-mail: jan.inauen@zhaw.ch [Institute of Materials and Process Engineering (IMPE), School of Engineering (SoE), Zurich University of Applied Sciences - ZHAW, Technikumstrasse 9, CH-8401 Winterthur (Switzerland); Villamaina, Diego, E-mail: diego.villamaina@gmail.com [Visiting scientist at IMPE, Permanent address: Rapidplatz 3, CH-8953 Dietikon (Switzerland); Winkler, Martin, E-mail: martin.winkler@zhaw.ch [Institute of Materials and Process Engineering (IMPE), School of Engineering (SoE), Zurich University of Applied Sciences - ZHAW, Technikumstrasse 9, CH-8401 Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2017-02-28

    The purpose of this study is to render polyethylene surfaces strongly and permanently hydrophobic. Polyethylene is a common plastic and, because of its inertness, difficult to graft. We chose polyethylene as example because of its ubiquity and model character. As graft chains linear perfluoroalkyl residues (−C{sub 4}F{sub 9}, −C{sub 6}F{sub 13}, −C{sub 8}F{sub 17} and −C{sub 10}F{sub 21}) were chosen, and photografting was selected as grafting method. Photolytically generated nitrenes can insert into carbon–hydrogen bonds and are therefore suited for binding to polyethylene. Hydrophobic photo reactive surface modifiers based on azide/nitrene chemistry are designed, synthesized in high yield and characterized. Four new molecules are described. Water contact angles exceeding 110° were achieved on grafted polyethylene. One problem is to demonstrate that the photografted surface modifiers are bound covalently to the polyethylene. Abrasion tests show that all new molecules, when photografted to polyethylene, have a higher abrasion resistance than a polyethylene surface coated with a long-chain perfluoroalkane. Relative abrasion resitances of 1.4, 2.0, 2.1 and 2.5 compared to the fluoroalkane coating were obtained for the four compounds. An abrasion model using ice is developed. Although all four compounds have the same λ{sub max} of 266 nm in acetonitrile solution, their molar extincition coefficients increase from 1.6·10{sup 4} to 2.2·10{sup 4} with increasing length of the fluorotelomer chain. Exitonic coupling of the chromophores of the surface modifiers is observed for specific molecules in the neat state. A linear correlation of water contact angle with fluorine surface content, as measured by photoelectron spectroscopy, in grafted polyethylene surfaces is established.

  3. Solubility studies of inorganic–organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.

  4. The surface chemistry of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane films deposited on magnesium alloy AZ91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.; Gray-Munro, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have desirable physical and mechanical properties for a number of applications. Unfortunately, these materials are highly susceptible to corrosion, particularly in the presence of aqueous solutions. The purpose of this study is to develop a uniform, non-toxic surface treatment to enhance the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. This paper reports the influence of the coating bath parameters and alloy microstructure on the deposition of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) coatings on magnesium alloy AZ91. The surface chemistry at the magnesium/MPTS interface has also been explored. The results indicate that the deposition of MPTS onto AZ91 was influenced by both the pH and MPTS concentration in the coating bath. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy results showed that the MPTS film deposited uniformly on all phases of the magnesium alloy surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed that at the magnesium/MPTS interface, the molecules bond to the surface through the thiol group in an acid-base interaction with the Mg(OH) 2 layer, whereas in the bulk of the film, the molecules are randomly oriented.

  5. The surface chemistry of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane films deposited on magnesium alloy AZ91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, A. [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Gray-Munro, J.E., E-mail: jgray@laurentian.c [Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2009-10-30

    Magnesium and its alloys have desirable physical and mechanical properties for a number of applications. Unfortunately, these materials are highly susceptible to corrosion, particularly in the presence of aqueous solutions. The purpose of this study is to develop a uniform, non-toxic surface treatment to enhance the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. This paper reports the influence of the coating bath parameters and alloy microstructure on the deposition of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) coatings on magnesium alloy AZ91. The surface chemistry at the magnesium/MPTS interface has also been explored. The results indicate that the deposition of MPTS onto AZ91 was influenced by both the pH and MPTS concentration in the coating bath. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy results showed that the MPTS film deposited uniformly on all phases of the magnesium alloy surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed that at the magnesium/MPTS interface, the molecules bond to the surface through the thiol group in an acid-base interaction with the Mg(OH){sub 2} layer, whereas in the bulk of the film, the molecules are randomly oriented.

  6. Deuteration and evolution in the massive star formation process. The role of surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontani, F.; Busquet, G.; Palau, Aina; Caselli, P.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Tan, J. C.; Audard, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. An ever growing number of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that the deuterated fraction (column density ratio between a species containing D and its hydrogenated counterpart, Dfrac) is an evolutionary indicator both in the low- and the high-mass star formation process. However, the role of surface chemistry in these studies has not been quantified from an observational point of view. Aims: Because many abundant species, such as NH3, H2CO, and CH3OH, are actively produced on ice mantles of dust grains during the early cold phases, their Dfrac is expected to evolve differently from species formed only (or predominantly) in the gas, such as N2H+, HNC, HCN, and their deuterated isotopologues. The differences are expected to be relevant especially after the protostellar birth, in which the temperature rises, causing the evaporation of ice mantles. Methods: To compare how the deuterated fractions of species formed only in the gas and partially or uniquely on grain surfaces evolve with time, we observed rotational transitions of CH3OH, 13CH3OH, CH2DOH, and CH3OD at 3 mm and 1.3 mm, of NH2D at 3 mm with the IRAM-30 m telescope, and the inversion transitions (1, 1) and (2, 2) of NH3 with the GBT, towards most of the cores already observed in N2H+, N2D+, HNC, and DNC. Results: NH2D is detected in all but two cores, regardless of the evolutionary stage. Dfrac(NH3) is on average above 0.1 and does not change significantly from the earliest to the most evolved phases, although the highest average value is found in the protostellar phase (~0.3). Few lines of CH2DOH and CH3OD are clearly detected, and then only towards protostellar cores or externally heated starless cores. In quiescent starless cores, we have only one doubtful detection of CH2DOH. Conclusions: This work clearly confirms an expected different evolutionary trend of the species formed exclusively in the gas (N2D+ and N2H+) and those formed partially (NH2D and NH3) or totally (CH2DOH and CH3

  7. Surface chemistry of InP ridge structures etched in Cl{sub 2}-based plasma analyzed with angular XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchoule, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.bouchoule@lpn.cnrs.fr; Cambril, Edmond; Guilet, Stephane [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructure (LPN)—UPR20, CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Chanson, Romain; Pageau, Arnaud; Rhallabi, Ahmed; Cardinaud, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.cardinaud@cnrs-imn.fr [Institut des matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR6502, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 44322 Nantes (France)

    2015-09-15

    Two x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy configurations are proposed to analyze the surface chemistry of micron-scale InP ridge structures etched in chlorine-based inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Either a classical or a grazing configuration allows to retrieve information about the surface chemistry of the bottom surface and sidewalls of the etched features. The procedure is used to study the stoichiometry of the etched surface as a function of ridge aspect ratio for Cl{sub 2}/Ar and Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma chemistries. The results show that the bottom surface and the etched sidewalls are P-rich, and indicate that the P-enrichment mechanism is rather chemically driven. Results also evidence that adding H{sub 2} to Cl{sub 2} does not necessarily leads to a more balanced surface stoichiometry. This is in contrast with recent experimental results obtained with the HBr ICP chemistry for which fairly stoichiometric surfaces have been obtained.

  8. Constraints on the Early Terrestrial Surface UV Environment Relevant to Prebiotic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Sukrit; Sasselov, Dimitar D

    2017-03-01

    The UV environment is a key boundary condition to abiogenesis. However, considerable uncertainty exists as to planetary conditions and hence surface UV at abiogenesis. Here, we present two-stream multilayer clear-sky calculations of the UV surface radiance on Earth at 3.9 Ga to constrain the UV surface fluence as a function of albedo, solar zenith angle (SZA), and atmospheric composition. Variation in albedo and latitude (through SZA) can affect maximum photoreaction rates by a factor of >10.4; for the same atmosphere, photoreactions can proceed an order of magnitude faster at the equator of a snowball Earth than at the poles of a warmer world. Hence, surface conditions are important considerations when computing prebiotic UV fluences. For climatically reasonable levels of CO 2 , fluence shortward of 189 nm is screened out, meaning that prebiotic chemistry is robustly shielded from variations in UV fluence due to solar flares or variability. Strong shielding from CO 2 also means that the UV surface fluence is insensitive to plausible levels of CH 4 , O 2 , and O 3 . At scattering wavelengths, UV fluence drops off comparatively slowly with increasing CO 2 levels. However, if SO 2 and/or H 2 S can build up to the ≥1-100 ppm level as hypothesized by some workers, then they can dramatically suppress surface fluence and hence prebiotic photoprocesses. H 2 O is a robust UV shield for λ levels of other atmospheric gases, fluence ≲198 nm is only available for cold, dry atmospheres, meaning sources with emission ≲198 (e.g., ArF excimer lasers) can only be used in simulations of cold environments with low abundance of volcanogenic gases. On the other hand, fluence at 254 nm is unshielded by H 2 O and is available across a broad range of [Formula: see text], meaning that mercury lamps are suitable for initial studies regardless of the uncertainty in primordial H 2 O and CO 2 levels. Key Words: Radiative transfer-Origin of life-Planetary environments

  9. Surface composition, chemistry, and structure of polystyrene modified by electron-beam-generated plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Evgeniya H; Petrovykh, Dmitri Y; Mack, Paul; Carney, Tim; White, Richard G; Walton, Scott G; Fernsler, Richard F

    2010-06-01

    Polystyrene (PS) surfaces were treated by electron-beam-generated plasmas in argon/oxygen, argon/nitrogen, and argon/sulfur hexafluoride environments. The resulting modifications of the polymer surface energy, morphology, and chemical composition were analyzed by a suite of complementary analytical techniques: contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS). The plasma treatments produced only minimal increases in the surface roughness while introducing the expected chemical modifications: oxygen-based after Ar/O(2) plasma, oxygen- and nitrogen-based after Ar/N(2) plasma, and fluorine-based after Ar/SF(6) plasma. Fluorinated PS surfaces became hydrophobic and did not significantly change their properties over time. In contrast, polymer treated in Ar/O(2) and Ar/N(2) plasmas initially became hydrophilic but underwent hydrophobic recovery after 28 days of aging. The aromatic carbon chemistry in the top 1 nm of these aged surfaces clearly indicated that the hydrophobic recovery was produced by reorientation/diffusion of undamaged aromatic polymer fragments from the bulk rather than by contamination. Nondestructive depth profiles of aged plasma-treated PS films were reconstructed from parallel angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) measurements using a maximum-entropy algorithm. The salient features of reconstructed profiles were confirmed by sputter profiles obtained with 200 eV Ar ions. Both types of depth profiles showed that the electron-beam-generated plasma modifications are confined to the topmost 3-4 nm of the polymer surface, while valence band measurements and unsaturated carbon signatures in ARXPS and REELS data indicated that much of the PS structure was preserved below 9 nm.

  10. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M.; Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O.; Puziy, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. ► Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. ► Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. ► Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. ► Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S BET = 2081 m 2 /g, V tot = 1.1 cm 3 /g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0–2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7–5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7–7.4; 8.8–9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1–10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  11. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sych, N.V.; Trofymenko, S.I.; Poddubnaya, O.I.; Tsyba, M.M. [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapsay, V.I.; Klymchuk, D.O. [M.G. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 2 Tereshchenkivska St., 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Puziy, A.M., E-mail: alexander.puziy@ispe.kiev.ua [Institute for Sorption and Endoecology Problems, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov St., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activation results in formation of carbons with acidic surface groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of surface groups is introduced at impregnation ratio 1.25. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons show high capacity to copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphoric acid activated carbons are predominantly microporous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum surface area and pore volume achieved at impregnation ratio 1.0. - Abstract: Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 Degree-Sign C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (S{sub BET} = 2081 m{sup 2}/g, V{sub tot} = 1.1 cm{sup 3}/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  12. Surface chemistry and cytotoxicity of reactively sputtered tantalum oxide films on NiTi plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, K. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Kolaj-Robin, O.; Belochapkine, S.; Laffir, F. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Gandhi, A.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Tofail, S.A.M., E-mail: tofail.syed@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-08-31

    NiTi, an equiatomic alloy containing nickel and titanium, exhibits unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. NiTi also forms a spontaneous protective titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) layer that allows its use in biomedical applications. Despite the widely perceived biocompatibility there remain some concerns about the sustainability of the alloy's biocompatibility due to the defects in the TiO{sub 2} protective layer and the presence of high amount of sub-surface Ni, which can give allergic reactions. Many surface treatments have been investigated to try to improve both the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of this layer. For such purposes, we have sputter deposited tantalum (Ta) oxide thin films onto the surface of the NiTi alloy. Despite being one of the promising metals for biomedical applications, Ta, and its various oxides and their interactions with cells have received relatively less attention. The oxidation chemistry, crystal structure, morphology and biocompatibility of these films have been investigated. In general, reactive sputtering especially in the presence of a low oxygen mixture yields a thicker film with better control of the film quality. The sputtering power influenced the surface oxidation states of Ta. Both microscopic and quantitative cytotoxicity measurements show that Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible with little to no variation in cytotoxic response when the surface oxidation state of Ta changes. - Highlights: • Reactive sputtering in low oxygen mixture yields thicker better quality films. • Sputtering power influenced surface oxidation states of Ta. • Cytotoxicity measurements show Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible. • Little to no variation in cytotoxic response when oxidation state changes.

  13. Roles of Bulk and Surface Chemistry in the Oxygen Exchange Kinetics and Related Properties of Mixed Conducting Perovskite Oxide Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola H. Perry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mixed conducting perovskite oxides and related structures serving as electrodes for electrochemical oxygen incorporation and evolution in solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells, respectively, play a significant role in determining the cell efficiency and lifetime. Desired improvements in catalytic activity for rapid surface oxygen exchange, fast bulk transport (electronic and ionic, and thermo-chemo-mechanical stability of oxygen electrodes will require increased understanding of the impact of both bulk and surface chemistry on these properties. This review highlights selected work at the International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER, Kyushu University, set in the context of work in the broader community, aiming to characterize and understand relationships between bulk and surface composition and oxygen electrode performance. Insights into aspects of bulk point defect chemistry, electronic structure, crystal structure, and cation choice that impact carrier concentrations and mobilities, surface exchange kinetics, and chemical expansion coefficients are emerging. At the same time, an understanding of the relationship between bulk and surface chemistry is being developed that may assist design of electrodes with more robust surface chemistries, e.g., impurity tolerance or limited surface segregation. Ion scattering techniques (e.g., secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, or low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, LEIS with high surface sensitivity and increasing lateral resolution are proving useful for measuring surface exchange kinetics, diffusivity, and corresponding outer monolayer chemistry of electrodes exposed to typical operating conditions. Beyond consideration of chemical composition, the use of strain and/or a high density of active interfaces also show promise for enhancing performance.

  14. A New Approach for Detection Improvement of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disorder through a Specific Surface Chemistry Applied onto Titration Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mille, Caroline; Debarnot, Dominique; Zorzi, Willy; Moualij, Benaissa El; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    This work illustrates the enhancement of the sensitivity of the ELISA titration for recombinant human and native prion proteins, while reducing other non-specific adsorptions that could increase the background signal and lead to a low sensitivity and false positives. It is achieved thanks to the association of plasma chemistry and coating with different amphiphilic molecules bearing either ionic charges and/or long hydrocarbon chains. The treated support by 3-butenylamine hydrochloride improves the signal detection of recombinant protein, while surface modification with the 3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-diamine (geranylamine) enhances the sensitivity of the native protein. Beside the surface chemistry effect, these different results are associated with protein conformation. PMID:25586034

  15. A New Approach for Detection Improvement of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disorder through a Specific Surface Chemistry Applied onto Titration Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Debarnot

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates the enhancement of the sensitivity of the ELISA titration for recombinant human and native prion proteins, while reducing other non-specific adsorptions that could increase the background signal and lead to a low sensitivity and false positives. It is achieved thanks to the association of plasma chemistry and coating with different amphiphilic molecules bearing either ionic charges and/or long hydrocarbon chains. The treated support by 3-butenylamine hydrochloride improves the signal detection of recombinant protein, while surface modification with the 3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dien-1-diamine (geranylamine enhances the sensitivity of the native protein. Beside the surface chemistry effect, these different results are associated with protein conformation.

  16. Nitrate pollution and surface water chemistry in Shimabara, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K.; Amano, H.

    2017-12-01

    Shimabara city has been experiencing serious nitrate pollution in groundwater. To evaluate nitrate pollution and water chemistry in surface water, water samples were collected at 42 sampling points in 15 rivers in Shimabara including a part of Unzen city from January to February 2017. Firstly, spatial distribution of water chemistry was assessed by describing stiff and piper-trilinear diagrams using major ions concentrations. Most of the samples showed Ca-HCO3 or Ca-(NO3+SO4) water types. It corresponds to groundwater chemistry. Some samples were classified into characteristic water types such as Na-Cl, (Na+K)-HCO3, and Ca-Cl. These results indicate sea water mixing and anthropogenic pollution. At the upstream of Nishi-river, although water chemistry showed Ca-HCO3, ions concentrations were higher than that of the other rivers. It indicates that this site was affected by the peripheral anthropogenic activities. Secondly, nitrate-pollution assessment was performed by using NO3-, NO2-, coprostanol (5β(H)-Cholestan-3β-ol), and cholestanol (5α(H)-Cholestan-3β-ol). NO2-N was detected at the 2 sampling points and exceeded drinking standard 0.9 mg L-1 for bottle-fed infants (WHO, 2011). NO3-N + NO2-N concentrations exceeded Japanese drinking standard 10 mg L-1 at 18 sampling points. The highest concentration was 27.5 mg L-1. Higher NO3-N levels were observed in the rivers in the northern parts of the study area. Coprostanol has been used as a fecal contamination indicator, since it can be found in only feces of higher animals. Coprostanol concentrations at 8 sampling points exceeded 700 ng L-1 (Australian drinking water standard). Coprostanol has a potential to distinguish the nitrate pollution sources between chemical fertilizer or livestock wastes, since water samples with similar NO3-N + NO2-N concentration showed distinct coprostanol concentration. The sterols ratio (5β/ (5β+5α)) exceeded 0.5 at 18 sampling points. This reveals that fecal pollution has occurred.

  17. Controls on Surface Water Chemistry in the Upper Merced River Basin, Yosemite National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, David W.; Alisa Mast, M.; Campbell, Donald H.

    1996-05-01

    Surface water draining granitic bedrock in Yosemite National Park exhibits considerable variability in chemical composition, despite the relative homogeneity of bedrock chemistry. Other geological factors, including the jointing and distribution of glacial till, appear to exert strong controls on water composition. Chemical data from three surface water surveys in the upper Merced River basin conducted in August 1981, June 1988 and August 1991 were analysed and compared with mapped geological, hydrological and topographic features to identify the solute sources and processes that control water chemistry within the basin during baseflow. Water at most of the sampling sites was dilute, with alkalinities ranging from 26 to 77 equiv. l-1. Alkalinity was much higher in two subcatchments, however, ranging from 51 to 302 equiv. l-1. Base cations and silica were also significantly higher in these two catchments than in the rest of the watershed. Concentrations of weathering products in surface water were correlated to the fraction of each subcatchment underlain by surficial material, which is mostly glacial till. Silicate mineral weathering is the dominant control on concentrations of alkalinity, silica and base cations, and ratios of these constituents in surface water reflect the composition of local bedrock. Chloride concentrations in surface water samples varied widely, ranging from <1 to 96 equiv. l-1. The annual volume-weighted mean chloride concentration in the Merced River at the Happy Isles gauge from 1968 to 1990 was 26 equiv. l-1, which was five times higher than in atmospheric deposition (4-5 equiv. l-1), suggesting that a source of chloride exists within the watershed. Saline groundwater springs, whose locations are probably controlled by vertical jointing in the bedrock, are the most likely source of the chloride. Sulphate concentrations varied much less than most other solutes, ranging from 3 to 14 equiv. l-1. Concentrations of sulphate in quarterly samples

  18. Plains hydrology and reclamation project: Spoil ground-water chemistry and its impacts on surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudell, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Description of the chemical makeup of spoil groundwater at Diplomat and Vesta mines in the Battle River mining area, 200 km southeast of Edmonton within the Lower Horseshoe Canyon coal zone; and at Highvale and Whitewood Mines in the Lake Wabamun mining area, 100 km west of Edmonton within the Ardley coal zone. This report compares the chemical characteristics of the spoil groundwater for each mine to those of the principal premining aquifer that is disrupted by surface mining. The characterization of spoil groundwater chemistry is based on the sampling and analyses of groundwater from piezometers installed in reclaimed areas. Forty-three samples were collected from 23 piezometers at Vesta Mine, and 54 samples were collected from 32 piezometers at Diplomat Mine. At Highvale Mine, 29 samples were collected from 13 piezometers installed in the reclaimed area at Pit 01. Eleven samples were also collected from piezometers installed in spoil at Whitewood Mine to augment a study of that site.

  19. Micropatterning of Functional Conductive Polymers with Multiple Surface Chemistries in Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Johan Ulrik; Acikgöz, Canet; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2012-01-01

    A versatile procedure is presented for fast and efficient micropatterning of multiple types of covalently bound surface chemistry in perfect register on and between conductive polymer microcircuits. The micropatterning principle is applied to several types of native and functionalized PEDOT (poly(3......,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) thin films. The method is based on contacting PEDOT-type thin films with a micropatterned agarose stamp containing an oxidant (aqueous hypochlorite) and applying a nonionic detergent. Where contacted, PEDOT not only loses its conductance but is entirely removed, thereby locally revealing...... of the method is illustrated by micropatterning cell-binding RGD-functionalized PEDOT on low cell-binding PMOXA (poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)) to produce cell-capturing microelectrodes on a cell nonadhesive background in a few simple steps. The method should be applicable to a wide range of native and chemically...

  20. SnSe Nanocrystals: Synthesis, Structure, Optical Properties, and Surface Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2010-07-21

    The colloidal synthesis of SnSe nanoparticles is accomplished through the injection of bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amino]tin(II) into hot trioctylphosphine: selenium in the presence of oleylamine. Through the manipulation of reaction temperature particles are grown with the average diameter reliably tuned to 4-10 nm. Quantum confinement is examined by establishing a relationship between particle size and band gap while the in depth growth dynamics are illuminated through UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. Surface chemistry effects are explored, including the demonstration of useful ligand exchanges and the development of routes toward anisotropic particle growth. Finally, transient current-voltage properties of SnSe nanocrystal films in the dark and light are examined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. Chemistry of the sea-surface microlayer. 3. Studies on the nutrient chemistry of the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; Narvekar, P.V.; Nagarajan, R.

    Nutrients showed enrichment in the surface microlayer compared to those in sub-surface water and there was a decreasing trend in the enrichment factor from nearshore to offshore in Northern Arabian Sea. The nutrient concentrations were correlated...

  2. Contributions of gas-phase plasma chemistry to surface modifications and gas-surface interactions: investigations of fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Michael F., II

    The fundamental aspects of inductively coupled fluorocarbon (FC) plasma chemistry were examined, with special emphasis on the contributions of gas-phase species to surface modifications. Characterization of the gas-phase constituents of single-source CF4-, C2F6-, C3F 8-, and C3F6-based plasmas was performed using spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. The effects of varying plasma parameters, including applied rf power (P) and system pressure (p) were examined. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were employed to monitor the behavior of excited and ground CFx (x = 1,2) radicals, respectively. Mass spectrometric techniques, including ion energy analyses, elucidated behaviors of nascent ions in the FC plasmas. These gas-phase data were correlated with the net effect of substrate processing for Si and ZrO2 surfaces. Surface-specific analyses were performed for post-processed substrates via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle goniometry. Generally, precursors with lower F/C ratios tended to deposit robust FC films of high surface energy. Precursors of higher F/C ratio, such as CF4, were associated with etching or removal of material from surfaces. Nonetheless, a net balance between deposition of FC moieties and etching of material exists for each plasma system. The imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique provided insight into the phenomena occurring at the interface of the plasma gas-phase and substrate of interest. IRIS results demonstrate that CFx radicals scatter copiously, with surface scatter coefficients, S, generally greater than unity under most experimental conditions. Such considerable S values imply surface-mediated production of the CFx radicals at FC-passivated sites. It is inferred that the primary route to surface production of CFx arises from energetic ion bombardment and ablation of surface FC films. Other factors which may influence the observed CFx

  3. THE EFFECTS OF SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON THE PROPERTIES OF PROTEINS CONFINED IN NANO-POROUS MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, L. M.; O' Neill, H.

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artifi cially reproduce the molecular crowding and confi nement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and ‘caged’ in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fl uorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purifi ed from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fl uorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fl uorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fl uorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  4. Graphdiyne as Electrode Material: Tuning Electronic State and Surface Chemistry for Improved Electrode Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuyue; Yan, Hailong; Wu, Fei; Zhao, Lijun; Yu, Ping; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang; Mao, Lanqun

    2017-12-05

    Graphdiyne (GDY) is recently synthesized two-dimensional carbon allotrope with hexagonal rings cross-linked by diacetylene through introducing butadiyne linkages (-C≡C-C≡C-) to form 18-C hexagons and is emerging to be fundamentally interesting and particularly useful in various research fields. In this study, we for the first time find that GDY can be used as an electrode material with reactivity tunable by electronic states and surface chemistry of GDY. To demonstrate this, GDY is oxidized into graphdiyne oxide (GDYO) that is then chemically and electrochemically reduced into chemically reduced GDYO (cr-GDYO) and electrochemically reduced GDYO (er-GDYO), respectively. Electrode reactivity of GDY and its derivatives (i.e., GDYO, cr-GDYO, and er-GDYO) is studied with hexaammineruthenium chloride ([Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ]Cl 3 ) and potassium ferricyanide (K 3 Fe(CN) 6 ) as redox probes. We find that electron transfer kinetics of the redox probes employed here at GDYs depends on the density of electronic state (DOS) and the synergetic effects of the surface chemistry as well as the hydrophilicity of the materials, and that the electron transfer kinetics at cr-GDYO and er-GDYO are faster than those at GDY and GDYO, and quite comparable with those at carbon nanotubes and graphene and its derivatives (i.e., GO, cr-GO, and er-GO). These properties, combined with the unique electronic and chemical structures of GDY, essentially enable GDY as a new kind of electrode material for fundamental studies on carbon electrochemistry and various electroanalytical applications.

  5. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleson, Timothy A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sahai, Nita [University of Akron; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Dura, Joseph A [ORNL; Majkrzak, Charles F [ORNL; Giuffre, Anthony J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  6. Chemistry and Photochemistry at the Surface of Urban Road Dust and Photoactive Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styler, S. A.; Abou-Ghanem, M.; Wickware, B.

    2017-12-01

    Each year, over a billion tons of dust are released into the atmosphere from arid regions. After its emission, dust can undergo efficient long-range transport to urban centres, where it can interact with local pollution sources. Another source of dust in urban regions is road dust resuspension, which is the largest anthropogenic source of primary particulate matter in both Canada and the United States. Since dust contains light-absorbing components, including iron- and titanium-containing minerals, dust-catalyzed photochemical processes have the potential to influence both the lifetime of pollutants present at the dust surface and the composition of the surrounding atmosphere. To date, most studies of dust photochemistry have focused on TiO2-mediated processes, and no studies have explored trace gas uptake at the surface of road dust. Here, we present first results from aerosol and coated-wall flow tube investigations of ozone uptake at the surface of a suite of titanium-containing minerals and road dust collected in Edmonton, Alberta. Together, this work represents a significant advance in our understanding of chemistry and photochemistry at realistic environmental interfaces.

  7. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, N. V.; Trofymenko, S. I.; Poddubnaya, O. I.; Tsyba, M. M.; Sapsay, V. I.; Klymchuk, D. O.; Puziy, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (SBET = 2081 m2/g, Vtot = 1.1 cm3/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  8. Understanding of catalysis on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through exploration of surface structure and chemistry during catalysis using in-situ approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Franklin [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-09-14

    Two main categories of heterogeneous catalysts are metal and metal oxide which catalyze 80% chemical reactions at solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces. Metal oxide catalysts are much more complicated than metal catalysts. The reason is that the cations of the metal atoms could exhibit a few different oxidation states on surface of the same catalyst particle such as Co3O4 or change of their oxidation states under different reactive environments. For a metal catalyst, there is only one oxidation state typically. In addition, surface of a metal oxide can be terminated with multiple surface functionalities including O atoms with different binding configurations and OH group. For metal, only metal atoms are exposed typically. Obviously, the complication of surface chemistry and structure of a metal oxide makes studies of surface of an oxide catalyst very challenging. Due to the complication of surface of a meal oxide, the electronic and geometric structures of surface of a metal oxide and the exposed species have received enormous attention since oxide catalysts catalyze at least 1/3 chemical reactions in chemical and energy industries. Understanding of catalytic reactions on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts is fundamentally intriguing and of great practical interest in energy- and environment-related catalysis. Exploration of surface chemistry of oxide-based catalysts at molecular level during catalysis has remained challenging though it is critical in deeply understanding catalysis on oxide-based catalysts and developing oxide-based catalysts with high activity and selectivity. Thus, the overall objective of this project is to explore surface chemistry and structure of early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through in-situ characterization of surface of catalysts, measurements of catalytic performances, and then build an intrinsic correlation of surface chemistry and structure with their catalytic performances in a few

  9. Quantum Chemistry in Nanoscale Environments: Insights on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto

    The understanding of molecular effects in nanoscale environments is becoming increasingly relevant for various emerging fields. These include spectroscopy for molecular identification as well as in finding molecules for energy harvesting. Theoretical quantum chemistry has been increasingly useful to address these phenomena to yield an understanding of these effects. In the first part of this dissertation, we study the chemical effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We use quantum chemistry simulations to study the metal-molecule interactions present in these systems. We find that the excitations that provide a chemical enhancement contain a mixed contribution from the metal and the molecule. Moreover, using atomistic studies we propose an additional source of enhancement, where a transition metal dopant surface could provide an additional enhancement. We also develop methods to study the electrostatic effects of molecules in metallic environments. We study the importance of image-charge effects, as well as field-bias to molecules interacting with perfect conductors. The atomistic modeling and the electrostatic approximation enable us to study the effects of the metal interacting with the molecule in a complementary fashion, which provides a better understanding of the complex effects present in SERS. In the second part of this dissertation, we present the Harvard Clean Energy Project, a high-throughput approach for a large-scale computational screening and design of organic photovoltaic materials. We create molecular libraries to search for candidates structures and use quantum chemistry, machine learning and cheminformatics methods to characterize these systems and find structure-property relations. The scale of this study requires an equally large computational resource. We rely on distributed volunteer computing to obtain these properties. In the third part of this dissertation we present our work related to the acceleration of electronic structure

  10. Synthesis and processing of ELISA polymer substitute: The influence of surface chemistry and morphology on detection sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana; Marel, Cees van der; Koole, Leo H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Polyacrylate coatings with controlled surface functionalities. • Impact of surface chemistry and morphology on dengue antibody immobilization. • Enhancement of detection signal as a result of bio-activation of polymer surface. - Abstract: Despite the known drawbacks of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), one of the deficiencies that have relatively been ignored is the performance of ELISA substrate itself. Polystyrene (PS), as the cost effective material of choice for mass production of ELISA well-plates, has shown obvious lacks of suitable physical and chemical properties for protein attachment. The general concept of this work was to develop a potential substrate that can be suggested as a material of choice for production of a new generation of ELISA analytical kits. Spin-coated thin films of polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) on silicon surfaces were designed and processed for detection of dengue virus. Coated surfaces of different molar ratios have been investigated as carboxyl-functionalized layers for obtaining platform for biomolecule immobilization with high level of protein activity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, we have used amine functional “spacers”, hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which were covalently bonded to the surfaces of PMMA-co-MAA coatings. Results demonstrate that the variation of surface concentration of carboxyl groups of PMMA-co-MAA can be used to control the amine surface concentration after carbodiimide coupling with HMDA and PEI spacers. The presence of amine spacers increases hydrophilicity of the coatings and significantly impacts the polymer surface morphology. In particular, protein immobilization via amine-bearing spacers has been achieved in two effective steps: (1) carbodiimide bonding between amine spacer molecules and PMMA-co-MAA polymer coatings; and (2) covalent immobilization of antibody via glutaraldehyde reaction with amine groups

  11. Synthesis and processing of ELISA polymer substitute: The influence of surface chemistry and morphology on detection sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Djordjevic, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.djordjevic@um.edu.my [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana [Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Marel, Cees van der [Philips Materials Analysis, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koole, Leo H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University (Netherlands)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Polyacrylate coatings with controlled surface functionalities. • Impact of surface chemistry and morphology on dengue antibody immobilization. • Enhancement of detection signal as a result of bio-activation of polymer surface. - Abstract: Despite the known drawbacks of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), one of the deficiencies that have relatively been ignored is the performance of ELISA substrate itself. Polystyrene (PS), as the cost effective material of choice for mass production of ELISA well-plates, has shown obvious lacks of suitable physical and chemical properties for protein attachment. The general concept of this work was to develop a potential substrate that can be suggested as a material of choice for production of a new generation of ELISA analytical kits. Spin-coated thin films of polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) on silicon surfaces were designed and processed for detection of dengue virus. Coated surfaces of different molar ratios have been investigated as carboxyl-functionalized layers for obtaining platform for biomolecule immobilization with high level of protein activity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, we have used amine functional “spacers”, hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which were covalently bonded to the surfaces of PMMA-co-MAA coatings. Results demonstrate that the variation of surface concentration of carboxyl groups of PMMA-co-MAA can be used to control the amine surface concentration after carbodiimide coupling with HMDA and PEI spacers. The presence of amine spacers increases hydrophilicity of the coatings and significantly impacts the polymer surface morphology. In particular, protein immobilization via amine-bearing spacers has been achieved in two effective steps: (1) carbodiimide bonding between amine spacer molecules and PMMA-co-MAA polymer coatings; and (2) covalent immobilization of antibody via glutaraldehyde reaction with amine groups

  12. Surface Redox Chemistry of Immobilized Nanodiamond: Effects of Particle Size and Electrochemical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; McDonald, B.; Carrizosa, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    The size of the diamond particle is tailored to nanoscale (nanodiamond, ND), and the ND surface is engineered targeting specific (electrochemical and biological) applications. In this work, we investigated the complex surface redox chemistry of immobilized ND layer on conductive boron-doped diamond electrode with a broad experimental parameter space such as particle size (nano versus micron), scan rate, pH (cationic/acidic versus anionic/basic), electrolyte KCl concentration (four orders of magnitude), and redox agents (neutral and ionic). We reported on the significant enhancement of ionic currents while recording reversible oxidation of neutral ferrocene methanol (FcMeOH) by almost one order of magnitude than traditional potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) redox agent. The current enhancement is inversely related to ND particle diameter in the following order: 1 μm << 1000 nm < 100 nm < 10 nm ≤ 5 nm < 2 nm. We attribute the current enhancement to concurrent electrocatalytic processes, i.e. the electron transfer between redox probes and electroactive surface functional (e.g. hydroxyl, carboxyl, epoxy) moieties and the electron transfer mediated by adsorbed FcMeOH+ (or Fe(CN) 6 3+ ) ions onto ND surface. The first process is pH dependent since it depends upon ND surface functionalities for which the electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The adsorption mediated process is observed most apparently at slower scan rates owing to self-exchange between adsorbed FcMeOH+ ions and FcMeOH redox agent molecules in diffusion-limited bulk electrolyte solution. Alternatively, it is hypothesized that the surface functionality and defect sites ( sp 2-bonded C shell and unsaturated bonds) give rise to surface electronic states with energies within the band gap (midgap states) in undoped ND. These surface states serve as electron donors (and acceptors) depending upon their bonding (and antibonding) character and, therefore, they can support electrocatalytic redox

  13. Controlling the Photophysical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Arrays by Strategically Altering Their Surface Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ashley R.

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are interesting materials that, after less than 40 years of research, are used in commercial products. QDs are now found in displays, such as Samsung televisions and the Kindle Fire, and have applications in lighting, bio-imaging, quantum computing, and photovoltaics. They offer a large range of desirable properties: a controllable band gap, solution processability, controlled energy levels, and are currently the best materials for multiple exciton generation. The tunable optoelectronic properties of QDs can be controlled using size, shape, composition, and surface treatments--as shown here. Due to the quasi-spherical shape of QDs the surface to volume ratio is high, i.e. many of the constituent atoms are found on the QD surface. This makes QDs highly sensitive to surface chemistry modifications. This thesis encompasses the effects of surface treatments for QDs of two semiconducting materials: lead chalcogenides and CsPbI3. Our group developed a new synthetic technique for lead chalcogenide QDs via the cation exchange of cadmium chalcogenides. An in-depth chemical analysis is paired with optical and electrical studies and we find that metal halide residue contributes to the oxidative stability and decreased trap state density in cation-exchanged PbS QDs. We exploit these properties to make air-stable QD photovoltaic devices from both PbS and PbSe QD materials. Beyond the effects of residual atoms left from the synthetic technique, I investigated how to controllably add atoms onto the surface of QDs. I found that by introducing metal halides as a post-treatment in an electronically coupled array I am able to control the performance parameters in QD photovoltaic devices. These treatments fully infiltrate the assembled film, even under short exposure times and allow me to add controlled quantities of surface atoms to study their effects on film properties and photovoltaic device performance. Finally, I sought to apply the knowledge of

  14. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A P

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of 'polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm 'carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  15. Surface/Interfacial Structure and Chemistry of High-Energy Nickel-Rich Layered Oxide Cathodes: Advances and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peiyu; Yin, Jiangmei; Ding, Meng; Huang, Jinzhao; Xu, Xijin

    2017-12-01

    The urgent prerequisites of high energy-density and superior electrochemical properties have been the main inspiration for the advancement of cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) in the last two decades. Nickel-rich layered transition-metal oxides with large reversible capacity as well as high operating voltage are considered as the most promising candidate for next-generation LIBs. Nonetheless, the poor long-term cycle-life and inferior thermal stability have limited their broadly practical applications. In the research of LIBs, it is observed that surface/interfacial structure and chemistry play significant roles in the performance of cathode cycling. This is due to the fact that they are basically responsible for the reversibility of Li + intercalation/deintercalation chemistries while dictating the kinetics of the general cell reactions. In this Review, the surface/interfacial structure and chemistry of nickel-rich layered cathodes involving structural defects, redox mechanisms, structural evolutions, side-reactions among others are initially demonstrated. Recent advancements in stabilizing the surface/interfacial structure and chemistry of nickel-rich cathodes by surface modification, core-shell/concentration-gradient structure, foreign-ion substitution, hybrid surface, and electrolyte additive are presented. Then lastly, the remaining challenges such as the fundamental studies and commercialized applications, as well as the future research directions are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferralis, Nicola, E-mail: ferralis@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Carraro, Carlo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • H-intercalated epitaxial graphene–SiC interface studied with surface enhanced Raman. • Evolution of graphene and H–Si interface with UV-ozone, annealing and O-exposure. • H–Si interface and quasi-freestanding graphene are retained after UV-ozone treatment. • Enhanced ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene. • Novel SERS method for characterizing near-surface graphene–substrate interfaces. - Abstract: A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer–SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm{sup −1} corresponding to the Si-H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  17. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferralis, Nicola; Carraro, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • H-intercalated epitaxial graphene–SiC interface studied with surface enhanced Raman. • Evolution of graphene and H–Si interface with UV-ozone, annealing and O-exposure. • H–Si interface and quasi-freestanding graphene are retained after UV-ozone treatment. • Enhanced ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene. • Novel SERS method for characterizing near-surface graphene–substrate interfaces. - Abstract: A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer–SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm −1 corresponding to the Si-H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching

  18. Scanning near-field optical microscopy on rough surfaces: applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear-force apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM with very sharp uncoated tapered waveguides relies on the unexpected enhancement of reflection in the shear-force gap. It is the technique for obtaining chemical (materials contrast in the optical image of “real world” surfaces that are rough and very rough without topographical artifacts, and it is by far less complicated than other SNOM techniques that can only be used for very flat surfaces. The experimental use of the new photophysical effect is described. The applications of the new technique are manifold. Important mechanistic questions in solid-state chemistry (oxidation, diazotization, photodimerization, surface hydration, hydrolysis are answered with respect to simultaneous AFM (atomic force microscopy and detailed crystal packing. Prehistoric petrified bacteria and concomitant pyrite inclusions are also investigated with local RAMAN SNOM. Polymer beads and unstained biological objects (rabbit heart, shrimp eye allow for nanoscopic analysis of cell organelles. Similarly, human teeth and a cancerous tissue are analyzed. Bladder cancer tissue is clearly differentiated from healthy tissue without staining and this opens a new highly promising diagnostic tool for precancer diagnosis. Industrial applications are demonstrated at the corrosion behavior of dental alloys (withdrawal of a widely used alloy, harmless substitutes, improvement of paper glazing, behavior of blood bags upon storage, quality assessment of metal particle preparations for surface enhanced RAMAN spectroscopy, and determination of diffusion coefficient and light fastness in textile fiber dyeing. The latter applications include fluorescence SNOM. Local fluorescence SNOM is also used in the study of partly aggregating dye nanoparticles within resin/varnish preparations. Unexpected new insights are obtained in all of the various fields that cannot be obtained by other techniques.

  19. Progression towards optimization of viscosity of highly concentrated carbonaceous solid-water slurries by incorporating and modifying surface chemistry parameters with and without additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Amrita

    Carbonaceous solid-water slurries (CSWS) are concentrated suspensions of coal, petcoke bitumen, pitch etc. in water which are used as feedstock for gasifiers. The high solid loading (60-75 wt.%) in the slurry increases CSWS viscosity. For easier handling and pumping of these highly loaded mixtures, low viscosities are desirable. Depending on the nature of the carbonaceous solid, solids loading in the slurry and the particle size distribution, viscosity of a slurry can vary significantly. Ability to accurately predict the viscosity of a slurry will provide a better control over the design of slurry transport system and for viscosity optimization. The existing viscosity prediction models were originally developed for hard-sphere suspensions and therefore do not take into account surface chemistry. As a result, the viscosity predictions using these models for CSWS are not very accurate. Additives are commonly added to decrease viscosity of the CSWS by altering the surface chemistry. Since additives are specific to CSWS, selection of appropriate additives is crucial. The goal of this research was to aid in optimization of CSWS viscosity through improved prediction and selection of appropriate additive. To incorporate effect of surface chemistry in the models predicting suspension viscosity, the effect of the different interfacial interactions caused by different surface chemistries has to be accounted for. Slurries of five carbonaceous solids with varying O/C ratio (to represent different surface chemistry parameters) were used for the study. To determine the interparticle interactions of the carbonaceous solids in water, interfacial energies were calculated on the basis of surface chemistries, characterized by contact angles and zeta potential measurements. The carbonaceous solid particles in the slurries were assumed to be spherical. Polar interaction energy (hydrophobic/hydrophilic interaction energy), which was observed to be 5-6 orders of magnitude higher than the

  20. Why the dish makes a difference: quantitative comparison of polystyrene culture surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Adam S; Hinton, Benjamin; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2013-07-01

    There is wide anecdotal recognition that biological cell viability and behavior can vary significantly as a function of the source of commercial tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) culture vessels to which those cells adhere. However, this marked material dependency is typically resolved by selecting and then consistently using the same manufacturer's product - following protocol - rather than by investigating the material properties that may be responsible for such experimental variation. Here, we quantified several physical properties of TCPS surfaces obtained from a wide range of commercial sources and processing steps, through the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based imaging and analysis, goniometry and protein adsorption quantification. We identify qualitative differences in surface features, as well as quantitative differences in surface roughness and wettability that cannot be attributed solely to differences in surface chemistry. We also find significant differences in cell morphology and proliferation among cells cultured on different TCPS surfaces, and resolve a correlation between nanoscale surface roughness and cell proliferation rate for both cell types considered. Interestingly, AFM images of living adherent cells on these nanotextured surfaces demonstrate direct interactions between cellular protrusions and topographically distinct features. These results illustrate and quantify the significant differences in material surface properties among these ubiquitous materials, allowing us to better understand why the dish can make a difference in biological experiments. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ground-Water, Surface-Water, and Water-Chemistry Data, Black Mesa Area, Northeastern Arizona - 1998

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Truini, Margot; Baum, B. M; Littin, G. R; Shingoitewa-Honanie, Gayl

    2000-01-01

    ...) flowmeter tests, and (5) ground-water and surface-water chemistry. In 1998 ,ground-water withdrawals for industrial and municipal use totaled about 7,060 acre-feet, which is less than a 1 percent decrease from 1997...

  2. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  3. Ferroelectric polarization effect on surface chemistry and photo-catalytic activity: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A.; Nadeem, M. A.; Idriss, H.

    2016-03-01

    The current efficiency of various photocatalytic processes is limited by the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the photocatalyst as well as the back-reaction of intermediate species. This review concentrates on the use of ferroelectric polarization to mitigate electron-hole recombination and back-reactions and therefore improve photochemical reactivity. Ferroelectric materials are considered as wide band gap polarizable semiconductors. Depending on the surface polarization, different regions of the surface experience different extents of band bending and promote different carriers to move to spatially different locations. This can lead to some interesting interactions at the surface such as spatially selective adsorption and surface redox reactions. This introductory review covers the fundamental properties of ferroelectric materials, effect of an internal electric field/polarization on charge carrier separation, effect of the polarization on the surface photochemistry and reviews the work done on the use of these ferroelectric materials for photocatalytic applications such as dye degradation and water splitting. The manipulation of photogenerated charge carriers through an internal electric field/surface polarization is a promising strategy for the design of improved photocatalysts.

  4. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  5. Surface Chemistry Manipulation of Gold Nanorods Displays High Cellular Uptake In Vitro While Preserving Optical Properties for Bio-Imaging and Photo-Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-28

    its analytical applications. TrAC Trends in Analytical Chemistry , 37(0), 32-47. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trac.2012.03.015 Livak, K. J...SURFACE CHEMISTRY MANIPULATION OF GOLD NANORODS DISPLAYS HIGH CELLULAR UPTAKE IN VITRO WHILE PRESERVING OPTICAL...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 7/2012 –1/2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SURFACE CHEMISTRY MANIPULATION OF GOLD NANORODS DISPLAYS

  6. Tuning the surface chemistry of lubricant-derived phosphate thermal films: The effect of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadaro, F. [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Rossi, A., E-mail: antonella.rossi@mat.ethz.ch [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Geologiche, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria di Monserrato, I-09100, Cagliari (Italy); Lainé, E.; Woodward, P. [Enabling Research, Infineum UK Ltd., Milton Hill, Steventon, Oxfordshire OX13 6BD (United Kingdom); Spencer, N.D., E-mail: nicholas.spencer@mat.ethz.ch [Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 5, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The additives bulk interactions in “neat” blends at high temperatures is evaluated. • The competition among the different additives to react with air-oxidized steel surfaces under pure thermal condition is investigated. • Different thermal films are grown, their in depth-composition and thickness is determined by ARXPS. • A reaction mechanism is proposed for elucidating the composition of the thermals films. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions among the various additives in a lubricant is important because they can have a major influence on the performance of blends under tribological conditions. The present investigation is focused on the interactions occurring between ZnDTP and dispersant molecules in an oil formulation, and on their reactivity under purely thermal conditions in the presence of air-oxidized iron surfaces. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was performed on undiluted blends at different temperatures, while angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) was exploited to investigate the surface reactivity on oxidized iron surfaces. The results indicate that the dispersant, generally added to blends for preventing the deposition of sludge, varnish and soot on the surface, might also inhibit the reaction of all other additives with the steel surface.

  7. Preparation of SnO2 Nanoparticles by Two Different Wet Chemistry Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridha, N.J.; Akrajas Ali Umar; Muhammad Yahya; Muhammad Mat Salleh; Mohamad Hafizuddin Jumali

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project is to prepare SnO 2 nanoparticles by two different wet chemistry methods namely sol gel and direct growth methods. The XRD results indicated that both samples are single phase SnO 2 . The FE-SEM micrographs displayed that SnO 2 nanoparticles prepared in first method exhibited a round shape with particle size around 15 nm while the second method produced SnO 2 nano rod with length and width of 570 nm and 55 nm respectively. Energy gap values for SnO 2 nanospheres and nano rods were 4.38 and 4.34 eV respectively. (author)

  8. The coupling effect of gas-phase chemistry and surface reactions on oxygen permeation and fuel conversion in ITM reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2015-08-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The effect of the coupling between heterogeneous catalytic reactions supported by an ion transport membrane (ITM) and gas-phase chemistry on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation in ITM reactors is examined. In ITM reactors, thermochemical reactions take place in the gas-phase and on the membrane surface, both of which interact with oxygen permeation. However, this coupling between gas-phase and surface chemistry has not been examined in detail. In this study, a parametric analysis using numerical simulations is conducted to investigate this coupling and its impact on fuel conversion and oxygen permeation rates. A thermochemical model that incorporates heterogeneous chemistry on the membrane surface and detailed chemical kinetics in the gas-phase is used. Results show that fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are strongly influenced by the simultaneous action of both chemistries. It is shown that the coupling somewhat suppresses the gas-phase kinetics and reduces fuel conversion, both attributed to extensive thermal energy transfer towards the membrane which conducts it to the air side and radiates to the reactor walls. The reaction pathway and products, in the form of syngas and C2 hydrocarbons, are also affected. In addition, the operating regimes of ITM reactors in which heterogeneous- or/and homogeneous-phase reactions predominantly contribute to fuel conversion and oxygen permeation are elucidated.

  9. Water chemistry of surface waters affected by the Fourmile Canyon wildfire, Colorado, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the Fourmile Canyon fire burned about 23 percent of the Fourmile Creek watershed in Boulder County, Colo. Water-quality sampling of Fourmile Creek began within a month after the wildfire to assess its effects on surface-water chemistry. Water samples were collected from five sites along Fourmile Creek (above, within, and below the burned area) monthly during base flow, twice weekly during snowmelt runoff, and at higher frequencies during storm events. Stream discharge was also monitored. Water-quality samples were collected less frequently from an additional 6 sites on Fourmile Creek, from 11 tributaries or other inputs, and from 3 sites along Boulder Creek. The pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, specific ultraviolet absorbance, total suspended solids, and concentrations (dissolved and total) of major cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium), anions (chloride, sulfate, alkalinity, fluoride, and bromide), nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and phosphorus), trace metals (aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, mercury, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, rubidium, antimony, selenium, strontium, vanadium, and zinc), and dissolved organic carbon are here reported for 436 samples collected during 2010 and 2011.

  10. Structure vs chemistry: friction and wear of Pt-based metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, A; Louzguine-Luzguin, D V; Bennewitz, R

    2013-11-13

    In comparison of a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with a Pt(111) single crystal we find that wearless friction is determined by chemistry through bond formation alloying, while wear is determined by structure through plasticity mechanisms. In the wearless regime, friction is affected by the chemical composition of the counter body and involves the formation of a liquid-like neck and interfacial alloying. The wear behavior of Pt-based metallic surfaces is determined by their structural properties and corresponding mechanisms for plastic deformation. In the case of Pt(111) wear occurs by dislocation-mediated homogeneous plastic deformation. In contrast the wear of Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass occurs through localized plastic deformation in shear bands that merge together in a single shear zone above a critical load and corresponds to the shear softening of metallic glasses. These results open a new route in the control of friction and wear of metals and are relevant for the development of self-lubricated and wear-resistant mechanical devices.

  11. Investigating thiol-modification on hyaluronan via carbodiimide chemistry using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Sruthi; Liang, Jue; Baid, Rinku; Ravi, Nathan

    2015-07-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan widely researched for its use as a biomaterial in tissue engineering, drug delivery, angiogenesis, and ophthalmic surgeries. The mechanical properties of this biomaterial can be altered to a required extent by chemically modifying the pendant reactive groups. However, derivatizing these polymers to a predetermined extent has been the Achilles heel for this process. In this study, we have investigated the factors controlling the derivatization of the carboxyl moieties of HA with amine containing thiol, cystamine dihydrochloride (Cys), via carbodiimide crosslinking chemistry. We used fractional factorial design to screen and identify the significant factor(s) affecting the reaction, and response surface methodology (RSM) to develop a model equation for predicting the degree of thiolation of HA. Also, we analyzed the reaction mechanism for potential side reactions. We observed that N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) (mole ratio with repeat unit of HA) is the significant factor controlling the degree of amidation. The quadratic equations developed from RSM predict the formulation for a desired degree of amidation of HA and percentage of potential side product. Hence, derivatizing HA to a predetermined extent with minimal side product can be achieved using the statistical design of experiments. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Human Fetal Osteoblast Response on Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)/Polystyrene Demixed Thin Film Blends: Surface Chemistry Vs Topography Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Sa, Raechelle A; Raj, Jog; Dickinson, Peter J; McCabe, Fiona; Meenan, Brian J

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in materials sciences have allowed for the development and fabrication of biomaterials that are capable of providing requisite cues to instigate cells to respond in a predictable fashion. We have developed a series of poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene (PMMA/PS) polymer demixed thin films with nanotopographies ranging from nanoislands to nanopits to study the response of human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOBs). When PMMA was in excess in the blend composition, a nanoisland topography dominated, whereas a nanopit topography dominated when PS was in excess. PMMA was found to segregate to the top of the nanoisland morphology with PS preferring the substrate interface. To further ascertain the effects of surface chemistry vs topography, we plasma treated the polymer demixed films using an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge reactor to alter the surface chemistry. Our results have shown that hFOBs did not have an increased short-term cellular response on pristine polymer demixed surfaces. However, increasing the hydrophilicty/wettability of the surfaces by oxygen functionalization causes an increase in the cellular response. These results indicate that topography alone is not sufficient to induce a positive cellular response, but the underlying surface chemistry is also important in regulating cell function.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Grain Surface Chemistry to Binding Energies of Ice Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, E. M.; Walsh, C.; Cuppen, H. M.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced telescopes, such as ALMA and the James Webb Space Telescope, are likely to show that the chemical universe may be even more complex than currently observed, requiring astrochemical modelers to improve their models to account for the impact of new data. However, essential input information for gas-grain models, such as binding energies of molecules to the surface, have been derived experimentally only for a handful of species, leaving hundreds of species with highly uncertain estimates. We present in this paper a systematic study of the effect of uncertainties in the binding energies on an astrochemical two-phase model of a dark molecular cloud, using the rate equations approach. A list of recommended binding energy values based on a literature search of published data is presented. Thousands of simulations of dark cloud models were run, and in each simulation a value for the binding energy of hundreds of species was randomly chosen from a normal distribution. Our results show that the binding energy of H2 is critical for the surface chemistry. For high binding energies, H2 freezes out on the grain forming an H2 ice. This is not physically realistic, and we suggest a change in the rate equations. The abundance ranges found are in reasonable agreement with astronomical ice observations. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that the binding energy of HCO, HNO, CH2, and C correlate most strongly with the abundance of dominant ice species. Finally, the formation route of complex organic molecules was found to be sensitive to the branching ratios of H2CO hydrogenation.

  14. The effect of heating rate on the surface chemistry of NiTi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undisz, Andreas; Hanke, Robert; Freiberg, Katharina E; Hoffmann, Volker; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the heating rate on the Ni content at the surface of the oxide layer of biomedical NiTi is explored. Heat treatment emulating common shape-setting procedures was performed by means of conventional and inductive heating for similar annealing time and temperature, applying various heating rates from ~0.25 K s(-1) to 250 K s(-1). A glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy method was established and employed to evaluate concentration profiles of Ni, Ti and O in the near-surface region at high resolution. The Ni content at the surface of the differently treated samples varies significantly, with maximum surface Ni concentrations of ~20 at.% at the lowest and ~1.5 at.% at the highest heating rate, i.e. the total amount of Ni contained in the surface region of the oxide layer decreases by >15 times. Consequently, the heating rate is a determinant for the biomedical characteristics of NiTi, especially since Ni available at the surface of the oxide layer may affect the hemocompatibility and be released promptly after surgical application of a respective implant. Furthermore, apparently contradictory results presented in the literature reporting surface Ni concentrations of ~3 at.% to >20 at.% after heat treatment are consistently explained considering the ascertained effect of the heating rate. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} synthesized using a chelating route for use in IT-SOFC cathodes: Microstructure, surface chemistry and electrical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scurtu, Rares [“IlieMurgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 SplaiulIndependentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Romania National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies(IMT), 023573 Bucharest (Romania); Somacescu, Simona, E-mail: ssimona@icf.ro [“IlieMurgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 SplaiulIndependentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Culita, Daniela [“IlieMurgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 SplaiulIndependentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Bulimestru, Ion; Popa, Nelea; Gulea, Aurelian [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology State University of Moldova 60 Mateevici, Chisinau MD 2009 Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Osiceanu, Petre [“IlieMurgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 SplaiulIndependentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-02-15

    Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} powders were synthesized by a chelating route using different polyfunctional H{sub x}APC acids (APC=aminopolycarboxylate; x=3, 4, 5). Different homologous aminopolycarboxylic acids, namely nitrilotriacetic (H{sub 3}nta), ethylenediaminetetraacetic (H{sub 4}edta), 1,2-cyclohexanediaminetetracetic (H{sub 4}cdta) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (H{sub 5}dtpa) acid, were used as chelating agents to combine Sm, Sr, Co elements into a perovskite structure. The effects of the chelating agents on the crystalline structure, porosity, surface chemistry and electrical properties were investigated. The electrical properties of the perovskite-type materials emphasized that their conductivities in the temperature range of interest (600–800 °C) depend on the nature of the precursors as well as on the presence of a residual Co oxide phase as shown by XRD and XPS analysis. The surface chemistry and the surface stoichiometries were determined by XPS revealing a complex chemical behavior of Sr that exhibits a peculiar “surface phase” and “bulk phase” chemistry within the detected volume (<10 nm). - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} powders by a chelating route and the investigation of the microstructure, surface chemistry and electrical properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline Sm{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoO{sub 3−δ} obtained by a chelating synthesis route. • Cubic perovskite structures with crystallite sizes ∼23±2 nm. • The porous nature revealed by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption (BET). • The surface chemistry and the surface stoichiometries highlighted by XPS. • A complex chemical behavior of Sr exhibits a peculiar “surface phase” and “bulk phase” chemistry.

  16. Surface chemistry on bimetallic alloy surfaces: adsorption of anions and oxidation of CO on Pt3Sn(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, Vojislav R; Arenz, Matthias; Lucas, Christopher A; Gallagher, Mark E; Ross, Philip N; Marković, Nenad M

    2003-03-05

    The microscopic structure of the Pt(3)Sn(111) surface in an electrochemical environment has been studied by a combination of ex situ low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and in situ surface X-ray scattering (SXS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) the clean-annealed surface produces a p(2 x 2) LEED pattern consistent with the surface composition, determined by LEIS, of 25 at. % Sn. SXS results show that the p(2 x 2) structure can be "transferred" from UHV into 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) and that the surface structure remains stable from 0.05 to 0.8 V. At 0.05 V the expansion of Pt surface atoms, ca. +2% from the bulk lattice spacing, is induced by adsorption of underpotential-deposited (UPD) hydrogen. At 0.5 V, where Pt atoms are covered by (bi)sulfate anions, the topmost layer is contracted relative to 0.05 V, although Sn atoms expand significantly, ca. 8.5%. The p(2 x 2) structure is stable even in solutions containing CO. In contrast to the Pt(111)-CO system, no ordered structures of CO are formed on the Pt(3)Sn(111) surface and the topmost layer expands relatively little (ca. 1.5%) from the bulk lattice spacing upon the adsorption of CO. The binding site geometry of CO on Pt(3)Sn(111) is determined by FTIR. In contrast to the near invariant band shape of a-top CO on Pt(111), changes in band morphology (splitting of the band) and vibrational properties (increase in the frequency mode) are clearly visible on the Pt(3)Sn(111) surface. To explain the line shape of the CO bands, we suggest that in addition to alloying effects other factors, such as intermolecular repulsion between coadsorbed CO and OH species, are controlling segregation of CO into cluster domains where the local CO coverage is different from the coverage expected for the CO-CO interaction on an unmodified Pt(111) surface.

  17. Chemical surface reactions by click chemistry: coumarin dye modification of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensch, Claudia; Hoeppener, Stephanie; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2008-01-01

    The functionalization of surfaces and the ability to tailor their properties with desired physico-chemical functions is an important field of research with a broad spectrum of applications. These applications range from the modification of wetting properties, over the alteration of optical properties, to the fabrication of molecular electronic devices. In each of these fields, it is of specific importance to be able to control the quality of the layers with high precision. The present study demonstrates an approach that utilizes the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of terminal acetylenes to prepare triazole-terminated monolayers on different substrates. The characterization of the precursor monolayers, the optimization of the chemical surface reactions as well as the clicking of a fluorescent dye molecule on such azide-terminated monolayers was carried out. A coumarin 343 derivative was utilized to discuss the aspects of the functionalization approach. Based on this approach, a number of potential surface reactions, facilitated via the acetylene-substituted functional molecules, for a broad range of applications is at hand, thus leading to numerous possibilities where surface modifications are concerned. These modifications can be applied on non-structured surfaces of silicon or glass or can be used on structured surfaces. Various possibilities are discussed

  18. Coupling aerosol surface and bulk chemistry with a kinetic double layer model (K2-SUB: oxidation of oleic acid by ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pfrang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a kinetic double layer model coupling aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (K2-SUB based on the PRA framework of gas-particle interactions (Pöschl-Rudich-Ammann, 2007. K2-SUB is applied to a popular model system of atmospheric heterogeneous chemistry: the interaction of ozone with oleic acid. We show that our modelling approach allows de-convoluting surface and bulk processes, which has been a controversial topic and remains an important challenge for the understanding and description of atmospheric aerosol transformation. In particular, we demonstrate how a detailed treatment of adsorption and reaction at the surface can be coupled to a description of bulk reaction and transport that is consistent with traditional resistor model formulations.

    From literature data we have derived a consistent set of kinetic parameters that characterise mass transport and chemical reaction of ozone at the surface and in the bulk of oleic acid droplets. Due to the wide range of rate coefficients reported from different experimental studies, the exact proportions between surface and bulk reaction rates remain uncertain. Nevertheless, the model results suggest an important role of chemical reaction in the bulk and an approximate upper limit of ~10−11 cm2 s−1 for the surface reaction rate coefficient. Sensitivity studies show that the surface accommodation coefficient of the gas-phase reactant has a strong non-linear influence on both surface and bulk chemical reactions. We suggest that K2-SUB may be used to design, interpret and analyse future experiments for better discrimination between surface and bulk processes in the oleic acid-ozone system as well as in other heterogeneous reaction systems of atmospheric relevance.

  19. Influence of surface chemistry of carbon materials on their interactions with inorganic nitrogen contaminants in soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaraj; Padhye, Lokesh P

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic nitrogen contaminants (INC) (NH 4 + , NO 3 - , NO 2 - , NH 3 , NO, NO 2 , and N 2 O) pose a growing risk to the environment, and their remediation methods are highly sought after. Application of carbon materials (CM), such as biochar and activated carbon, to remediate INC from agricultural fields and wastewater treatment plants has gained a significant interest since past few years. Understanding the role of surface chemistry of CM in adsorption of various INC is highly critical to increase adsorption efficiency as well as to assess the long term impact of using these highly recalcitrant CM for remediation of INC. Critical reviews of adsorption studies related to INC have revealed that carbon surface chemistry (surface functional groups, pH, Eh, elemental composition, and mineral content) has significant influence on adsorption of INC. Compared to basic functional groups, oxygen containing surface functional groups have been found to be more influential for adsorption of INC. However, basic sites on carbon materials still play an important role in chemisorption of anionic INC. Apart from surface functional groups, pH, Eh and pH zpc of CM and elemental and mineral composition of its surface are important properties capable of altering INC interactions with CM. This review summarizes our current understanding of INC interactions with CM's surface through the known chemisorption mechanisms: electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, electron donor-acceptor mechanism, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interaction, chemisorption aided by minerals, and interactions influenced by pH and elemental composition. Change in surface chemistry of CM in soil during aging is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Orientation-dependent chemistry and band-bending of Ti on polar ZnO surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghetti, Patrizia; Mouchaal, Younes; Dai, Zongbei; Cabailh, Gregory; Chenot, Stéphane; Lazzari, Rémi; Jupille, Jacques

    2017-04-19

    Orientation-dependent reactivity and band-bending are evidenced upon Ti deposition (1-10 Å) on polar ZnO(0001)-Zn and ZnO(0001[combining macron])-O surfaces. At the onset of the Ti deposition, a downward band-bending was observed on ZnO(0001[combining macron])-O while no change occurred on ZnO(0001)-Zn. Combining this with the photoemission analysis of the Ti 2p core level and Zn L 3 (L 2 )M 45 M 45 Auger transition, it is established that the Ti/ZnO reaction is of the form Ti + 2ZnO → TiO 2 + 2Zn on ZnO(0001)-Zn and Ti + yZnO → TiZn x O y + (y - x)Zn on ZnO(0001[combining macron])-O. Consistently, upon annealing thicker Ti adlayers, the metallic zinc is removed to leave ZnO(0001)-Zn surfaces covered with a TiO 2 -like phase and ZnO(0001[combining macron])-O surfaces covered with a defined (Ti, Zn, O) compound. Finally, a difference in the activation temperature between the O-terminated (500 K) and Zn-terminated (700 K) surfaces is observed, which is tentatively explained by different electric fields in the space charge layer at ZnO surfaces.

  1. Predicting Near-Surface Meteorological Variations over Different Vegetation Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutjes, R.W.A.; Klaassen, W.; Kruijt, B.; Veen, A.W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Meteorological conditions close to a surface are strongly influenced by the properties of the surface itself. As a result, input data for models calculating evaporation of surfaces differing from the measurement site need to be transformed. A transformation scheme proposed previously is tested on

  2. Industrial scale salt-free reactive dyeing of cationized cotton fabric with different reactive dye chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallathambi, Arivithamani; Venkateshwarapuram Rengaswami, Giri Dev

    2017-10-15

    Dyeing of knitted cotton goods in the industry has been mostly with reactive dyes. Handling of salt laden coloured effluent arising out of dyeing process is one of the prime concerns of the industry. Cationization of cotton is one of the effective alternative to overcome the above problem. But for cationization to be successful at industrial scale it has to be carried out by exhaust process and should be adoptable for the various dye chemistries currently practiced in the industry. Hence, in the present work, industrial level exhaust method of cationization process was carried out with concentration of 40g/L and 80g/L. The fabrics were dyed with dyes of three different dye chemistry and assessed for its dyeing performance without the addition of salt. Dye shades ranging from medium to extra dark shades were produced without the addition of salt. This study will provide industries the recipe that can be adopted for cationized cotton fabric for the widely used reactive dyes at industrial level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sulfamide chemistry applied to the functionalization of self-assembled monolayers on gold surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Pantaine

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aniline-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on gold surfaces have successfully reacted with ArSO2NHOSO2Ar (Ar = 4-MeC6H4 or 4-FC6H4 resulting in monolayers with sulfamide moieties and different end groups. Moreover, the sulfamide groups on the SAMs can be hydrolyzed showing the partial regeneration of the aniline surface. SAMs were characterized by water contact angle (WCA measurements, Fourier-transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS.

  4. Transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes through silica based porous media: influences of aquatic chemistry, surface chemistry, and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Bitter, Julie L; Smith, Billy A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ball, William P

    2013-12-17

    This paper provides results from studies of the transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (O-MWCNTs) of varying surface oxygen concentrations under a range of aquatic conditions and through uniform silica glass bead media. In the presence of Na(+), the required ionic strength (IS) for maximum particle attachment efficiency (i.e., the critical deposition concentration, or CDC) increased as the surface oxygen concentration of the O-MWCNTs or pH increased, following qualitative tenets of theories based on electrostatic interactions. In the presence of Ca(2+), CDC values were lower than those with Na(+) present, but were no longer sensitive to surface oxygen content, suggesting that Ca(2+) impacts the interactions between O-MWCNTs and glass beads by mechanisms other than electrostatic alone. The presence of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) decreased the attachment efficiency of O-MWCNTs in the presence of either Na(+) or Ca(2+), but with more pronounced effects when Na(+) was present. Nevertheless, low concentrations of SRNOM (organic carbon) were sufficient to mobilize all O-MWCNTs studied at CaCl2 concentrations as high as 10 mM. Overall, this study reveals that NOM content, pH, and cation type show more importance than surface chemistry in affecting O-MWCNTs deposition during transport through silica-based porous media.

  5. Mercury biomagnification in three geothermally-influenced lakes differing in chemistry and algal biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Piet, E-mail: piet.verburg@niwa.co.nz; Hickey, Christopher W.; Phillips, Ngaire

    2014-09-15

    Accumulation of Hg in aquatic organisms is influenced not only by the contaminant load but also by various environmental variables. We compared biomagnification of Hg in aquatic organisms, i.e., the rate at which Hg accumulates with increasing trophic position, in three lakes differing in trophic state. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in food webs were compared in an oligotrophic, a mesotrophic and a eutrophic lake with naturally elevated levels of Hg associated with geothermal water inputs. We explored relationships of physico-chemistry attributes of lakes with Hg concentrations in fish and biomagnification in the food web. Trophic positions of biota and food chain length were distinguished by stable isotope {sup 15}N. As expected, THg in phytoplankton decreased with increasing eutrophication, suggesting the effect of biomass dilution. In contrast, THg biomagnification and THg concentrations in trout were controlled by environmental physico-chemistry and were highest in the eutrophic lake. In the more eutrophic lake frequent anoxia occurred, resulting in favorable conditions for Hg transfer into and up the food chain. The average concentration of THg in the top predator (rainbow trout) exceeded the maximum recommended level for consumption by up to 440%. While there were differences between lakes in food chain length between plankton and trout, THg concentration in trout did not increase with food chain length, suggesting other factors were more important. Differences between the lakes in biomagnification and THg concentration in trout correlated as expected from previous studies with eight physicochemical variables, resulting in enhanced biomagnification of THg in the eutrophic lake. - Highlights: • Relationships between Hg biomagnification and 11 variables in 3 lakes. • Hg in trout too high for consumption in two geothermally-influenced lakes. • Hg biomagnification was highest in the most eutrophic lake. • First study to compare Hg biomagnification in

  6. Mercury biomagnification in three geothermally-influenced lakes differing in chemistry and algal biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, Piet; Hickey, Christopher W.; Phillips, Ngaire

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Hg in aquatic organisms is influenced not only by the contaminant load but also by various environmental variables. We compared biomagnification of Hg in aquatic organisms, i.e., the rate at which Hg accumulates with increasing trophic position, in three lakes differing in trophic state. Total Hg (THg) concentrations in food webs were compared in an oligotrophic, a mesotrophic and a eutrophic lake with naturally elevated levels of Hg associated with geothermal water inputs. We explored relationships of physico-chemistry attributes of lakes with Hg concentrations in fish and biomagnification in the food web. Trophic positions of biota and food chain length were distinguished by stable isotope 15 N. As expected, THg in phytoplankton decreased with increasing eutrophication, suggesting the effect of biomass dilution. In contrast, THg biomagnification and THg concentrations in trout were controlled by environmental physico-chemistry and were highest in the eutrophic lake. In the more eutrophic lake frequent anoxia occurred, resulting in favorable conditions for Hg transfer into and up the food chain. The average concentration of THg in the top predator (rainbow trout) exceeded the maximum recommended level for consumption by up to 440%. While there were differences between lakes in food chain length between plankton and trout, THg concentration in trout did not increase with food chain length, suggesting other factors were more important. Differences between the lakes in biomagnification and THg concentration in trout correlated as expected from previous studies with eight physicochemical variables, resulting in enhanced biomagnification of THg in the eutrophic lake. - Highlights: • Relationships between Hg biomagnification and 11 variables in 3 lakes. • Hg in trout too high for consumption in two geothermally-influenced lakes. • Hg biomagnification was highest in the most eutrophic lake. • First study to compare Hg biomagnification in lakes

  7. Magnetical and optical properties of nanodiamonds can be tuned by particles surface chemistry: theoretical and experimental study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Šebera, Jakub; Ashcheulov, Petr; Golan, Martin; Ledvina, Miroslav; Mičová, Júlia; Mravec, F.; Kovalenko, A.; Zverev, D.; Yavkin, B.; Orlinskii, S.; Záliš, Stanislav; Fišerová, Anna; Richter, Jan; Šefc, L.; Turánek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 43 (2014), s. 25245-25252 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01011165; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10279S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanodiamond particles * NV luminescent centers * surface functionalization * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.772, year: 2014

  8. Chemistry of Frozen NaCl and MgSO4 Brines - Implications for Surface Expression of Europa's Ocean Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. V.; Hodyss, R. P.; Choukroun, M.; Vu, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Europa's subsurface ocean is a critical determinant of its habitability, but current analysis of the ocean composition is limited to its expression on the Europan surface. While there is observational evidence indicating that ocean materials make their way to the surface, our understanding of the chemical processes that can alter this material under Europan surface conditions is limited. We present experimental data on the chemistry of mixed solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 as they are frozen to 100 K, replicating the conditions that may occur when subsurface ocean fluids are emplaced onto Europa's surface. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the formation of salts during the freezing process, and the interaction of ions in the frozen brines. Our data indicate that mixed aqueous solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 form Na2SO4 and MgCl2 preferentially when frozen, rather than making NaCl and MgSO4 precipitates. The detection of epsomite (MgSO4Ÿ•7H2O) on Europa's surface may therefore imply an ocean composition relatively low in sodium, unless radiolytic chemistry converts MgCl2 to MgSO4 as suggested by Hand and Brown 2013 (ApJ 145 110). These results have important implications for the interpretation of remote sensing data of Europa's surface.

  9. Effects of steam activation on the pore structure and surface chemistry of activated carbon derived from bamboo waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Juan; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Duan, Zheng-Kang; Li, Meng; Wang, Yin

    2014-10-01

    The effects of steam activation on the pore structure evolution and surface chemistry of activated carbon (AC) obtained from bamboo waste were investigated. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms revealed that higher steam activation temperatures and/or times promoted the creation of new micropores and widened the existing micropores, consequently decreasing the surface area and total pore volume. Optimum conditions included an activation temperature of 850 °C, activation time of 120 min, and steam flush generated from deionized water of 0.2 cm3 min-1. Under these conditions, AC with a BET surface area of 1210 m2 g-1 and total pore volume of 0.542 cm-3 g-1was obtained. Changes in surface chemistry were determined through Boehm titration, pH measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results revealed the presence of a large number of basic groups on the surface of the pyrolyzed char and AC. Steam activation did not affect the species of oxygen-containing groups but changed the contents of these species when compared with pyrolyzed char. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface morphology of the products. AC obtained under optimum conditions showed a monolayer adsorption capacity of 330 mg g-1 for methylene blue (MB), which demonstrates its excellent potential for MB adsorption applications.

  10. Surface chemistry-mediated penetration and gold nanorod thermotherapy in multicellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shubin; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Huili; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liu, Juan; Hou, Shuai; Meng, Jie; Wang, Paul C.; Wu, Xiaochun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit.We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods section. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31877f

  11. Early interactions between leukocytes and three different potentially bioactive titanium surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Anna; Malmberg, Per; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Arvidsson, Martin; Franke Stenport, Victoria

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the early interactions between leukocytes and three different surface modifications, suggested as bioactive. Blasted titanium discs were modified by alkali and heat treatment, sodium fluoride treatment, or hydroxyapatite coating. A number of these discs were also immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for a week, a treatment which yielded high levels of calcium and phosphate on each surface type. The specimens were exposed for human venous blood for 32 minutes and the respiratory burst response was measured in terms of reactive oxygen species with a luminometer, and coverage of viable cells with a fluorescence microscope after staining steps. The topography, morphology, and chemistry of the surfaces were evaluated with optical interferometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). A high respiratory burst response was found for HA coated titanium in comparison with the other surface groups (p burst response (p < 0.0005) and removed statistically significant differences between the surface groups. Thus, the results in the present study indicate that different titanium surface modifications influence the early inflammatory response differently, and that calcium phosphate compounds increase the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of herbicides diuron and amitrole from water by an activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha-Cámara, M A; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2007-01-30

    A study was conducted on the effects of carbon surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of diuron and amitrole from aqueous solutions by adsorption on an as-received and oxidized activated carbon fiber. Results obtained were explained by the surface characteristics of the adsorbents and the characteristics of the herbicide molecules. Under the experimental conditions used, diuron uptake was much higher than that of amitrole, despite its larger molecular dimensions, due to the lesser water solubility, greater hydrophobicity, and larger dipolar moment of diuron compared with amitrole. Uptake variations associated with differences in carbon surface oxidation, solution pH, and ionic strength were explained by corresponding changes in electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions.

  13. Effects of surface orientation, fluid chemistry and mechanical polishing on the variability of dolomite dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Voltolini, Marco; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies of carbonate surface reactivity have underscored the fundamental variability of dissolution rates and the heterogeneous distribution of the reaction over the mineral surface due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surface energy. Dolomite dissolution rates relative to different cleavage planes (r-planes) and surfaces cut approximately perpendicular to the c-axis (c-planes) were studied at 50 °C as a function of pH (3.4 ≤ pH ≤ 9.0) and solution composition by vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with the aim of providing an estimate of the intrinsic rate variation of dolomite single crystals and describing the surface reaction distribution and the rate controlling mechanisms. Surface normal retreat rates measured under acidic conditions increased linearly with time and were not visibly affected by the parallel increase of surface roughness. Mean total dissolution rates of r-planes decreased by over 200 times from pH 3.4 to pH 9.0 and CO32--rich solutions, whereas corresponding rate variations spanned over 3 orders of magnitude when also c-plane rate distributions were included in the analysis. At acid to near neutral pH, c-planes dissolved ∼ three times faster than the adjoining r-planes but slower at basic pH and high total carbon concentration, displaying a distinctive morphologic evolution in these two regimes. The comparison of polished and unpolished crystals showed that polished cleavage planes dissolved about three times faster than the unpolished counterpart at near neutral to basic conditions, whereas no significant difference in reactivity was observed at pH < 5. Although experimental data and observations indicate a tendency of dolomite faces to reach a low-energy topography over the course of the reaction, the evolution of the entire crystal morphology depends also on the reactivity of edge and corner regions, whose contribution to measured rates is not generally taken into account by laboratory

  14. Surface physical chemistry properties in coated bacterial cellulose membranes with calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Olyveira, Gabriel Molina; Basmaji, Pierre; Costa, Ligia Maria Manzine; Dos Santos, Márcio Luiz; Dos Santos Riccardi, Carla; Guastaldi, Fernando Pozzi Semeghini; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel Mantuaneli; de Oliveira Capote, Ticiana Sidorenko; Pizoni, Elisabeth; Guastaldi, Antônio Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose has become established as a new biomaterial, and it can be used for medical applications. In addition, it has called attention due to the increasing interest in tissue engineering materials for wound care. In this work, the bacterial cellulose fermentation process was modified by the addition of chondroitin sulfate to the culture medium before the inoculation of the bacteria. The biomimetic process with heterogeneous calcium phosphate precipitation of biological interest was studied for the guided regeneration purposes on bacterial cellulose. FTIR results showed the incorporation of the chondroitin sulfate in the bacterial cellulose, SEM images confirmed the deposition of the calcium phosphate on the bacterial cellulose surface, XPS analysis showed a selective chemical group influences which change calcium phosphate deposition, besides, the calcium phosphate phase with different Ca/P ratios on bacterial cellulose surface influences wettability. XTT results concluded that these materials did not affect significantly in the cell viability, being non-cytotoxic. Thus, it was produced one biomaterial with the surface charge changes for calcium phosphate deposition, besides different wettability which builds new membranes for Guided Tissue Regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tuning optoelectronic properties of small semiconductor nanocrystals through surface ligand chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Katie N.

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (SNCs) are a class of material with one dimension reported. Furthermore, the outstanding increase in PL-QY was found to be a product of both passivation and delocalization effects. Next we used poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG)-thiolate ligands to passivate the SNC and provide unique solubility properties in both aqueous and organic solvents as well as utilized their highly conductive nature to explore inter-SNC electronic coupling. The electronic coupling was studied: 1) as a function of SNC size where the smallest SNC exhibited the largest coupling energy (170 meV) and 2) as a function of annealing temperature, where an exceptionally large (˜400 meV) coupling energy was observed. This strong electronic coupling in self-organized films could facilitate the large-scale production of highly efficient electronic materials for advanced optoelectronic device applications. Strong inter-SNC electronic coupling together with high solubility, such as that provided by PEG-thiolate-coated CdSe SNCs, can increase the stability of SNCs during solution-phase electrochemical characterization. Therefore, we utilized these properties to characterize solution-state electrochemical properties and photocatalytic activity of ternary copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2) SNCs as a function of their size and surface ligand chemistry. Electrochemical characterization of our PEG-thiolate-coated SNCs showed that the thermodynamic driving force (-?G) for oxygen reduction, which increased with decreasing bandgap, was a major contributor to the overall photocatalytic reaction. Additionally, phenol degradation efficiency was monitored in which the smallest diameter SNC and shortest chain length of PEG provided the highest efficiency. The information provided herein could be used to produce superior SNC photocatalysts for a variety of applications including oxidation of organic contaminants, conversion of water to hydrogen gas, and decomposition of crude oil or pesticides

  16. Revisiting 30 years of Biofunctionalization and Surface Chemistry of Inorganic Nanoparticles for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João eConde

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last 30 years we have assisted to a massive advance of nanomaterials in material science. Nanomaterials and structures, in addition to their small size, have properties that differ from those of larger bulk materials, making them ideal for a host of novel applications. The spread of nanotechnology in the last years has been due to the improvement of synthesis and characterization methods on the nanoscale, a field rich in new physical phenomena and synthetic opportunities. In fact, the development of functional nanoparticles has progressed exponentially over the past two decades. This work aims to extensively review 30 years of different strategies of surface modification and functionalization of noble metal (gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanocrystals and semiconductor nanoparticles, such as quantum dots. The aim of this review is not only to provide in-depth insights into the different biofunctionalization and characterization methods, but also to give an overview of possibilities and limitations of the available nanoparticles.

  17. Final Technical Report for DOE Grant, number DE-FG02-05ER15701; Probing Surface Chemistry Under Catalytic Conditions: Olefin Hydrogenation,Cyclization and Functionalization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neurock, Matthew

    2011-05-26

    The specific goal of this work was to understanding the catalytic reactions pathways for the synthesis of vinyl acetate over Pd, Au and PdAu alloys. A combination of both experimental methods (X-ray and Auger spectroscopies, low-energy ion scattering (LEIS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and theory (Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and Monte Carlo methods under various different reactions) were used to track the surface chemistry and the influence of alloying. The surface intermediates involved in the various reactions were characterized using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and LEED to identify the nature of the surface species and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) to follow the decomposition pathways and measure heats of adsorption. These results along with those from density functional theoretical calculations were used determine the kinetics for elementary steps. The results from this work showed that the reaction proceeds via the Samanos mechanism over Pd surfaces whereby the ethylene directly couples with acetate to form an acetoxyethyl intermediate that subsequently undergoes a beta-hydride elimination to form the vinyl acetate monomer. The presence of Au was found to modify the adsorption energies and surface coverages of important surface intermediates including acetate, ethylidyne and ethylene which ultimately influences the critical C-H activation and coupling steps. By controlling the surface alloy composition or structure one can begin to control the steps that control the rate and even the mechanism.

  18. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes. 2. Effects of molecular properties of guests and surface functionalities of dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Cheng, Yiyun; Wu, Qinglin; Zhao, Libo; Xu, Tongwen

    2009-08-06

    The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is investigated by NMR techniques, including (1)H NMR and 2D-NOESY studies. The effects of molecular properties of drug molecules (protonation ability and spatial steric hindrance of charged groups) and surface functionalities of dendrimers (positively charged amine groups and negatively charged carboxylate groups) on the host-guest interactions are discussed. Different interaction mechanisms between dendrimers and drug molecules are proposed on the basis of NMR results. Primary amine- and secondary amine-containing drugs preferentially bind to negatively charged dendrimers by strong electrostatic interactions, whereas tertiary amine and quaternary ammonium-containing drugs have weak binding ability with dendrimers due to relatively low protonation ability of the tertiary amine group and serious steric hindrance of the quaternary ammonium group. Positively charged drugs locate only on the surface of negatively charged dendrimers, whereas negatively charged drugs locate both on the surface and in the interior cavities of positively charged dendrimers. The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is promising for the development of new drug delivery systems.

  19. Inland dissolved salt chemistry: statistical evaluation of bivariate and ternary diagram models for surface and subsurface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. THRELKELD

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available We compared the use of ternary and bivariate diagrams to distinguish the effects of atmospheric precipitation, rock weathering, and evaporation on inland surface and subsurface water chemistry. The three processes could not be statistically differentiated using bivariate models even if large water bodies were evaluated separate from small water bodies. Atmospheric precipitation effects were identified using ternary diagrams in water with total dissolved salts (TDS 1000 mg l-1. A principal components analysis showed that the variability in the relative proportions of the major ions was related to atmospheric precipitation, weathering, and evaporation. About half of the variation in the distribution of inorganic ions was related to rock weathering. By considering most of the important inorganic ions, ternary diagrams are able to distinguish the contributions of atmospheric precipitation, rock weathering, and evaporation to inland water chemistry.

  20. Couple of biomimetic surfaces with different morphologies for remanufacturing nonuniform wear rail surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qi; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Haifeng; Feng, Li; Zhang, Peng

    2018-02-01

    In this work, biomimetic laser treatment was performed on repairing and remanufacturing the nonuniform worn rail surface. The wearing depth distribution of three work regions of a failure rail surface was discussed, and different thickness hardening layers with different microstructure, microhardness and wear resistances were detected from the worm surfaces. Varying wear resistances of the surfaces with different biomimetic morphologies were obtained by biomimetic laser treatments, and the corresponding effect on the lubrication sliding wear of treated and untreated surfaces were studied for comparative study. In addition, the relationship between wear resistance and the spacing of units was also provided, which can lay the important theoretical foundation for avoiding the wear resistance of the serious worn surface is less than that of the slight worn surface in the future practical applications.

  1. Role of surface chemistry in modified ACF (activated carbon fiber)-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shiying, E-mail: ysy@ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Environment and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Qingdao 266100 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Environment and Geological Engineering (MEGE), Qingdao 266100 (China); Li, Lei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Xiao, Tuo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); China City Environment Protection Engineering Limited Company, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zheng, Di; Zhang, Yitao [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • ACF can efficiently activate peroxymonosulfate to degrade organic pollutants. • Basic functional groups may mainly increase the adsorption capacity of ACF. • C1, N1, N2 have promoting effect on the ACF catalyzed PMS oxidation. • Modification by heat after nitric acid is also a way of ACF regeneration. - Abstract: A commercial activated carbon fiber (ACF-0) was modified by three different methods: nitration treatment (ACF-N), heat treatment (ACF-H) and heat treatment after nitration (ACF-NH), and the effects of textural and chemical properties on the ability of the metal-free ACF-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5), an azo dye being difficultly adsorbed onto ACF, in aqueous solution were investigated in this work. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes, surface morphology and the chemical state inside ACF samples were characterized by Boehm titration, N{sub 2} adsorption, scanning electron microscopy in couple with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. XPS spectra deconvolution was applied to figure out the importance of surface nitrogen-containing function groups. We found that π-π, pyridine and amine have promoting effect on the catalytic oxidation while the −NO{sub 2} has inhibitory effect on the ACF/PMS systems for RB5 destroy. Sustainability and renewability of the typical ACF-NH for catalytic oxidation of RB5 were also discussed in detail. Information about our conclusions are useful to control and improve the performance of ACF-catalyzed PMS oxidation for organic pollutants in wastewater treatment.

  2. Color and Surface Chemistry Changes of Pine Wood Flour after Extraction and Delignification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao Chen; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Nicole M. Stark; Yongming Fan

    2014-01-01

    A detailed study was undertaken to examine the color and chemistry changes of pine wood flour when its extractives are removed and when it is delignified. The solvent systems employed were toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot-water (HW), while sodium chlorite/acetic acid were used for delignification (i.e., lignin removal (LR)). Samples were analyzed by...

  3. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: surface chemistry effects on the cellular uptake of biocompatible block copolymer assemblies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de Castro, C. E.; Ribeiro, C. A. S.; Alavarse, A. C.; Albuquerque, L. J. C.; da Silva, M. C. C.; Jäger, Eliezer; Surman, František; Schmidt, V.; Giacomelli, C.; Giacomelli, F. C.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 5 (2018), s. 2180-2188 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-09998S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : biocompatibility * block copolymers * controlled drug delivery Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.833, year: 2016

  4. Surface organization of aqueous MgCl2 and application to atmospheric marine aerosol chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Casillas-Ituarte, N. N.; Callahan, K. M.; Tang, CH. Y.; Chen, X.; Roeselová, Martina; Tobias, D. J.; Allen, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 15 (2010), s. 6616-6621 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk ME09064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : magnesium chloride * fatty acid * air/aqueous interface Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.771, year: 2010

  5. Dielectric Properties and Characterisation of Titanium Dioxide Obtained by Different Chemistry Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wypych

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We made comparison of titanium dioxide powders obtained from three syntheses including sol-gel and precipitation methods as well as using layered (tetramethylammonium titanate as a source of TiO2. The obtained precursors were subjected to step annealing at elevated temperatures to transform into rutile form. The transformation was determined by Raman measurements in each case. The resulting products were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The main goal of the studies performed was to compare the temperature of the transformation in three titania precursors obtained by different methods of soft chemistry routes and to evaluate dielectric properties of rutile products by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Different factors affecting the electrical properties of calcinated products were discussed. It was found that sol-gel synthesis provided rutile form after annealing at 850°C with the smallest particles size about 20 nm, the highest value of dielectric permittivity equal to 63.7, and loss tangent equal to 0.051 at MHz frequencies. The other powders transformed to rutile at higher temperature, that is, 900°C, exhibit lower value of dielectric permittivity and had a higher value of particles size. The correlation between the anatase-rutile transformation temperature and the size of annealed particles was proposed.

  6. Different pathways but same result? Comparing chemistry and biological effects of burned and decomposed litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; El-Gawad, Ahmed M. Abd; Sarker, Tushar Chandra; Cesarano, Gaspare; Saulino, Luigi; Saracino, Antonio; Castro Rego, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    Litter burning and biological decomposition are oxidative processes co-occurring in many terrestrial ecosystems, producing organic matter with different chemical properties and differently affecting plant growth and soil microbial activity. Here, we tested the chemical convergence hypothesis (i.e. materials with different initial chemistry tend to converge towards a common profile, with similar biological effects, as the oxidative process advances) for burning and decomposition. We compared the molecular composition of 63 organic materials - 7 litter types either fresh, decomposed for 30, 90, 180 days, or heated at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 °C - as assessed by 13C NMR. We used litter water extracts (5% dw) as treatments in bioassays on plant (Lepidium sativum) and fungal (Aspergillus niger) growth, and a washed quartz sand amended with litter materials (0.5 % dw) to assess heterotrophic respiration by CO2 flux chamber. We observed different molecular variations for materials either burning (i.e. a sharp increase of aromatic C and a decrease of most other fractions above 200 °C) or decomposing (i.e. early increase of alkyl, methoxyl and N-alkyl C and decrease of O-alkyl and di-O-alkyl C fractions). Soil respiration and fungal growth progressively decreased with litter age and temperature. Plant growth underwent an inhibitory effect by untreated litter, more and less rapidly released over decomposing and burning materials, respectively. Correlation analysis between NMR and bioassay data showed that opposite responses for soil respiration and fungi, compared to plants, are related to essentially the same C molecular types. Our findings suggest a functional convergence of decomposed and burnt organic substrates, emerging from the balance between the bioavailability of labile C sources and the presence of recalcitrant and pyrogenic compounds, oppositely affecting different trophic levels.

  7. Simple Preparation of Thiol-Ene Particles in Glycerol and Surface Functionalization by Thiol-Ene Chemistry (TEC) and Surface Chain Transfer Free Radical Polymerization (SCT-FRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Chiaula, Valeria; Yu, Liyun; Pinelo, Manuel; Woodley, John M; Daugaard, Anders E

    2018-01-01

    Thiol-ene (TE)-based polymer particles are traditionally prepared via emulsion polymerization in water (using surfactants, stabilizers, and cosolvents). Here, a green and simple alternative is presented with excellent control over particle size, while avoiding the addition of stabilizers. Glycerol is applied as a dispersing medium for the preparation of off-stoichiometric TE microparticles, where sizes in the range of 40-400 µm are obtained solely by changing the mixing speed of the emulsions prior to crosslinking. Control over surface chemistry is achieved by surface functionalization of excess thiol groups via photochemical thiol-ene chemistry resulting in a functional monolayer. In addition, surface chain transfer free radical polymerization is used for the first time to introduce a thicker polymer layer on the particle surface. The application potential of the system is demonstrated by using functional particles as adsorbent for metal ions and as a support for immobilized enzymes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Variation in size of blood puddles on different surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutziger, Janett; Haim, Andreas; Jonsson, Kim; Wenzel, Volker; Stark, Matthias; Nussbaumer, Walter

    2014-10-01

    It is known that visual estimation of blood loss is inaccurate independently from experience and qualification of rescuers or members of hospital staff. There is no information available about the size of a puddle of blood for a given amount of blood depending on the surface. This pilot study evaluated the size of blood puddles on various surfaces. Human blood was portioned in standardized amounts of fluid and poured on different surfaces: wooden and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) floors, flagging, carpet, asphalt, concrete, forest soil, mattress and towel. The resulting puddles of blood were documented by digital photos and their surface areas measured using a computer. The largest blood puddles were found on even surfaces such as PVC floors and concrete, and the smallest blood puddles were found on forest soil and carpet. When blood volume was 100 ml, the difference between the smallest and the largest blood puddle added up to a factor of 13.8 (77 cm forest soil, 1061 cm PVC). This factor was comparable in all other blood amounts on these two surfaces (13.7 with 250 ml, 13.0 with 500 ml, 13.5 with 1000 ml). A table with objects of daily life of comparable size (CD, letter, newspaper, etc.) was added for teaching purposes. The size of puddles of blood depended strongly on the type of surface. Up to 13 times larger blood puddles were found on hard and nonabsorbant surfaces (PVC, concrete) than on absorbant surfaces such as carpet or forest soil.

  9. [Corrosion resistant properties of different anodized microtopographies on titanium surfaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangjun, Huo; Li, Xie; Xingye, Tong; Yueting, Wang; Weihua, Guo; Weidong, Tian

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the corrosion resistant properties of titanium samples prepared by anodic oxidation with different surface morphologies. Pure titanium substrates were treated by anodic oxidation to obtain porous titanium films in micron, submicron, and micron-submicron scales. The surface morphologies, coating cross-sectional morphologies, crystalline structures, and surface roughness of these samples were characterized. Electrochemical technique was used to measure the corrosion potential (Ecorr), current density of corrosion (Icorr), and polarization resistance (Rp) of these samples in a simulated body fluid. Pure titanium could be modified to exhibit different surface morphologies by the anodic oxidation technique. The Tafel curve results showed that the technique can improve the corrosion resistance of pure titanium. Furthermore, the corrosion resistance varied with different surface morphologies. The submicron porous surface sample demonstrated the best corrosion resistance, with maximal Ecorr and Rp and minimal Icorr. Anodic oxidation technology can improve the corrosion resistance of pure titanium in a simulated body fluid. The submicron porous surface sample exhibited the best corrosion resistance because of its small surface area and thick barrier layer.

  10. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal and Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Satish C.

    2008-01-01

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  11. Frost formation on a plate with different surface hydrophilicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyunuk Lee; Jongmin Shin; Samchul Ha; Bongjun Choi [Digital Appliance Co. Research Lab., L G Electronics Inc., Changwon, Kyoungnam (Korea); Jaekeun Lee

    2004-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop frost maps for two different surfaces having two different hydrophilic characteristics and to find ambient conditions associated with the formation of frost structures. Test samples with two different surfaces having dynamic contact angle (DCA) of 23{sup o} and 88{sup o} were installed in a wind tunnel and exposed to a humid airflow. Frost structure is observed with a visualization system in the operating conditions of household refrigerator: airflow temperature in the range of 20 {sup o}C, humidity in the range of 2.64-9.36 g/kg, Reynolds number in the range of 7000-17,000 and cold plate temperature in the range of -11.6 to -28.4 {sup o}C. As a result of this study, frost structures are classified and frost maps are proposed for two different surface hydrophilicities. Surface with low DCA (23{sup o}) shows lower frost thickness and higher frost density than that with high DCA (88{sup o}). It was found that frost structures on surfaces with different DCA are similar. However, low DCA surface at low humidity provides 20-30% denser frost formation due to the shift of areas with different structures. (Author)

  12. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of apprx 40 ANG . A systematic...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  13. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization has been developed for surface modification of carbon nanotubes with polymers for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via mussel inspired chemistry. • Preparation of aminated polymers through free radical polymerization. • Functionalized CNTs with aminated polymers via Michael addition reaction. • Highly dispersed CNTs in organic and aqueous solution. - Abstract: In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  14. Workers and alate queens of Solenopsis geminata share qualitatively similar but quantitatively different venom alkaloid chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun-Hui eShi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Solenopsis geminata group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae encompasses ant species commonly called fire ants because of their painful sting. The many physiological effects of the venom are caused by 2-methyl-6-alkyl and/or alkenylpiperidine alkaloids. The variation in piperidine alkaloid structures has useful taxonomic characters. The most well studied Solenopsis species is S. invicta, which was accidentally imported into the USA in the 1930s from South America. It quickly spread throughout the southern USA and is now a major invasive pest ant in the USA and in other parts of the world. Interestingly, the invasive S. invicta has largely displaced a native USA fire ant, S. geminata, from the southern USA. We explore the possibility that differences in venom chemistry could be correlated with this displacement. The cis and trans alkaloids from body extracts of workers and alate queens of S. geminata were separated by silica gel chromatography, identified, and quantitated by GC-MS analysis. Both workers and alate queens produce primarily cis- and trans-2-methyl-6-n-undecyl-piperidines, as well as other minor alkaloid components. Imported fire ant, S. invicta, alate queens produce the same alkaloids as S. geminata alate queens, but in contrast S. invicta workers produce piperidine alkaloids with longer side chains, which are purported to be physiologically more effective. These results are discussed in relation to the evolutionary progression of fire ant venom alkaloids and displacement of S. geminata by S. invicta in the USA.

  15. Probing the heat sources during thermal runaway process by thermal analysis of different battery chemistries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siqi; Wang, Li; Feng, Xuning; He, Xiangming

    2018-02-01

    Safety issue is very important for the lithium ion battery used in electric vehicle or other applications. This paper probes the heat sources in the thermal runaway processes of lithium ion batteries composed of different chemistries using accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The adiabatic thermal runaway features for the 4 types of commercial lithium ion batteries are tested using ARC, whereas the reaction characteristics of the component materials, including the cathode, the anode and the separator, inside the 4 types of batteries are measured using DSC. The peaks and valleys of the critical component reactions measured by DSC can match the fluctuations in the temperature rise rate measured by ARC, therefore the relevance between the DSC curves and the ARC curves is utilized to probe the heat source in the thermal runaway process and reveal the thermal runaway mechanisms. The results and analysis indicate that internal short circuit is not the only way to thermal runaway, but can lead to extra electrical heat, which is comparable with the heat released by chemical reactions. The analytical approach of the thermal runaway mechanisms in this paper can guide the safety design of commercial lithium ion batteries.

  16. Controlling Foam Morphology of Poly(methyl methacrylate via Surface Chemistry and Concentration of Silica Nanoparticles and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Process Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Rende

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanocomposite foams have received considerable attention because of their potential use in advanced applications such as bone scaffolds, food packaging, and transportation materials due to their low density and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to traditional polymer foams. In this study, silica nanofillers were used as nucleating agents and supercritical carbon dioxide as the foaming agent. The use of nanofillers provides an interface upon which CO2 nucleates and leads to remarkably low average cell sizes while improving cell density (number of cells per unit volume. In this study, the effect of concentration, the extent of surface modification of silica nanofillers with CO2-philic chemical groups, and supercritical carbon dioxide process conditions on the foam morphology of poly(methyl methacrylate, PMMA, were systematically investigated to shed light on the relative importance of material and process parameters. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified with tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl triethoxysilane leading to three different surface chemistries. The silica concentration was varied from 0.85 to 3.2% (by weight. The supercritical CO2 foaming was performed at four different temperatures (40, 65, 75, and 85°C and between 8.97 and 17.93 MPa. By altering the surface chemistry of the silica nanofiller and manipulating the process conditions, the average cell diameter was decreased from 9.62±5.22 to 1.06±0.32 μm, whereas, the cell density was increased from 7.5±0.5×108 to 4.8±0.3×1011 cells/cm3. Our findings indicate that surface modification of silica nanoparticles with CO2-philic surfactants has the strongest effect on foam morphology.

  17. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  18. Associating Animations with Concrete Models to Enhance Students' Comprehension of Different Visual Representations in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Hajri, Sheikha H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to explore the impact of associating animations with concrete models on eleventh-grade students' comprehension of different visual representations in organic chemistry. The study used a post-test control group quasi-experimental design. The experimental group (N = 28) used concrete models, submicroscopic…

  19. Symmetrical electroadhesives independent of different interfacial surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Hovell, T.; Bamber, T.; Petzing, J.; Justham, L.

    2017-11-01

    Current electroadhesive actuators cannot produce stable electroadhesive forces on the same substrate with different interfacial surface interactions. It is, therefore, desirable to develop electroadhesive actuators that can generate stable adhesive forces on different surface conditions. A symmetrical electroadhesive pad that is independent of different interfacial scratch directions is developed and presented. A relative difference of only 6.4% in the normal force direction was observed when the electroadhesive was facing an aluminium plate with surface scratch directions of 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°. This step-change improvement may significantly promote the application of electroadhesion technology. In addition, this manifests that significant performance improvements could be achieved via further investigations into electroadhesive designs.

  20. Study of deposited crud composition on fuel surfaces in the environment of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) of a Boiling Water Reactor at Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Su, Te-Yen; Wen, Tung-Jen; Men, Lee-Chung

    2012-09-01

    This paper aimed at the characterization of metallic composition and surface analysis on the crud of fuel rods for unit-1 of BWR-4 at Nuclear Power Plant. The inductively coupled plasma- atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) and the gamma spectrometry were carried out to analyze the corrosion product distributions and to determine the elemental compositions along the fuel rod under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) switched from normal water chemistry (NWC) of reactor coolant in this study. Most of the crud consisted of the flakes and irregular shapes via SEM morphology. The loosely adherent oxide layer was mostly composed of hematite (α- Fe 2 O 3 ) with amorphous iron oxides by XRD results. The average deposited amounts of crud was the order of 0.5 mg/cm 2 , indicating that the fuel surface of this plant under HWC environment appeared to be one with the lower crud deposition in terms of low iron level of feedwater. It also showed no significant difference in comparison with NWC condition. (authors)

  1. Surface chemistry of carbon removal from indium tin oxide by base and plasma treatment, with implications on hydroxyl termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, John A.; Koh, Sharon E.; Dulcey, Charles S.; Pehrsson, Pehr E.

    2003-01-01

    The surface chemistry of carbon removal from indium tin oxide (ITO) has been investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and high-resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HR-ELS). A vibrating Kelvin probe (KP) was used to monitor the work function (PHI) of ITO after cleaning, either by base-cleaning with alcoholic-KOH or by O 2 plasma-cleaning. Base-cleaning lowered PHI ITO as seen in the KP analysis, whereas plasma-cleaning slightly increased PHI ITO by an oxidative process. The degree of PHI ITO depression by base-cleaning was seen to depend on the initial surface, but the PHI depression itself was nonreductive to the ITO, as seen in the In-MNN AES lineshape. The nonreductive depression of PHI ITO by base-cleaning was further supported by a constant charge carrier density, as estimated from the HR-ELS. Base-cleaning was slightly more effective than the oxygen plasma in removing carbon from the ITO surface. However, base-cleaning preferentially removed graphitic carbon while leaving significant hydrocarbon contaminants, as determined by vibrational analysis with HREELS. All other ITO surfaces retained a significant carbon and hydrocarbon contamination as evidenced by AES and HREELS. There was little evidence of the formation of surface hydroxyl species, as expected for such an inherently contaminated surface as ITO

  2. Modulation of Protein Fouling and Interfacial Properties at Carbon Surfaces via Immobilization of Glycans Using Aryldiazonium Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Federico; Angione, M. Daniela; Behan, James A.; Cullen, Ronan J.; Duff, Thomas; Vasconcelos, Joana M.; Scanlan, Eoin M.; Colavita, Paula E.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon materials and nanomaterials are of great interest for biological applications such as implantable devices and nanoparticle vectors, however, to realize their potential it is critical to control formation and composition of the protein corona in biological media. In this work, protein adsorption studies were carried out at carbon surfaces functionalized with aryldiazonium layers bearing mono- and di-saccharide glycosides. Surface IR reflectance absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance were used to study adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Protein adsorption was found to decrease by 30–90% with respect to bare carbon surfaces; notably, enhanced rejection was observed in the case of the tested di-saccharide vs. simple mono-saccharides for near-physiological protein concentration values. ζ-potential measurements revealed that aryldiazonium chemistry results in the immobilization of phenylglycosides without a change in surface charge density, which is known to be important for protein adsorption. Multisolvent contact angle measurements were used to calculate surface free energy and acid-base polar components of bare and modified surfaces based on the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model: results indicate that protein resistance in these phenylglycoside layers correlates positively with wetting behavior and Lewis basicity. PMID:27108562

  3. Cell behavior on microparticles with different surface morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Wound Healing and Cell Biology Laboratory, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Fu Xiaobing, E-mail: fuxiaobing@vip.sina.co [Wound Healing and Cell Biology Laboratory, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853 (China); Burns Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital, General Hospital of PLA, Trauma Center of Postgraduate Medical College, Beijing 100037 (China)

    2010-03-18

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the cell aggregation to the site of the defect for tissue regeneration. To develop favorable microparticles for cell delivery application, we fabricated and evaluated three types of microparticles that differ in surface properties. The microparticles with varied surface morphology (smooth, pitted and multicavity) were created from chemically crosslinked gelatin particles that underwent various drying treatments. Three types of microparticles were characterized and assessed in terms of the cell behavior of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts seeded on them. The cells could attach, spread and proliferate on all types of microparticles but spread and populated more slowly on the microparticles with smooth surfaces than on those with pitted or multicavity surfaces. Microparticles with a multicavity surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment and growth rate. Furthermore, cells tested on microparticles with a multicavity surface exhibited better morphology and induced the earlier formation of extracellular-based cell-microparticle aggregation than those on microparticles with other surface morphology (smooth and pitted). Thus, microparticles with a multicavity surface show promise for attachment and proliferation of cells in tissue engineering.

  4. Wettability transition of laser textured brass surfaces inside different mediums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huangping; Abdul Rashid, Mohamed Raiz B.; Khew, Si Ying; Li, Fengping; Hong, Minghui

    2018-01-01

    Hydrophobic surface on brass has attracted intensive attention owing to its importance in scientific research and practical applications. Laser texturing provides a simple and promising method to achieve it. Reducing wettability transition time from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity or superhydrophobicity remains a challenge. Herein, wettability transition of brass surfaces with hybrid micro/nano-structures fabricated by laser texturing was investigated by immersing the samples inside different mediums. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface contact angle measurement were employed to characterize surface morphology, chemical composition and wettability of the fabricated surfaces of brass samples. Wettability transition time from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity was shortened by immersion into isopropyl alcohol for a period of 3 h as a result of the absorption and accumulation of organic substances on the textured brass surface. When the textured brass sample was immersed into sodium bicarbonate solution, flower-like structures on the sample surface played a key role in slowing down wettability transition. Moreover, it had the smallest steady state contact angle as compared to the others. This study provides a facile method to construct textured surfaces with tunable wetting behaviors and effectively extend the industrial applications of brass.

  5. X-ray free electron laser as a real-time probe of chemistry on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    X-ray free electron laser has opened up new possibilities for the study of surface chemical reactions on ultrafast time scale. This article reviews the recent work on the desorption of a molecule from a surface, which is one of the most fundamental surface chemical process. (author)

  6. Cleaning of biomaterial surfaces: protein removal by different solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Fabian; Grass, Simone; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scheibe, Christian; Müller-Renno, Christine; Davoudi, Neda; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The removal of biofilms or protein films from biomaterials is still a challenging task. In particular, for research investigations on real (applied) surfaces the reuse of samples is of high importance, because reuse allows the comparison of the same sample in different experiments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of different solvents (SDS, water, acetone, isopropanol, RIPA-buffer and Tween-20) on five different biomaterials (titanium, gold, PMMA (no acetone used), ceramic, and PTFE) with different wettability which were covered by layers of two different adsorbed proteins (BSA and lysozyme). The presence of a protein film after adsorption was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment of the surfaces with the different solvents, the residual proteins on the surface were determined by BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid assay). Data of the present study indicate that SDS is an effective solvent, but for several protein-substrate combinations it does not show the cleaning efficiency often mentioned in literature. RIPA-buffer and Tween-20 were more effective. They showed very low residual protein amounts after cleaning on all examined material surfaces and for both proteins, however, with small differences for the respective substrate-protein combinations. RIPA-buffer in combination with ultrasonication completely removed the protein layer as confirmed by TEM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Well-Defined Molybdenum Oxo Alkyl Complex Supported on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Highly Active Olefin Metathesis Precatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Nicolas

    2016-12-05

    The well-defined silica-supported molybdenum oxo alkyl species (SiO−)MoO(CH Bu) was selectively prepared by grafting of MoO(CH Bu)Cl onto partially dehydroxylated silica (silica) using the surface organometallic chemistry approach. This surface species was fully characterized by elemental analysis and DRIFT, solid-state NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopy. This new material is related to the active species of industrial supported MoO/SiO olefin metathesis catalysts. It displays very high activity in propene self-metathesis at mild (turnover number = 90 000 after 25 h). Remarkably, its catalytic performance outpaces those of the parent imido derivative and its tungsten oxo analogue.

  8. Well-Defined Molybdenum Oxo Alkyl Complex Supported on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Highly Active Olefin Metathesis Precatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas; Le Quéméner, Frédéric; Bouhoute, Yassine; Szeto, Kai C; De Mallmann, Aimery; Barman, Samir; Samantaray, Manoja K; Delevoye, Laurent; Gauvin, Régis M; Taoufik, Mostafa; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-02-15

    The well-defined silica-supported molybdenum oxo alkyl species (≡SiO-)MoO(CH 2 t Bu) 3 was selectively prepared by grafting of MoO(CH 2 t Bu) 3 Cl onto partially dehydroxylated silica (silica 700 ) using the surface organometallic chemistry approach. This surface species was fully characterized by elemental analysis and DRIFT, solid-state NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopy. This new material is related to the active species of industrial supported MoO 3 /SiO 2 olefin metathesis catalysts. It displays very high activity in propene self-metathesis at mild (turnover number = 90 000 after 25 h). Remarkably, its catalytic performance outpaces those of the parent imido derivative and its tungsten oxo analogue.

  9. Benchtop chemistry for the rapid prototyping of label-free biosensors: Transmission localized surface plasmon resonance platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ssu; Chen, Xin; Yang, Tinglu; Castellana, Edward T.; Chen, Jixin; Cremer, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, a simple label-free biosensor fabrication method is demonstrated based on transmission localized surface plasmon resonance (T-LSPR). The platform, which consists of a silver nanoparticle array, can be prepared in just a few minutes using benchtop chemistry. The array was made by a templating technique in conjunction with the photoreduction of Ag ions from solution. This metal surface was functionalized with biotin-linked thiol ligands for binding streptavidin molecules from solution. For an array of 19 nm diameter silver nanoparticles, a redshift in the T-LSPR spectrum of 24 nm was observed upon protein-ligand binding at saturation. The binding constant was found to be 2 × 1012 M–1. Platforms were also fabricated with silver nanoparticles of 34, 55, and 72 nm diameters. The maximum LSPR wavelength shift was nanoparticle size dependent and the maximum sensitivity was obtained with the smaller nanoparticles. PMID:20408728

  10. College Chemistry and Piaget: An Analysis of Gender Difference, Cognitive Abilities, and Achievement Measures Seventeen Years Apart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Milakofsky, Louis M.; Bender, David S.; Patterson, Henry O.

    2003-05-01

    This study revisits an analysis of gender difference in the cognitive abilities of college chemistry students using scores from "Inventory of Piaget's Developmental Tasks" (IPDT), the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT), and final grades from an introductory college chemistry course. Comparison of 1998 scores with those from 1981 showed an overall decline on most of the measures and a changing pattern among males and females. Gender differences were found in the IPDT subtests measuring imagery, classification, and proportional reasoning, but not conservation, a pattern that differs from the findings reported 17 years earlier. The generational and gender differences revealed in this study suggest that instructors should be cognizant of, and should periodically assess, the diversity of students' cognitive abilities.

  11. Differences in vole preference, secondary chemistry and nutrient levels between naturally regenerated and planted Norway spruce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virjamo, Virpi; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Henttonen, Heikki; Hiltunen, Eveliina; Karjalainen, Reijo; Korhonen, Juhani; Huitu, Otso

    2013-10-01

    Field voles (Microtus agrestis) cause severe damage to young Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantations during wintertime in Fennoscandia. We experimentally investigated vole preference for winter-dormant, naturally regenerated seedlings; spring-planted seedlings; or autumn-planted seedlings; and how preference corresponds with seedling chemistry. Voles showed the highest preference for autumn-planted seedlings and the second highest for spring-planted seedlings, while naturally regenerated seedlings were avoided. The stems of the autumn-planted seedlings contained higher concentrations of nitrogen and piperidine alkaloids and lower concentrations of stilbenes than did the other groups. In addition to differences between naturally regenerated and planted seedlings, we investigated seasonal differences in naturally regenerated P. abies needle and bark secondary chemistry. While piperidine alkaloid concentrations did not vary with season, the soluble non-tannin phenolics of needles and the condensed tannins of bark were lower in May than in November or January. At the time of planting, the concentration of bark piperidine alkaloids was higher in autumn-planted than in spring-planted seedlings. We detected two alkaloids not previously found in P. abies, 2-methyl-6-propyl-1,6-piperideine and a tentatively identified pinidine-isomer. Our results demonstrate that vole choice of spruce seedlings is promoted by high nitrogen and low stilbene content, both associated with seedlings planted late in the season. As vole damage is linked to seedling chemistry, damage potentially could be mitigated by advancing planting or by manipulating plant chemistry in nurseries.

  12. Osteoblast response to zirconia surfaces with different topographies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herath, H.M.T.U. [Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Di Silvio, L. [Guy' s, King' s and St Thomas' Medical and Dental Institute, King' s College London, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Evans, J.R.G., E-mail: j.r.g.evans@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    Zirconia-3 mol% yttria ceramics were prepared with as-sintered, abraded, polished, and porous surfaces in order to explore the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like cells. After modification, all surfaces were heated to 600 °C to extinguish traces of organic contamination. All surfaces supported cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation but the surfaces with grain boundary grooves or abraded grooves provided conditions for enhanced initial cell attachment. Nevertheless, overall cell proliferation and total DNA were highest on the polished surface. Zirconia sintered at a lower temperature (1300 °C vs. 1450 °C) had open porosity and presented reduced proliferation as assessed by alamarBlue™ assay, possibly because the openness of the pores prevented cells developing a local microenvironment. All cells retained the typical polygonal morphology of osteoblast-like cells with variations attributable to the underlying surface notably alignment along the grooves of the abraded surface. - Highlights: • Biocompatibility of chemically identical, topologically different ZrO{sub 2} was tested. • ZrO{sub 2} promoted cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and nodule formation. • Proliferation was high on polished ZrO{sub 2} but initial recruitment was high on abraded ZrO{sub 2}. • With open porosity, proliferation was low; cells cannot establish a microenvironment.

  13. Combined quantum chemistry and Monte Carlo simulation of competitive adsorption of O{sub 2} and OH on Pt surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rui, E-mail: ruililcu@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuling [Department of Chemistry, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Liu, Jifeng, E-mail: liujifeng111@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education of China, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Competitive adsorption of O{sub 2} and OH on different Pt surfaces was theoretically studied. • The adsorption energies of O{sub 2} and OH depend on the Pt surfaces and the adsorption sites. • The order of O{sub 2} adsorption efficiency was characterized. - Abstract: To obtain a microscopic explanation on the difference of oxygen reduction reaction activity on different Pt low index surfaces, we simulated competitive adsorptions of O{sub 2} and OH on four Pt low index surfaces. Firstly, all possible chemical adsorption configurations of the O{sub 2} and OH molecules on the three surfaces were acquired through density functional theory. The distribution of these configurations on the different surfaces was collected from Monte Carlo simulations. Our results demonstrated that the adsorption energy order of O{sub 2} on different surfaces was (110)(1 × 2) > (110) > (100) > (111) and that the adsorption energy order of the OH molecules on Pt surfaces was the same. Considering the competitive adsorption of O{sub 2} and OH on Pt surfaces, the final O{sub 2} adsorption efficiencies order of three surfaces was (111) > (110) > (100) > (110)(1 × 2), which was consistent with the experimental activities of oxygen reduction. Our study provided theoretical references for previous experimental studies and had important significance for the understanding of oxygen adsorption on Pt surfaces.

  14. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H 2 O 2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  15. Friction and surface chemistry of some ferrous-base metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The friction properties of some ferrous-base metallic glasses were measured both in argon and in vacuum to a temperature of 350 C. The alloy surfaces were also analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to identify the compounds and elements present on the surface. The results of the investigation indicate that even when the surfaces of the amorphous alloys, or metallic glasses, are atomically clean, bulk contaminants such as boric oxide and silicon dioxide diffuse to the surfaces. Friction measurements in both argon and vacuum indicate that the alloys exhibit higher coefficients of friction in the crystalline state than they do in the amorphous state.

  16. Designing a Study Abroad Course in Chemistry: Information from Three Different Courses to Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine, Susan Sonchik

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for planning a study abroad course in chemistry start with defining the course objectives and outcomes. These, in turn, guide the choice of course content and format, location, length of travel, activities, and assessment. Budgetary issues include transportation, lodging, admission fees, activities, docents and guides (including audio…

  17. Application of response surface methodology to tailor the surface chemistry of electrospun chitosan-poly(ethylene oxide) fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösiger, Peter; Richard, Isabelle M T; Le Gat, Luce; Michen, Benjamin; Schubert, Mark; Rossi, René M; Fortunato, Giuseppino

    2018-04-15

    Chitosan is a promising biocompatible polymer for regenerative engineering applications, but its processing remains challenging due to limited solubility and rigid crystalline structure. This work represents the development of electrospun chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) blend nanofibrous membranes by means of a numerical analysis in order to identify and tailor the main influencing parameters with respect to accessible surface nitrogen functionalities which are of importance for the biological activity as well as for further functionalization. Depending on the solution composition, both gradient fibers and homogenous blended fiber structures could be obtained with surface nitrogen concentrations varying between 0 and 6.4%. Response surface methodology (RSM) revealed chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) ratio and chitosan molecular weight as the main influencing factors with respect to accessible nitrogen surface atoms and respective concentrations. The model showed good adequacy hence providing a tool to tailor the surface properties of chitosan/poly(ethylene oxide) blends by addressing the amount of accessible chitosan. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of surface microstructure and chemistry on osteoinduction and osteoclastogenesis by biphasic calcium phosphate discs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davison, N.L.; Su, J.; Yuan, H.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Bruijn, J.D. de; rrere-de Groot, F. Ba

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that surface microstructural dimensions can influence the osteoinductivity of calcium phosphates (CaPs), and osteoclasts may play a role in this process. We hypothesised that surface structural dimensions of

  19. Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fino, A; Petrone, L; Aldred, N; Ederth, T; Liedberg, B; Clare, A S

    2014-02-01

    In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE and charge, with higher settlement on low-energy (hydrophobic) surfaces and negatively charged SAMs. Positively charged SAMs resulted in low settlement, with intermediate settlement on neutral SAMs of similar SFE. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that despite previous suggestions to the contrary, these two species of barnacle show similar preferences in response to SFE; they also respond similarly to charge. These findings have positive implications for the development of novel antifouling (AF) coatings and support the importance of consistency in substratum choice for assays designed to compare surface preferences of fouling organisms.

  20. Gas-surface interactions and heterogeneous chemistry on interstellar grains analogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fillion, J. H.; Dulieu, F.; Romanzin, C.; Cazaux, S.

    Detailed laboratory studies and progress in surface science technique, have allowed in recent years the first experimental confirmation of surface reaction schemes, as introduced by Tielens, Hagen and Charnley [1,2]. In this paper, we review few heterogeneous processes which give routes to form

  1. A Novel General Chemistry Laboratory: Creation of Biomimetic Superhydrophobic Surfaces through Replica Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanic, Samuel; Brady, Owen; Sanda, Ahmed; Gustafson, Carolina; Donhauser, Zachary J.

    2014-01-01

    Biomimetic replicas of superhydrophobic lotus and taro leaf surfaces can be made using polydimethylsiloxane. These replicas faithfully reproduce the microstructures of the leaves' surface and can be analyzed using contact angle goniometry, self-cleaning experiments, and optical microscopy. These simple and adaptable experiments were used to…

  2. Evaluation of Cellulosic Fabrics Surface Characteristics after Different Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Vitalija MASTEIKAITĖ; Ulzan SMAILOVA; Maira NURZHASAROVA; Virginija SACEVIČIENĖ; Tadas KLEVECKAS

    2014-01-01

    Various clothes treatments during their manufacture and wear change the fabrics physical and surface characteristics. The different testing methods for fabrics quality evaluation are used in this research. The aim of this work is to examine the effect of enzyme treatment, laundering and abrasion on the appearance of different cellulosic fabrics. Six cotton and cotton blend woven fabrics used for faded garments production were chosen for this examination. Treatments such, as enzyme wash, domes...

  3. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  4. In-plume gas scavenging: Insights into gas adsorption, ash-surface chemistry and the role of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ana S.; Wadsworth, Fabian; Ayris, Paul M.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    In-plume gas scavenging-processes are well known to occur in large volcanic eruptions, where, over the range of plume conditions (temperature and gas composition) and physicochemical ash-surface properties, volcanic gases (mainly SO2, HCl, and HF) can be sequestrated by the occurrence (alone or combined) of three processes: (1) salt deposition, (2) adsorption, or (3) acidic liquid condensation on the ash-surface. Several studies have sought to constrain the diffusion-driven mechanisms through which scavenging occurs, the optimal temperatures for efficient scavenging, and the likely reaction products formed. Here we bolster these datasets with new high-resolution experimental work. Our current project additionally seeks to identify the role of water vapour in gas scavenging processes using a time- and temperature- series of experiments with well-characterized ash samples, for which, particle size distribution, surface area, and bulk chemistry were constrained. These samples will be exposed to various hydrous and anhydrous gas atmospheres with proportions of some plume-relevant gas mixtures (SO2, SO2-H2O) at high temperatures (200 to 800 °C) for various time series (1 to 60 min.) in the Advanced Ash-Gas Reactor (AGAR) available at the LMU chemistry laboratory. Post-experimental samples are analyzed by standard leachate techniques. We show that a diffusion-controlled sequestration mechanism will be strongly temperature dependent proportional to the diffusivity of the mobile species. In complex mixtures of gases, which could result in the diffusion of more than a single species, it remains to be tested whether simple diffusion models can yield average sequestration volumes. This will be tested explicitly using simple diffusion time scaling laws. Future work should target the additional combined effects of HCl, SO2 and H2O in more realistic complex volcanic atmospheres.

  5. Trends in the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and surface waters in the Lake Maggiore catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogora

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Maggiore catchment is the area of Italy most affected by acid deposition. Trend analysis was performed on long-term (15-30 years series of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition, four small rivers draining forested catchments and four high mountain lakes. An improvement in the quality of atmospheric deposition was detected, due to decreasing sulphate concentration and increasing pH. Similar trends were also found in high mountain lakes and in small rivers. Atmospheric deposition, however, is still providing a large and steady flux of nitrogen compounds (nitrate and ammonium which is causing increasing nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems and increasing nitrate levels in rivers. Besides atmospheric deposition, an important factor controlling water acidification and recovery is the weathering of rocks and soils which may be influenced by climate warming. A further factor is the episodic deposition of Saharan calcareous dust which contributes significantly to base cation deposition. Keywords: trend, atmospheric deposition, nitrogen, stream water chemistry.

  6. The effect of ozone on nicotine desorption from model surfaces:evidence for heterogeneous chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Lee, Sharon K.; Gundel, LaraA.

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using nicotine as a tracer or biomarker is affected by sorption of the alkaloid to indoor surfaces and by its long-term re-emission into the gas phase. However, surface chemical interactions of nicotine have not been sufficiently characterized. Here, the reaction of ozone with nicotine sorbed to Teflon and cotton surfaces was investigated in an environmental chamber by monitoring nicotine desorption over a week following equilibration in dry or humid air (65-70 % RH). The Teflon and cotton surfaces had N{sub 2}-BET surface areas of 0.19 and 1.17 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and water mass uptakes (at 70 % RH) of 0 and 7.1 % respectively. Compared with dry air baseline levels in the absence of O{sub 3}, gas phase nicotine concentrations decrease, by 2 orders of magnitude for Teflon after 50 h at 20-45 ppb O{sub 3}, and by a factor of 10 for cotton after 100 h with 13-15 ppb O{sub 3}. The ratios of pseudo first-order rate constants for surface reaction (r) to long-term desorption (k) were r/k = 3.5 and 2.0 for Teflon and cotton surfaces, respectively. These results show that surface oxidation was competitive with desorption. Hence, oxidative losses could significantly reduce long-term re-emissions of nicotine from indoor surfaces. Formaldehyde, N-methylformamide, nicotinaldehyde and cotinine were identified as oxidation products, indicating that the pyrrolidinic N was the site of electrophilic attack by O{sub 3}. The presence of water vapor had no effect on the nicotine-O{sub 3} reaction on Teflon surfaces. By contrast, nicotine desorption from cotton in humid air was unaffected by the presence of ozone. These observations are consistent with complete inhibition of ozone-nicotine surface reactions in an aqueous surface film present in cotton but not in Teflon surfaces.

  7. Surface patterning with natural and synthetic polymers via an inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction employing microcontact chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roling, Oliver; Mardyukov, Artur; Lamping, Sebastian; Vonhören, Benjamin; Rinnen, Stefan; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Studer, Armido; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-10-21

    Bioorthogonal ligation methods are the focus of current research due to their versatile applications in biotechnology and materials science for post-functionalization and immobilization of biomolecules. Recently, inverse electron demand Diels-Alder (iEDDA) reactions employing 1,2,4,5-tetrazines as electron deficient dienes emerged as powerful tools in this field. We adapted iEDDA in microcontact chemistry (μCC) in order to create enhanced surface functions. μCC is a straightforward soft-lithography technique which enables fast and large area patterning with high pattern resolutions. In this work, tetrazine functionalized surfaces were reacted with carbohydrates conjugated with norbornene or cyclooctyne acting as strained electron rich dienophiles employing μCC. It was possible to create monofunctional as well as bifunctional substrates which were specifically addressable by proteins. Furthermore we structured glass supported alkene terminated self-assembled monolayers with a tetrazine conjugated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator enabling surface grafted polymerizations of poly(methylacrylate) brushes. The success of the surface initiated iEDDA via μCC as well as the functionalization with natural and synthetic polymers was verified via fluorescence and optical microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

  8. Corrosion resistance, chemistry, and mechanical aspects of Nitinol surfaces formed in hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalovskay, Svetlana A.; Anderegg, James W.; Undisz, Andreas; Rettenmayr, Markus; Rondelli, Gianni C.

    2012-06-12

    Ti oxides formed naturally on Nitinol surfaces are only a few nanometers thick. To increase their thickness, heat treatments are explored. The resulting surfaces exhibit poor resistance to pitting corrosion. As an alternative approach to accelerate surface oxidation and grow thicker oxides, the exposure of Nitinol to strong oxidizing H2O2 aqueous solutions (3 and 30%) for various periods of time was used. Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger spectroscopy, it was found that the surface layers with variable Ti (6–15 at %) and Ni (5–13 at %) contents and the thickness up to 100 nm without Ni-enriched interfaces could be formed. The response of the surface oxides to stress in superelastic regime of deformations depended on oxide thickness. In the corrosion studies performed in both strained and strain-free states using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarizations, the surfaces treated in H2O2 showed no pitting in corrosive solution that was assigned to higher chemical homogeneity of the surfaces free of secondary phases and inclusions that assist better biocompatibility of Nitinol medical devices. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 100B: 1490–1499, 2012

  9. Supramolecular Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    antigen interactions. working in different areas such as chemical science, biological science, physical science, material science and so on. On the whole, supramolecular chemistry focuses on two over- lapping areas, 'supramolecules' and ...

  10. Effect of UV exposure on the surface chemistry of wood veneers treated with ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patachia, Silvia; Croitoru, Catalin; Friedrich, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of four types of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) on the chemical alteration of the surface of wood veneers exposed to 254 nm UV irradiation have been studied by using image analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and surface energy calculation. The wood treated with ionic liquids showed better stability to UV light, as demonstrated by the low lignin, carbonyl index and cellulose crystallinity index variation, as well as very small color modification of the surface with the increase of the UV exposure period, by comparing to non-treated wood. The results show that the tested ionic liquids could be effective as UV stabilizers.

  11. Investigation on the Self-discharge of the LiFePO4/C nanophosphate battery chemistry at different conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Stan, Ana-Irina

    2014-01-01

    to detailed empirical investigations in order to find out how self-discharge of this chemistry depends on different storing conditions. Precise knowledge about the level of the self-discharge of lithium ion battery cells is very important for improving the performance of the battery management system since...... it allows also for more precise determination of the actual battery SOC after prolonged storage. In this paper the self-discharge of the nanophosphate LiFePO4/C is studied at different temperature, SOC conditions and at different SOH levels of the battery. Moreover, cell to cell differences in self...

  12. Surface chemistry of metals and their oxides in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.

    1975-01-01

    Examination of oxide and metal surfaces in water at high temperature by a broad spectrum of techniques is bringing understanding of corrosion product movement and alleviation of activity transport in CANDU-type reactor primary coolant circuits. (Author)

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Srikanth [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  14. Scanning near-field optical microscopy on rough surfaces: Applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kaupp, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Shear-force apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) with very sharp uncoated tapered waveguides relies on the unexpected enhancement of reflection in the shear-force gap. It is the technique for obtaining chemical (materials) contrast in the optical image of “real world” surfaces that are rough and very rough without topographical artifacts, and it is by far less complicated than other SNOM techniques that can only be used for very flat surfaces. The ex...

  15. Machine learning of single molecule free energy surfaces and the impact of chemistry and environment upon structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Rachael A; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2015-03-14

    The conformational states explored by polymers and proteins can be controlled by environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, and solvent) and molecular chemistry (e.g., molecular weight and side chain identity). We introduce an approach employing the diffusion map nonlinear machine learning technique to recover single molecule free energy landscapes from molecular simulations, quantify changes to the landscape as a function of external conditions and molecular chemistry, and relate these changes to modifications of molecular structure and dynamics. In an application to an n-eicosane chain, we quantify the thermally accessible chain configurations as a function of temperature and solvent conditions. In an application to a family of polyglutamate-derivative homopeptides, we quantify helical stability as a function of side chain length, resolve the critical side chain length for the helix-coil transition, and expose the molecular mechanisms underpinning side chain-mediated helix stability. By quantifying single molecule responses through perturbations to the underlying free energy surface, our approach provides a quantitative bridge between experimentally controllable variables and microscopic molecular behavior, guiding and informing rational engineering of desirable molecular structure and function.

  16. Development and Application of a Flow Reactor Cell for Studies of Surface Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algrim, L. B.; Pagonis, D.; Price, D.; Day, D. A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    We have designed, constructed, characterized, and employed a flow reactor cell that can be used to investigate the interaction of gaseous species such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), oxidants, acids, and water vapor with authentic and model surfaces that are present in indoor and outdoor environments. The 3.9 L rectangular cell is made of FEP-coated aluminum and has one open face that can be sealed to the surface of interest. An internal plunger is raised (lowered) to expose (cover) the surface while various probe chemicals are added to the flow. To date we have exposed painted surfaces to O3, OH radicals (made from reaction of O3 with tetramethylethene and from photolysis of methyl nitrate/NO mixtures), and NO3 radicals (made from thermal decomposition N2O5) and analyzed the emitted oxidation products with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) equipped with an iodide reagent ion source. Further studies have included the reaction of oxidants with surfaces coated with organic films such as squalene and polyethylene glycol, as well as uptake of ketones and acids from the gas-phase to painted surfaces. The cell was also recently deployed at the University of Colorado-Boulder Art Museum during spring of 2017 to investigate the oxidation products released from the museum walls and floors. Results from all of these studies will be presented.

  17. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 14. Methods for projecting future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, K.W.; Marmorek, D.; Ryan, P.F.; Heltcher, K.; Robinson, D.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the report are to: critically evaluate methods for projecting future effects of acidic deposition on surface water acid-base chemistry; review and evaluate techniques and procedures for analyzing projection uncertainty; review procedures for estimating regional lake and stream population attributes; review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) methodology for projecting the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry; and present the models, uncertainty estimators, population estimators, and proposed approach selected to project the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry in the NAPAP 1990 Integrated Assessment and discuss the selection rationale

  18. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Hélène van de Sande

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP, compomer (C, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and resin cement (RC. Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0 or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0 for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200 before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period at 5% significance level. RESULTS: The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (pRMGIC>C>R (p0.05. Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. CONCLUSIONS: Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions.

  19. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 10. Watershed and lake processes affecting surface-water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.S.; Cook, R.B.; Miegroet, H.V.; Johnson, D.W.; Elwood, J.W.

    1990-09-01

    The acid-base chemistry of surface waters is governed by the amount and chemistry of deposition and by the biogeochemical reactions that generate acidity or acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) along the hydrologic pathways that water follows through watersheds to streams and lakes. The amount of precipitation and it chemical loading depend on the area's climate and physiography, on it proximity to natural or industrial gaseous or particulate sources, and on local or regional air movements. Vegetation interacts with the atmosphere to enhance both wet and dry deposition of chemicals to a greater or lesser extent, depending on vegetation type. Vegetation naturally acidifies the environment in humid regions through processes of excess base cation uptake and generation of organic acids associated with many biological processes. Natural acid production and atmospheric deposition of acidic materials drive the acidification process. The lake or stream NAC represents a balance between the acidity-and ANC-generating processes that occur along different flow paths in the watershed and the relative importance of each flow path

  20. Titanium nitride films for micro-supercapacitors: Effect of surface chemistry and film morphology on the capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Amine; Porto, Raul Lucio; Soussou, Mohamed-Akram; Islam, Mohammad; Boujtita, Mohammed; Aissa, Kaltouma Ait; Le Brizoual, Laurent; Djouadi, Abdou; Brousse, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical capacitors (EC) in the form of packed films can be integrated in various electronic devices as power source. A fabrication process of EC electrodes, which is compatible with micro-fabrication, should be addressed for practical applications. Here, we show that titanium nitride films with controlled porosity can be deposited on flat silicon substrates by reactive DC-sputtering for use as high performance micro-supercapacitor electrodes. A superior volumetric capacitance as high as 146.4 F cm-3, with an outstanding cycling stability over 20,000 cycles, was measured in mild neutral electrolyte of potassium sulfate. The specific capacitance of the films as well as their capacitance retentions were found to depend on thickness, porosity and surface chemistry of electrodes. The one step process used to fabricate these TiN electrodes and the wide use of this material in the field of semiconductor technology make it promising for miniaturized energy storage systems.

  1. XPS study of the surface chemistry of UO2 (111) single crystal film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslakov, Konstantin I.; Teterin, Yury A.; Popel, Aleksej J.; Teterin, Anton Yu.; Ivanov, Kirill E.; Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Petrov, Vladimir G.; Springell, Ross; Scott, Thomas B.; Farnan, Ian

    2018-03-01

    A (111) air-exposed surface of UO2 thin film (150 nm) on (111) YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) before and after the Ar+ etching and subsequent in situ annealing in the spectrometer analytic chamber was studied by XPS technique. The U 5f, U 4f and O 1s electron peak intensities were employed for determining the oxygen coefficient kO = 2 + x of a UO2+x oxide on the surface. It was found that initial surface (several nm) had kO = 2.20. A 20 s Ar+ etching led to formation of oxide UO2.12, whose composition does not depend significantly on the etching time (up to 180 s). Ar+ etching and subsequent annealing at temperatures 100-380 °C in vacuum was established to result in formation of stable well-organized structure UO2.12 reflected in the U 4f XPS spectra as high intensity (∼28% of the basic peak) shake-up satellites 6.9 eV away from the basic peaks, and virtually did not change the oxygen coefficient of the sample surface. This agrees with the suggestion that a stable (self-assembling) phase with the oxygen coefficient kO ≈ 2.12 forms on the UO2 surface.

  2. Adsorbate-induced lifting of substrate relaxation is a general mechanism governing titania surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, David; Kowalski, Piotr M; Traeger, Franziska; Buchholz, Maria; Bebensee, Fabian; Meyer, Bernd; Wöll, Christof

    2016-09-30

    Under ambient conditions, almost all metals are coated by an oxide. These coatings, the result of a chemical reaction, are not passive. Many of them bind, activate and modify adsorbed molecules, processes that are exploited, for example, in heterogeneous catalysis and photochemistry. Here we report an effect of general importance that governs the bonding, structure formation and dissociation of molecules on oxidic substrates. For a specific example, methanol adsorbed on the rutile TiO 2 (110) single crystal surface, we demonstrate by using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques that strongly bonding adsorbates can lift surface relaxations beyond their adsorption site, which leads to a significant substrate-mediated interaction between adsorbates. The result is a complex superstructure consisting of pairs of methanol molecules and unoccupied adsorption sites. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that the paired methanol molecules remain intact and do not deprotonate on the defect-free terraces of the rutile TiO 2 (110) surface.

  3. Analysis of Surface Chemistry and Detector Performance of Chemically Process CdZnTe crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOSSAIN, A.; Yang, G.; Sutton, J.; Zergaw, T.; Babalola, O. S.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda. ZG. S.; Gul, R.; Roy, U. N., and James, R. B.

    2015-10-05

    The goal is to produce non-conductive smooth surfaces for fabricating low-noise and high-efficiency CdZnTe devices for gamma spectroscopy. Sample preparation and results are discussed. The researachers demonstrated various bulk defects (e.g., dislocations and sub-grain boundaries) and surface defects, and examined their effects on the performance of detectors. A comparison study was made between two chemical etchants to produce non-conductive smooth surfaces. A mixture of bromine and hydrogen peroxide proved more effective than conventional bromine etchant. Both energy resolution and detection efficiency of CZT planar detectors were noticeably increased after processing the detector crystals using improved chemical etchant and processing methods.

  4. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  5. Original Research. Surface Roughness Changes of Different Restoration Materials after Tooth Brushing Simulation Using Different Toothpastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudás Csaba

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for the whitening effects of toothpastes became primary for most users. Changes in the surface roughness of restoration materials after tooth brushing are inevitable, and the abrasion is known to increase the possibility of dental plaque accumulation. Aim of the study: To evaluate in vitro surface roughness changes of different dental restorative materials after tooth brushing simulation. Material and methods: Fifty specimens of two composite materials (Evicrol, Super-Cor, two glass ionomer materials (Glassfill, Kavitan Cem and a silicate cement (Fritex were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Each group of specimens was divided in three subgroups for tooth brushing simulation: using two different types of toothpaste and without toothpaste. Before and after 153 hours of tooth brushing simulation with a custom-made device, the surface roughness was measured with a surface roughness tester. Statistical analysis was performed after collecting the data. Results: All materials exhibited changes in surface roughness after the use of both toothpastes. The self-curing composite showed the less change and glass ionomer materials showed the greatest changes in surface roughness. Conclusions: The surface changes of dental materials depended on their composition and the cleaning procedure. Although self-curing composite was the most resistant to surface changes, its surface roughness values were high. Light-curing composite presented the lowest surface roughness values, even after brushing with toothpastes. The “medium” labeled toothbrush caused significant changes without toothpaste on the surface of light-curing composite, glass ionomer and silicate cement materials.

  6. Robust superhydrophobic surface by nature-inspired polyphenol chemistry for effective oil-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yiming; Huang, Jingjing; Zhang, Shiyu; Wang, Yinghua; Gu, Shaojin; Cao, Genyang; Yang, Hongjun; Ye, Dezhan; Zhou, Yingshan; Xu, Weilin

    2018-05-01

    With the ever-increasing oil spillages, oil-water separation has attracted widespread concern in recent years. In this work, a nature-inspired polyphenol method has been developed to fabricate the durable superhydrophobic surfaces for the oil-water separation. Inspiring from the adhesion of polyphenol and reducing capacity of free catechol/pyrogallol groups in polyphenol, firstly, the simple immersion of commercial materials (melamine sponge, PET, and nonwoven cotton fabrics) in tannic acid (TA) solution allows to form a multifunctional coating on the surface of sponge or fabrics, which was used as reducing reagent to generate Ag nanoparticles (NPs). Then, decoration of 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecanethiol (PFDT) molecules produced superhydrophobic surfaces. The surface topological structure, chemical composition, and superhydrophobic property of the as-prepared surface are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and water contact angle (WCA) measurements. The WCAs of as-prepared sponge and fabrics were higher than 150°. The stability, absorption capacity, and recyclability of as-prepared sponge and fabrics were investigated. The as-prepared sponge demonstrates high oil/water selectivity and high absorption capacity (66-150 g/g) for a broad variety of oils and organic solvents, and was chemically resistant, robust against abrasion, and long-term durability in harsh environments. Most important of all, it can continuously separate various kinds of oils or organic pollutants from the surface of water. This study presents a facile strategy to fabricate superhydrophobic materials for continuous oil-water separation, displaying great potential in large-scale practical application.

  7. Micro reflectance difference techniques: Optical probes for surface exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Herrera-Jasso, R.; Ulloa-Castillo, N.A.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Micro reflectance difference spectroscopy ({mu}-RDS) is a promising tool for the in-situ and ex-situ characterization of semiconductors surfaces and interfaces. We discuss and compare two different approaches used to measure {mu}-RD spectra. One is based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, while the other uses a laser and a XY translation stage. To show the performance of these systems, we have measured surface optical anisotropies of GaSb(001) sample on which anisotropic strains have been generated by preferential mechanical polishing along [110] and [1 anti 10] directions. The spectrometers are complementary and the selection of one of them depends on the sample to be investigated and on experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Correlation between the surface chemistry and the atmospheric corrosion of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feliu, S.; Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F.; Arrabal, R.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used in order to investigate the correlation between the surface chemistry and the atmospheric corrosion of AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium alloys exposed to 98% relative humidity at 50 deg. C. Commercially pure magnesium, used as the reference material, revealed MgO, Mg(OH) 2 and tracers of magnesium carbonate in the air-formed film. For the AZ80 and AZ91D alloys, the amount of magnesium carbonate formed on the surface reached similar values to those of MgO and Mg(OH) 2 . A linear relation between the amount of magnesium carbonate formed on the surface and the subsequent corrosion behaviour in the humid environment was found. The AZ80 alloy revealed the highest amount of magnesium carbonate in the air-formed film and the highest atmospheric corrosion resistance, even higher than the AZ91D alloy, indicating that aluminium distribution in the alloy microstructure influenced the amount of magnesium carbonate formed.

  9. Surface chemistry and morphology of the solid electrolyte interphase on silicon nanowire lithium-ion battery anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Candace K.

    2009-04-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have the potential to perform as anodes for lithium-ion batteries with a much higher energy density than graphite. However, there has been little work in understanding the surface chemistry of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on silicon due to the reduction of the electrolyte. Given that a good, passivating SEI layer plays such a crucial role in graphite anodes, we have characterized the surface composition and morphology of the SEI formed on the SiNWs using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We have found that the SEI is composed of reduction products similar to that found on graphite electrodes, with Li2CO3 as an important component. Combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the results were used to determine the optimal cycling parameters for good cycling. The role of the native SiO2 as well as the effect of the surface area of the SiNWs on reactivity with the electrolyte were also addressed. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Colloid and surface chemistry a laboratory guide for exploration of the nano world

    CERN Document Server

    Bucak, Seyda

    2013-01-01

    Scientific Research The research processEthics in Science Design of Experiments Fundamentals of Scientific Computing, Nihat Baysal Recording Data: Keeping a Good Notebook Presenting Data: Writing a Laboratory ReportReferencesCharacterization Techniques Surface Tension Measurements, Seyda BucakViscosity/Rheological Measurements, Patrick UnderhillElectrokinetic Techniques, Marek KosmulskiDiffraction (XRD), Deniz RendeScattering, Ulf OlssonMicroscopy, Cem Levent Altan and Nico A.J.M. SommerdijkColloids and Surfaces Experiment 1: SedimentationExperiment 2: Determination of Critical Micelle Concent

  11. On the Surface Chemistry of Iron Oxides in Reactive Gas Atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, Emiel; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Cinquini, Fabrizio; Bluhm, Hendrik; Sautet, Phillippe; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is based on the generation and subsequent combination of chemical species retained on the surface of a catalytic solid. Elementary reaction steps, that is, the dissociation of reactants and association to products, take place at the solid–gas or solid–liquid interface.

  12. Phosphate availability in the soil-root system : integration of oxide surface chemistry, transport and uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelhoed, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    A study is presented on the adsorption of phosphate on goethite, the interaction of phosphate with other adsorbing ions at the goethite surface, and the resulting availability of phosphate to plants. The plant-availability of sorbed phosphate was determined from phosphorus uptake of plants

  13. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-02-05

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of 100 nm polystyrene particles (one uncoated and one with an amine functionalized surface) were used to measure the influence of surface type. In identically prepared conditioned medium, agglomeration was visible in all samples after 1 h, but was variable, indicating inter-sample variability in secretion rates and extracellular medium conditions. In samples conditioned for 1 h or more, ENP agglomeration rates varied significantly. Agglomerate size measured by DLS was well correlated with surface sequestered peptide number for uncoated but not for amine coated polystyrene ENPs. Amine-coated ENPs grew much faster and into larger agglomerates associated with fewer sequestered peptides, but including significant sequestered lactose dehydrogenase. We conclude that interference with extracellular peptide balance and oxidoreductase activity via sequestration is worthy of further study, as increased oxidative stress via this new mechanism may be important for cell toxicity. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemistry of the sea surface microlayer. 1. Fabrication and testing of the sampler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; Narvekar, P.V.

    A screen sampler fabricated to study the sea surface microlayer (SML) has been described. The screen sampler was tested in the Mandovi estuary and adjacent waters. Physico-chemical parameters of the subsurface waters from a depth of 25 cm was also...

  15. Chemistry of aqueous silica nanoparticle surfaces and the mechanism of selective peptide adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Emami, Fateme S; Berry, Rajiv J; Jones, Sharon E; Naik, Rajesh R; Deschaume, Olivier; Heinz, Hendrik; Perry, Carole C

    2012-04-11

    Control over selective recognition of biomolecules on inorganic nanoparticles is a major challenge for the synthesis of new catalysts, functional carriers for therapeutics, and assembly of renewable biobased materials. We found low sequence similarity among sequences of peptides strongly attracted to amorphous silica nanoparticles of various size (15-450 nm) using combinatorial phage display methods. Characterization of the surface by acid base titrations and zeta potential measurements revealed that the acidity of the silica particles increased with larger particle size, corresponding to between 5% and 20% ionization of silanol groups at pH 7. The wide range of surface ionization results in the attraction of increasingly basic peptides to increasingly acidic nanoparticles, along with major changes in the aqueous interfacial layer as seen in molecular dynamics simulation. We identified the mechanism of peptide adsorption using binding assays, zeta potential measurements, IR spectra, and molecular simulations of the purified peptides (without phage) in contact with uniformly sized silica particles. Positively charged peptides are strongly attracted to anionic silica surfaces by ion pairing of protonated N-termini, Lys side chains, and Arg side chains with negatively charged siloxide groups. Further, attraction of the peptides to the surface involves hydrogen bonds between polar groups in the peptide with silanol and siloxide groups on the silica surface, as well as ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, and van-der-Waals interactions. Electrostatic attraction between peptides and particle surfaces is supported by neutralization of zeta potentials, an inverse correlation between the required peptide concentration for measurable adsorption and the peptide pI, and proximity of cationic groups to the surface in the computation. The importance of hydrogen bonds and polar interactions is supported by adsorption of noncationic peptides containing Ser, His, and Asp residues, including

  16. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kesrak, Pimmada; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3) were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon) of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm), Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 3 7 ∘ C storage in an incuba...

  17. The interaction of climate and glacial landforms on subsurface and surface hydrology and chemistry across a heterogeneous boreal plain landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokanson, Kelly; Carrera-Hernández, Jaime; Devito, Kevin; Mendoza, Carl

    2016-04-01

    The Boreal Plains (BP) region of Canada is experiencing high levels of anthropogenic activity and may be susceptible to climate change to various degrees. The BP is characterized by heterogeneous glacial landforms, with large contrasts in storage and transmissivity, which when coupled with wet-dry climate cycles, results in complex groundwater-surface water interactions. Predicting the impacts of land use change, climate change, and the future performance of constructed and reclaimed landscapes is currently not possible due to our limited knowledge regarding the natural variability of water table fluctuations, geochemistry, and salinity across the various glacial landforms in the BP. We compare isotopes, EC, chemistry (DOC, Ca, Mg, SO4) and water table position between a drought (2003) and a wet (2013) year to examine the interactions between climate, landform, and geology on the variation in landscape connectivity and overall salinity distribution. Data were collected from surface waters to a depth of 40 m, along a 50 km transect encompassing pond-wetland-forestland sequences across the major glacial depositional types typical of the BP (coarse textured glaciofluvial outwash, fine textured stagnant ice moraine, and lacustrine clay plain). Within each landform, sites range from isolated local flow systems to large intermediate scale flow systems. High spatial variability of water table fluctuations and salinity illustrate the strong regional controls that climate and geology exerts over scales of groundwater flow between landforms and surface water bodies across the BP, reinforcing the need to link surface water and groundwater processes when developing conceptual models. Additionally, when coupled with a strong, physical hydrogeologic conceptual model, synoptic chemical and isotopic surveys can be used to confirm scales and directions of flow; however, without an understanding of the climatic and geologic influence of the region, such data cannot be used as a

  18. Evaluation of Cellulosic Fabrics Surface Characteristics after Different Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalija MASTEIKAITĖ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Various clothes treatments during their manufacture and wear change the fabrics physical and surface characteristics. The different testing methods for fabrics quality evaluation are used in this research. The aim of this work is to examine the effect of enzyme treatment, laundering and abrasion on the appearance of different cellulosic fabrics. Six cotton and cotton blend woven fabrics used for faded garments production were chosen for this examination. Treatments such, as enzyme wash, domestic laundering, abrasion using IT-2 and Martindale (Mesdan instruments and rubbing were applied in order to evaluate the worn look of the different fabrics. The degree of fabrics distortion was determined by using abrasion resistance and weight change characteristics. Also, the colour fastness and staining after different dry and wet treatments were analysed. The results of this research show that the surface characteristics of cellulosic fabrics depend on the properties of the fabrics and the type of treatment. Most of the tested cellulosic fabrics have changed their difference in colour not only after the enzyme wash but also after successive abrading and cyclical domestic launderings. Both colour fading of the fabrics and staining of cotton white fabric may appear after rubbing in dry and especially in wet conditions. The received results show that during tested fabrics laundering, the cotton and nylon parts of multifibre fabric were stained more heavily. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4331

  19. Aqueous and Surface Chemistries of Photocatalytic Fe-Doped CeO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangdao Channei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the effects of water on Fe-doped nanoparticulate CeO2, produced by flame spray pyrolysis, which is a critical environmental issue because CeO2 is not stable in typical atmospheric conditions. It is hygroscopic and absorbs ~29 wt % water in the bulk when exposed to water vapor but, more importantly, it forms a hydrated and passivating surface layer when immersed in liquid water. In the latter case, CeO2 initially undergoes direct and/or reductive dissolution, followed by the establishment of a passivating layer calculated to consist of ~69 mol % solid CeO2·2H2O and ~30 mol % gelled Ce(OH4. Under static flow conditions, a saturated boundary layer also forms but, under turbulent flow conditions, this is removed. While the passivating hydrated surface layer, which is coherent probably owing to the continuous Ce(OH4 gel, would be expected to eliminate the photoactivity, this does not occur. This apparent anomaly is explained by the calculation of (a the thermodynamic stability diagrams for Ce and Fe; (b the speciation diagrams for the Ce4+-H2O, Ce3+-H2O, Fe3+-H2O, and Fe2+-H2O systems; and (c the Pourbaix diagrams for the Ce-H2O and Fe-H2O systems. Furthermore, consideration of the probable effects of the localized chemical and redox equilibria owing to the establishment of a very low pH (<0 at the liquid-solid interface also is important to the interpretation of the phenomena. These factors highlight the critical importance of the establishment of the passivating surface layer and its role in photocatalysis. A model for the mechanism of photocatalysis by the CeO2 component of the hydrated phase CeO2·2H2O is proposed, explaining the observation of the retention of photocatalysis following the apparent alteration of the surface of CeO2 upon hydration. The model involves the generation of charge carriers at the outer surface of the hydrated surface layer, followed by the formation of radicals, which decompose organic

  20. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  1. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low temperature combustion and the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in earth’s atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization make characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, while master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  2. Reaction Mechanisms on Multiwell Potential Energy Surfaces in Combustion (and Atmospheric) Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David L.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical reactions occurring on a potential energy surface with multiple wells are ubiquitous in low-temperature combustion and in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds in Earth's atmosphere. The rich variety of structural isomerizations that compete with collisional stabilization makes characterizing such complex-forming reactions challenging. This review describes recent experimental and theoretical advances that deliver increasingly complete views of their reaction mechanisms. New methods for creating reactive intermediates coupled with multiplexed measurements provide many experimental observables simultaneously. Automated methods to explore potential energy surfaces can uncover hidden reactive pathways, and master equation methods enable a holistic treatment of both sequential and well-skipping pathways. Our ability to probe and understand nonequilibrium effects and reaction sequences is increasing. These advances provide the fundamental science base for predictive models of combustion and the atmosphere that are crucial to address global challenges.

  3. Surface chemistry of water-dispersed detonation nanodiamonds modified by atmospheric DC plasma afterglow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štenclová, Pavla; Celedova, V.; Artemenko, Anna; Jirásek, Vít; Jíra, Jaroslav; Rezek, B.; Kromka, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 62 (2017), s. 38973-38980 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01687S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond nanoparticles * explosive detonation * barrier discharge * absorption * oxidation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  4. Tailoring the surface chemistry of zeolite templated carbon by electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Berenguer Betrián, Raúl; Morallón Núñez, Emilia; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Itoi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takafumi; Kyotani, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    One option to optimize carbon materials for supercapacitor applications is the generation of surface functional groups that contribute to the pseudocapacitance without losing the designed physical properties. This requires suitable functionalization techniques able to selectively introduce a given amount of electroactive oxygen groups. In this work, the influence of the chemical and electrochemical oxidation methods, on the chemical and physical properties of a zeolite templated carbon (ZTC),...

  5. Nanoparticle growth and surface chemistry changes in cell-conditioned culture medium

    OpenAIRE

    Kendall, Michaela; Hodges, Nikolas J.; Whitwell, Harry; Tyrrell, Jess; Cangul, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    When biomolecules attach to engineered nanoparticle (ENP) surfaces, they confer the particles with a new biological identity. Physical format may also radically alter, changing ENP stability and agglomeration state within seconds. In order to measure which biomolecules are associated with early ENP growth, we studied ENPs in conditioned medium from A549 cell culture, using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and linear trap quadrupole electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. Two types of ...

  6. Surface Chemistry Interactions of Cationorm with Films by Human Meibum and Tear Film Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi As. Georgiev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cationorm® (CN cationic nanoemulsion was demonstrated to enhance tear film (TF stability in vivo possibly via effects on tear film lipid layer (TFLL. Therefore the interactions of CN with human meibum (MGS and TFLL in vitro and in vivo deserve special study. MGS and CN were spread at the air/water interface of a Langmuir surface balance to ensure a range of MGS/CN oil phase ratios: 20/1, 10/1, 5/1, 3/1, 2/1 and 1/1. The films capability to reorganize during dynamic area changes was evaluated via the surface pressure-area compression isotherms and step/relaxation dilatational rheology studies. Films structure was monitored with Brewster angle microscopy. CN/TFLL interactions at the ocular surface were monitored with non-contact specular microscopy. The in vitro studies of MGS/CN layers showed that (i CN inclusion (at fixed MGS content increased film elasticity and thickness and that (ii CN can compensate for moderate meibum deficiency in MGS/CN films. In vivo CN mixed with TFLL in a manner similar to CN/MGS interactions in vitro, and resulted in enhanced thickness of TFLL. In vitro and in vivo data complement each other and facilitated the study of the composition-structure-function relationship that determines the impact of cationic nanoemulsions on TF.

  7. SURFACE CHEMISTRY AND PARTICLE SHAPE: PROCESSES FOR THE EVOLUTION OF AEROSOLS IN TITAN's ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavvas, P.; Imanaka, H.; Sander, M.; Kraft, M.

    2011-01-01

    We use a stochastic approach in order to investigate the production and evolution of aerosols in Titan's atmosphere. The simulation initiates from the benzene molecules observed in the thermosphere and follows their evolution to larger aromatic structures through reaction with gas-phase radical species. Aromatics are allowed to collide and provide the first primary particles, which further grow to aggregates through coagulation. We also consider for the first time the contribution of heterogenous processes at the surface of the particles, which are described by the deposition of the formed aromatic structures on the surface of the particles, and also through the chemical reaction with radical species. Our results demonstrate that the evolution of aerosols in terms of size, shape, and density is a result of competing processes between surface growth, coagulation, and sedimentation. Furthermore, our simulations clearly demonstrate the presence of a spherical growth region in the upper atmosphere followed by a transition to an aggregate growth region below. The transition altitude ranges between 500 and 600 km based on the parameters of the simulation.

  8. Influence of coffee on reflectance and chemistry of resin composite protected by surface sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cesar, Ilene Cristine Rosia; Santos, Carla Gabriela Couto; De Cardoso, Ana Luiza Merigo Oliveira; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy; Munin, Egberto; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2007-10-01

    To assess the influence of the light-curing unit type and whether or not it was worth using surface sealant protection on resin composite restorative materials stained by coffee. Another objective was to propose the monitoring of coffee staining by FT-Raman spectroscopy using carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds as reference to the composite matrix degradation. Sixty cylindrical specimens of resin composite were prepared and divided into six groups: HC (control)--cured with a halogen light; LC (control) cured with a LED; HF--cured with a halogen light + Fortify Plus; LF--cured with a LED + Fortify Plus; HP--cured with a halogen light + PermaSeal; LP--cured with a LED + PermaSeal. After storage for 24 hours at 37% and 100% of relative humidity, the top surface was protected, and the other surfaces isolated. Polishing with paper discs was performed after 24 hours of curing and prior to FT-Raman spectroscopy and reflectance measurements. All specimens were submitted to coffee staining for 14 days and evaluated by both systems. Results were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. FT-Raman spectrum only showed significant changes in groups LC and LP (P< 0.05). Reflectance demonstrated that staining was present in all specimens protected by sealants. Sealant staining was larger in the HF (P < 0.001) group.

  9. Role of Surface Chemistry in Grain Adhesion and Dissipation during Collisions of Silica Nanograins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadery, Abrar H.; Tucker, William C.; Dove, Adrienne R.; Schelling, Patrick K. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Doan, Baochi D., E-mail: patrick.schelling@ucf.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The accretion of dust grains to form larger objects, including planetesimals, is a central problem in planetary science. It is generally thought that weak van der Waals interactions play a role in accretion at small scales where gravitational attraction is negligible. However, it is likely that in many instances, chemical reactions also play an important role, and the particular chemical environment on the surface could determine the outcomes of dust grain collisions. Using atomic-scale simulations of collisional aggregation of nanometer-sized silica (SiO{sub 2}) grains, we demonstrate that surface hydroxylation can act to weaken adhesive forces and reduce the ability of mineral grains to dissipate kinetic energy during collisions. The results suggest that surface passivation of dangling bonds, which generally is quite complete in an Earth environment, should tend to render mineral grains less likely to adhere during collisions. It is shown that during collisions, interactions scale with interparticle distance in a manner consistent with the formation of strong chemical bonds. Finally, it is demonstrated that in the case of collisions of nanometer-scale grains with no angular momentum, adhesion can occur even for relative velocities of several kilometers per second. These results have significant implications for early planet formation processes, potentially expanding the range of collision velocities over which larger dust grains can form.

  10. The carbon chemistry of the moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, G.; Maxwell, J. R.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis of lunar samples has shown that the carbon chemistry of the moon is entirely different from the carbon chemistry of the earth. Lunar carbon chemistry is more closely related to cosmic physics than to conventional organic chemistry. Sources of carbon on the moon are considered, giving attention to meteorites and the solar wind. The approaches used in the analysis of the samples are discussed, taking into account the method of gas chromatography employed and procedures used by bioscience investigators in the study of the lunar fines. The presence of indigenous methane and carbide in the lunar fines was established. Reactions and processes taking place on the lunar surface are discussed.

  11. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudikov, D.A.; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  12. Comparison of the effectiveness of different antimicrobial surface technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhl Sebastian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The risk of infection via microbiologically contaminated surfaces has already been demonstrated by other publications. In this work two different antibacterial surface technologies transition metalloacids (AMiSTec and TiO2/AgNO3 (Health Complete were compared regarding feasibility as well as their advantages and disadvantages. The examination of the antimicrobial activity was assessed according to the JIS Z 2801. We could demonstrate that all of our tested samples showed a strong antimicrobial activity (>log 3 germ reduction in the JIS experiments. Furthermore this strong antibacterial effect could be shown already after <30min incubation and at low light intensity (approx. 300 Lux for the TiO2/AgNO3 samples. Both technologies provide a high potential for an improved infection control for example in a high risk environment like operation rooms or intensive care units.

  13. Characterization of the damage produced on different materials surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellavale Clara, Hector Damian

    2004-01-01

    In the present work the characterization techniques of surfaces ULOI and RIMAPS have been applied on laboratory samples made from aluminium, stainless steel and material based on fiberglass.The resultant surfaces of, chemical etching with corrosive agents Keller and Tucker, mechanic damage from the wear and tear of abrasive paper and sandrubbing with alumina particles, are analyzed to different level of damage.The systematic application of the above mentioned techniques is carried out with the objective of finding information, which allows to characterize the superficial damage, both in its incipient state as in the extreme situation revealed by the presence of etch pits. Important results have been obtained, in the characterization of the incipient stage of the chemical etching, using the curves of the normalized area.In addition, it was possible to verify the capacity of the techniques in the early detection of the preferential directions generated by the etch pits

  14. Comparison of different real-time PCR chemistries and their suitability for detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žel Jana

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The real-time polymerase chain reaction is currently the method of choice for quantifying nucleic acids in different DNA based quantification applications. It is widely used also for detecting and quantifying genetically modified components in food and feed, predominantly employing TaqMan® and SYBR® Green real-time PCR chemistries. In our study four alternative chemistries: Lux™, Plexor™, Cycling Probe Technology and LNA® were extensively evaluated and compared using TaqMan® chemistry as a reference system. Results Amplicons were designed on the maize invertase gene and the 5'-junction of inserted transgene and plant genomic DNA in MON 810 event. Real-time assays were subsequently compared for their efficiency in PCR amplification, limits of detection and quantification, repeatability and accuracy to test the performance of the assays. Additionally, the specificity of established assays was checked on various transgenic and non-transgenic plant species. The overall applicability of the designed assays was evaluated, adding practicability and costs issues to the performance characteristics. Conclusion Although none of the chemistries significantly outperformed the others, there are certain characteristics that suggest that LNA® technology is an alternative to TaqMan® when designing assays for quantitative analysis. Because LNA® probes are much shorter they might be especially appropriate when high specificity is required and where the design of a common TaqMan® probe is difficult or even impossible due to sequence characteristics. Plexor™ on the other hand might be a method of choice for qualitative analysis when sensitivity, low cost and simplicity of use prevail.

  15. Indoor Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Carslaw, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    This review aims to encapsulate the importance, ubiquity, and complexity of indoor chemistry. We discuss the many sources of indoor air pollutants and summarize their chemical reactions in the air and on surfaces. We also summarize some of the known impacts of human occupants, who act as sources...... and sinks of indoor chemicals, and whose activities (e.g., cooking, cleaning, smoking) can lead to extremely high pollutant concentrations. As we begin to use increasingly sensitive and selective instrumentation indoors, we are learning more about chemistry in this relatively understudied environment....

  16. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prabhakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an analysis of combined airborne and ground observations of particulate nitrate (NO3−(p concentrations made during the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality study at one of the most polluted cities in the United States – Fresno, CA – in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV and focuses on developing an understanding of the various processes that impact surface nitrate concentrations during pollution events. The results provide an explicit case-study illustration of how nighttime chemistry can influence daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations, complementing previous studies in the SJV. The observations exemplify the critical role that nocturnal chemical production of NO3−(p aloft in the residual layer (RL can play in determining daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Further, they indicate that nocturnal production of NO3−(p in the RL, along with daytime photochemical production, can contribute substantially to the buildup and sustaining of severe pollution episodes. The exceptionally shallow nocturnal boundary layer (NBL heights characteristic of wintertime pollution events in the SJV intensify the importance of nocturnal production aloft in the residual layer to daytime surface concentrations. The observations also demonstrate that dynamics within the RL can influence the early-morning vertical distribution of NO3−(p, despite low wintertime wind speeds. This overnight reshaping of the vertical distribution above the city plays an important role in determining the net impact of nocturnal chemical production on local and regional surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Entrainment of clean free-tropospheric (FT air into the boundary layer in the afternoon is identified as an important process that reduces surface-level NO3−(p and limits buildup during pollution episodes. The influence of dry deposition of HNO

  17. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Gouri; Parworth, Caroline L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Kim, Hwajin; Young, Dominique E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Nowak, John B.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Zhang, Qi; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    This study discusses an analysis of combined airborne and ground observations of particulate nitrate (NO3-(p)) concentrations made during the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality) study at one of the most polluted cities in the United States - Fresno, CA - in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and focuses on developing an understanding of the various processes that impact surface nitrate concentrations during pollution events. The results provide an explicit case-study illustration of how nighttime chemistry can influence daytime surface-level NO3-(p) concentrations, complementing previous studies in the SJV. The observations exemplify the critical role that nocturnal chemical production of NO3-(p) aloft in the residual layer (RL) can play in determining daytime surface-level NO3-(p) concentrations. Further, they indicate that nocturnal production of NO3-(p) in the RL, along with daytime photochemical production, can contribute substantially to the buildup and sustaining of severe pollution episodes. The exceptionally shallow nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) heights characteristic of wintertime pollution events in the SJV intensify the importance of nocturnal production aloft in the residual layer to daytime surface concentrations. The observations also demonstrate that dynamics within the RL can influence the early-morning vertical distribution of NO3-(p), despite low wintertime wind speeds. This overnight reshaping of the vertical distribution above the city plays an important role in determining the net impact of nocturnal chemical production on local and regional surface-level NO3-(p) concentrations. Entrainment of clean free-tropospheric (FT) air into the boundary layer in the afternoon is identified as an important process that reduces surface-level NO3-(p) and limits buildup during pollution episodes. The influence of dry deposition of HNO3 gas to the surface on

  18. DIFFERENCES IN BIOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KNEE EXTENSOR REBOUND WITH THE DIFFERENT SURFACE ELASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Herodek

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The sample includes 40 subjects of both sexes: male (20 and female (20 population of students of the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Nis. The research involves the application of the rebound in gymnastics with two different heights (40 and 50cm on three different surfaces of elasticity: hard, demyelastic and elastic surface. The subject of the research were the dynamic parameters of movement laid down from Drop Jump (DJ with Myotest device and in the following parameters: height (in cm, power (in W/ kg, force (in N/ kg and speed (cm/ s. Using canonical-discrimination analysis showed no statistically significant differences in the performance jump of hard and demyelastic surface from a height 40 cm and 50 cm for men and women, thethe studied parameters (height, strength ,power and speed of the bounce . Revealed a statistically significant difference in performance with the elastic rebound surface elevations of 40 cm and 50 cm for men and women (p = 0.00. Of the examined parameters was obtained that there are significant differences in the Force reflection to the significance level of 98% (0.0255 and the power of reflection on the significance level of 100% (0.0009 in men. In women of the examined parameters was obtained a statistically significant difference in the strength of the rebound only from positions of 40cm and 50cm and 100% (0.0075.

  19. Click chemistry based biomolecular conjugation monitoring using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palla, Mirko; Kumar, Shiv; Li, Zengmin

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based technique for monitoring the conjugation of small molecules by the well-known click reaction between an alkyne and azido moiety on the partner molecules. The monitoring principle is based on the loss of the characteristic...... such as bioconjugation, material science or drug discovery. Additionally, as an attractive advantage of this technique, no significant background signal is expected during the measurements, since these signals reside in a Raman silent region of 2000–2300 cm−1, where virtually all biological molecules are transparent....

  20. Theoretical investigations of metallic surfaces for water chemistry; Theoretische Untersuchungen metallischer Oberflaechen fuer die Wasserstoffchemie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnur, Sebastian

    2010-11-19

    Properties of the metal-water interface have been addressed by periodic density functional theory calculations, in particular with respect to the electronic and geometric structures of water bilayers on several transition metal surfaces. The structure and the vibrational spectra of water bilayers at room temperatures have been studied performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In order to model varying electrode potentials, an explicite counter electrode has been implemented in a periodic density functional theory code, and first preliminary results using this implementation will be presented. (orig.)

  1. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C J, E-mail: carl.j.palmer@gmail.co [Department of Oceanography, University of Cape Town, 7701 (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  2. Aqueous bromine etching of InP: a specific surface chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causier, A.; Bouttemy, M.; Gerard, I.; Aureau, D.; Vigneron, J.; Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, Versailles-Saint-Quentin University, UMR CNRS 8180, 45 Av. des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2012-06-15

    The n -InP behaviour in HBr (0.1-1.0 M)/Br{sub 2} (1.25 x 10{sup -2}M) aqueous solutions is studied by AAS, XPS and SEM-FEG. Indium AAS-titrations of the HBr/Br{sub 2} solutions demonstrate that InP undergoes an etching mechanism whatever the HBr/Br{sub 2} formulation. The etching process is always linear with time but its rate depends on the HBr concentration. XPS analyses permit to link the apparent slow-down of the dissolution process when decreasing the HBr molarity from 1.0 M to 0.1 M to the presence of a mixed (In,P){sub ox} oxide layer on the surface. Therefore, the dissolution process of InP in HBr/Br{sub 2} solution appears to be ruled by the surface chemical state (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Characteristics of the surface chemistry of linden pyrochar after removal of labile organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, A. A.; Smirnova, E. V.; Giniyatullin, K. G.; Vorobev, V. V.; Biktasheva, L. R.; Grachev, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The changes of chemical properties of the pyrochar surface were studied in the laboratory experiment that simulated pedogenic transformation of pyrochar under the influence of soil biota. The native pyrochar samples were obtained by pyrolysis of linden wood residues at the temperature of 250°C, 450°C and 650°C. Their modified samples were obtained by removing an easily degradable pool of organic substances that can be used by microorganisms during the first months after application to the soil. In low-temperature linden pyrochar (250°C and 450°C) dominated carboxylic and phenolic surface groups, in high-temperature (650°C) - lactonic groups. After removal of readily decomposable organic substances the acidity of the phenolic and lactonic groups in pyrochar of low-temperature pyrolysis sharply decreased. Characteristic feature of all studied samples is the presence in IR spectra of absorption bands of gyroxyl, carbonyl, methylene groups and organosilicon polymers. The feature of IR spectra of linden pyrochar (250°C and 450°C) is the presence of absorption bands of the stretching vibrations of the tertiary alcohols and phenols C-O group.

  4. The surface chemistry of Cu in the presence of CO2 and H2O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xingyi; Verdaguer, Albert; Herranz, Tirma; Weis, Christoph; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-07-16

    The chemical nature of copper and copper oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) surfaces in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at room temperature was investigated using ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The studies reveal that in the presence of 0.1 torr CO{sub 2} several species form on the initially clean Cu, including carbonate CO{sub 3}{sup 2}, CO{sub 2}{sup {delta}-} and C{sup 0}, while no modifications occur on an oxidized surface. The addition of 0.1 ML Zn to the Cu results in the complete conversion of CO{sub 2}{sup {delta}-} to carbonate. In a mixture of 0.1 torr H{sub 2}O and 0.1 torr CO{sub 2}, new species are formed, including hydroxyl, formate and methoxy, with H{sub 2}O providing the hydrogen needed for the formation of hydrogenated species.

  5. Surface roughness and the flexural and bend strength of zirconia after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerppe, Jenni; Närhi, Timo O; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2016-10-01

    Different surface treatments are commonly used during the fabrication of zirconia fixed dental prostheses. However, such treatments can affect the properties of the zirconia framework material. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of different surface treatments on the surface roughness and flexural and bend strength of zirconia. Seventy-two zirconia disks (n=8) and 72 zirconia bars (n=8) were sintered and divided into 9 groups for different surface treatments: sintered control, airborne-particle abraded with 50-μm aluminum oxide, airborne-particle abraded with Rocatec soft (30 μm), airborne-particle abraded with Rocatec (105 μm), grinding dry with a micromotor, turbine grinding under water cooling, grinding with silicon carbide paper, diamond paste polishing, and steam cleaning. The biaxial flexural strength of the disks (diameter 19 mm, thickness 1.6 mm) and 3-point bend test of the bars (thickness 2 mm, height 2 mm, length 25 mm) were measured dry at room temperature. One-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05) and Pearson correlation test were used for statistical analysis. Airborne-particle abrasion and silicon carbide paper grinding increased the flexural and bend strength of zirconia specimens (Pzirconia framework material. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics, using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 1. 1. Atomic and molecular physics. 2. Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  7. Understanding the Effect of Surface Chemistry on Charge Generation and Transport in Poly (3-hexylthiophene)/CdSe Hybrid Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lek, Jun Yan; Xi, Lifei; Kardynal, Beata

    2011-01-01

    For hybrid solar cells, interfacial chemistry is one of the most critical factors for good device performance. We have demonstrated that the size of the surface ligands and the dispersion of nanoparticles in the solvent and in the polymer are important criteria in obtaining optimized device...

  8. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  9. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  10. Silicon and germanium nanoparticles with tailored surface chemistry as novel inorganic fiber brightening agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Prabakar, Sujay; Krsinic, Gail; Dyer, Jolon M; Tilley, Richard D

    2013-07-31

    Low-molecular-weight organic molecules, such as coumarins and stilbenes, are used commercially as fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) to mask photoyellowing and to brighten colors in fabrics. FWAs achieve this by radiating extra blue light, thus changing the hue and also adding to the brightness. However, organic FWAs can rapidly photodegrade in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, exacerbating the yellowing process through a reaction involving singlet oxygen species. Inorganic nanoparticles, on the other hand, can provide a similar brightening effect with the added advantage of photostability. We report a targeted approach in designing new inorganic silicon- and germanium-based nanoparticles, functionalized with hydrophilic (amine) surface terminations as novel inorganic FWAs. When applied on wool, by incorporation in a sol-gel Si matrix, the inorganic FWAs improved brightness properties, demonstrated enhanced photostability toward UV radiation, especially the germanium nanoparticles, and also generated considerably lower levels of reactive oxygen species compared to a commercial stilbene-based organic FWA, Uvitex NFW.

  11. Recent advances in the understanding of electrocatalysis and its relation to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, E.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that electrosorption plays a key role in electrocatalysis. Little information is available, however, concerning the chemical nature of the interactions of the adsorbed species with the electrode and even less about the adsorption sites. The role of adsorbed species and surface layers in electrocatalysis is reviewed for several electrode systems. In recent years, some general insights have been achieved into the relationship of hydrogen electrode kinetics to hydrogen adsorption. For a given mechanism the exchange current density is related to the standard free energy of adsorption of the particular type of adsorbed hydrogen upon which the kinetics depend. The oxygen electrode reactions are less well understood than the reactions for the hydrogen electrode. The pronounced irreversibility of the oxygen electrode reactions at moderate temperatures has severely complicated mechanistic studies.

  12. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at the highest As(V) adsorption density. The results suggest that the solid solution model proposed by Fox (1989, 1992) for control of arsenate and phosphate concentrations in natural waters may be invalid. ?? 1993.

  13. Fine-tuning of substrate architecture and surface chemistry promotes muscle tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex, A G; Kocher, F M; Fortunato, G; Körner, E; Hegemann, D; Carrel, T P; Tevaearai, H T; Giraud, M N

    2012-04-01

    Tissue engineering has been increasingly brought to the scientific spotlight in response to the tremendous demand for regeneration, restoration or substitution of skeletal or cardiac muscle after traumatic injury, tumour ablation or myocardial infarction. In vitro generation of a highly organized and contractile muscle tissue, however, crucially depends on an appropriate design of the cell culture substrate. The present work evaluated the impact of substrate properties, in particular morphology, chemical surface composition and mechanical properties, on muscle cell fate. To this end, aligned and randomly oriented micron (3.3±0.8 μm) or nano (237±98 nm) scaled fibrous poly(ε-caprolactone) non-wovens were processed by electrospinning. A nanometer-thick oxygen functional hydrocarbon coating was deposited by a radio frequency plasma process. C2C12 muscle cells were grown on pure and as-functionalized substrates and analysed for viability, proliferation, spatial orientation, differentiation and contractility. Cell orientation has been shown to depend strongly on substrate architecture, being most pronounced on micron-scaled parallel-oriented fibres. Oxygen functional hydrocarbons, representing stable, non-immunogenic surface groups, were identified as strong triggers for myotube differentiation. Accordingly, the highest myotube density (28±15% of total substrate area), sarcomeric striation and contractility were found on plasma-coated substrates. The current study highlights the manifold material characteristics to be addressed during the substrate design process and provides insight into processes to improve bio-interfaces. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions ─ Part 2: Exemplary practical applications and numerical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ammann; U. Pöschl

    2007-01-01

    International audience; A kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions has been presented in the preceding companion paper by Pöschl, Rudich and Ammann (Pöschl et al., 2005), abbreviated PRA. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reaction at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and...

  15. Synergistic effect of topography, surface chemistry and conductivity of the electrospun nanofibrous scaffold on cellular response of PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingling; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Hu, Jue; Chen, Menglin; Besenbacher, Flemming; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-09-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous nerve implants is a promising therapy for peripheral nerve injury, and its performance can be tailored by chemical cues, topographical features as well as electrical properties. In this paper, a surface modified, electrically conductive, aligned nanofibrous scaffold composed of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and polypyrrole (Ppy), referred to as o-PLAPpy_A, was fabricated for nerve regeneration. The morphology, surface chemistry and hydrophilicity of nanofibers were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle, respectively. The effects of these nanofibers on neuronal differentiation using PC12 cells were evaluated. A hydrophilic surface was created by Poly-ornithine coating, which was able to provide a better environment for cell attachment, and furthermore aligned fibers were proved to be able to guide PC12 cells grow along the fiber direction and be beneficial for neurite outgrowth. The cellular response of PC12 cells to pulsed electrical stimulation was evaluated by NF 200 and alpha tubulin expression, indicating that electrical stimulation with a voltage of 40mV could enhance the neurite outgrowth. The PC12 cells stimulated with electrical shock showed greater level of neurite outgrowth and smaller cell body size. Moreover, the PC12 cells under electrical stimulation showed better viability. In summary, the o-PLAPpy_A nanofibrous scaffold supported the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of PC12 cells in the absence of electrical stimulation, which could be potential candidate for nerve regeneration applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Partitioning of metals in different binding phases of tropical estuarine sediments: importance of metal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Vudamala, Krushna; Sarkar, Arindam; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-02-01

    Distribution of metals in different binding phases of estuarine sediments provides chemically significant description of metal-sediment interactions. This study describes the influences of ligand field stabilization energy (LFSE), Jahn-Teller effect, and water exchange rate (k-w) on metal distribution in different binding phases of estuarine sediments. It was found that Cu had highest affinity for organic binding phases in the studied sediments followed by Ni and Pb. However, Pb showed strong association with Fe/Mn oxide phases followed by Ni and Cu. Faster k-w of Cu (II) (1 × 10(9) s(-1)) increased the rate of complex formation of Cu(2+) ion with ligand in the organic phases. The Cu-ligand (from organic phase) complexes gained extra stability by the Jahn-Teller effect. The combined effects of these two phenomena and high ionic potential increased the association of Cu with the organic phases of the sediments than Ni and Pb. The smaller ionic radii of Ni(2+) (0.72 Å) than Pb(2+) (1.20 Å) increase the stability of Ni-ligand complexes in the organic phase of the sediments. High LFSE of Ni(II) (compared with Pb(2+) ions) also make Ni-organic complexes increasingly stable than Pb. High k-w (7 × 10(9) s(-1)) of Pb did not help it to associate with organic phases in the sediments. The high concentration of Pb in the Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phase was probably due to co-precipitation of Pb(2+) and Fe(3+). High surface area or site availability for Pb(2+) ion on Fe oxyhydroxide phase was probably responsible for the high concentration of Pb in Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase. Increasing concentrations of Cu in organic phases with the increasing Cu loading suggest that enough binding sites were available for Cu in the organic binding phases of the sediments. This study also describes the influence of nature of sedimentary organic carbon (terrestrial and marine derived OC) in controlling these metal distribution and speciation in marine sediment.

  17. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Polyatomic Hydrocarbon Projectile Ions with Different Initial Internal Energy Content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Qayyum, A.; Herman, Zdeněk; Tepnual, T.; Mair, C.; Matt-Leubner, S.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2004), s. 1-8 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/0632 Grant - others:XE(CZ) EURATOM-IPP.CR Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : surface induced * polyatomic ions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.639, year: 2004

  18. Surface treatment of diamond films grown on glass by different microwave plasma systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babchenko, Oleg; Rezek, Bohuslav; Stuchlík, Jiří; Kromka, Alexander; Arnault, J.-C.; Bergonzo, P.

    Roč. 6, č. 7 ( 2014 ), s. 82-86 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0996 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : linear antenna plasma * nanocrystalline diamond * surface chemistry * water contact angle * X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  19. A combinatorial variation in surface chemistry and pore size of three-dimensional porous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds modulates the behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yingdi; Tan, Ke; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang, E-mail: zhaoyangye@ecust.edu.cn; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-02-01

    Biomaterial properties play significant roles in controlling cellular behaviors. The objective of the present study was to investigate how pore size and surface chemistry of three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds regulate the fate of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro in combination. First, on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films, the hydrolytic treatment was found to stimulate the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of human MSCs (hMSCs) in comparison with pristine films, while the aminolysis showed mixed effects. Then, 3D porous PCL scaffolds with varying pore sizes (100–200 μm, 200–300 μm and 300–450 μm) were fabricated and subjected to either hydrolysis or aminolysis. It was found that a pore size of 200–300 μm with hydrolysis in 3D scaffolds was the most favorable condition for growth of hMSCs. Importantly, while a pore size of 200–300 μm with hydrolysis for 1 h supported the best osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, the chondrogenic differentiation was greatest in scaffolds with a pore size of 300–450 μm and treated with aminolysis for 1 h. Taken together, these results suggest that surface chemistry and pore size of 3D porous scaffolds may potentially have a synergistic impact on the behaviors of MSCs. - Highlights: • Surface chemistry of poly(ε-caprolactone) films actively modulates MSC behaviors. • Varying surface chemistry and pore size in combination is enabled in 3D scaffolds. • Surface chemistry and pore size potentially dictate MSC fates in synergy.

  20. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 m a.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH 4 + and Ca 2+ , whereas the main anion was HCO 3 − , which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO 3 − , SO 4 2− and Cl − . Data analysis suggested that Na + , Cl − and K + were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and HCO 3 − were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO 3 − and SO 4 2− concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH 4 + was derived from gaseous NH 3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from − 1.9 to − 23.2‰ in δ 18 O, and from − 0.8 to − 174‰ in δ 2 H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha −1 y −1 ) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO 3

  1. Generation of Well-Defined Pairs of Silylamine on Highly Dehydroxylated SBA-15: Application to the Surface Organometallic Chemistry of Zirconium

    KAUST Repository

    Azzi, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    Design of a new well-defined surface organometallic species [O-(=Si–NH)2Zr(IV)Np2] has been obtained by reaction of tetraneopentyl zirconium (ZrNp4) on SBA-15 surface displaying mainly silylamine pairs [O-(=Si–NH2)2]. These surface species have been achieved by an ammonia treatment of a highly dehydroxylated SBA-15 at 1000°C (SBA-151000). This support is known to contain mainly strained reactive siloxane bridges (≡Si-O-Si≡)[1] along with a small amount of isolated plus germinal silanols =Si(OH)2. Chemisorption of ammonia occurs primarily by opening these siloxane bridges[2] to generate silanol/silylamine pairs [O-(=Si–NH2)(=SiOH)] followed by substitution of the remaining silanol. Further treatment using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) results in the protection of the isolated remaining silanol groups by formation of ≡Si-O-SiMe3 and =Si(OSiMe3)2 but leaves ≡SiNH2 untouched. After reaction of this functionalized surface with ZrNp4, this latter displays mainly a bi-podal zirconium neopentyl organometallic complex [O-(=Si–NH)2Zr(IV)Np2] which has been fully characterized by diverse methods such as infrared transmission spectroscopy, magic angle spinning solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, surface elemental analysis, small angle X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption and energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). These different characterization tools unambiguously prove that the zirconium organometallic complex reacts mostly with silylamine pairs to give a bi-podal zirconium bis-neopentyl complex, uniformly distributed into the channels of SBA-151000. Therefore this new material opens a new promising research area in Surface Organometallic Chemistry which, so far, was dealing mainly with O containing surface. It is expected that vicinal amine functions may play a very different role as compared with classical inorganic supports. Given the importance in the last decades of N containing ligands in catalysis, one may expect

  2. Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

  3. Electron Pair Repulsion Responsible for the Peculiar Edge Effects and Surface Chemistry of Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Peng; Shen, Xiaomei; Jang, Joonkyung; Gao, Xingfa

    2018-03-01

    The electronic and optical properties of black phosphorus (black-P) are significantly modulated by fabricating the edges of this two-dimensional material. Electron lone pairs (ELPs) are ubiquitous in black-P, but their role in creating the edge effects of black-P is poorly understood. Using first-principle calculations, we report ELPs of black-P experience severe Coulomb repulsion and play a central role in creating the edge effects of black-P. We discover the outermost P atoms of the zigzag edges of black-PQDs are free of the Coulomb repulsion, but the P atoms of the armchair edges do experience the Coulomb repulsion. The Coulomb repulsion serves as a new chemical driving force to make electron donor-acceptor bonds with chemical groups bearing vacant orbitals. Our results provide insights into the mechanism responsible for the peculiar edge effects of black-P and highlight the opportunity to use the ELPs of black-P for their damage-free surface functionalization.

  4. The Impact of Surface Chemistry on Bio-derived Carbon Performance as Supercapacitor Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Husam N.

    2016-12-23

    In this study, we demonstrate that highly functionalized and porous carbons can be derived from palm-leaf waste using the template-free facile synthesis process. The derived carbons have high content of nitrogen dopant, high surface area, and various defects. Moreover, these carbons exhibit a high electrical conductivity (107 S m−1). Thanks to the high content of edge N (64.3%) and highly microporous nature (82% of microspores), these biomass-derived carbons show promising performance when used as supercapacitor electrodes. To be specific, these carbonaceous materials show a specific capacitance as high as 197 and 135 F g−1 at 2 and 20 A g−1 in three-electrode configuration, respectively. Furthermore, the symmetrical cells using palm-leaf-derived carbon show an energy density of 8.4 Wh Kg−1 at a power density of 0.64 kW Kg−1, with high cycling life stability (∼8% loss after 10,000 continuous charge–discharge cycles at 20 A g−1). Interestingly, as the power density increases from 4.4 kW kg−1 to 36.8 kW kg−1, the energy density drops slowly from 8.4 Wh kg−1 to 3.4 Wh kg−1. Getting such extremely high power density without significant loss of energy density indicates that these palm-leaf-derived carbons have excellent electrode performance as supercapacitor electrodes.

  5. Effects of water chemistry and surface contact on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun; Cheng, Jinping

    2017-07-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has created concerns about its potential impacts on natural microbial communities. In this study, the physicochemical properties of AgNPs and its toxicity on natural bacteria Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were investigated in aqueous conditions. The characterization data showed that AgNPs highly aggregated in aqueous conditions, and the hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs in aqueous conditions was larger than its primary size. The studied AgNPs was less toxic to B. subtilis in estuarine water as compared to that in Milli-Q water and artificial seawater, which might be due to the observed enhanced aggregation of AgNPs in estuarine water. The toxicity of AgNPs to B. subtilis was greatly reduced when their surface contact was blocked by a dialysis membrane. Scanning electron microscope images showed that exposure contact to AgNPs resulted in damage of the microbial cell wall and enhanced formation of fibrillar structures. These results suggest that particle-cell contact is largely responsible for the observed toxicity of AgNPs in B. subtilis. This study can help to understand the potential impacts of AgNPs to natural microbes, especially in the complex aquatic environments.

  6. Surface chemistry of intermetallic AlSb-anodes for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stjerndahl, M.; Bryngelsson, H.; Gustafsson, T.; Vaughey, J.T.; Thackeray, M.M.; Edstroem, K.

    2007-01-01

    The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer on AlSb electrodes has been studied in Li/AlSb cells containing a LiPF 6 EC/DEC electrolyte using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Data were collected before SEI-formation, during formation, and after formation at 0.01 V versus Li 0 /Li + , and at full delithiation in cycled cells at 1.20 V. The thickness of the SEI layer increases during lithiation and decreases during delithiation. This dynamic behaviour occurs continuously on cycling the cells. The growth of the SEI layer can be attributed predominantly to the deposition of carbonaceous species below 0.50 V versus Li 0 /Li + ; these species disappear almost completely during delithiation. The extra surface-layer formation is a consequence of the additional charge that is needed to lithiate the remaining Sb component of the micrometer-sized AlSb particles at low potentials as seen by synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction. Aluminium is not reactive to lithium alloying in this electrolyte. Relatively small amounts of LiF were detected in the AlSb SEI layers compared to that commonly found in the SEI layers on graphite electrodes

  7. Design of supported bi-metallic nanoparticles based on Platinum and Palladium using Surface Organometallic Chemistry (SOMC)

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shareef, Reem A.

    2017-11-01

    Well-defined silica supported bimetallic catalysts Pt100-x Pdx (where x is the molar ratio of Pd) are prepared by Surface Organometallic Chemistry (SOMC) via controlled decomposition of Pd2(allyl)2Cl2 on Pt/SiO2. For comparison purposes, Pt100-x Pdx bimetallic catalysts is also prepared by ion-exchange (IE). According to the results of STEM, XAS and H2 chemisorption, all bimetallic nanoparticles, prepared using neither SOMC nor IE, produce discrete formation of monometallic species (either Pt or Pd). Most catalysts exhibit a narrow particle size distribution with an average diameter ranging from 1 to 3 nm for samples prepared by IE and from 2 to 5 nm for the ones synthesized by SOMC. For all catalysts investigated in the present work, iso-butane reaction with hydrogen under differential conditions (conversions below 5%) leads to the formation of methane and propane (hydrogenolysis), n-butane (isomerization), and traces of iso-butylene (dehydrogenation). The total rate of reaction decreases with increasing the Pd loading for both catalysts series as a result of decreasing turnover rate (expressed as moles converted per total surface metal per second) of both isomerization and hydrogenolysis. In the case of Pt100-x Pdx(SOMC) catalysts, the results suggest a selective coverage of Pt (100) surface by a Pd layer, followed by a buildup of Pd overcoat onto a Pd layer assuming that each metal keeps its intrinsic catalytic properties. There is no mutual electronic charge transfer between the two metals (DFT). For the PtPd catalysts prepared by IE, the catalytic behavior cannot simply be explained by a surface coverage of highly active Pt metal by less active Pd (not observed), suggesting there is formation of a surface alloy between Pt and Pd collaborated by EXAFS and DFT. The catalytic results are explained by a simple structure activity relationship based on the previously proposed mechanism of C-H bond and C-C Bond activation and cleavage for iso-butane hydrogenolysis

  8. Research and Development in support of the Surface Chemistry Branch. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    notable difference between the L " cold-and. hot-implanted- Si3 N4 substrates can be found in their oxygen profiles. ( Recall that the sputtering rates...zero, and remains there. to at least twice that depth..’. Recall .that .. .XPS sputter depth.. . I profiles of the nonimplanted portion also showed no...collection was performed. Mass spectral analysis was performed on a Sciex TAGA 6000 APCI trirle quadrupole mass spectrometer.ý The analysis conditions were

  9. Modification of Semiconductor Surfaces through Si-N Linkages by Wet-Chemistry Approaches and Modular Functionalization of Zinc Oxide Surfaces for Chemical Protection of Material Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei

    Semiconductor substrates are widely used in many applications. Multiple practical uses involving these materials require the ability to tune their physical and chemical properties to adjust those to a specific application. In recent years, surface and interface reactions have affected dramatically device fabrication and material design. Novel surface functionalization techniques with diverse chemical approaches make the desired physical, thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties attainable. Meanwhile, the modified surface can serve as one of the most important key steps for further assembly process in order to make novel devices and materials. In the following chapters, novel chemical approaches to the functionalization of silicon and zinc oxide substrates will be reviewed and discussed. The specific functionalities including amines, azides, and alkynes on surfaces of different materials will be applied to address subsequent attachment of large molecules and assembly processes. This research is aimed to develop new strategies for manipulating the surface properties of semiconductor materials in a controlled way. The findings of these investigations will be relevant for future applications in molecular and nanoelectronics, sensing, and solar energy conversion. The ultimate goals of the projects are: 1) Preparation of an oxygen-and carbon-free silicon surface based exclusively on Si-N linkages for further modification protocols.. This project involves designing the surface reaction of hydrazine on chlorine-terminated silicon surface, introduction of additional functional group through dehydrohalogenation condensation reaction and direct covalent attachment of C60. 2) Demonstrating alternative method to anchor carbon nanotubes to solid substrates directly through the carbon cage.. This project targets surface modification of silicon and gold substrates with amine-terminated organic monolayers and the covalent attachment of nonfunctionalized and carboxylic acid

  10. Effects of Different Surface Treatments on Composite Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Kamozaki, Maria Beatriz Beber; Gutierrez, Natália Cortez; Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments on roughness and bond strength of composite repairs. 120 truncated conical specimens were prepared with composite Grandio SO (VOCO) and submitted to 5000 thermal cycles. Specimens were divided into 12 groups (n = 10) regarding the surface treatments: negative control (NC), without treatment; medium-grit diamond bur (MGD); coarse-grit diamond bur (CGD); conventional carbide bur (ConC); crosscut carbide bur (CutC); chemical vapor deposition diamond bur (CVD); sandblasting with aluminum oxide (AlO); Er:YAG laser 200 mJ/10 Hz (Er200); Er:YAG laser 60 mJ/10 Hz (Er50); Nd:YAG laser 120 mJ/15 Hz (Nd120); Nd:YAG laser 60 mJ/ 15Hz (Nd60); air abrasion with 110-μm silica modified aluminum oxide (Rocatec Plus-3M) (SIL). After the surface treatments, the surface roughness (Ra) was measured using a profilometer, and then the adhesive system Admira Bond (VOCO) was applied. Another truncated conical restoration was built up with the same composite over the bonded area of each specimen. In order to evaluate the cohesive strength, double-cone specimens were made and considered as a control group (CoheC). The specimens were submitted to tensile bond strength testing and the obtained data (MPa) were evaluated by one-way ANOVA, Tukey's and correlation tests. ANOVA showed significant differences among experimental groups for roughness and adhesive strength (p < 0.00). The roughness values (Ra) were: NC (0.21 ± 0.19)(c); ConC (0.30 ± 0.08)(c); CutC (0.50 ± 0.22)(cd); CVD (0.74 ± 0.14)(bd); MGD (0.89 ± 0.39)(ab); Er50 (0.89 ± 0.14)(ab); AlO (0.90 ± 0.07)(ab); Nd60 (0.94 ± 0.33ab; SIL (0.98 ± 0.07)(ab); Nd120 (1.10 ± 0.19)(a); CGD (1.10 ± 0.32)(a); Er200 (1.12 ± 0.21)(a). The results of the tensile bond strength test in MPa were: CGD (11.58 ± 3.03)(a); MGD (12.66 ± 3.82)(ab); NC (13.51 ± 3.95(ab); Nd120 (14.11 ± 5.95)(ab); ConC (14.73 ± 6.12)(ab); Er200 (15.51 ± 1.45)(abc); CVD (15.61 ± 5.00(abc); Er50 (16.44

  11. XPS study of the surface chemistry of Ag-covered L-CVD SnO2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwoka, M.; Ottaviano, L.; Passacantando, M.; Czempik, G.; Santucci, S.; Szuber, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of SnO 2 thin films prepared by laser chemical vapour deposition (L-CVD) and subsequently covered by Ag atoms just after deposition and after long-term exposed to dry air, subsequent annealing in ultra high vacuum at 400 deg. C and dry air oxidation at 400 deg. C. Using the standard analytical procedure based on atomic sensitivity factors, the variation of surface chemistry defined in terms of the relative concentration of the main components of the films after the above-mentioned procedures has been determined. It was confirmed that after dry air exposure as well as dry air oxidation, the layers undergo an oxidation reaching almost SnO 2 stoichiometry. Besides, during ultra high vacuum annealing, the films undergo reduction to almost SnO stoichiometry. At the same time, Ag atoms deposited at the top of layers diffuse into the subsurface layers. This was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis

  12. Green chemistry focus on optimization of silver nanoparticles using response surface methodology (RSM) and mosquitocidal activity: Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondari Nyakundi, Erick; Padmanabhan, M Nalini

    2015-01-01

    There is an exigent necessity for development of environmental friendly bio-control agent(s) for elimination of mosquito due to increased resistance resurgence against synthetic control agents. Mosquito control strategy will lay a strong foundation to malaria exclusion or it can be curbed to certain level especially in the developing nations. In this study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized by green chemistry approach using Tridax procumbens leaf extract as a reducing agent. The reaction medium involved in the synthesis process was optimized by statistical experimental design using response surface methodology to obtain better yield, uniform size, shape and stability. Further, these synthesized nanoparticles were confirmed through UV-Visible, FT-IR spectroscopy, PSA and SEM Subsequently, the bioefficacy of these particles were investigated on Anopheles stephensi for larvicidal and pupicidal activity. Interestingly, time period of 90 min, temperature of 76±2 °C, pH 7.2±2, 2 mM silver nitrate (AgNO3), 3mM PEG and 2mM PVP showed excellent parameters for bioprocess design for large scale production of stabilized nanoparticles. A concentration of 5 ppm of PVP stabilized nanoparticles exhibited 100% mortality. Thus, the obtained results clearly suggest that silver nanoparticles stabilized by PEG and PVP may have important function as stabilizers, dispersants as well as larvicides for mosquito control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Adsorption of ethylene carbonate on lithium cobalt oxide thin films: A synchrotron-based spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerle, Mathias; Späth, Thomas; Schulz, Natalia; Hausbrand, René

    2017-11-01

    The surface chemistry of cathodic lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) in contact with the Li-ion battery solvent ethylene carbonate (EC) was studied via synchrotron based soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS). By stepwise in-situ adsorption of EC onto an rf-magnetron sputtered LiCoO2 thin film and consecutive recording of SXPS spectra, the chemical and electronic properties of the interface were determined. EC partially decomposes and forms a predominantly organic adlayer. Prolonged exposure results in the formation of a condensed EC layer, demonstrating that the decomposition layer has passivating properties. Lithium ions deintercalate from the electrode and are dissolved in the adsorbate phase, without forming a large amount of Li-containing reaction products, indicating that electrolyte reduction remains limited. Due to a large offset between the LiCoO2 valence band and the EC HOMO, oxidation of EC molecules is unlikely, and should require energy level shifts due to interaction or double layer effects for real systems.

  14. Influence of surface chemistry on the formation of crystalline hydroxide coatings on Mg alloys in liquid water and steam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Chong; Wu, Yajie; Qiu, Yao; Duan, Junhao; Birbilis, Nick; Chen, Xiao-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A steam treatment was employed to provide protective coatings to Mg-alloys. • The steam treatment was conducted in stainless steel autoclaves at 150 °C for 3 h. • The formation mechanism of the steam coatings on various Mg-alloys was explored. • Steam is more favourable than liquid water regarding to coating properties. • Alloying elements also influence coatings properties. - Abstract: An environmentally-friendly ‘steam-coating’ treatment was employed to prepare protective coatings on magnesium (Mg) and its alloys against corrosion. This involved a hydrothermal surface treatment performed in water vapour using a closed stainless steel autoclave at 150 °C for 3 h. The correlation between coating functionality and alloy chemistry, including the concentration of alloying elements of aluminium, zinc and rare earth, was studied. It was determined that Al played a significant role in the formation of a protective Mg(OH) 2 coating, whilst Zn and RE elements were not a key contributor to protective development.

  15. Influence of Structure and Surface Chemistry of Porous Carbon Electrodes on Supercapacitor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerret, Francois

    Two-phase flows are very frequent in the industry, especially in the petroleum industry and in the nuclear industry. In steam generators of nuclear plants, water is heated so that at the top of the generator an important fraction of the water flows as gas. In this upper part a two phase flow transverse to the tube bundle takes place. Fluids exert significant forces on the tubes in this area, and that is why we want to study this specific geometry. For this we must gather information on the flow conditions associated to the different two-phase flow patterns, which can be bubbly, intermittent, or annular. This requires that we characterize first those flow patterns. Many studies have been done to determine the nature of the flows, but most of them were carried out for internal flows in cylindrical tubes and not for transverse external flows typical of flow inside a steam generator. We undertook an experimental campaign for a transverse flow in a tube bundle representative of the flow in a steam generator. We were particularly interested with flow patterns that contain high gas fraction. This kind of flow are particularly not well known and they are potentially responsible for damages. Using pressure and void fraction measurements, we characterized the flow patterns and their corresponding flow rates. We obtained a more complete flow pattern map than those presented in the literature, thanks to a new methodology. We then focused on the flow pattern for which significant pressure fluctuations are noticeable. For this pattern, important damages are expected on the tubes of the steam generator. We showed that two types of pressure fluctuations occur at different frequencies. We characterized dependencies of these fluctuations in term of fluid velocities, location in the experimental setup, mean pressure, as well the geometry of the exit. Thanks to a new methodology, this study brought a new understanding on causes of destructive forces in the steam generators of nuclear

  16. Surface chemistry of photoluminescent F8BT conjugated polymer nanoparticles determines protein corona formation and internalization by phagocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Khanbeigi, Raha; Abelha, Thais Fedatto; Woods, Arcadia; Rastoin, Olivia; Harvey, Richard D; Jones, Marie-Christine; Forbes, Ben; Green, Mark A; Collins, Helen; Dailey, Lea Ann

    2015-03-09

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles are being developed for a variety of diagnostic and theranostic applications. The conjugated polymer, F8BT, a polyfluorene derivative, was used as a model system to examine the biological behavior of conjugated polymer nanoparticle formulations stabilized with ionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate; F8BT-SDS; ∼207 nm; -31 mV) and nonionic (pegylated 12-hydroxystearate; F8BT-PEG; ∼175 nm; -5 mV) surfactants, and compared with polystyrene nanoparticles of a similar size (PS200; ∼217 nm; -40 mV). F8BT nanoparticles were as hydrophobic as PS200 (hydrophobic interaction chromatography index value: 0.96) and showed evidence of protein corona formation after incubation with serum-containing medium; however, unlike polystyrene, F8BT nanoparticles did not enrich specific proteins onto the nanoparticle surface. J774A.1 macrophage cells internalized approximately ∼20% and ∼60% of the F8BT-SDS and PS200 delivered dose (calculated by the ISDD model) in serum-supplemented and serum-free conditions, respectively, while cell association of F8BT-PEG was minimal (<5% of the delivered dose). F8BT-PEG, however, was more cytotoxic (IC50 4.5 μg cm(-2)) than F8BT-SDS or PS200. The study results highlight that F8BT surface chemistry influences the composition of the protein corona, while the properties of the conjugated polymer nanoparticle surfactant stabilizer used determine particle internalization and biocompatibility profile.

  17. Tandem diazonium salt electroreduction and click chemistry as a novel, efficient route for grafting macromolecules to gold surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahouche, Samia; Mekni, Nejib; Abbassi, Leila; Lang, Philippe; Perruchot, Christian; Jouini, Mohamed; Mammeri, Fayna; Turmine, Mireille; Romdhane, Hatem Ben; Chehimi, Mohamed M.

    2009-11-01

    Bis-alkynylated oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and a monopropargyl-functionalized perfluorinated ethylene glycol (FEG) were clicked to azide-functionalized gold surface (Au-N 3) at room temperature via the well known 1,3 cycloaddition click chemical reaction. The Au-N 3 substrate was obtained by nucleophilic attack of NaN 3 on gold substrates modified by the electrochemical reduction of the BF4-, +N 2-C 6H 4-CH 2Br diazonium salt. This electrochemical process yields aryl layer-modified gold of the type Au-C 6H 4-CH 2Br (hereafter Au-Br). The untreated and modified gold plates were examined by XPS, PMIRRAS and contact angle measurements. XPS brought evidence for electrografting aryl layers by the detection of Br3d; azide functionalization by the increase of the N/Br atomic ratio; and click reaction of OEG with Au-N 3 by the increase of O/N ratio. In addition, the perfluorinated plate (Au-FEG) exhibited F1s and characteristic C1s peaks from -(CF 2) 7- chain and terminal CF 3. Infra red spectroscopy (PMIRRAS) evidenced (i) grafting N 3 to Au-Br; (ii) characteristic stretching bands, from ethylene glycol units, C-O-C (1100-1300 cm -1); CF 2 (1000-1100 cm -1) and CF 3 (1100-1350 cm -1) from FEG grafts; and (iii) suppression of alkynyl bands from OEG and FEG after surface click chemistry. More importantly, PMIRRAS results support an important bridging of the bispropargyl oligoethylene glycol at the gold surface. Water drop contact angles were found to be 48.7° and 83.0° for Au-OEG and Au-FEG, respectively, therefore highlighting the control over the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of the clicked substrate. This work shows that clicking macromolecules to grafted, diazonium salt-derived aryl layers is a novel, simple and valuable approach for designing robust, functional surface organic coatings.

  18. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  19. Surface modification of cyclomatrix polyphosphazene microsphere by thiol-ene chemistry and lectin recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chen; Zhu, Xue-yan; Gao, Qiao-ling; Fang, Fei; Huang, Xiao-jun, E-mail: hxjzxh@zju.edu.cn

    2016-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A new synthetic route leading to polyphosphazene cyclomatrix microsphere with various functional groups has achieved via thiol-ene click modification. Herein, hexacholorocyclophosphazene (HCCP) crosslinked with bisphenol-S and 4,4′-diallyl bisphenol-S to generate broadly dispersed microspheres. Thiol-ene modification under UV irradiation not only presented high efficiency and flexibility for post-functionalization, but also imposed no harm on global morphology and crosslinked skeleton of such microspheres. - Highlights: • Functional polyphosphazene microspheres with high chemical flexibility were synthesized by thiol-ene modification. • Polyphosphazene microspheres possessed high thermal stability. • Glycosylated polyphosphazene microspheres showed affinity to lectin Con-A, which inferred potential application in biomedicine. - Abstract: A new synthetic route leading to functional polyphosphazene cyclomatrix microsphere has been developed via thiol-ene click modification. Hexacholorocyclophosphazene (HCCP) was crosslinked with both bisphenol-S and 4,4′-diallyl bisphenol-S to obtain vinyl polyphosphazene microspheres (VPZM) in order to ensure high crosslinking degree and introduce vinyl moieties. Compared to the microspheres obtained by HCCP and bisphenol-S, the size of VPZM was broadly dispersed from 400 nm to 1.40 μm. Thiol-ene click reactions were carried out to attach functional groups, such as glucosyl, carboxyl, ester and dodecyl groups onto polyphosphazene microspheres, which demonstrated no change in morphology and size after modification. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectoscopy (FT-IR) results showed that the vinyl moieties were introduced in the period of crosslinking and functionalization was also successful via click reactions. Moreover, the microspheres presented a little difference in thermal properties after modification. Concanavalin A (Con-A) fluorescent adsorption was also observed for

  20. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Topographic roughness was demonstrated as higher for SLA treated surfaces, measured by atomic force microscopy and elemental analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray, showing a similar composition for both surfaces. The adhesion of neutrophils to the `rough' Ti surface was initially stronger than adhesion ...

  1. The physics and chemistry of Earth's dynamic surface (Ralph Alger Bagnold Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, James W.

    2013-04-01

    Ralph Alger Bagnold became a Fellow of the Royal Society and one of the founders of modern geomorphology despite having no formal academic affiliation, no cadre of students or postdocs under his command, no steady financial support, and no scientific training beyond a second-class honors degree in engineering. What he did have, and used to great effect, were a deep curiosity about natural phenomena, a powerful physical intellect, a talent for clever experimentation, extensive opportunities to observe geomorphic processes at work in the field, and - perhaps most important of all - the time and freedom to focus his energies on significant scientific challenges. A hallmark of Bagnold's work is the artful compromise between the goal of simple, general, physical laws describing natural phenomena, and the practical necessity for observational empiricisms to account for the real-world complexities that cannot be incorporated explicitly into such simple laws. Efforts to find these sorts of artful compromises continue to the present day. Typically, both in Bagnold's work and in present-day geomorphology, one seeks mathematical process laws whose form embodies the "pure physics" of the problem, and whose coefficients subsume the inevitable observational empiricisms. Present-day geomorphologists have an array of new tools that open our eyes to temporal and spatial scales that were invisible to Bagnold and his contemporaries. These observations, in turn, have yielded new surprises and challenges, sometimes confounding our intuition about how geomorphic systems "should" behave. One surprise has been that decadal-scale erosion rates, as reflected in stream sediment loads and reservoir sedimentation rates, often differ from longer-term erosion rates by large multiples. In some agricultural landscapes, modern-day erosion rates greatly exceed the long-term background rate, as one might intuitively expect. In other landscapes, however, contemporary erosion rates can be a small

  2. Role of chamber dimension in fluorocarbon based deposition and etching of SiO2 and its effects on gas and surface-phase chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, E. A.; Zhou, B.-S.; Sant, S. P.; Overzet, L. J.; Goeckner, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well understood that chamber geometry is an influential factor governing plasma processing of materials. Simple models suggest that a large fraction of this influence is due to changes in basic plasma properties, namely, density, temperature, and potential. However, while such factors do play an important role, they only partly describe the observed differences in process results. Therefore, to better elucidate the role of chamber geometry in this work, the authors explore the influence of plasma chemistry and its symbiotic effect on plasma processing by decoupling the plasma density, temperature, and potential from the plasma-surface (wall) interactions. Specifically, a plasma system is used with which the authors can vary the chamber dimension so as to vary the plasma-surface interaction directly. By varying chamber wall diameter, 20-66 cm, and source-platen distance, 4-6 cm, the etch behavior of SiO 2 (or the deposition behavior of fluorocarbon polymer) and the resulting gas-phase chemistry change significantly. Results from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry show significant differences in etch characteristics, with etch rates as high as 350 nm/min and as low as 75 nm/min for the same self-bias voltage. Fluorocarbon deposition rates are also highly dependent on chamber dimension and vary from no net deposition to deposition rates as high as 225 nm/min. Etch yields, however, remain unaffected by the chamber size variations. From Langmuir probe measurements, it is clear that chamber geometry results in significant shifts in plasma properties such as electron and ion densities. Indeed, such measurements show that on-wafer processes are limited at least in part by ion flux for high energy reactive ion etch. However, in situ multipass Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that the line-averaged COF 2 , SiF 4 , CF 2 , and CF 3 gas-phase densities are also dependent on chamber dimension at high self-bias voltage and also correlate well to the CF x

  3. Differences in Temperature and Water Chemistry Shape Distinct Diversity Patterns in Thermophilic Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriac, Cecilia M; Szekeres, Edina; Rudi, Knut; Baricz, Andreea; Hegedus, Adriana; Dragoş, Nicolae; Coman, Cristian

    2017-11-01

    areas are isolated and have a limited exchange of organisms, nutrients, and energy with the surrounding environments, hot spring microbial communities can be used in model studies to elucidate the colonizing potential within extreme settings. Thus, they are of great importance in evolutionary biology, microbial ecology, and exobiology. In spite of all the efforts that have been made, the current understanding of the influence of temperature and water chemistry on the microbial community composition, diversity, and abundance in microbial mats is limited. In this study, the composition and diversity of microbial communities developed in thermal gradients in the vicinity of three hot springs from Romania were investigated, each having particular physicochemical characteristics. Our results expose new factors that could determine the formation of these ecosystems, expanding the current knowledge in this regard. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Synthesis and processing of ELISA polymer substitute: The influence of surface chemistry and morphology on detection sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana; van der Marel, Cees; Koole, Leo H.

    2014-10-01

    Despite the known drawbacks of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), one of the deficiencies that have relatively been ignored is the performance of ELISA substrate itself. Polystyrene (PS), as the cost effective material of choice for mass production of ELISA well-plates, has shown obvious lacks of suitable physical and chemical properties for protein attachment. The general concept of this work was to develop a potential substrate that can be suggested as a material of choice for production of a new generation of ELISA analytical kits. Spin-coated thin films of polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) on silicon surfaces were designed and processed for detection of dengue virus. Coated surfaces of different molar ratios have been investigated as carboxyl-functionalized layers for obtaining platform for biomolecule immobilization with high level of protein activity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, we have used amine functional "spacers", hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI), which were covalently bonded to the surfaces of PMMA-co-MAA coatings. Results demonstrate that the variation of surface concentration of carboxyl groups of PMMA-co-MAA can be used to control the amine surface concentration after carbodiimide coupling with HMDA and PEI spacers. The presence of amine spacers increases hydrophilicity of the coatings and significantly impacts the polymer surface morphology. In particular, protein immobilization via amine-bearing spacers has been achieved in two effective steps: (1) carbodiimide bonding between amine spacer molecules and PMMA-co-MAA polymer coatings; and (2) covalent immobilization of antibody via glutaraldehyde reaction with amine groups from amine-treated surfaces. The application of PEI spacer in comparison to HMDA has shown much higher intensity of detection signal in ELISA experiment, indicating better immobilization efficiency and preservation of antibody activity upon attachment to the

  5. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions ─ Part 2: Exemplary practical applications and numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ammann

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions has been presented in the preceding companion paper by Pöschl, Rudich and Ammann (Pöschl et al., 2007, abbreviated PRA. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reaction at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes. Here we present multiple exemplary model systems and calculations illustrating how the general mass balance and rate equations of the PRA framework can be easily reduced to compact sets of equations which enable a mechanistic description of time and concentration dependencies of trace gas uptake and particle composition in systems with one or more chemical components and physicochemical processes. Time-dependent model scenarios show the effects of reversible adsorption, surface-bulk transport, and chemical aging on the temporal evolution of trace gas uptake by solid particles and solubility saturation of liquid particles. They demonstrate how the transformation of particles and the variation of trace gas accommodation and uptake coefficients by orders of magnitude over time scales of microseconds to days can be explained and predicted from the initial composition and basic kinetic parameters of model systems by iterative calculations using standard spreadsheet programs. Moreover, they show how apparently inconsistent experimental data sets obtained with different techniques and on different time scales can be efficiently linked and mechanistically explained by application of consistent model formalisms and terminologies within the PRA framework. Steady-state model scenarios illustrate characteristic effects of gas phase composition and basic kinetic parameters on the rates of mass transport and chemical reactions. They demonstrate how adsorption and

  6. Interstellar grain surface chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical calculations, laboratory studies, and observations of interstellar icy grain mantles are reviewed. The emphasis is on recent ground-based observations of the interstellar 2167 cm -1 (4.67μm) band and air-borne studies of the interstellar 1665 and 1460 cm -1 (6.0 and 6.85μm) bands. From a comparison with laboratory studies it is concluded that interstellar icy gain mantles consist mainly of H 2 O, CH 3 OH and CO in an approximate ratio of 100:50:5. Traces of other molecules have also been detected. Evidence for the presence of a separate, more inert, grain mantle component, perhaps consisting mainly of solid CO, will also be presented. Theoretical calculations of the composition of interstellar icy gain mantles are confronted with observational data and the shortcomings of the models are pointed out. Finally, the evolution of icy grain mantles under UV irradiation and their possible interrelationship with an organic grain component observed in the diffuse interstellar medium are discussed

  7. How AI localisation in plant tissues determines the targeted pest spectrum of different chemistries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Anke; Trapp, Stefan

    Many pests suck on the vascular system and/or cells of different plant tissues. The sucking target in the cell differs between pests such as Hemiptera (e.g. aphids and whiteflies) or Acari (mites). The agronomic control of sucking pests is most effective with pesticides taken up orally. The cuticle...... of the targeted pest....

  8. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestrini, Raffaella, E-mail: balestrini@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute, National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), Via del Mulino 19, Brugherio, MB (Italy); Polesello, Stefano [Water Research Institute, National Research Council (IRSA-CNR), Via del Mulino 19, Brugherio, MB (Italy); Sacchi, Elisa [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pavia and IGG-CNR, Via Ferrata 1, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 m a.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}, whereas the main anion was HCO{sub 3}{sup −}, which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO{sub 3}{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and Cl{sup −}. Data analysis suggested that Na{sup +}, Cl{sup −} and K{sup +} were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+} and HCO{sub 3}{sup −} were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO{sub 3}{sup −} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH{sub 4}{sup +} was derived from gaseous NH{sub 3} scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from − 1.9 to − 23.2‰ in δ{sup 18}O, and from − 0.8 to − 174‰ in δ{sup 2}H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha{sup −1} y{sup −1

  9. Critical stages of a biodetection platform development from sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry and assay development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Yildiz

    2014-06-01

    Once viewed solely as a tool to analyse biomolecular interactions, biosensors are gaining widespread interest for diagnostics, biological defense, environmental and quality assurance in agriculture/food industries. Advanced micro fabrication techniques have facilitated integration of microfluidics with sensing functionalities on the same chip making system automation more convenient1. Biosensor devices relying on lab-on-a-chip technologies and nanotechnology has attracted much of attention in recent years for biological defense research and development. However, compared with the numerous publications and patents available, the commercialization of biosensors technology has significantly lagged behind the research output. This paper reviews the reasons behind the slow commercialisation of biosensors with an insight to the critical stages of a biosensor development from the sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry applications and nanotechnology applications in sensing with case studies. In addition, the paper includes the description of a new biodetection platform based on Real-time Electrochemical ProfilingTM (REPTM) that comprises novel electrode arrays and nanoparticle based sensing. The performance of the REPTM platform has been tested for the detection of Planktothrix agardhii, one of the toxic bloom-forming cyanobacteria, usually found in shallow fresh water sources that can be used for human consumption. The optimised REPTM assay allowed the detection of P. agardhii DNA down to 6 pM. This study, showed the potential of REPTM as a new biodetection platform for toxic bacteria and hence further studies will involve the development of a portable multi-analyte biosensor based on REPTM technology for on-site testing.

  10. Surface and Sliding Wear Behaviour of Different Coatings and Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera-Cárdenas E.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the sliding wear behaviour of the coatings TiN, CrN and WC/C applied on steel substrates was studied using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were carried out in dry conditions, at room temperature (20-23 C and 45% - 50% relative humidity. The average sliding velocity was 0.08 m/s and an amplitude of 2 mm was used. The applied loads were 11.76 N (Po = 1.74 GPa and 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa. Optical microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of wear scars and spalls and possible causes of their formation. The variation of the friction coefficient against the number of cycles was obtained. This was used to determine more precisely the time (number of cycles where the coating presented the first signs of wear, in addition Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS was performed, as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and hardness tests on the wear traces, which reinforced the previous observations. Thus it was possible to know the wear life of different coatings and possible causes of variation. Increasing the load was an important factor in the variation of wear life results. But it is also important to consider other factors such as surface roughness and thickness of coatings.

  11. Comparison of Different Biomass Pretreatment Techniques and their Impact on Chemistry and Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema eSingh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is a prerequisite to overcome recalcitrance and allow enzyme accessibility to cellulose and maximize product recovery for improved economics of second-generation lignocellulosic bio-refineries. Recently, the three US-DOE funded Bioenergy Research Centers (Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC, and BioEnergy Science Center (BESC compared ionic liquid (IL, dilute sulfuric acid (DA, and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEXTM pretreatments and published comparative data on mass balance, total sugar yields, substrate accessibility, and microbial fermentation (Biotechnology for Biofuels 7: 71; 72 (2014. In this study, corn stover solids from IL, DA, and AFEX pretreatments were compared to gain comprehensive, in-depth understanding of induced morphological and chemical changes incorporated to corn stover, and how they overcome the biomass recalcitrance. These studies reveal that biomass recalcitrance is overcome by combination of structural and chemical changes to carbohydrates and lignin after pretreatment. Thermal analysis indicates that AFEX and IL pretreated corn stover showed a lower thermal stability while DA pretreated corn stover showed the opposite. The surface roughness variations measured by SANS were correlated to the removal and redistribution of biomass components and was consistent with compositional analysis, AFM and confocal fluorescence imaging results. With AFM and confocal fluorescent microscopy, lignin was found to be re-deposited on cellulose surface with average cellulose fiber width significantly decreased for DA pretreated corn stover (one third of IL and AFEX. HSQC NMR spectra revealed a ~17.9% reduction of β-aryl ether units after AFEX, ~59.8% reduction after DA and >98% reduction after IL. Both NMR and SEC showed similar patterns of lignin depolymerization with highest degree of depolymerization observed for IL followed with DA and AFEX.

  12. Proceedings of the 17. Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Chemistry Society; 7. National Symposium on Inorganic Chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    These 17. Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Chemistry Society and 7. National Symposium on Inorganic Chemistry present several subjects of different interests for the participants, including sections about inorganic chemistry; organic chemistry; environmental chemistry; technological chemistry; electrochemistry; physical chemistry; photochemistry; chemical education; natural products; analytical chemistry and biological chemistry. (C.G.C.)

  13. Surface-Induced Dissociation and Chemical Reactions of C2D4+ on Stainless Steel, Carbon (HOPG), and Two Different Diamond Surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Žabka, Ján; Zappa, F.; Grill, V.; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2009), s. 927-938 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : surface-induced process * diamond surfaces * chemical reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.391, year: 2009

  14. The role of surface chemistry at ceramic/electrolyte intefaces in the generation of pulsed corona discharges in water using porous ceramic-coated rod electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Člupek, Martin; Babický, Václav; Šunka, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2009), s. 719-728 ISSN 1612-8850 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * electrical discharge * water * surface chemistry Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.037, year: 2009 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/122593644/PDFSTART

  15. Surface chemistry of gold nanoparticles determines the biocorona composition impacting cellular uptake, toxicity and gene expression profiles in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the role of nanoparticle size and surface chemistry on biocorona composition and its effect on uptake, toxicity and cellular responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), employing 40 and 80 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), lipoic acid (LA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings. Proteomic analysis identified 59 hard corona proteins among the various AuNP, revealing largely surface chemistry-dependent signature adsorbomes exhibiting human serum albumin (HSA) abundance. Size distribution analysis revealed the relative instability and aggregation inducing potential of bare and corona-bound BPEI-AuNP, over LA- and PEG-AuNP. Circular dichroism analysis showed surface chemistry-dependent conformational changes of proteins binding to AuNP. Time-dependent uptake of bare, plasma corona (PC) and HSA corona-bound AuNP (HSA-AuNP) showed significant reduction in uptake with PC formation. Cell viability studies demonstrated dose-dependent toxicity of BPEI-AuNP. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed 126 genes, from 13 biological pathways, to be differentially regulated by 40 nm bare and PC-bound BPEI-AuNP (PC-BPEI-AuNP). Furthermore, PC formation relieved the toxicity of cationic BPEI-AuNP by modulating expression of genes involved in DNA damage and repair, heat shock response, mitochondrial energy metabolism, oxidative stress and antioxidant response, and ER stress and unfolded protein response cascades, which were aberrantly expressed in bare BPEI-AuNP-treated cells. NP surface chemistry is shown to play the dominant role over size in determining the biocorona composition, which in turn modulates cell uptake, and biological responses, consequently defining the potential safety and efficacy of nanoformulations.

  16. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 ma.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH4(+) and Ca(2+), whereas the main anion was HCO3(-), which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO3(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). Data analysis suggested that Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and HCO3(-) were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO3(-) and SO4(2-) concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH4(+) was derived from gaseous NH3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from -1.9 to -23.2‰ in δ(18)O, and from -0.8 to -174‰ in δ(2)H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha(-1) y(-1)) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO3(-) concentrations in the surface waters

  17. Plant-induced changes in soil chemistry do not explain differences in uranium transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquene, L.; Vandenhove, H.; Tack, F.; Avoort, E. van der; Hees, M. van; Wannijn, J.

    2006-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was set up with maize, ryegrass, Indian mustard, wheat and pea to evaluate to what extent differences in uranium (U) transfer factors can be explained by root-mediated changes in selected soil properties. The experiment involved an acid and an alkaline soil contaminated with 238 U. U soil-to-shoot transfer factors (TFs) ranged between 0.0005 and 0.021 on the acid soil and between 0.007 and 0.179 on the alkaline soil. Indian mustard showed the highest U uptake in shoots and maize the lowest. The root TFs, only available for the acid soil, ranged from 0.58 for maize and Indian mustard to 1.38 for ryegrass. The difference in U uptake between the two soils and the five plants was only partially explained by the different initial U concentrations in soil solution or differences in soil properties in the two soils. However, we obtained a significant relation for differences in shoot TFs observed between the two soils when relating shoot TFs with concentration of UO 2 2+ and uranyl carbonate complexes in soil solution (R 2 = 0.88). The physiological mechanisms by which root-to-shoot U transfer is inhibited or promoted seemed at least as important as the plant-induced changes in soil characteristics in determining soil-to-shoot TFs

  18. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-01-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle

  19. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R

    2004-06-30

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 {mu}m, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 {mu}m. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  20. How active ingredient localisation in plant tissues determines the targeted pest spectrum of different chemistries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Anke; Trapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    adsorption into leaf cells and thus a favourable distribution into apoplast and xylem sap. Slightly lipophilic bases get trapped in vacuoles, which is a less suited place to control hemipteran pests but appropriate to control mites. Non-favourable cellular localisation led to a strong reduction...... information sets revealed that the intracellular localisation of active ingredients determines the performance of test compounds against different target pests because of different feeding behaviours: mites feed on mesophyll, and aphids and whiteflies mostly in the vascular system. Polar compounds have a slow...

  1. A UNIFIED MONTE CARLO TREATMENT OF GAS-GRAIN CHEMISTRY FOR LARGE REACTION NETWORKS. II. A MULTIPHASE GAS-SURFACE-LAYERED BULK MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasyunin, A. I.; Herbst, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The observed gas-phase molecular inventory of hot cores is believed to be significantly impacted by the products of chemistry in interstellar ices. In this study, we report the construction of a full macroscopic Monte Carlo model of both the gas-phase chemistry and the chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. Our model treats icy grain mantles in a layer-by-layer manner, which incorporates laboratory data on ice desorption correctly. The ice treatment includes a distinction between a reactive ice surface and an inert bulk. The treatment also distinguishes between zeroth- and first-order desorption, and includes the entrapment of volatile species in more refractory ice mantles. We apply the model to the investigation of the chemistry in hot cores, in which a thick ice mantle built up during the previous cold phase of protostellar evolution undergoes surface reactions and is eventually evaporated. For the first time, the impact of a detailed multilayer approach to grain mantle formation on the warm-up chemistry is explored. The use of a multilayer ice structure has a mixed impact on the abundances of organic species formed during the warm-up phase. For example, the abundance of gaseous HCOOCH 3 is lower in the multilayer model than in previous grain models that do not distinguish between layers (so-called two phase models). Other gaseous organic species formed in the warm-up phase are affected slightly. Finally, we find that the entrapment of volatile species in water ice can explain the two-jump behavior of H 2 CO previously found in observations of protostars.

  2. The Effect of Different Textual Narrations on Students' Explanations at the Submicroscopic Level in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different textual versions (macroscopic (control), submicroscopic, and guided imagery) of the explanation of a chemical phenomenon on students' submicroscopic explanation of a related phenomenon was examined. The sample included 152 pre-service science teachers. The three textual versions of the explanation were distributed randomly…

  3. Tensile bond strength of metal bracket bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces with different surface conditionings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoundi, Ms Ahmad; Kamel, M Rahmati; Hashemi, Sh Mahmood; Imani, M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments. Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA). Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primer and adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively. The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (Ptensile bond strength.

  4. Hysteresis of boiling for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszko Robert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of boiling hysteresis on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil is proposed. Hysteresis is an adverse phenomenon, preventing high heat flux systems from thermal stabilization, characterized by a boiling curve variation at an increase and decrease of heat flux density. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS, narrow tunnel structures (NTS and mini-fins covered with the copper wire net (NTS-L. The experiments were carried out with water, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. A detailed analysis of the measurement results identified several cases of type I, II and III for TS, NTS and NTS-L surfaces.

  5. The atmospheric chemistry of trace gases and particulate matter emitted by different land uses in Borneo

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, A. R.; Langford, B.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Robinson, N.; Misztal, P. K.; Heard, D. E.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Jones, C. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Monks, P. S.; Karunaharan, A.; Hornsby, K. E.; Nicolas-Perea, V.; Coe, H.; Gabey, A. M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Whalley, L. K.; Edwards, P. M.; Evans, M. J.; Stone, D.; Ingham, T.; Commane, R.; Furneaux, K. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Nemitz, E.; Seng, Yap Kok; Fowler, D.; Pyle, J. A.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of atmospheric composition over a tropical rainforest and over a nearby oil palm plantation in Sabah, Borneo. The primary vegetation in each of the two landscapes emits very different amounts and kinds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), resulting in distinctive VOC fingerprints in the atmospheric boundary layer for both landscapes. VOCs over the Borneo rainforest are dominated by isoprene and its oxidation products, with a significant additional contribution from monoterpenes. Rather than consuming the main atmospheric oxidant, OH, these high concentrations of VOCs appear to maintain OH, as has been observed previously over Amazonia. The boundary-layer characteristics and mixing ratios of VOCs observed over the Borneo rainforest are different to those measured previously over Amazonia. Compared with the Bornean rainforest, air over the oil palm plantation contains much more isoprene, monoterpenes are relatively less important, and the flower scent, estragole, is prominent. Concentrations of nitrogen oxides are greater above the agro-industrial oil palm landscape than over the rainforest, and this leads to changes in some secondary pollutant mixing ratios (but not, currently, differences in ozone). Secondary organic aerosol over both landscapes shows a significant contribution from isoprene. Primary biological aerosol dominates the super-micrometre aerosol over the rainforest and is likely to be sensitive to land-use change, since the fungal source of the bioaerosol is closely linked to above-ground biodiversity. PMID:22006961

  6. Non-thermally activated chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1987-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: state-of-the art of non-thermally activated chemical processes; basic phenomena in non-thermal chemistry including mechanochemistry, photochemistry, laser chemistry, electrochemistry, photo-electro chemistry, high-field chemistry, magneto chemistry, plasma chemistry, radiation chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, and positronium and muonium chemistry; elementary processes in non-thermal chemistry including nuclear chemistry, interactions of electromagnetic radiations, electrons and heavy particles with matter, ionic elementary processes, elementary processes with excited species, radicalic elementary processes, and energy-induced elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces; and comparative considerations. An appendix with historical data and a subject index is given. 44 figs., 41 tabs., and 544 refs

  7. Understanding the molecular-level chemistry of water plasmas and the effects of surface modification and deposition on a selection of oxide substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Kristina J.

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation first examines electrical discharges used to study wastewater samples for contaminant detection and abatement. Two different water samples contaminated with differing concentrations of either methanol (MeOH) or methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) were used to follow breakdown mechanisms. Emission from CO* was used to monitor the contaminant and for molecular breakdown confirmation through actinometric OES as it can only arise from the carbon-based contaminant in either system. Detection was achieved at concentrations as low as 0.01 ppm, and molecular decomposition was seen at a variety of plasma parameters. This dissertation also explores the vibrational (thetaV), rotational (thetaR) and translational (thetaT) temperatures for a range of diatomic species in different plasma systems. For the majority of the plasma species studied, thetaV are much higher than thetaR and thetaT. This suggests that more energy is partitioned into the vibrational degrees of freedom in our plasmas. The thetaR reported are significantly lower in all the plasma systems studied and this is a result of radical equilibration to the plasma gas temperature. thetaT values show two characteristics; (1) they are less than the thetaV and higher than the theta R and (2) show varying trends with plasma parameters. Radical energetics were examined through comparison of thetaR, thetaT, and thetaV, yielding significant insight on the partitioning of internal and kinetic energies in plasmas. Correlations between energy partitioning results and corresponding radical surface scattering coefficients obtained using our imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique are also presented. Another aspect of plasma process chemistry, namely surface modification via plasma treatment, was investigated through characterization of metal oxides (SiOxNy, nat-SiO2, and dep-SiO2) following their exposure to a range of plasma discharges. Here, emphasis was placed on the surface wettability

  8. Structural characterization of S100A15 reveals a novel zinc coordination site among S100 proteins and altered surface chemistry with functional implications for receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Jill I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100 proteins are a family of small, EF-hand containing calcium-binding signaling proteins that are implicated in many cancers. While the majority of human S100 proteins share 25-65% sequence similarity, S100A7 and its recently identified paralog, S100A15, display 93% sequence identity. Intriguingly, however, S100A7 and S100A15 serve distinct roles in inflammatory skin disease; S100A7 signals through the receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE in a zinc-dependent manner, while S100A15 signals through a yet unidentified G-protein coupled receptor in a zinc-independent manner. Of the seven divergent residues that differentiate S100A7 and S100A15, four cluster in a zinc-binding region and the remaining three localize to a predicted receptor-binding surface. Results To investigate the structural and functional consequences of these divergent clusters, we report the X-ray crystal structures of S100A15 and S100A7D24G, a hybrid variant where the zinc ligand Asp24 of S100A7 has been substituted with the glycine of S100A15, to 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Remarkably, despite replacement of the Asp ligand, zinc binding is retained at the S100A15 dimer interface with distorted tetrahedral geometry and a chloride ion serving as an exogenous fourth ligand. Zinc binding was confirmed using anomalous difference maps and solution binding studies that revealed similar affinities of zinc for S100A15 and S100A7. Additionally, the predicted receptor-binding surface on S100A7 is substantially more basic in S100A15 without incurring structural rearrangement. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that S100A15 retains the ability to coordinate zinc through incorporation of an exogenous ligand resulting in a unique zinc-binding site among S100 proteins. The altered surface chemistry between S100A7 and S100A15 that localizes to the predicted receptor binding site is likely responsible for the differential recognition of distinct

  9. Surface and sliding wear behaviour of different coatings and steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera-Cardenas, E.E. [Universidad Politecnica de Pachuca, Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico)]. E-mail: evera@upp.edu.mx; Vite-Torres, M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: drmanulvite9@hotmail.com; Lewis, R. [University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: roger.lewis@sheffield.ac.uk

    2012-01-15

    In this work, the sliding wear behaviour of the coatings TiN, CrN and WC/C applied on steel substrates was studied using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were carried out in dry conditions, at room temperature (20-23 degrees Celsius and 45% - 50% relative humidity). The average sliding velocity was 0.08 m/s and an amplitude of 2 mm was used. The applied loads were 11.76 N (Po = 1.74 GPa) and 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa). Optical microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of wear scars and spalls and possible causes of their formation. The variation of the friction coefficient against the number of cycles was obtained. This was used to determine more precisely the time (number of cycles) where the coating presented the first signs of wear, in addition Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) was performed, as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and hardness tests on the wear traces, which reinforced the previous observations. Thus it was possible to know the wear life of different coatings and possible causes of variation. Increasing the load was an important factor in the variation of wear life results. But it is also important to consider other factors such as surface roughness and thickness of coatings. [Spanish] En este trabajo se estudio el comportamiento en desgaste por deslizamiento de los recubrimientos de TiN, CrN y WC/C aplicados sobre sustratos de acero. Las pruebas se realizaron con una maquina reciprocante en condiciones secas a temperatura ambiente (20-23 grados centigrados y 45% - 50% de humedad relativa). Se empleo una velocidad promedio de 0.08 m/s y una amplitud de 2 mm. Las cargas aplicadas fueron de 11.76N (Po = 1.74 GPa) y de 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa). Se realizo microscopia optica para observar las caracteristicas de las zonas de desgaste y sus posibles causas de formacion. Se obtuvo graficamente la variacion del coeficiente de friccion con el numero de ciclos. Estos datos se emplearon para determinar con mayor precision el

  10. High-Pressure Chemistry of a Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Compound in the Presence of Different Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Junhyuck; Yim, Narae; Kim, Jaheon; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2016-09-14

    Pressure-dependent structural and chemical changes of the zeolitic imidazolate framework compound ZIF-8 have been investigated using different pressure transmitting media (PTM) up to 4 GPa. The unit cell of ZIF-8 expands and contracts under hydrostatic pressure depending on the solvent molecules used as PTM. When pressurized in water up to 2.2(1) GPa, the unit cell of ZIF-8 reveals a gradual contraction. In contrast, when alcohols are used as PTM, the ZIF-8 unit cell volume initially expands by 1.2% up to 0.3(1) GPa in methanol, and by 1.7% up to 0.6(1) GPa in ethanol. Further pressure increase then leads to a discontinuous second volume expansion by 1.9% at 1.4(1) GPa in methanol and by 0.3% at 2.3(1) GPa in ethanol. The continuous uptake of molecules under pressure, modeled by the residual electron density derived from Rietveld refinements of X-ray powder diffraction, reveals a saturation pressure near 2 GPa. In non-penetrating PTM (silicone oil), ZIF-8 becomes amorphous at 0.9(1) GPa. The structural changes observed in the ZIF-8-PTM system under pressure point to distinct molecular interactions within the pores.

  11. Groundwater, surface-water, and water-chemistry data, Black Mesa area, northeastern Arizona—2013–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Jamie P.; Mason, Jon P.

    2017-12-07

    The Navajo (N) aquifer is an extensive aquifer and the primary source of groundwater in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area in northeastern Arizona. Availability of water is an important issue in northeastern Arizona because of continued water requirements for industrial and municipal use by a growing population and because of low precipitation in the arid climate of the Black Mesa area. Precipitation in the area typically is between 6 and 16 inches per year.The U.S. Geological Survey water-monitoring program in the Black Mesa area began in 1971 and provides information about the long-term effects of groundwater withdrawals from the N aquifer for industrial and municipal uses. This report presents results of data collected as part of the monitoring program in the Black Mesa area from January 2013 to December 2015. The monitoring program includes measurements of (1) groundwater withdrawals (pumping), (2) groundwater levels, (3) spring discharge, (4) surface-water discharge, and (5) groundwater chemistry.In 2013, total groundwater withdrawals were 3,980 acre-feet (ft), in 2014 total withdrawals were 4,170 acre-ft, and in 2015 total withdrawals were 3,970 acre-ft. From 2013 to 2015 total withdrawals varied by less than 5 percent.From 2014 to 2015, annually measured water levels in the Black Mesa area declined in 9 of 15 wells that were available for comparison in the unconfined areas of the N aquifer, and the median change was -0.1 feet. Water levels declined in 3 of 16 wells measured in the confined area of the aquifer. The median change for the confined area of the aquifer was 0.6 feet. From the prestress period (prior to 1965) to 2015, the median water-level change for 34 wells in both the confined and unconfined areas was -13.2 feet; the median water-level changes were -1.7 feet for 16 wells measured in the unconfined areas and -42.3 feet for 18 wells measured in the confined area.Spring flow was measured at four springs in 2014. Flow fluctuated during the

  12. Third Chemistry Conference on Recent Trends in Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.M.; Wheed, S.

    2011-01-01

    The third chemistry conference 2011 on recent trends in chemistry was held from October 17-19, 2001 at Islamabad, Pakistan. More than 65 papers and oral presentation. The scope of the conference was wide open and provides and opportunity for participation of broad spectrum of chemists. This forum provided a platform for the dissemination of the latest research followed by discussion pertaining to new trends in chemistry. This con fence covered different aspects of subjects including analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, industrial chemistry, biochemistry and nano chemistry etc. (A.B.)

  13. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  14. Tribological behaviors of UHMWPE composites with different counter surface morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhen; Yin, Zhongwei; Li, Hulin; Gao, Gengyuan

    2017-12-01

    The influence of counter surface morphologies on hybrid glass fiber (GF) and carbon fiber (CF) filled ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were studied under various contact pressure and sliding speed against GCr15 steel in dry condition. The goals were to investigate the tribological behavior of GF/CF/UHMWPE composite as a kind of water lubricated journal bearing material. The friction and wear behavior of composites were examined using a pin-on-disc tribometer. The morphologies of the worn surface were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser 3D micro-imaging and profile measurement. Generally, the wear rate and friction coefficient of composites increase as the increment of counter surface roughness. The friction coefficient increases firstly and then decrease with an increase in sliding speed and contact pressure for counterface with Ra=0.2 and 3.5 μm, while the friction coefficient decreased for counterface with Ra=0.6 μm.

  15. Evaluation of surface roughness of three different composite resins with three different polishing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzal, Mohammed S; Rathakrishnan, Mensudar; Prakash, Venkatachalam; Vivekanandhan, Paramasivam; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Sukumaran, Vridhachalam Ganapathy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of three composites with three different polishing systems. Composite specimens were made from the Teflon mold with a standardized cavity size (6 mm diameter and 3 mm height). Group I - Filtek Z350XT (Nano clusters), group II - T-Econom plus (Microhybrid), group III - G-aenial Flo (True Nano). The samples were cured for 30 s from both sides with the matrices in place. The 60 samples were divided into 3 groups (N = 20), which accounted for 40 surfaces, (n = 20 × 2 = 40) in each groups. Each group were subdivided into four subgroups based on the type polishing material, subgroup A - Control, subgroup B - Astrobrush, subgroup C - Astropol, and subgroup D - Soflex spiral wheel. The samples of all groups except group A (control) were finished and polished according to the manufacture's instruction. After polishing, the roughness (Ra) of the resin composite of all the specimens were measured using a profilometer. Soflex spiral wheel (group D) significantly had the least roughness (Ra) value as compared to the other groups. Among the three resin composites tested, G-aenial Flo exhibited least Ra value due to its reduced filler size and its uniform distribution.

  16. Performances of different metals in optical fibre-based surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For the past few years, intense investigations were done on various sensing techniques, which may be employed for ... vector parallel to the incident plane) coincide with those of the surface plasmon wave, this light resonantly .... critical angle of the fibre and ncl is the refractive index of the cladding of the fibre. 2.6 Sensitivity ...

  17. Silver nanoprisms self-assembly on differently functionalized silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipavicius, J; Chodosovskaja, A; Beganskiene, A; Kareiva, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work colloidal silica/silver nanoprisms (NPRs) composite coatings were made. Firstly colloidal silica sols were synthesized by sol-gel method and produced coatings on glass by dip-coating technique. Next coatings were silanized by (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (AEAPTMS), (3- Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Silver NPRs where synthesized via seed-mediated method and high yield of 94±15 nm average edge length silver NPRs were obtained with surface plasmon resonance peak at 921 nm. Silica-Silver NPRs composite coatings obtained by selfassembly on silica coated-functionalized surface. In order to find the most appropriate silanization way for Silver NPRs self-assembly, the composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), water contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) methods. Results have showed that surface functionalization is necessary to achieve self-assembled Ag NPRs layer. MPTMS silanized coatings resulted sparse distribution of Ag NPRs. Most homogeneous, even distribution composite coatings obtained on APTES functionalized silica coatings, while AEAPTMS induced strong aggregation of Silver NPRs

  18. Silver nanoprisms self-assembly on differently functionalized silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipavicius, J.; Chodosovskaja, A.; Beganskiene, A.; Kareiva, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this work colloidal silica/silver nanoprisms (NPRs) composite coatings were made. Firstly colloidal silica sols were synthesized by sol-gel method and produced coatings on glass by dip-coating technique. Next coatings were silanized by (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (AEAPTMS), (3- Mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). Silver NPRs where synthesized via seed-mediated method and high yield of 94±15 nm average edge length silver NPRs were obtained with surface plasmon resonance peak at 921 nm. Silica-Silver NPRs composite coatings obtained by selfassembly on silica coated-functionalized surface. In order to find the most appropriate silanization way for Silver NPRs self-assembly, the composite coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), water contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) methods. Results have showed that surface functionalization is necessary to achieve self-assembled Ag NPRs layer. MPTMS silanized coatings resulted sparse distribution of Ag NPRs. Most homogeneous, even distribution composite coatings obtained on APTES functionalized silica coatings, while AEAPTMS induced strong aggregation of Silver NPRs.

  19. Characterization of neutrophil adhesion to different titanium surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing blood; however, direct contact between the oxide layer of the implant and neutrophils has not been completely described. The aim of the present study is to compare ... Titanium surfaces; neutrophil morphology; adhesion molecules; inflammatory response; flow cytome- try; scanning electron microscopy. 1. Introduction.

  20. Performances of different metals in optical fibre-based surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    an angle θ and the right-hand side shows the real part of the propagation constant of the surface plasmon. 2.4 Reflection coefficient. The expression for the amplitude reflection coefficient of the p-polarized incident light can be obtained by using the matrix method for N-layer model [15]. The matrix method is very easy and ...

  1. Estimation of surface impedance using different types of microphone arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richard, Antoine Philippe André; Fernandez Grande, Efren; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    , the performances of a rigid spherical array and a double layer planar array are examined. The use of sparse array processing methods and conventional regulariation approaches are studied. In addition, the influence of the size of the sample on the surface impedance estimation is investigated using both...

  2. Surface free energy of polypropylene and polycarbonate solidifying at different solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibowski, Emil; Terpilowski, Konrad

    2009-01-01

    Advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, glycerol and diiodomethane were measured on polypropylene (PP) and polycarbonate (PC) sample surfaces which solidified at Teflon, glass or stainless steel as matrix surfaces. Then from the contact angle hystereses (CAH) the apparent free energies γ s tot of the surfaces were evaluated. The original PP surface is practically nonpolar, possessing small electron donor interaction (γ s - =1.91mJ/m 2 ), as determined from the advancing contact angles of these liquids. It may result from impurities of the polymerization process. However, it increases up to 8-10 mJ/m 2 for PP surfaces contacted with the solids. The PC surfaces both original and modified show practically the same γ s - =6.56.7mJ/m 2 . No electron acceptor interaction is found on the surfaces. The γ s tot of modified PP and PC surfaces depend on the kind of probe liquid and contacted solid surface. The modified PP γ s tot values determined from CAH of polar liquids are greater than that of original surface and they increase in the sequence: Teflon, glass, stainless steel surface, at which they solidified. No clear dependence is observed between γ s tot and dielectric constant or dipole moment of the polar probe liquids. The changes in γ s tot of the polymer surfaces are due to the polymer nature and changes in its surface structure caused by the structure and force field of the contacting solid. It has been confirmed by AFM images.

  3. Comparison of nine different real-time PCR chemistries for qualitative and quantitative applications in GMO detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buh Gasparic, Meti; Tengs, Torstein; La Paz, Jose Luis; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Pla, Maria; Esteve, Teresa; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2010-03-01

    Several techniques have been developed for detection and quantification of genetically modified organisms, but quantitative real-time PCR is by far the most popular approach. Among the most commonly used real-time PCR chemistries are TaqMan probes and SYBR green, but many other detection chemistries have also been developed. Because their performance has never been compared systematically, here we present an extensive evaluation of some promising chemistries: sequence-unspecific DNA labeling dyes (SYBR green), primer-based technologies (AmpliFluor, Plexor, Lux primers), and techniques involving double-labeled probes, comprising hybridization (molecular beacon) and hydrolysis (TaqMan, CPT, LNA, and MGB) probes, based on recently published experimental data. For each of the detection chemistries assays were included targeting selected loci. Real-time PCR chemistries were subsequently compared for their efficiency in PCR amplification and limits of detection and quantification. The overall applicability of the chemistries was evaluated, adding practicability and cost issues to the performance characteristics. None of the chemistries seemed to be significantly better than any other, but certain features favor LNA and MGB technology as good alternatives to TaqMan in quantification assays. SYBR green and molecular beacon assays can perform equally well but may need more optimization prior to use.

  4. Interstellar chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature. PMID:16894148

  5. Physical chemistry II essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    1992-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Physical Chemistry II includes reaction mechanisms, theoretical approaches to chemical kinetics, gravitational work, electrical and magnetic work, surface work, kinetic theory, collisional and transport properties of gases, statistical mechanics, matter and waves, quantum mechanics, and rotations and vibrations of atoms and molecules.

  6. A quantum chemistry study on surface reactivity of pristine and carbon-substituted AlN nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdaviani, Amir; Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Esrafili, Ali; Behzadi, Hadi

    2013-09-01

    A density functional theory investigation was performed to predict the surface reactivity of pristine and carbon-substituted (6,0) single-walled aluminum nitride nanotubes (AlNNTs). The properties determined include the electrostatic potentials VS(r) and average local ionization energies ĪS(r) on the surfaces of the investigated tub