WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface charge densities

  1. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    dissociation of these groups, result into a pH dependent surface charge whose density can be measured by acid-base titration. The surface charge density determined by such method is essentially measured relative to the unknown condition of the oxide/liquid interface prior to reagent addition (i.e. at the point of zero ...

  2. Scattered surface charge density: A tool for surface characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Naydenov, Borislav

    2011-11-28

    We demonstrate the use of nonlocal scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements to characterize the local structure of adspecies in their states where they are significantly less perturbed by the probe, which is accomplished by mapping the amplitude and phase of the scattered surface charge density. As an example, we study single-H-atom adsorption on the n-type Si(100)-(4 × 2) surface, and demonstrate the existence of two different configurations that are distinguishable using the nonlocal approach and successfully corroborated by density functional theory. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  3. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    . ... include manufacture of aerospace housing, automotive and jet engines and lead acid batteries. [2]. In specialised ... diameter of one hydrated ion) from the surface of the oxide (ψd) are normally measured through methods such as ...

  4. Modeling the Electric Potential and Surface Charge Density Near Charged Thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Matthew Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Thundercloud charge separation, or the process by which the bottom portion of a cloud gathers charge and the top portion of the cloud gathers the opposite charge, is still not thoroughly understood. Whatever the mechanism, though, a charge separation definitely exists and can lead to electrostatic discharge via cloud-to-cloud lightning and cloud-to-ground lightning. We wish to examine the latter form, in which upward leaders from Earth connect with downward leaders from the cloud to form a plasma channel and produce lightning. Much of the literature indicates that the lower part of a thundercloud becomes negatively charged while the upper part becomes positively charged via convective charging, although the opposite polarity can certainly exist along with various, complex intra-cloud currents. It is estimated that >90% of cloud-to-ground lightning is "negative lightning," or the flow of charges from the bottom of the cloud, while the remaining the flow of charges from the top of the cloud. We wish to understand the electric potential surrounding charged thunderclouds as well as the resulting charge density on the surface of Earth below them. In this paper we construct a simple and adaptable model that captures the very basic features of the cloud/ground system and that exhibits conditions favorable for both forms of lightning. In this way, we provide a practical application of electrostatic dipole physics as well as the method of images that can serve as a starting point for further modeling and analysis by students.

  5. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...

  6. Estimation of Nanodiamond Surface Charge Density from Zeta Potential and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yi

    2017-04-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used to study their interactions with various biological macromolecules. Such simulations generally require detailed knowledge of the surface composition of the NP under investigation. Even for some well-characterized nanoparticles, however, this knowledge is not always available. An example is nanodiamond, a nanoscale diamond particle with surface dominated by oxygen-containing functional groups. In this work, we explore using the harmonic restraint method developed by Venable et al., to estimate the surface charge density (σ) of nanodiamonds. Based on the Gouy-Chapman theory, we convert the experimentally determined zeta potential of a nanodiamond to an effective charge density (σ eff ), and then use the latter to estimate σ via molecular dynamics simulations. Through scanning a series of nanodiamond models, we show that the above method provides a straightforward protocol to determine the surface charge density of relatively large (> ∼100 nm) NPs. Overall, our results suggest that despite certain limitation, the above protocol can be readily employed to guide the model construction for MD simulations, which is particularly useful when only limited experimental information on the NP surface composition is available to a modeler.

  7. A Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Cylindrical nanoparticle with Controlled Surface Charge Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Choi, Sung-Min; Kline, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant molecules in aqueous solution self assemble into various micellar structures such as sphere, rod, vesicle, and lamellar, above critical micelle concentration (CMC). Self-assembled surfactants systems, therefore, have been very popular as templates for preparing various nanostructured materials. Due to their dynamic nature, however, micellar structures are very susceptible to solution conditions such as temperature, concentration, pH and pressure, limiting their applications. In this study, we have developed rigid rod-like nanoparticles with controlled surface charge density by the free radical polymerization of cationic surfactants with polymerizable counterions, cetyltrimethylammonium 4- vinylbenzoate (CTVB), with varying concentration of sodium styrenesulfonate (NaSS). The structure and surface charge density of the nanoparticles were characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and zeta potential measurements

  8. Improving energy conversion efficiency for triboelectric nanogenerator with capacitor structure by maximizing surface charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianming; Guo, Hengyu; Yue, Xule; Gao, Jun; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-02-07

    Nanogenerators with capacitor structures based on piezoelectricity, pyroelectricity, triboelectricity and electrostatic induction have been extensively investigated. Although the electron flow on electrodes is well understood, the maximum efficiency-dependent structure design is not clearly known. In this paper, a clear understanding of triboelectric generators with capacitor structures is presented by the investigation of polydimethylsiloxane-based composite film nanogenerators, indicating that the generator, in fact, acts as both an energy storage and output device. Maximum energy storage and output depend on the maximum charge density on the dielectric polymer surface, which is determined by the capacitance of the device. The effective thickness of polydimethylsiloxane can be greatly reduced by mixing a suitable amount of conductive nanoparticles into the polymer, through which the charge density on the polymer surface can be greatly increased. This finding can be applied to all the triboelectric nanogenerators with capacitor structures, and it provides an important guide to the structural design for nanogenerators. It is demonstrated that graphite particles with sizes of 20-40 nm and 3.0% mass mixed into the polydimethylsiloxane can reduce 34.68% of the effective thickness of the dielectric film and increase the surface charges by 111.27% on the dielectric film. The output power density of the triboelectric nanogenerator with the composite polydimethylsiloxane film is 3.7 W m(-2), which is 2.6 times as much as that of the pure polydimethylsiloxane film.

  9. Surface-plasmon dispersion relation for the inhomogeneous charge-density medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsh, O.K.; Agarwal, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The surface-plasmon dispersion relation is derived for the plane-bounded electron gas when there is an inhomogeneous charge-density distribution in the plasma. The hydrodynamical model is used. Both cphi and dcphi/dx are taken to be continuous at the surface of the slab, where cphi is the scalar potential. The dispersion relation is compared with the theoretical works of Stern and Ferrell and of Harsh and Agarwal. It is also compared with the observations of Kunz. A dispersion relation for the volume-plasmon oscillations is derived which resembles the well-known relation of Bohm and Pines

  10. A surface structural model for ferrihydrite I: Sites related to primary charge, molar mass, and mass density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2009-01-01

    A multisite surface complexation (MUSIC) model for ferrihydrite (Fh) has been developed. The surface structure and composition of Fh nanoparticles are described in relation to ion binding and surface charge development. The site densities of the various reactive surface groups, the molar mass, the

  11. Multiple charge density wave states at the surface of TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ling; Kraft, Aaron M.; Sharma, Bishnu; Singh, Manoj; Walmsley, Philip; Fisher, Ian R.; Boyer, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    We studied TbT e3 using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in the temperature range of 298-355 K. Our measurements detect a unidirectional charge density wave (CDW) state in the surface Te layer with a wave vector consistent with that of the bulk qCDW=0.30 ±0.01 c* . However, unlike previous STM measurements, and differing from measurements probing the bulk, we detect two perpendicular orientations for the unidirectional CDW with no directional preference for the in-plane crystal axes (a or c axis) and no noticeable difference in wave vector magnitude. In addition, we find regions in which the bidirectional CDW states coexist. We propose that observation of two unidirectional CDW states indicates a decoupling of the surface Te layer from the rare-earth block layer below, and that strain variations in the Te surface layer drive the local CDW direction to the specific unidirectional or, in rare occurrences, bidirectional CDW orders observed. This indicates that similar driving mechanisms for CDW formation in the bulk, where anisotropic lattice strain energy is important, are at play at the surface. Furthermore, the wave vectors for the bidirectional order we observe differ from those theoretically predicted for checkerboard order competing with stripe order in a Fermi-surface nesting scenario, suggesting that factors beyond Fermi-surface nesting drive CDW order in TbT e3 . Finally, our temperature-dependent measurements provide evidence for localized CDW formation above the bulk transition temperature TCDW.

  12. Calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density by measurement of the three-phase contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, H; Nikolov, A; Wasan, D T

    2012-11-01

    The silica/silicon wafer is widely used in the semiconductor industry in the manufacture of electronic devices, so it is essential to understand its physical chemistry and determine the surface potential at the silica wafer/water interface. However, it is difficult to measure the surface potential of a silica/silicon wafer directly due to its high electric resistance. In the present study, the three-phase contact angle (TPCA) on silica is measured as a function of the pH. The surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/water surface are calculated by a model based on the Young-Lippmann equation in conjunction with the Gouy-Chapman model for the electric double layer. In measurements of the TPCA on silica, two distinct regions were identified with a boundary at pH 9.5-showing a dominance of the surface ionization of silanol groups below pH 9.5 and a dominance of the dissolution of silica into the aqueous solution above pH 9.5. Since the surface chemistry changes above pH 9.5, the model is applied to solutions below pH 9.5 (ionization dominant) for the calculation of the surface potential and surface charge density at the silica/aqueous interface. In order to evaluate the model, a galvanic mica cell was made of a mica sheet and the surface potential was measured directly at the mica/water interface. The model results are also validated by experimental data from the literature, as well as the results obtained by the potentiometric titration method and the electro-kinetic measurements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of surface charge density in cationic liposome-promoted dendritic cell maturation and vaccine-induced immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifan; Zhuang, Yan; Xie, Xiaofang; Wang, Ce; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Dongmei; Zeng, Jianqiang; Cai, Lintao

    2011-05-01

    Cationic liposomes have emerged as a novel adjuvant and antigen delivery system to enhance vaccine efficacy. However, the role of surface charge density in cationic liposome-regulated immune responses has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we prepared a series of DOTAP/DOPC cationic liposomes with different surface densities by incorporating varying amounts of DOPC (a neutral lipid) into DOTAP (a cationic lipid). The results showed that DOTAP/DOPC cationic liposome-regulated immune responses relied on the surface charge density, and might occur through ROS signaling. The liposomes with a relatively high charge density, such as DOTAP/DOPC 5 : 0 and 4 : 1 liposomes, potently enhanced dendritic cell maturation, ROS generaion, antigen uptake, as well as the production of OVA-specific IgG2a and IFN-γ. In contrast, low-charge liposomes, such as DOTAP/DOPC 1 : 4 liposome, failed to promote immune responses even at high concentrations, confirming that the immunoregulatory effect of cationic liposomes is mostly attributable to their surface charge density. Moreover, the DOTAP/DOPC 1 : 4 liposome suppressed anti-OVA antibody responses in vivo. Overall, maintaining an appropriate surface charge is crucial for optimizing the adjuvant effect of cationic liposomes and enhancing the efficacy of liposome-based vaccines.

  14. Fermi Surface Evolution Across Multiple Charge Density Wave Transitions in ErTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R.G.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Brouet, V.; /Orsay, LPS; He, R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The Fermi surface (FS) of ErTe{sub 3} is investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Low temperature measurements reveal two incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) gaps created by perpendicular FS nesting vectors. A large {Delta}{sub 1} = 175 meV gap arising from a CDW with c* - q{sub CDW1} {approx} 0.70(0)c* is in good agreement with the expected value. A second, smaller {Delta}{sub 2} = 50 meV gap is due to a second CDW with a* - q{sub CDW2} {approx} 0.68(5)a*. The temperature dependence of the FS, the two gaps and possible interaction between the CDWs are examined.

  15. Determination of surface charge density of α-alumina by acid-base titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W. Ntalikwa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface charge density (σo of colloidal alpha alumina suspended in various 1:1 electrolytes was measured using acid-base titration. An autotitrator capable of dispensing accurately 25 plus or minus 0.1 μL of titrant was used. The pH and temperature in the titration cell were monitored using single junction electrodes and platinum resistance thermometers, respectively. A constant supply of nitrogen gas in the cell was used to maintain inert conditions. The whole set up was interfaced with a computer for easy data acquisition. It was observed that the material exhibits a point of zero charge (PZC, this occurred at pH of 7.8 plus or minus 0.1, 7.6 plus or minus 0.2, 8.5 plus or minus 0.1, 8.3 plus or minus 0.1 for NaCl, NaNO3, CsCl and CsNO3 systems, respectively. It was also observed that below PZC, σo increases with increase in electrolyte concentration (Co whereas above PZC, σo decreases with increase in Co. It was concluded that σo of this material is a function of pH and Co and that its polarity can be varied through zero by varying these parameters.

  16. Membrane effects of Vitamin E deficiency: bioenergetic and surface-charge-density studies of skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintanilha, A.T.; Packer, L.; Szyszlo Davies, J.M.; Racanelli, T.L.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1981-12-01

    Vitamin E (dl-..cap alpha..-tocopherol) deficiency in rats increased the sensitivity of liver and muscle mitochondria to damage during incubation at various temperatures, irradiation with visible light, or steady state respiration with substrates. In all cases, vitamin E deficient mitochondria exhibited increased lipid peroxidation, reduced transmembrane potential, decreased respiratory coupling, and lower rates of electron transport, compared to control mitochondria. Muscle mitochondria always showed greater negative inner membrane surface charge density, and were also more sensitive to damage than were liver mitochondria. Vitamin E deficient mitochondria also showed slightly more negative inner membrane surface charge density compared to controls. The relationship between greater negative surface potential and increased sensitivity to damage observed, provides for a new and sensitive method to further probe the role of surface charge in membrane structure and function. Implications of these new findings for the well known human muscle myopathies and those experimentally induced by Vitamin E deficiency in animals, are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of surface charge density and surface potential by electrophoretic mobility for solid lipid nanoparticles and human brain-microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Chen, I-Chun

    2007-09-27

    Electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential, surface charge density, and surface potential of cacao butter-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) were analyzed in this study. Electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential were determined experimentally. Surface charge density and surface potential were evaluated theoretically via incorporation of ion condensation theory with the relationship between surface charge density and surface potential. The results revealed that the lower the pH value, the weaker the electrostatic properties of the negatively charged SLN and HBMEC. A higher content of cacao butter or a slower stirring rate yielded a larger SLN and stronger surface electricity. On the contrary, storage led to instability of SLN suspension and weaker electrical behavior because of hydrolysis of ionogenic groups on the particle surfaces. Also, high H+ concentration resulted in excess adsorption of H+ onto HBMEC, rendering charge reversal and cell death. The largest normalized discrepancy between surface potential and zeta potential occurred at pH = 7. For a fixed biocolloidal species, the discrepancy was nearly invariant at high pH value. However, the discrepancy followed the order of electrical intensity for HBMEC system at low pH value because mammalian cells were sensitive to H+. The present study provided a practical method to obtain surface charge properties by capillary electrophoresis.

  18. Effect of the surface charge density on the creep of copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhmakin, Yu. D.; Rybyanets, V. A.; Nevskii, S. A.; Gromov, V. E.

    2015-01-01

    The creep of polycrystalline copper under the action of high and low electric potentials is studied. At potentials of ±4 kV and ±5 V, the steady-state creep rate decreases, and the effect in the former case is weaker than in the latter by a factor of 2.5. This difference is caused by the fact that the charge density in the sample-capacitor bank system at the high electric potentials is lower than at the low potentials.

  19. Extracting dielectric fixed charge density on highly doped crystalline-silicon surfaces using photoconductance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, A.; Hoex, B.

    2017-11-01

    A novel method for the extraction of fixed interface charge, Qf, and the surface recombination parameters, Sn0 and Sp0, from the injection-level dependent effective minority carrier lifetime measurements is presented. Unlike conventional capacitance-voltage measurements, this technique can be applied to highly doped surfaces provided the surface carrier concentration transitions into strong depletion or inversion with increased carrier injection. By simulating the injection level dependent Auger-corrected inverse lifetime curve of symmetrically passivated and diffused samples after sequential annealing and corona charging, it was revealed that Qf, Sn0, and Sp0 have unique signatures. Therefore, these important electronic parameters, in some instances, can independently be resolved. Furthermore, it was shown that this non-linear lifetime behaviour is exhibited on both p-type and n-type diffused inverted surfaces, by demonstrating the approach with phosphorous diffused n+pn+ structures and boron diffused p+np+ structures passivated with aluminium oxide (AlOx) and silicon nitride, respectively (SiNx). The results show that the approximation of a mid-gap Shockley-Read-Hall defect level with equal capture cross sections is able to, in the samples studied in this work, reproduce the observed injection level dependent lifetime behaviour.

  20. Controlling surface charge and spin density oscillations by Dirac plasmon interaction in thin topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyli, M. Ameen; Hrtoň, M.; Nechaev, I. A.; Nikitin, A. Y.; Echenique, P. M.; Silkin, V. M.; Aizpurua, J.; Esteban, R.

    2018-03-01

    Thin topological insulator (TI) films support optical and acoustic plasmonic modes characterized by effective net charge or net spin density, respectively. We combine many-body and electromagnetic calculations to study how these modes can be selectively excited at films and nanodisks at infrared and THz frequencies. We first discuss the excitation of propagating plasmons in a thin film by a point dipolar source. We emphasize how changing the distance between the dipolar source and the film allows us to control the relative strength of the acoustic and optical plasmons and thus to excite net-spin or net-charge waves on demand. The acoustic and optical modes in a nanodisk structure can be efficiently tuned by changing the size of the disk or by applying electrostatic gating. Furthermore, these modes can be confined to regions of dimensions much smaller than the wavelength. The control of the excitation of acoustic and optical modes indicates that thin topological insulators are a promising system to manipulate the spin and charge properties of the plasmonic response, with potential applications in fast, compact, and electrically-controlled spintronic devices.

  1. Charge-density waves studied at the surface and at the atomic scale in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Christophe; Wang, Zhao-Zhong; Monceau, Pierre; Brazovskii, Serguei

    2012-01-01

    We have studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the two charge-density wave (CDW) transitions in NbSe 3 on in situ cleaved (b,c) plane. We could identify the three types of chains existing inside a single unit cell as well as characterize how both CDWs are distributed on these elementary chains. We also followed between 5 and 140 K the temperature dependence of first-order CDW satellite spots, obtained from the Fourier transform of the STM images, to extract the surface critical temperatures (T s ). Whereas the high-temperature CDW appears to have comparable critical temperature to the bulk one, the low-T CDW transition occurs at T 2s =70–75K, more than 15 K above the bulk T 2b =59K while at exactly the same wave number. A reasonable mechanism for such an unusually high surface enhancement is a softening of transverse phonon modes involved in the CDW formation.

  2. Theory to determine the critical charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, F.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we theoretically determine the critical charge density in the system earthed metallic sphere-uniformly charged dielectric plane, in presence of earthed surfaces. This is a situation frequently encountered in industrial condition and has a great importance to evaluate the danger of the electrostatic discharges. (author)

  3. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  4. Full charge-density calculation of the surface energy of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J..; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and the work function of the 4d metals by means of an energy functional based on a self-consistent, spherically symmetric atomic-sphere potential. In this approach the kinetic energy is calculated completely within the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) by mea...

  5. Protein structural transition at negatively charged electrode surfaces. Effects of temperature and current density

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černocká, Hana; Ostatná, Veronika; Paleček, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 174, AUG 2015 (2015), s. 356-360 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15479S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00956S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Bovine serum albumin * sensing of surface-attached protein stability * protein structural transition at Hg Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.803, year: 2015

  6. Modern charge-density analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on developments from the past 10-15 years, this volume presents an objective overview of the research in charge density analysis. The most promising methodologies are included, in addition to powerful interpretative tools and a survey of important areas of research.

  7. Interaction between heterogeneously charged surfaces: surface patches and charge modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2013-02-01

    When solid surfaces are immersed in aqueous solutions, some of their charges can dissociate and leave behind charged patches on the surface. Although the charges are distributed heterogeneously on the surface, most of the theoretical models treat them as homogeneous. For overall non-neutral surfaces, the assumption of surface charge homogeneity is rather reasonable since the leading terms of two such interacting surfaces depend on the nonzero average charge. However, for overall neutral surfaces the nature of the surface charge distribution is crucial in determining the intersurface interaction. In the present work we study the interaction between two charged surfaces across an aqueous solution for several charge distributions. The analysis is preformed within the framework of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann theory. For periodic charge distributions the interaction is found to be repulsive at small separations, unless the two surface distributions are completely out-of-phase with respect to each other. For quenched random charge distributions we find that due to the presence of the ionic solution in between the surfaces, the intersurface repulsion dominates over the attraction in the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The effect of quenched charge heterogeneity is found to be particularly substantial in the case of large charged domains.

  8. Charge densities and charge noise in mesoscopic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We introduce a hierarchy of density of states to characterize the charge distribution in a mesoscopic conductor. At the bottom of this hierarchy are the partial density of states which represent the contribution to the local density of states if both the incident and the out-going scattering channel is prescribed. The partial density ...

  9. How good are Hartree-Fock charge densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, X.

    1975-01-01

    The principle characteristics of Hartree-Fock charge densities (mean square radius, surface thickness, quantum fluctuation) calculated using different effective interactions are discussed in terms of their nuclear matter properties (Fermi momentum, effective mass, incompressibility). A comparison with the experimental charge distributions is made. Differences between the charge densities of neighbouring nuclei (isotope and isotone shifts) are also considered and the main factors governing these effects are discussed [fr

  10. Surface-enhanced charge-density-wave instability in underdoped Bi2Sr2-xLaxCuO6+delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosen, J. A.; Comin, R.; Levy, G.; Fournier, D.; Zhu, Z. -H.; Ludbrook, B.; Veenstra, C. N.; Nicolaou, A.; Wong, D.; Dosanjh, P.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Blake, G. R.; White, F.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Sutarto, R.; He, F.; Pereira, A. Frano; Lu, Y.; Keimer, B.; Sawatzky, G.; Petaccia, L.; Damascelli, A.

    Neutron and X-ray scattering experiments have provided mounting evidence for spin and charge ordering phenomena in underdoped cuprates. These range from early work on stripe correlations in Nd-LSCO to the latest discovery of charge-density-waves in YBa2Cu3O6 + x. Both phenomena are characterized by

  11. Exploring effective interactions through transition charge density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov; effective interactions; transition charge density. PACS Nos 21.60.-n; 21.10.-k; 23.20.-g; 27.50.+e. 1. Introduction ... Transition charge density study of 70,72,74,76Ge nuclei models like Hartree–Fock, ...... [31] P N Tripathi and S K Sharma, Phys. Rev. C34, 1081 (1986). [32] P K Rath and S K Sharma ...

  12. Central depression of nuclear charge density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Yanyun; Ren Zhongzhou; Wang Zaijun; Dong Tiekuang

    2010-01-01

    The center-depressed nuclear charge distributions are investigated with the parametrized distribution and the relativistic mean-field theory, and their corresponding charge form factors are worked out with the phase shift analysis method. The central depression of nuclear charge distribution of 46 Ar and 44 S is supported by the relativistic mean-field calculation. According to the calculation, the valence protons in 46 Ar and 44 S prefer to occupy the 1d 3/2 state rather than the 2s 1/2 state, which is different from that in the less neutron-rich argon and sulfur isotopes. As a result, the central proton densities of 46 Ar and 44 S are highly depressed, and so are their central charge densities. The charge form factors of some argon and sulfur isotopes are presented, and the minima of the charge form factors shift upward and inward when the central nuclear charge distributions are more depressed. Besides, the effect of the central depression on the charge form factors is studied with a parametrized distribution, when the root-mean-square charge radii remain constant.

  13. Do plasma proteins distinguish between liposomes of varying charge density?

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2012-03-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) are one of the most employed nonviral nanovector systems in gene therapy. However, their transfection efficiency is strongly affected by interactions with plasma components, that lead to the formation of a "protein corona" onto CL surface. The interactions between nanoparticles entering the body and biomolecules have an essential role for their biodistribution. Because the knowledge of proteins adsorbed onto vector surface could be useful in the screening of new, more efficient and more biocompatible liposomal formulations, the behavior of three CLs with different membrane charge densities was investigated. The proteins of the three coronas were identified by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified with label-free spectral counting strategy. Fibrinogen displayed higher association with CLs with high membrane charge density, while apolipoproteins and C4b-binding protein with CLs with low membrane charge density. These results are discussed in terms of the different lipid compositions of CLs and may have a deep biological impact for in vivo applications. Surface charge of nanoparticles is emerging as a relevant factor determining the corona composition after interaction with plasma proteins. Remarkably, it is also shown that the charge of the protein corona formed around CLs is strongly related to their membrane charge density. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Spacecraft Surface Charging Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    discharges however produce replacement currents that can be global. The local effect of punchthrough is illustrated by a small dipole model for the...St’rap I Farda or TEK7103 Scope Power Dipole -- Line tenna To To PA HP05000 and Spectrum X-Y Analyzer Plotter Figure 61. Test setup for surface...Testing Seminar, Los Angeles, CA, p. 77-82, 19817. Levadou, F., "Proprietes Electriques Des Materiaux." Space Environment: Prevention of Risks Related

  15. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Wall

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement.

  16. Transition density of charge-exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The transition density between parent and analogue states is studied with special reference to its role in charge-exchange nuclear reactions. The structure of the target nucleus is described in a perturbative approach, in which the Coulomb and asymmetry potentials mix the eigenstates of a charge-independent single-particle Hamiltonian. In this model formulae are derived for the transition density, the Coulomb displacement energy and the neutron-proton density difference, and their relationship is used to estimate the transition density. This estimate shows that: the largest contribution comes from the density of the excess neutrons; the weight of the Coulomb-mixing effect is small up to excess neutron number 10, and grows rapidly beyond; the weight of the core polarization term induced by the excess neutrons is modest and is the same for all nuclei. It is indicated that the Coulomb effect may explain the departure from the Lane model of nucleon charge-exchange scattering found for heavy nuclei, whereas the core polarization may account for the observed anomalous dependence of the deg 0 pion charge-exchange cross section on the number of excess neutrons. (author)

  17. Meaningful structural descriptors from charge density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalke, Dietmar

    2011-08-16

    This paper provides a short introduction to the basics of electron density investigations. The two predominant approaches for the modelling and various interpretations of electron density distributions are presented. Their potential translations into chemical concepts are explained. The focus of the article lies on the deduction of chemical properties from charge density studies in some selected main group compounds. The relationship between the obtained numerical data and commonly accepted simple chemical concepts unfortunately is not always straightforward, and often the chemist relies on heuristic connections rather than rigorously defined ones. This article tries to demonstrate how charge density analyses can shed light on aspects of chemical bonding and reactivity resulting from the determined bonding situation. Sometimes this helps to identify misconceptions and sets the scene for new unconventional synthetic approaches. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The 7 × 1 Fermi Surface Reconstruction in a Two-dimensional f -electron Charge Density Wave System: PrTe3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Kim, Hyun Woo; Denlinger, J. D.; Kim, Heejung; Kim, Junwon; Kim, Kyoo; Min, B. I.; Min, B. H.; Kwon, Y. S.; Kang, J.-S.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure of a charge density wave (CDW) system PrTe3 and its modulated structure in the CDW phase have been investigated by employing ARPES, XAS, Pr 4 f RPES, and first-principles band structure calculation. Pr ions are found to be nearly trivalent, supporting the CDW instability in the metallic Te sheets through partial filling. Finite Pr 4 f spectral weight is observed near the Fermi level, suggesting the non-negligible Pr 4 f contribution to the CDW formation through the Pr 4 f -Te 5p hybridization. The two-fold symmetric features in the measured Fermi surface (FS) of PrTe3 are explained by the calculated FS for the assumed 7 × 1 CDW supercell formation in Te sheets. The shadow bands and the corresponding very weak FSs are observed, which originate from both the band folding due to the 3D interaction of Te sheets with neighboring Pr-Te layers and that due to the CDW-induced FS reconstruction. The straight vertical FSs are observed along kz, demonstrating the nearly 2D character for the near-EF states. The observed linear dichroism reveals the in-plane orbital character of the near-EF Te 5p states. PMID:27453329

  19. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  20. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biljakovic, K. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: katica@ifs.hr; Staresinic, D.; Dominko, D. [Institute of Physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Lasjaunias, J.C. [Institut Neel, Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-01

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties.

  1. Charge density glass from fictions to facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljakovic, K.; Staresinic, D.; Dominko, D.; Lasjaunias, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years ago Fukuyama [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45 (1978) 1474] predicted a transition from charge density wave (CDW) state to the charge density glass (CDG) at a finite temperature as the consequence of the competition between the uniform commensurability pinning and the random impurity pinning. We present strong evidence that the CDG phase indeed exists as a generic feature of density wave systems. However, it arises from the competition of the random impurity pinning and the electrostatic intra-CDW interaction which tends to establish a uniform phase at low temperature. The glass transition occurs at the temperature at which the free carriers cannot efficiently screen the phase distortions. The characteristic length scale of the disorder, i.e. the size of the phase coherent domains, governs the glass properties

  2. Charge transport by holographic Fermi surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Thomas; Liu, Hong; McGreevy, John; Vegh, David

    2013-01-01

    We compute the contribution to the conductivity from holographic Fermi surfaces obtained from probe fermions in an AdS charged black hole. This requires calculating a certain part of the one-loop correction to a vector propagator on the charged black hole geometry. We find that the current dissipation is as efficient as possible and the transport lifetime coincides with the single-particle lifetime. In particular, in the case where the spectral density is that of a marginal Fermi liquid, the resistivity is linear in temperature.

  3. Polarization Charge Density in Strained Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Noah

    Graphene, the world's first truly two-dimensional material, is unique for having an electronic structure described by an effective Lorentz invariant theory. One important consequence is that the ratio or Coulomb energy to kinetic energy is a constant, depending only on conditions within the lattice rather than on the average charge density as in a typical Galilean invariant material. Given this unusual property, a natural question would be how do phenomena, such as screening of a Coulomb impurity, happen in graphene? Moreover, how does the addition of uniaxial strain enhance or diminish this behavior? Here I discuss our work to calculate the charge density distribution in a lattice of strained graphene under the effect of an external Coulomb impurity. Graphene can have its band structure significantly altered by the application of uniaxial strain. Two cases are here explored: relatively weak strain at some finite chemical potential, and extreme strain with zero chemical potential. In the first system, the strain induces elliptic Dirac cones, engendering some inherent directionality to graphene's electronic properties that did not exist before. This anisotropy manifests itself in the polarization function, and so too in the screening charge density. A finite chemical potential in this case is necessary for any screening to take place in graphene since, without it, there are no electron states near the Fermi level to polarize. Both in the strained and unstrained case, decaying oscillations known as Friedel oscillations are observed. The result of strain is a multifaceted anisotropy of the charge distribution: the amplitude, frequency, and the position of the first peak in the oscillations are each varied depending on the direction one observes. In the second system, extreme strain in graphene leads to a merging of Dirac cones, yielding a transition to a new energy spectrum. This band structure is unusual in that it becomes quadratic along the direction of strain

  4. Surface Charging and Points of Zero Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Kosmulski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Presents Points of Zero Charge data on well-defined specimen of materials sorted by trademark, manufacturer, and location. This text emphasizes the comparison between particular results obtained for different portions of the same or very similar material and synthesizes the information published in research reports over the past few decades

  5. Complementary surface charge for enhanced capacitive deionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, X.; Porada, S.; Omosebi, A.; Liu, K.L.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Landon, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercially available activated carbon cloth electrodes are treated using nitric acid and ethylenediamine solutions, resulting in chemical surface charge enhanced carbon electrodes for capacitive deionization (CDI) applications. Surface charge enhanced electrodes are then configured in a CDI

  6. Surface charge compensation for a highly charged ion emission microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.W.; Hamza, A.V.; Newman, M.W.; Holder, J.P.; Schneider, D.H.G.; Schenkel, T.

    2003-01-01

    A surface charge compensation electron flood gun has been added to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) highly charged ion (HCI) emission microscope. HCI surface interaction results in a significant charge residue being left on the surface of insulators and semiconductors. This residual charge causes undesirable aberrations in the microscope images and a reduction of the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) mass resolution when studying the surfaces of insulators and semiconductors. The benefits and problems associated with HCI microscopy and recent results of the electron flood gun enhanced HCI microscope are discussed

  7. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... peak overlap. Additionally, it offers the opportunity for collecting data on a single scale. For charge densities studies, the critical task is to recover accurate and bias-free structure factors from the diffraction pattern. This is the focal point of the present study, scrutinizing the performance...

  8. Charge density wave states in tantalum dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; Duxbury, Phillip M.

    2018-01-01

    Using density functional theory, we explore a range of charge density wave states (CDWs) in tantalum-based transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers. The high-symmetry states of the 1 H phases of Ta X2 (X = S, Se, Te) are lower in total energy compared to the 1 T variants, while the 1 T phases exhibit a much stronger tendency for CDW formation. The stability of several CDWs is found to be stronger as the chalcogenide is changed in the sequence (S, Se, Te), with the tellurium-based systems exhibiting several CDWs with binding energy per formula unit in the range of 100 meV . These 1 T CDW phases are lower in energy than the corresponding 1 H CDW phases. The diversity of CDWs exhibited by these materials suggests that many "hidden" states may occur on ultrafast excitation or photodoping. Changes in electronic structure across the Ta X2 series are also elucidated.

  9. Invisible Surface Charge Pattern on Inorganic Electrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fei; Hansen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    We propose an easy method to pattern the surface charge of ${\\rm SiO}_{2}$ electrets without patterning the dielectric layer. By eliminating the use of metal guard electrodes, both the charge efficiency and the surface charge stability in humid environments improve. We apply the concept...

  10. Mapping and Quantifying Surface Charges on Clay Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Gaikwad, Ravi; Hande, Aharnish; Das, Siddhartha; Thundat, Thomas

    2015-09-29

    Understanding the electrical properties of clay nanoparticles is very important since they play a crucial role in every aspect of oil sands processing, from bitumen extraction to sedimentation in mature fine tailings (MFT). Here, we report the direct mapping and quantification of surface charges on clay nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The morphology of clean kaolinite clay nanoparticles shows a layered structure, while the corresponding surface potential map shows a layer-dependent charge distribution. More importantly, a surface charge density of 25 nC/cm(2) was estimated for clean kaolinite layers by using EFM measurements. On the other hand, the EFM measurements show that the clay particles obtained from the tailings demonstrate a reduced surface charge density of 7 nC/cm(2), which may be possibly attributed to the presence of various bituminous compounds residing on the clay surfaces.

  11. Understanding colloidal charge renormilization from surface chemistry : experiment and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gisler, Thomas; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, Michal; Sticher, Hans; Schurtenberger, Peter; D'Aguanno, Bruno; Klein, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stem capacitance) are determined from tits of a Stem ...

  12. Effects of fibre dimension and charge density on nanocellulose gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Llyza; Gunawardhana, Thilina; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2018-04-18

    Carboxylated cellulose nanofibres can produce gels at low concentrations. The effect of pulp source on the nanocellulose fibre dimension and gel rheology are studied. It is hypothesised that fibre length and surface charge influence aspects of the gel rheological properties. TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl)- mediated oxidised cellulose nanofibres from never-dried hardwood and softwood pulp and containing different charge levels were produced and characterized. Steady-state and dynamic rheological studies were performed to ascertain the effects of pulp type on gel behavior and properties. Nanocellulose fibres extracted from softwood (SW-TOCN) and hardwood (HW-TOCN) pulp exhibit similar widths but different length dimensions as shown via AFM analysis. Rheological measurements show that the dynamic moduli (G' and G'') of nanocellulose gels are independent of pulp source and are mostly influenced by fibre concentration. Differences in the steady-state behavior (i.e. viscosity) at constant surface charge can be attributed to differences in fibre length. Increasing the surface charge density influences the critical strain and the viscosity at the percolation concentration (0.1 wt%) due to higher electrostatic interactions. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Theory of the surface dipole layer and of surface tension in liquids of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of the surface density profiles and of the surface tension of a two-component liquid of charged particles in equilibrium with its vapour is examined. The exact equilibrium conditions for the profiles are given in terms of the inverse response functions of the inhomogeneous fluid, and alternative exact expressions for the surface tension are derived. The use of a density gradient expansion reduces the problem to knowledge of properties of a homogeneous charged fluid on a uniform neutralizing background, in which the total particle density and the charge density are independent variables. Additional simplifications are discussed for special cases for which a perturbative treatment of the surface charge density profile can be developed, and in particular for nearly symmetric ionic liquids and for simple liquid metals. (author)

  14. Surface charge measurement by the Pockels effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sam, Y L

    2001-01-01

    have been observed by applying both impulse and AC voltages to a needle electrode in direct contact with the BSO. AC surface discharge behaviour of polymeric materials bonded to the BSO has also been investigated. The effect of the surrounding environment has been experimentally examined by placing the cell inside a vacuum chamber. Surface charge measurements have been made at various atmospheric pressures. The effect of an electro-negative gas (Sulphur Hexafluoride) on the surface charge distribution has also been investigated. This thesis is concerned with the design and development of a surface charge measurement system using Pockels effect. The measurement of surface charge is important in determining the electrical performance of high voltage insulation materials. The method proposed allows on-line measurement of charge and can generate two-dimensional images that represent the charge behaviour on the surface of the material under test. The measurement system is optical and uses a Pockels crystal as the ...

  15. Surface charging, discharging and chemical modification at a sliding contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S. V.; Kusano, Y.; Morgen, P.; Michelsen, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic charging, discharging, and consequent surface modification induced by sliding dissimilar surfaces have been studied. The surface-charge related phenomena were monitored by using a home-built capacitive, non-contact electrical probe, and the surface chemistry was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experiments were performed on the disk surface of a ball-on-rotating-disk apparatus; using a glass disk and a Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) ball arrangement, and a polyester disks and a diamondlike carbon (DLC) coated steel ball arrangement. The capacitive probe is designed to perform highly resolved measurements, which is sensitive to relative change in charge density on the probed surface. For glass and Teflon arrangement, electrical measurements show that the ball track acquires non-uniform charging. Here not only the increase in charge density, but interestingly, increase in number of highly charged regions on the ball track was resolved. Threefold increase in the number of such highly charged regions per cycle was detected immediately before the gas breakdown-like incidences compared to that of other charge/discharge incidences at a fixed disk rotation speed. We are also able to comment on the behavior and the charge decay time in the ambient air-like condition, once the sliding contact is discontinued. XPS analysis showed a marginal deoxidation effect on the polyester disks due to the charging and discharging of the surfaces. Moreover, these XPS results clearly indicate that the wear and friction (sliding without charging) on the surface can be discarded from inducing such a deoxidation effect.

  16. On equilibrium charge distribution above dielectric surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Slyusarenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the equilibrium state of the charged many-particle system above dielectric surface is formulated. We consider the case of the presence of the external attractive pressing field and the case of its absence. The equilibrium distributions of charges and the electric field, which is generated by these charges in the system in the case of ideally plane dielectric surface, are obtained. The solution of electrostatic equations of the system under consideration in case of small spatial heterogeneities caused by the dielectric surface, is also obtained. These spatial inhomogeneities can be caused both by the inhomogeneities of the surface and by the inhomogeneous charge distribution upon it. In particular, the case of the "wavy" spatially periodic surface is considered taking into account the possible presence of the surface charges.

  17. Surface charging, discharging and chemical modification at a sliding contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Kusano, Yukihiro; Morgen, Per

    2012-01-01

    -ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experiments were performed on the disk surface of a ball-on-rotating-disk apparatus; using a glass disk and a Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) ball arrangement, and a polyester disks and a diamondlike carbon (DLC) coated steel ball arrangement. The capacitive probe...... is designed to perform highly resolved measurements, which is sensitive to relative change in charge density on the probed surface. For glass and Teflon arrangement, electrical measurements show that the ball track acquires non-uniform charging. Here not only the increase in charge density, but interestingly...... indicate that the wear and friction (sliding without charging) on the surface can be discarded from inducing such a deoxidation effect. © 2012 American Institute of Physics...

  18. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  19. Orthogonal bases of radial functions for charge density refinements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restori, R.

    1990-01-01

    Charge density determination from X-ray measurements necessitates the evaluation of the Fourier-Bessel transforms of the radial functions used to expand the charge density. Analytical expressions are given here for four sets of orthogonal functions which can substitute for the 'traditional exponential functions' set in least-squares refinements. (orig.)

  20. Critical Doping for the Onset of Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Charge-Density-Wave Order in the Cuprate Superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Badoux

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO was measured in magnetic fields large enough to access the normal state at low temperatures, for a range of Sr concentrations from x=0.07 to x=0.15. For x=0.11, 0.12, 0.125, and 0.13, S/T decreases upon cooling to become negative at low temperatures. The same behavior is observed in the Hall coefficient R_{H}(T. In analogy with other hole-doped cuprates at similar hole concentrations p, the negative S and R_{H} show that the Fermi surface of LSCO undergoes a reconstruction caused by the onset of charge-density-wave modulations. Such modulations have indeed been detected in LSCO by x-ray diffraction in precisely the same doping range. Our data show that in LSCO this Fermi-surface reconstruction is confined to 0.085charge-density-wave order ends at a critical doping p_{CDW}=0.15±0.005, well below the pseudogap critical doping p^{⋆}≃0.19.

  1. Charge densities and charge noise in mesoscopic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interest in spin transport will require spin resolved partial density of states. In hybrid normal superconducting systems [51] a resolution of both electron and hole density of states is conceptually useful [52,53]. The description of electrical conduction processes in terms of transmission and reflection probabilities has become ...

  2. Direct quantification of negatively charged functional groups on membrane surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Surface charge plays an important role in membrane-based separations of particulates, macromolecules, and dissolved ionic species. In this study, we present two experimental methods to determine the concentration of negatively charged functional groups at the surface of dense polymeric membranes. Both techniques consist of associating the membrane surface moieties with chemical probes, followed by quantification of the bound probes. Uranyl acetate and toluidine blue O dye, which interact with the membrane functional groups via complexation and electrostatic interaction, respectively, were used as probes. The amount of associated probes was quantified using liquid scintillation counting for uranium atoms and visible light spectroscopy for the toluidine blue dye. The techniques were validated using self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols with known amounts of charged moieties. The surface density of negatively charged functional groups of hand-cast thin-film composite polyamide membranes, as well as commercial cellulose triacetate and polyamide membranes, was quantified under various conditions. Using both techniques, we measured a negatively charged functional group density of 20-30nm -2 for the hand-cast thin-film composite membranes. The ionization behavior of the membrane functional groups, determined from measurements with toluidine blue at varying pH, was consistent with published data for thin-film composite polyamide membranes. Similarly, the measured charge densities on commercial membranes were in general agreement with previous investigations. The relative simplicity of the two methods makes them a useful tool for quantifying the surface charge concentration of a variety of surfaces, including separation membranes. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. First principle study of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Azam, Sikander, E-mail: sikander.physicst@gmail.com [Institute of complex systems, FFPW, CENAKVA-University of South Bohemia in CB, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic)

    2014-02-15

    The electronic structure, Fermi surface, electronic charge density and optical properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn single crystals are studied. The calculations are based on the full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the local density approximation (LDA) and generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), in addition the Engel–Vosko (EV-GGA) formalism was also applied. The DFT calculations show that these compounds have metallic origin. The contribution of different bands was analyzed from total and partial density of states curves. The values of the density of states at Fermi energy (N(E{sub F})) for ThCu{sub 5}In (ThCu{sub 5}Sn) is 1.75 (1.63) states/eV unit cell. The bare electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) is found to be equal to 0.30 and 0.28 mJ/mol-K{sup 2} for ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn, respectively. The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction. The bonding features are analyzed by using the electronic charge density contour in the (101) crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. - Highlights: • The DFT-FPLAPW method used for calculating the properties of ThCu{sub 5}In and ThCu{sub 5}Sn compounds. • This study shows that the nature of the two compounds is metallic. • Crystallographic plane and it shows the covalent character of Cu–Cu and Sn/In–Cu bonds. • The optical properties were also calculated and analyzed. • The Fermi surface of ThCu{sub 5}In/ThCu{sub 5}Sn is composed of three/four bands crossing along the R–Γ direction.

  4. Geometric interpretation of density displacements and charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ness kernel. It can be expressed using the functional chain-rule transformation in terms the closed system density response, and the extra term present in the open molecular systems, which involves the electro- nic FF and the system global softness.9 For this purpose we express the ground state density as functional of.

  5. Possibilities of increasing coal charge density by adding fuel oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fröhlichová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of all coke-making facilities is to achieve the highest possible production of high quality coke from a chamber. It can be achieved by filling the effective capacity of the chamber with the highest possible amount of coal. One of the possibilities of meeting this requirement is to increase the charge density in the coke chamber. In case of a coke battery operating on bulk coal there are many methods to increase the charge density including the use of wetting agents in the charge. This article presents the results of the laboratory experiments aiming at the increase of the charge density using fuel oil as a wetting agent. The experiments were carried out by means of the Pitin’s device using 3 coal charges with various granularity composition and moisture content of 7, 8, 9 and 10 %.

  6. Surface transport processes in charged porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2017-07-15

    Surface transport processes are very important in chemistry, colloidal sciences, engineering, biology, and geophysics. Natural or externally produced charges on surfaces create electrical double layers (EDLs) at the solid-liquid interface. The existence of the EDLs produces several complex processes including bulk and surface transport of ions. In this work, a model is presented to simulate bulk and transport processes in homogeneous porous media comprising big pores. It is based on a theory for capacitive charging by ideally polarizable porous electrodes without Faradaic reactions or specific adsorption of ions. A volume averaging technique is used to derive the averaged transport equations in the limit of thin electrical double layers. Description of the EDL between the electrolyte solution and the charged wall is accomplished using the Gouy-Chapman-Stern (GCS) model. The surface transport terms enter into the average equations due to the use of boundary conditions for diffuse interfaces. Two extra surface transports terms appear in the closed average equations. One is a surface diffusion term equivalent to the transport process in non-charged porous media. The second surface transport term is a migration term unique to charged porous media. The effective bulk and transport parameters for isotropic porous media are calculated solving the corresponding closure problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding colloidal charge renormalization from surface chemistry: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisler, T.; Schulz, S. F.; Borkovec, M.; Sticher, H.; Schurtenberger, P.; D'Aguanno, B.; Klein, R.

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we report on the charging behavior of latex particles in aqueous suspensions. We use static light scattering and acid-base titrations as complementary techniques to observe both effective and bare particle charges. Acid-base titrations at various ionic strengths provide the pH dependent charging curves. The surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant of the acidic carboxylic groups, total density of ionizable sites and Stern capacitance) are determined from fits of a Stern layer model to the titration data. We find strong evidence that the dissociation of protons is the only specific adsorption process. Effective particle charges are determined by fits of integral equation calculations of the polydisperse static structure factor to the static light scattering data. A generalization of the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model including the dissociation of the acidic surface groups and the autodissociation of water is used to predict effective particle charges from the surface chemical parameters determined by the titration experiments. We find that the light scattering data are best described by a model where a small fraction of the ionizable surface sites are sulfate groups which are completely dissociated at moderate pH. These effective charges are comparable to the predictions by a basic cell model where charge regulation is absent.

  8. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C; Boudou, L; Makasheva, K; Teyssedre, G

    2017-12-15

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson's equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  9. Methodology for extraction of space charge density profiles at nanoscale from Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the physical phenomena occurring at metal/dielectric interfaces, determination of the charge density profile at nanoscale is crucial. To deal with this issue, charges were injected applying a DC voltage on lateral Al-electrodes embedded in a SiN x thin dielectric layer. The surface potential induced by the injected charges was probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). It was found that the KPFM frequency mode is a better adapted method to probe accurately the charge profile. To extract the charge density profile from the surface potential two numerical approaches based on the solution to Poisson’s equation for electrostatics were investigated: the second derivative model method, already reported in the literature, and a new 2D method based on the finite element method (FEM). Results highlight that the FEM is more robust to noise or artifacts in the case of a non-flat initial surface potential. Moreover, according to theoretical study the FEM appears to be a good candidate for determining charge density in dielectric films with thicknesses in the range from 10 nm to 10 μm. By applying this method, the charge density profile was determined at nanoscale, highlighting that the charge cloud remains close to the interface.

  10. Geometric interpretation of density displacements and charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    afresh from the density perspective. This conceptual DFT development has had a uni- fying influence on the reactivity theory. It combines the so-called electron following (EF) and electron preceding (EP) descriptions of both the closed and open molecular or reactive systems. In the former the nuclear displacements or the ...

  11. 3D electric field calculation with surface charge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an outline and some examples of three dimensional electric field calculations with a computer code developed at NIRS. In the code, a surface charge method is adopted because of it's simplicity in the mesh establishing procedure. The charge density in a triangular mesh is assumed to distribute with a linear function of the position. The electric field distribution is calculated for a pair of drift tubes with the focusing fingers on the opposing surfaces. The field distribution in an acceleration gap is analyzed with a Fourier-Bessel series expansion method. The calculated results excellently reproduces the measured data with a magnetic model. (author)

  12. Effective Area and Charge Density of Iridium Oxide Neural Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Alexander R.; Paolini, Antonio G.; Wallace, Gordon G.

    2017-01-01

    The effective electrode area and charge density of iridium metal and anodically activated iridium has been measured by optical and electrochemical techniques. The degree of electrode activation could be assessed by changes in electrode colour. The reduction charge, activation charge, number of activation pulses and charge density were all strongly correlated. Activated iridium showed slow electron transfer kinetics for reduction of a dissolved redox species. At fast voltammetric scan rates the linear diffusion electroactive area was unaffected by iridium activation. At slow voltammetric scan rates, the steady state diffusion electroactive area was reduced by iridium activation. The steady state current was consistent with a ring electrode geometry, with lateral resistance reducing the electrode area. Slow electron transfer on activated iridium would require a larger overpotential to reduce or oxidise dissolved species in tissue, limiting the electrodes charge capacity but also reducing the likelihood of generating toxic species in vivo.

  13. Changes of the density of charge on mineral soil components by adsorption of some metabolites of hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Hollederer, Gorch; Calmano, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption on clay minerals and sesquioxides of some polar degradation products of naphthalene and alkylated benzenes was investigated by 14C-tracer experiments. Surface charge density of the solids was measured by titration with sodium polyethene sulfonate and polydiallyl-dimethyl-ammonium chloride at pH-range 4-7. Adsorption of organic anions reduced the positive charge on oxidic surfaces and increased the density of negative charge on clay minerals, respectively. The increase of the de...

  14. Experimental Evidence for Static Charge Density Waves in Iron Oxypnictides

    KAUST Repository

    Martinelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this Letter we report high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis of Mn-substituted LaFeAsO samples, demonstrating that a static incommensurate modulated structure develops across the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, whose modulation wave vector depends on the Mn content. The incommensurate structural distortion is likely originating from a charge-density-wave instability, a periodic modulation of the density of conduction electrons associated with a modulation of the atomic positions. Our results add a new component in the physics of Fe-based superconductors, indicating that the density wave ordering is charge driven.

  15. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-09

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters.

  16. Improving the bulk density of coal charge in conventional cokemaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, H.S.; Prasad, H.N.; Krishnan, S.H.; Akthar, M.S.; Sinha, S. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)

    1999-04-01

    The throughput from a battery of coke ovens can be increased in two ways, namely by shortening the carbonization cycle or by increasing the coal charge per oven. The former can be achieved by increasing the coking rate which would result in deterioration in coke quality and shortening the battery life. The second alternative is, therefore, more attractive: it is based on an increase in the bulk density of the coal charge which allows more coal to be charged per oven. Although oil addition to the coal charge at Tata Steel has been practiced since 1962, the full benefits could accrue following optimisation of oil dosing with LDO in the laboratory with respect to bulk density, angle of repose and flowability properties, providing mixing facilities, and modifying the oil dosing system in the plant. 7 refs., 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Surface charge measurement using an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1998-01-01

    During the 1960s, the first measurements of charge on dielectric surfaces using simple electrostatic probes were reported. However it is only within the last 10 years that a proper understanding of the probe response has been developed. This situation arose as a consequence of the earlier studies...

  18. Electron charge densities at conduction-band edges of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, S.L.; Cohen, M.L.; Louie, S.G.; Chelikowsky, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that both the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) and the linear combination of atomiclike orbitals (LCAO) approach are capable of producing consistent electronic charge distributions in a compound semiconductor. Since the EPM approach is known to produce total valence electron charge densities which compare well with experimental x-ray data (e.g., Si), this work serves as a further test for the LCAO method. In particular, the EPM scheme, which uses an extended plane-wave basis, and the LCAO scheme, which employs a localized Gaussian basis, are used, with the same empirical potential as input, to analyze both the total valence electron charge density and the charge density of the first conduction band at the GAMMA, L, and X k points of the Brillouin zone. These charge densities are decomposed into their s-, p-, and d-orbital contributions, and this information is used to interpret the differences in the topologies of the conduction bands at GAMMA, L, and X. Such differences are crucial for a comprehensive understanding of interstitial impurities and the response of specific band states to perturbations in compound semiconductors

  19. Ion association at discretely-charged dielectric interfaces: Giant charge inversion [Dielectric response controlled ion association at physically heterogeneous surfaces: Giant charge reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi -Yong [Chongqing Univ. of Technology, Chongqing (China); Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Wu, Jianzhong [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Giant charge reversal has been identified for the first time by Monte Carlo simulation for a discretely charged surface in contact with a trivalent electrolyte solution. It takes place regardless of the surface charge density under study and the monovalent salt. In stark contrast to earlier predictions based on the 2-dimensional Wigner crystal model to describe strong correlation of counterions at the macroion surface, we find that giant charge reversal reflects an intricate interplay of ionic volume effects, electrostatic correlations, surface charge heterogeneity, and the dielectric response of the confined fluids. While the novel phenomenon is yet to be confirmed with experiment, the simulation results appear in excellent agreement with a wide range of existing observations in the subregime of charge inversion. Lastly, our findings may have far-reaching implications to understanding complex electrochemical phenomena entailing ionic fluids under dielectric confinements.

  20. Effect of surface topography and morphology on space charge packets in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yuanxiang; Wang Yunshan; Sun Qinghua; Wang Ninghua

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is a major kind of internal insulating material. With great progresses of space charge measurement technologies in the last three decades, lots of researches are focused on space charge in PE. The heat pressing and annealing condition of polyethylene affect its morphology obviously. During the heat pressing, the surface of PE forms different surface topographies because of different substrate materials. Surface topography has great relation to the epitaxial crystallization layer and influences the space charge characteristic of PE dramatically. This paper studied the formation process of different surface topographies and their micrographic characters in low density polyethylene (LDPE). pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method was used to measure the space charge distribution of samples with different surface topographies and morphologies in LDPE. The effect of surface topography and morphology to space charge packet were studied. The surface topography has great influence on space charge packet polarity and morphology has influence on both movement speed rate and polarity of space charge packet.

  1. Kaon transverse charge density from space- and timelike data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecholsky, N. A.; Meija-Ott, J.; Carmignotto, M.; Horn, T.; Miller, G. A.; Pegg, I. L.

    2017-12-01

    We used the world data on the kaon form factor to extract the transverse kaon charge density using a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the kaon form factor in the timelike region. Our analysis includes recent data from e+e- annihiliation measurements extending the kinematic reach of the data into the region of high momentum transfers conjugate to the region of short transverse distances. To calculate the transverse density we created a superset of both timelike and spacelike data and developed an empirical parameterization of the kaon form factor. The spacelike set includes two new data points we extracted from existing cross section data. We estimate the uncertainty on the resulting transverse density to be 5% at b =0.025 fm and significantly better at large distances. New kaon data planned with the 12 GeV Jefferson Lab may have a significant impact on the charge density at distances of b <0.1 fm.

  2. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil [Santa Fe, NM; Singleton, John [Los Alamos, NM; Migliori, Albert [Santa Fe, NM

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  3. Radial densities of nuclear matter and charge via moment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    In this report I will discuss some initial efforts in our program to describe radial densities of nuclear matter and charge with the use of moment methods. A brief introduction to trace reduction formulas and computation problems along with proposed methods to overcome them will be given. This will be followed by a general discussion on computation of expectation values using moment methods with particular emphasis on formulation for the radial density applications

  4. Nuclear charge radii: density functional theory meets Bayesian neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, R.; Chen, Wei-Chia; Piekarewicz, J.

    2016-11-01

    The distribution of electric charge in atomic nuclei is fundamental to our understanding of the complex nuclear dynamics and a quintessential observable to validate nuclear structure models. The aim of this study is to explore a novel approach that combines sophisticated models of nuclear structure with Bayesian neural networks (BNN) to generate predictions for the charge radii of thousands of nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. A class of relativistic energy density functionals is used to provide robust predictions for nuclear charge radii. In turn, these predictions are refined through Bayesian learning for a neural network that is trained using residuals between theoretical predictions and the experimental data. Although predictions obtained with density functional theory provide a fairly good description of experiment, our results show significant improvement (better than 40%) after BNN refinement. Moreover, these improved results for nuclear charge radii are supplemented with theoretical error bars. We have successfully demonstrated the ability of the BNN approach to significantly increase the accuracy of nuclear models in the predictions of nuclear charge radii. However, as many before us, we failed to uncover the underlying physics behind the intriguing behavior of charge radii along the calcium isotopic chain.

  5. The interaction between theory and experiment in charge density analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    The field of x-ray charge density analysis has gradually morphed into an area benefiting from the strong interactions between theoreticians and experimentalists, leading to new concepts on chemical bonding and of intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Some highlights of the developments culminating in the 2013 Aminoff Award are described in this paper. (comment)

  6. Pressure induced Superconductivity in the Charge Density Wave Compound Tritelluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, J.J.; Zocco, D.A.; Sayles, T.A.; Maple, M.B.; /UC, Davis; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    A series of high-pressure electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals of TbTe{sub 3} reveal a complex phase diagram involving the interplay of superconducting, antiferromagnetic and charge density wave order. The onset of superconductivity reaches a maximum of almost 4 K (onset) near {approx} 12.4 GPa.

  7. Gate effect in charge-density wave nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, E.; Holst, M.A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated transport characteristics of charge-density wave nanowires with a few hundred parallel chains. At temperatures below50K, these samples show power-law behavior in temperature and voltage, characteristic for one-dimensional transport. In this regime, gate dependent transport has

  8. Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZIRAN CHEN

    2017-08-04

    Aug 4, 2017 ... Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties of 'plate-like' coronene topological structures. ZIRAN CHENa, ZHANRONG HEa, YOUHUI XUa and WENHAO YUb,∗. aDepartment of Architecture and Environment Engineering, Sichuan Vocational and Technical College, Suining,.

  9. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramics; charge density; X-ray diffraction; bonding; microstructure. 1. Introduction. Ferroelectric perovskite materials are .... on Powder Diffraction Standards (JCPDS) database. (PDF# 05-0626). Existence of well-defined and ..... Li W, Xu Z, Chu R, Fu P and Hao J 2010 J. Alloy. Compd. 499 255. 9. Glinchuk M D, Bykov I P, ...

  10. Charge density wave dynamics from ultrafast XUV ARPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frassetto F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast angle–resolved XUV photoemission reveals the time- and momentum-dependent electronic structure of 1T–TaS2, a hybrid Mott and charge-density-wave insulator. Both electronic orderings melt well before the lattice responds, suggesting that electronic correlations play a role not just in the Mott localization but in the CDW ordering as well.

  11. High density thermite mixture for shaped charge ordnance disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Elshenawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermite mixture based on aluminum and ferric oxides for ammunition neutralization has been studied and tested. Thermochemical calculations have been carried out for different percentage of Al using Chemical Equilibrium Code to expect the highest performance thermite mixture used for shaped charge ordnance disposal. Densities and enthalpy of different formulations have been calculated and demonstrated. The optimized thermite formulation has been prepared experimentally using cold iso-static pressing technique, which exhibited relatively high density and high burning rate thermite mixture. The produced green product compacted powder mixture was tested against small caliber shaped charge bomblet for neutralization. Theoretical and experimental results showed that the prepared thermite mixture containing 33% of aluminum as a fuel with ferric oxide can be successfully used for shaped charge ordnance disposal.

  12. Interchain interaction and fractionally charged solitons in a commensurate charge-density-wave system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Lomdahl, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the effect of interchain interaction on thermally excited solitons in a charge-density wave for a Peierls system of commensurability 3. In such a system solitons with charges ±2e / 3 are expected. It is shown that the interchain coupling in some cases will generate solitons...... with lower and higher charge than ±2e / 3. The effect of discreteness is taken into account and gives rise to chaotic deformed solitons as the interchain coupling increases. The model may be applied to tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) under 19-kbar pressure....

  13. The density functional theory and the charged fluid molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.P.; Zerah, G.

    1993-01-01

    Car and Parrinello had the idea of combining the density functional theory (Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham) to the 'molecular dynamics' numerical modelling method, in order to simulate metallic or co-valent solids and liquids from the first principles. The objective of this paper is to present a simplified version of this method ab initio, applicable to classical and quantal charged systems. The method is illustrated with recent results on charged colloidal suspensions and highly correlated electron-proton plasmas. 1 fig., 21 refs

  14. First-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from first principles.

  15. LEO Orbit Surface Charging and Its Relationship to Environment, Vehicle Geometry, and Ionospheric Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fennell, Joseph F; Anderson, Phillip C

    2008-01-01

    .... Such surfaces can be both in shadow and in the satellite wake at the same time, which enhances the chances of charging in the dusk to pre-noon sector of the auroral oval, depending on plasma density...

  16. Surface current density K: an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the vector surface of current density K used in electrical insulation studies. K is related to the vector tangential electric field Kt at the surface of a body by the vector equation K=ΓE t where Γ represents the surface conductivity. The author derives a surface continuity...

  17. High charge density and mobility in poly(3-hexylthiophene) using a polarizable gate dielectric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, R.C.G.; Mulder, M; de Boer, B; Blom, PWM; de Leeuw, DM

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) typically exhibit either a high charge transport mobility or a high charge density. Here we demonstrate an OFET in which both the mobility and the charge density have high values of 0.1 cm(2)/V s and 28 mC/m(2), respectively. The high charge density is

  18. Pion transverse charge density from timelike form factor data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Miller, Mark Strikman, Christian Weiss

    2011-01-01

    The transverse charge density in the pion can be represented as a dispersion integral of the imaginary part of the pion form factor in the timelike region. This formulation incorporates information from e+e- annihilation experiments and allows one to reconstruct the transverse density much more accurately than from the spacelike pion form factor data alone. We calculate the transverse density using an empirical parametrization of the timelike pion form factor and estimate that it is determined to an accuracy of ~10% at a distance b ~ 0.1 fm, and significantly better at larger distances. The density is found to be close to that obtained from a zero-width rho meson pole over a wide range and shows a pronounced rise at small distances. The resulting two-dimensional image of the fast-moving pion can be interpreted in terms of its partonic structure in QCD. We argue that the singular behavior of the charge density at the center requires a substantial presence of pointlike configurations in the pion's partonic wave function, which can be probed in other high-momentum transfer processes.

  19. Effective Electrostatic Interactions Between Two Overall Neutral Surfaces with Quenched Charge Heterogeneity Over Atomic Length Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.

    2017-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo results as a reference, a classical density functional theory ( CDFT) is shown to reliably predict the forces between two heterogeneously charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution, whereas the Poisson-Boltzmann ( PB) theory is demonstrated to deteriorate obviously for the same system even if the system parameters considered fall within the validity range of the PB theory in the homogeneously charged surfaces. By applying the tested CDFT, we study the effective electrostatic potential of mean force ( EPMF) between two face-face planar and hard surfaces of zero net charge on which positive and negative charges are separated and considered to present as discontinuous spots on the inside edges of the two surfaces. Main conclusions are summarized as follows: (i) strength of the EPMF in the surface charge separation case is very sensitively and positively correlated with the surface charge separation level and valency of the salt ion. Particularly, the charge separation level and the salt ion valency have a synergistic effect, which makes high limit of the EPMF strength in the surface charge separation case significantly go beyond that of the ideal homogeneously charged surface counterpart at average surface charge density similar to the average surface positive or negative charge density in the charge separation case. (ii) The surface charge distribution patterns mainly influence sign of the EPMF: symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns induce repulsive and attractive (at small distances) EPMF, respectively; but with low valency salt ions and low charge separation level the opposite may be the case. With simultaneous presence of both higher valency cation and anion, the EPMF can be repulsive at intermediate distances for asymmetrical patterns. (iii) Salt ion size has a significant impact, which makes the EPMF tend to become more and more repulsive with the ion diameter regardless of the surface charge distribution patterns and the valency of

  20. High density thermite mixture for shaped charge ordnance disposal

    OpenAIRE

    Tamer Elshenawy; Salah Soliman; Ahmed Hawass

    2017-01-01

    The effect of thermite mixture based on aluminum and ferric oxides for ammunition neutralization has been studied and tested. Thermochemical calculations have been carried out for different percentage of Al using Chemical Equilibrium Code to expect the highest performance thermite mixture used for shaped charge ordnance disposal. Densities and enthalpy of different formulations have been calculated and demonstrated. The optimized thermite formulation has been prepared experimentally using col...

  1. Density functional theory calculations of charge transport properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we used density functional theory (DFT) at the M06-2X/6−31+G(d) level to compute the charge transport rates of nine coronene topological structures. The results show that the energy gap of these nine coronene derivatives is in the range 2.90–3.30 eV, falling into the organic semiconductor category. The size ...

  2. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivovichev, S.V.; Krivovichev, S.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    2007-01-01

    Single crystals of [C 10 H 26 N 2 ][(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)](H 2 SeO 4 ) 0.85 (H 2 O) 2 (1), [C 10 H 26 N 2 ][(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 ] (H 2 SeO 4 ) 0.50 (H 2 O) (2), and [C 8 H 20 N] 2 [(UO 2 )(SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] (H 2 O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO 7 and SeO 4 polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] 2- chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH 3 (CH 2 ) 10 NH 3 ] 2+ molecules, H 2 O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H 2 SeO 4 ) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 ] 2- sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H 2 SeO 4 ) groups but is based upon alternating [UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O)] 2- sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH 3 (CH 2 ) 7 CH 3 ] + . The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in general, actinyl) chemistry, it requires specific additional mechanisms: (a) in long-chain-amine-templated compounds, protonated amine molecules inter-digitate; (b) in long-chain-diamine-templated compounds, incorporation of acid-water interlayers into

  3. first-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A computational study of the total electrons charge density in the diamond-structure semiconductor crystals has been performed. In a typical modern electronic structure calculation, the charge density is obtained from a certain density functional, however, the charge density in this work was obtained from.

  4. Does low surface brightness mean low density?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS

    1996-01-01

    We compare the dynamical properties of two galaxies at identical positions on the Tully-Fisher relation, but with different surface brightnesses. We find that the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 128 has a higher mass-to-light ratio, and yet has lower mass densities than the high surface brightness

  5. Density and surface tension of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbeck, C; Lehmann, J; Lovelock, K R J; Cremer, T; Paape, N; Wasserscheid, P; Fröba, A P; Maier, F; Steinrück, H-P

    2010-12-30

    We measured the density and surface tension of 9 bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([Tf(2)N](-))-based and 12 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium ([C(8)C(1)Im](+))-based ionic liquids (ILs) with the vibrating tube and the pendant drop method, respectively. This comprehensive set of ILs was chosen to probe the influence of the cations and anions on density and surface tension. When the alkyl chain length in the [C(n)C(1)Im][Tf(2)N] series (n = 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12) is increased, a decrease in density is observed. The surface tension initially also decreases but reaches a plateau for alkyl chain lengths greater than n = 8. Functionalizing the alkyl chains with ethylene glycol groups results in a higher density as well as a higher surface tension. For the dependence of density and surface tension on the chemical nature of the anion, relations are only found for subgroups of the studied ILs. Density and surface tension values are discussed with respect to intermolecular interactions and surface composition as determined by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). The absence of nonvolatile surface-active contaminants was proven by ARXPS.

  6. Measuring charge density of electron beam single nanosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchar, A.I.; Nesterenko, V.S.; Fazkullin, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of a probe design and electrometric repeater circuit and technique for measuring the charge (current) density of electron beam single pulses by integrating current at a reference capacitor with a subsequent registering of voltage across the capacitor. The probe consists of a band-type signal electrodes and two oval cross-section sleeves: external and internal with larger and smaller rectangular openings, respectively. The external sleeve has antidynatron grid located over the hole. The design employs integer nickel sleever - the cores of electron tube cathodes. The signal electrode is made of nickel band 0.15 mm thick. The probe elements are insulated from each other along the whole length with a layer of teflon band (30 μm), with rectangular openings cut in compliance with the sleeve openings. The measurement range is from 0.4x10 - 9 to 1x10 - 7 C/cm 2 . The rated accuracy of measurements is no worse than +-5% for the beam energy of 0.2 to 3 KeV. The ultimate parameters the charge density - 6 C/cm 2 and direct current density 3 mA/cm 2 - are specified by the breakdown voltage (200 V) of the input capacitor and probe insulation

  7. Charge density wave in hydrogen at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdău, Ioan B.; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2017-10-01

    We present extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations investigating numerous candidate crystal structures for hydrogen in conditions around the present experimental frontier (400 GPa). Spontaneous phase transitions in the simulations reveal a new structure candidate comprising twofold coordinated chains of hydrogen atoms. We explain the electronic structure of this phase in terms of a charge density wave and calculate its experimental signature. In detailed tests of the accuracy of our calculation, we find that k-point sampling is far more important in MD than in static calculations, because of the freedom it give the atoms to rearrange themselves optimally for the given sampling.

  8. Charge density study of two FeS2 polymorphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Jørgensen, Mads Ry Vogel; Bjerg, Lasse

    experimental electron density studies of an inorganic solid containing a transition metal was presented by Stevens et al. [2] who investigated the effect of crystal-field splitting of the partially filled iron d-orbitals in the pyrite structure of FeS2. Other studies of various FeS2 structures, including...... pyrite, has been performed by Gibbs et al. [3], however, these are all based on theoretical calculations rather than experiment. In the current study we revisit FeS2 through an experimental charge density study of the two low-spin iron FeS2 structures, pyrite and marcasite. High-quality, low...... been determined by multipole least squares modelling and analyzed by means of the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules. The resulting topology has been compared to the results obtained by Gibbs et al. and to current periodic ab-initio DFT calculations and in general a good agreement between experiment...

  9. Charge carrier density in Li-intercalated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structures of bulk C 6Li, Li-intercalated free-standing bilayer graphene, and Li-intercalated bilayer and trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) are studied using density functional theory. Our estimate of Young\\'s modulus suggests that Li-intercalation increases the intrinsic stiffness. For decreasing Li-C interaction, the Dirac point shifts to the Fermi level and the associated band splitting vanishes. For Li-intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) the splitting at the Dirac point is tiny. It is also very small at the two Dirac points of Li-intercalated trilayer graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1). For all the systems under study, a large enhancement of the charge carrier density is achieved by Li intercalation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A numerical method for calculation of electrostatic charge distribution induced on conducting surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Hatamzadeh-Varmazyar; Zahra Masouri

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this article is on calculation of electrostatic charge distribution induced on conducting surfaces. For this purpose, the integral equation concept is used for mathematical modeling of the problem. A special set of exponential basis functions is introduced and defined to be used in formulation of a numerical method for solving the integral equation to obtain the charge distribution. The method is numerically evaluated via calculation of charge density for some structures by which...

  11. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivovichev, S.V. [Saint Petersburg State Univ., Dept. of Crystallography, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation); Krivovichev, S.V.; Tananaev, I.G.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15

    Single crystals of [C{sub 10}H{sub 26}N{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.85}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (1), [C{sub 10}H{sub 26}N{sub 2}][(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}] (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}){sub 0.50}(H{sub 2}O) (2), and [C{sub 8}H{sub 20}N]{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (H{sub 2}O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO{sub 7} and SeO{sub 4} polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2-} chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 10}NH{sub 3}]{sup 2+} molecules, H{sub 2}O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) groups but is based upon alternating [UO{sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup 2-} sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 7}CH{sub 3}]{sup +}. The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in

  12. Surface Charge Transfer Doping of Monolayer Phosphorene via Molecular Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanyuan; Xia, Feifei; Shao, Zhibin; Zhao, Jianwei; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-12-03

    Monolayer phosphorene has attracted much attention owing to its extraordinary electronic, optical, and structural properties. Rationally tuning the electrical transport characteristics of monolayer phosphorene is essential to its applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, we study the electronic transport behaviors of monolayer phosphorene with surface charge transfer doping of electrophilic molecules, including 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), NO2, and MoO3, using density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. F4TCNQ shows optimal performance in enhancing the p-type conductance of monolayer phosphorene. Static electronic properties indicate that the enhancement is originated from the charge transfer between adsorbed molecule and phosphorene layer. Dynamic transport behaviors demonstrate that additional channels for hole transport in host monolayer phosphorene were generated upon the adsorption of molecule. Our work unveils the great potential of surface charge transfer doping in tuning the electronic properties of monolayer phosphorene and is of significance to its application in high-performance devices.

  13. Adsorption of cations onto positively charged surface mesopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neue, Uwe; Iraneta, Pamela; Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-11-29

    Uwe Neue developed a theoretical treatment to account for the adsorption of ions on mesopores of packing materials the walls of which are bonded to ionic ligands but left this work unfinished. We elaborated upon this treatment and refined it, based on the equivalence that he suggested between charged surface particles and a membrane that separates two ionic solutions but is impermeable to one specification. He had written that the electro-chemical potentials in both ionic solutions are equal (Donnan equilibrium). The equilibrium between the surface and the pore concentrations is accounted for by an homogeneous electrostatically modified Langmuir (EML) isotherm model. The theoretical results are presented for four different charge surface concentrations σ0=0, 0.001, 0.002, and 0.003C/m(2), using a phosphate buffer (W(S)pH=2.65) of ionic strength I=10mM. The average pore size, the specific surface area, and the specific pore volume of the stationary phase were Dp=140Å, Sp=182m(2)/g, and Vp=0.70cm(3)/g, respectively. The theoretical results provide the quantitative difference between the ionic strength, the pH, and the concentrations of all the ions in the pores and in the bulk eluent. The theory predicts (1) that the retention times of cations under linear conditions is lower and (2) that their band widths under overloaded conditions for a given retention factor shrinks when the surface charge density σ0 is increased. These theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental results published previously and explain them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transition from Fowler-Nordheim field emission to space charge limited current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2006-01-01

    The Fowler-Nordheim law gives the current density extracted from a surface under strong fields, by treating the emission of electrons from a metal-vacuum interface in the presence of an electric field normal to the surface as a quantum mechanical tunneling process. Child's law predicts the maximum transmitted current density by considering the space charge effect. When the electric field becomes high enough, the emitted current density will be limited by Child's law. This work analyzes the transition of the transmitted current density from the Fowler-Nordheim law to Child's law space charge limit using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code. Also studied is the response of the emission model to strong electric fields near the transition point. We find the transition without geometrical effort is smooth and much slower than reported previously [J. P. Barbour, W. W. Dolan, J. K. Trolan, E. E. Martin, and W. P. Dyke, Phys. Rev. 92, 45 (1953)]. We analyze the effects of geometric field enhancement and work function on the transition. Using our previous model for effective field enhancement [Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 12, 103301 (2005)], we find the geometric effect dominates, and enhancement β>10 can accelerate the approach to the space charge limit at practical electric field. A damped oscillation near the local plasma frequency is observed in the transient system response

  15. Adsorption of benzene, toluene, and xylene by two tetramethylammonium-smectites having different charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiunn-Fwu; Mortland, Max M.; Chiou, Cary T.; Kite, Daniel E.; Boyd, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-charge smectite from Arizona [cation-exchange capacity (CEC) = 120 meq/100 g] and a low-charge smectite from Wyoming (CEC = 90 meq/100 g) were used to prepare homoionic tetramethylammonium (TMA)-clay complexes. The adsorption of benzene, toluene, and o-xylene as vapors by the dry TMA-clays and as solutes from water by the wet TMA-clays was studied. The adsorption of the organic vapors by the dry TMA-smectite samples was strong and apparently consisted of interactions with both the aluminosilicate mineral surfaces and the TMA exchange ions in the interlayers. In the adsorption of organic vapors, the closer packing of TMA ions in the dry high-charge TMA-smectite, compared with the dry low-charge TMA-smectite, resulted in a somewhat higher degree of shape-selective adsorption of benzene, toluene, and xylene. In the presence of water, the adsorption capacities of both samples for the aromatic compounds were significantly reduced, although the uptake of benzene from water by the low-charge TMA-smectite was still substantial. This lower sorption capacity was accompanied by increased shape-selectivity for the aromatic compounds. The reduction in uptake and increased selectivity was much more pronounced for the water-saturated, high-charge TMA-smectite than for the low-charge TMA-smectite. Hydration of the TMA exchange ions and/or the mineral surfaces apparently reduced the accessibility of the aromatic molecules to interlamellar regions. The resulting water-induced sieving effect was greater for the high-charge TMA-smectite due to the higher density of exchanged TMA-ions. The low-charge Wyoming TMA-smectite was a highly effective adsorbent for removing benzene from water and may be useful for purifying benzene-contaminated water.

  16. The influence of oxidation on space charge formation in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, G; Xie, H K; Banford, H M; Davies, A E

    2003-01-01

    The research presented in this paper investigates the role of oxidation in the formation of space charge in gamma-irradiated low-density polyethylene after being electrically stressed under dc voltage. Polyethylene plaques both with and without antioxidant were irradiated up to 500 kGy using a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma source and space charge distributions were measured using the piezoelectric induced pressure wave propagation method. It has been found that a large amount of positive charge evolved adjacent to the cathode in the sample without antioxidant and was clearly associated with oxidation of the surface. The amount of charge formed for a given applied stress increased with the dose absorbed by the material. A model has been proposed to explain the formation of space charge and its profile. The charge decay after the removal of the external applied stress is dominated by a process being controlled by the cathode interfacial stress (charge injection) rather than a conventional RC circuit model. On the other ...

  17. Surface charge method for molecular surfaces with curved areal elements I. Spherical triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2018-03-01

    Parametrizing a curved surface with flat triangles in electrostatics problems creates a diverging electric field. One way to avoid this is to have curved areal elements. However, charge density integration over curved patches appears difficult. This paper, dealing with spherical triangles, is the first in a series aiming to solve this problem. Here, we lay the ground work for employing curved patches for applying the surface charge method to electrostatics. We show analytically how one may control the accuracy by expanding in powers of the the arc length (multiplied by the curvature). To accommodate not extremely small curved areal elements, we have provided enough details to include higher order corrections that are needed for better accuracy when slightly larger surface elements are used.

  18. Surface-confined electroactive molecules for multistate charge storage information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Torrent, M; Rovira, C; Veciana, J

    2013-01-18

    Bi-stable molecular systems with potential for applications in binary memory devices are raising great interest for device miniaturization. Particular appealing are those systems that operate with electrical inputs since they are compatible with existing electronic technologies. The processing of higher memory densities in these devices could be accomplished by increasing the number of memory states in each cell, although this strategy has not been much explored yet. Here we highlight the recent advances devoted to the fabrication of charge-storage molecular surface-confined devices exhibiting multiple states. Mainly, this goal has been realized immobilizing a variety (or a combination) of electroactive molecules on a surface, although alternative approaches employing non-electroactive systems have also been described. Undoubtedly, the use of molecules with chemically tunable properties and nanoscale dimensions are raising great hopes for the devices of the future in which molecules can bring new perspectives such as multistability.

  19. Improved DFT Potential Energy Surfaces via Improved Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Park, Hansol; Son, Suyeon; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2015-10-01

    Density-corrected DFT is a method that cures several failures of self-consistent semilocal DFT calculations by using a more accurate density instead. A novel procedure employs the Hartree-Fock density to bonds that are more severely stretched than ever before. This substantially increases the range of accurate potential energy surfaces obtainable from semilocal DFT for many heteronuclear molecules. We show that this works for both neutral and charged molecules. We explain why and explore more difficult cases, for example, CH(+), where density-corrected DFT results are even better than sophisticated methods like CCSD. We give a simple criterion for when DC-DFT should be more accurate than self-consistent DFT that can be applied for most cases.

  20. The effect of contrast medium SonoVue® on the electric charge density of blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelska, Aneta D; Janica, Jacek R; Kotynska, Joanna; Łebkowska, Urszula; Figaszewski, Zbigniew A

    2012-01-01

    The effect of contrast medium SonoVue® on the electric charge density of blood cells (erythrocytes and thrombocytes) was measured using a microelectrophoretic method. We examined the effect of adsorbed H⁺ and OH⁻ ions on the surface charge of erythrocytes or thrombocytes. Surface charge density values were determined from electrophoretic mobility measurements of blood cells performed at various pH levels. The interaction between solution ions and the erythrocyte's or thrombocyte's surface was described by a four-component equilibrium model. The agreement between the experimental and theoretical charge variation curves of the erythrocytes and thrombocytes was good at pH 2-9. The deviation observed at a higher pH may be caused by disregarding interactions between the functional groups of blood cells.

  1. Effect of the surface roughness on contact charging of polypropylene with mercury; Polypropylene to suigin tono sesshoku taiden ni oyobosu hyomen arasa no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Y.; Saito, K. [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-02-14

    The effect of the surface roughness on the contact charging of polypropylene with mercury has been studied by measuring the two-dimensional surface charge distribution. For each sample film, one half of its area was made rough by sandpaper, and the other half was left untreated. These two portions were charged by contacting them simultaneously with mercury, and the two-dimensional surface charge distribution was measured over the entire sample. Our observations show that the behavior of the contact charging clearly depends on physical roughness. The charge density on rough surface was lower than that on smooth surface. Moreover, when the surface was made exceedingly rough, no contact charging occurred. (author)

  2. Charge density glass dynamics – Soft potentials and soft modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biljaković, K.; Starešinić, D.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Remenyi, G.; Mélin, R.; Monceau, P.; Sahling, S.

    2012-01-01

    An universal fingerprint of glasses has been found in low-temperature thermodynamic properties of charge/spin density wave (C/SDW) systems. Deviations from the well-known Debye, elastic continuum prediction for specific heat (flat C p /T 3 plot) appear as two anomalies; the upturn below 1 K and a broad bump at T∼10 K (named Boson peak in glasses). The first one, inherent of localized two level systems within the shalow corrugated phase space, exhibits slow relaxation with the complex dynamics. The second one, “Boson peak-like peak” was attributed to the pinned mode and incomplete softening of CDW superstructural mode. We discuss similar C p (T) features found also in incommensurate dielectrics with well documented soft-mode anomalies.

  3. Charge density glass dynamics - Soft potentials and soft modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biljakovic, K., E-mail: katica@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, HR-10001, Zagreb, P.O. Box 304 (Croatia); Staresinic, D., E-mail: damirs@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, HR-10001, Zagreb, P.O. Box 304 (Croatia); Lasjaunias, J.C., E-mail: jean-claude.lasjaunias@pop3.grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Remenyi, G., E-mail: Gyorgy.Remenyi@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Melin, R., E-mail: Regis.Melin@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Monceau, P., E-mail: pierre.monceau@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Sahling, S., E-mail: sven.olaf@gmail.com [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Dresden, D-01062, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-06-01

    An universal fingerprint of glasses has been found in low-temperature thermodynamic properties of charge/spin density wave (C/SDW) systems. Deviations from the well-known Debye, elastic continuum prediction for specific heat (flat C{sub p}/T{sup 3} plot) appear as two anomalies; the upturn below 1 K and a broad bump at T{approx}10 K (named Boson peak in glasses). The first one, inherent of localized two level systems within the shalow corrugated phase space, exhibits slow relaxation with the complex dynamics. The second one, 'Boson peak-like peak' was attributed to the pinned mode and incomplete softening of CDW superstructural mode. We discuss similar C{sub p}(T) features found also in incommensurate dielectrics with well documented soft-mode anomalies.

  4. Surface-induced charge at the Ge (001) surface and its interaction with self-interstitials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-21

    The Ge (001) surface with dimer structure, is negatively charged while into the bulk, positive charges are observed even deeper than the fifteenth layer from the surface. This is different from the Si case. This charge distribution can lead to the repulsion of positively charged self-interstitials by the positively charged near surface layer in an implantation or irradiation process. Self-interstitial reflection by Ge surfaces had been proposed to explain the results of diffusion experiments during irradiation whereby positively charged self-interstitials are generated by collisions of highly energetic particles with Ge atoms. We investigated different Ge (001) surface comparing an as-cleaved surface with dangling bonds to a surface with dimer structure, and to a surface terminated by hydrogen atoms. The effect of these different surface terminations on the surface-induced charges in the near surface bulk were calculated by ab initio techniques.

  5. Role of protein surface charge in monellin sweetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Szczepankiewicz, Olga; Thulin, Eva; Linse, Sara; Carey, Jannette

    2009-03-01

    A small number of proteins have the unusual property of tasting intensely sweet. Despite many studies aimed at identifying their sweet taste determinants, the molecular basis of protein sweetness is not fully understood. Recent mutational studies of monellin have implicated positively charged residues in sweetness. In the present work, the effect of overall net charge was investigated using the complementary approach of negative charge alterations. Multiple substitutions of Asp/Asn and Glu/Gln residues radically altered the surface charge of single-chain monellin by removing six negative charges or adding four negative charges. Biophysical characterization using circular dichroism, fluorescence, and two-dimensional NMR demonstrates that the native fold of monellin is preserved in the variant proteins under physiological solution conditions although their stability toward chemical denaturation is altered. A human taste test was employed to determine the sweetness detection threshold of the variants. Removal of negative charges preserves monellin sweetness, whereas added negative charge has a large negative impact on sweetness. Meta-analysis of published charge variants of monellin and other sweet proteins reveals a general trend toward increasing sweetness with increasing positive net charge. Structural mapping of monellin variants identifies a hydrophobic surface predicted to face the receptor where introduced positive or negative charge reduces sweetness, and a polar surface where charges modulate long-range electrostatic complementarity.

  6. Charge transmission through liquid neon and helium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galea, R [Nevis Laboratories, Columbia University, 136 South Broadway, P.O.Box 137, Irvington, NY, 10533 (United States); Dodd, J [Nevis Laboratories, Columbia University, 136 South Broadway, P.O.Box 137, Irvington, NY, 10533 (United States); Leltchouk, M [Nevis Laboratories, Columbia University, 136 South Broadway, P.O.Box 137, Irvington, NY, 10533 (United States); Willis, W [Nevis Laboratories, Columbia University, 136 South Broadway, P.O.Box 137, Irvington, NY, 10533 (United States); Rehak, P [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Tcherniatine, V [Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The transmission of charges through liquid neon and helium surfaces was studied. It was found that the penetration of charges from the liquid to the gas phase is more complex than a simple barrier penetration. The effective surface trapping times of localized electrons in liquid neon is much longer than previously measured.

  7. Charge transmission through liquid neon and helium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, R.; Dodd, J.; Leltchouk, M.; Willis, W.; Rehak, P.; Tcherniatine, V.

    2007-04-01

    The transmission of charges through liquid neon and helium surfaces was studied. It was found that the penetration of charges from the liquid to the gas phase is more complex than a simple barrier penetration. The effective surface trapping times of localized electrons in liquid neon is much longer than previously measured.

  8. Toward a global description of nuclear charge radii: Exploring the Fayans energy density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, P.-G.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2017-06-01

    Background: Binding energies and charge radii are fundamental properties of atomic nuclei. When inspecting their particle-number dependence, both quantities exhibit pronounced odd-even staggering. While the odd-even effect in binding energy can be attributed to nucleonic pairing, the origin of staggering in charge radii is less straightforward to ascertain. Purpose: In this work, we study the odd-even effect in binding energies and charge radii, and systematic behavior of differential radii, to identify the underlying components of the effective nuclear interaction. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory using a family of Fayans and Skyrme energy density functionals fitted to similar data sets but using different optimization protocols. We inspect various correlations between differential charge radii, odd-even staggering in energies and radii, and nuclear matter properties. The Fayans functional is assumed to be in the local FaNDF0 form. Detailed analysis is carried out for medium-mass and heavy semimagic nuclei with a particular focus on the Ca chain. Results: By making the surface and pairing terms dependent on density gradients, the Fayans functional offers the superb simultaneous description of odd-even staggering effects in energies and charge radii. Conversely, when the data on differential radii are added to the pool of fit observables, the coupling constants determining the strengths of the gradient terms of Fayans functional are increased by orders of magnitude. The Skyrme functional optimized in this work with the generalized Fayans pairing term offers results of similar quality. We quantify these findings by performing correlation analysis based on the statistical linear regression technique. The nuclear matter parameters characterizing Fayans and Skyrme functionals optimized to similar data sets are fairly close. Conclusion: The Fayans paring functional, with its generalized density dependence, significantly improves the description of

  9. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface’s optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  11. Time-dependent density functional theory for the charging kinetics of electric double layer containing room-temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Cheng; Zhao, Shuangliang; Liu, Honglai; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-11-28

    Understanding the charging kinetics of electric double layers is of fundamental importance for the design and development of novel electrochemical devices such as supercapacitors and field-effect transistors. In this work, we study the dynamic behavior of room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical time-dependent density functional theory that accounts for the molecular excluded volume effects, the electrostatic correlations, and the dispersion forces. While the conventional models predict a monotonic increase of the surface charge with time upon application of an electrode voltage, our results show that dispersion between ions results in a non-monotonic increase of the surface charge with the duration of charging. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of van der Waals attraction between electrode/ionic-liquid interactions on the charging processes.

  12. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-07

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  13. Interference effects in the nonlinear charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelcic, D.; Batistic, I.; Bjelis, A.

    1987-12-01

    The main features of the nonlinear charge density wave transport in the external dc-ac field are shown to be the natural consequences of resonant phase slip diffusion. This process is treated numerically within the time dependent Landau-Ginzburg model, developed by Gor'kov. The resonances in the ac field are manifested as Shapiro steps in I-V characteristics, present at all rational ratios of internal frequency of current oscillations and external ac frequency. The origin of Shapiro steps, as well as their forms and heights, are cosidered in detail. In particular, it is shown that close to resonances the phase slip voltage acquires a highly nonsinusoidal modulation which leads to the appearance of low frequency and satellite peaks in the Fourier spectrum. Taking into account the interference of adjacent phase slips and the segment or domain structure of physical samples, we interpret the finite width of steps, side wings, synchronization, incomplete and complete mode locking and some other effects observed in numerous experiments on NbSe 3 and other CDW materials. (author). 36 refs, 12 figs

  14. Surface determinants of low density lipoprotein uptake by endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeroeg, P.; Pearson, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The surface sialic acid content of aortic endothelial cells in vitro was substantially lower in sparse cultures than at confluence. Binding of LDL to endothelial cells did not change at different culture densities and was unaffected by brief pretreatment with neuraminidase to partially remove surface sialic acid residues. In contrast, internalisation of LDL declined by a factor of 3 between low density cell cultures and confluent monolayers; neuraminidase pretreatment increased LDL uptake and the effect was most marked (>10-fold) at confluence. Pretreatment with cationised ferritin, which removed most of the surface sialic acid residues as well as glycosaminoglycans, increased LDL internalisation by up to 20-fold, again with most effect on confluent monolayers. Thus LDL uptake is inversely correlated with sialic acid content. We conclude that changes in the surface density of sialic acid (and possibly other charged) residues significantly modulate endothelial LDL uptake, and suggest that focal increases in LDL accumulation during atherogenesis may be related to alterations in endothelial endocytic properties at sites of increased cell turnover or damage. (author)

  15. Interfacial biocatalysis on charged and immobilized substrates: the roles of enzyme and substrate surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2011-01-04

    An enzyme charge ladder was used to examine the role of electrostatic interactions involved in biocatalysis at the solid-liquid interface. The reactive substrate consisted of an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer prepared using a layer-by-layer technique. The zeta potential of the BSA substrate and each enzyme variant was measured to determine the absolute charge in solution. Enzyme adsorption and the rate of substrate surface hydrolysis were monitored for the enzyme charge ladder series to provide information regarding the strength of the enzyme-substrate interaction and the rate of interfacial biocatalysis. First, each variant of the charge ladder was examined at pH 8 for various solution ionic strengths. We found that for positively charged variants the adsorption increased with the magnitude of the charge until the surface became saturated. For higher ionic strength solutions, a greater positive enzyme charge was required to induce adsorption. Interestingly, the maximum catalytic rate was not achieved at enzyme saturation but at an invariable intermediate level of adsorption for each ionic strength value. Furthermore, the maximum achievable reaction rate for the charge ladder was larger for higher ionic strength values. We propose that diffusion plays an important role in interfacial biocatalysis, and for strong enzyme-substrate interaction, the rate of diffusion is reduced, leading to a decrease in the overall reaction rate. We investigated the effect of substrate charge by varying the solution pH from 6.1 to 8.7 and by examining multiple ionic strength values for each pH. The same intermediate level of adsorption was found to maximize the overall reaction rate. However, the ionic strength response of the maximum achievable rate was clearly dependent on the pH of the experiment. We propose that this observation is not a direct effect of pH but is caused by the change in substrate surface charge induced by changing the pH. To prove this

  16. Electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated bacterial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yongsuk; Brown, Derick G

    2008-05-06

    The electrostatic behavior of the charge-regulated surfaces of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus brevis was studied using numerical modeling in conjunction with potentiometric titration and electrophoretic mobility data as a function of solution pH and electrolyte composition. Assuming a polyelectrolytic polymeric bacterial cell surface, these experimental and numerical analyses were used to determine the effective site numbers of cell surface acid-base functional groups and Ca(2+) sorption coefficients. Using effective site concentrations determined from 1:1 electrolyte (NaCl) experimental data, the charge-regulation model was able to replicate the effects of 2:1 electrolyte (CaCl(2)), both alone and as a mixture with NaCl, on the measured zeta potential using a single Ca(2+) surface binding constant for each of the bacterial species. This knowledge is vital for understanding how cells respond to changes in solution pH and electrolyte composition as well as how they interact with other surfaces. The latter is especially important due to the widespread use of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in the interpretation of bacterial adhesion. As surface charge and surface potential both vary on a charge-regulated surface, accurate modeling of bacterial interactions with surfaces ultimately requires use of an electrostatic model that accounts for the charge-regulated nature of the cell surface.

  17. Screening model for nanowire surface-charge sensors in liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martin Hedegård; Mortensen, Asger; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    The conductance change of nanowire field-effect transistors is considered a highly sensitive probe for surface charge. However, Debye screening of relevant physiological liquid environments challenge device performance due to competing screening from the ionic liquid and nanowire charge carriers....

  18. Why Do Spacecraft Charge in Sunlight? Differential Charging and Surface Condition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lai, Shu T; Tautz, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    .... We compare the results with observations. The second reason concerns reflectance. Much attention has been paid in recent years to the effect of surface conditions on secondary emission, which plays an essential role in spacecraft charging...

  19. Breakdown of the Fermi arcs in underdoped cuprates by incommensurate charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, L. P.

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between the coherent excitations on disconnected arcs along a "bare" Fermi surface (the socalled Fermi arcs FAs) seen by angle-resolved photo emission spectroscopy (ARPES) in several underdoped (UD) cuprates and incommensurate charge density wave (IC CDW) ordering at lowering of the temperature have been studied. The carriers on FAs scatter strongly on the short-wavelength potential of CDW. The large momentum transfer relates FAs with the electronic states lying deeply under the chemical potential thus involving into consideration the Fermi liquid interactions. At low temperatures IC CDW may fully destroy low lying excitations on the Fermi arcs, leaving electrons on the pocket at the Γ point as the only charged elementary excitations in the CDW phase in UD cuprates. The results infer competition between superconducting and CDW order parameters.

  20. NEW CONCEPTS AND TEST METHODS OF CURVE PROFILE AREA DENSITY IN SURFACE: ESTIMATION OF AREAL DENSITY ON CURVED SPATIAL SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Shen

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of curve profile, curve intercept, curve intercept density, curve profile area density, intersection density in containing intersection (or intersection density relied on intersection reference), curve profile intersection density in surface (or curve intercept intersection density relied on intersection of containing curve), and curve profile area density in surface (AS) were defined. AS expressed the amount of curve profile area of Y phase in the unit containing surface area, S...

  1. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-03-19

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.

  2. Three-dimensional biofilm properties on dental bonding agent with varying quaternary ammonium charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Liu, Huaibing; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    Tooth-restoration interfaces are the weak link with secondary caries causing restoration failure. The objectives of this study were to develop an antimicrobial bonding agent with dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), and investigate the effects of quaternary amine charge density on three-dimensional (3D) biofilms on dental resin for the first time. DMAHDM was synthesized and incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-Purpose bonding agent at mass fractions of 0% (control), 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10%. Streptococcus mutans bacteria were inoculated on the polymerized resin and cultured for two days to form biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to measure biofilm thickness, live and dead biofilm volumes, and live bacteria percentage in 3D biofilm vs. distance from resin surface. Charge density of the resin had a significant effect on the antibacterial efficacy (pBiofilms on control resin had the greatest thicknesses. Biofilm thickness and live biofilm volume decreased with increasing surface charge density (pbiofilm thickness (pbiofilm was dead and the percentage of live bacteria was nearly 0% throughout the biofilm thickness. Adding new antibacterial monomer DMAHDM into dental bonding agent yielded a strong antimicrobial activity, substantially decreasing the 3D biofilm thickness, live biofilm volume, and percentage of live bacteria on cross-sections through the biofilm thickness. Novel DMAHDM-containing bonding agent with capability of inhibiting 3D biofilms is promising for a wide range of dental restorative and preventive applications to inhibit biofilms at the tooth-restoration margins and prevent secondary caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bond index: relation to second-order density matrix and charge fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambiagi, M.S. de; Giambiagi, M.; Jorge, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that, in the same way as the atomic charge is an invariant built from the first-order density matrix, the closed-shell generalized bond index is an invariant associated with the second-order reduced density matrix. The active charge of an atom (sum of bond indices) is shown to be the sum of all density correlation functions between it and the other atoms in the molecule; similarly, the self-charge is the fluctuation of its total charge. (Author) [pt

  4. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1−xTe alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    covalent character of bonding compared to other wide gap II–. VI semiconductors like ZnTe. The first-principles ... basis of heteropolar gap (Al-Douri et al 2003). 2. Empirical pseudopotential method. EPM (Cohen ..... anion plane z = 0·25 used to compute charge density are shaded. Figure 5. Charge density obtained at the ...

  5. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a…

  6. Application of »Mass Titration« to Determination of Surface Charge of Metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The mass titration method, used for the point of zero charge determination, was extended to the measurement of the surface charge density. The results agree with the common method, which is the acid-base titration of the colloidal suspension. The advantage of mass titration is that one does not need to perform blank titration, instead one simply adds metal oxide powder to the electrolyte aqueous solution of known pH. To cover the pH range above and below the point of zero charge, two experime...

  7. Concentration polarization and desalination in nanochannels: Effect of surface charge dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mathias B.; Bruus, Henrik; Mani, Ali; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2011-11-01

    Mani, Zangle, and Santiago (Langmuir, 25, 3898-3916) have shown that at microchannel-nanochannel junctions the coupled effect of concentration polarization and surface conduction can lead to long range propagation of bulk ion-depletion shocks. Essential for this phenomena is the surface charge which for many materials depends on both the concentration and the pH of the local bulk electrolyte. Standard models predict that the surface charge decreases with decreasing concentration leading to the contradictory expectation that there is little or no surface charge in the depleted region and hence no mechanism to sustain long range propagation of desalination shocks. We show that this simple prediction fails to take into account axial transport terms. As such, we couple a surface charge model with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for electric potential and ionic species combined with the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations for fluid velocity. Motivated by experimental work we consider steady-state solutions at the dead end of a nanochannel against a membrane, a scenario where especially space charge and electroosmotic flow are important. Our results suggest that the surface charge density remains finite and does not vanish, and even grows, as the depletion front propagates through the channel.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Glass Surface Charging Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Gabriel

    Charging behavior of multi-component display-type (i.e. low alkali) glass surfaces has been studied using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Data obtained by way of a Rolling Sphere Test (RST), streaming/zeta potential and surface energy measurements from commercially available display glass surfaces (Corning EAGLE XGRTM and Lotus(TM) XT) suggest that charge accumulation is highly dependent on surface treatment (chemical and/or physical modification) and measurement environment, presumably through reactionary mechanisms at the surface with atmospheric moisture. It has been hypothesized that water dissociation, along with the corresponding hydroxylation of the glass surface, are important processes related to charging in glass-metal contact systems. Classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, in conjunction with various laboratory based measurements (RST, a newly developed ElectroStatic Gauge (ESG) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS)) on simpler Calcium AluminoSilicate (CAS) glass surfaces were used to further explore these phenomena. Analysis of simulated high-silica content (≥50%) (CAS) glass structures suggest that controlled variation of bulk chemistry can directly affect surface defect concentrations, such as non-bridging oxygen (NBO), which can be suitable high-energy sites for hydrolysis-type reactions to occur. Calculated NBO surface concentrations correlate well with charge based measurements on laboratory fabricated CAS surfaces. The data suggest that a directional/polar shift in contact-charge transfer occurs at low silica content (≤50%) where the highest concentrations of NBOs are observed. Surface charging sensitivity with respect to NBO concentration decreases as the relative humidity of the measurement environment increases; which should be expected as the highly reactive sites are progressively covered by liquid water layers. DRIFTS analysis of CAS powders expand on this analysis showing

  9. Far-Infrared Study of the Charge Density Wave in Tetrathiofulvalene Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, D. B.; Cummings, K. D.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1981-01-01

    Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...... at 40 cm-1 while at higher temperatures it appears at zero frequency. Values are obtained for the effective mass (20m*) and lifetime (1.6×10-12 sec at 60 K) of the charge-density wave.......Detailed far-infrared measurements at temperatures from 25 to 300 K provide strong support for a charge-density-wave mechanism for the dc conductivity and microwave dielectric constant of tetrathiafulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ). At low temperatures the charge-density wave is pinned...

  10. Chemical sensors based on surface charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasebi, Amirmasoud; Kruse, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The focus of this review is an introduction to chemiresistive chemical sensors. The general concept of chemical sensors is briefly introduced, followed by different architectures of chemiresistive sensors and relevant materials. For several of the most common systems, the fabrication of the active materials used in such sensors and their properties are discussed. Furthermore, the sensing mechanism, advantages, and limitations of each group of chemiresistive sensors are briefly elaborated. Compared to electrochemical sensors, chemiresistive sensors have the key advantage of a simpler geometry, eliminating the need for a reference electrode. The performance of bulk chemiresistors can be improved upon by using freestanding ultra-thin films (nanomaterials) or field effect geometries. Both of those concepts have also been combined in a gateless geometry, where charge transport though a percolation network of nanomaterials is modulated via adsorbate doping.

  11. Dimensional Crossover in a Charge Density Wave Material Probed by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, C. W.; Berthod, C.; Puppin, M.; Berger, H.; Wolf, M.; Hoesch, M.; Monney, C.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data reveal evidence of a crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior in the prototypical charge density wave (CDW) material NbSe3 . In the low-temperature 3D regime, gaps in the electronic structure are observed due to two incommensurate CDWs, in agreement with x-ray diffraction and electronic-structure calculations. At higher temperatures we observe a spectral weight depletion that approaches the power-law behavior expected in one dimension. From the warping of the quasi-1D Fermi surface at low temperatures, we extract the energy scale of the dimensional crossover. This is corroborated by a detailed analysis of the density of states, which reveals a change in dimensional behavior dependent on binding energy. Our results offer an important insight into the dimensionality of excitations in quasi-1D materials.

  12. Persistent Charge-Density-Wave Order in Single-Layer TaSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Chen, Yi; Kim, Heejung; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Tang, Shujie; Jiang, Juan; Liou, Franklin; Kahn, Salman; Jia, Caihong; Omrani, Arash A; Shim, Ji Hoon; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung Il; Hwang, Choongyu; Crommie, Michael F; Mo, Sung-Kwan

    2018-02-14

    We present the electronic characterization of single-layer 1H-TaSe 2 grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. We demonstrate that 3 × 3 charge-density-wave (CDW) order persists despite distinct changes in the low energy electronic structure highlighted by the reduction in the number of bands crossing the Fermi energy and the corresponding modification of Fermi surface topology. Enhanced spin-orbit coupling and lattice distortion in the single-layer play a crucial role in the formation of CDW order. Our findings provide a deeper understanding of the nature of CDW order in the two-dimensional limit.

  13. A surface diffuse scattering model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model for the mobility of electrons in surface charge coupled devices is studied on the basis of the results previously obtained, considering a surface diffuse scattering; the importance of the results obtained for a better understanding of the influence of the fringing field in surface charge coupled devices is discussed. (author)

  14. Growth and decay of surface charges in grafts of Teflon in electrets states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinelli, I.M.M.

    1971-01-01

    The greatest problem founded in a cardiovascular implant is the thrombus formation. Teflon grafts were used in electret state for prothesis in vena cava of dogs. To put these grafts in an electret state a corona discharge in air was used and homocharge was formed predominantly. To measure the formed surface charge the oscillating capacitor technique was used. In the electret state the grafts have showed an initial density of charge of 10- 8 C/cm 2 and the charge decay and time decay of the samples were measured under many conditions. We found two activation energies, E 2 =0.17 e V and E 3 =1.12 e V, due to rapid and slow decay, respectively. The charged grafts were sterilized with ethilene gas oxide and this process apparently did not influence the charges

  15. Effect of plasma-induced surface charging on catalytic processes: application to CO2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Kristof M.; Huygh, Stijn; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the nature and effect of the multitude of plasma–surface interactions in plasma catalysis is a crucial requirement for further process development and improvement. A particularly intriguing and rather unique property of a plasma-catalytic setup is the ability of the plasma to modify the electronic structure, and hence chemical properties, of the catalyst through charging, i.e. the absorption of excess electrons. In this work, we develop a quantum chemical model based on density functional theory to study excess negative surface charges in a heterogeneous catalyst exposed to a plasma. This method is specifically applied to investigate plasma-catalytic CO2 activation on supported M/Al2O3 (M = Ti, Ni, Cu) single atom catalysts. We find that (1) the presence of a negative surface charge dramatically improves the reductive power of the catalyst, strongly promoting the splitting of CO2 to CO and oxygen, and (2) the relative activity of the investigated transition metals is also changed upon charging, suggesting that controlled surface charging is a powerful additional parameter to tune catalyst activity and selectivity. These results strongly point to plasma-induced surface charging of the catalyst as an important factor contributing to the plasma-catalyst synergistic effects frequently reported for plasma catalysis.

  16. Laboratory measurements of dusty surface charging in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kevin; Wang, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    A novel method is developed to study the charging of a conducting surface covered by a thin dust layer in plasma. The potential profile in the dust layer and the floating potential of the surface underneath are measured directly by embedding conducting wires in the dust and connecting the wires to a measurement plate outside the vacuum chamber, where a Trek non-contacting electrostatic voltmeter measures the floating potential of the measurement plate. Laboratory experiments are carried out to study plasma charging of a conducting plate covered by lunar dust simulant, JSC-1A. The results show that the plate potential is dependent on both the ambient plasma condition and the dust layer thickness. The current balance condition controls the floating potential of the dust surface while the dust layer acts as a capacitor and controls the potential of the plate with respect to the dust surface. Hence, a dust covered conducting plate will be charged more negatively than a clean plate.

  17. Self-Amplified Surface Charging and Partitioning of Ionic Liquids in Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Justin N.; Van Aken, K. L.; Gogotsi, Y.; Wesolowski, David J.; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-09-01

    We study ion partitioning and self-charging of nanoporous electrodes with room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical density-functional theory that accounts for molecular-excluded volume effects and electrostatic correlations. Nanopores of zero electrical potential are predicted to favor adsorption of small ions even without specific surface attraction, and the imbalanced distributions of cations and anions inside the pore induces a net surface charge that promotes further enrichment of small ions. The self-amplified ion partitioning is most significant when the nanopore and the ionic species are of comparable dimension.

  18. Spectroscopic study of the charge density wave order in 2H[ -TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Wijayaratne, K.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Chung, D. Y.; Gu, G.; Chatterjee, U.

    2017-09-01

    We conduct Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation on 2H-TaS2, a prototypical incommensurate Charge Density Wave (CDW) material. A comparative study of the low-energy electronic structures of 2H-TaS2 and two other related compounds, 2H-TaSe2 and 2H-NbSe2, identifies several generic features of their CDW orders. Firstly, Fermi surface (FS) nesting alone doesn't seem to give rise to the CDW instability in these compounds. Secondly, partial gapping of the underlying FS surface in the CDW state is common to each of these materials. Finally, the CDW energy gap, unlike the energy gap in a superconductor, is not symmetric with respect to the chemical potential.

  19. Origin of Superconductivity and Latent Charge Density Wave in NbS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Christoph; Poncé, Samuel; Lambert, Henry; Schlipf, Martin; Margine, Elena R.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2017-08-01

    We elucidate the origin of the phonon-mediated superconductivity in 2 H -NbS2 using the ab initio anisotropic Migdal-Eliashberg theory including Coulomb interactions. We demonstrate that superconductivity is associated with Fermi surface hot spots exhibiting an unusually strong electron-phonon interaction. The electron-lattice coupling is dominated by low-energy anharmonic phonons, which place the system on the verge of a charge density wave instability. We also provide definitive evidence for two-gap superconductivity in 2 H -NbS2 , and show that the low- and high-energy peaks observed in tunneling spectra correspond to the Γ - and K -centered Fermi surface pockets, respectively. The present findings call for further efforts to determine whether our proposed mechanism underpins superconductivity in the whole family of metallic transition metal dichalcogenides.

  20. Charge-scaling effect in ionic liquids from the charge-density analysis of N,N'-dimethylimidazolium methylsulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichel, Witali; Trapp, Nils; Hauf, Christoph; Kohler, Oliver; Eickerling, Georg; Scherer, Wolfgang; Krossing, Ingo

    2014-03-17

    The charge scaling effect in ionic liquids was explored on the basis of experimental and theoretical chargedensity analyses of [C1MIM][C1SO4] employing the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) approach. Integrated QTAIM charges of the experimental (calculated) charge density of the cation and anion resulted in non-integer values of ±0.90 (±0.87) e. Efficient charge transfer along the bond paths of the hydrogen bonds between the imidazolium ring and the anion was considered as the origin of these reduced charges. In addition, a detailed QTAIM analysis of the bonding situation in the [C1SO4]- anion revealed the presence of negative πO→σ*S-O hyperconjugation.

  1. Surface charge algebra in gauge theories and thermodynamic integrability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Compere, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    Surface charges and their algebra in interacting Lagrangian gauge field theories are constructed out of the underlying linearized theory using techniques from the variational calculus. In the case of exact solutions and symmetries, the surface charges are interpreted as a Pfaff system. Integrability is governed by Frobenius' theorem and the charges associated with the derived symmetry algebra are shown to vanish. In the asymptotic context, we provide a generalized covariant derivation of the result that the representation of the asymptotic symmetry algebra through charges may be centrally extended. Comparison with Hamiltonian and covariant phase space methods is made. All approaches are shown to agree for exact solutions and symmetries while there are differences in the asymptotic context

  2. Charged particle discrimination with silicon surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coote, G.E.; Pithie, J.; Vickridge, I.C.

    1996-01-01

    The application for materials analysis of nuclear reactions that give rise to charged particles is a powerful surface analytical and concentration depth profiling technique. Spectra of charged particles, with energies in the range 0.1 to 15 MeV, emitted from materials irradiated with beams of light nuclei such as deuterons are measured with silicon surface barrier detectors. The spectra from multi-elemental materials typically encountered in materials research are usually composed of an overlapping superposition of proton, alpha, and other charged particle spectra. Interpretation of such complex spectra would be simplified if a means were available to electronically discriminate between the detector response to the different kinds of charged particle. We have investigated two methods of discriminating between different types of charged particles. The fast charge pulses from a surface barrier detector have different shapes, depending on the spatial distribution of energy deposition of the incident particle. Fast digitisation of the pulses, followed by digital signal processing provides one avenue for discrimination. A second approach is to use a thin transmission detector in front of a thick detector as a detector telescope. For a given incident energy, different types of charged particles will lose different amounts of energy in the thin detector, providing an alternative means of discrimination. We show that both approaches can provide significant simplification in the interpretation of charged particle spectra in practical situations, and suggest that silicon surface barrier detectors having graded electronic properties could provide improved discrimination compared to the current generation of detectors having homogeneous electronic properties. (author).12 refs., 2 tabs., 28 figs

  3. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  4. In-vivo comparison of the charge densities required to evoke motor responses using novel annular penetrating microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Kate Brunton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes for cortical stimulation need to deliver current to neural tissue effectively and safely. We have developed electrodes with a novel annular geometry for use in cortical visual prostheses. Here we explore a critical question on the ideal annulus height to ensure electrical stimulation will be safe and effective. We implanted single electrodes into the motor cortex of anesthetized rats and measured the current required to evoke a motor response to stimulation, and the charge injection capacity of the electrodes. We compared platinum iridium electrodes with different annulus heights, with and without a coating of porous titanium nitride. Threshold charge densities to evoke a motor response ranged from 12-36 µC.cm^-2.ph^-1. Electrodes with larger geometric surface areas required higher currents to evoke responses, but lower charge densities. The addition of a porous titanium nitride coating did not significantly influence the current required to evoke a motor response. The charge injection capacity of both electrode types was significantly reduced in-vivo compared with in-vitro measurements. The measured charge injection capacity was 72 and 18 µC.cm^-2.ph^-1 for electrodes with and without a titanium nitride coating respectively. These results support the use of platinum iridium annular electrodes with annulus heights greater than 100 µm (geometric surface area of 38, 000 µm^2. However, if the electrodes are coated with porous titanium nitride the annulus height can be reduced to 40 µm (geometric surface area of 16,000 µm^2.

  5. Charge-density study on layered oxyarsenides (LaO)MAs (M = Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Kouichi; Hiramoto, Shozo; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Sato, Kazunori; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2017-12-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, we investigate the charge-density distributions of the layered oxypnictides (LaO)MnAs, (LaO)FeAs, (LaO)NiAs, and (LaO)ZnAs, which are an antiferromagnetic semiconductor, a parent material of an iron-based superconductor, a low-temperature superconductor, and a non-magnetic semiconductor, respectively. For the metallic samples, clear charge densities are observed in both the transition-metal pnictide layers and the rare-earth-oxide layers. However, in the semiconducting samples, there is no finite charge density between the transition-metal element and As. These differences in charge density reflect differences in physical properties. First-principles calculations using density functional theory reproduce the experimental results reasonably well.

  6. Cytotoxicity of surface-functionalized silicon and germanium nanoparticles: the dominant role of surface charges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Singh, M.P.; Atkins, T.M.; Purkait, T.K.; Xu, Z.; Regli, S.; Shukaliak, A.; Clark, R.J.; Mitchell, B.S.; Alink, G.M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Fink, M.J.; Veinot, J.G.C.; Kauzlarich, S.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is frequently hypothesized that surface (like surface charge) and physical characteristics (like particle size) play important roles in cellular interactions of nanoparticles (NPs), a systematic study probing this issue is missing. Hence, a comparative cytotoxicity study, quantifying

  7. Charged particle density distributions in Au+ Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of ...

  8. Modulated spin and charge densities in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have played a crucial role in characterizing the spin and charge correlations in copper-oxide superconductors. While the data are often interpreted with respect to specific theories of the cuprates, an attempt is made here to distinguish those facts that can be extracted empirically, and the connections that can be made with minimal assumptions.

  9. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of ...

  10. Influence of surface charge on lysozyme adsorption to ceria nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Binghui; Wu Peng; Yokel, Robert A.; Grulke, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding mechanisms for forming protein coronas on nanomaterial surfaces is essential to designing drug delivery systems and designing and interpreting the results of nanomaterial toxicity tests. The study reports the adsorption behavior of a positively charged protein, lysozyme, on cerium dioxide (ceria) nanoparticles with three different surface charges. Adsorption isotherms were modeled with the Toth and Sips equations. Isotherm loading levels were compared to monolayer coverage estimate for ‘side-on’ and ‘end-on’ lysozyme orientations as well as random packing (jamming) and maximum packing limits. Evaluation of adsorption site energy distributions (generated using the model coefficients) suggested that the negatively charged ceria surface had a very broad site energy distribution and that its surface heterogeneity controls the adsorption process. By contrast, the adsorption of lysozyme on the positively charged nanoparticles appears to be influenced by lateral effects from adsorbed protein species. The results illustrate the importance of nanoparticle surface chemistry to protein adsorption. The modeling and site energy distribution evaluations may be useful for interpreting the formation of protein coronas on nanoparticles.

  11. Peltier effect in multilayered nanopillars under high density charge current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravier, L; Fukushima, A; Kubota, H; Yamamoto, A; Yuasa, S

    2006-01-01

    From the basic equations of thermoelectricity, we model the thermal regimes that develop in multilayered nanopillar elements experiencing continuous charge currents. The energy conservation principle was applied to all layer-layer and layer-electrode junctions. The obtained set of equations was solved to derive the temperature of each junction. The contribution of the Peltier effect is included in an effective resistance. This model gives satisfactory fits to experimental data obtained on a series of reference nanopillar elements

  12. Surface Charge and Ion Sorption Properties of Titanium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, M. K.; Machesky, M. L.; Wesolowski, D. J.; Finnegan, M. P.; Palmer, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    The interaction of submicron metal oxide particles with natural aqueous solutions results in the hydroxylation of surface sites, which impart a pH-dependent surface charge. The charged submicron particles influence processes such as nanoparticle assembly and alteration, crystal growth rates and morphologies, colloid flocculation, and contaminant transport. The surface charge and ion sorption properties of metal-oxide particles may be studied by potentiometric titrations, using hydrogen-electrode concentration-cells or traditional glass electrodes and an autotitrator. These techniques have been used to quantify the adsorption of various ions (Na+, Rb+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Cl-) on rutile, at ionic strengths up to 1.0 molality and temperatures to 250° C. The crystalline rutile used in these studies is less than 400 nm in diameter, has a BET surface area of 17 m2/g, and the 110 and 100 faces predominate. The negative surface charge of the rutile was enhanced by increasing temperature, increasing ionic strength, and decreasing the ionic radii of the electrolyte cation. Moreover, the addition of a divalent cation significantly enhances the negative charge of the rutile surface. These data have been rationalized with the MUSIC model of Hiemestra and van Riemsdijk, and a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). Model fitting of the experimental data provides binding constants for the adsorbed counterions and divalent cations, and capacitance values as well as corresponding electrical potential values of the binding planes. Recently, new studies have been initiated to determine particle size affects on the proton induced surface charge and ion sorption properties of titanium dioxide. In these studies, anatase with a BET surface area of 40 and 100 m2/g (primary particle sizes of 40 and 10 nm, respectively) is being investigated. The complexity of both the experimental and modeling procedures increases with decreasing particle size. For example, the fine

  13. Lateral diffusion of the topological charge density in stochastic optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic (i.e. random and quasi-random) optical fields may contain distributions of optical vortices that are represented by non-uniform topological charge densities. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the evolution under free...

  14. Determination of charge carrier mobility in doped low density polyethylene using DC transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M.Salah; Henk, Peter O; Henriksen, Mogens

    1989-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility was determined for plain and doped low-density polyethylene (LDPE) using DC transient currents. Barium titanate was used as a strongly polar dopant and titanium dioxide as a semiconductor dopant. The values of the mobility obtained were on the order of 10-10 cm2 v-1 s-1...... by a factor of five. Charge trapping and space charge formation were modified by the introduction of titanium dioxide...

  15. Rendering high charge density of states in ionic liquid-gated MoS 2 transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.; Lee, J.; Kim, S.; Park, H.S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated high charge density of states (DOS) in the bandgap of MoS2 nanosheets with variable temperature measurements on ionic liquid-gated MoS2 transistors. The thermally activated charge transport indicates that the electrical current in the two-dimensional MoS 2 nanosheets under high

  16. Charged particle density distributions in Au·Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au·Au collisions using the BRAHMS ... Relativistic heavy-ion collisions; charged hadron production; pseudorapidity distribu- tions; centrality .... the predictions of two different theoretical models: (i) the high density gluon saturation model of Kharzeev and ...

  17. On contribution of known atomic partial charges of protein backbone in electrostatic potential density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin

    2017-06-01

    Partial charges of atoms in a molecule and electrostatic potential (ESP) density for that molecule are known to bear a strong correlation. In order to generate a set of point-field force field parameters for molecular dynamics, Kollman and coworkers have extracted atomic partial charges for each of all 20 amino acids using restrained partial charge-fitting procedures from theoretical ESP density obtained from condensed-state quantum mechanics. The magnitude of atomic partial charges for neutral peptide backbone they have obtained is similar to that of partial atomic charges for ionized carboxylate side chain atoms. In this study, the effect of these known atomic partial charges on ESP is examined using computer simulations and compared with the experimental ESP density recently obtained for proteins using electron microscopy. It is found that the observed ESP density maps are most consistent with the simulations that include atomic partial charges of protein backbone. Therefore, atomic partial charges are integral part of atomic properties in protein molecules and should be included in model refinement. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. Charge density of GaxAl1− xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charge density calculations and electronic band structures for GaAl1- = 1.0, 0.5 and 0.0 are presented in this work. The calculations are performed using the empirical pseudopotential method. The charge density is computed for a number of planes, i.e. = 0:0, 0.125 and 0.25 0 by generating the potential through a ...

  19. Charge density wave formation in R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm, and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K. Y.; Laverock, J.; Wu, Y. Q.; Condron, C.; Toney, M.; Dugdale, S.; Kramer, M.; Fisher, I.

    2008-04-01

    The rare earth (R) tellurides R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have a crystal structure intermediate between that of RTe{sub 2} and RTe{sub 3}, consisting of alternating single and double Te planes sandwiched between RTe block layers. We have successfully grown single crystals of Nd{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Gd{sub 2}Te{sub 5} from a self-flux and we describe here evidence for charge density wave formation in these materials. The superlattice patterns for all three compounds are relatively complex, consisting at room temperature of at least two independent wave vectors. Consideration of the electronic structure indicates that, to a large extent, these wave vectors are separately associated with sheets of the Fermi surface which are principally derived from the single and double Te layers.

  20. Charge Density Wave Formation in R(2)Te(5) (R=Nd, Sm, And Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, K.Y.; Laverock, J.; Wu, Y.Q.; Condron, C.L.; Toney, M.F.; Dugdale, S.B.; Kramer, M.J.; Fisher, I.R.

    2009-05-27

    The rare earth (R) tellurides R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} have a crystal structure intermediate between that of RTe{sub 2} and RTe{sub 3}, consisting of alternating single and double Te planes sandwiched between RTe block layers. We have successfully grown single crystals of Nd{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, Sm{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, and Gd{sub 2}Te{sub 5} from a self-flux and we describe here evidence for charge density wave formation in these materials. The superlattice patterns for all three compounds are relatively complex, consisting at room temperature of at least two independent wave vectors. Consideration of the electronic structure indicates that, to a large extent, these wave vectors are separately associated with sheets of the Fermi surface which are principally derived from the single and double Te layers.

  1. Synthetic polycations with controlled charge density and molecular weight as building blocks for biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberger, Rachelle M; Burke, Nicholas A D; Zhou, Christal; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-01-01

    A series of polycations prepared by RAFT copolymerization of N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide hydrochloride (APM) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide, with molecular weights of 15 and 40 kDa, and APM content of 10-75 mol%, were tested as building blocks for electrostatically assembled hydrogels such as those used for cell encapsulation. Complexation and distribution of these copolymers within anionic calcium alginate gels, as well as cytotoxicity, cell attachment, and cell proliferation on surfaces grafted with the copolymers were found to depend on composition and molecular weight. Copolymers with lower cationic charge density and lower molecular weight showed less cytotoxicity and cell adhesion, and were more mobile within alginate gels. These findings aid in designing improved polyelectrolyte complexes for use as biomaterials.

  2. Electrokinetic effect combined with surface-charge assumption: a possible generation mechanism of coseismic EM signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hengxin; Wen, Jian; Huang, Qinghua; Chen, Xiaofei

    2015-02-01

    According to field observations, electromagnetic (EM) signals accompanying seismic waves can be recorded. The orders of magnitude of observed coseismic electric and magnetic signals associated with earthquakes are usually around 1 to 101 mV km-1 and 10-2 to 1 nT, respectively. In this paper, we carry out numerical simulation of coseismic EM signals associated with seismic waves due to electrokinetic effect and compare with field observations. The seismic source is represented by a finite fault measuring 15 × 9 km2 with a max slip displacement 1.5 m, corresponding to a Mw 5.9 earthquake. While using the EM surface boundary condition of continuous horizontal EM components, the magnetic signals only accompany the late-arriving S waves at receiver near the ground surface. This is obviously different from field observations. Thus, we adopt another EM surface boundary condition which assumes the ground surface carries surface charge. For the used half-space model, a surface-charge density magnitude |Qsc| in excess of 10-4 C m-2 is sufficient to make horizontal magnetic components clearly show up at the whole time duration of seismic waves. When |Qsc| increases, the contribution of surface-charge density to coseismic EM signals becomes more and more dominant comparing with that of the seismically induced streaming-current. We estimate the Qsc expected at the Earth's surface might be a value between -5 × 10-4 and -0.1 C m-2 by the comparison between numerical results and field observations. The vertical magnetic signals only accompany the late-arriving seismic waves, because they are theoretically only induced by SH wave. The field observation results of vertical magnetic signals may be resulted from the scattering effect or the seismic dynamo effect. We conclude that electrokinetic effect combined with surface-charge assumption is one possible generation mechanism of the observed coseismic EM signals.

  3. The protective nature of passivation films on zinc: surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muster, Tim H.; Cole, Ivan S.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of oxide surface charge on the corrosion performance of zinc metals was investigated. Oxidised zinc species (zinc oxide, zinc hydroxychloride, zinc hydroxysulfate and zinc hydroxycarbonate) with chemical compositions similar to those produced on zinc during atmospheric corrosion were formed as particles from aqueous solution, and as passive films deposited onto zinc powder, and rolled zinc, surfaces. Synthesized oxides were characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. The zeta potentials of various oxide particles, as determined by microelectrophoresis, are reported as a function of pH. Particulates containing a majority of zinc hydroxycarbonate and zinc hydroxysulfate crystallites were found to possess a negative surface charge below pH 6, whilst zinc oxide-hydroxide and zinc hydroxychloride crystallites possessed isoelectric points (IEP's) higher than pH 8. The ability of chloride species to pass through a bed of 3 μm diameter zinc powder was found to increase for surfaces possessing carboxy and sulfate surface species, suggesting that negatively charged surfaces can aid in the repulsion of chloride ions. Electrochemical analysis of the open-circuit potential as a function of time at a fixed pH of 6.5 showed that the chemical composition of passive films on zinc plates influenced the ability of chloride ions to access anodic sites for periods of approximately 1 h

  4. Chemical bonding and charge density distribution analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mid bond electron density values revealed the enhancement of covalent nature between titanium and oxygen ions and predominant ionic nature between barium and oxygen ions. Average grain sizes were estimated for the undoped and doped samples. SEM investigations showed the existence of smaller grains with ...

  5. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongjun; Yeo, Hwasoo

    2015-01-01

    The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC) stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive adoption of electric

  6. An Analytical Planning Model to Estimate the Optimal Density of Charging Stations for Electric Vehicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Ahn

    Full Text Available The charging infrastructure location problem is becoming more significant due to the extensive adoption of electric vehicles. Efficient charging station planning can solve deeply rooted problems, such as driving-range anxiety and the stagnation of new electric vehicle consumers. In the initial stage of introducing electric vehicles, the allocation of charging stations is difficult to determine due to the uncertainty of candidate sites and unidentified charging demands, which are determined by diverse variables. This paper introduces the Estimating the Required Density of EV Charging (ERDEC stations model, which is an analytical approach to estimating the optimal density of charging stations for certain urban areas, which are subsequently aggregated to city level planning. The optimal charging station's density is derived to minimize the total cost. A numerical study is conducted to obtain the correlations among the various parameters in the proposed model, such as regional parameters, technological parameters and coefficient factors. To investigate the effect of technological advances, the corresponding changes in the optimal density and total cost are also examined by various combinations of technological parameters. Daejeon city in South Korea is selected for the case study to examine the applicability of the model to real-world problems. With real taxi trajectory data, the optimal density map of charging stations is generated. These results can provide the optimal number of chargers for driving without driving-range anxiety. In the initial planning phase of installing charging infrastructure, the proposed model can be applied to a relatively extensive area to encourage the usage of electric vehicles, especially areas that lack information, such as exact candidate sites for charging stations and other data related with electric vehicles. The methods and results of this paper can serve as a planning guideline to facilitate the extensive

  7. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations in the charge-density wave compound lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Borzi, R.A.; Rost, A.; Mackenzie, A.P.; /St. Andrews U., Phys. Astron.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; /Bristol U.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were measured in lanthanum tritelluride (LaTe{sub 3}) to probe the partially gapped Fermi surface resulting from charge density wave (CDW) formation. Three distinct frequencies were observed, one of which can be correlated with a FS sheet that is unaltered by CDW formation. The other two frequencies arise from FS sheets that have been reconstructed in the CDW state.

  8. Dendrimer-induced leukocyte procoagulant activity depends on particle size and surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Patri, Anil K; Potter, Timothy M; Rodriguez, Jamie C; Hall, Jennifer B; McNeil, Scott E

    2012-02-01

    Thrombogenicity associated with the induction of leukocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) is a common complication in sepsis and cancer. Since nanoparticles are increasingly used for drug delivery, their interaction with coagulation systems is an important part of the safety assessment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of nanoparticle physicochemical properties on leukocyte PCA, and to get insight into the mechanism of PCA induction. A total of 12 formulations of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, varying in size and surface charge, were studied in vitro using recalcification time assay. Irrespective of their size, anionic and neutral dendrimers did not induce leukocyte PCA in vitro. Cationic particles induced PCA in a size- and charge-dependent manner. The mechanism of PCA induction was similar to that of doxorubicin. Cationic dendrimers were also found to exacerbate endotoxin-induced PCA. PAMAM dendrimer-induced leukocyte PCA depends on particle size, charge and density of surface groups.

  9. The control mechanism of surface traps on surface charge behavior in alumina-filled epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chuanyang; Hu, Jun; Lin, Chuanjie; He, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role surface traps play in the charge injection and transfer behavior of alumina-filled epoxy composites, surface traps with different trap levels are introduced by different surface modification methods which include dielectric barrier discharges plasma, direct fluorination, and Cr 2 O 3 coating. The resulting surface physicochemical characteristics of experimental samples were observed using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The surface potential under dc voltage was detected and the trap level distribution was measured. The results suggest that the surface morphology of the experimental samples differs dramatically after treatment with different surface modification methods. Different surface trap distributions directly determine the charge injection and transfer property along the surface. Shallow traps with trap level of 1.03–1.11 eV and 1.06–1.13 eV introduced by plasma and fluorination modifications are conducive for charge transport along the insulating surface, and the surface potential can be modified, producing a smoother potential curve. The Cr 2 O 3 coating can introduce a large number of deep traps with energy levels ranging from 1.09 to 1.15 eV. These can prevent charge injection through the reversed electric field formed by intensive trapped charges in the Cr 2 O 3 coatings. (paper)

  10. Competitive adsorption and ordered packing of counterions near highly charged surfaces: From mean-field theory to Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jiayi; Zhou, Shenggao; Xu, Zhenli; Li, Bo

    2012-04-01

    Competitive adsorption of counterions of multiple species to charged surfaces is studied by a size-effect-included mean-field theory and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The mean-field electrostatic free-energy functional of ionic concentrations, constrained by Poisson's equation, is numerically minimized by an augmented Lagrangian multiplier method. Unrestricted primitive models and canonical ensemble MC simulations with the Metropolis criterion are used to predict the ionic distributions around a charged surface. It is found that, for a low surface charge density, the adsorption of ions with a higher valence is preferable, agreeing with existing studies. For a highly charged surface, both the mean-field theory and the MC simulations demonstrate that the counterions bind tightly around the charged surface, resulting in a stratification of counterions of different species. The competition between mixed entropy and electrostatic energetics leads to a compromise that the ionic species with a higher valence-to-volume ratio has a larger probability to form the first layer of stratification. In particular, the MC simulations confirm the crucial role of ionic valence-to-volume ratios in the competitive adsorption to charged surfaces that had been previously predicted by the mean-field theory. The charge inversion for ionic systems with salt is predicted by the MC simulations but not by the mean-field theory. This work provides a better understanding of competitive adsorption of counterions to charged surfaces and calls for further studies on the ionic size effect with application to large-scale biomolecular modeling.

  11. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  12. Proton surface charge determination in Spodosol horizons with organically bound aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllberg, Ulf; Borggaard, Ole K.

    1998-05-01

    Net proton surface charge densities were determined in O, E, Bh, and Bs horizons of a sandy till, Spodosol from Denmark, by means of acid-base titration combined with ion adsorption in 0.005 M Ca(NO 3) 2 and independent permanent charge determination. The release of organic anions exceeded the adsorption of NO 3-, resulting in a desorption of anions in all horizons. Data were found to obey the law of balance between surface charges and adsorbed ions only when charges pertaining to Al and organic anions released during the titration experiments were accounted for, in addition to charges pertaining the potential determining ions (PDI) H + and OH - and the index ions Ca 2+ and NO 3-. It was furthermore shown that the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) in soils highly depends on the concentration of organically bound Al. Approaches previously used in soils, in which adsorbed Al n+ has been ignored (i.e., considered equivalent to nH + as a PDI), resulted in a PZNPC of 4.1 in the Bs horizon. If instead organically bound Al was accounted for as a counter-ion similar to 3/2Ca 2+, a PZNPC of 2.9 was obtained for the same Bs horizon. Based on PZNPC values estimated by the latter approach, combined with a weak-acid analog, it was shown that organic proton surface charges buffered pH with a similar intensity in the O, E, Bh, and Bs horizons of this study. Because the acidity of Al adsorbed to conjugate bases of soil organic acids is substantially weaker than the acidity of the corresponding protonated form of the organic acids, the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) will increase if the concentration of organically adsorbed Al increases at the expense of adsorbed H. This means that PZNPC values determined for soils with unknown concentrations of organically adsorbed Al are highly operational and not very meaningful as references.

  13. Nanoscale smoothing and the analysis of interfacial charge and dipolar densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junquera, Javier; Cohen, Morrel H; Rabe, Karin M

    2007-01-01

    The interface properties of interest in multilayers include interfacial charge densities, dipole densities, band offsets, and screening lengths, among others. Most such properties are inaccessible to direct measurements, but are key to understanding the physics of the multilayers. They are contained within first-principles electronic structure computations but are buried within the vast amount of quantitative information those computations generate. Thus far, they have been extracted from the numerical data by heuristic nanosmoothing procedures which do not necessarily provide results independent of the smoothing process. In the present paper we develop the theory of nanosmoothing, establishing procedures for both unpolarized and polarized systems which yield interfacial charge and dipole densities and band offsets invariant to the details of the smoothing procedures when the criteria we have established are met. We show also that dipolar charge densities, i.e. the densities of charge transferred across the interface, and screening lengths are not invariant. We illustrate our procedure with a toy model in which real, transversely averaged charge densities are replaced by sums of Gaussians. (topical review)

  14. Oxidation and metal-insertion in molybdenite surfaces: evaluation of charge-transfer mechanisms and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutthanandan V

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2, a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and geotechnical engineering. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. In addition, understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and metal-insertion will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions onto geomedia. The present work was performed to understand thermal oxidation and metal-insertion processes of molybdenite surfaces. The analysis was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS, and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA. Structural studies using SEM and TEM indicate the local-disordering of the structure as a result of charge-transfer process between the inserted lithium and the molybdenite layer. Selected area electron diffraction measurements indicate the large variations in the diffusivity of lithium confirming that the charge-transfer is different along and perpendicular to the layers in molybdenite. Thermal heating of molybenite surface in air at 400°C induces surface oxidation, which is slow during the first hour of heating and then increases significantly. The SEM results indicate that the crystals formed on the molybdenite surface as a result of thermal oxidation exhibit regular thin-elongated shape. The average size and density of the crystals on the surface is dependent on the time of annealing; smaller size and high density during the first one-hour and

  15. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1.......5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e...... were inferred by combining the space charge and current density measurements...

  16. Electron capture by highly charged ions from surfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.

    2008-01-11

    In this study highly charged ions produced in Electron Beam Ion Traps are used to investigate electron capture from surfaces and gases. The experiments with gas targets focus on spectroscopic measurements of the K-shell x-rays emitted at the end of radiative cascades following electron capture into Rydberg states of Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions as a function of collision energy. The ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at an energy of 2 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and then decelerated down to 5 eVu{sup -1} for interaction with an argon gas target. For decreasing collision energies a shift to electron capture into low orbital angular momentum capture states is observed. Comparative measurements of the K-shell x-ray emission following electron capture by Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions from background gas in the trap are made and a discrepancy in the results compared with those from the extraction experiments is found. Possible explanations are discussed. For the investigation of electron capture from surfaces, highly charged ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at energies of 2 to 3 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and directed onto targets comprising arrays of nanoscale apertures in silicon nitride membranes. The highly charged ions implemented are Ar{sup 16+} and Xe{sup 44+} and the aperture targets are formed by focused ion beam drilling in combination with ion beam assisted thin film deposition, achieving hole diameters of 50 to 300 nm and aspect ratios of 1:5 to 3:2. After transport through the nanoscale apertures the ions pass through an electrostatic charge state analyzer and are detected. The percentage of electron capture from the aperture walls is found to be much lower than model predictions and the results are discussed in terms of a capillary guiding mechanism. (orig.)

  17. Modeling on oxide dependent 2DEG sheet charge density and threshold voltage in AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Jena, K.; Swain, R.; Lenka, T. R.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a physics based analytical model for the calculation of threshold voltage, two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and surface potential for AlGaN/GaN metal oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMT). The developed model includes important parameters like polarization charge density at oxide/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN interfaces, interfacial defect oxide charges and donor charges at the surface of the AlGaN barrier. The effects of two different gate oxides (Al2O3 and HfO2) are compared for the performance evaluation of the proposed MOSHEMT. The MOSHEMTs with Al2O3 dielectric have an advantage of significant increase in 2DEG up to 1.2 × 1013 cm-2 with an increase in oxide thickness up to 10 nm as compared to HfO2 dielectric MOSHEMT. The surface potential for HfO2 based device decreases from 2 to -1.6 eV within 10 nm of oxide thickness whereas for the Al2O3 based device a sharp transition of surface potential occurs from 2.8 to -8.3 eV. The variation in oxide thickness and gate metal work function of the proposed MOSHEMT shifts the threshold voltage from negative to positive realizing the enhanced mode operation. Further to validate the model, the device is simulated in Silvaco Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) showing good agreement with the proposed model results. The accuracy of the developed calculations of the proposed model can be used to develop a complete physics based 2DEG sheet charge density and threshold voltage model for GaN MOSHEMT devices for performance analysis.

  18. Surface charge modulated aptasensor in a single glass conical nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Sheng-Lin; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Zheng, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Jin-Lei; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-09-15

    In this work, we have proposed a label-free nanopore-based biosensing strategy for protein detection by performing the DNA-protein interaction inside a single glass conical nanopore. A lysozyme binding aptamer (LBA) was used to functionalize the walls of glass nanopore via siloxane chemistry and negatively charged recognition sites were thus generated. The covalent modification procedures and their recognition towards lysozyme of the single conical nanopore were characterized via ionic current passing through the nanopore membrane, which was measured by recording the current-voltage (I-V) curves in 1mM KCl electrolyte at pH=7.4. With the occurring of recognition event, the negatively charged wall was partially neutralized by the positively charged lysozyme molecules, leading to a sensitive change of the surface charge-dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Our results not only demonstrate excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards the target protein, but also suggest a route to extend this nanopore-based sensing strategy to the biosensing platform designs of a wide range of proteins based on a charge modulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring charge density analysis in crystals at high pressure: data collection, data analysis and advanced modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Genoni, Alessandro; Meyer, Benjamin; Krawczuk, Anna; Macchi, Piero

    2017-08-01

    The possibility to determine electron-density distribution in crystals has been an enormous breakthrough, stimulated by a favourable combination of equipment for X-ray and neutron diffraction at low temperature, by the development of simplified, though accurate, electron-density models refined from the experimental data and by the progress in charge density analysis often in combination with theoretical work. Many years after the first successful charge density determination and analysis, scientists face new challenges, for example: (i) determination of the finer details of the electron-density distribution in the atomic cores, (ii) simultaneous refinement of electron charge and spin density or (iii) measuring crystals under perturbation. In this context, the possibility of obtaining experimental charge density at high pressure has recently been demonstrated [Casati et al. (2016). Nat. Commun. 7, 10901]. This paper reports on the necessities and pitfalls of this new challenge, focusing on the species syn-1,6:8,13-biscarbonyl[14]annulene. The experimental requirements, the expected data quality and data corrections are discussed in detail, including warnings about possible shortcomings. At the same time, new modelling techniques are proposed, which could enable specific information to be extracted, from the limited and less accurate observations, like the degree of localization of double bonds, which is fundamental to the scientific case under examination.

  20. Charge and transition densities of samarium isotopes in the interacting Boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinester, M.A.; Alster, J.; Dieperink, A.E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The interacting boson approximation (IBA) model has been used to interpret the ground-state charge distributions and lowest 2 + transition charge densities of the even samarium isotopes for A = 144-154. Phenomenological boson transition densities associated with the nucleons comprising the s-and d-bosons of the IBA were determined via a least squares fit analysis of charge and transition densities in the Sm isotopes. The application of these boson trasition densities to higher excited 0 + and 2 + states of Sm, and to 0 + and 2 + transitions in neighboring nuclei, such as Nd and Gd, is described. IBA predictions for the transition densities of the three lowest 2 + levels of 154 Gd are given and compared to theoretical transition densities based on Hartree-Fock calculations. The deduced quadrupole boson transition densities are in fair agreement with densities derived previously from 150 Nd data. It is also shown how certain moments of the best fit boson transition densities can simply and sucessfully describe rms radii, isomer shifts, B(E2) strengths, and transition radii for the Sm isotopes. (orig.)

  1. Effect of hydrogen charging on the stability of SAE 10B22 steel surface in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modiano, S.; Carreno, J.A.; Fugivara, C.S.; Benedetti, A.V.; Mattos, O.R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen charging into a quenched and tempered boron steel membrane electrode (SAE 10B22) was studied using borate buffer (pH 8.4) and NaOH solutions (pH 12.7), with or without the addition of 0.01 M EDTA. At the hydrogen input side, hydrogen charging influenced cyclic voltammograms increasing the anodic charge of iron(II) hydroxide formation, and decreasing the donor density of passive films. These results suggest that the hydrogen ingress caused instability of metallic surface, increasing the surface area activity

  2. Charge density modification of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals for stable silver nanoparticles suspension preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeng, Fanny; Denneulin, Aurore; Neuman, Charles; Bras, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) has been found to be a great method for producing metallic particles in a sustainable way. In this work, we propose to evaluate the influence of the charge density of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO)-oxidized CNC on the morphology and the stability of synthetized silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by sol–gel reaction using borohydride reduction, and charge density of TEMPO-oxidized CNC was tuned by an amine grafting. The grafting was performed at room temperature and neutral pH. Crystallinity and morphology were kept intact during the peptidic reaction on CNC allowing knowing the exact impact of the charge density. Charge density has been found to have a strong impact on shape, organization, and suspension stability of resulting silver particles. Results show an easy way to tune the charge density of CNC and propose a sustainable way to control the morphology and stability of silver nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

  3. Charge Transfer Enhancement in the D-π-A Type Porphyrin Dyes: A Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Guo-Jun; Song, Chao; Ren, Xue-Feng

    2016-11-25

    The electronic geometries and optical properties of two D-π-A type zinc porphyrin dyes (NCH₃-YD2 and TPhe-YD) were systematically investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to reveal the origin of significantly altered charge transfer enhancement by changing the electron donor of the famous porphyrin-based sensitizer YD2-o-C8. The molecular geometries and photophysical properties of dyes before and after binding to the TiO₂ cluster were fully investigated. From the analyses of natural bond orbital (NBO), extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA), and electron density variations (Δρ) between the excited state and ground state, it was found that the introduction of N(CH₃)₂ and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups enhanced the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) character compared to YD2-o-C8. The absorption wavelength and transition possess character were significantly influenced by N(CH₃)₂ and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups. NCH₃-YD2 with N(CH₃)₂ groups in the donor part is an effective way to improve the interactions between the dyes and TiO₂ surface, light having efficiency (LHE), and free energy change (ΔG inject ), which is expected to be an efficient dye for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  4. Charge Transfer Enhancement in the D-π-A Type Porphyrin Dyes: A Density Functional Theory (DFT and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The electronic geometries and optical properties of two D-π-A type zinc porphyrin dyes (NCH3-YD2 and TPhe-YD were systematically investigated by density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT to reveal the origin of significantly altered charge transfer enhancement by changing the electron donor of the famous porphyrin-based sensitizer YD2-o-C8. The molecular geometries and photophysical properties of dyes before and after binding to the TiO2 cluster were fully investigated. From the analyses of natural bond orbital (NBO, extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA, and electron density variations (Δρ between the excited state and ground state, it was found that the introduction of N(CH32 and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups enhanced the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT character compared to YD2-o-C8. The absorption wavelength and transition possess character were significantly influenced by N(CH32 and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups. NCH3-YD2 with N(CH32 groups in the donor part is an effective way to improve the interactions between the dyes and TiO2 surface, light having efficiency (LHE, and free energy change (ΔGinject, which is expected to be an efficient dye for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs.

  5. Influence of solvent polarization and non-uniform ion size on electrostatic properties between charged surfaces in an electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jun-Sik

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study electrostatic properties between two similar or oppositely charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution by using the mean-field approach accounting for solvent polarization and non-uniform size effects. Applying a free energy formalism accounting for unequal ion sizes and orientational ordering of water dipoles, we derive coupled and self-consistent equations to calculate electrostatic properties between charged surfaces. Electrostatic properties for similarly charged surfaces depend on the counterion size but not on the coion size. Moreover, electrostatic potential and osmotic pressure between similarly charged surfaces are found to be increased with increasing counterion size. On the other hand, the corresponding ones between oppositely charged surfaces are related to both sizes of positive and negative ions. For oppositely charged surfaces, the electrostatic potential, number density of solvent molecules, and relative permittivity of an electrolyte having unequal ion sizes are not symmetric about the centerline between the charged surfaces. For either case, the consideration of solvent polarization results in a decrease in the electrostatic potential and the osmotic pressure compared to the case without the effect.

  6. Method of measuring a profile of the density of charged particles in a particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyman, L.G.; Jankowski, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    A profile of the relative density of charged particles in a beam is obtained by disposing a number of rods parallel to each other in a plane perpendicular to the beam and shadowing the beam. A second number of rods is disposed perpendicular to the first rods in a plane perpendicular to the beam and also shadowing the beam. Irradiation of the rods by the beam of charged particles creates radioactive isotopes in a quantity proportional to the number of charged particles incident upon the rods. Measurement of the radioactivity of each of the rods provides a measure of the quantity of radioactive material generated thereby and, together with the location of the rods, provides information sufficient to identify a profile of the density of charged particles in the beam

  7. Investigation of space charge in low-density polyethylene using a field probe technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, M. Salah; Hansen, Bo Svarrer

    1988-01-01

    A test method that uses a capacitive field probe to investigate the space charge distribution in low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is described. Specimens of 7-mm thickness were stressed under 100 kV DC at room temperature and for different time periods. The results indicate that the LDPE insulation...... layer between electrodes is occupied by positive and negative homocharges. The dependence of space charge distribution on the stressing time is also evident...

  8. Chiral anomaly, charge density waves, and axion strings from Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    We study dynamical instability and chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional Weyl semimetals, which turns Weyl semimetals into “axion insulators.” Charge density waves (CDWs) are found to be the natural consequence of chiral symmetry breaking. The phase mode of this charge density wave state is identified as the axion, which couples to an electromagnetic field in the topological θE·B term. One of our main results is that “axion strings” can be realized as the (screw or edge) dislocations in the charge density wave, which provides a simple physical picture for the elusive axion strings. These axion strings carry gapless chiral modes, therefore they have important implications for dissipationless transport properties of Weyl semimetals with broken symmetry.

  9. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Grether, M.; Spieler, A.; Niemann, D. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A.

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  10. Extraction Compression and Acceleration of High Line Charge Density Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grote, D P; Peters, Craig; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    HEDP applications require high line charge density ion beams. An efficient method to obtain this type of beams is to extract a long pulse, high current beam from a gun at high energy, and let the beam pass through a decelerating field to compress it. The low energy beam bunch is loaded into a solenoid and matched to a Brillouin flow. The Brillouin equilibrium is independent of the energy if the relationship between the beam size (a), solenoid magnetic field strength (B) and line charge density is such that (Ba)2

  11. Quantum time crystal by decoherence: Proposal with an incommensurate charge density wave ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsugawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Tanda, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that time translation symmetry of a ring system with a macroscopic quantum ground state is broken by decoherence. In particular, we consider a ring-shaped incommensurate charge density wave (ICDW ring) threaded by a fluctuating magnetic flux: the Caldeira-Leggett model is used to model the fluctuating flux as a bath of harmonic oscillators. We show that the charge density expectation value of a quantized ICDW ring coupled to its environment oscillates periodically. The Hamiltonians considered in this model are time independent unlike "Floquet time crystals" considered recently. Our model forms a metastable quantum time crystal with a finite length in space and in time.

  12. Pushing X-ray charge densities to the limit: Comparative study of CoSb3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro; Larsen, Finn Krebs; Overgaard, Jacob

    ] In order to understand the origin of the thermoelectric properties of this family of materials, it is important to understand the crystal structure and chemical bonding of the un-doped host material.[3] This can be achieved through analysis of the charge density, which in principle can be obtained from...... modeling of accurate X-ray diffraction data.[4] However, considering the heavy elements, the high symmetry and the perfect crystallinity of this inorganic network structure one cannot think of a much more challenging case for experimental charge density analysis. In the present study we analyze several low...

  13. Interaction of slow highly charged ions with surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aumayr, F. [Technische Universitaet Wien (Austria)

    1994-12-31

    A review will be presented on recent investigations concerning the interaction of slow ({le} 10{sup 6} m/s) ions in high charge states approaching a clean metal surface. Detailed information on the generation and decay of transiently formed multiply excited {open_quotes}hollow atoms{close_quotes} can be gained from the measurement of total yields and energy distributions of emitted electrons and, in particular, from the electron emission statistics. By comparing measured results with model calculations based on a recently extended classical over-barrier approach, different sources for the observed electron emission can be identified: autoionisation of the multiply excited hollow atoms on their way toward the surface; promotion above the vacuum barrier of electrons previously captured by the projectile, due to their self- and image-charge screening near the surface; `peeling-off` of electrons still bound in highly excited projectile states at the moment of surface impact, and finally; electron emission due to final subsurface de-excitation.

  14. Probing the Surface Charge on the Basal Planes of Kaolinite Particles with High-Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution atomic force microscopy is used to map the surface charge on the basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles in an ambient solution of variable pH and NaCl or CaCl2 concentration. Using DLVO theory with charge regulation, we determine from the measured force–distance curves the surface charge distribution on both the silica-like and the gibbsite-like basal plane of the kaolinite particles. We observe that both basal planes do carry charge that varies with pH and salt concentration. The silica facet was found to be negatively charged at pH 4 and above, whereas the gibbsite facet is positively charged at pH below 7 and negatively charged at pH above 7. Investigations in CaCl2 at pH 6 show that the surface charge on the gibbsite facet increases for concentration up to 10 mM CaCl2 and starts to decrease upon further increasing the salt concentration to 50 mM. The increase of surface charge at low concentration is explained by Ca2+ ion adsorption, while Cl– adsorption at higher CaCl2 concentrations partially neutralizes the surface charge. Atomic resolution imaging and density functional theory calculations corroborate these observations. They show that hydrated Ca2+ ions can spontaneously adsorb on the gibbsite facet of the kaolinite particle and form ordered surface structures, while at higher concentrations Cl– ions will co-adsorb, thereby changing the observed ordered surface structure. PMID:29140711

  15. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  16. Versatile Density Functionals for Computational Surface Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorff, Jess

    resampling techniques, thereby systematically avoiding problems with overfitting. The first ever density functional presenting both reliable accuracy and convincing error estimation is generated. The methodology is general enough to be applied to more complex functional forms with higher-dimensional fitting...... and resampling. This is illustrated by searching for meta-GGA type functionals that outperform current meta-GGAs while allowing for error estimation....

  17. A variable pressure method for characterizing nanoparticle surface charge using pore sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert; Anderson, Will; Eldridge, James; Glossop, Ben; Willmott, Geoff

    2012-04-03

    A novel method using resistive pulse sensors for electrokinetic surface charge measurements of nanoparticles is presented. This method involves recording the particle blockade rate while the pressure applied across a pore sensor is varied. This applied pressure acts in a direction which opposes transport due to the combination of electro-osmosis, electrophoresis, and inherent pressure. The blockade rate reaches a minimum when the velocity of nanoparticles in the vicinity of the pore approaches zero, and the forces on typical nanoparticles are in equilibrium. The pressure applied at this minimum rate can be used to calculate the zeta potential of the nanoparticles. The efficacy of this variable pressure method was demonstrated for a range of carboxylated 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles with different surface charge densities. Results were of the same order as phase analysis light scattering (PALS) measurements. Unlike PALS results, the sequence of increasing zeta potential for different particle types agreed with conductometric titration.

  18. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  19. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J; Alvarellos, J E; Chacon, E; GarcIa-Gonzalez, P

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z 0 ), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z 0 , and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description

  20. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Luican-Mayer, Adina; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2017-11-01

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW → NCCDW transition.

  1. Effect of surface bilayer charges on the magnetic field around ionic channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes Soares, Marília Amável [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Cortez, Celia Martins, E-mail: ccortezs@ime.uerj.br [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Oliveira Cruz, Frederico Alan de [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Department of Physics, Rural Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, Dilson [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a physic-mathematical model for representing the ion transport through membrane channels, in special Na{sup +} and K{sup +}-channels, and discuss the influence of surface bilayer charges on the magnetic field behavior around the ionic current. The model was composed of a set of equations, including: a nonlinear differential Poisson-Boltzmann equation which usually allows to estimate the surface potentials and electric potential profile across membrane; equations for the ionic flux through channel and the ionic current density based on Armstrong's model for Na{sup +} and K{sup +} permeability and other Physics concepts; and a magnetic field expression derived from the classical Ampère equation. Results from computational simulations using the finite element method suggest that the ionic permeability is strongly dependent of surface bilayer charges, the current density through a K{sup +}-channel is very less sensible to temperature changes than the current density through a Na{sup +}- channel, active Na{sup +}-channels do not directly interfere with the K{sup +}-channels around, and vice-versa, since the magnetic perturbation generated by an active channel is of short-range.

  2. Finite temperature fermion condensate, charge and current densities in a (2+1)-dimensional conical space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Bezerra de Mello, E.R. [Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Braganca, E. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Universidade Federal da Parai ba, Departamento de Fisica, 58.059-970, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Saharian, A.A. [Yerevan State University, Department of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia)

    2016-06-15

    We evaluate the fermion condensate and the expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic field in (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime with a magnetic flux located at the cone apex. The consideration is done for both irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. The expectation values are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from particles and antiparticles. All these contributions are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. Related to the non-invariance of the model under the parity and time-reversal transformations, the fermion condensate and the charge density have indefinite parity with respect to the change of the signs of the magnetic flux and chemical potential. The expectation value of the radial current density vanishes. The azimuthal current density is the same for both the irreducible representations of the Clifford algebra. It is an odd function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. The behavior of the expectation values in various asymptotic regions of the parameters are discussed in detail. In particular, we show that for points near the cone apex the vacuum parts dominate. For a massless field with zero chemical potential the fermion condensate and charge density vanish. Simple expressions are derived for the part in the total charge induced by the planar angle deficit and magnetic flux. Combining the results for separate irreducible representations, we also consider the fermion condensate, charge and current densities in parity and time-reversal symmetric models. Possible applications to graphitic nanocones are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Charge and density fluctuations lock horns: ionic criticality with power-law forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqua, Jean-Noel; Fisher, Michael E

    2004-01-01

    How do charge and density fluctuations compete in ionic fluids near gas-liquid criticality when quantum mechanical effects play a role? To gain some insight, long-range Φ L ±± /r d+σ interactions (with σ > 0), which encompass van der Waals forces (when σ = d = 3), have been incorporated in exactly soluble, d-dimensional 1:1 ionic spherical models with charges ±q 0 and hard-core repulsions. In accord with previous work, when d > min{σ, 2} (and q 0 is not too large), the Coulomb interactions do not alter the (q 0 = 0) critical universality class that is characterized by density correlations at criticality decaying as 1/r d-2+η with η = max{0, 2 - σ}. But screening is now algebraic, the charge-charge correlations decaying, in general, only as 1/r d+σ+4 ; thus σ = 3 faithfully mimics known noncritical d = 3 quantal effects. But in the absence of full (+, -) ion symmetry, density and charge fluctuations mix via a transparent mechanism: then the screening at criticality is weaker by a factor r 4-2η . Furthermore, the otherwise valid Stillinger-Lovett sum rule fails at criticality whenever η = 0 (as, e.g., when σ > 2) although it remains valid if η > 0 (as for σ < 2 or in real d ≤ 3 Ising-type systems). (letter to the editor)

  4. The nematicity induced d-symmetry charge density wave in electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Pin; Chen, Hong-Yi; Ting, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    The interplay among the nematicity, the stripe spin-density-wave (SDW) order and superconductivity in iron-pnictides is studied in a self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Our calculations have shown that the nematic-order breaks the degeneracy of dxz and dyz orbitals and causes the elliptic Fermi surface near the Γ point in the normal state. In addition, the appearance of the orthorhombic magnetic fluctuations generates two uneven pairs of peaks at ( ± π, 0) and (0, ± π) in its Fourier transformation. All these are comparing favorably with experimental measurements. In the nematic phase, our results indicate that the charge density and its spatial image in the local density of states exhibit a dx2 -y2-like symmetry. Finally, the complete phase diagram is obtained and the nematic phase is found to be in a narrow region close to the SDW transition in the electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors.

  5. Biofilm Surface Density Determines Biocide Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available High resistance of biofilms for chemical challenges is a serious industrial and medical problem. In this work a gradient of surface covered with biofilm has been produced and correlated to the effectiveness of different commercially available oxidative biocides. The results for thin Escherichia coli biofilms grown in rich media supplemented with glucose or lactose on glass or poly methyl methacrylate surfaces indicate that the effectiveness of hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide and quaternary ammonium compounds is inversely proportional to the fraction of the surface covered with the biofilm. In areas where biofilm covered more than 90% of the available surface the biocide treatment was inefficient after 60 min of incubation. The combined effect of oxidant and surfactant increased the effectiveness of the biocide. On the other hand, the increased biofilm viscoelasticity reduced biocide effectiveness. The results emphasize differential biocide effectiveness depending on the fraction of the attached bacterial cells. The results suggest that biofilm biocide resistance is an acquired property that increases with biofilm maturation. The more dense sessile structures present lower log reductions compared to less dense ones.

  6. Effects of external surface charges on the enhanced piezoelectric potential of ZnO and AlN nanowires and nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Min Kim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate external surface charge effects on piezoelectric potential of ZnO and AlN nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs under uniform compression. The free carrier depletion caused by negative surface charges via surface functionalization on vertically compressed ZnO and AlN NWs/NTs is simulated using finite element calculation; this indicates the enhancement of piezoelectric potential is due to the free carriers (electrons being fully depleted at the critical surface charge density. Numerical simulations reveal that full coverage of surface charges surrounding the NTs increases the piezoelectric output potential exponentially within a relatively smaller range of charge density compared to the case of NWs for a typical donor concentration (∼1017 cm−3. The model can be used to design functional high-power semiconducting piezoelectric nanogenerators.

  7. Charge exchange, surface-induced dissociation and reactions of doubly charged molecular ions SF42+ upon impact on a stainless steel surface: A comparison with surface-induced dissociation of singly charged SF4+ molecular ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feketeová, L.; Grill, V.; Zappa, F.; Endstrasser, N.; Rasul, B.; Herman, Zdeněk; Scheier, P.; Märk, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 1 (2008), s. 37-42 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : doubly charged ion * surface-induced dissociations * surface-induced reaction * charge exchange Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.445, year: 2008

  8. Charge density of GaxAl1− xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The charge density is computed for a number of planes, i.e. = 0:0, 0.125 and 0.25 0 by generating the potential through a number of potential parameters available in the literature. The virtual crystal approximation was applied for the semiconducting alloy. The characteristics of the band structure and ...

  9. Comparison of the Volume Charge Density of Nanofiltration Membranes Obtained from Retention and Conductivity Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Silva, V.; Pradanos, P.

    2010-01-01

    A version of the Donnan steric-partitioning pore model with dielectrical exclusion (DSPM-DE) has been used to get information on the pore size and charge density of a commercial membrane, NF45 from FilmTec, from its retention of KCl solutions. The conductivity inside the pores has been measured b...

  10. Electrical transport through constrictions in the charge-density wave conductor NbSe3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O´Neill, K.; Slot, E.; Thorne, R.; Van der Zant, H.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the electrical transport properties of insulating and metallic constrictions of dimensions 100nm-10_m in the charge-density wave (CDW) conductor NbSe3. The constrictions are made in a variety of ways: focused ion beam, reactive ion etching through a resist mask, and in a

  11. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1− xTe alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    II–VI semiconductor alloys; band structure; charge density; empirical pseudopotential method. Abstract. Electronic band structure calculations are performed for the BeZn1−Te (0 ≤ ≤ 1 in steps of 0.2) alloys following the empirical pseudopotential method. The alloying effects are modelled through the modified virtual ...

  12. Resonant soft x-ray scattering and charge density waves in correlated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusydi, Andrivo

    2006-01-01

    Summary This work describes results obtained on the study of charge density waves (CDW) in strongly correlated systems with a new experimental method: resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS). The basic motivation is the 1986 discovery by Bednorz and Müler of a new type of superconductor, based on Cu

  13. Charge density study of hydrogen-[(2,4-diaminopyrimidin-1-io)methyl]phosphonate monohydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Holý, Antonín; Petříček, Václav; Císařová, I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2002), s. 519-529 ISSN 0108-7681 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/M037; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : X-ray diffraction * charge density study * multipole refinement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.026, year: 2002

  14. The effect of the charge density on the dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.; Germano, J.S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the calculation, using the Variational Cellular Method (VCM), of the electric dipole moment of several diatomic molecules are improved. In previous calculations, the electronic charge density was treated like a spherically symmetric function in the inscribed sphere within each cell and as being the same constant value for all intercellular regions. Since the results obtained with such an approximation have not been satisfactory, an improved approximation for the charge density in the intercellular regions is needed. It is considered that the charge density is still constant outside the inscribed sphere but with different values in each intercellular region. A new expression for the dipole moment is obtained, and applied to the diatomic molecules HF, CO, BF and CS. In addition, the corresponding dipole moment curves, potential energy curves and spectroscopic constants are calculated taking into consideration our approximation and the traditional approximation for the charge density. The results of the two models are compared with each other and with experimental results for all the molecules considered. (Author) [pt

  15. Conformations of polyelectrolyte macromolecules with different charge density in solutions of different ionic strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dommes, O A; Okatova, O V; Pavlov, G M

    2016-01-01

    Studies of charged polymer chains are interesting in both fundamental and applied aspects. Especially, polyelectrolytes attract huge attention of researchers due to their ability to form interpolymer complexes with synthetic and biopolymers. The study was carried out on the fractions of hydrophilic copolymers of N-methyl-N-vinyl acetamide and N-methyl-N-vinyl amine hydrochloride of different degrees of polymerization and of different charge density using methods of molecular hydrodynamics. Hydrodynamic and conformational characteristics as well as molar masses of isolated molecules were estimated. In addition, the intrinsic viscosity of fractions was studied at the extreme ionic strengths - in distilled water (∼10 -6 M) and in 6M NaCl. Scaling relations for intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation and translational diffusion coefficients with molar mass were obtained. Conformational behavior of macromolecules with different linear charge density was compared. (paper)

  16. Estimation of the space density of low surface brightness galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briggs, FH

    1997-01-01

    The space density of low surface brightness and tiny gas-rich dwarf galaxies are estimated for two recent catalogs: the Arecibo Survey of Northern Dwarf and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies and the Catalog of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies, List II. The goals are (1) to evaluate the additions to the

  17. Charge modification of the endothelial surface layer modulates the permeability barrier of isolated rat mesenteric small arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaren, Paul M. A.; VanBavel, Ed; Vink, Hans; Spaan, Jos A. E.

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesized that modulation of the effective charge density of the endothelial surface layer ( ESL) results in altered arterial barrier properties to transport of anionic solutes. Rat mesenteric small arteries ( diameter similar to 190 mu m) were isolated, cannulated, perfused, and superfused

  18. Corrected Debye-Hückel analysis of surface complexation. II. A theory of surface charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Magnus; Abbas, Zareen; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Gobom, Sylvia; Nordholm, Sture

    2002-05-01

    A theory of surface charging of colloidal particles suspended in an electrolyte solution is presented. The charging at the particle surface is assumed to originate from the adsorption and desorption of protons and is therefore strongly dependent on the acidity of the solution. The surface binding of protons occurs locally at sites of occupancy zero or one that are described by a binding energy u(0) and a three-dimensional vibration of frequency nu. The diffuse screening of ions at the surface is described by the corrected Debye-Hückel analysis assuming linear response. The model contains a capacitor layer close to the charged surface and the finite size of the electrolyte ions is taken into account. The theory has been applied to titrated surface charge data on goethite (alpha-FeOOH) at NaClO(4) background concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1.0 M. The protonation mechanism used in the modeling of these data corresponds to the 1-pK approach. A very good description of the experimental data was obtained at the highest ionic strength. Close to the pH(pzc) the theory also gave a good description at lower ionic strengths. However, at low salt concentrations and pH values far away from the pH(pzc) the electrostatic potential outside the capacitor layer becomes so high that nonlinear electrostatic effects become important and the theory therefore underestimates the surface charge. These results were compared with model calculations obtained using existing surface complexation models.

  19. The role of surface charge in cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of medical nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröhlich E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Eleonore FröhlichCenter for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Graz, AustriaAbstract: Many types of nanoparticles (NPs are tested for use in medical products, particularly in imaging and gene and drug delivery. For these applications, cellular uptake is usually a prerequisite and is governed in addition to size by surface characteristics such as hydrophobicity and charge. Although positive charge appears to improve the efficacy of imaging, gene transfer, and drug delivery, a higher cytotoxicity of such constructs has been reported. This review summarizes findings on the role of surface charge on cytotoxicity in general, action on specific cellular targets, modes of toxic action, cellular uptake, and intracellular localization of NPs. Effects of serum and intercell type differences are addressed. Cationic NPs cause more pronounced disruption of plasma-membrane integrity, stronger mitochondrial and lysosomal damage, and a higher number of autophagosomes than anionic NPs. In general, nonphagocytic cells ingest cationic NPs to a higher extent, but charge density and hydrophobicity are equally important; phagocytic cells preferentially take up anionic NPs. Cells do not use different uptake routes for cationic and anionic NPs, but high uptake rates are usually linked to greater biological effects. The different uptake preferences of phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells for cationic and anionic NPs may influence the efficacy and selectivity of NPs for drug delivery and imaging.Keywords: endocytosis, plasma membrane, lysosomes, polystyrene particles, quantum dots, dendrimers

  20. Electrokinetics of nanochannels and porous membranes with dynamic surface charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo

    interesting because it relies on capillary filling, so it avoids the use of external forcing such as electric fields. Basically, during the filling of nanochannels by capillary action, the advancing electrolyte is titrated by deprotonation from the surface. This is observed using the pH-sensitive fluorescent....... Notably, we find that the conductance minimum is mainly caused by hydronium ions, and in our case almost exclusively due to carbonic acid generated from the dissolution of CO2 from the atmosphere. We carry out delicate experiments and measure the conductance of silica nanochannels as a function...... in the literature. Fourth, we use our model to predict a novel phenomenon called currentinduced membrane discharge (CIMD) to explain over-limiting current in ionexchange membranes. The model is based on dynamic surface charges in the membrane in equilibrium with the buffer. However, here we take the next step...

  1. Optical Properties of the Charge-Density-Wave Polychalcogenide Compounds R2Te5 (R=Nd, Sm and Gd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfuner, F.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Shin, K.Y.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the rare-earth polychalcogenide R{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (R = Nd, Sm and Gd) charge-density-wave (CDW) compounds by optical methods. From the absorption spectrum we extract the excitation energy of the CDW gap and estimate the fraction of the Fermi surface which is gapped by the formation of the CDW condensate. In analogy to previous findings on the related RTe{sub n} (n = 2 and 3) families, we establish the progressive closing of the CDW gap and the moderate enhancement of the metallic component upon chemically compressing the lattice.

  2. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States); Weiss, Christian [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at peripheral distances b = O(M{pi}{sup -1}), where they are governed by universal chiral dynamics and can be computed in a model-independent manner. Of particular interest is the comparison of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities. We summarize (a) their interpretation as spin-independent and -dependent current matrix elements; (b) the leading-order chiral effective field theory results; (c) their mechanical interpretation in the light-front formulation; (d) the large-N_c limit of QCD and the role of {Delta} intermediate states; (e) the connection with generalized parton distributions and peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  3. Crystal structure and charge density analysis of Li2NH by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noritake, T.; Nozaki, H.; Aoki, M.; Towata, S.; Kitahara, G.; Nakamori, Y.; Orimo, S.

    2005-01-01

    Complex hydrides, such as lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium imide (Li 2 NH), have recently been noticed as one of the most promising materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In this paper, we reveal the bonding nature of hydrogen in Li 2 NH crystal by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measurement at room temperature. The crystal structure was refined by Rietveld method and the charge density distribution was analyzed by maximum entropy method (MEM). The Li 2 NH crystal is anti-fluorite type structure (space group Fm3-bar m) consisting of Li and NH. Hydrogen atom occupies randomly the 48h (Wyckoff notation) sites around N atom. The refined lattice constant is a=5.0742(2)A. The charge density distribution around NH anion in Li 2 NH is almost spherical. The number of electrons within the sphere around the Li and NH is estimated from the obtained charge density distribution. As the result, the ionic charge is expressed as [Li 0.99+ ] 2 [NH] 1.21- . Therefore, it is confirmed experimentally that Li 2 NH is ionically bonded

  4. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  5. Analysis of surface degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Analysis of surface degradation of high density polyethylene (HDPE) insulation ... ammonium chloride as the contaminant, in high density polyethylene ..... liquid in the material. When diffusion is driven by the concentration gradient and if there is no chemical change between liquid and material, this would result in mass.

  6. Surface charge regulation upon polyelectrolyte adsorption, hematite, polystyrene sulfonate, surface charge regulation - Theoretical calculations and hematite-poly(styrene sulfonate) system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Koopal, L.K.; Stuart, M.A.C.; Klein Wolterink, J.

    2006-01-01

    The charge regulation of a mineral surface upon adsorption of a strong polyelectrolyte is studied theoretically and experimentally. Self-consistent-field calculations were done to evaluate the charge characteristics of a model oxide surface in the absence and presence of a linear strong

  7. Advances in electric field and atomic surface derived properties from experimental electron densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhmaida, Nouzha; Ghermani, Nour Eddine

    2008-07-14

    The present study is devoted to a general use of the Gauss law. This is applied to the atomic surfaces derived from the topological analysis of the electron density. The method proposed here is entirely numerical, robust and does not necessitate any specific parametrization of the atomic surfaces. We focus on two fundamental properties: the atomic charges and the electrostatic forces acting on atoms in molecules. Application is made on experimental electron densities modelized by the Hansen-Coppens model from which the electric field is derived for a heterogenic set of compounds: water molecule, NO(3) anion, bis-triazine molecule and MgO cluster. Charges and electrostatic forces are estimated by the atomic surface flux of the electric field and the Maxwell stress tensor, respectively. The charges obtained from the present method are in good agreement with those issued from the conventional volume integration. Both Feynman and Ehrenfest forces as well as the electrostatic potential at the nuclei (EPN) are here estimated from the experimental electron densities. The values found for the molecular compounds are presented and discussed in the scope of the mechanics of atomic interactions.

  8. Donation and back-donation analyzed through a charge transfer model based on density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Valencia, Ulises; Gázquez, José L; Vela, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    The net charge transfer process that occurs between two species, A and B, interacting with each other, may be decomposed into two processes: one in which A receives charge from B, which can be identified as the electrophilic channel for A or the nucleophilic channel for B, and a second in which A donates charge to B, which can be identified as the nucleophilic channel for A or the electrophilic channel for B. By determining the amount of charge associated with both processes through the minimization of the interaction energy associated with each case, the expressions for the amount of charge involved in each case can be expressed in terms of the directional chemical potentials and the hardnesses of the interacting species. The correlation between the charges obtained for the interaction between phosphine ligands of the type PRR'R'' and Ni, and the A 1 carbonyl stretching frequency provides support for their interpretation as measures of the electrophilicity and nucleophilicity of a chemical species, and, at the same time, allows one to describe the donation and back-donation processes in terms of the density functional theory of chemical reactivity.

  9. Chemical bonding in view of electron charge density and kinetic energy density descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2009-05-01

    Stalke's dilemma, stating that different chemical interpretations are obtained when one and the same density is interpreted either by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) and subsequent natural resonance theory (NRT) application or by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), is reinvestigated. It is shown that within the framework of QTAIM, the question as to whether for a given molecule two atoms are bonded or not is only meaningful in the context of a well-defined reference geometry. The localized-orbital-locator (LOL) is applied to map out patterns in covalent bonding interaction, and produces results that are consistent for a variety of reference geometries. Furthermore, LOL interpretations are in accord with NBO/NRT, and assist in an interpretation in terms of covalent bonding. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Surface characterization and surface electronic structure of organic quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Claessen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We have thoroughly characterized the surfaces of the organic charge-transfer salts TTF-TCNQ and (TMTSF)(2)PF6 which are generally acknowledged as prototypical examples of one-dimensional conductors. In particular x-ray-induced photoemission spectroscopy turns out to be a valuable nondestructive d...

  11. 'Bootstrap' charging of surfaces composed of multiple materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, P. R.; Katz, I.; Parks, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The paper examines the charging of a checkerboard array of two materials, only one of which tends to acquire a negative potential alone, using the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP). The influence of the charging material's field causes the otherwise 'non-charging' material to acquire a negative potential due to the suppression of its secondary emission ('bootstrap' charging). The NASCAP predictions for the equilibrium potential difference between the two materials are compared to results based on an analytical model.

  12. Device for radiometric measurement, e.g. of surface density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Kopl, F.

    1973-01-01

    A design is described of a device for radiometric measurements, such as of material surface density, thickness of coating layers, surface moisture, and for the analysis of chemical composition. The device uses backscattered radiation indicated by two ionization chambers with gas filling; the radiation source is placed in between the chambers. (J.K.)

  13. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, B.L.H.M.; Schols, H.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Norde, W.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between ß-lactoglobulin (ß-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness. Varying

  14. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, Bram L. H. M.; Schols, Henk A.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem; Voragen, Alphons G. J.

    The complex formation between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness.

  15. On the molecular mechanism of surface charge amplification and related phenomena at aqueous polyelectrolyte-graphene interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Simonson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this communication we illustrate the occurrence of a recently reported new phenomenon of surface-charge amplification, SCA, (originally dubbed overcharging, OC, [Jimenez-Angeles F. and Lozada-Cassou M., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2004, 108, 7286] by means of molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous electrolytes solutions involving multivalent cations in contact with charged graphene walls and the presence of short-chain lithium polystyrene sulfonates where the solvent water is described explicitly with a realistic molecular model. We show that the occurrence of SCA in these systems, in contrast to that observed in primitive models, involves neither contact co-adsorption of the negatively charged macroions nor divalent cations with a large size and charge asymmetry as required in the case of implicit solvents. In fact the SCA phenomenon hinges around the preferential adsorption of water (over the hydrated ions with an average dipolar orientation such that the charges of the water's hydrogen and oxygen sites induce magnification rather than screening of the positive-charged graphene surface, within a limited range of surface-charge density.

  16. Strong electron-lattice coupling as the mechanism behind charge density wave transformations in transition-metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a single band of conduction electrons interacting with displacements of the transitional ions. In the classical regime strong enough coupling transforms the harmonic elastic energy for an ion to the one of the well with two deep minima, so that the system is described in terms of Ising spins. Intersite interactions order spins at lower temperatures. Extension to the quantum regime is discussed. Below the charge density wave (CDW) transition the energy spectrum of electrons remains metallic because the structural vector Q and the Fermi surface sizes are not related. Large values of the CDW gap seen in the tunneling experiments correspond to the energy of the minima in the electron-ion two-well complex. The gap is defined through the density of states inside the electronic bands below the CDW transition. We focus mainly on electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides.

  17. Optimization of tetravalent manganese feroxyhyte's negative charge density: A high-performing mercury adsorbent from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, E; Simeonidis, K; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Mitrakas, M

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates an optimization procedure for the development of an Hg-specified adsorbent able to comply with the regulation limit for drinking water of 1μg/L. On this purpose, the synthesis of Mn(IV)-feroxyhyte was modified to achieve high negative charge density by combining alkaline and extreme oxidizing conditions. In particular, precipitation of FeSO 4 at pH9 and excess of KMnO 4 follows a very fast nucleation step providing a product with very small nanocrystal size (1-2nm), high specific surface area (300m 2 /g) and maximum negative charge density (1.8mmol H + /g). The adsorbent was validated for Hg removal in batch experiments and column tests using natural-like water indicating an adsorption capacity as high as 2.5μg/mg at equilibrium concentration 1μg/L under reliable conditions of application. Importantly, the adsorption is an exothermic spontaneous process, resulting in the formation of inner sphere complexes by sharing both A-type and B-type oxygen atoms with the metal surface octahedral as revealed by the X-ray absorption fine structure results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel charge density wave transition in crystals of R 5 Ir 4 Si 10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review the observation of novel charge density wave (CDW) transitions in ternary R5Ir4Si10 compounds. A high quality single crystal of Lu5Ir4Si10 shows the formation of a commensurate CDW along -axis below 80 K in the (ℎ, 0, ) plane that coexists with BCS type superconductivity below 3.9 K. However, in a single ...

  19. The scaling dimension of low lying Dirac eigenmodes and of the topological charge density

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, C.; Gottlieb, Steven; Gregory, E.B.; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, J.E.; Osborn, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; de Forcrand, Ph.; Jahn, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    As a quantitative measure of localization, the inverse participation ratio of low lying Dirac eigenmodes and topological charge density is calculated on quenched lattices over a wide range of lattice spacings and volumes. Since different topological objects (instantons, vortices, monopoles, and artifacts) have different co-dimension, scaling analysis provides information on the amount of each present and their correlation with the localization of low lying eigenmodes.

  20. Atomic and molecular adsorption on transition-metal carbide (111) surfaces from density-functional theory: a trend study of surface electronic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Ruberto, C.; Lundqvist, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    This study explores atomic and molecular adsorption on a number of early transition-metal carbides (TMCs) in NaCl structure by means of density-functional theory calculations. The investigated substrates are the TM-terminated TMC(111) surfaces, of interest because of the presence of different types......, surface relaxations, Bader charges, and surface-localized densities of states (DOSs). Detailed comparisons between surface and bulk DOSs reveal the existence of transition-metal localized SRs (TMSRs) in the pseudogap and of several C-localized SRs (CSRs) in the upper valence band on all considered TMC(111......) surfaces. The spatial extent and the dangling bond nature of these SRs are supported by real-space analyses of the calculated Kohn-Sham wavefunctions. Then, atomic and molecular adsorption energies, geometries, and charge transfers are presented. An analysis of the adsorbate-induced changes in surface DOSs...

  1. Suppression of surface charge accumulation on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin insulator under dc voltage by direct fluorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Guixin, E-mail: guixin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Chuanyang; He, Jinliang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Qiang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Mechatronic Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); An, Zhenlian [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Surface charge accumulation on insulators under high dc voltage is a major factor that may lead to the reduction of insulation levels in gas insulated devices. In this paper, disc insulators made of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin were surface fluorinated using a F{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture (12.5% F{sub 2}) at 50 °C and 0.1 MPa for different durations of 15 min, 30 min and 60 min. A dc voltage was applied to the insulator for 30 min and the charge density on its surface was measured by an electrostatic probe. The results revealed significant lower surface charge densities on the fluorinated insulators in comparison with the original one. Surface conductivity measurements indicated a higher surface conductivity by over three orders of magnitude after fluorination, which would allow the charges to transfer along the surface and thus may suppress their accumulation. Further, attenuated total reflection infrared analysis and surface morphology observations of the samples revealed that the introduction of fluoride groups altered the surface physicochemical properties. These structure changes, especially the physical defects reduced the depth of charge traps in the surface layer, which was verified by the measurement of energy distributions of the electron and hole traps based on the isothermal current theory. The results in this paper demonstrate that fluorination can be a promising and effective method to suppress surface charge accumulation on epoxy insulators in gas insulated devices.

  2. New Density Estimation Methods for Charged Particle Beams With Applications to Microbunching Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balsa Terzic, Gabriele Bassi

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we discuss representations of charge particle densities in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, analyze the sources and profiles of the intrinsic numerical noise, and present efficient methods for their removal. We devise two alternative estimation methods for charged particle distribution which represent significant improvement over the Monte Carlo cosine expansion used in the 2d code of Bassi, designed to simulate coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in charged particle beams. The improvement is achieved by employing an alternative beam density estimation to the Monte Carlo cosine expansion. The representation is first binned onto a finite grid, after which two grid-based methods are employed to approximate particle distributions: (i) truncated fast cosine transform (TFCT); and (ii) thresholded wavelet transform (TWT). We demonstrate that these alternative methods represent a staggering upgrade over the original Monte Carlo cosine expansion in terms of efficiency, while the TWT approximation also provides an appreciable improvement in accuracy. The improvement in accuracy comes from a judicious removal of the numerical noise enabled by the wavelet formulation. The TWT method is then integrated into Bassi's CSR code, and benchmarked against the original version. We show that the new density estimation method provides a superior performance in terms of efficiency and spatial resolution, thus enabling high-fidelity simulations of CSR effects, including microbunching instability.

  3. Molecular Weight and Charge Density Effects of Guanidinylated Biodegradable Polycarbonates on Antimicrobial Activity and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hae Cho, Chloe A; Liang, Chao; Perera, Janesha; Liu, Jie; Varnava, Kyriakos G; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi; Cooney, Ralph P; McGillivray, Duncan J; Brimble, Margaret A; Swift, Simon; Jin, Jianyong

    2017-11-21

    Six guanidine functionalized aliphatic biodegradable polycarbonates with varying molecular weights and charge densities were synthesized via postsynthesis modification of alkyne containing polycarbonates using Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry. The concept of passive diluting group was to modify the cationic charge density of the polycarbonate without changing its hydrophilicity. Within the molecular weight range from 8000 to 30000 g mol -1 , these guanidine polycarbonates exhibited broad-spectrum biocidal activity with low toxicity to red blood cells (RBCs). The lowest molecular weight homopolymer sample (PG-8k-100) showed the best antimicrobial activity (MIC = 40 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and MIC = 20 μg/mL against Staphylococcus epidermidis) and least RBC toxicity (0.6% hemolysis at MIC). Within the three guanidine charge densities from 20% to 70%, the low to medium dilution samples (PG-8k-7030 and PG-8k-5050) had no obvious loss in antimicrobial activities compared to the nondiluted control sample PG-8k-100. However, upon further dilution, PG-8k-2080 gave the lowest antimicrobial activity.

  4. Metallicity at interphase boundaries due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2018-02-09

    The electronic properties of interphase boundaries are of basic importance for most materials, particularly when those properties deviate strongly from the bulk behavior. We introduce a mechanism that can result in metallicity at stoichiometric interphase boundaries between semiconductors based on the idea of polar catastrophe, which is usually considered only in the context of heterostructures. To this end, we perform ab initio calculations within density functional theory to investigate the electronic states at stoichiometric SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries. In this system, one would not expect polar catastrophe to have a role according to state-of-the-art theory because the interface lacks formal charge discontinuity. However, we observe the formation of a hole gas between the semiconductors SnO and SnO2. To explain these findings, we provide a generalized theory based on the idea that the charge density discontinuity between SnO and SnO2, a consequence of lattice mismatch, drives a polar catastrophe scenario. As a result, SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries can develop metallicity depending on the grain size. The concept of metallicity due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity is of general validity and applies to many interphase boundaries with lattice mismatch.

  5. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrophoresis of a polarizable charged colloid with hydrophobic surface: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Majee, Partha Sarathi

    2017-04-01

    We consider the electrophoresis of a charged colloid for a generalized situation in which the particle is considered to be polarizable and the surface exhibits hydrophobicity. The dielectric polarization of the particle creates a nonlinear dependence of the electrophoretic velocity on the applied electric field, and the core hydrophobicity amplifies the fluid convection in the Debye layer. Thus, a linear analysis is no longer applicable for this situation. The present analysis is based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear electrokinetic equations based on the Navier-Stokes-Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations coupled with the Laplace equation for the electric field within the dielectric particle. The hydrophobicity of the particle may influence its electric polarization by enhancing the convective transport of ions. The nonlinear effects, such as double-layer polarization and relaxation, are also influenced by the hydrophobicity of the particle surface. The present results compare well for a lower range of the applied electric field and surface charge density with the existing results for a perfectly dielectric particle with a hydrophobic surface based on the first-order perturbation analysis due to Khair and Squires [Phys. Fluids 21, 042001 (2009), 10.1063/1.3116664]. Dielectric polarization creates a reduction in particle electrophoretic velocity, and its impact is strong for a moderate range of Debye length. A quantitative measure of the nonlinear effects is demonstrated by comparing the electrophoretic velocity with an existing linear model.

  7. NTERACTION BETWEEN SURFACE CHARGE PHENOMENA AND MULTI-SPECIES DIFFUSION IN CEMENT BASED MATERIALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Measurements strongly indicate that the ‘inner’ surface of the microscopic structure of cement based materials has a fixed negative charge. This charge contributes to the formation of so-called electrical double layers. In the case of cement based materials the ionic species located in such layers...... are typically potassium -, sodium - and calcium ions. Due to the high specific surface area of hydrated cement, a large amount of ions can be located in theses double layers even if the surface charge is relatively low. The attraction force, caused by the fixed surface charge on ions located close to surfaces...

  8. Negligible water surface charge determined using Kelvin probe and total reflection X-ray fluorescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, Vladimir L; Möhwald, Helmuth; Konovalov, Oleg V; Knecht, Volker

    2013-09-07

    The water surface charge has been extensively debated in recent decades. Electrophoretic mobilities of air bubbles in water and disjoining pressures between the surfaces of aqueous films suggest that the surface of water exhibits a significant negative charge. This is commonly attributed to a strong adsorption of hydroxide ions at the interface, though spectroscopic measurements and simulation studies suggest surface depletion of hydroxide ions. Alternatively, the negative surface charge could arise from surface contamination with trace charged surfactants. We have probed the variation in the surface charge of water with pH by measuring surface potentials using the Kelvin probe technique. Independently, the abundance in the interfacial layer of "reporter ions" (Rb(+) and Br(-)), which must be affected by a charged surface, has been monitored using the total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXF) technique. Special care was taken to prove the high sensitivity of this technique as well as to avoid surface contaminants. The magnitude of the surface charge was found to be below 1 e per 500 nm(2) (TRXF). No evidence of variations in the surface potential between pH 2-3 and pH 9-12 was detected within the accuracies of the methods (5 mV for Kelvin probe and 2 mV for TRXF). Hence, our findings suggest that the clean water surface exhibits negligible charge in a wide pH range.

  9. Specification of the Surface Charging Environment with SHIELDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Delzanno, G. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Godinez, H. C.; Jeffery, C. A.; Lawrence, E. C.; Meierbachtol, C.; Moulton, J. D.; Vernon, L.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Brito, T.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Yu, Y.; Albert, J.; Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.; Denton, M.; Horne, R. B.; Lemon, C.; Markidis, S.; Thomsen, M. F.; Young, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. "space weather", remains a big space physics challenge. A recently funded project through the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program aims at developing a new capability to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. The project goals are to understand the dynamics of the surface charging environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and microscale. Important physics questions related to rapid particle injection and acceleration associated with magnetospheric storms and substorms as well as plasma waves are investigated. These challenging problems are addressed using a team of world-class experts in the fields of space science and computational plasma physics, and state-of-the-art models and computational facilities. In addition to physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites are developed. Simulations with the SHIELDS framework of the near-Earth space environment where operational satellites reside are presented. Further model development and the organization of a "Spacecraft Charging Environment Challenge" by the SHIELDS project at LANL in collaboration with the NSF Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) Workshop and the multi-agency Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to assess the accuracy of SCE predictions are discussed.

  10. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Aeschlimann, M. [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  11. Enhanced charge recombination due to surfaces and twin defects in GaAs nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Evan; Sheng, Chunyang; Nakano, Aiichiro [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Department of Physics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2015-02-07

    Power conversion efficiency of gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire (NW) solar cells is severely limited by enhanced charge recombination (CR) at sidewall surfaces, but its atomistic mechanisms are not well understood. In addition, GaAs NWs usually contain a high density of twin defects that form a twin superlattice, but its effects on CR dynamics are largely unknown. Here, quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations reveal the existence of an intrinsic type-II heterostructure at the (110) GaAs surface. Nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics (NAQMD) simulations show that the resulting staggered band alignment causes a photoexcited electron in the bulk to rapidly transfer to the surface. We have found orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the CR rate at the surface compared with the bulk value. Furthermore, QMD and NAQMD simulations show unique surface electronic states at alternating (111)A and (111)B sidewall surfaces of a twinned [111]-oriented GaAs NW, which act as effective CR centers. The calculated large surface recombination velocity quantitatively explains recent experimental observations and provides microscopic understanding of the underlying CR processes.

  12. New bounds for the atomic charge and momentum densities at the origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, J.C.; Dehesa, J.S.; Galvez, F.J. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna)

    1991-02-01

    The 'Stieltjes moment problem' technique together with the positivity and monotonic decreasing properties of the electronic density of an atom is used to find new and more accurate lower bounds for the charge density at the nucleus and the momentum density at the origin, in terms of radial and momentum expectation values, respectively. Bounds depending on two and three expectation values are given explicitly and a Hartree-Fock study of their quality is carried out. Also, the behavior of the new bounds at large Z's is discussed. The Stieltjes technique allows to find lower bounds of better accuracy by including expectation values of higher order. (orig.).

  13. Density functional theory in surface science and heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Scheffler, M.; Toulhoat, H.

    2006-01-01

    Solid surfaces are used extensively as catalysts throughout the chemical industry, in the energy sector, and in environmental protection. Recently, density functional theory has started providing new insight into the atomic-scale mechanisms of heterogeneous catalysis, helping to interpret the large...... amount of experimental data gathered during the last decades. This article shows how density functional theory can be used to describe the state of the surface during reactions and the rate of catalytic reactions. It will also show how we are beginning to understand the variation in catalytic activity...

  14. Negatively charged ions on Mg(0001) surfaces: appearance and origin of attractive adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Su-Ting; Todorova, Mira; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2014-09-26

    Adsorption of electronegative elements on a metal surface usually leads to an increase in the work function and decrease in the binding energy as the adsorbate coverage rises. Using density-functional theory calculations, we show that Cl adsorbed on a Mg(0001) surface complies with these expectations, but adsorption of {N,O,F} causes a decrease in the work function and an increase in the binding energy. Analyzing the electronic structure, we show that the presence of a highly polarizable electron spill-out in front of Mg(0001) causes this unusual adsorption behavior and is responsible for the appearance of a hitherto unknown net-attractive lateral electrostatic interaction between same charged adsorbates.

  15. Azimuthal asymmetries of the charged particle densities in EAS in the range of KASCADE-Grande

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sima, O.; Morariu, C.; Manailescu, C.; Rebel, H.; Haungs, A.

    2009-03-01

    The reconstruction of Extended Air Showers (EAS) observed by ground level particle detectors is based on the characteristics of observables like particle lateral density (PLD), arrival time signals etc. Lateral densities, inferred from detector data, are usually parameterized by applying various lateral distribution functions (LDF). The LDFs are used in turn for evaluating quantities like the total number of particles, the density at particular radial distances. Typical expressions for LDFs anticipate azimuthal symmetry of the density around the shower axis. The deviations of the particle lateral density from this assumption are smoothed out in the case of compact arrays like KASCADE, but not in the case of arrays like Grande, which only sample a smaller part of the azimuthal variation. In this report we discuss the origin of the asymmetry: geometric, attenuation and geomagnetic effects. Geometric effects occur in the case of inclined showers, due to the fact that the observations are made in a plane different from the intrinsic shower plane. Hence the projection procedure from the observational plane to the relevant normal shower plane plays a significant role. Attenuation effects arise from the differences between the distances travelled by particles that reach the ground at the same radial coordinate but with various azimuthal positions in the case of inclined showers. The influence of the geomagnetic field distorts additionally the charged particle distributions in a way specific to the geomagnetic location. Based on dedicated CORSIKA simulations we have evaluated the magnitude of the effects. Focused to geometric and attenuation effects, procedures for minimizing the effects of the azimuthal asymmetry of lateral density in the intrinsic shower plane were developed. The consequences of the reconstruction of the charge particle sizes determined with the Grande array are also discussed and a procedure for practical application of restoring the azimuthal symmetry

  16. Advanced portrayal of SMIL coating by allying CZE performance with in-capillary topographic and charge-related surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Leitner, Michael; Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Bonazza, Klaus [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent; Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM), UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Ebner, Andreas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stutz, Hanno, E-mail: hanno.stutz@sbg.ac.at [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-01-25

    A successive multiple ionic polymer layer (SMIL) coating composed of four layers improved the capillary electrophoretic separation of a recombinant major birch pollen allergen and closely related variants when poly(acrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propansulfonate) (55% PAMAMPS) replaced dextran sulfate as terminal SMIL layer. 55% PAMAMPS decelerated the electroosmotic flow (EOF) due to its lower charge density. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate SMIL properties directly on the inner capillary surface and to relate them to EOF measurements and results of associated CZE separations of a mixture of model proteins and peptides that were performed in the same capillary. For the first time, AFM-based biosensing topography and recognition imaging mode (TREC) under liquid conditions was applied for a sequential characterization of the inner surface of a SMIL coated capillary after selected treatments including pristine SMIL, SMIL after contact with the model mixture, after alkaline rinsing, and the replenishment of the terminal polyelectrolyte layer. A cantilever with tip-tethered avidin was used to determine the charge homogeneity of the SMIL surface in the TREC mode. SMIL coated rectangular capillaries with 100 μm internal diameter assured accessibility of the inner surface for this cantilever type. Observed changes in CZE performance and EOF mobility during capillary treatment were also reflected by alterations in surface roughness and charge distribution of the SMIL coating. A renewal of the terminal SMIL layer restored the original surface properties of SMIL and the separation performance. The alliance of the novel TREC approach and CZE results allows for an improved understanding and a comprehensive insight in effects occurring on capillary coatings. - Highlights: • SMIL coating with a terminal layer of reduced charge density improves CZE separation. • Capillaries with rectangular diameter allow for in-capillary TREC-AFM measurement.

  17. Calculating the Maximum Density of the Surface Packing of Ions in Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislenko, S. A.; Moroz, Yu. O.; Karu, K.; Ivaništšev, V. B.; Fedorov, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    The maximum density of monolayer packing on a graphene surface is calculated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) for ions of characteristic size and symmetry: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium [BMIM]+, tetrabutylammonium [TBA]+, tetrafluoroborate [BF4]-, dicyanamide [DCA]-, and bis(trifluoromethane) sulfonimide [TFSI]-. The characteristic orientations of ions in a closely packed monolayer are found. It is shown that the formation of a closely packed monolayer is possible for [DCA]- and [BF4]- anions only at surface charges that exceed the limit of the electrochemical stability of the corresponding ionic liquids. For the [TBA]+ cation, a monolayer structure can be observed at the charge of nearly 30 μC/cm2 attainable in electrochemical experiment.

  18. Instantaneous generation of charge-separated state on TiO₂ surface sensitized with plasmonic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2014-03-19

    Photoexcitation of the plasmon band in metallic nanoparticles adsorbed on a TiO2 surface initiates many important photovoltaic and photocatalytic processes. The traditional view on the photoinduced charge separation involves excitation of a surface plasmon, its subsequent dephasing into electron-hole pairs, followed by electron transfer (ET) from the metal nanoparticle into TiO2. We use nonadiabatic molecular dynamics combined with time-domain density functional theory to demonstrate that an electron appears inside TiO2 immediately upon photoexcitation with a high probability (~50%), bypassing the intermediate step of electron-hole thermalization inside the nanoparticle. By providing a detailed, atomistic description of the charge separation, energy relaxation, and electron-hole recombination processes, the simulation rationalizes why the experimentally observed ultrafast photoinduced ET in an Au-TiO2 system is possible in spite of the fast energy relaxation. The simulation shows that the photogenerated plasmon is highly delocalized onto TiO2, and thus, it is shared by the electron donor and acceptor materials. In the 50% of the cases remaining after the instantaneous photogeneration of the charge-separated state, the electron injects into TiO2 on a sub-100 fs time scale by the nonadiabatic mechanism due to high density of acceptor states. The electron-phonon relaxation parallels the injection and is slower, resulting in a transient heating of the TiO2 surface by 40 K. Driven by entropy, the electron moves further into TiO2 bulk. If the electron remains trapped at the TiO2 surface, it recombines with the hole on a picosecond time scale. The obtained ET and recombination times are in excellent agreement with the experiment. The delocalized plasmon state observed in our study establishes a novel concept for plasmonic photosensitization of wide band gap semiconductors, leading to efficient conversion of photons to charge carriers and to hybrid materials with a wide

  19. Density Functional Theory Study of Chemical Sensing on Surfaces of Single-Layer MOS2 and Graphene (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-22

    Surface contour plots of charge densities for graphene and MoS2 adsorbed on SiO2 plotted along a plane passing through the center of (a) car- bon of...graphene, silicon, and oxygen atoms and (b) molybdenum, sulfur, sil- icon , and oxygen atoms. 164302-6 F. Mehmood and R. Pachter J. Appl. Phys. 115, 164302

  20. Characterizing the surface charge of clay minerals with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The engineering properties of clayey soils, including fluid permeability, erosion resistance and cohesive strength, are quite different from those of non-cohesive soils. This is mainly due to their small platy particle shape and the surrounding diffuse double layer structure. By using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, the surface topography and the interaction force between the silicon dioxide tip and the kaolinite/montmorillonite clay minerals have been measured in the 1.0 mM NaCl solution at neutral pH. From this, the surface potential of the clay minerals is determined by mathematical regression analyses using the DLVO model. The length/thickness ratio of kaolinite and montmorillonite particles measured ranges from 8.0 to 15.0. The surface potential and surface charge density vary with particles. The average surface potential of montmorillonite is −62.8 ± 10.6 mV, and the average surface potential of kaolinite is −40.9 ± 15.5 mV. The measured results help to understand the clay sediment interaction, and will be used to develop interparticle force model to simulate sediment transport during erosion process.

  1. Power Spectral Density Evaluation of Laser Milled Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul-Amadeus Lorbeer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ablating surfaces with a pulsed laser system in milling processes often leads to surface changes depending on the milling depth. Especially if a constant surface roughness and evenness is essential to the process, structural degradation may advance until the process fails. The process investigated is the generation of precise thrust by laser ablation. Here, it is essential to predict or rather control the evolution of the surfaces roughness. Laser ablative milling with a short pulse laser system in vacuum (≈1 Pa were performed over depths of several 10 µm documenting the evolution of surface roughness and unevenness with a white light interference microscope. Power spectral density analysis of the generated surface data reveals a strong influence of the crystalline structure of the solid. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate that this effect could be suppressed for gold.

  2. Buffer-eliminated, charge-neutral epitaxial graphene on oxidized 4H-SiC (0001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirikumara, Hansika I., E-mail: hansi.sirikumara@siu.edu; Jayasekera, Thushari, E-mail: thushari@siu.edu [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Buffer-eliminated, charge-neutral epitaxial graphene (EG) is important to enhance its potential in device applications. Using the first principles Density Functional Theory calculations, we investigated the effect of oxidation on the electronic and structural properties of EG on 4H-SiC (0001) surface. Our investigation reveals that the buffer layer decouples from the substrate in the presence of both silicate and silicon oxy-nitride at the interface, and the resultant monolayer EG is charge-neutral in both cases. The interface at 4H-SiC/silicate/EG is characterized by surface dangling electrons, which opens up another route for further engineering EG on 4H-SiC. Dangling electron-free 4H-SiC/silicon oxy-nitride/EG is ideal for achieving charge-neutral EG.

  3. Inverse calculation of power density for laser surface treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Meijer, J.

    2000-01-01

    Laser beam surface treatment requires a well-defined temperature profile. In this paper an analytic method is presented to solve the inverse problem of heat conduction in solids, based on the 2-dimensional Fourier transform. As a result, the required power density profile of the laser beam can be

  4. Variation In Surface Water Vapour Density Over Four Nigerian Stations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The surface water vapour density ρ has been studied using monthly averages of temperature and relative humidity at four selected weather stations in Nigeria for the years 1987 to 1991. It is found that during the dry season months of November to March, ρ is higher at night by an average of about 9.9% than during the day ...

  5. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  6. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Andreas; Hartmann, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density Σ of Σ c ∼ 120 M ☉ pc –2 (A K ∼ 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area Σ SFR with increasing Σ, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of Σ SFR , approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of Σ SFR versus Σ in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A ∼ Σ –3 for low-mass regions and A ∼ Σ –1 for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse

  7. Origin of the charge density wave in 1T-TiSe2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhiyong

    2012-06-27

    All-electron ab initio calculations are used to study the microscopic origin of the charge density wave (CDW) in 1T-TiSe2. A purely electronic picture is ruled out as a possible scenario, indicating that the CDW transition in the present system is merely a structural phase transition. The CDW instability is the result of a symmetry lowering by electron correlations occurring with electron localization. Suppression of the CDW in pressurized and in Cu-intercalated 1T-TiSe2 is explained by a delocalization of the electrons, which weakens the correlations and counteracts the symmetry lowering.

  8. Nonuniversal critical behaviour in a model for charge density wave dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritala, R.K.; Hertz, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied short range fluctuations around the infinite-range model of charge density wave (CDW) dynamics. We find that the inhomogeneity of the local field, which is neglected in the infinite-range approximation has a dramatic effect on the transition. In the Bethe approximation the critical behaviour is nonuniversal. In particular, the current exponent is ζ = 3/2 log(z-1)/[log(z)]+log(1+f/J)], where z is the number of neighbors, f the pinning strength, and J the elastic coupling. (orig.)

  9. Time-of-flight spectra for mapping of charge density of ionsproduced by laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Parys, P.; Velardy, L.; Velyhan, Andriy; Ryc, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2014), s. 15-20 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454 Grant - others:LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser ion sources * map of ion charge density * ion expansion * modeling Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2014

  10. Metal-charge density wave coexistence in TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaddour, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Campus Universitaire, Université de Tunis El-Manar, Tunis 2092 (Tunisia); Auban-Senzier, P.; Raffy, H.; Monteverde, M.; Pouget, J.-P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Pasquier, C.R., E-mail: pasquier@lps.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR 8502-CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay F-91405 (France); Alemany, P. [Departament de Química Física and Institut de Química Teòrica i Computacional (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Canadell, E. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Valade, L. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Route de Narbonne F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-01

    We have established a new pressure–temperature phase diagram of TTF[Ni(dmit){sub 2}]{sub 2} based on longitudinal and transverse resistivity measurements under pressure up to 30 kbar. We were able to identify three different charge density wave (CDW) states which all coexist with a metallic state in a wide temperature range and superconductivity at the lowest temperatures. At low pressure, two successive CDW transitions have been clearly identified. These two transitions merge into a single one at 12 kbar. A maximum of this unique CDW transition temperature is observed at 19 kbar.

  11. Quantum phase slips in charge-density waves: the system-size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Noriyuki; Shiobara, Masato; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanda, Satoshi

    1998-03-01

    We present a phenomenological model for quantum phase slips of charge-density waves that takes into account the system-size effect. The process of quantum nucleation leading to the phase slip changes from vortex pair to vortex ring creations as the external electric field increases, which is analogous to the evolution of a ripple in a rectanglar water tank. The clossover field is determined by the system size. The present model describes a number of features observed in the nonohmic conductivity in TsS3 at low temperature.

  12. Dimensional crossover of quantum nucleation processes in charge-density-wave phase slips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakenaka, Noriyuki; Shiobara, Masato; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanda, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    A phenomenological model for quantum phase slips of charge-density waves that takes into account the system-size effect is presented. The process of quantum nucleation leading to the phase slip changes from vortex-pair to vortex-ring creations as the external electric field increases, which is analogous to the evolution of a ripple in a rectangular water tank. The crossover field is determined by the system size. The present model describes a number of features observed in the nonohmic conductivity in TaS3 at low temperature.

  13. Improved lower bounds for the atomic charge density at the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvez, F.J.; Porras, I.; Angulo, J.C.; Dehesa, J.S.

    1988-06-14

    Lower bounds F(..cap alpha.., ..beta..) for the electronic charge density of atomic systems with N electrons at the nucleus, p (O), are given by means of any two radial expectation values and , for real ..cap alpha.. not ..beta.., in a rigorous and simple way. In particular, p (O) greater than or equal to (N/8 ..pi..)/sup 2// which improves bounds found previously. An interesting property of these bounds is that they are equal to the exact value p(O) in the limit ..beta.. -> -3 for any fixed ..cap alpha.. value.

  14. Analysis of flame surface density measurements in turbulent premixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halter, Fabien [Institut PRISME, Universite d' Orleans, 45072 Orleans (France); Chauveau, Christian; Goekalp, Iskender [Institut de Combustion, Aerothermique, Reactivite et Environnement, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans (France); Veynante, Denis [Laboratoire E.M2.C, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Ecole Centrale Paris, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2009-03-15

    In premixed turbulent combustion, reaction rates can be estimated from the flame surface density. This parameter, which measures the mean flame surface area available per unit volume, may be obtained from algebraic expressions or by solving a transport equation. In this study, detailed measurements were performed on a Bunsen-type burner fed with methane/air mixtures in order to determine the local flame surface density experimentally. This burner, located in a high-pressure combustion chamber, allows investigation of turbulent premixed flames under various flow, mixture, and pressure conditions. In the present work, equivalence ratio was varied from 0.6 to 0.8 and pressure from 0.1 to 0.9 MPa. Flame front visualizations by Mie scattering laser tomography are used to obtain experimental data on the instantaneous flame front dynamics. The exact equation given by Pope is used to obtain flame surface density maps for different flame conditions. Some assumptions are made in order to access three-dimensional information from our two-dimensional experiments. Two different methodologies are proposed and tested in term of global mass balance (what enters compared to what is burned). The detailed experimental flame surface data provided for the first time in this work should progressively allow improvement of turbulent premixed flame modeling approaches. (author)

  15. Ion distributions, exclusion coefficients, and separation factors of electrolytes in a charged cylindrical nanopore: a partially perturbative density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2009-10-07

    The structural and thermodynamic properties for charge symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes as well as mixed electrolyte system inside a charged cylindrical nanopore are investigated using a partially perturbative density functional theory. The electrolytes are treated in the restricted primitive model and the internal surface of the cylindrical nanopore is considered to have a uniform charge density. The proposed theory is directly applicable to the arbitrary mixed electrolyte solution containing ions with the equal diameter and different valences. Large amount of simulation data for ion density distributions, separation factors, and exclusion coefficients are used to determine the range of validity of the partially perturbative density functional theory for monovalent and multivalent counterion systems. The proposed theory is found to be in good agreement with the simulations for both mono- and multivalent counterion systems. In contrast, the classical Poisson-Boltzmann equation only provides reasonable descriptions of monovalent counterion system at low bulk density, and is qualitatively and quantitatively wrong in the prediction for the multivalent counterion systems due to its neglect of the strong interionic correlations in these systems. The proposed density functional theory has also been applied to an electrolyte absorbed into a pore that is a model of the filter of a physiological calcium channel.

  16. Aspirin degradation in surface-charged TEMPO-oxidized mesoporous crystalline nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Daniel O; Hua, Kai; Forsgren, Johan; Mihranyan, Albert

    2014-01-30

    TEMPO-mediated surface oxidation of mesoporous highly crystalline Cladophora cellulose was used to introduce negative surface charges onto cellulose nanofibrils without significantly altering other structural characteristics. This enabled the investigation of the influence of mesoporous nanocellulose surface charges on aspirin chemical stability to be conducted. The negative surface charges (carboxylate content 0.44±0.01 mmol/g) introduced on the mesoporous crystalline nanocellulose significantly accelerated aspirin degradation, compared to the starting material which had significantly less surface charge (0.06±0.01 mmol/g). This effect followed from an increased aspirin amorphisation ability in mesopores of the oxidized nanocellulose. These results highlight the importance of surface charges in formulating nanocellulose for drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Colloids from oppositely charged polymers: reversibility and surface activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofs, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    The research described in this thesis concerns the formation, solution properties, and adsorption of polyelectrolyte complexes composed of at least one diblock copolymer with a neutral and a charged block and either an oppositely charged homopolyelectrolyte or a diblock copolymer, with a neutral

  18. Gravitational lensing by a smoothly variable surface mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczynski, Bohdan; Wambsganss, Joachim

    1989-01-01

    The statistical properties of gravitational lensing due to smooth but nonuniform distributions of matter are considered. It is found that a majority of triple images had a parity characteristic for 'shear-induced' lensing. Almost all cases of triple or multiple imaging were associated with large surface density enhancements, and lensing objects were present between the images. Thus, the observed gravitational lens candidates for which no lensing object has been detected between the images are unlikely to be a result of asymmetric distribution of mass external to the image circle. In a model with smoothly variable surface mass density, moderately and highly amplified images tended to be single rather than multiple. An opposite trend was found in models which had singularities in the surface mass distribution.

  19. Influence of charge density and ionic strength on the aggregation process of cellulose nanocrystals in aqueous suspension, as revealed by small-angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherhal, Fanch; Cousin, Fabrice; Capron, Isabelle

    2015-05-26

    Aggregation of rodlike colloidal particles is investigated here through the aggregation process by either increasing ionic strength or decreasing surface charge density of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The form factor of the nanoparticles is characterized up to the Guinier plateau using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) extended to very small scattering vector Q. Ionic strength, above the threshold of screening charges, brings aggregative conditions that induced fractal organizations for both charged and uncharged CNCs. These two structures display respective fractal dimensions of 2.1 for charged CNCs at high ionic strength and 2.3 for desulfated CNCs over more than a decade of the scattering vector Q, irrespective of salinity, revealing a denser structuration for neutral particles. This is discussed in the framework of aggregation of rodlike particles with an aspect ratio higher than 8. Furthermore, dilution of the rod gel led to disentanglement of the network of fractal aggregates with a subsequent macroscopic sedimentation of the suspensions, with a characteristic time that depends upon the ionic strength and surface charge density. It revealed a threshold independent of salt content around 2.5 g/L and the metastable out-of-equilibrium character of CNC suspensions.

  20. Polysaccharide charge density regulating protein adsorption to air/water interfaces by protein/polysaccharide complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Kosters, H.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Because the formation of protein/polysaccharide complexes is dominated by electrostatic interaction, polysaccharide charge density is expected to play a major role in the adsorption behavior of the complexes. In this study, pullulan (a non-charged polysaccharide) carboxylated to four different

  1. Random distribution of background charge density for numerical simulation of discharge inception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grange, F.; Loiseau, J.F.; Spyrou, N.

    1998-01-01

    The models of electric streamers based on a uniform background density of electrons may appear not to be physical, as the number of electrons in the small active region located in the vicinity of the electrode tip under regular conditions can be less than one. To avoid this, the electron background is modelled by a random density distribution such that, after a certain time lag, at least one electron is present in the grid close to the point electrode. The modelling performed shows that the streamer inception is not very sensitive to the initial location of the charged particles; the ionizing front, however, may be delayed by several tens of nanoseconds, depending on the way the electron has to drift before reaching the anode. (J.U.)

  2. Transverse charge and magnetization densities: Improved chiral predictions down to b=1 fms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Jose Manuel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hiller Blin, Astrid N. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Vicente Vacas, Manuel J. [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain). Univ. of Valencia (UV), Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Weiss, Christian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The transverse charge and magnetization densities provide insight into the nucleon’s inner structure. In the periphery, the isovector components are clearly dominant, and can be computed in a model-independent way by means of a combination of chiral effective field theory (cEFT) and dispersion analysis. With a novel N=D method, we incorporate the pion electromagnetic formfactor data into the cEFT calculation, thus taking into account the pion-rescattering effects and r-meson pole. As a consequence, we are able to reliably compute the densities down to distances b1 fm, therefore achieving a dramatic improvement of the results compared to traditional cEFT calculations, while remaining predictive and having controlled uncertainties.

  3. Ultrafast dynamics in CeTe{sub 3} near the pressure-induced charge-density-wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauch, Jonas; Obergfell, Manuel [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, Hanjo [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Demsar, Jure [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (Germany); Giraldo, Paula; Fisher, Ian R. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University (United States); Pashkin, Alexej [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is an efficient tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in strongly correlated electronic systems, in particular, compounds with a charge-density-wave (CDW) order. Application of external pressure often leads to a suppression of a CDW state due to an impairment of the Fermi surface nesting. We combine time-resolved optical spectroscopy and diamond anvil cell technology to study electron and lattice dynamics in tri-telluride compound CeTe{sub 3}. Around pressures of 4 GPa we observe a gradual vanishing of the relaxation process related to the recombination of the photoexcited quasiparticles. The coherent oscillations of the phonon modes coupled to the CDW order parameter demonstrate even more dramatic suppression with increasing pressure. These observations clearly indicate a transition into the metallic state of CeTe{sub 3} induced by the external pressure.

  4. Highly charged ions impinging on a stepped metal surface under grazing incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robin, A; Niemann, D; Stolterfoht, N; Heiland, W

    We report on energy loss measurements and charge state distributions for 60 keV N6+ and 75 keV N5+ ions scattered off a Pt(110)(1x2) single crystal surface. In particular, the influence of surface steps on the energy loss and the outgoing charge states is discussed. The scattering angle and the

  5. Phosphorus solubility of agricultural soils: a surface charge and phosphorus-31 NMR speciation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated ten soils from six states in United States to determine the relationship between potentiometric titration derived soil surface charge and Phosphorus-31 (P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) speciation with the concentration of water-extractable P (WEP). The surface charge value at the...

  6. The interplay between surface charging and microscale roughness during plasma etching of polymeric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memos, George; Lidorikis, Elefterios; Kokkoris, George

    2018-02-01

    The surface roughness developed during plasma etching of polymeric substrates is critical for a variety of applications related to the wetting behavior and the interaction of surfaces with cells. Toward the understanding and, ultimately, the manipulation of plasma induced surface roughness, the interplay between surface charging and microscale roughness of polymeric substrates is investigated by a modeling framework consisting of a surface charging module, a surface etching model, and a profile evolution module. The evolution of initially rough profiles during plasma etching is calculated by taking into account as well as by neglecting charging. It is revealed, on the one hand, that the surface charging contributes to the suppression of root mean square roughness and, on the other hand, that the decrease of the surface roughness induces a decrease of the charging potential. The effect of charging on roughness is intense when the etching yield depends solely on the ion energy, and it is mitigated when the etching yield additionally depends on the angle of ion incidence. The charging time, i.e., the time required for reaching a steady state charging potential, is found to depend on the thickness of the polymeric substrate, and it is calculated in the order of milliseconds.

  7. Boron Nitride Nanoporous Membranes with High Surface Charge by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matthieu; Koonkaew, Boonprakrong; Balme, Sebastien; Utke, Ivo; Picaud, Fabien; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Coy, Emerson; Miele, Philippe; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-05-17

    In this work, we report the design and the fine-tuning of boron nitride single nanopore and nanoporous membranes by atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, we developed an ALD process based on the use of BBr 3 and NH 3 as precursors in order to synthesize BN thin films. The deposited films were characterized in terms of thickness, composition, and microstructure. Next, we used the newly developed process to grow BN films on anodic aluminum oxide nanoporous templates, demonstrating the conformality benefit of BN prepared by ALD, and its scalability for the manufacturing of membranes. For the first time, the ALD process was then used to tune the diameter of fabricated single transmembrane nanopores by adjusting the BN thickness and to enable studies of the fundamental aspects of ionic transport on a single nanopore. At pH = 7, we estimated a surface charge density of 0.16 C·m -2 without slip and 0.07 C·m -2 considering a reasonable slip length of 3 nm. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with experimental conditions confirmed the conductivities and the sign of surface charges measured. The high ion transport results obtained and the ability to fine-tune nanoporous membranes by such a scalable method pave the way toward applications such as ionic separation, energy harvesting, and ultrafiltration devices.

  8. Effects of rational surface density on resistive g turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1993-01-01

    The Beklemishev-Horton theory states that the anomalous transport coefficient is proportional to the density of rational surfaces provided that the interaction between the modes localized around different rational surfaces is weak compared with modes of the same helicity. The authors examine the effects of the density of states ρ using resistive g turbulence in 2D (single-helicity) and 3D (multi-helicity) simulations. They find that the modes with different helicities do not equipartition the available energy, but rather the coalescence or inverse cascade effect is strong so that a few low order mode rational surfaces receive most of the energy. The quasilinear flattening at the surfaces is a strong effect and they use bifurcation theory to derive that the effective diffusivity increases as χ eff = χ 0 ρ/(1 - Cρ) where C is a constant determined by interaction integrals. For a sufficiently high density of states Cρ ≤ 1, the higher order nonlinear interaction must be taken into account

  9. Electromigration and charge carrier density versus free lattice volume effects in doped zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' Peko, Jean-Claude; Paz, Fernando Y.; Mir, Mirta; De Souza, Milton F. [Institute of Physics at Sao Carlos (IFSC), University of Sao Paulo (USP), P.O. Box 369, CEP 13560-970 Sao Carlos/SP (Brazil)

    2004-11-01

    Ion conducting yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (3YTZ) and Er{sup 3+}-, Nd{sup 3+}- and Hf{sup 4+}-doped 3YTZ ceramics were prepared and studied in this work. It is noted that dopant-induced structural effects, associated with free lattice volume for bulk conduction, may still be dominant over charge carrier density effects, even for variations of these latter by up to about 30%. In that way, dopant ion size-modified charge (oxygen vacancy) mobility varied to about +25% in Er{sup 3+}-doped 3YTZ and about -45% in Nd{sup 3+}-doped 3YTZ, with respect to original 3YTZ. Meanwhile, the behavior of grain-boundary electrical properties appeared to adapt well with Frenkel's space-charge model. In both bulk and grain-boundary cases, the electrical response of Hf{sup 4+}-doped 3YTZ remained close to that from 3YTZ, a fact which is also discussed in this report. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Density functional study of the interaction of carbon monoxide with small neutral and charged silver clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Li, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Wen-Ning; Fan, Kang-Nian

    2006-06-08

    CO adsorption on small neutral, anionic, and cationic silver clusters Ag(n) (n = 1-7) has been studied with use of the PW91PW91 density functional theory (DFT) method. The adsorption of CO on-top site, among various possible sites, is energetically preferred irrespective of the charge state of the silver cluster. The cationic silver clusters generally have a greater tendency to adsorb CO than the anionic and neutral silver ones, except for n = 3 and 4, and the binding energies reach a local minimum at n = 5. The binding energies on the neutral clusters, instead, reach a local maximum at n = 3, which is about 0.87 eV, probably large enough to be captured in the experiments. Binding of CO to the silver clusters is generally weaker than that to the copper and gold counterparts at the same size and charge state. This is due to the weaker orbital interaction between silver and CO, which is caused by the larger atomic radius of the silver atom. In contrast, Au atoms with a larger nuclear charge but a similar atomic radius to silver owing to the lanthanide contraction are able to have a stronger interaction with CO.

  11. Density functional theory for the description of charge-transfer processes at TTF/TCNQ interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Van Regemorter, Tanguy

    2012-09-15

    In the field of organic electronics, a central issue is to assess how the frontier electronic levels of two adjacent organic layers align with respect to one another at the interface. This alignment can be driven by the presence of a partial charge transfer and the formation of an interface dipole; it plays a key role for instance in determining the rates of exciton dissociation or exciton formation in organic solar cells or light-emitting diodes, respectively. Reliably modeling the processes taking place at these interfaces remains a challenge for the computational chemistry community. Here, we review our recent theoretical work on the influence of the choice of density functional theory (DFT) methodology on the description of the charge-transfer character in the ground state of TTF/ TCNQ model complexes and interfaces. Starting with the electronic properties of the isolated TTF and TCNQ molecules and then considering the charge transfer and resulting interface dipole in TTF/TCNQ donor-acceptor stacks and bilayers, we examine the impact of the choice of DFT functional in describing the interfacial electronic structure. Finally, we employ computations based on periodic boundary conditions to highlight the impact of depolarization effects on the interfacial dipole moment. © Springer-Verlag 2012.

  12. Magnetic properties of the charge density wave compounds RTe3, R=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er & Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    The antiferromagnetic transition is investigated in the rare-earth (R) tritelluride RTe{sub 3} family of charge density wave (CDW) compounds via specific heat, magnetization and resistivity measurements. Observation of the opening of a superzone gap in the resistivity of DyTe{sub 3} indicates that additional nesting of the reconstructed Fermi surface in the CDW state plays an important role in determining the magnetic structure.

  13. Charge and spin density in s-stable rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, H. de.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis deals with a study of the electronic structure of rare earth intermetallic compounds, in particular the electronic charge and spin density distribution. These are closely related to the properties of the rare earth ions, which carry the partly filled 4f shell. In chapter 1 a survey of the theory of hyperfine interaction as far as it has a bearing on the Moessbauer effect of 155 Gd and 151 Eu is given. Also some details of the Moessbauer spectra, which have practical importance are discussed. In chapter 2 the experimental set-up is described. Special attention is paid to the gamma radiation source and gamma detection requirements. In chapter 3 the author introduces the theoretical framework which will be used to interpret the measurements. In chapter 4 the results of the 155 Gd Moessbauer measurements are presented. Also it is discussed how the result can be understood in terms of the charge and spin density in rare earth intermetallic compounds. In order to lend support to the picture emerging from the previous chapter, in chapter 5 the conduction electron band structure of some representative Gd intermetallics is computed with an approximate semi-empirical LCAO method. The results are compared with those from chapter 4. Finally, in chapter 6, the 151 Eu resonance is used to investigate the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field and line width in the Eu intermetallic compounds Eu 2 Mg 17 and EuMg 5 . (Auth.)

  14. Superficial Collagen Fibril Modulus and Pericellular Fixed Charge Density Modulate Chondrocyte Volumetric Behaviour in Early Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Tanska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if the experimentally detected altered chondrocyte volumetric behavior in early osteoarthritis can be explained by changes in the extracellular and pericellular matrix properties of cartilage. Based on our own experimental tests and the literature, the structural and mechanical parameters for normal and osteoarthritic cartilage were implemented into a multiscale fibril-reinforced poroelastic swelling model. Model simulations were compared with experimentally observed cell volume changes in mechanically loaded cartilage, obtained from anterior cruciate ligament transected rabbit knees. We found that the cell volume increased by 7% in the osteoarthritic cartilage model following mechanical loading of the tissue. In contrast, the cell volume decreased by 4% in normal cartilage model. These findings were consistent with the experimental results. Increased local transversal tissue strain due to the reduced collagen fibril stiffness accompanied with the reduced fixed charge density of the pericellular matrix could increase the cell volume up to 12%. These findings suggest that the increase in the cell volume in mechanically loaded osteoarthritic cartilage is primarily explained by the reduction in the pericellular fixed charge density, while the superficial collagen fibril stiffness is suggested to contribute secondarily to the cell volume behavior.

  15. Explaining electrostatic charging and flow of surface-modified acetaminophen powders as a function of relative humidity through surface energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallo, Laila J; Dave, Rajesh N

    2015-07-01

    Powder flow involves particle-particle and particle-vessel contacts and separation resulting in electrostatic charging. This important phenomenon was studied for uncoated and dry-coated micronized acetaminophen (MAPAP) as a function of relative humidity. The main hypothesis is that by modifying powder surface energy via dry coating of MAPAP performed using magnetically assisted impaction coating, its charging tendency, flow can be controlled. The examination of the relationship between electrostatic charging, powder flow, and the surface energies of the powders revealed that an improvement in flow because of dry coating corresponded to a decrease in the charging of the particles. A general trend of reduction in both electrostatic charging and dispersive surface energy with dry coating and relative humidity were also observed, except that a divergent behavior was observed at higher relative humidities (≥55% RH). The uncoated powder was found to have strong electron acceptor characteristic as compared with the dry coated. The adhesion energy between the particles and the tubes used for the electrostatic charging qualitatively predicted the decreasing trend in electrostatic charging from plastic tubes to stainless steel. In summary, the surface energies of the powders and the vessel could explain the electrostatic charging behavior and charge reduction because of dry coating. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Charged-particle pseudorapidity density in proton-proton collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{\\textit s}}$ = 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is measured at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV with the ALICE detector. We report on the measurement performed in the central pseudorapidity region for inelastic events (INEL) and events with at least one charged particle in $\\left|\\eta\\right| $0). The pseudorapidity density of charged particles produced in the pseudorapidity region $\\left|\\eta\\right| $0 events, respectively. The results are compared with calculations from Monte Carlo models commonly used at the LHC.

  17. Molecular simulation insights on the in vacuo adsorption of amino acids on graphene oxide surfaces with varying surface oxygen densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmani, Farzin; Nouranian, Sasan, E-mail: sasan@olemiss.edu; Mahdavi, Mina [University of Mississippi, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States); Al-Ostaz, Ahmed [University of Mississippi, Department of Civil Engineering (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In this fundamental study, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were performed in vacuo to investigate the energetics and select geometries of 20 standard amino acids (AAs) on pristine graphene (PG) and graphene oxide (GO) surfaces as a function of graphene surface oxygen density. These interactions are of key interest to graphene/biomolecular systems. Our results indicate that aromatic AAs exhibit the strongest total interactions with the PG surfaces due to π-π stacking. Tryptophan (Trp) has the highest aromaticity due to its indole side chain and, hence, has the strongest interaction among all AAs (−16.66 kcal/mol). Aliphatic, polar, and charged AAs show various levels of affinity to the PG sheets depending on the strength of their side chain hydrophobic interactions. For example, arginine (Arg) with its guanidinium side chain exhibits the strongest interaction with the PG sheets (−13.81 kcal/mol) following aromatic AAs. Also, glycine (Gly; a polar AA) has the weakest interaction with the PG sheets (−7.29 kcal/mol). When oxygen-containing functional groups are added to the graphene sheets, the π-π stacking in aromatic AAs becomes disrupted and perfect parallelism of the aromatic rings is lost. Moreover, hydrogen bonding and/or electrostatic interactions become more pronounced. Charged AAs exhibit the strongest interactions with the GO surfaces. In general, the AA-GO interactions increase with increasing surface oxygen density, and the effect is more pronounced at higher O/C ratios. This study provides a quantitative measure of AA-graphene interactions for the design and tuning of biomolecular systems suitable for biosensing, drug delivery, and gene delivery applications.

  18. Electrostatic solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using molecular dynamics with density functional theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, Timothy T. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Baer, Marcel D. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Schenter, Gregory K. [Physical Science Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Mundy, Chistopher J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98185, USA

    2017-10-28

    Determining the solvation free energies of single ions in water is one of the most fundamental problems in physical chemistry and yet many unresolved questions remain. In particular, the ability to decompose the solvation free energy into simple and intuitive contributions will have important implications for coarse grained models of electrolyte solution. Here, we provide rigorous definitions of the various types of single ion solvation free energies based on different simulation protocols. We calculate solvation free energies of charged hard spheres using density functional theory interaction potentials with molecular dynamics simulation (DFT-MD) and isolate the effects of charge and cavitation, comparing to the Born (linear response) model. We show that using uncorrected Ewald summation leads to highly unphysical values for the solvation free energy and that charging free energies for cations are approximately linear as a function of charge but that there is a small non-linearity for small anions. The charge hydration asymmetry (CHA) for hard spheres, determined with quantum mechanics, is much larger than for the analogous real ions. This suggests that real ions, particularly anions, are significantly more complex than simple charged hard spheres, a commonly employed representation. We would like to thank Thomas Beck, Shawn Kathmann, Richard Remsing and John Weeks for helpful discussions. Computing resources were generously allocated by PNNL's Institutional Computing program. This research also used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. TTD, GKS, and CJM were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. MDB was supported by MS3 (Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across

  19. Ultralow energy ion beam surface modification of low density polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenton, Martyn J; Bradley, James W; van den Berg, Jaap A; Armour, David G; Stevens, Gary C

    2005-12-01

    Ultralow energy Ar+ and O+ ion beam irradiation of low density polyethylene has been carried out under controlled dose and monoenergetic conditions. XPS of Ar+-treated surfaces exposed to ambient atmosphere show that the bombardment of 50 eV Ar+ ions at a total dose of 10(16) cm(-2) gives rise to very reactive surfaces with oxygen incorporation at about 50% of the species present in the upper surface layer. Using pure O+ beam irradiation, comparatively low O incorporation is achieved without exposure to atmosphere (approximately 13% O in the upper surface). However, if the surface is activated by Ar+ pretreatment, then large oxygen contents can be achieved under subsequent O+ irradiation (up to 48% O). The results show that for very low energy (20 eV) oxygen ions there is a dose threshold of about 5 x 10(15) cm(-2) before surface oxygen incorporation is observed. It appears that, for both Ar+ and O+ ions in this regime, the degree of surface modification is only very weakly dependent on the ion energy. The results suggest that in the nonequilibrium plasma treatment of polymers, where the ion flux is typically 10(18) m(-2) s(-1), low energy ions (<50 eV) may be responsible for surface chemical modification.

  20. Nanodrop on a nanorough solid surface: Density functional theory considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berim, Gersh O.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2008-07-01

    The density distributions and contact angles of liquid nanodrops on nanorough solid surfaces are determined on the basis of a nonlocal density functional theory. Two kinds of roughness, chemical and physical, are examined. The former considers the substrate as a sequence of two kinds of semi-infinite vertical plates of equal thicknesses but of different natures with different strengths for the liquid-solid interactions. The physical roughness involves an ordered set of pillars on a flat homogeneous surface. Both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were considered. For the chemical roughness, the contact angle which the drop makes with the flat surface increases when the strength of the liquid-solid interaction for one kind of plates decreases with respect to the fixed value of the other kind of plates. Such a behavior is in agreement with the Cassie-Baxter expression derived from macroscopic considerations. For the physical roughness on a hydrophobic surface, the contact angle which a drop makes with the plane containing the tops of the pillars increases with increasing roughness. Such a behavior is consistent with the Wenzel formula developed for macroscopic drops. For hydrophilic surfaces, as the roughness increases the contact angle first increases, in contradiction with the Wenzel formula, which predicts for hydrophilic surfaces a decrease of the contact angle with increasing roughness. However, a further increase in roughness changes nonmonotonously the contact angle, and at some roughness, the drop disappears and only a liquid film is present on the surface. It was also found that the contact angle has a periodic dependence on the volume of the drop.

  1. A study of charge transfer kinetics in dye-sensitized surface conductivity solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Dennis

    2011-05-15

    The efficiency of the quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell developed by Junghaenel and Tributsch, the so-called Nano Surface Conductivity Solar Cell (NSCSC), was improved from 2% to 3.5% introducing a compact TiO{sub 2} underlayer, modifying the surface of the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} electrode, optimizing the deposition process of the electrolyte film, and replacing the platinum counter electrode by a carbon layer. Space-resolved photocurrent images revealed the importance of a homogeneous distribution of the electrolyte film. An uneven dispersion led to localized areas of high and low photocurrents, whereas the latter were attributed to an insufficient concentration of the redox couple. Impedance spectroscopy was performed on cells containing different concentrations of the redox couple. By modeling the spectra using an equivalent circuit with a transmission line of resistive and capacitive elements, the characteristic parameters of electron transport in the TiO{sub 2}, such as diffusion length and electron lifetime were obtained. The measurements indicated that the transport of the positive charge to the counter electrode is the main process limiting the efficiency of the cells. Excess charge carrier decay in functioning devices was analyzed by contactless transient photoconductance measurements in the microwave frequency range (TRMC). The lifetime of the photogenerated charge carriers was observed to decrease with increasing applied potential, reaching its maximum close to the opencircuit potential of the cell, where the photocurrent density was minimal, i.e. the potential dependent decay observed was limited by the injection of electrons into the front contact. The functioning of this NSCSC indicated that the transport of the positive charge occurs by solid-state diffusion at the surface of the TiO{sub 2} particles. TRMC measurements on subset devices in the form of sensitized TiO{sub 2} layers revealed charge carrier kinetics strongly dependent on the

  2. Diurnal and seasonal variations of surface water vapour density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diurnal and seasonal variations of surface water vapour density over some meteorological stations in Nigeria. ... Ife Journal of Science ... the three Sahelian stations, was 5.29±0.39; while during the rainy season, they were 21.72±1.22, 19.60±0.12 and 19.47±0.07 for the Southern, Midland and Northern regions respectively.

  3. Atomistic simulation of charge effects: From tunable thin film growth to isolation of surface states with spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Wenmei

    This dissertation revitalizes the importance of surface charge effects in semiconductor nanostructures, in particular in the context of thin film growth and exotic electronic structures under delicate spin-orbit coupling. A combination of simulation techniques, including density functional theory calculation, kinetic Monte Carlo method, nonequilibrium Green's function method, and tight binding method, were employed to reveal the underlying physical mechanisms of four topics: (1) Effects of Li doping on H-diffusion in MgH 2 for hydrogen storage. It addresses both the effect of Fermi level tuning by charged dopant and the effect of dopant-defect interaction, and the latter was largely neglected in previous works; (2) Tuning nucleation density of the metal island with charge doping of the graphene substrate. It is the first time that the surface charge doping effect is proposed and studied as an effective approach to tune the kinetics of island nucleation at the early stage of thin film growth; (3) Complete isolation of Rashba surface states on the saturated semiconductor surface. It shows that the naturally saturated semiconductor surface of InSe(0001) with Au single layer film provides a mechanism for the formation of Rashba states with large spin splitting; it opens up an innovative route to obtaining ideal Rashba states without the overwhelming bulk spin-degenerate carriers in spin-dependent transport; (4) Formation of large band gap quantum spin Hall state on Si surface. This study reveals the importance of atomic orbital composition in the formation of a topological insulator, and shows promisingly the possible integration of topological insulator technology into Si-based modern electronic devices.

  4. Surface interactions involved in flashover with high density electronegative gases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, Keith Conquest; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wallace, Zachariah Red; Lehr, Jane Marie

    2010-01-01

    This report examines the interactions involved with flashover along a surface in high density electronegative gases. The focus is on fast ionization processes rather than the later time ionic drift or thermalization of the discharge. A kinetic simulation of the gas and surface is used to examine electron multiplication and includes gas collision, excitation and ionization, and attachment processes, gas photoionization and surface photoemission processes, as well as surface attachment. These rates are then used in a 1.5D fluid ionization wave (streamer) model to study streamer propagation with and without the surface in air and in SF6. The 1.5D model therefore includes rates for all these processes. To get a better estimate for the behavior of the radius we have studied radial expansion of the streamer in air and in SF6. The focus of the modeling is on voltage and field level changes (with and without a surface) rather than secondary effects, such as, velocities or changes in discharge path. An experiment has been set up to carry out measurements of threshold voltages, streamer velocities, and other discharge characteristics. This setup includes both electrical and photographic diagnostics (streak and framing cameras). We have observed little change in critical field levels (where avalanche multiplication sets in) in the gas alone versus with the surface. Comparisons between model calculations and experimental measurements are in agreement with this. We have examined streamer sustaining fields (field which maintains ionization wave propagation) in the gas and on the surface. Agreement of the gas levels with available literature is good and agreement between experiment and calculation is good also. Model calculations do not indicate much difference between the gas alone versus the surface levels. Experiments have identified differences in velocity between streamers on the surface and in the gas alone (the surface values being larger).

  5. Surface charges for gravity and electromagnetism in the first order formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frodden, Ernesto; Hidalgo, Diego

    2018-02-01

    A new derivation of surface charges for 3  +  1 gravity coupled to electromagnetism is obtained. Gravity theory is written in the tetrad-connection variables. The general derivation starts from the Lagrangian, and uses the covariant symplectic formalism in the language of forms. For gauge theories, surface charges disentangle physical from gauge symmetries through the use of Noether identities and the exactness symmetry condition. The surface charges are quasilocal, explicitly coordinate independent, gauge invariant and background independent. For a black hole family solution, the surface charge conservation implies the first law of black hole mechanics. As a check, we show the first law for an electrically charged, rotating black hole with an asymptotically constant curvature (the Kerr–Newman (anti-)de Sitter family). The charges, including the would-be mass term appearing in the first law, are quasilocal. No reference to the asymptotic structure of the spacetime nor the boundary conditions is required and therefore topological terms do not play a rôle. Finally, surface charge formulae for Lovelock gravity coupled to electromagnetism are exhibited, generalizing the one derived in a recent work by Barnich et al Proc. Workshop ‘ About Various Kinds of Interactions’ in honour of Philippe Spindel (4–5 June 2015, Mons, Belgium) C15-06-04 (2016 (arXiv:1611.01777 [gr-qc])). The two different symplectic methods to define surface charges are compared and shown equivalent.

  6. Dental plaque microcosm response to bonding agents containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates with different chain lengths and charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Hockin H K

    2013-11-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to combat bacteria and caries at tooth-restoration margins. The objectives of this study were to incorporate new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to bonding agent and determine the effects of alkyl chain length (CL) and quaternary amine charge density on dental plaque microcosm bacteria response for the first time. Six QAMs were synthesized with CL=3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18. Each QAM was incorporated into Scotchbond multi-purpose (SBMP). To determine the charge density effect, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM, CL=16) was mixed into SBMP at mass fraction=0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%. Charge density was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Dental plaque microcosm using saliva from ten donors was tested. Bacteria were inoculated on resins. Early-attachment was tested at 4h. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacteria early-attachment. Microcosm biofilm CFU for CL=16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent increased with DMAHDM content. Bacteria early-attachment decreased with increasing charge density. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by 4 log. The killing effect was similarly-strong against total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci. Increasing alkyl chain length and charge density of bonding agent was shown for the first time to decrease microcosm bacteria attachment and reduce biofilm CFU by 4 orders of magnitude. Novel antibacterial resins with tailored chain length and charge density are promising for wide applications in bonding, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental plaque microcosm response to bonding agents containing quaternary ammonium methacrylates with different chain lengths and charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Han; Li, Fang; Weir, Michael D.; Xu, Hockin H.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Antibacterial bonding agents are promising to combat bacteria and caries at tooth-restoration margins. The objectives of this study were to incorporate new quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs) to bonding agent and determine the effects of alkyl chain length (CL) and quaternary amine charge density on dental plaque microcosm bacteria response for the first time. Methods Six QAMs were synthesized with CL = 3, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18. Each QAM was incorporated into Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP). To determine the charge density effect, dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM, CL = 16) was mixed into SBMP at mass fraction = 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%. Charge density was measured using a fluorescein dye method. Dental plaque microcosm using saliva from ten donors was tested. Bacteria were inoculated on resins. Early-attachment was tested at 4 hours. Biofilm colony-forming units (CFU) were measured at 2 days. Results Incorporating QAMs into SBMP reduced bacteria early-attachment. Microcosm biofilm CFU for CL = 16 was 4 log lower than SBMP control. Charge density of bonding agent increased with DMAHDM content. Bacteria early-attachment decreased with increasing charge density. Biofilm CFU at 10% DMAHDM was reduced by 4 log. The killing effect was similarly-strong against total microorganisms, total streptococci, and mutans streptococci. Conclusions Increasing alkyl chain length and charge density of bonding agent was shown for the first time to decrease microcosm bacteria attachment and reduce biofilm CFU by 4 orders of magnitude. Novel antibacterial resins with tailored chain length and charge density are promising for wide applications in bonding, cements, sealants and composites to inhibit biofilms and caries. PMID:23948394

  8. Density and Charge of Pristine Fluffy Particles from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulle, M.; Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Weissman, P.; Juhasz, A.; Szego, K.; Sordini, R.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Accolla, M.; Merouane, S.; Zakharov, V.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Rodríguez, J.; Colangeli, L.; Palumbo, P.; Grün, E.; Hilchenbach, M.; Bussoletti, E.; Esposito, F.; Green, S. F.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Morales, R.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Rodrigo, R.; Zarnecki, J. C.; Cosi, M.; Giovane, F.; Gustafson, B.; Herranz, M. L.; Jerónimo, J. M.; Leese, M. R.; López-Jiménez, A. C.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-03-01

    The Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator (GIADA) instrument on board ESA’s Rosetta mission is constraining the origin of the dust particles detected within the coma of comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). The collected particles belong to two families: (i) compact particles (ranging in size from 0.03 to 1 mm), witnessing the presence of materials that underwent processing within the solar nebula and (ii) fluffy aggregates (ranging in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm) of sub-micron grains that may be a record of a primitive component, probably linked to interstellar dust. The dynamics of the fluffy aggregates constrain their equivalent bulk density to \\lt 1 kg m-3. These aggregates are charged, fragmented, and decelerated by the spacecraft negative potential and enter GIADA in showers of fragments at speeds \\lt 1 m s-1. The density of such optically thick aggregates is consistent with the low bulk density of the nucleus. The mass contribution of the fluffy aggregates to the refractory component of the nucleus is negligible and their coma brightness contribution is less than 15%.

  9. Simulating Supercapacitors: Can We Model Electrodes As Constant Charge Surfaces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlet, Céline; Péan, Clarisse; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Madden, Paul A; Simon, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2013-01-17

    Supercapacitors based on an ionic liquid electrolyte and graphite or nanoporous carbon electrodes are simulated using molecular dynamics. We compare a simplified electrode model in which a constant, uniform charge is assigned to each carbon atom with a realistic model in which a constant potential is applied between the electrodes (the carbon charges are allowed to fluctuate). We show that the simulations performed with the simplified model do not provide a correct description of the properties of the system. First, the structure of the adsorbed electrolyte is partly modified. Second, dramatic differences are observed for the dynamics of the system during transient regimes. In particular, upon application of a constant applied potential difference, the increase in the temperature, due to the Joule effect, associated with the creation of an electric current across the cell follows Ohm's law, while unphysically high temperatures are rapidly observed when constant charges are assigned to each carbon atom.

  10. Management of deep brain stimulator battery failure: battery estimators, charge density, and importance of clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaihan Fakhar

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed in this investigation to study deep brain stimulation (DBS battery drain with special attention directed toward patient symptoms prior to and following battery replacement. BACKGROUND: Previously our group developed web-based calculators and smart phone applications to estimate DBS battery life (http://mdc.mbi.ufl.edu/surgery/dbs-battery-estimator. METHODS: A cohort of 320 patients undergoing DBS battery replacement from 2002-2012 were included in an IRB approved study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0 (IBM, Armonk, NY. RESULTS: The mean charge density for treatment of Parkinson's disease was 7.2 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 3.82, for dystonia was 17.5 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 8.53, for essential tremor was 8.3 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 4.85, and for OCD was 18.0 µC/cm(2/phase (SD = 4.35. There was a significant relationship between charge density and battery life (r = -.59, p<.001, as well as total power and battery life (r = -.64, p<.001. The UF estimator (r = .67, p<.001 and the Medtronic helpline (r = .74, p<.001 predictions of battery life were significantly positively associated with actual battery life. Battery status indicators on Soletra and Kinetra were poor predictors of battery life. In 38 cases, the symptoms improved following a battery change, suggesting that the neurostimulator was likely responsible for symptom worsening. For these cases, both the UF estimator and the Medtronic helpline were significantly correlated with battery life (r = .65 and r = .70, respectively, both p<.001. CONCLUSIONS: Battery estimations, charge density, total power and clinical symptoms were important factors. The observation of clinical worsening that was rescued following neurostimulator replacement reinforces the notion that changes in clinical symptoms can be associated with battery drain.

  11. On the physics of both surface overcharging and charge reversal at heterophase interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Pengli; Ma, Zengwei

    2018-02-07

    The conventional paradigm for characterizing surface overcharging and charge reversal is based on the so-called Stern layer, in which surface dissociation reaction and specific chemical adsorption are assumed to take place. In this article, a series of Monte Carlo simulations have been applied to obtain useful insights into the underlying physics responsible for these two kinds of anomalous phenomena at the interface of two dielectrics, with special emphasis on the case of divalent counterions that are more relevant in natural and biological environments. At a weakly charged surface, it is found that independent of the type of surface charge distribution and the dielectric response of the solution, the overcharging event is universally driven by the ion size-asymmetric effect. Exceptionally, the overcharging still persists when the surface is highly charged but is only restricted to the case of discrete surface charge in a relatively low dielectric medium. As compared to the adsorption onto the homogeneously smeared charge surface that has the same average affinity for counterions, on the other hand, charge reversal under the action of a dielectric response can be substantially enhanced in the discrete surface charge representation due to strong association of counterions with interfacial groups, and the degree of enhancement depends in a nontrivial way on the reduction of the medium dielectric constant and the steric effects of finite ion size. Rather interestingly, the charge reversal is of high relevance to the overcharging of interfaces because the overwhelming interfacial association forces the coions closer to the surface due to their smaller size than the counterions. Upon the addition of a monovalent salt to the solution, the interfacial association with divalent counterions makes surface overcharging and charge reversal widely unaffected, in contrast to the prevailing notion that screening of surface charge of a homogeneous nature is determined by the

  12. The adsorption of CO on charged and neutral Au and Au2: A comparison between wave-function based and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Lein, Matthias; Krawczyk, Robert P.; Jacob, Christoph R.

    2008-03-01

    Quantum theoretical calculations are presented for CO attached to charged and neutral Au and Au2 with the aim to test the performance of currently applied density functional theory (DFT) by comparison with accurate wave-function based results. For this, we developed a compact sized correlation-consistent valence basis set which accompanies a small-core energy-consistent scalar relativistic pseudopotential for gold. The properties analyzed are geometries, dissociation energies, vibrational frequencies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities. The important role of the basis-set superposition error is addressed which can be substantial for the negatively charged systems. The dissociation energies decrease along the series Au+-CO, Au-CO, and Au--CO and as well as along the series Au2+-CO, Au2-CO, and Au2--CO. As one expects, a negative charge on gold weakens the carbon oxygen bond considerably, with a consequent redshift in the CO stretching frequency when moving from the positively charged to the neutral and the negatively charged gold atom or dimer. We find that the different density functional approximations applied are not able to correctly describe the rather weak interaction between CO and gold, thus questioning the application of DFT to CO adsorption on larger gold clusters or surfaces.

  13. Charge transfer effects on the Fermi surface of Ba0.5K 0.5Fe2As2

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2011-01-31

    Ab-initio calculations within density functional theory are performed to obtain a more systematic understanding of the electronic structure of iron pnictides. As a prototypical compound we study Ba0.5K 0.5Fe2As2 and analyze the changes of its electronic structure when the interaction between the Fe2As 2 layers and their surrounding is modified. We find strong effects on the density of states near the Fermi energy as well as the Fermi surface. The role of the electron donor atoms in iron pnictides thus cannot be understood in a rigid band picture. Instead, the bonding within the Fe2As 2 layers reacts to a modified charge transfer from the donor atoms by adapting the intra-layer Fe-As hybridization and charge transfer in order to maintain an As3- valence state. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Luminescent systems based on the isolation of conjugated PI systems and edge charge compensation with polar molecules on a charged nanostructured surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Zhao, Bin; Geohegan, David B.; Styers-Barnett, David J.; Hu, Hui

    2014-07-15

    A photoluminescent or electroluminescent system and method of making a non-luminescent nanostructured material into such a luminescent system is presented. The method of preparing the luminescent system, generally, comprises the steps of modifying the surface of a nanostructured material to create isolated regions to act as luminescent centers and to create a charge imbalance on the surface; applying more than one polar molecule to the charged surface of the nanostructured material; and orienting the polar molecules to compensate for the charge imbalance on the surface of the nanostructured material. The compensation of the surface charge imbalance by the polar molecules allows the isolated regions to exhibit luminescence.

  15. Theoretical study of the amphoteric oxide nanoparticle surface charge during multi-particle interactions in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfimov, A. V.; Aryslanova, E. M.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticle surface charge plays an important role in many biological applications. In this study, an analytical surface charging model for the amphoteric oxide nanoparticles has been presented. The model accounts for the particle's electric double layer self-action on the charging process and the charge regulation during multi-particle interactions in aqueous solutions. The employment of the model allows to explicitly describe the nanoparticle agglomeration process and the accompanying agglomerate surface charge variation.

  16. Power Spectral Density Specification and Analysis of Large Optical Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2009-01-01

    The 2-dimensional Power Spectral Density (PSD) can be used to characterize the mid- and the high-spatial frequency components of the surface height errors of an optical surface. We found it necessary to have a complete, easy-to-use approach for specifying and evaluating the PSD characteristics of large optical surfaces, an approach that allows one to specify the surface quality of a large optical surface based on simulated results using a PSD function and to evaluate the measured surface profile data of the same optic in comparison with those predicted by the simulations during the specification-derivation process. This paper provides a complete mathematical description of PSD error, and proposes a new approach in which a 2-dimentional (2D) PSD is converted into a 1-dimentional (1D) one by azimuthally averaging the 2D-PSD. The 1D-PSD calculated this way has the same unit and the same profile as the original PSD function, thus allows one to compare the two with each other directly.

  17. High-Density Infrared Surface Treatments of Refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    2005-03-31

    Refractory materials play a crucial role in all energy-intensive industries and are truly a crosscutting technology for the Industries of the Future (IOF). One of the major mechanisms for the degradation of refractories and a general decrease in their performance has been the penetration and corrosion by molten metals or glass. Methods and materials that would reduce the penetration, wetting, and corrosive chemistry would significantly improve refractory performance and also maintain the quality of the processed liquid, be it metal or glass. This report presents the results of an R&D project aimed at investigating the use of high-density infrared (HDI) heating to surface treat refractories to improve their performance. The project was a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). HDI is capable of heating the near-surface region of materials to very high temperatures where sintering, diffusion, and melting can occur. The intended benefits of HDI processing of refractories were to (1) reduce surface porosity (by essentially sealing the surface to prevent liquid penetration), (2) allow surface chemistry changes to be performed by bonding an adherent coating onto the underlying refractory (in order to inhibit wetting and/or improve corrosion resistance), and (3) produce noncontact refractories with high-emissivity surface coatings.

  18. Simultaneous solution of the geoid and the surface density anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, A. A.; Safari, A.; Karimi, R.; AllahTavakoli, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The main application of the land gravity data in geodesy is "local geoid" or "local gravity field" modeling, whereas the same data could play a vital role for the anomalous mass-density modeling in geophysical explorations. In the realm of local geoid computations based on Geodetic Boundary Value Problems (GBVP), it is needed that the effect of the topographic (or residual terrain) masses be removed via application of the Newton integral in order to perform the downward continuation in a harmonic space. However, harmonization of the downward continuation domain may not be perfectly possible unless accurate information about the mass-density of the topographic masses be available. On the other hand, from the exploration point of view the unwanted topographical masses within the aforementioned procedure could be regarded as the signal. In order to overcome the effect of the remaining masses within the remove step of the GBVP, which cause uncertainties in mathematical modeling of the problem, here we are proposing a methodology for simultaneous solution of the geoid and residual surface density modeling In other words, a new mathematical model will be offered which both provides the needed harmonic space for downward continuation and at the same time accounts for the non-harmonic terms of gravitational field and makes use of it for residual mass density modeling within the topographic region. The presented new model enjoys from uniqueness of the solution, opposite to the inverse application of the Newton integral for mass density modeling which is non-unique, and only needs regularization to remove its instability problem. In this way, the solution of the model provides both the incremental harmonic gravitational potential on surface of the reference ellipsoid as the gravity field model and the lateral surface mass-density variations via the second derivatives of the non harmonic terms of gravitational field. As the case study and accuracy verification, the proposed

  19. The charge density distribution in a model compound of the catalytic triad in serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaard, J; Schiøtt, B; Larsen, F K; Iversen, B B

    2001-09-03

    Combined low temperature (28(1) K) X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out on the co-crystallised complex of betaine, imidazole, and picric acid (1). The experimental charge density was determined and compared with ab initio theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The complex serves as a model for the active site in, for example, the serine protease class of enzymes, the so-called catalytic triad. The crystal contains three short strong N-H...O hydrogen bonds (HBs) with dN...O comparison with low-barrier and single-well hydrogen bonding systems (e.g., benzoylacetone and nitromalonamide) shows that the low-barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) state is characterized by an enormously increased hydrogen atom source contribution to the bond critical point in the HB. In this context, HB2 can be characterized as intermediate between localized HBs and delocalized LBHBs.

  20. Local Atomic Structure and Discommensurations in the Charge Density Wave of CeTe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Tomic, A.T.; Tessmer, S.H.; Billinge, S.J.L.; Malliakas, C.D.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    The local structure of CeTe 3 in the incommensurate charge density wave (IC-CDW) state has been obtained using atomic pair distribution function analysis of x-ray diffraction data. Local atomic distortions in the Te nets due to the CDW are larger than observed crystallographically, resulting in distinct short and long Te-Te bonds. Observation of different distortion amplitudes in the local and average structures is explained by the discommensurated nature of the CDW, since the pair distribution function is sensitive to the local displacements within the commensurate regions, whereas the crystallographic result averages over many discommensurated domains. The result is supported by STM data. This is the first quantitative local structural study within the commensurate domains in an IC-CDW system

  1. Monte Carlo studies of diamagnetism and charge density wave order in the cuprate pseudogap regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward Sierens, Lauren; Achkar, Andrew; Hawthorn, David; Melko, Roger; Sachdev, Subir

    2015-03-01

    The pseudogap regime of the hole-doped cuprate superconductors is often characterized experimentally in terms of a substantial diamagnetic response and, from another point of view, in terms of strong charge density wave (CDW) order. We introduce a dimensionless ratio, R, that incorporates both diamagnetic susceptibility and the correlation length of CDW order, and therefore reconciles these two fundamental characteristics of the pseudogap. We perform Monte Carlo simulations on a classical model that considers angular fluctuations of a six-dimensional order parameter, and compare our Monte Carlo results for R with existing data from torque magnetometry and x-ray scattering experiments on YBa2Cu3O6+x. We achieve qualitative agreement, and also propose future experiments to further investigate the behaviour of this dimensionless ratio.

  2. Charge carrier dynamics and surface plasmon interaction in gold nanorod-blended organic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aniket; Gupta, Neeraj; Lochan, Abhiram; Sharma, G. D.; Chand, Suresh; Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Rajiv K.

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of plasmonic nanoparticles into organic solar cell enhances the light harvesting properties that lead to higher power conversion efficiency without altering the device configuration. This work defines the consequences of the nanoparticle overloading amount and energy transfer process between gold nanorod and polymer (active matrix) in organic solar cells. We have studied the hole population decay dynamics coupled with gold nanorods loading amount which provides better understanding about device performance limiting factors. The exciton and plasmon together act as an interacting dipole; however, the energy exchange between these two has been elucidated via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) mechanism. Further, the charge species have been identified specifically with respect to their energy levels appearing in ultrafast time domain. The specific interaction of these charge species with respective surface plasmon resonance mode, i.e., exciton to transverse mode of oscillation and polaron pair to longitudinal mode of oscillations, has been explained. Thus, our analysis reveals that PRET enhances the carrier population density in polymer via non-radiative process beyond the concurrence of a particular plasmon resonance oscillation mode and polymer absorption range. These findings give new insight and reveal specifically the factors that enhance and control the performance of gold nanorods blended organic solar cells. This work would lead in the emergence of future plasmon based efficient organic electronic devices.

  3. Charge carrier dynamics and surface plasmon interaction in gold nanorod-blended organic solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Aniket; Lochan, Abhiram; Chand, Suresh; Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Rajiv K.; Gupta, Neeraj; Sharma, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of plasmonic nanoparticles into organic solar cell enhances the light harvesting properties that lead to higher power conversion efficiency without altering the device configuration. This work defines the consequences of the nanoparticle overloading amount and energy transfer process between gold nanorod and polymer (active matrix) in organic solar cells. We have studied the hole population decay dynamics coupled with gold nanorods loading amount which provides better understanding about device performance limiting factors. The exciton and plasmon together act as an interacting dipole; however, the energy exchange between these two has been elucidated via plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) mechanism. Further, the charge species have been identified specifically with respect to their energy levels appearing in ultrafast time domain. The specific interaction of these charge species with respective surface plasmon resonance mode, i.e., exciton to transverse mode of oscillation and polaron pair to longitudinal mode of oscillations, has been explained. Thus, our analysis reveals that PRET enhances the carrier population density in polymer via non-radiative process beyond the concurrence of a particular plasmon resonance oscillation mode and polymer absorption range. These findings give new insight and reveal specifically the factors that enhance and control the performance of gold nanorods blended organic solar cells. This work would lead in the emergence of future plasmon based efficient organic electronic devices.

  4. Influence of the Ion Treatment Regime on Defects Density and Surface Destruction of the Polycrystalline Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ion beam technology is used for finish treatment of large-scale optic parts to achieve highest precision and minimal surface roughness. The surface roughness increases during the ion treatment of polycrystalline materials in contrast to usual optic materials. This is caused, first, by polycrystalline structure of material and, second, by micro-defects appearing on its surface. The aim of the work is to investigate the influence of ion processing conditions on the amount of defects formed on the polycrystalline glass CO-115M.As an ion source, was used the anode layer accelerator with electromagnetically focusing ion beam and with excess charge compensation on the residual gas. The ion accelerator provided Gaussian ion current distribution on the treated sample surface. The accelerator had three operation conditions: 1 – Ud = 2 kV, Id = 110 mA; 2 – Ud = 3 kV, Id = 110 mA; 3 – Ud = 3,8 kV, Id = 50 mA (Ud – discharge voltage, Id – discharge current. Processing time was 30 min.For quantitative estimation of surface destruction degree the surface defects density was used which is equal to the ratio of total area of defects within the region under consideration to entire area. Defects area was calculated using the microphotography of treated surface.The investigations have shown that the defects occurred as microscopic chips in all operation conditions of treatment. The defects density distribution corresponds to ion current distribution on the sample surface. With increasing ion current power density a size of defects has grown and their amount has increased. With the constant power density an increasing acceleration voltage results in decreasing density of defects. It was shown that a process of appearing defects is of the threshold nature. For each accelerated voltage there is a power density at which defects do not appear. The work results may be useful to choose the ion beam processing operation conditions in manufacturing large

  5. Surface potential based modeling of charge, current, and capacitances in DGTFET including mobile channel charge and ambipolar behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-08-01

    We present a surface potential based analytical model for double gate tunnel field effect transistor (DGTFET) for the current, terminal charges, and terminal capacitances. The model accounts for the effect of the mobile charge in the channel and captures the device physics in depletion as well as in the strong inversion regime. The narrowing of the tunnel barrier in the presence of mobile charges in the channel is incorporated via modeling of the inverse decay length, which is constant under channel depletion condition and bias dependent under inversion condition. To capture the ambipolar current behavior in the model, tunneling at the drain junction is also included. The proposed model is validated against TCAD simulation data and it shows close match with the simulation data.

  6. Effect of surface charge on the cellular uptake of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kralj, Slavko, E-mail: slavko.kralj@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Materials Synthesis (Slovenia); Rojnik, Matija [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy (Slovenia); Romih, Rok [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Cell Biology (Slovenia); Jagodic, Marko [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics (Slovenia); Kos, Janko [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy (Slovenia); Makovec, Darko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Materials Synthesis (Slovenia)

    2012-10-15

    We report on the nanoparticle uptake into MCF10A neoT and PC-3 cells using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the nanoparticles' surface charge on the uptake efficiency. The surface of the superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles was modified using amino functionalization for the positive surface charge (CNPs), and carboxyl functionalization for the negative surface charge (ANPs). The CNPs and ANPs exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 500 {mu}g/cm{sup 3} in 24 h. The CNPs, bound to a plasma membrane, were intensely phagocytosed, while the ANPs entered cells through fluid-phase endocytosis in a lower internalization degree. The ANPs and CNPs were shown to be co-localized with a specific lysosomal marker, thus confirming their presence in lysosomes. We showed that tailoring the surface charge of the nanoparticles has a great impact on their internalization.

  7. Effect of surface charge on the cellular uptake of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Slavko; Rojnik, Matija; Romih, Rok; Jagodič, Marko; Kos, Janko; Makovec, Darko

    2012-10-01

    We report on the nanoparticle uptake into MCF10A neoT and PC-3 cells using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the nanoparticles' surface charge on the uptake efficiency. The surface of the superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles was modified using amino functionalization for the positive surface charge (CNPs), and carboxyl functionalization for the negative surface charge (ANPs). The CNPs and ANPs exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 500 μg/cm3 in 24 h. The CNPs, bound to a plasma membrane, were intensely phagocytosed, while the ANPs entered cells through fluid-phase endocytosis in a lower internalization degree. The ANPs and CNPs were shown to be co-localized with a specific lysosomal marker, thus confirming their presence in lysosomes. We showed that tailoring the surface charge of the nanoparticles has a great impact on their internalization.

  8. Phase transitions to dipolar clusters and charge density waves in high T{sub c} superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarela, M., E-mail: Mikko.Saarela@oulu.fi [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Kusmartsev, F.V. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    We show that doping of hole charge carriers leads to formation of electric dipolar clusters in cuprates. They are created by many-body interactions between the dopant ion outside and holes inside the CuO planes. Because of the two-fold degeneracy holes in the CuO plane cluster into four-particles resonance valence bond plaquettes bound with dopant ions. Such dipoles may order into charge-density waves (CDW) or stripes or form a disordered state depending on doping and temperature. The lowest energy of the ordered system corresponds to a local anti-ferroelectric ordering. The mobility of individual disordered dipoles is very low at low temperatures and they prefer first to bind into dipole-dipole pairs. Electromagnetic radiation interacts strongly with electric dipoles and when the sample is subjected to it the mobility changes significantly. This leads to a fractal growth of dipolar clusters. The existence of electric dipoles and CDW induce two phase transitions with increasing temperature, melting of the ordered state and disappearance of the dipolar state. Ferroelectricity at low doping is a natural consequence of such dipole moments. We develop a theory based on two-level systems and dipole-dipole interaction to explain the behavior of the polarization as a function of temperature and electric field.

  9. Charge density waves and local states in quasi-one-dimensional mixed valence inorganic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradson, S.D.; Stroud, M.A.; Zietlow, M.H.; Swanson, B.I.; Baeriswyl, D.; Bishop, A.R.

    1987-10-01

    The ground state structures and local states associated with chemical defects in quasi-one-dimensional halogen (X) bridged transition metal (M) mixed valence solids of MX and MMX type have been studied. An adiabatic Hartree-Fock theoretical framework is presented and representative members are classified. The MX materials provide a class whose strong electron-phonon coupling usually favors a charge-density-wave (CDW) ground state. However, the coupling strength can be chemically tuned (e.g., by extension to MMX systems) or altered by pressure, driving the ground state structures towards, e.g., a bond-order-wave (BOW) phase. Electron-phonon driven self-trapped states are expected in both the CDW or BOW regimes. Resonance Raman spectra of the MMX solid K 4 (Pt 2 (P 2 O 5 H 2 ) 4 Cl)·H 2 O show, in addition to the homogeneous ground state modes, sharp new features with excitation profiles shifted to the red of the intervalence-charge-transfer (IVCT) band. We attribute these new bands to a local polaron state formed by oxidation of the Pt 2 Cl chain by a chemical defect. The observed spectral characteristics of this local state are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. (author). 28 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  10. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  11. Charge Retention by Monodisperse Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant; Priest, Thomas; Laskin, Julia

    2012-02-01

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Gold clusters were synthesized in methanol solution by reduction of a gold precursor with a weak reducing agent in the presence of a diphosphine capping ligand. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) it is demonstrated that the cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a fluorinated self assembled monolayer on gold. In contrast, when deposited onto carboxylic acid terminated and conventional alkyl thiol surfaces on gold the clusters exhibit larger relative abundances of the 2+ and 1+ charge states, respectively. The kinetics of charge reduction on the surface have been investigated using in-situ Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance SIMS. It is shown that an extremely slow interfacial charge reduction occurs on the fluorinated monolayer surface while an almost instantaneous neutralization takes place on the surface of the alkyl thiol monolayer. Our results demonstrate that the size and charge state of small gold clusters on surfaces, both of which exert a dramatic influence on their chemical and physical properties, may be tuned through soft landing of mass-selected ions onto selected substrates.

  12. Cryogenic germanium detectors for dark matter search: Surface events rejection by charge measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broniatowski, A.; Censier, B.; Juillard, A.; Berge, L.

    2006-01-01

    Test experiments have been performed on a Ge detector of the Edelweiss collaboration, combining time-resolved acquisition of the ionization signals with heat measurements. Pulse-shape analysis of the charge signals demonstrates the capability to reject surface events of poor charge collection with energies larger than 50 keV in ionization

  13. Adhesion of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Charged Surfaces and Diagnostics Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorse, Diane; Dhinojwala, Ali; Moore, Francisco

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) causes more than 1 million deaths annually. Smear microscopy is a primary rapid detection tool in areas where 95 % of PTB cases occur. This technique, in which the sputum of a symptomatic patient is stained and examined using a light microscope for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) shows sensitivity between 20 and 60 %. Insufficient bacterial isolation during sample preparation may be a reason for low sensitivity. We are optimizing a system to capture bacteria on the basis of electrostatic interactions to more thoroughly isolate bacteria from suspension and facilitate more accurate detection. Silica supports coated with positively-charged polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), captured approximately 4.1 times more Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism for MTB, than was captured on negatively-charged silica substrates. Future experimentation will employ branched polymer systems and seek to justify the use of colloidal stability theories to describe initial capture. Supported by University of Akron, Department of Polymer Science, Department of Biology; LORD Corporation.

  14. Direct Visualization of Orbital Flipping in Volborthite by Charge Density Analysis Using Detwinned Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kento; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujii, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Takafumi; Katayama, Naoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Sawa, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    The distribution of d-orbital valence electrons in volborthite [Cu3V2O7(OH)2 • 2H2O] was investigated by charge density analysis of the multipole model refinement. Diffraction data were obtained by synchrotron radiation single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. Data reduction by detwinning of the multiple structural domains was performed using our developed software. In this study, using high-quality data, we demonstrated that the water molecules in volborthite can be located by the hydrogen bonding in cavities that consist of Kagome lattice layers of CuO4(OH)2 and pillars of V2O7. Final multipole refinements before and after the structural phase transition directly visualized the deformation electron density of the valence electrons. We successfully directly visualized the orbital flipping of the d-orbital dx2-y2, which is the highest level of 3d orbitals occupied by d9 electrons in volborthite. The developed techniques and software can be employed for investigations of structural properties of systems with multiple structural domains.

  15. Synchrotron X-Ray Charge-Density Study of Coordination Polymer (Mn(HCOO)2(H2O)2)∞

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Rasmus D.; Jorgensen, Mads R.V.; Overgaard, Jacob; Larsen, Finn K.; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Graber, Timothy; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Iversen, Bo B.

    2007-01-01

    Three high-quality single-crystal X-ray diffraction data sets have been measured under very different conditions on a structurally simple, but magnetically complex, coordination polymer, (Mn(HCOO) 2 (H 2 O) 2 )∞ (1). The first data set is a conventional 100(2) K Mo Kα data set, the second is a very high resolution 100(2) K data set measured on a second-generation synchrotron source, while the third data set was measured with a tiny crystal on a high brilliance third-generation synchrotron source at 16(2) K. Furthermore, the magnetic susceptibility (χ) and the heat capacity (C p ) have been measured from 2 to 300 K on pressed powder. The charge density of 1 was determined from multipole modeling of the experimental structure factors, and overall there is good agreement between the densities obtained separately from the three data sets. When considering the fine density features, the two 100 K data sets agree well with each other, but show small differences to the 16 K data set. Comparison with ab initio theory suggests that the 16 K APS data set provides the most accurate density. Topological analysis of the metal-ligand bonding, experimental 3d orbital populations on the Mn atoms, and Bader atomic charges indicate quite ionic, high-spin metal atoms. This picture is supported by the effective moment estimated from the magnetization measurements (5.840(2)μ B ), but it is at variance with earlier spin density measurements from polarized neutron diffraction. The magnetic ordering originates from superexchange involving covalent interactions with the ligands, and non-ionic effects are observed in the static deformation density maps as well as in plots of the valence shell charge concentrations. Overall, the present study provides a benchmark charge density that can be used in comparison with future metal formate dihydrate charge densities.

  16. Synchrotron X-ray charge-density study of coordination polymer [Mn(HCOO)2(H2O)2]infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Rasmus D; Jørgensen, Mads R V; Overgaard, Jacob; Larsen, Finn K; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Graber, Timothy; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Iversen, Bo B

    2007-01-01

    Three high-quality single-crystal X-ray diffraction data sets have been measured under very different conditions on a structurally simple, but magnetically complex, coordination polymer, [Mn(HCOO)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](infinity) (1). The first data set is a conventional 100(2) K Mo(Kalpha) data set, the second is a very high resolution 100(2) K data set measured on a second-generation synchrotron source, while the third data set was measured with a tiny crystal on a high brilliance third-generation synchrotron source at 16(2) K. Furthermore, the magnetic susceptibility (chi) and the heat capacity (C(p)) have been measured from 2 to 300 K on pressed powder. The charge density of 1 was determined from multipole modeling of the experimental structure factors, and overall there is good agreement between the densities obtained separately from the three data sets. When considering the fine density features, the two 100 K data sets agree well with each other, but show small differences to the 16 K data set. Comparison with ab initio theory suggests that the 16 K APS data set provides the most accurate density. Topological analysis of the metal-ligand bonding, experimental 3d orbital populations on the Mn atoms, and Bader atomic charges indicate quite ionic, high-spin metal atoms. This picture is supported by the effective moment estimated from the magnetization measurements (5.840(2) mu(B)), but it is at variance with earlier spin density measurements from polarized neutron diffraction. The magnetic ordering originates from superexchange involving covalent interactions with the ligands, and non-ionic effects are observed in the static deformation density maps as well as in plots of the valence shell charge concentrations. Overall, the present study provides a benchmark charge density that can be used in comparison with future metal formate dihydrate charge densities.

  17. Parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations of lysozyme orientation on charged surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yun; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the parallel tempering Monte Carlo (PTMC) algorithm is applied to accurately and efficiently identify the global-minimum-energy orientation of a protein adsorbed on a surface in a single simulation. When applying the PTMC method to simulate lysozyme orientation on charged surfaces, it is found that lysozyme could easily be adsorbed on negatively charged surfaces with "side-on" and "back-on" orientations. When driven by dominant electrostatic interactions, lysozyme tends to be adsorbed on negatively charged surfaces with the side-on orientation for which the active site of lysozyme faces sideways. The side-on orientation agrees well with the experimental results where the adsorbed orientation of lysozyme is determined by electrostatic interactions. As the contribution from van der Waals interactions gradually dominates, the back-on orientation becomes the preferred one. For this orientation, the active site of lysozyme faces outward, which conforms to the experimental results where the orientation of adsorbed lysozyme is co-determined by electrostatic interactions and van der Waals interactions. It is also found that despite of its net positive charge, lysozyme could be adsorbed on positively charged surfaces with both "end-on" and back-on orientations owing to the nonuniform charge distribution over lysozyme surface and the screening effect from ions in solution. The PTMC simulation method provides a way to determine the preferred orientation of proteins on surfaces for biosensor and biomaterial applications.

  18. The RF charge pump technique for measuring the interface state density on leaky dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; de Vries, Hendrikus; Vries, Henk; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work the RF charge pump technique is presented. It is shown that this technique can rovide charge pump data of devices that have a leakage current too high for classical charge pump measurements. The methodology of accurately performing RF charge pump measurements is discussed and

  19. Charge pumping at radio frequencies [MOSFET device interface state density measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasse, G.T.; de Vries, Hendrikus; de Vries, H.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, for the first time, charge pump results are shown that are obtained at frequencies in the GHz range. A comparison is made with charge pump results at lower frequencies. A very good agreement is seen between the low frequency charge pump data and the RF charge pump data. Measurement

  20. Research of the Ion Current Density Influence on the Glass-Ceramics Surface Defects Forming under Ion-Beam Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Pozdnyakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of modern optics is primarily determined by manufacturing accuracy of the working surfaces of optical parts. Therefore, at the last stage of manufacturing optical parts the ion-beam treatment is applied. This method uses spraying the high-energy ions of heavy gases on the surface of a solid body. After an intense ion treatment there are microscopic defects, resembling chips, on the surface of polycrystalline glass. The aim of this work is to study distribution of the surface density of defects by sizes, depending on the density of ion current.Accelerator with an anode layer and a focused ion beam was used as an ion source. The accelerator worked on argon and created ion beam with Gaussian distribution of current density along the radius. The excess positive charge of the ion beam was compensated owing to ionization of residual gas. To eliminate the influence of slow ions with peripheral regions of the ion beam, the etching was performed through a circular aperture with a diameter of 40 mm.Surface treatment of the sample was carried out at the discharge voltage of 3800 V and current of 50 mA for 30 min. The maximum ion current density on the sample surface was 20.2 A/m2 and a power density was of 5.4·104 W/m2 .Distribution of defects by size was measured in three areas of the treated surface corresponding to different densities of ion current, namely: 20.2 A/m2 , 11.3A/m2 , and 3.4 A/m2 . Their number per area unit defines a density of defects.The results show that with increasing ion current density the density of defects on the surface of polycrystalline glass decreases. Thus a view of distribution function of defect density according to size is changed: density of small defects is reduced, and density of large ones increases. Also with increasing ion current density is observed an increase in the size of defects: a 6 times increase of the average size of defects results in 1.6 times increasing ion current density.These data will

  1. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram Harold; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Sîretanu, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the

  2. The influence of spherical cavity surface charge distribution on the sequence of partial discharge events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illias, Hazlee A [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chen, George; Lewin, Paul L, E-mail: h.illias@um.edu.my [Tony Davies High Voltage Laboratory, School of Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-22

    In this work, a model representing partial discharge (PD) behaviour of a spherical cavity within a homogeneous dielectric material has been developed to study the influence of cavity surface charge distribution on the electric field distribution in both the cavity and the material itself. The charge accumulation on the cavity surface after a PD event and charge movement along the cavity wall under the influence of electric field magnitude and direction has been found to affect the electric field distribution in the whole cavity and in the material. This in turn affects the likelihood of any subsequent PD activity in the cavity and the whole sequence of PD events. The model parameters influencing cavity surface charge distribution can be readily identified; they are the cavity surface conductivity, the inception field and the extinction field. Comparison of measurement and simulation results has been undertaken to validate the model.

  3. Influence of nanopore surface charge and magnesium ion on polyadenosine translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Coulon, Pierre Eugène; Bechelany, Mikhael; Cambedouzou, Julien; Janot, Jean-Marc; Balme, Sebastien

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the influence of a nanopore surface state and the addition of Mg(2+) on poly-adenosine translocation. To do so, two kinds of nanopores with a low aspect ratio (diameter ∼3-5 nm, length 30 nm) were tailored: the first one with a negative charge surface and the second one uncharged. It was shown that the velocity and the energy barrier strongly depend on the nanopore surface. Typically if the nanopore and polyA exhibit a similar charge, the macromolecule velocity increases and its global energy barrier of entrance in the nanopore decreases, as opposed to the non-charged nanopore. Moreover, the addition of a divalent chelating cation induces an increase of energy barrier of entrance, as expected. However, for a negative nanopore, this effect is counterbalanced by the inversion of the surface charge induced by the adsorption of divalent cations.

  4. Mapping Charge Carrier Density in Organic Thin-Film Transistors by Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Lifetime Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Liu, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    The device performance of organic transistors is strongly influenced by the charge carrier distribution. A range of factors effect this distribution, including injection barriers at the metal-semiconductor interface, the morphology of the organic film, and charge traps at the dielectric/organic i......The device performance of organic transistors is strongly influenced by the charge carrier distribution. A range of factors effect this distribution, including injection barriers at the metal-semiconductor interface, the morphology of the organic film, and charge traps at the dielectric....../organic interface or at grain boundaries. In our comprehensive experimental and analytical work we demonstrate a method to characterize the charge carrier density in organic thin-film transistors using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We developed a numerical model that describes the electrical...

  5. Small scale density variations of electrons and charged particles in the vicinity of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present small scale variations of electron number densities and particle charge number densities measured in situ in the presence of polar mesosphere summer echoes. It turns out that the small scale fluctuations of electrons and negatively charged particles show a strong anticorrelation down to the smallest scales observed. Comparing these small scale structures with the simultaneously measured radar signal to noise profile, we find that the radar profile is well described by the power spectral density of both electrons and charged particles at the radar half wavelength (=the Bragg scale. Finally, we consider the shape of the power spectra of the observed plasma fluctuations and find that both charged particles and electrons show spectra that can be explained in terms of either neutral air turbulence acting on the distribution of a low diffusivity tracer or the fossil remnants of a formerly active turbulent region. All these results are consistent with the theoretical ideas by Rapp and Lübken (2003 suggesting that PMSE can be explained by a combination of active and fossil neutral air turbulence acting on the large and heavy charged aerosol particles which are subsequently mirrored in the electron number density distribution that becomes visible to a VHF radar when small scale fluctuations are present.

  6. The surface chemistry of divalent metal carbonate minerals; a critical assessment of surface charge and potential data using the charge distribution multi-site ion complexation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation or CD–MUSIC modeling approach is used to describe the chemical structure of carbonate mineralaqueous solution interfaces. The new model extends existing surface complexation models of carbonate minerals, by including atomic scale information on

  7. Interfacial Tension and Surface Pressure of High Density Lipoprotein, Low Density Lipoprotein, and Related Lipid Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O. H. S.; Lamberg, A.; Lehtivaara, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets play a central role in energy storage and metabolism on a cellular scale. Their core is comprised of hydrophobic lipids covered by a surface region consisting of amphiphilic lipids and proteins. For example, high and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL, respectively....... Here we use coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations to consider a number of related issues by calculating the interfacial tension in protein-free lipid droplets, and in HDL and LDL particles mimicking physiological conditions. First, our results suggest that the curvature dependence...

  8. Studies of the pressure dependence of the charge density distribution in cerium phosphide by the maximum-entropy method

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimatsu, N; Takata, M; Nishibori, E; Sakata, M; Hayashi, J; Shirotani, I; Shimomura, O

    2002-01-01

    The physical properties relating to 4f electrons in cerium phosphide, especially the temperature dependence and the isomorphous transition that occurs at around 10 GPa, were studied by means of x-ray powder diffraction and charge density distribution maps derived by the maximum-entropy method. The compressibility of CeP was exactly determined using a helium pressure medium and the anomaly that indicated the isomorphous transition was observed in the compressibility. We also discuss the anisotropic charge density distribution of Ce ions and its temperature dependence.

  9. Strain Tuning of the Charge Density Wave in Monolayer and Bilayer 1T-TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2015-12-07

    By first-principles calculations, we investigate the strain effects on the charge density wave states of monolayer and bilayer 1T-TaS2. The modified stability of the charge density wave in the monolayer is understood in terms of the strain dependent electron localization, which determines the distortion amplitude. On the other hand, in the bilayer the effect of strain on the interlayer interaction is also crucial. The rich phase diagram under strain opens new venues for applications of 1T-TaS2. We interpret the experimentally observed insulating state of bulk 1T-TaS2 as inherited from the monolayer by effective interlayer decoupling.

  10. Enterococcus faecalis strains show culture heterogeneity in cell surface charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Annet; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Waar, K; Krom, BP

    Adhesion of micro-organisms to biotic and abiotic surfaces is an important virulence factor and involves different types of interactions. Enterococcus faecalis, a human commensal and an important opportunistic pathogen, has the ability to adhere to surfaces. Biliary stents frequently become clogged

  11. Unipolar charging of nanoparticles by the Surface-discharge Microplasma Aerosol Charger (SMAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon-Bark; Sakurai, Hiromu; Seto, Takafumi

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a novel unipolar charger for nanoparticles, a system that achieves low particle loss and high charging efficiency without the use of sheath air. The efficient unipolar charging of the system is realized mainly by the surface-discharge microplasma unit, a device previously applied with good success to the neutralization or charging of submicron particles [Kwon et al., 2005, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 39, 987-1001; 2006, J. Aerosol Sci., 37, 483-499]. The unipolar charger generates unipolar ions using the surface discharge of a single electrode with a DC pulse supply. This marks an advance from our previous method of generating bipolar ions with the use of dual electrodes in earlier studies. We evaluated the efficiency of the penetration (or loss) and charging of nanoparticles in the size range of 3-15 nm, then compared the charging efficiencies measured with those predicted by diffusion charging theory. More than 90% of inlet nanoparticles penetrated the charger (less than 10% of the particle were lost) without the use of sheath air. Other chargers have only realized this high penetration efficiency by relying on sheath air flow. Moreover, the measured charging efficiencies agreed well with those predicted by diffusion charging theory and were somewhat higher and more size-dependent than the charging efficiencies of other nanoparticle chargers.

  12. Unipolar charging of nanoparticles by the Surface-discharge Microplasma Aerosol Charger (SMAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Soon-Bark [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Environment and Fire Control Research Team (Korea, Republic of); Sakurai, Hiromu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, National Metrology Institute of Japan (Japan); Seto, Takafumi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute (Japan)], E-mail: t.seto@aist.go.jp

    2007-08-15

    In this paper, we report the development of a novel unipolar charger for nanoparticles, a system that achieves low particle loss and high charging efficiency without the use of sheath air. The efficient unipolar charging of the system is realized mainly by the surface-discharge microplasma unit, a device previously applied with good success to the neutralization or charging of submicron particles [Kwon et al., 2005, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 39, 987-1001; 2006, J. Aerosol Sci., 37, 483-499]. The unipolar charger generates unipolar ions using the surface discharge of a single electrode with a DC pulse supply. This marks an advance from our previous method of generating bipolar ions with the use of dual electrodes in earlier studies. We evaluated the efficiency of the penetration (or loss) and charging of nanoparticles in the size range of 3-15 nm, then compared the charging efficiencies measured with those predicted by diffusion charging theory. More than 90% of inlet nanoparticles penetrated the charger (less than 10% of the particle were lost) without the use of sheath air. Other chargers have only realized this high penetration efficiency by relying on sheath air flow. Moreover, the measured charging efficiencies agreed well with those predicted by diffusion charging theory and were somewhat higher and more size-dependent than the charging efficiencies of other nanoparticle chargers.

  13. Unipolar charging of nanoparticles by the Surface-discharge Microplasma Aerosol Charger (SMAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Soon-Bark; Sakurai, Hiromu; Seto, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a novel unipolar charger for nanoparticles, a system that achieves low particle loss and high charging efficiency without the use of sheath air. The efficient unipolar charging of the system is realized mainly by the surface-discharge microplasma unit, a device previously applied with good success to the neutralization or charging of submicron particles [Kwon et al., 2005, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 39, 987-1001; 2006, J. Aerosol Sci., 37, 483-499]. The unipolar charger generates unipolar ions using the surface discharge of a single electrode with a DC pulse supply. This marks an advance from our previous method of generating bipolar ions with the use of dual electrodes in earlier studies. We evaluated the efficiency of the penetration (or loss) and charging of nanoparticles in the size range of 3-15 nm, then compared the charging efficiencies measured with those predicted by diffusion charging theory. More than 90% of inlet nanoparticles penetrated the charger (less than 10% of the particle were lost) without the use of sheath air. Other chargers have only realized this high penetration efficiency by relying on sheath air flow. Moreover, the measured charging efficiencies agreed well with those predicted by diffusion charging theory and were somewhat higher and more size-dependent than the charging efficiencies of other nanoparticle chargers

  14. Control of single-electron charging of metallic nanoparticles onto amorphous silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Martin; Gmucová, Katarína; Nádazdy, Vojtech; Capek, Ignác; Satka, Alexander; Kopáni, Martin; Cirák, Július; Majková, Eva

    2008-11-01

    Sequential single-electron charging of iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in oleic acid/oleyl amine envelope and deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto Pt electrode covered with undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon film is reported. Single-electron charging (so-called quantized double-layer charging) of nanoparticles is detected by cyclic voltammetry as current peaks and the charging effect can be switched on/off by the electric field in the surface region induced by the excess of negative/positive charged defect states in the amorphous silicon layer. The particular charge states in amorphous silicon are created by the simultaneous application of a suitable bias voltage and illumination before the measurement. The influence of charged states on the electric field in the surface region is evaluated by the finite element method. The single-electron charging is analyzed by the standard quantized double layer model as well as two weak-link junctions model. Both approaches are in accordance with experiment and confirm single-electron charging by tunnelling process at room temperature. This experiment illustrates the possibility of the creation of a voltage-controlled capacitor for nanotechnology.

  15. Molecular-scale model for the mass density of electrolyte solutions bound by clay surfaces: application to bentonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalvès, J; Rousseau-Gueutin, P

    2008-04-15

    A model to simulate the density of solutions adsorbed onto clay mineral surfaces is proposed. In this model, the alteration of the ionic distribution caused by the electric field associated with the surface charge of clay platelets is accounted for using an electrical triple-layer model with an overlapping diffuse layer. The combined effects of ion hydration and the electric field on the structure of water are introduced through their influence on the partial molar volume of water. This model, applied to Na-montmorillonite, simulates the distribution of the interplatelet solution density as a function of the distance to the mineral surface. High densities in the direct vicinity of the surface and slightly lower density (a few percent) than the normal density in the diffuse layer are obtained. These results show good consistency with the available data on bentonite and with the densities that can be inferred from molecular dynamics simulations. This model shows that the interplatelet distance plays an important role in the distribution of the mass density of the solution in the pore space of clay rocks.

  16. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA; Luican-Mayer, Adina [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada; Bhattacharya, Anand [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2017-11-27

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW! NCCDW transition.

  17. Biofouling in membrane bioreactors: nexus between polyacrylonitrile surface charge and community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbelia, Lisendra; Hernalsteens, Marie-Aline; Ilyas, Shazia; Öztürk, Basak; Szymczyk, Anthony; Springael, Dirk; Vankelecom, Ivo

    2018-02-15

    The influence of membrane surface charge on biofouling community composition during activated sludge filtration in a membrane bioreactor was investigated in this study using polyacrylonitrile-based membranes. Membranes with different surface properties were synthesized by phase inversion followed by a layer-by-layer modification. Various characterization results showed that the membranes differed only in their surface chemical composition and charge, ie two of them were negative, one neutral and one positive. Membrane fouling experiments were performed for 40 days and the biofouling communities were analyzed. PCR-DGGE fingerprinting indicated selective enrichment of bacterial populations from the sludge suspension within the biofilms at any time point. The biofilm community composition seemed to change with time. However, no difference was observed between the biofilm community of differently charged membranes at specific time points. It could be concluded that membrane charges do not play a decisive role in the long-term selection of the key bacterial foulants.

  18. Dynamics of surface screening charges on domains of BiFeO3 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-xing Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of surface screening charges on BiFeO3 films with pre-written stripe domains was studied with surface potential measurements by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy. The screening effect decays exponentially over time, and this decay is slower in the arrays with wider domains or larger intervals of domains, indicating that the in-plane diffusion of the surface screening charges plays a major role in the decay dynamics. The good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results based on diffusion-drift model confirms the mechanism of in-plane diffusion of the screening charges in the decay dynamics. Our work could provide a pathway to control the data stability of charge storage by artificially designing the ferroelectric domains.

  19. Lateral phase drift of the topological charge density in stochastic optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The statistical distributions of optical vortices or topological charge in stochastic optical fields can be inhomogeneous in both transverse directions. Such two-dimensional inhomogeneous vortex or topological charge distributions evolve in a...

  20. Incommensurate Phonon Anomaly and the Nature of Charge Density Waves in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, H.; Ishikawa, D.; Heid, R.; Le Tacon, M.; Fabbris, G.; Meyers, D.; Gu, G. D.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Dean, M. P. M.

    2018-01-01

    While charge density wave (CDW) instabilities are ubiquitous to superconducting cuprates, the different ordering wave vectors in various cuprate families have hampered a unified description of the CDW formation mechanism. Here, we investigate the temperature dependence of the low-energy phonons in the canonical CDW-ordered cuprate La1.875 Ba0.125 CuO4 . We discover that the phonon softening wave vector associated with CDW correlations becomes temperature dependent in the high-temperature precursor phase and changes from a wave vector of 0.238 reciprocal lattice units (r.l.u.) below the ordering transition temperature to 0.3 r.l.u. at 300 K. This high-temperature behavior shows that "214"-type cuprates can host CDW correlations at a similar wave vector to previously reported CDW correlations in non-214-type cuprates such as YBa2 Cu3 O6 +δ . This indicates that cuprate CDWs may arise from the same underlying instability despite their apparently different low-temperature ordering wave vectors.

  1. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures...... at B∼15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry...... remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ∼ 0.123, we find that a field (B∼10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction...

  2. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  3. Recent Advances in Two-Dimensional Materials with Charge Density Waves: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mongur Hossain

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two-dimensional (2D charge density wave (CDW materials have attracted extensive interest due to potential applications as high performance functional nanomaterials. As other 2D materials, 2D CDW materials are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into layers of single unit cell thickness. Although bulk CDW materials have been studied for decades, recent developments in nanoscale characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities allowing applications such as oscillators, electrodes in supercapacitors, energy storage and conversion, sensors and spinelectronic devices. In this review, we first outline the synthesis techniques of 2D CDW materials including mechanical exfoliation, liquid exfoliation, chemical vapor transport (CVT, chemical vapor deposition (CVD, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE and electrochemical exfoliation. Then, the characterization procedure of the 2D CDW materials such as temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, temperature-dependent resistivity, magnetic susceptibility and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are reviewed. Finally, applications of 2D CDW materials are reviewed.

  4. Assessment of fixed charge density in regenerated cartilage by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Furukawa, Katsuko; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Applying regenerated cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of cartilage tissue. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage is well accepted and has been applied clinically in recent years. We attempt to establish a noninvasive method to evaluate the maturity of regenerated cartilage tissue using gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. To reconstruct cartilaginous tissue, we embedded articular chondrocytes harvested from bovine humeral head in agarose gel and cultured the cells in vitro up to 4 weeks. The fixed charge density (FCD) of the cartilage was determined using MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content was determined by dimethylmethylene blue dye-binding assay. The sGAG content and FCD of the regenerated cartilage increased with duration of culture. In the T 1 Gd maps, the [Gd-DTPA 2- ] in the specimen decreased, and the boundary between the sample disk and the bath solution of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) became clearer as time in culture increased. In the linear regression analysis, FCD and sGAG content correlated significantly. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging measurements can be useful predictors of the degree of cartilaginous tissue formation. (author)

  5. Microwave modification of surface hydroxyl density for g-C3N4 with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Na; Zhao, Yang; Mao, Zhiyong; Agrawal, Dinesh Kumar; Wang, Dajian

    2018-03-01

    Microwave modification was performed on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) photocatalysts to tail the surface hydroxyl content for enhanced photocatalytic activity in this work. The influence of microwave heating on the surface hydroxyl density was investigated by a suite of characterization methods. The microwave treated g-C3N4 (MT-g-C3N4) delivered a higher photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation than pristine g-C3N4 due to its improved separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carries and promoted absorption capacity of RhB reactants on surface, which resulted from the increased surface hydroxyl density induced by microwave treatment. This study provides a simple and convenient method to modify g-C3N4 materials with enhanced photocatalytic activity for the potential application in photocatalytic elimination of environmental pollutants.

  6. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettenis, M.M.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  7. Higgs-mode radiance and charge-density-wave order in 2 H -NbSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, Romain; Cea, Tommaso; Gallais, Yann; Cazayous, Maximilien; Sacuto, Alain; Cario, Laurent; Benfatto, Lara; Méasson, Marie-Aude

    2018-03-01

    Despite being usually considered two competing phenomena, charge-density wave and superconductivity coexist in few systems, the most emblematic one being the transition-metal dichalcogenide 2 H -NbSe2 . This unusual condition is responsible for specific Raman signatures across the two phase transitions in this compound. While the appearance of a soft phonon mode is a well-established fingerprint of the charge-density-wave order, the nature of the sharp subgap mode emerging below the superconducting temperature is still under debate. In this work we use external pressure as a knob to unveil the delicate interplay between the two orders, and consequently the nature of the superconducting mode. Thanks to an advanced extreme-conditions Raman technique, we are able to follow the pressure evolution and the simultaneous collapse of the two intertwined charge-density-wave and superconducting modes. The comparison with microscopic calculations in a model system supports the Higgs-type nature of the superconducting mode and suggests that charge-density wave and superconductivity in 2 H -NbSe2 involve mutual electronic degrees of freedom. These findings fill the knowledge gap on the electronic mechanisms at play in transition-metal dichalcogenides, a crucial step to fully exploit their properties in few-layer systems optimized for device applications.

  8. Charge density wave and superconductivity in 2H-and 4H-NbSe2: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Good-quality hexagonal NbSe2 single crystals were prepared. In 2H-NbSe2, superconducting and charge density wave (CDW) transitions were found at = 7.4 K and = 35 K respectively as reported previously. We have noticed that these two transitions are changed to = 42 K and = 6.5 K, in 4H-NbSe2.

  9. Transmission and reflection of charge-density wave packets in a quantum Hall edge controlled by a metal gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Masahiro; Mano, Takaaki; Noda, Takeshi; Shibata, Naokazu; Hotta, Masahiro; Yusa, Go

    2018-02-01

    Quantum energy teleportation (QET) is a proposed protocol related to quantum vacuum. The edge channels in a quantum Hall system are well suited for the experimental verification of QET. For this purpose, we examine a charge-density wave packet excited and detected by capacitively coupled front gate electrodes. We observe the waveform of the charge packet, which is proportional to the time derivative of the applied square voltage wave. Further, we study the transmission and reflection behaviors of the charge-density wave packet by applying a voltage to another front gate electrode to control the path of the edge state. We show that the threshold voltages where the dominant direction is switched in either transmission or reflection for dense and sparse wave packets are different from the threshold voltage where the current stops flowing in an equilibrium state.

  10. Deduction of edge electron density with multiply charged ions in ORNL volume-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, H-J; Woo, H-J; Chung, K-S; Liu, Y; Meyer, F W; Lho, T; Lee, M-J

    2008-02-01

    The electron densities in the argon plasmas of the ORNL 6 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a flat central magnetic field have been deduced from the ion branches of the electric probe current-voltage curves measured in the edge region of the plasmas. To overcome the difficulties due to unknown velocities of multiply charged ions at the sheath edge, a modified generalized Bohm criterion for the ion sheath velocity is introduced and the mean velocity of all ionic charge states at the sheath edge is assumed to be equal to the sound velocity of the system of particles. The calculated electron densities and temperatures for different plasmas optimized for four charge state distributions are discussed.

  11. Interaction of singly and multiply charged ions with a lithium-fluoride surface

    CERN Document Server

    Wirtz, L

    2001-01-01

    Charge transfer between slow ions and an ionic crystal surface still poses a considerable challenge to theory due to the intrinsic many-body character of the system. For the neutralization of multiply charged ions in front of metal surfaces, the Classical Over the Barrier (COB) model is a widely used tool. We present an extension of this model to ionic crystal surfaces where the localization of valence electrons at the anion sites and the lack of cylindrical symmetry of the ion-surface system impede a simple analytical estimate of electron transfer rates. We use a classical trajectory Monte Carlo approach to calculate electron transfer rates for different charge states of the projectile ion. With these rates we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the neutralization of slow Ne10+ ions in vertical incidence on an LiF surface. Capture of one or several electrons may lead to a local positive charge up of the surface. The projectile dynamics depends on the balance between the repulsion due to this charge and the a...

  12. X-ray emission in slow highly charged ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H; Abe, T; Fujita, Y; Sun, J; Takahashi, S; Tona, M; Yoshiyasu, N; Nakamura, N; Sakurai, M; Yamada, C; Ohtani, S

    2007-01-01

    X-rays emitted in the collisions of highly charged ions with a surface have been measured to investigate dissipation schemes of their potential energies. While 8.1% of the potential energy was dissipated in the collisions of He-like I ions with a W surface, 29.1% has been dissipated in the case of He-like Bi ions. The x-ray emissions play significant roles in the dissipation of the potential energies in the interaction of highly charged heavy ions with the surface

  13. Screening charge localization at LiNbO{sub 3} surface with Schottky junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Takahiro, E-mail: NAGATA.Takahiro@nims.go.jp; Chikyow, Toyohiro [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Kitamura, Kenji [Environment and Energy Materials Division, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2016-04-25

    Screening charge localization was demonstrated by using a Schottky contact with LiNbO{sub 3} (LN). A Cr/LN stack structure with a 2 μm diameter hole array penetrating the Cr layer localized the screening charge of LN in the hole, although the Al/LN stack structure exhibited no surface charge localization behavior. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that Cr formed a Schottky contact with LN, which prevents the screening charge from escaping from the hole arrays. The screening charge localization was enhanced by inserting SiO{sub 2} between the metal and LN, which moved the position of the Fermi level to mid gap.

  14. Charge retention by gold clusters on surfaces prepared using soft landing of mass selected ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grant E; Priest, Thomas; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas phase, and mass selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au(11)L(5)(3+), L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane), which was delivered to surfaces at well-controlled kinetic energies. Using in situ time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), it is demonstrated that the Au(11)L(5)(3+) cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) on gold. In contrast, when deposited onto 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (COOH-SAM) and 1-dodecanethiol (HSAM) surfaces on gold, the clusters exhibit larger relative abundances of the 2+ and 1+ charge states, respectively. The kinetics of charge reduction on the FSAM and HSAM surfaces are investigated using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) SIMS. It is shown that an extremely slow interfacial charge reduction occurs on the FSAM surface while an almost instantaneous neutralization takes place on the surface of the HSAM. Our results demonstrate that the size and charge state of small gold clusters on surfaces, both of which exert a dramatic influence on their chemical and physical properties, may be tuned through soft landing of mass-selected ions onto carefully selected substrates. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Impact of Molecular Orientation and Packing Density on Electronic Polarization in the Bulk and at Surfaces of Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-16

    The polarizable environment surrounding charge carriers in organic semiconductors impacts the efficiency of the charge transport process. Here, we consider two representative organic semiconductors, tetracene and rubrene, and evaluate their polarization energies in the bulk and at the organic-vacuum interface using a polarizable force field that accounts for induced-dipole and quadrupole interactions. Though both oligoacenes pack in a herringbone motif, the tetraphenyl substituents on the tetracene backbone of rubrene alter greatly the nature of the packing. The resulting change in relative orientations of neighboring molecules is found to reduce the bulk polarization energy of holes in rubrene by some 0.3 eV when compared to tetracene. The consideration of model organic-vacuum interfaces highlights the significant variation in the electrostatic environment for a charge carrier at a surface although the net change in polarization energy is small; interestingly, the environment of a charge even just one layer removed from the surface can be viewed already as representative of the bulk. Overall, it is found that in these herringbone-type layered crystals the polarization energy has a much stronger dependence on the intralayer packing density than interlayer packing density.

  16. Insight into induced charges at metal surfaces and biointerfaces using a polarizable Lennard-Jones potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geada, Isidro Lorenzo; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Jamil, Tariq; Sulpizi, Marialore; Heinz, Hendrik

    2018-02-19

    Metallic nanostructures have become popular for applications in therapeutics, catalysts, imaging, and gene delivery. Molecular dynamics simulations are gaining influence to predict nanostructure assembly and performance; however, instantaneous polarization effects due to induced charges in the free electron gas are not routinely included. Here we present a simple, compatible, and accurate polarizable potential for gold that consists of a Lennard-Jones potential and a harmonically coupled core-shell charge pair for every metal atom. The model reproduces the classical image potential of adsorbed ions as well as surface, bulk, and aqueous interfacial properties in excellent agreement with experiment. Induced charges affect the adsorption of ions onto gold surfaces in the gas phase at a strength similar to chemical bonds while ions and charged peptides in solution are influenced at a strength similar to intermolecular bonds. The proposed model can be applied to complex gold interfaces, electrode processes, and extended to other metals.

  17. Zinc surface complexes on birnessite: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison

    2009-01-05

    Biogeochemical cycling of zinc is strongly influenced by sorption on birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which are found in diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments. Zinc has been observed to form both tetrahedral (Zn{sup IV}) and octahedral (Zn{sup VI}) triple-corner-sharing surface complexes (TCS) at Mn(IV) vacancy sites in hexagonal birnessite. The octahedral complex is expected to be similar to that of Zn in the Mn oxide mineral, chalcophanite (ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O), but the reason for the occurrence of the four-coordinate Zn surface species remains unclear. We address this issue computationally using spin-polarized Density Functional Theory (DFT) to examine the Zn{sub IV}-TCS and Zn{sup VI}-TCS species. Structural parameters obtained by DFT geometry optimization were in excellent agreement with available experimental data on Zn-birnessites. Total energy, magnetic moments, and electron-overlap populations obtained by DFT for isolated Zn{sup IV}-TCS revealed that this species is stable in birnessite without a need for Mn(III) substitution in the octahedral sheet and that it is more effective in reducing undersaturation of surface O at a Mn vacancy than is Zn{sub VI}-TCS. Comparison between geometry-optimized ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O (chalcophanite) and the hypothetical monohydrate mineral, ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, which contains only tetrahedral Zn, showed that the hydration state of Zn significantly affects birnessite structural stability. Finally, our study also revealed that, relative to their positions in an ideal vacancy-free MnO{sub 2}, Mn nearest to Zn in a TCS surface complex move toward the vacancy by 0.08-0.11 {angstrom}, while surface O bordering the vacancy move away from it by 0.16-0.21 {angstrom}, in agreement with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses.

  18. Surface treatment of silica nanoparticles for stable and charge-controlled colloidal silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hye Min; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Kim, Tae-il; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Paek, Seung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to control the surface charge of colloidal silica nanoparticles with 20 nm and 100 nm diameters. Untreated silica nanoparticles were determined to be highly negatively charged and have stable hydrodynamic sizes in a wide pH range. To change the surface to a positively charged form, various coating agents, such as amine containing molecules, multivalent metal cation, or amino acids, were used to treat the colloidal silica nanoparticles. Molecules with chelating amine sites were determined to have high affinity with the silica surface to make agglomerations or gel-like networks. Amino acid coatings resulted in relatively stable silica colloids with a modified surface charge. Three amino acid moiety coatings (L-serine, L-histidine, and L-arginine) exhibited surface charge modifying efficacy of L-histidine > L-arginine > L-serine and hydrodynamic size preservation efficacy of L-serine > L-arginine > L-histidine. The time dependent change in L-arginine coated colloidal silica was investigated by measuring the pattern of the backscattered light in a Turbiscan™. The results indicated that both the 20 nm and 100 nm L-arginine coated silica samples were fairly stable in terms of colloidal homogeneity, showing only slight coalescence and sedimentation. PMID:25565824

  19. Dependence of Lunar Surface Charging on Solar Wind Plasma Conditions and Solar Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the pohotoemission of electrons, J(sub p), and the collection of plasma electrons J(sub e) and ions J(sub i). These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n(sub 0), electron temperature T(sub e), ion temperature T(sub i), bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence J(sub P0), and photo electron temperature T(sub p). Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, T(sub e) is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while J(sub P0) and T(sub p) dominate over most of the dayside.

  20. The Natural Charge On The Surface Of The Earth | Mamah | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The natural electric charge or its artificial analogue as the fundamental unit of exploration has been fundamentally derived and compared for both the equatorial region and the polar region. The ratio of the unit charge on the surface of the earth at the equatorial region (ω ± ω0) = 0.59 rad where ω0 = 1.65; to that at the polar ...

  1. Structure and electronic properties of the V 2O 3(0001) surface: ab initio density functional theory cluster studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, I.; Witko, M.; Hermann, K.

    2003-02-01

    Electronic properties of the V 2O 3(0001) surface are studied using ab initio density functional theory method. In addition, the nature of surface V-O bonding as well as the electronic states of the structurally different surface oxygen and vanadium sites are discussed and compared with bulk oxygen/vanadium centers. The (0001) surface of vanadium sesquioxide is modeled using clusters of different size where the three ideal bulk-terminated surfaces, denoted as VV 'O (terminated by a double layer of vanadium atoms), V 'OV (terminated by one layer of V atoms), and OVV ' (terminated by one layer of oxygen atoms), are considered. For these surface terminations electronic properties of various surface and bulk centers are discussed. The results confirm bonding in vanadium sesquioxide as a mixture of ionic and covalent characters. Further, charging of structurally non-equivalent surface vanadium and oxygen sites is found to increase with the corresponding coordination number. Large differences in charging between surface and bulk vanadium atoms are found. In addition, the strong interaction between neighboring vanadium ions are observed.

  2. Surface and charge transport characterization of polyaniline-cellulose acetate composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Asif A; Hyland, Margaret M; Patterson, Darrell A

    2011-02-24

    This study elucidates the charge transport processes of polyaniline (PANI) composite membranes and correlates them to the PANI deposition site and the extent of PANI surface layering on the base microporous membranes. PANI was deposited either as a surface layer or inside the pores of cellulose acetate microporous membranes using various in situ chemical polymerization techniques. The extent of PANI layering at the surface of the base membrane and its oxidation and doping states were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). PANI deposition on the membranes showed a strong dependence on the polymerization technique and polymerization time within a single technique. In XPS, the deconvolution of C 1s and N 1s core-level spectra of the composite membranes was used to quantify the extent of PANI layering at the surface along with its oxidation and doping states. PANI incompletely covered the surface of the base microporous membranes for all the employed techniques. However, the extent of the layering increased with the polymerization time in a particular technique. The charge transport through the bulk membrane and charge transfer at the membrane/electrode interface were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The data were analyzed using the equivalent circuit modeling technique. The modeling parameters revealed that PANI deposition at the surface enhanced the interfacial charge transfer but the process depended on the extent of the surface coverage of the membrane. In addition, the charge transport in the bulk membrane depended on the PANI intercalation level, which varied depending on the polymerization technique employed. In addition, the EIS of electrolyte-soaked membranes was also conducted to evaluate the effects of PANI deposition site on charge transport in the presence of an electrolyte. PANI layering at the pore walls of the base membrane from diaphragmatic polymerization

  3. Adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on [Formula: see text] surface: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedon, M; Spencer, M J S; Yarovsky, I

    2009-04-08

    The adsorption of atomic nitrogen and oxygen on the ([Formula: see text]) crystal face of zinc oxide (ZnO) was studied. Binding energies, workfunction changes, vibrational frequencies, charge density differences and electron localization functions were calculated. It was elucidated that atomic oxygen binds more strongly than nitrogen, with the most stable [Formula: see text] structure exhibiting a binding energy of -2.47 eV, indicating chemisorption onto the surface. Surface reconstructions were observed for the most stable minima of both atomic species. Positive workfunction changes were calculated for both adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen if the adsorbate interacted with zinc atoms. Negative workfunction changes were calculated when the adsorbate interacted with both surface oxygen and zinc atoms. Interactions between the adsorbate and the surface zinc atoms resulted in ionic-type bonding, whereas interactions with oxygen atoms were more likely to result in the formation of covalent-type bonding. The positive workfunction changes correlate with an experimentally observed increase in resistance of ZnO conductometric sensor devices.

  4. Effects of Surface Charges on Dental Implants: Past, Present, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Yan Guo; Jukka Pekka Matinlinna; Alexander Tin Hong Tang

    2012-01-01

    Osseointegration is a major factor influencing the success of dental implantation. To achieve rapid and strong, durable osseointegration, biomaterial researchers have investigated various surface treatment methods for dental subgingival titanium (Ti) implants. This paper focuses on surface-charge modification on the surface of titanium dental implants, which is a relatively new and very promising methodology for improving the implants' osseointegration properties. We give an overview on both ...

  5. Modeling space-charge-limited currents in organic semiconductors: Extracting trap density and mobility

    KAUST Repository

    Dacuña, Javier

    2011-11-28

    We have developed and have applied a mobility edge model that takes drift and diffusion currents to characterize the space-charge-limited current in organic semiconductors into account. The numerical solution of the drift-diffusion equation allows the utilization of asymmetric contacts to describe the built-in potential within the device. The model has been applied to extract information of the distribution of traps from experimental current-voltage measurements of a rubrene single crystal from Krellner showing excellent agreement across several orders of magnitude in the current. Although the two contacts are made of the same metal, an energy offset of 580 meV between them, ascribed to differences in the deposition techniques (lamination vs evaporation) was essential to correctly interpret the shape of the current-voltage characteristics at low voltage. A band mobility of 0.13cm 2V-1s-1 for holes is estimated, which is consistent with transport along the long axis of the orthorhombic unit cell. The total density of traps deeper than 0.1 eV was 2.2×1016cm -3. The sensitivity analysis and error estimation in the obtained parameters show that it is not possible to accurately resolve the shape of the trap distribution for energies deeper than 0.3 eV or shallower than 0.1 eV above the valence-band edge. The total number of traps deeper than 0.3 eV, however, can be estimated. Contact asymmetry and the diffusion component of the current play an important role in the description of the device at low bias and are required to obtain reliable information about the distribution of deep traps. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  6. Comparison of diffusion charging and mobility-based methods for measurement of aerosol agglomerate surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2012-05-01

    We compare different approaches to measure surface area of aerosol agglomerates. The objective was to compare field methods, such as mobility and diffusion charging based approaches, with laboratory approach, such as Brunauer, Emmett, Teller (BET) method used for bulk powder samples. To allow intercomparison of various surface area measurements, we defined 'geometric surface area' of agglomerates (assuming agglomerates are made up of ideal spheres), and compared various surface area measurements to the geometric surface area. Four different approaches for measuring surface area of agglomerate particles in the size range of 60-350 nm were compared using (i) diffusion charging-based sensors from three different manufacturers, (ii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate, (iii) mobility diameter of an agglomerate assuming a linear chain morphology with uniform primary particle size, and (iv) surface area estimation based on tandem mobility-mass measurement and microscopy. Our results indicate that the tandem mobility-mass measurement, which can be applied directly to airborne particles unlike the BET method, agrees well with the BET method. It was also shown that the three diffusion charging-based surface area measurements of silver agglomerates were similar within a factor of 2 and were lower than those obtained from the tandem mobility-mass and microscopy method by a factor of 3-10 in the size range studied. Surface area estimated using the mobility diameter depended on the structure or morphology of the agglomerate with significant underestimation at high fractal dimensions approaching 3.

  7. Investigation of charges carrier density in phosphorus and boron doped SiN{sub x}:H layers for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paviet-Salomon, B., E-mail: bertrand.paviet-salomon@epfl.ch [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire d’Innovation pour les Technologies des Énergies Nouvelles et les nanomatériaux (LITEN), Institut National de l’Énergie Solaire - INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Gall, S. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique (CEA), Laboratoire d’Innovation pour les Technologies des Énergies Nouvelles et les nanomatériaux (LITEN), Institut National de l’Énergie Solaire - INES, 50 avenue du Lac Léman, 73377 Le Bourget du Lac (France); Slaoui, A. [Institut de l’Électronique du Solide et des Systèmes (InESS), Unité Mixte de Recherche 7163 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Université de Strasbourg (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 20 CR, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We investigate the properties of phosphorus and boron-doped silicon nitride films. ► Phosphorus-doped layers yield higher lifetimes than undoped ones. ► The fixed charges density decreases when increasing the films phosphorus content. ► Boron-doped films feature very low lifetimes. ► These doped layers are of particular interest for crystalline silicon solar cells. -- Abstract: Dielectric layers are of major importance in crystalline silicon solar cells processing, especially as anti-reflection coatings and for surface passivation purposes. In this paper we investigate the fixed charge densities (Q{sub fix}) and the effective lifetimes (τ{sub eff}) of phosphorus (P) and boron (B) doped silicon nitride layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. P-doped layers exhibit a higher τ{sub eff} than standard undoped layers. In contrast, B-doped layers exhibit lower τ{sub eff}. A strong Q{sub fix} decrease is to be seen when increasing the P content within the film. Based on numerical simulations we also demonstrate that the passivation obtained with P- and B-doped layers are limited by the interface states rather than by the fixed charges.

  8. Acceptor-compensated charge transport and surface chemical reactions in Au-implanted SnO₂ nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Akash; Sun, Gun-Joo; Choi, Sun-Woo; Hishita, Shunichi; Kulish, Vadym V; Wu, Ping; Kim, Sang Sub

    2014-04-09

    A new deep acceptor state is identified by density functional theory calculations, and physically activated by an Au ion implantation technique to overcome the high energy barriers. And an acceptor-compensated charge transport mechanism that controls the chemical sensing performance of Au-implanted SnO2 nanowires is established. Subsequently, an equation of electrical resistance is set up as a function of the thermal vibrations, structural defects (Au implantation), surface chemistry (1 ppm NO2), and solute concentration. We show that the electrical resistivity is affected predominantly not by the thermal vibrations, structural defects, or solid solution, but the surface chemistry, which is the source of the improved chemical sensing. The response and recovery time of chemical sensing is respectively interpreted from the transport behaviors of major and minor semiconductor carriers. This acceptor-compensated charge transport mechanism provides novel insights not only for sensor development but also for research in charge and chemical dynamics of nano-semiconductors.

  9. Electric Double Layer Composed of an Antagonistic Salt in an Aqueous Mixture: Local Charge Separation and Surface Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke; Onuki, Akira

    2017-09-15

    We examine an electric double layer containing an antagonistic salt in an aqueous mixture, where the cations are small and hydrophilic but the anions are large and hydrophobic. In this situation, a strong coupling arises between the charge density and the solvent composition. As a result, the anions are trapped in an oil-rich adsorption layer on a hydrophobic wall. We then vary the surface charge density σ on the wall. For σ>0 the anions remain accumulated, but for σ<0 the cations are attracted to the wall with increasing |σ|. Furthermore, the electric potential drop Ψ(σ) is nonmonotonic when the solvent interaction parameter χ(T) exceeds a critical value χ_{c} determined by the composition and the ion density in the bulk. This leads to a first-order phase transition between two kinds of electric double layers with different σ and common Ψ. In equilibrium such two-layer regions can coexist. The steric effect due to finite ion sizes is crucial in these phenomena.

  10. Effects of the surface concentration of fixed charges in C18-bonded stationary phases on the adsorption process and on the preparative chromatography of small ionizable compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-11-06

    The effects of the surface concentration of positive charges attached to the surface of research BEH-C 18 hybrid particles on the overloaded band profiles and the adsorption isotherms of a neutral (caffeine) and a positively charged (nortryptilinium hydrochloride) compounds were measured and investigated. The inverse method (IM) of chromatography was used to determine the isotherm parameters. Three columns were packed with endcapped BEH-C 18 particles doped with three different charge densities on their surfaces (LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH). Two other columns packed with unbonded, non-endcapped, and endcapped BEH-C 18 particles served as standard reference materials. Minor disturbance method (MDM) experiments were conducted with acetonitrile/water mixtures in order to assess qualitatively the surface densities of the fixed positive charges. A more quantitative approach based on the solution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the decrease of the experimental Henry constant was also applied. The results show that the surface concentrations of the fixed charges in the LOW, MEDIUM and HIGH columns were 0.029, 0.050, and 0.064μmol/m 2 , e.g., close to two orders of magnitude smaller than the surface density of bonded C 18 chains (2.1μmol/m 2 ). The adsorption isotherm of the ionizable compound nortryptilinium onto the BEH-C 18 columns is consistent with a two-sites adsorption model. The density of the high energy sites correlates directly to the total amount of the fixed charges and isolated silanols amidst the C 18 -bonded chains. The amount of low energy sites reflects the specific surface area of the adsorbent. The binding constants on the high- and low-energy adsorption sites are respectively ten and two times lower on the HIGH column than on the reference endcapped column. The active sites are closer to the adsorbent surface than the weak adsorption sites. Finally, a higher production rate of ionizable compounds can be achieved in preparative

  11. Phase behavior of charged colloids on spherical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Colm; Guerra, Rodrigo; Chaikin, Paul

    For a broad class of 2D materials, the transition from isotropic fluid to crystalline solid is described by the theory of melting due to Kosterlitz, Thouless, Halperin, Nelson and Young. According to this theory, long-range order is achieved via elimination of the topological defects which proliferate in the fluid phase. However, many natural and man-made 2D systems posses spatial curvature and/or non-trivial topology, which require the presence of defects, even at T = 0 . In principle, the presence of these defects could profoundly affect the phase behavior of such a system. In this presentation, we describe experiments and simulations we have performed on repulsive particles which are bound to the surface of a sphere. We observe spatial structures and inhomogeneous dynamics that cannot be captured by the measures traditionally used to describe flat-space phase behavior. We show that ordering is achieved by a novel mechanism: sequestration of topological defects into freely-terminating grain boundaries (``scars''), and simultaneous spatial organization of the scars themselves on the vertices of an icosahedron. The emergence of icosahedral order coincides with the localization of mobility into isolated ``lakes'' of fluid or glassy particles, situated at the icosahedron vertices.

  12. Influence of the projectile charge state on electron emission spectra from a Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Silkin, V. M.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Double differential electron emission distributions produced by grazing impact of fast dressed ions on a Cu(111) surface are investigated focusing on the effects of the electronic band structure. The process is described within the Band-Structure-Based approximation, which is a perturbative method that includes an accurate representation of the electron-surface interaction, incorporating information of the electronic band structure of the solid. Differences in the behavior of the emission spectra for He+ q, Li+ q, Be+ q and C+ q projectiles with different charge states q are explained by the combined effect of the projectile trajectory and the projectile charge distribution.

  13. Adsorption and oxidation of oxalic acid on anatase TiO2 (001) surface: A density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Porun; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-09-15

    Anatase TiO2 (001) surfaces have attracted great interest for photo-degradation of organic species recently due to their high reactivity. In this work, adsorption properties and oxidation mechanisms of oxalic acid on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface have been theoretically investigated using the first-principles density functional theory. Various possible adsorption configurations are considered by diversifying the connectivity of carboxylic groups with the surface. It is found that the adsorption of oxalic acid on the anatase (001) surface prefer the dissociative states. A novel double-bidentate configuration has been found due to the structural match between oxalic acid and the (001) surface. More charge is transferred from the adsorbed oxalic acid to the surface with the double-bidentate configuration when comparing with other adsorption structures. Thus, there is a positive correlation relationship between the transferred charge amount and the interfacial bond numbers when oxalic acid adsorbs on the anatase TiO2 (001) surface. The adsorption energies with dispersion corrections have demonstrated that the van der Waals interactions play an important role in the adsorption, especially when adsorbates are close to the surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Robust doubly charged nodal lines and nodal surfaces in centrosymmetric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzdušek, Tomáš; Sigrist, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    Weyl points in three spatial dimensions are characterized by a Z -valued charge—the Chern number—which makes them stable against a wide range of perturbations. A set of Weyl points can mutually annihilate only if their net charge vanishes, a property we refer to as robustness. While nodal loops are usually not robust in this sense, it has recently been shown using homotopy arguments that in the centrosymmetric extension of the AI symmetry class they nevertheless develop a Z2 charge analogous to the Chern number. Nodal loops carrying a nontrivial value of this Z2 charge are robust, i.e., they can be gapped out only by a pairwise annihilation and not on their own. As this is an additional charge independent of the Berry π -phase flowing along the band degeneracy, such nodal loops are, in fact, doubly charged. In this manuscript, we generalize the homotopy discussion to the centrosymmetric extensions of all Atland-Zirnbauer classes. We develop a tailored mathematical framework dubbed the AZ +I classification and show that in three spatial dimensions such robust and multiply charged nodes appear in four of such centrosymmetric extensions, namely, AZ +I classes CI and AI lead to doubly charged nodal lines, while D and BDI support doubly charged nodal surfaces. We remark that no further crystalline symmetries apart from the spatial inversion are necessary for their stability. We provide a description of the corresponding topological charges, and develop simple tight-binding models of various semimetallic and superconducting phases that exhibit these nodes. We also indicate how the concept of robust and multiply charged nodes generalizes to other spatial dimensions.

  15. Effective charges of ionic liquid determined self-consistently through combination of molecular dynamics simulation and density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2017-11-15

    A self-consistent scheme combining the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and density functional theory (DFT) was recently proposed to incorporate the effects of the charge transfer and polarization of ions into non-poralizable force fields of ionic liquids for improved description of energetics and dynamics. The purpose of the present work is to analyze the detailed setups of the MD/DFT scheme by focusing on how the basis set, exchange-correlation (XC) functional, charge-fitting method or force field for the intramolecular and Lennard-Jones interactions affects the MD/DFT results of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ( [C1mim][NTf2]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium glycinate ( [C2mim][Gly]). It was found that the double-zeta valence polarized or larger size of basis set is required for the convergence of the effective charge of the ion. The choice of the XC functional was further not influential as far as the generalized gradient approximation is used. The charge-fitting method and force field govern the accuracy of the MD/DFT scheme, on the other hand. We examined the charge-fitting methods of Blöchl, the iterative Hirshfeld (Hirshfeld-I), and REPEAT in combination with Lopes et al.'s force field and general AMBER force field. There is no single combination of charge fitting and force field that provides good agreements with the experiments, while the MD/DFT scheme reduces the effective charges of the ions and leads to better description of energetics and dynamics compared to the original force field with unit charges. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices.

  17. Determination of Charge-Carrier Mobility in Disordered Thin-Film Solar Cells as a Function of Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäckel, Helmut; MacKenzie, Roderick C. I.

    2018-03-01

    Charge-carrier mobility is a fundamental material parameter, which plays an important role in determining solar-cell efficiency. The higher the mobility, the less time a charge carrier will spend in a device and the less likely it is that it will be lost to recombination. Despite the importance of this physical property, it is notoriously difficult to measure accurately in disordered thin-film solar cells under operating conditions. We, therefore, investigate a method previously proposed in the literature for the determination of mobility as a function of current density. The method is based on a simple analytical model that relates the mobility to carrier density and transport resistance. By revising the theoretical background of the method, we clearly demonstrate what type of mobility can be extracted (constant mobility or effective mobility of electrons and holes). We generalize the method to any combination of measurements that is able to determine the mean electron and hole carrier density, and the transport resistance at a given current density. We explore the robustness of the method by simulating typical organic solar-cell structures with a variety of physical properties, including unbalanced mobilities, unbalanced carrier densities, and for high or low carrier trapping rates. The simulations reveal that near VOC and JSC , the method fails due to the limitation of determining the transport resistance. However, away from these regions (and, importantly, around the maximum power point), the method can accurately determine charge-carrier mobility. In the presence of strong carrier trapping, the method overestimates the effective mobility due to an underestimation of the carrier density.

  18. Preferential affinity of calcium ions to charged phosphatidic acid surface from a mixed calcium/barium solution: X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wei; Flores, Kevin; Pleasants, Jacob; Vaknin, David

    2009-01-20

    X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence near total reflection experiments were performed to examine the affinities of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Ba(2+)) from aqueous solution to a charged phosphatidic acid (PA) surface. A phospholipid (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate, DMPA), spread as a monolayer at the air/water interface, was used to form and control the charge density at the interface. We find that, for solutions of the pure salts (i.e., CaCl(2) and BaCl(2)), the number of bound ions per DMPA at the interface is saturated at concentrations that exceed 10(-3) M. For 1:1 Ca(2+)/Ba(2+) mixed solutions, we find that the bound Ca(2+)/Ba(2+) ratio at the interface is 4:1. If the only property determining charge accumulation near PA were the ionic charges, the concentration of mixed Ca(2+)/Ba(2+) at the interface would equal that of the bulk. Our results show a clear specific affinity of PA for Ca compared to Ba. We provide some discussion on this issue as well as some implications for biological systems. Although our results indicate an excess of counterion charge with respect to the surface charge, that is, charge inversion, the analysis of both reflectivity and fluorescence do not reveal an excess of co-ions (namely, Cl(-) or I(-)).

  19. Wave-vector-dependent electron-phonon coupling and the charge-density-wave transition in TbT e3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschek, M.; Rosenkranz, S.; Heid, R.; Said, A. H.; Giraldo-Gallo, P.; Fisher, I. R.; Weber, F.

    2015-06-01

    We present a high-energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the soft phonon mode in the charge-density-wave (CDW) system TbT e3 . We analyze our data based on lattice dynamical calculations using density-functional-perturbation theory and find clear evidence that strongly momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling defines the periodicity of the CDW superstructure: Our experiment reveals strong phonon softening and increased phonon linewidths over a large part in reciprocal space adjacent to the CDW ordering vector qCDW=(0 ,0 ,0.3 ) . Further, qCDW is clearly offset from the wave vector of (weak) Fermi surface nesting qFS=(0 ,0 ,0.25 ) , and our detailed analysis indicates that electron-phonon coupling is responsible for this shift. Hence, we can add TbT e3 , which was previously considered as a canonical CDW compound following the Peierls scenario, to the list of distinct charge-density-wave materials characterized by momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling.

  20. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Weiyao; Moreland, J. Scott; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2017-10-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and pseudorapidity-dependent measurements of the medium's charged particle density and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is first used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is then compared to p +Pb and Pb + Pb charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle pseudorapidity correlations and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including the pseudorapidity-dependent anisotropic flows, event-plane decorrelations, and flow correlations. We find that the form of the initial local longitudinal entropy profile is well constrained by these experimental measurements.

  1. Spin polarization driven by a charge-density wave in monolayer 1T−TaS2

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun

    2014-08-06

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic and vibrational properties of monolayer T-phase TaS2. We demonstrate that a charge-density wave is energetically favorable at low temperature, similar to bulk 1T-TaS2. Electron-phonon coupling is found to be essential for the lattice reconstruction. The charge-density wave results in a strong localization of the electronic states near the Fermi level and consequently in spin polarization, transforming the material into a magnetic semiconductor with enhanced electronic correlations. The combination of inherent spin polarization with a semiconducting nature distinguishes the monolayer fundamentally from the bulk compound as well as from other two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. Monolayer T-phase TaS2 therefore has the potential to enable two-dimensional spintronics. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  2. Effect of Chemical Pressure on the Charge Density Wave Transition in Rare-Earth Tritellurides RTe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Condron, C.L.; Margulis, G.Y.; Shin, K.Y.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Toney, M.F.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL /Bristol U.

    2009-04-30

    The charge density wave transition is investigated in the bilayer family of rare-earth tritelluride RTe{sub 3} compounds (R=Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm) via high-resolution x-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity. The transition temperature increases monotonically with increasing lattice parameter from 244(3) K for TmTe{sub 3} to 416(3) K for SmTe{sub 3}. The heaviest members of the series, R=Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm, are observed to have a second transition at a lower temperature, which marks the onset of an additional charge density wave with wave vector almost equal in magnitude to the first, but oriented in the perpendicular direction.

  3. Flavor structure of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors and transverse charge densities in the chiral quark-soliton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, António; Urbano, Diana; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the flavor decomposition of the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon, based on the chiral quark-soliton model (χQSM) with symmetry-conserving quantization. We consider the rotational 1/N_c and linear strange-quark mass (ms) corrections. We discuss the results of the flavor-decomposed electromagnetic form factors in comparison with the recent experimental data. In order to see the effects of the strange quark, we compare the SU(3) results with those of SU(2). Finally, we discuss the transverse charge densities for both unpolarized and polarized nucleons. The transverse charge density inside a neutron turns out to be negative in the vicinity of the center within the SU(3) χQSM, which can be explained by the contribution of the strange quark.

  4. Direct observation of competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Holmes, A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Superconductivity often emerges in the proximity of, or in competition with, symmetry-breaking ground states such as antiferromagnetism or charge density waves (CDW). A number of materials in the cuprate family, which includes the high transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductors, show spin...... and charge density wave order. Thus a fundamental question is to what extent do these ordered states exist for compositions close to optimal for superconductivity. Here we use high-energy X-ray diffraction to show that a CDW develops at zero field in the normal state of superconducting YBa2Cu3O6.67 (Tc= 67 K......). This sample has a hole doping of 0.12 per copper and a well-ordered oxygen chain superstructure. Below Tc, the application of a magnetic field suppresses superconductivity and enhances the CDW. Hence, the CDW and superconductivity in this typical high-Tc material are competing orders with similar energy...

  5. Neutralization and equilibration of highly charged argon ions at grazing incidence on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winecki, S.; Cocke, C.L.; Stoeckli, M.P.; Fry, D.

    1996-01-01

    Final charge state distributions of argon ions, scattered grazingly from a smooth highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface, have been measured as a function of initial charge state (q=4-17) and impact velocity (v=0.15-0.62 a.u.). The final charge state distribution changes strongly with the impact velocity, but is almost independent of the initial charge state. The neutralization during grazing-angle scattering is compared to the charge state equilibration experienced by ions passing through a solid (carbon foil), and these two processes seem to have common properties. A K x-ray spectrum from the K-shell vacancy decay of 51 keV Ar 17+ projectiles was obtained as a function of the angle between the ion beam and the surface. First measurements of x-ray spectra in coincidence with grazingly scattered ions are reported. A simple model for argon neutralization near and below the surface is proposed. The model assumes a direct side-feeding into the Ar M-shell followed by Auger and radiative L and K-shell filling

  6. Charge reversal of the rodlike colloidal fd virus through surface chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenkun; Buitenhuis, Johan; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael; Dhont, Jan K G

    2010-07-06

    There is increasing interest in the use of viruses as model systems for fundamental research and as templates for nanomaterials. In this work, the rodlike fd virus was subjected to chemical modifications targeting different solvent-exposed functional groups in order to tune its surface properties, especially reversing the surface charge from negative to positive. The carboxyl groups of fd were coupled with different kinds of organic amines by carbodiimide chemistry, resulting in modified viruses that are positively charged over a wide range of pH. Care was taken to minimize intervirus cross linking, which often occurs because of such modifications. The surface amino groups were also grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) end-functionalized with an active succinimidyl ester in order to introduce a steric stabilization effect. By combining charge reversal with PEG grafting, a reversible attraction between positively and negatively charged PEG-grafted fd viruses could be realized, which was tuned by the ionic strength of the solution. In addition, a charge-reversed fd virus forms only a pure nematic phase in contrast to the cholesteric phase of the wild type. These modified viruses might be used as model systems in soft condensed matter physics, for example, in the study of polyelectrolyte complexes or lyotropic liquid-crystalline phase behavior.

  7. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  8. Experimental Charge Density Study of Trichromium Linear Metal String Complex – Cr3(dpa)4Cl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lai-Chin; Cheng, Ming-Chuan; Thomsen, Maja Krüger

    An experimental and theoretical charge density study, based on Bader’s Quantum Theory: Atoms in Molecule (QTAIM), on a trichromium metal string complex, Cr3(dpa)4Cl2(C2H5OC2H5)x(CH2Cl2)1-x (1, dpa- = bis(2-pyridyl)amido)) is performed. The structure and multipole model of 1 are performed by usin...

  9. Cutaneous and mucosal human papillomaviruses differ in net surface charge, potential impact on tropism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibom Carl

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Papillomaviruses can roughly be divided into two tropism groups, those infecting the skin, including the genus beta PVs, and those infecting the mucosa, predominantly genus alpha PVs. The L1 capsid protein determines the phylogenetic separation between beta types and alpha types and the L1 protein is most probably responsible for the first interaction with the cell surface. Virus entry is a known determinant for tissue tropism and to study if interactions of the viral capsid with the cell surface could affect HPV tropism, the net surface charge of the HPV L1 capsid proteins was analyzed and HPV-16 (alpha and HPV-5 (beta with a mucosal and cutaneous tropism respectively were used to study heparin inhibition of uptake. The negatively charged L1 proteins were all found among HPVs with cutaneous tropism from the beta- and gamma-PV genus, while all alpha HPVs were positively charged at pH 7.4. The linear sequence of the HPV-5 L1 capsid protein had a predicted isoelectric point (pI of 6.59 and a charge of -2.74 at pH 7.4, while HPV-16 had a pI of 7.95 with a charge of +2.98, suggesting no interaction between HPV-5 and the highly negative charged heparin. Furthermore, 3D-modelling indicated that HPV-5 L1 exposed more negatively charged amino acids than HPV-16. Uptake of HPV-5 (beta and HPV-16 (alpha was studied in vitro by using a pseudovirus (PsV assay. Uptake of HPV-5 PsV was not inhibited by heparin in C33A cells and only minor inhibition was detected in HaCaT cells. HPV-16 PsV uptake was significantly more inhibited by heparin in both cells and completely blocked in C33A cells.

  10. Electron Density and Temperature During the CHARGE-2B Sounding Rocket Mission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ernstmeyer, James

    1997-01-01

    The CHARGE-2B sounding rocket was launched from Poker Flats Research Range, Alaska, in March 1992 to investigate VLF electromagnetic radiation generated by a modulated electron beam in the ionosphere...

  11. Extracting charge density distributions from diffraction data: a model study on urea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.Y.; Feil, D.; Tsirelson, V.G.

    The quality of the extraction of electron density distributions by means of a multipole refinement method is investigated. Structure factors of the urea crystal have been obtained from an electron density distribution (EDD) resulting from a density function calculation with the CRYSTAL95 package. To

  12. Charge density waves in nanocrystalline thin films of blue bronze K0.3MoO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starešinić, D.; Dominko, D.; Salamon, K.; Biljaković, K.; Tomeljak, A.; Schäfer, H.; Huber, T.; Demsar, J.; Socol, G.; Ristoscu, C.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Siketić, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Thin granular films of charge density wave (CDW) system K 0.3 MoO 3 were prepared by pulsed laser deposition and investigated by various standard characterization methods such as GI-XRD, electric transport, TOF-ERDA, AFM and UV–visible spectroscopy. While all these methods indicate that the thin films consist of nanometer grains of K 0.3 MoO 3 , it is only the non-destructive femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy (fsTRS) that demonstrates the charge density wave nature of the ground state and therefore proves directly the presence of K 0.3 MoO 3 . Furthermore, the comparison of the fsTRS data obtained in thin films and in single crystals shows the reduction of the charge density wave transition temperature and of the photoinduced signal strength in granular thin films with respect to single crystals, which is attributed to the granularity and crystal growth morphology. Our results establish fsTRS technique as the essential tool for the detection and characterization of complex ground states in nano-sized systems.

  13. Potential sputtering from a Si surface by very highly charged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tona, Masahide; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshiyasu, Nobuo; Sakurai, Makoto; Yamada, Chikashi; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2007-01-01

    We have observed radiation effect in collision of slow highly charged ions with the following target materials; a SiO 2 thin film, a Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface and a hydrogen terminated Si(1 1 1)-(1 x 1) surface. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning tunneling microscopy revealed some features due to 'potential sputtering'; (a) strong dependence of secondary particle emission on the surface condition, (b) high yield of positive ion emission including cluster fragments and (c) creation of nanometer sized surface structure. The mechanism for the potential sputtering is briefly discussed, based on the 'Coulomb explosion' model

  14. Nano-scale surface modification of materials with slow, highly charged ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, M.; Tona, M.; Takahashi, S.; Watanabe, H.; Nakamura, N.; Yoshiyasu, N.; Yamada, C.; Ohtani, S.; Sakaue, H.A.; Kawase, Y.; Mitsumori, K.; Terui, T.; Mashiko, S.

    2007-01-01

    Some results on surface modification of Si and graphite with highly charged ions (HCIs) are presented. Modified surfaces were observed using scanning tunneling microscopy. Crater-like structure with a diameter in nm region is formed on a Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface by the incidence of a single HCI. The protrusion structure is formed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface on the other hand, and the structure becomes an active site for molecular adsorption. A new, intense HCI source and an experimental apparatus are under development in order to process and observe aligned nanostructures created by the impact of collimated HCI beam

  15. A local leaky-box model for the local stellar surface density-gas surface density-gas phase metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Yan, Renbin; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the relation between the stellar surface density, the gas surface density and the gas-phase metallicity of typical disc galaxies in the local Universe with the SDSS-IV/MaNGA survey, using the star formation rate surface density as an indicator for the gas surface density. We show that these three local parameters form a tight relationship, confirming previous works (e.g. by the PINGS and CALIFA surveys), but with a larger sample. We present a new local leaky-box model, assuming star-formation history and chemical evolution is localized except for outflowing materials. We derive closed-form solutions for the evolution of stellar surface density, gas surface density and gas-phase metallicity, and show that these parameters form a tight relation independent of initial gas density and time. We show that, with canonical values of model parameters, this predicted relation match the observed one well. In addition, we briefly describe a pathway to improving the current semi-analytic models of galaxy formation by incorporating the local leaky-box model in the cosmological context, which can potentially explain simultaneously multiple properties of Milky Way-type disc galaxies, such as the size growth and the global stellar mass-gas metallicity relation.

  16. Double layer of platinum electrodes: Non-monotonic surface charging phenomena and negative double layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Eikerling, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a refined double layer model of platinum electrodes accounting for chemisorbed oxygen species, oriented interfacial water molecules, and ion size effects in solution is presented. It results in a non-monotonic surface charging relation and a peculiar capacitance vs. potential curve with a maximum and possibly negative values in the potential regime of oxide-formation.

  17. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Opstal, van E.J.; Alink, G.M.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles

  18. Nanometer-size surface modification produced by single, low energy, highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    Atomically flat surfaces of insulators have been bombarded with low energy, highly charged ions to search for nanometer-size surface modifications. It is expected that the high electron deficiency of highly charged ions will capture and/or remove many of the insulator's localized electrons when impacting on an insulating surface. The resulting local electron deficiency is expected to locally disintegrate the insulator through a open-quotes Coulomb explosionclose quotes forming nanometer-size craters. Xe ions with charge states between 10+ and 45+ and kinetic energies between 0 and 10 keV/q were obtained from the KSU-CRYEBIS, a CRYogenic Electron Beam Ion Source and directed onto various insulating materials. Mica was favored as target material as atomically flat surfaces can be obtained reliably through cleaving. However, the authors observations with an atomic force microscope have shown that mica tends to defoliate locally rather than disintegrate, most likely due to the small binding forces between adjacent layers. So far the authors measurements indicate that each ion produces one blister if the charge state is sufficiently high. The blistering does not seem to depend very much on the kinetic energy of the ions

  19. Using the lambda function to evaluate probe measurements of charged dielectric surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rerup, T. O.; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1996-01-01

    The use of Pedersen's λ function to evaluate electrostatic probe measurements of charged dielectric surfaces is demonstrated. With a knowledge of the probe λ function, the procedure by which this function is employed is developed, and thereafter applied to a set of experimental measurements avail...

  20. First-Principle Framework for Total Charging Energies in Electrocatalytic Materials and Charge-Responsive Molecular Binding at Gas-Surface Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A; Seal, Prasenjit; Smith, Sean C

    2016-05-04

    Heterogeneous charge-responsive molecular binding to electrocatalytic materials has been predicted in several recent works. This phenomenon offers the possibility of using voltage to manipulate the strength of the binding interaction with the target gas molecule and thereby circumvent thermochemistry constraints, which inhibit achieving both efficient binding and facile release of important targets such as CO2 and H2. Stability analysis of such charge-induced molecular adsorption has been beyond the reach of existing first-principle approaches. Here, we draw on concepts from semiconductor physics and density functional theory to develop a first principle theoretical approach that allows calculation of the change in total energy of the supercell due to charging. Coupled with the calculated adsorption energy of gas molecules at any given charge, this allows a complete description of the energetics of the charge-induced molecular adsorption process. Using CO2 molecular adsorption onto negatively charged h-BN (wide-gap semiconductor) and g-C4N3 (half metal) as example cases, our analysis reveals that - while adsorption is exothermic after charge is introduced - the overall adsorption processes are not intrinsically spontaneous due to the energetic cost of charging the materials. The energies needed to overcome the barriers of these processes are 2.10 and 0.43 eV for h-BN and g-C4N3, respectively. This first principle approach opens up new pathways for a more complete description of charge-induced and electrocatalytic processes.

  1. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-06

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids.

  2. Factors influencing the cytotoxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles: particle size and surface charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, M; Kim, M K; Cho, H J; Lee, J A; Yu, J; Chung, H E; Choi, S J

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle is one of the most important materials in diverse applications, since it has UV light absorption, antimicrobial, catalytic, semi-conducting, and magnetic properties. However, there is little information about the toxicological effects of ZnO nanoparticles with respect to physicochemical properties. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the relationships between cytotoxicity and physicochemical properties of ZnO nanoparticle such as particle size and surface charge in human lung cells. Two different sizes of ZnO nanoparticles (20 and 70 nm) were prepared with positive (+) or negative (-) charge, and then, cytotoxicity of different ZnO nanoparticles was evaluated by measuring cell proliferation in short-term and long-term, membrane integrity, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The results demonstrated that smaller particles exhibited high cytotoxic effects compared to larger particles in terms of inhibition of cell proliferation, membrane damage, and ROS generation. In addition, positively charged ZnO showed greater ROS production than ZnO with negative charge. These findings suggest that the cytoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles are strongly affected by their particle size and surface charge, highlighting the role of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles to understand and predict their potential adverse effects on human.

  3. Structural and electrostatic effects at the surfaces of size- and charge-selected aqueous nanodrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard J; O'Brien, Jeremy T; Chang, Terrence M; Williams, Evan R

    2017-07-01

    The effects of ion charge, polarity and size on the surface morphology of size-selected aqueous nanodrops containing a single ion and up to 550 water molecules are investigated with infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy and theory. IRPD spectra of M(H 2 O) n where M = La 3+ , Ca 2+ , Na + , Li + , I - , SO 4 2- and supporting molecular dynamics simulations indicate that strong interactions between multiply charged ions and water molecules can disrupt optimal hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) at the nanodrop surface. The IRPD spectra also reveal that "free" OH stretching frequencies of surface-bound water molecules are highly sensitive to the ion's identity and the OH bond's local H-bond environment. The measured frequency shifts are qualitatively reproduced by a computationally inexpensive point-charge model that shows the frequency shifts are consistent with a Stark shift from the ion's electric field. For multiply charged cations, pronounced Stark shifting is observed for clusters containing ∼100 or fewer water molecules. This is attributed to ion-induced solvent patterning that extends to the nanodrop surface, and serves as a spectroscopic signature for a cation's ability to influence the H-bond network of water located remotely from the ion. The Stark shifts measured for the larger nanodrops are extrapolated to infinite dilution to obtain the free OH stretching frequency of a surface-bound water molecule at the bulk air-water interface (3696.5-3701.0 cm -1 ), well within the relatively wide range of values obtained from SFG measurements. These cluster measurements also indicate that surface curvature effects can influence the free OH stretching frequency, and that even nanodrops without an ion have a surface potential that depends on cluster size.

  4. Mapping Optimal Charge Density and Length of ROMP-Based PTDMs for siRNA Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Leah M; deRonde, Brittany M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-10-10

    A fundamental understanding of how polymer structure impacts internalization and delivery of biologically relevant cargoes, particularly small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA), is of critical importance to the successful design of improved delivery reagents. Herein we report the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) methods to synthesize two series of guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs): one based on an imide scaffold that contains one guanidinium moiety per repeat unit, and another based on a diester scaffold that contains two guanidinium moieties per repeat unit. By varying both the degree of polymerization and, in effect, the relative number of cationic charges in each PTDM, the performances of the two ROMP backbones for siRNA internalization were evaluated and compared. Internalization of fluorescently labeled siRNA into Jurkat T cells demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-siRNA internalization had a charge content dependence, with PTDMs containing approximately 40 to 60 cationic charges facilitating the most internalization. Despite this charge content dependence, the imide scaffold yielded much lower viabilities in Jurkat T cells than the corresponding diester PTDMs with similar numbers of cationic charges, suggesting that the diester scaffold is preferred for siRNA internalization and delivery applications. These developments will not only improve our understanding of the structural factors necessary for optimal siRNA internalization, but will also guide the future development of optimized PTDMs for siRNA internalization and delivery.

  5. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H. [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  6. PEDOT-CNT coated electrodes stimulate retinal neurons at low voltage amplitudes and low charge densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba, R; Herrmann, T; Zeck, G

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two different microelectrode materials--the conductive polymer composite poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT)-carbon nanotube(CNT) and titanium nitride (TiN)--at activating spikes in retinal ganglion cells in whole mount rat retina through stimulation of the local retinal network. Stimulation efficacy of the microelectrodes was analyzed by comparing voltage, current and transferred charge at stimulation threshold. Retinal ganglion cell spikes were recorded by a central electrode (30 μm diameter) in the planar grid of an electrode array. Extracellular stimulation (monophasic, cathodic, 0.1-1.0 ms) of the retinal network was performed using constant voltage pulses applied to the eight surrounding electrodes. The stimulation electrodes were equally spaced on the four sides of a square (400 × 400 μm). Threshold voltage was determined as the pulse amplitude required to evoke network-mediated ganglion cell spiking in a defined post stimulus time window in 50% of identical stimulus repetitions. For the two electrode materials threshold voltage, transferred charge at threshold, maximum current and the residual current at the end of the pulse were compared. Stimulation of retinal interneurons using PEDOT-CNT electrodes is achieved with lower stimulation voltage and requires lower charge transfer as compared to TiN. The key parameter for effective stimulation is a constant current over at least 0.5 ms, which is obtained by PEDOT-CNT electrodes at lower stimulation voltage due to its faradaic charge transfer mechanism. In neuroprosthetic implants, PEDOT-CNT may allow for smaller electrodes, effective stimulation in a safe voltage regime and lower energy-consumption. Our study also indicates, that the charge transferred at threshold or the charge injection capacity per se does not determine stimulation efficacy.

  7. PEDOT-CNT coated electrodes stimulate retinal neurons at low voltage amplitudes and low charge densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba, R.; Herrmann, T.; Zeck, G.

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare two different microelectrode materials—the conductive polymer composite poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT)-carbon nanotube(CNT) and titanium nitride (TiN)—at activating spikes in retinal ganglion cells in whole mount rat retina through stimulation of the local retinal network. Stimulation efficacy of the microelectrodes was analyzed by comparing voltage, current and transferred charge at stimulation threshold. Approach. Retinal ganglion cell spikes were recorded by a central electrode (30 μm diameter) in the planar grid of an electrode array. Extracellular stimulation (monophasic, cathodic, 0.1-1.0 ms) of the retinal network was performed using constant voltage pulses applied to the eight surrounding electrodes. The stimulation electrodes were equally spaced on the four sides of a square (400 × 400 μm). Threshold voltage was determined as the pulse amplitude required to evoke network-mediated ganglion cell spiking in a defined post stimulus time window in 50% of identical stimulus repetitions. For the two electrode materials threshold voltage, transferred charge at threshold, maximum current and the residual current at the end of the pulse were compared. Main results. Stimulation of retinal interneurons using PEDOT-CNT electrodes is achieved with lower stimulation voltage and requires lower charge transfer as compared to TiN. The key parameter for effective stimulation is a constant current over at least 0.5 ms, which is obtained by PEDOT-CNT electrodes at lower stimulation voltage due to its faradaic charge transfer mechanism. Significance. In neuroprosthetic implants, PEDOT-CNT may allow for smaller electrodes, effective stimulation in a safe voltage regime and lower energy-consumption. Our study also indicates, that the charge transferred at threshold or the charge injection capacity per se does not determine stimulation efficacy.

  8. Method of impressing and reading out a surface charge on a multilayered detector structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zermeno, A.; Marsh, L.M.; Cowart, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A latent charge image is recorded on and reproduced from a multilayered detector. Firstly the detector is given a uniform surface charge on its photoconductive layer. This layer is then biased with an electric field of opposite polarity to the surface charge. The detector is then exposed to a modulated radiation flux to cause at least partial discharge of the photoconductive layer. The latent charge image of the modulated radiation flux is thus stored and later read by scanning the surface of the photoconductive layer with a small diameter photon beam to discharge further sequentially the photoconductive layer. The changing electrical potential of this discharge is detected and processed into a video signal by a processor for storage or display. This invention provides a method and apparatus capable of replacing conventional photographic and radiographic films. It also provides an X-ray sensing system which produces radiographic images of a patient using a lower radiation dosage. The output is an analog or digital video signal that may be displayed on a television monitor, recorded on film or directly stored or processed in a computer for image enhancement or pattern recognition. Other aspects are detailed. (U.K.)

  9. One-Step Synthesis of PEGylated Gold Nanoparticles with Tunable Surface Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rares Stiufiuc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports a rapid, simple and efficient one-step synthesis and detailed characterisation of stable aqueous colloids of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated with unmodified poly(ethyleneglycol (PEG molecules of different molecular weights and surface charges. By mixing and heating aqueous solutions of PEG with variable molecular chain and gold(III chloride hydrate (HAuCl4 in the presence of NaOH, we have successfully produced uniform colloidal 5 nm PEG coated AuNPs of spherical shape with tunable surface charge and an average diameter of 30 nm within a few minutes. It has been found out that PEGylated AuNPs provide optical enhancement of the characteristic vibrational bands of PEG molecules attached to the gold surface when they are excited with both visible (532 nm and NIR (785 nm laser lines. The surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS signal does not depend on the length of the PEG molecular chain enveloping the AuNPs, and the stability of the colloid is not affected by the addition of concentrated salt solution (0.1 M NaCl, thus suggesting their potential use for in vitro and in vivo applications. Moreover, by gradually changing the chain length of the biopolymer, we were able to control nanoparticles’ surface charge from −28 to −2 mV, without any modification of the Raman enhancement properties and of the colloidal stability.

  10. Electrostatic Deformation of Liquid Surfaces by a Charged Rod and a Van de Graaff Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Slisko, Josip; García Molina, Rafael; Abril Sánchez, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Authors of physics textbooks frequently use the deflection of a thin, vertically falling water jet by a charged balloon, 1–3 comb, 4–6 or rod 7–9 as a visually appealing and conceptually relevant example of electrostatic attraction. Nevertheless, no attempts are made to explore whether these charged bodies could cause visible deformation of a horizontal water surface. That being so, we were quite surprised when we discovered that a 19th-century French book 10 contained a drawing showing an ap...

  11. The dependence of the nuclear charge form factor on short range correlations and surface fluctuation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massen, S. E.; Garistov, V. P.; Grypeos, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nuclear surface fluctuations on harmonic oscillator elastic charge form factor of light nuclei are investigated, simultaneously approximating the short-range correlations through a Jastrow correlation factor. Inclusion of the surface fluctuation effects within this description, by truncating the cluster expansion at the two-body part, is found to improve somewhat the fit to the elastic charge form-factor of 16 O and 40 Ca. However, the convergence of the cluster expansion is expected to deteriorate. An additional finding is that surface-fluctuation correlations produce a drastic change in the asymptotic behaviour of the point-proton form-factor, which now falls off quite slowly (i.e. as const.q -4 ) at large values of the momentum transfer q

  12. Wetting of a Charged Surface of Glassy Carbon by Molten Alkali-Metal Chlorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, V. P.

    2018-03-01

    Values of the contact angle of wetting of a surface of glassy carbon by molten chlorides of lithium, sodium, potassium, and cesium are measured by the meniscus weight method to determine the common factors of wettability of solid surfaces by ionic melts upon a change in the salt phase composition and a jump in electric potential. It is found that with a potential shift in the positive direction the shape of the curve of the contact angle's dependence on the potential varies upon substitution of one salt by another: the angle of wetting shrinks monotonously in lithium chloride but remains constant in molten cesium chloride. This phenomenon is explained by the hypothesis that the nature of the halide anion adsorption on the positively charged surface of an electrode is chemical and not electrostatic. It is shown that the adsorption process is accompanied by charge transfer through the interface, with covalent bonding between the adsorbent and adsorbate.

  13. Surface potential, charging and local current transport of individual Ge quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha, R.K. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Manna, S.; Bar, R.; Das, S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Ray, S.K., E-mail: physkr@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: We have elaborately explained the individual Ge QD charging phenomena and current transport, which is very important to understand the Ge/Si nano devices. This paper will give a flavor to properly understand these phenomena linked together along with the photocurrent mechanism which is related to the Ge/Si valence band offset. • Both the CAFM and KPFM techniques point out the functionality of doping nature of the underneath Si substrate on the aforementioned characteristics of Ge QDs. • Analysis of the surface potential mapping using KPFM technique yields an approximate valence band offset measurement which is required to understand the intra-valence transition of holes for the realization of long wavelength infrared photodetector. • KPFM and CAFM can be utilized to explore the charging/discharging phenomena of dots and their composition variations. • Current-voltage (I–V) characteristics of the individual Ge QD strongly depends on the individual QD size. • Energy band diagrams for diamond tip and Ge QD shows the higher barrier for electrons and lower barrier for holes allowing the easy tunneling for holes to dominate the transport. - Abstract: It is fundamentally important to understand the nanoscale electronic properties of a single quantum dot (QD) contrary to an ensemble of QDs. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) are two important tools, which could be employed to probe surface potential, charging phenomena, and current transport mechanism of individual QD. We demonstrate the aforementioned characteristics of self-assembled Ge QDs, which was grown on Si substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy driven by the Stranski-Krastanov method. Study reveals that each Ge QD acts as charge storage node even at zero applied bias. The shape, size and density of QDs could be well probed by CAFM and KPFM, whereas QD facets could be better resolved by the conductive tip. The CAFM investigation

  14. DNA Condensation by Partially Acetylated Poly(amido amine Dendrimers: Effects of Dendrimer Charge Density on Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald G. Larson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of poly(amido amine (or PAMAM dendrimers to condense semiflexible dsDNA and penetrate cell membranes gives them great potential in gene therapy and drug delivery but their high positive surface charge makes them cytotoxic. Here, we describe the effects of partial neutralization by acetylation on DNA condensation using light scattering, circular dichroism, and single molecule imaging of dendrimer-DNA complexes combed onto surfaces and tethered to those surfaces under flow. We find that DNA can be condensed by generation-five (G5 dendrimers even when the surface charges are more than 65% neutralized, but that such dendrimers bind negligibly when an end-tethered DNA is stretched in flow. We also find that when fully charged dendrimers are introduced by flow to end-tethered DNA, all DNA molecules become equally highly coated with dendrimers at a rate that becomes very fast at high dendrimer concentration, and that dendrimers remain bound during subsequent flow of dendrimer-free buffer. These results suggest that the presence of dendrimer-free DNA coexisting with dendrimer-bound DNA after bulk mixing of the two in solution may result from diffusion-limited irreversible dendrimer-DNA binding, rather than, or in addition to, the previously proposed cooperative binding mechanism of dendrimers to DNA.

  15. Full charge-density scheme with a kinetic-energy correction: Application to ground-state properties of the 4d metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Kollár, J.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We present a full charge-density technique to evaluate total energies from the output of self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) calculations in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA). The Coulomb energy is calculated exactly from the complete, nonspherically symmetric charge density...... defined within nonoverlapping, space-filling Wigner-Seitz cells; the exchange-correlation energy is evaluated by means of the local-density approximation or the generalized gradient approximation applied to the complete charge-density; and the ASA kinetic energy is corrected for the nonspherically...... symmetric charge density by a gradient expansion. The technique retains most of the simplicity and the computational efficiency of the LMTO-ASA method, and calculations of atomic volumes and elastic constants of the 4d elements show that it has the accuracy of full-potential methods....

  16. Nanofabrication on a Si surface by slow highly charged ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tona, Masahide; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshiyasu, Nobuo; Sakurai, Makoto; Terui, Toshifumi; Mashiko, Shinro; Yamada, Chikashi; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2007-01-01

    We have observed surface chemical reactions which occur at the impact sites on a Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface bombarded by highly charged ions (HCIs) by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Crater structures are formed on the Si(1 1 1)-(7 x 7) surface by single I 50+ -impacts. STM-observation for the early step of oxidation on the surface suggests that the impact site is so active that dangling bonds created by HCI impacts are immediately quenched by reaction with residual gas molecules. We show also the selective adsorption of organic molecules at a HCI-induced impact site on the HOPG surface

  17. Impact of nanosilver on various DNA lesions and HPRT gene mutations - effects of charge and surface coating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huk, A.; Izak-Nau, E.; el Yamani, N.; Uggerud, H.; Vadset, M.; Zasońska, Beata Anna; Duschl, A.; Dusinska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, 24 July (2015), 25_1-25_20 ISSN 1743-8977 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : silver nanomaterials * surface charge * surface coating Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.649, year: 2015

  18. Enhanced charge density wave order in La2-xSrxCuO4 at high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wen, Jiajia; Jang, Hoyoung; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Satoshi; Song, Sanghoon; Chollet, Matthieu; Zhu, Diling; Fujita, Masaki; Rotundu, Costel R.; Sheckelton, John P.; Jiang, Mingde; Kao, Chi-Chang; Lee, Jun-Sik; Lee, Young S.

    There has been much recent interest in the charge density wave (CDW) order in the cuprate superconductors. An intriguing form of the density wave occurs in the La2CuO4-based family where both the charge and spin form ``stripes'' near 1/8 doping. Charge order has been reported in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) in zero magnetic field near 1/8 doping that was enhanced in moderate DC fields (up to 10 T). In this talk, I will discuss our recent experiment which combines a pulsed magnet with the x-rays from a free electron laser to characterize the CDW in LSCO with x =0.115 in fields up to 24 Tesla. In contrast to the YBCO family, which shows field-induced 3D CDW order, the field-enhanced CDW order in LSCO remains two-dimensional up to 24 T. Further results regarding the field-dependence and zero-field behavior of the CDW will be discussed. Our study provides important information on the interplay between CDW order and high-Tc superconductivity. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  19. Microtubule Protofilament Number Is Modulated in a Step-Wise Fashion By the Charge of Density of An Enveloping Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raviv, U.; Nguyen, T.; Ghafouri, R.; Needleman, D.J.; Li, Y.; Miller, H.P.; Wilson, L.; Bruinsma, R.F.; Safinya, C.R.; UC, Santa Barbara; UCLA

    2007-01-01

    Microtubules are able to adjust their protofilament (PF) number and, as a consequence, their dynamics and function, to the assembly conditions and presence of cofactors. However, the principle behind such variations is poorly understood. Using synchrotron x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy, we studied how charged membranes, which under certain conditions can envelop preassembled MTs, regulate the PF number of those MTs. We show that the mean PF number, , is modulated primarily by the charge density of the membranes. decreases in a stepwise fashion with increasing membrane charge density. does not depend on the membrane-protein stoichiometry or the solution ionic strength. We studied the effect of taxol and found that increases logarithmically with taxol/tubulin stoichiometry. We present a theoretical model, which by balancing the electrostatic and elastic interactions in the system accounts for the trends in our findings and reveals an effective MT bending stiffness of order 10-100 k B T/nm, associated with the observed changes in PF number

  20. An exact formula for electromagnetic momentum in terms of the charge density and the Coulomb gauge vector potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essén, Hanno

    2018-03-01

    The electromagnetic momentum {\\boldsymbol{p}}=1/(4π c)\\int {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}}{{d}}V is sometimes approximated by {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0=(1/c)\\int \\varrho {\\boldsymbol{A}}{{d}}V, where ϱ is the charge density and {\\boldsymbol{A}} is the Coulomb gauge vector potential. Here, we show that {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0 is the first term in an exact two-term expression {\\boldsymbol{p}}={{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0+{{\\boldsymbol{p}}}1 where the second term refers to radiation. When the charge density is zero, {\\boldsymbol{p}}={{\\boldsymbol{p}}}1 is the momentum of fields propagating in vacuum. In the presence of charged particles, however, {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0 normally dominates. We argue that {{\\boldsymbol{p}}}0 is the natural formula for the electromagnetic momentum when radiation can be neglected. It is shown that this term may in fact be much larger than the purely mechanical contribution from mass times velocity.

  1. Enhanced density of negative fixed charges in Al2O3 layers on Si through a subsequent deposition of TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes; Kaufmann, Kai; Ilse, Klemens; Sprafke, Alexander; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2016-04-01

    The passivation of silicon surfaces play an important role for achieving high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. In this work, a stack system comprising of 20nm Al2O3 with a 22nm TiO2 topping layer was deposited on p-type Si using thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) and was investigated regarding its passivation quality. Quasi-steady-state photo conductance (QSSPC) measurements reveal that the minority carrier lifetime at an injection density of 1015cm-3 increased from 1.10ms to 1.96ms after the deposition of TiO2, which shows that the deposition of TiO2 onto Al2O3 is capable of enhancing its passivation quality. Capacity voltage (CV) measurements show that the amount of negative charges in the dielectric layer has increased from -2.4·1012cm-2 to -6.3·1012cm-2 due to the deposition of TiO2. The location of the additional charges was analyzed in this work by etching the dielectric layer stack in several steps. After each step CV measurements were performed. It is found that the additional negative charges are created within the Al2O3 layer. Additionally, ToF-SIMS measurements were performed to check for diffusion processes within the Al2O3 layer.

  2. A simple method of extracting the polarization charge density in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure from current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü Yuan-Jie; Lin Zhao-Jun; Yu Ying-Xia; Meng Ling-Guo; Cao Zhi-Fang; Luan Chong-Biao; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2012-01-01

    An Ni Schottky contact on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is fabricated. The flat-band voltage for the Schottky contact on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is obtained from the forward current—voltage characteristics. With the measured capacitance—voltage curve and the flat-band voltage, the polarization charge density in the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is investigated, and a simple formula for calculating the polarization charge density is obtained and analyzed. With the approach described in this paper, the obtained polarization charge density agrees well with the one calculated by self-consistently solving Schrodinger's and Poisson's equations

  3. Exploring the Binding of Barbital to a Synthetic Macrocyclic Receptor; a Charge Density Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jonathan J.; Hanrahan, Jane Rouse; Solomon, V. Raja

    2018-01-01

    , with the presence of barbital in (3) resulting in the greatest stabilisation. Hydrogen bonds ranging in strength from 4-70 kJ mol-1 were the main stabilising force. Further analysis of the electrostatic potential between (1), (2) and (3) showed significant charge redistribution when co-crystallisation occurred...

  4. Charge density of GaxAl1−xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approximation (LDA) based methods as LDA underestimates the energy gap [4] and quasi-particle method is very ... Interestingly, the EPM has rarely been applied to unravel band gaps and ionicity in semiconducting alloys. 295 ..... Figures 4b and 3a show that the charge is minimum around Sb anion being nearly half the ...

  5. Picosecond charge transport in rutile at high carrier densities studiedby transient terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajac, Vít; Němec, Hynek; Kužel, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 11 (2016), 1-9, č. článku 115206. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12386S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : terahertz spectroscopy * charge transport * TiO 2 * rutile * ultrafast spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  6. Charged particle density distributions in Au·Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FOUAD RAMI, for the BRAHMS Collaboration. Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, IN2P3-CNRS, Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France. Abstract. Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au·Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of ...

  7. Implementation and interpretation of surface potential decay measurements on corona-charged non-woven fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabti, B; Antoniu, A; Plopeanu, M; Dascalescu, L; Yahiaoui, B; Bendahmane, B

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the peculiarities of the surface potential decay (SPD) curves obtained for certain non-woven media. The experiments were performed on samples of non-woven poly-propylene (PP) sheets, which are typically employed in the construction of air filters for heat, ventilation and air conditioning. The samples were in contact with a grounded plane, in order to: (1) ensure better charging and measurement reproducibility; (2) simulate the worst situation of practical interest. They were charged using either a high-voltage wire-type dual electrode or a triode-type electrode arrangement. The aspect of the SPD curves depends on the electrode configuration. When the electric field is strong enough, it can activate charge injection at the insulator-metal interface and extrinsic conduction.

  8. Implementation and interpretation of surface potential decay measurements on corona-charged non-woven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabti, B.; Antoniu, A.; Plopeanu, M.; Yahiaoui, B.; Bendahmane, B.; Dascalescu, L.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the peculiarities of the surface potential decay (SPD) curves obtained for certain non-woven media. The experiments were performed on samples of non-woven poly-propylene (PP) sheets, which are typically employed in the construction of air filters for heat, ventilation and air conditioning. The samples were in contact with a grounded plane, in order to: (1) ensure better charging and measurement reproducibility; (2) simulate the worst situation of practical interest. They were charged using either a high-voltage wire-type dual electrode or a triode-type electrode arrangement. The aspect of the SPD curves depends on the electrode configuration. When the electric field is strong enough, it can activate charge injection at the insulator-metal interface and extrinsic conduction.

  9. Probing the surface charge on the basal planes of Kaolinite particles with high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Naveen; Andersson, M.P.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Sîretanu, Igor

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution atomic force microscopy is used to map the surface charge on the basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles in an ambient solution of variable pH and NaCl or CaCl2 concentration. Using DLVO theory with charge regulation, we determine from the measured force–distance curves the surface

  10. Exploring the entrance of proton pathways in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans: surface charge, buffer capacity and redox-dependent polarity changes at the internal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberg, Kristina; Michel, Hartmut; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal oxidase of cellular respiration, reduces molecular oxygen to water. The mechanism of proton pumping as well as the coupling of proton and electron transfer is still not understood in this redox-linked proton pump. Eleven residues at the aqueous-exposed surfaces of CcO from Paracoccus denitrificans have been exchanged to cysteines in a two-subunit base variant to yield single reactive cysteine variants. These variants are designed to provide unique labeling sites for probes to be used in spectroscopic experiments investigating the mechanism of proton pumping in CcO. To this end we have shown that all cysteine variants are enzymatically active. Cysteine positions at the negative (N-) side of the membrane are located close to the entrance of the D- and K-proton transfer pathways that connect the N-side with the catalytic oxygen reduction site. Labeling of the pH-indicator dye fluorescein to these sites allowed us to determine the surface potential at the cytoplasmic CcO surface, which corresponds to a surface charge density of -0.5 elementary charge/1000Å(2). In addition, acid-base titrations revealed values of CcO buffer capacity. Polarity measurements of the label environment at the N-side provided (i) site-specific values indicative of a hydrophilic and a more hydrophobic environment dependent on the label position, and (ii) information on a global change to a more apolar environment upon reduction of the enzyme. Thus, the redox state of the copper and heme centers inside the hydrophobic interior of CcO affect the properties at the cytoplasmic surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An algorithm for three-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulation of charge distribution at biofunctionalized surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Bulyha, Alena

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a Monte-Carlo algorithm in the constant-voltage ensemble for the calculation of 3d charge concentrations at charged surfaces functionalized with biomolecules is presented. The motivation for this work is the theoretical understanding of biofunctionalized surfaces in nanowire field-effect biosensors (BioFETs). This work provides the simulation capability for the boundary layer that is crucial in the detection mechanism of these sensors; slight changes in the charge concentration in the boundary layer upon binding of analyte molecules modulate the conductance of nanowire transducers. The simulation of biofunctionalized surfaces poses special requirements on the Monte-Carlo simulations and these are addressed by the algorithm. The constant-voltage ensemble enables us to include the right boundary conditions; the dna strands can be rotated with respect to the surface; and several molecules can be placed in a single simulation box to achieve good statistics in the case of low ionic concentrations relevant in experiments. Simulation results are presented for the leading example of surfaces functionalized with pna and with single- and double-stranded dna in a sodium-chloride electrolyte. These quantitative results make it possible to quantify the screening of the biomolecule charge due to the counter-ions around the biomolecules and the electrical double layer. The resulting concentration profiles show a three-layer structure and non-trivial interactions between the electric double layer and the counter-ions. The numerical results are also important as a reference for the development of simpler screening models. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Possible improvements to the self-consistent-charges density-functional tight-binding method within the second order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodrog, Zoltan; Aradi, Balint [Bremen Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Improving the precision of self-consistent-charges density-functional tight-binding method (SCC-DFTB) without losing its computational efficiency is primarily thought and hoped to be possible, if possible at all, by moving beyond its current two-centre-approximative tight-binding structure and the second-order nature of SCC. In this paper, however, we point out that there may still be possibilities of making it more precise without such an extension. Two improvements within the very second-order SCC are proposed here. First, inclusion of a multipole expansion of interacting atomic charge fluctuations, and second, a semi-empirical refinement of their interaction potential profiles and their self-interaction energies. Besides showing in detail what is to be improved with respect to the current SCC-DFTB realizations, we fully derive the respective new formulas ready to implement. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Density functional theory study of chemical sensing on surfaces of single-layer MoS2 and graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, F.; Pachter, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to investigate chemical sensing on surfaces of single-layer MoS 2 and graphene, considering the adsorption of the chemical compounds triethylamine, acetone, tetrahydrofuran, methanol, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, o-nitrotoluene, o-dichlorobenzene, and 1,5-dicholoropentane. Physisorption of the adsorbates on free-standing surfaces was analyzed in detail for optimized material structures, considering various possible adsorption sites. Similar adsorption characteristics for the two surface types were demonstrated, where inclusion of a correction to the DFT functional for London dispersion was shown to be important to capture interactions at the interface of molecular adsorbate and surface. Charge transfer analyses for adsorbed free-standing surfaces generally demonstrated very small effects. However, charge transfer upon inclusion of the underlying SiO 2 substrate rationalized experimental observations for some of the adsorbates considered. A larger intrinsic response for the electron-donor triethylamine adsorbed on MoS 2 as compared to graphene was demonstrated, which may assist in devising chemical sensors for improved sensitivity

  14. Characterization of lacunae density in pictorial surfaces using GIS software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Henriques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the application of simple image-processing techniques, in a geographic information system (GIS environment, on a detailed digital photography of a retabular painting. The aim is to register semi-automatically the lacunae density, through reclassification, and point density estimation. The digital photography image used on the exercise displays a detail of a 16th century panel painting named "Resurrection of Lazarus", from the Rotunda of Christ Convent, in Tomar, Portugal. The final result is a thematic pathology map of lacunae type.

  15. Bacterial resistance control on mineral surfaces of hydroxyapatite and human teeth via surface charge-driven antifouling coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venault, Antoine; Yang, Hui-Shan; Chiang, Yen-Che; Lee, Bor-Shuinn; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Chang, Yung

    2014-03-12

    This works reports a set of new functionalized polyethyleneimine (PEI) polymers, including a neutral PEGylated polymer PEI-g-PEGMA, a negatively charged polymer PEI-g-SA, and a zwitterionic polymer PEI-g-SBMA, and their use as antibiofouling coating agent for human teeth protection. Polymers were synthesized by Michael addition, XPS analysis revealed that each polymer could be efficiently coated onto hydroxyapatite, ceramic material used as a model tooth. Polymers carrying a negative net charge were more efficiently adsorbed, because of the establishment of electrostatic interactions with calcium ions. Protein adsorption tests revealed that two factors were important in the reduction of protein adsorption. Both the surface charge and the surface ability to bind and entrap water molecules had to be considered. PEI-g-SBMA, which zeta potential in PBS solution was negative, was efficient to inhibit the adsorption of BSA, a negative protein. On the other hand, it also resisted the adsorption of lysozyme, a positive protein, because zwitterionic molecules can easily entrap water and provide a very hydrophilic environment. Streptococcus mutans attachment tests performed unveiled that all modified polymers were efficient to resist this type of bacteria responsible for dental carries. Best results were also obtained with PEI-g-SBMA coating. This polymer was also shown to efficiently resist the adsorption of positively charged bacteria (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia). Tests performed on real human tooth showed that PEI-g-SBMA could inhibit up to 70% of bacteria adhesion, which constitutes a major result considering that surface of teeth is very rough, therefore physically promoting the attachment of proteins and bacteria.

  16. Charge density of GaxAl1−xSb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    semiconducting compounds and alloys to make heterostructures having applica- tions in photodiodes, heterostructure field effect transistors (HFET) and resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) [3]. To study these semiconducting compounds, empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) is highly suitable, compared to the local density.

  17. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  18. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  19. Specification of electron radiation environment at GEO and MEO for surface charging estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganushkina, N.; Dubyagin, S.; Mateo Velez, J. C.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    A series of anomalies at GEO have been attributed to electrons of energy below 100 keV, responsible for surface charging. The process at play is charge deposition on covering insulating surfaces and is directly linked to the space environment at a time scale of a few tens of seconds. Even though modern satellites benefited from the analysis of past flight anomalies and losses, it appears that surface charging remains a source of problems. Accurate specification of the space environment at different orbits is of a key importance. We present the operational model for low energy (index. The presented model provides the low energy electron flux at all L-shells and at all satellite orbits, when necessary. IMPTAM is used to simulate the fluxes of low energy electrons inside the Earth's magnetosphere at the time of severe events measured on LANL satellites at GEO. There is no easy way to say what will be the flux of keV electrons at MEO when surface charging events are detected at GEO than to use a model. The maximal electron fluxes obtained at MEO (L = 4.6) within a few tens of minutes hours following the LANL events at GEO have been extracted to feed a database of theoretical/numerical worst-case environments for surface charging at MEO. All IMPTAM results are instantaneous, data have not been average. In order to validate the IMPTAM output at MEO, we conduct the statistical analysis of measured electron fluxes onboard Van Allen Probes (ECT HOPE (20 eV-45 keV) and ECT MagEIS (30 - 300 keV) at distances of 4.6 Re. IMPTAM e- flux at MEO is used as input to SPIS, the Spacecraft Plasma Interaction System Software toolkit for spacecraft-plasma interactions and spacecraft charging modelling (http://dev.spis.org/projects/spine/home/spis). The research leading to these results was funded by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement No 606716 SPACESTORM and by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under

  20. Elevated temperature annealing behaviors of bulk resistivity and space charge density (Neff) of neutron irradiated silicon detectors and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The bulk resistivity of neutron irradiated detector grade silicon material has been measured under the condition of no or low electrical filed (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) after elevated temperature (T=110 C) anneals (ETA). The ENB resistivity (ρ) for as-irradiated silicon material increases with neutron fluence at low fluences (Φ n 13 n/cm 2 ) and starts to saturate at a value between 300-400 kΩ cm at high fluences (Φ n >10 13 n/cm 2 ). The saturation of the ENB resistivity near the intrinsic value can be explained by the near perfect compensation of all neutron induced deep donors and acceptors in the ENB. After ETA, it has been observed that ρ increases with annealing time for silicon materials irradiated below the saturation and decreases with annealing time for those irradiated after saturation. For those irradiated near the saturation point, ρ increases with annealing time initially and decreases thereafter. This ETA behavior of ρ may be explained by the increase of net acceptor-like deep levels in silicon during the anneal, qualitatively consistent with the observed reverse annealing effect of the space charge density (N eff ) in silicon detectors which is an increase of negative space charge density (acceptors) after long term room temperature (RTA) anneal and/or ETA. However, the amount of the increase of net hole concentration (p) of about 5 x 10 11 cm -3 , corresponding to 20 hours of ETA at 110 C for a fluence of 1.5 x 10 14 n/cm 2 , is still much less than the corresponding increase of N eff of about 1.5 x 10 13 cm -3 . This suggests that while the ETA restores some of the free carrier concentration (namely holes), there is still a large degree of compensation. The space charge density is still dominated by the deep levels and N eff ≠p. (orig.)

  1. Constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the multiplicity and average pT ratios of charged pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozma, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions, a probe of the density dependence of symmetry energy above the saturation point, has been proven in a previous study to be extremely sensitive to the strength of the isovector Δ (1232 ) potential in nuclear matter. As there is no knowledge, either from theory or experiment, about the magnitude of this quantity, the extraction of constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation by using exclusively the mentioned observable is hindered at present. It is shown that, by including the ratio of average pT of charged pions / in the list of fitted observables, the noted problem can be circumvented. A realistic description of this observable requires accounting for the interaction of pions with the dense nuclear matter environment by the incorporation of the so-called S -wave and P -wave pion optical potentials. This is performed within the framework of a quantum molecular dynamics transport model that enforces the conservation of the total energy of the system. It is shown that constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density and the strength of the Δ (1232) potential can be simultaneously extracted. A symmetry energy with a value of the slope parameter L >50 MeV is favored, at 1 σ confidence level, from a comparison with published FOPI experimental data. A precise constraint will require experimental data more accurate than presently available, particularly for the charged pion multiplicity ratio, and better knowledge of the density and momentum dependence of the pion potential for the whole range of these two variables probed in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  2. Dynamical image potential and induced forces for charged particles moving parallel to a solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arista, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamical image potential and ensuing forces induced by a charged particle moving parallel to a solid surface are investigated by using a dielectric formulation for semi-infinite dispersive media. The adiabatic behavior of the field in the asymptotic range is discussed in a general way using a multipole expansion. Several calculations illustrate the behavior of the field using both a simple model, where the surface response is approximated by a single plasma resonance, and a more realistic representation of the medium based upon the empirical information on the optical constants for various solids (Al, Cu, Ag, and Au). The model parameters may be adjusted to provide very good agreement with the optical-data integrations of the stopping and lateral forces on the moving charge. On the other hand, important differences in the description of the wake potential using either the simple plasma resonance model, or the optical-data representation, are obtained for Cu, Ag, and Au

  3. The density functional study of electronic structure, electronic charge density, linear and nonlinear optical properties of single crystal alpha-LiAlTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • FP-LAPW technique is used for calculating the electronic structure. • The band structure shows that the calculated compound is semiconductor. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Nonlinear optical properties has also been calculated. • This compound can be used for molecular engineering of the crystals. - Abstract: Self-consistent calculations is performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) technique based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, linear and non-linear optical properties of α-LiAlTe{sub 2} compound having tetragonal symmetry with space group I4{sup ¯}2d. The electronic structure are calculated using the Ceperley Alder local density approach (CA-LDA), Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof generalize gradient approach (PBE-GGA), Engel–Vosko generalize gradient approach (EVGGA) and modified Becke Johnson approach (mBJ). Band structure calculations of (α-LiAlTe{sub 2}) depict semiconducting nature with direct band gap of 2.35 eV (LDA), 2.48 eV (GGA), 3.05 eV (EVGGA) and 3.13 eV (mBJ), which is comparable to experimental value. The calculated electronic charge density show ionic interaction between Te and Li atoms and polar covalent interaction between Al and Te atoms. Some optical susceptibilities like dielectric constants, refractive index, extension co-efficient, reflectivity and energy loss function have been calculated and analyzed on the basis of electronic structure. The compound α-LiAlTe{sub 2} provides a considerable negative value of birefringence of −0.01. Any anisotropy observed in the linear optical properties which are in favor to enhance the nonlinear optical properties. The symbol χ{sub abc}{sup (2)}(ω) represents the second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, possess six non-zero components in this symmetry (tetragonal), called: 1 2 3, 2 1 3, 2 3 1, 1 3 2, 3 1 2 and 3 2 1

  4. Energy spectra and charge states of light atoms scattered by solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parilis, E.S.; Verleger, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    The theories of backscattering and charge state formation of light atoms (H, D, and He) for the energy range 1 keV 0 0 and theta. The dependence of epsilonsub(max) on theta determines the mean effective range for the scattering at the angle theta. The appearance of surface peaks in the energy spectra of neutrals below energy E 0 + , Hsup(*), and H - . (orig.)

  5. Development of GaN-based nanosensors using surface charge lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa, Veaceslav; Braniste, Tudor; Volciuc, Olesea; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Sarua, Andrei; Kuball, Martin; Heard, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanotechnology is a fast developing branch of modern engineering that offers perspectives for the development of electronic devices with superior parameters. A special and important niche in nanotechnology is allocated to the fabrication of nanosensors which are expected to exhibit higher sensitivity in comparison with classical microelectronic sensors. Various aspects of fabrication of GaN based nanosensors using Surface Charge Lithography are discussed and preliminary tests for gas sensors applications are presented.

  6. Binding of chloroquine to ionic micelles: Effect of pH and micellar surface charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Santos, Marcela de, E-mail: marcelafarmausp77@gmail.com [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida do Café, s/n, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-903 (Brazil); Perpétua Freire de Morais Del Lama, Maria, E-mail: mpemdel@fcfrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física e Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida do Café, s/n, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-903 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Departamento de Química Analítica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitária Zeferino Vaz, s/n, Campinas, São Paulo 13083-970 (Brazil); Siuiti Ito, Amando, E-mail: amandosi@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes, 3900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); and others

    2014-03-15

    The pharmacological action of chloroquine relies on its ability to cross biological membranes in order to accumulate inside lysosomes. The present work aimed at understanding the basis for the interaction between different chloroquine species and ionic micelles of opposite charges, the latter used as a simple membrane model. The sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence of chloroquine to changes in its local environment was used to probe its interaction with cetyltrimethylammonium micelles presenting bromide (CTAB) and sulfate (CTAS) as counterions, in addition to dodecyl sulfate micelles bearing sodium (SDS) and tetramethylammonium (TMADS) counterions. Counterion exchange was shown to have little effect on drug–micelle interaction. Chloroquine first dissociation constant (pKa{sub 1}) shifted to opposite directions when anionic and cationic micelles were compared. Chloroquine binding constants (K{sub b}) revealed that electrostatic forces mediate charged drug–micelle association, whereas hydrophobic interactions allowed neutral chloroquine to associate with anionic and cationic micelles. Fluorescence quenching studies indicated that monoprotonated chloroquine is inserted deeper into the micelle surface of anionic micelles than its neutral form, the latter being less exposed to the aqueous phase when associated with cationic over anionic assemblies. The findings provide further evidence that chloroquine–micelle interaction is driven by a tight interplay between the drug form and the micellar surface charge, which can have a major effect on the drug biological activity. -- Highlights: • Chloroquine (CQ) pKa{sub 1} increased for SDS micelles and decreased for CTAB micelles. • CQ is solubilized to the surface of both CTAB and SDS micelles. • Monoprotonated CQ is buried deeper into SDS micelles than neutral CQ. • Neutral CQ is less exposed to aqueous phase in CTAB over SDS micelles. • Local pH and micellar surface charge mediate interaction of CQ with

  7. Centrality dependence of the pseudorapidity density distribution for charged particles in Pb–Pb collisions at √SNN = 5.02 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Janssen, M M; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C. D.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barioglio, L.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411263188; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371577810; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371578248; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Iga Buitron, S. A.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411885812; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Capon, A. A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A R; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, Sukhee; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411888056; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Conti, C.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. Derradi; Degenhardt, H. F.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372618715; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355502488; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; De Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Garg, P.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326052577; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosa, F.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Grull, F. R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.W.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Islam, M. S.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jercic, M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370530780; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.M.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kielbowicz, M. M.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.-S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371571227; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.L.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362845670; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074064975; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kundu, Seema; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080192; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lavicka, R.; Lazaridis, L.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411295721; Strunz-Lehner, Christine; Lehrbach, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Litichevskyi, V.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W. J.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Loncar, P.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355080400; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412461684; Marín, Alicia; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, J. A. L.; Martínez, Isabel M.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Mathis, A. M.; Matyja, A.; mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mihaylov, D. L.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325781435; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369405870; Mohanty, B.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Naik, B.; Nair, Rajiv; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal Da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao De Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Nesbo, S. V.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07051349X; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323375618; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Panebianco, S.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Park, J.-W.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833959; Peng, X.; Pereira, L. G.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Pezzi, R. P.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Pozdniakov, V.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Rana, D. B.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ratza, V.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413319628; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Saha, S. K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandoval, A.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Sas, M. H.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413332993; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M. O.; Schmidt, M.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sett, P.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q. Y.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165585781; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thakur, D.; Thakur, J. S.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; tripathy, S.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Umaka, E. N.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Van Der Maarel, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412860996; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250599171; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413533751; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Vértesi, R.; Vickovic, L.; Vigolo, S.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Voscek, D.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369509307; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Witt, W. E.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the charged-particle pseudorapidity density in Pb–Pb collisions at √SNN = 5.02 TeV in centrality classes measured by ALICE. The measurement covers a wide pseudorapidity range from −3.5 to 5, which is sufficient for reliable estimates of the total number of charged particles produced in

  8. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; van Opstal, Edward J.; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size 45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size 50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  9. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav, E-mail: sourav.bhattacharjee@wur.nl [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands); Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han [Wageningen University, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M. [Wageningen University, Division of Toxicology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size {approx}45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size {approx}50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  10. Developing an optical chopper-modulated capacitive probe for measuring surface charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugolini, D; McKinney, R; Harry, G M

    2007-04-01

    Gravitational-wave observatories such as Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) use suspended optics in a Michelson interferometer configuration to measure strains in space between 10 Hz and 3 kHz. One potential noise source in this frequency range is the buildup and motion of surface charge on the optics, which can generate fluctuating electric fields, interfere with position control, and reduce reflectance by attracting dust to the optical surface. We have developed a capacitive probe to measure the magnitude and relaxation time of surface charge deposited on smaller test optics in high vacuum ( approximately 10(-5) Torr). Our device modulates capacitance with a tuning-fork optical chopper between probe and sample, chosen for vacuum compatibility and minimal cost. We have found that the probe has a resolution of (3.5+/-0.5)x10(5) e(-)cm(2) in air, on the order of charging levels that could contribute noise to Advanced LIGO, and sufficient for measuring relaxation times on test optics.

  11. Surface charge-specific interactions between polymer nanoparticles and ABC transporters in Caco-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sourav; Opstal, Edward J. van; Alink, Gerrit M.; Marcelis, Antonius T. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The surface charge-dependent transport of polymeric nanoparticles (PNPs) across Caco-2 monolayers grown on transwell culture systems as an in vitro model for intestinal transport was tested. The transport of well-characterized, monodisperse, and fluorescent tri-block copolymer nanoparticles (TCNPs/size ∼45 nm) and polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs/size ∼50 nm), with different surface charges (positive and negative), was quantified. The positive PNPs showed a higher intracellular uptake and flux across the Caco-2 monolayers than the negative PNPs. Multidrug resistance/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp), a specific ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, was found to play a major role in the cellular efflux of positive PNPs, whereas the multidrug resistance protein 1 took part in the efflux of negative PNPs from Caco-2 cells. The positive PNPs also caused an increased cellular uptake and apical to basolateral transport of the carcinogen PhIP across the Caco-2 monolayer. The flavonoid quercetin, which is known to interact with ABC transporters, promoted the intracellular uptake of different PNPs and interfered with the normal distribution patterns of PNPs in the transwell system. These results indicate that PNPs display surface charge-specific interactions with ABC transporters and can even affect the bioavailability of toxic food-borne compounds (like pro-carcinogens).

  12. A Study of the Relationship between Average Transverse Momentum and Charged Pseudorapidity Density for Pions and Antiprotons at Tevatron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Philip Lawrence [Purdue U.

    1991-12-01

    The transverse momentum of $\\pi^{\\pm}$ and $\\overline{p}$ produced within the pseudorapidity range of $\\eta$ = -0.36 to +1.0 and azimuthal range of $\\phi$ = +2° to $\\phi$ = +18° has been measured in $\\overline{p}p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 546, 1000 and 1800 GeV. The charged multiplicity of each event was measured by either the 240 element cylindrical hodoscope covering the range -3.25 < $\\eta$ < +3.25 or the central drift chamber, which spans a pseudorapidity range of 3.2 units. The average transverse momentum as a function of the pseudorapidity density for mass-identified particles is presented. Pseudorapidity densities as high as 30 particles per unit pseudorapidity have been observed.

  13. High charge carrier density at the NaTaO3/SrTiO3 hetero-interface

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2011-08-05

    The formation of a (quasi) two-dimensional electron gas between the band insulators NaTaO3 and SrTiO3 is studied by means of the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method of density functional theory. Optimization of the atomic positions points to only small changes in the chemical bonding at the interface. Both the p-type (NaO)−/(TiO2)0 and n-type (TaO2)+/(SrO)0 interfaces are found to be metallic with high charge carrier densities. The effects of O vacancies are discussed. Spin-polarized calculations point to the formation of isolated O 2pmagnetic moments, located in the metallic region of the p-type interface.

  14. Density functional theory for disordered alloys with short-range order: Systematic inclusion of charge-correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, D. A.; Ernst, A.; Györffy, B. L.; Staunton, J. B.

    2006-04-01

    For many years, density-functional-based calculations for the total energies of substitutionally disordered alloys have been based upon the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent-potential approximation (KKR-CPA). However, as a result of the single-site nature of the KKR-CPA, such calculations do not take into account important local environmental effects such as charge correlations (the Madelung energy) and chemical short-range order (SRO). Here the above approach is generalized by combining the recently developed Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker nonlocal coherent-potential approximation with density functional theory, showing how these effects may be systematically taken into account. As a first application of the theory, total energy calculations for the bcc Cu50Zn50 solid solution are presented, showing how the total energy varies as a function of SRO. The fcc Cu60Pd40 and Cu77Ni23 systems are also investigated.

  15. Pseudorapidity density of charged particles p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Arend, Andreas; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Asryan, Andzhey; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Francesco; Blanco, F; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boccioli, Marco; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caballero Orduna, Diego; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Wisla; Carena, Francesco; Carlin Filho, Nelson; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castillo Hernandez, Juan Francisco; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crescio, Elisabetta; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Kushal; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Das, Debasish; Dash, Sadhana; Dash, Ajay Kumar; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; De Marco, Nora; Denes, Ervin; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deppman, Airton; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Di Bari, Domenico; Dietel, Thomas; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, Mihir Ranjan; Dutta Majumdar, AK; Elia, Domenico; Emschermann, David Philip; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara; Erdal, Hege Austrheim; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Falchieri, Davide; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Fearick, Roger Worsley; Fehlker, Dominik; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Fenton-Olsen, Bo; Feofilov, Grigory; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago, Alberto; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo; Garishvili, Irakli; Gerhard, Jochen; Germain, Marie; Geuna, Claudio; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Gianotti, Paola; Girard, Martin Robert; Giubellino, Paolo; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez, Ramon; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Gonzalez-Trueba, Laura Helena; Gonzalez-Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Goswami, Ankita; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grajcarek, Robert; 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Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jin Sook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Dong Jo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Bosing, Christian; Kliemant, Michael; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kohler, Markus; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolojvari, Anatoly; Kondratiev, Valery; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Konevskih, Artem; Kour, Ravjeet; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kramer, Frederick; Kravcakova, Adela; Krawutschke, Tobias; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Krus, Miroslav; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kucheriaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paul; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, AB; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kvaerno, Henning; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; Ladron de Guevara, Pedro; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; Lara, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; La Rocca, Paola; Lea, Ramona; Lechman, Mateusz; Lee, Ki Sang; Lee, Sung Chul; Lee, Graham Richard; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lenhardt, Matthieu Laurent; Lenti, Vito; Leon, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Levai, Peter; Lien, Jorgen; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Loenne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera; Loginov, Vitaly; Lohner, Daniel; Loizides, Constantinos; Loo, Kai Krister; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp; Lunardon, Marcello; Luo, Jiebin; Luparello, Grazia; Luzzi, Cinzia; Ma, Ke; Ma, Rongrong; Madagodahettige-Don, Dilan Minthaka; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahapatra, Durga Prasad; Maire, Antonin; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Ludmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Mangotra, Lalit Kumar; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez, Mario Ivan; Martinez Davalos, Arnulfo; Martinez Garcia, Gines; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matthews, Zoe Louise; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Mercado Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mizuno, Sanshiro; Mlynarz, Jocelyn; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Monteno, Marco; Montes, Esther; Moon, Taebong; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Munhoz, Marcelo; Musa, Luciano; Musso, Alfredo; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Nattrass, Christine; Navin, Sparsh; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Niida, Takafumi; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikolic, Vedran; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nikulin, Sergey; Nilsen, Bjorn Steven; Nilsson, Mads Stormo; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Novitzky, Norbert; Nyanin, Alexandre; Nyatha, Anitha; Nygaard, Casper; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Ochirov, Alexander; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Sun Kun; Oh, Saehanseul; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Ostrowski, Piotr Krystian; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozawa, Kyoichiro; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pachr, Milos; Padilla, Fatima; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Painke, Florian; Pajares, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palaha, Arvinder Singh; Palmeri, Armando; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Park, Woo Jin; Passfeld, Annika; Pastircak, Blahoslav; Patalakha, Dmitri Ivanovich; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pavlinov, Alexei; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitri; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perini, Diego; Perrino, Davide; Peryt, Wiktor Stanislaw; Pesci, Alessandro; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petran, Michal; Petris, Mariana; Petrov, Plamen Rumenov; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Piccotti, Anna; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Pitz, Nora; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Planinic, Mirko; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pocheptsov, Timur; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polak, Karel; Polichtchouk, Boris; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf-Houssais, Sarah; Pospisil, Vladimir; Potukuchi, Baba; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puddu, Giovanna; Punin, Valery; Putis, Marian; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Quercigh, Emanuele; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rademakers, Alphonse; Raiha, Tomi Samuli; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Ramirez Reyes, Abdiel; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick; Reicher, Martijn; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riccati, Lodovico; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roed, Ketil; Rohr, David; Rohrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossegger, Stefan; Rossi, Andrea; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovsky, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakaguchi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Shingo; Sakata, Dosatsu; Salgado, Carlos Albert; Salzwedel, Jai; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sano, Satoshi; Santagati, Gianluca; Santoro, Romualdo; Sarkamo, Juho Jaako; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schreiner, Steffen; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schuster, Tim; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Patrick Aaron; Scott, Rebecca; Segato, Gianfranco; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senyukov, Serhiy; Seo, Jeewon; Serci, Sergio; Serradilla, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shabratova, Galina; Shahoyan, Ruben; Sharma, Satish; Sharma, Natasha; Sharma, Rohini; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer, Katherin; Sibiriak, Yury; Siciliano, Melinda; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Skjerdal, Kyrre; Smakal, Radek; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Sogaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soos, Csaba; Soramel, Francesca; Sputowska, Iwona; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Stolpovskiy, Mikhail; Strmen, Peter; Suaide, Alexandre Alarcon do Passo; Subieta Vasquez, Martin Alfonso; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Susa, Tatjana; Symons, Timothy; Szanto de Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szostak, Artur Krzysztof; Szymanski, Maciej; Takahashi, Jun; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tarazona Martinez, Alfonso; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terrevoli, Cristina; Thader, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony; Tlusty, David; Toia, Alberica; Torii, Hisayuki; Toscano, Luca; Trubnikov, Victor; Truesdale, David Christopher; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ulery, Jason Glyndwr; Ullaland, Kjetil; Ulrich, Jochen; Uras, Antonio; Urban, Jozef; Urciuoli, Guido Marie; Usai, Gianluca; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; van Leeuwen, Marco; Vannucci, Luigi; Vargas, Aurora Diozcora; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veldhoen, Misha; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Yury; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopianov, Alexander; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Vladimir; Wagner, Boris; Wan, Renzhuo; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Kengo; Weber, Michael; Wessels, Johannes; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilk, Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, Leonidas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Shiming; Yang, Hongyan; Yasnopolsky, Stanislav; Yi, JunGyu; Yin, Zhongbao; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jongik; Yu, Weilin; Yuan, Xianbao; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zach, Cenek; Zampolli, Chiara; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zaviyalov, Nikolai; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zelnicek, Pierre; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Fengchu; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianlin; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zoccarato, Yannick Denis; Zynovyev, Mykhaylo; Zyzak, Maksym

    2013-01-18

    The charged-particle pseudorapidity density measured over 4 units of pseudorapidity in non-single-diffractive (NSD) p-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV is presented. The average value at midrapidity is measured to be 16.81 $\\pm$ 0.71 (syst.), which corresponds to 2.14 $\\pm$ 0.17 (syst.) per participating nucleon. This is 16% lower than in NSD pp collisions interpolated to the same collision energy, and 84% higher than in d-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 0.2 TeV. The measured pseudorapidity density in p-Pb collisions is compared to model predictions, and provides new constraints on the description of particle production in high-energy nuclear collisions.

  16. Surface charges and Np(V) sorption on amorphous Al- and Fe- silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Nero, M.; Assada, A.; Barillon, R.; Duplatre, G.; Made, B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Sorption onto Si-rich alteration layers of crystalline minerals and nuclear glasses, and onto amorphous secondary silicates of rocks and soils, are expected to retard the migration of actinides in the near- and far-field of HLW repositories. We present experimental and modeling studies on the effects of silicate structure and bulk chemistry, and of solution chemistry, on charges and adsorption of neptunyl ions at surfaces of synthetic, amorphous or poorly ordered silica, Al-silicates and Fe-silicates. The Al-silicates display similar pH-dependent surface charges characterized by predominant Si-O - Si sites, and similar surface affinities for neptunyl ions, irrespective to their Si/Al molar ratio (varying from 10 to 4.3). Such experimental features are explained by incorporation of Al atoms in tetrahedral position in the silicate lattice, leading to only trace amounts of high-affinity Al-OH surface groups due to octahedral Al. By contrast, the structure of the Fe-silicates ensures the occurrence of high-affinity Fe-OH surface groups, whose concentration is shown by proton adsorption measurements to increase with decreasing of the silicate Si/Fe molar ratio (from 10 to 2.3). Nevertheless, experimental data of the adsorption of neptunyl and electrolyte ions show unexpectedly weak effect of the Si/Fe ratio, and suggest predominant Si-OH surface groups. A possible explanation is that aqueous silicate anions, released by dissolution, adsorb at OH Fe - surface groups and / or precipitate as silica gel coatings, because experimental solutions were found at near-equilibrium with respect to amorphous silica. Therefore, the environmental sorption of Np(V) onto Si-rich, amorphous or poorly ordered Al-silicates may primarily depend on pH and silicate specific surface areas, given the low overall chemical affinity of such phases for dissolved metals. By contrast, the sorption of Np(V) on natural, amorphous or poorly ordered Fe-silicates may be a

  17. Lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination of cell surface immunoglobulin: incorporated radioactivity may not reflect relative cell surface Ig density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, R.L.; Yuen, C.C.; Mage, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    Rabbit and mouse splenic lymphocytes were radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase technique, extracted with non-ionic detergent, immunoprecipitated with high titered rabbit anti-kappa antisera, and compared by SDS-PAGE. Mouse sIg peaks were reproducibly larger in size than rabbit sIg peaks (often greater than 10 times). Neither differences in incorporation of label into the rabbit cell surface, nor differences in average sIg density explain this result. Total TCA-precipitable radioactivity was similar in each species. Estimation of the relative amounts of sIg in the mouse and rabbit showed similar average sIg densities. Differences in detergent solubility, proteolytic lability, or antisera used also do not adequately account for this difference. Thus, these data indicate that radioactivity incorporated after lactoperoxidase catalyzed cell surface radioiodination may not reflect cell surface Ig density. Conclusions about cell surface density based upon relative incorporation of radioactivity should be confirmed by other approaches

  18. Experimental and theoretical charge density distribution in a host-guest system: synthetic terephthaloyl receptor complexed to adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Ha; Howard, Sian T; Hanrahan, Jane R; Groundwater, Paul W; Platts, James A; Hibbs, David E

    2012-06-14

    The experimental charge density distributions in a host-guest complex have been determined. The host, 1,4-bis[[(6-methylpyrid-2-yl)amino]carbonyl]benzene (1) and guest, adipic acid (2). The molecular geometries of 1 and 2 are controlled by the presence in the complex of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions and the presence in the host 1 of intramolecular hydrogen bonding motifs. This system therefore serves as an excellent model for studying noncovalent interactions and their effects on structure and electron density, and the transferability of electron distribution properties between closely related molecules. For the complex, high resolution X-ray diffraction data created the basis for a charge density refinement using a pseudoatomic multipolar expansion (Hansen-Coppens formalism) against extensive low-temperature (T = 100 K) single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and compared with a selection of theoretical DFT calculations on the same complex. The molecules crystallize in the noncentrosymmetric space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. A topological analysis of the resulting density distribution using the atoms in molecules methodology is presented along with multipole populations, showing that the host and guest structures are relatively unaltered by the geometry changes on complexation. Three separate refinement protocols were adopted to determine the effects of the inclusion of calculated hydrogen atom anisotropic displacement parameters on hydrogen bond strengths. For the isotropic model, the total hydrogen bond energy differs from the DFT calculated value by ca. 70 kJ mol(-1), whereas the inclusion of higher multipole expansion levels on anisotropic hydrogen atoms this difference is reduced to ca. 20 kJ mol(-l), highlighting the usefulness of this protocol when describing H-bond energetics.

  19. Density-functional calculations of the surface tension of liquid Al and Na

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, D.; Grimson, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations of the surface tensions of liquid Al and Na are described using the full ionic density functional formalism of Wood and Stroud (1983). Surface tensions are in good agreement with experiment in both cases, with results substantially better for Al than those found previously in the gradient approximation. Preliminary minimization with respect to surface profile leads to an oscillatory profile superimposed on a nearly steplike ionic density disribution; the oscillations have a wavellength of about a hardsphere diameter.

  20. The surface charge of oxides and its role in deposition and transport of radioactivity in water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, P.H.; Campbell, A.B.

    1972-01-01

    The role of surface charges in the deposition of suspended oxides on surfaces is discussed. Results of deposition of corrosion-product oxides on surfaces at room temperature and 200 o C are reported. These, together with results of the specific adsorption of Co(II) on negatively charged Fe 3 O 4 suspensions are used to explain the growth of Co-60 radiation fields in water-cooled reactors. (author)