WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface buoy supporting

  1. Response of surface buoy moorings in steady and wave flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    A numerical model has been developed to evaluate the dynamics of surface buoy mooring systems under wave and current loading. System tension response and variation of tension in the mooring line at various depths have been evaluated for deep water...

  2. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  3. System for Monitoring, Determining, and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves in Near Realtime from a Moored Buoy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A moored buoy floating at the ocean surface and anchored to the seafloor precisely measures acceleration, pitch, roll, and Earth's magnetic flux field of the buoy...

  4. Development of a GNSS Buoy for Monitoring Water Surface Elevations in Estuaries and Coastal Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Pin; Huang, Ching-Jer; Chen, Sheng-Hsueh; Doong, Dong-Jiing; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2017-01-18

    In this work, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) buoy that utilizes a Virtual Base Station (VBS) combined with the Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning technology was developed to monitor water surface elevations in estuaries and coastal areas. The GNSS buoy includes a buoy hull, a RTK GNSS receiver, data-transmission devices, a data logger, and General Purpose Radio Service (GPRS) modems for transmitting data to the desired land locations. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to test the capability of the buoy and verify the accuracy of the monitored water surface elevations. For the field tests, the GNSS buoy was deployed in the waters of Suao (northeastern part of Taiwan). Tide data obtained from the GNSS buoy were consistent with those obtained from the neighboring tide station. Significant wave heights, zero-crossing periods, and peak wave directions obtained from the GNSS buoy were generally consistent with those obtained from an accelerometer-tilt-compass (ATC) sensor. The field tests demonstrate that the developed GNSS buoy can be used to obtain accurate real-time tide and wave data in estuaries and coastal areas.

  5. Coherent Wave Measurement Buoy Arrays to Support Wave Energy Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, F.; Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Janssen, T. T.; Barney, P.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    Wave energy is the most abundant form of hydrokinetic energy in the United States and wave energy converters (WECs) are being developed to extract the maximum possible power from the prevailing wave climate. However, maximum wave energy capture is currently limited by the narrow banded frequency response of WECs as well as extended protective shutdown requirements during periods of large waves. These limitations must be overcome in order to maximize energy extraction, thus significantly decreasing the cost of wave energy and making it a viable energy source. Techno-economic studies of several WEC devices have shown significant potential to improve wave energy capture efficiency through operational control strategies that incorporate real-time information about local surface wave motions. Integral Consulting Inc., with ARPA-E support, is partnering with Sandia National Laboratories and Spoondrift LLC to develop a coherent array of wave-measuring devices to relay and enable the prediction of wave-resolved surface dynamics at a WEC location ahead of real time. This capability will provide necessary information to optimize power production of WECs through control strategies, thereby allowing for a single WEC design to perform more effectively across a wide range of wave environments. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000514.

  6. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Measurement of Near-Surface Salinity, Temperature and Directional Wave Spectra using a Novel Wave-Following, Lagrangian Surface Contact Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Results from a surface contact drifter buoy which measures near-surface conductivity ( 10 cm depth), sea state characteristics and near-surface water temperature ( 2 cm depth) are described. This light (autonomous, with low power requirements and solar panel battery recharging. Onboard sensors include an inductive toroidal conductivity probe for salinity measurement, a nine-degrees-of-freedom motion package for derivation of directional wave spectra and a thermocouple for water temperature measurement. Data retrieval for expendable, ocean-going operation uses an onboard Argos transmitter. Scientific results as well as data processing algorithms are presented from laboratory and field experiments which support qualification of buoy platform measurements. These include sensor calibration experiments, longer-term dock-side biofouling experiments during 2013-2014 and a series of short-duration ocean deployments in the Gulf Stream in 2014. In addition, a treatment method will be described which appears to minimize the effects of biofouling on the inductive conductivity probe when in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and ease of deployment, scores, perhaps hundreds of these novel instruments could be deployed from ships or aircraft during process studies or to provide surface validation for satellite-based measurements, particularly in high precipitation regions.

  8. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1991 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free-drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components of the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  9. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1990 are proposed with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (US) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components on the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation values are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  10. On rationally supported surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Juttler, B.; Sir, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the class of surfaces which are equipped with rational support functions. Any rational support function can be decomposed into a symmetric (even) and an antisymmetric (odd) part. We analyze certain geometric properties of surfaces with odd and even rational support functions....... In particular it is shown that odd rational support functions correspond to those rational surfaces which can be equipped with a linear field of normal vectors, which were discussed by Sampoli et al. (Sampoli, M.L., Peternell, M., Juttler, B., 2006. Rational surfaces with linear normals and their convolutions...... with rational surfaces. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 23, 179-192). As shown recently, this class of surfaces includes non-developable quadratic triangular Bezier surface patches (Lavicka, M., Bastl, B., 2007. Rational hypersurfaces with rational convolutions. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 24, 410426; Peternell, M...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34402, Lat: 28.21788 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020724-20020920.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020911-20030305.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040622-20040808.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040919-20050411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060326-20071017.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020224-20020420.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20070902.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020918-20030314.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050413-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10283, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020315-20021023.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020424-20020802.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011020-20011225.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040629-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72288, Lat: 15.23746 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050921-20060525.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040924-20051014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81595, Lat: 27.85396 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20060915-20080828.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.50m; Data Range: 20030801-20030810.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34402, Lat: 28.21788 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011022-20020325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020922-20030316.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050411-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020505-20020810.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040209-20041002.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051016-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030812-20040428.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060918-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10289, Lat: 05.88463 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20080401-20100410.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10289, Lat: 05.88463 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20080401-20090515.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060917-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011017-20020120.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74252, Lat: 25.77290 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20030724-20040923.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  4. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56228, Lat: -14.28372 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20060218-20080223.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051020-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; CNMI, GUA; Long: 144.79778, Lat: 13.51902 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20030924-20040531.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  7. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91588, Lat: 25.96764 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20090910-20100922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; CNMI, GUA; Long: 144.80048, Lat: 13.52900 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20070513-20090405.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TAU; Long: -169.50890, Lat: -14.24409 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20060304-20080229.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20021001-20030321.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74250, Lat: 25.77240 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20040924-20060910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060326-20080401.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. Upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) from Satellite-tracked drifting buoys (drifters) as part of the Global Drifter Program for Hawaii region 1980/02/01 - 2009/03/31 (NODC Accession 0063296)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global...

  14. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  15. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  16. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  17. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  18. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    transmeters. This paper discusses the design aspects and performance characteristics of these buoys presenting a small fraction of the considerable data set acquired. The requiremnts for further inclusion of certain sensors and hardware are described...

  19. Water temperature, salinity, and surface meteorology measurements collected from the Tropical Moored Buoys Array in the equatorial oceans from November 1977 to March 2017. (NODC Accession 0078936)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program is a multi-national effort to provide data in real-time for climate research and forecasting. Major components include...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-11-20 to 2007-05-08 (NODC Accession 0117495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117495 includes Surface underway, biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South...

  1. IPAB Antarctic Drifting Buoy Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), through participating research organizations in various countries,...

  2. NDBC Standard Meteorological Buoy Data, 1970-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) distributes meteorological data from moored buoys maintained by NDBC and others. Moored buoys are the weather sentinels of the...

  3. Design of Buoys for Mounting Wind Turbines at Exposed Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Beytullah; Çelıkkol, Barbaros; Swift, Robinson

    2018-04-01

    In this study, two designs for a buoy capable of supporting a 10 kW wind turbine and its tower were developed to operate at the University of New Hampshire's Center of Ocean Renewable Energy testing site located off the Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire. The buoys are to be moored by a catenary chain system. To evaluate wave response, two Froude-scaled models were constructed, tested, and compared at the Ocean Engineering wave tank at the University of New Hampshire. These buoys have been implemented and compared with wave tank measurements of the spar displacement at a reference elevation 2.44 m above the mean water level.

  4. Downwelling radiation at the sea surface in the central Mediterranean: one year of shortwave and longwave irradiance measurements on the Lampedusa buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Bommarito, Carlo; Anello, Fabrizio; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Meloni, Daniela; Monteleone, Francesco; Pace, Giandomenico; Piacentino, Salvatore; Sferlazzo, Damiano

    2017-04-01

    An oceanographic buoy has been developed and deployed in August 2015 about 3.3 miles South West of the island of Lampedusa, at 35.49°N, 12.47°E, in the central Mediterranean Sea. The buoy was developed within the Italian RITMARE flagship project, and contributes to the Italian fixed-point oceanographic observation network. The buoy is an elastic beacon type and is intended to study air-sea interactions, propagation of radiation underwater, and oceanographic properties. The buoy measurements complement the atmospheric observations carried out at the long-term Station for Climate Observations on the island of Lampedusa (www.lampedusa.enea.it; 35.52°N, 12.63°E), which is located about 15 km E-NE of the buoy. Underwater instruments and part of the atmospheric sensors are presently being installed on the buoy. Measurements of downwelling shortwave, SW, and longwave, LW, irradiance, have been made since September 2015 with a Kipp and Zonen CMP21 pyranometer and a Kipp and Zonen CGR4 pyrgeometer, respectively. The radiometers are mounted on a small platform at about 7 m above sea level, on an arm protruding southward of the buoy. High time resolution data, at 1 Hz, have been acquired since December 2015, together with the sensors' attitude. Data from the period December 2015-December 2016 are analyzed and compared with measurements made on land at the Station for Climate Observations at 50 m above mean sea level. This study aims at deriving high quality determinations of the downwelling radiation over sea in the central Mediterranean. The following aspects will be discussed: - representativeness of time averaging of irradiance measurements over moving platforms; - comparison of downwelling irradiance measurements made over land and over ocean, and identification of possible correction strategies to infer irradiances over the ocean from close by measurements made over land; - influence of dome cleaning on the quality of measurements; - envisaging possible corrections

  5. An autonomous drifting buoy system for long term pCO2 observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Wakita, M.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have been carried out around the world to understand what happens to carbon dioxide (CO2) once it is emitted into the atmosphere, and how it relates to long-term climate change. However, the sea surface pCO2 observations on volunteer observation ships and research vessels concentrated in the North Atlantic and North Pacific. To assess the spatial and temporal variations of surface pCO2 in the global ocean, new automated pCO2 sensor which can be used in platform systems such as buoys or moorings is strongly desired. We have been developing the small drifting buoy system (diameter 250-340 mm, length 470 mm, weight 15 kg) for pCO2 measurement, with the support of the Japan EOS Promotion Program (JEPP), the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The objective is to provide simplified, automated measurements of pCO2 over all the world's oceans, an essential factor in understanding how the ocean responds to climate change. The measurement principle for the pCO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry (e.g. Lefèvre et al., 1993; Degrandpre et al., 1995). The CO2 in the surrounding seawater equilibrates with the indicator solution across the gas permeable membranes. The equilibration process causes a change of pH in the indicator solution, which results in the change of optical absorbance. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. In our analytical system, we used an amorphous fluoropolymer tubing form of AF-2400 by DuPontTM for the gas permeable membrane due to its high gas permeability coefficients. The measurement system of the sensor consisted mainly of a LED light source, optical fibers, a CCD detector, and a downsized PC. The measured data were transmitted to the laboratory by satellite communication (Argos system). In the laboratory experiment, we obtained a high response time (less than 2 minutes) and a precision

  6. Numerical simulation and experimental analysis for a Risers Uphold Sub-Surface Buoy (BSR); Simulacao numerica e ensaio experimental da Boia de Sub-superficie de Suporte de Risers - BSSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jairo B. de; Almeida, Jose Carlos L. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rangel, Marcos; Fernandes, Antonio C.; Santos, Melquisedec F. dos; Sales Junior, Joel Sena [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents results, numeric and experimental, due to installation operation of a Risers Uphold Sub-Surface Buoy, (BSR). This kind of installation developed by PETROBRAS is unique in the world. The work of BSR installation was based on a numeric pre analysis to verify the system and determine the main parameters to be experimentally verified. The second phase of the work was the experimental analysis in a deep water ocean basin. s. The work describes the BSR and their main accessories, the experimental environment and the model constructed in aluminum in a 1:12 scale and the main results. (author)

  7. GNSS Buoy Array in the Ocean for Natural Hazard Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Yamamoto, S. I.; Iwakiri, N.; Toyoshima, M.; Koshikawa, N.; Motohashi, O.; Hashimoto, G.; Wada, A.

    2015-12-01

    The GNSS buoy system for tsunami early warning has been developed in Japan. The system has been implemented as a national wave monitoring system and its record was used to update the tsunami warning at the 3.11 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The lessons learned in this experience was that the buoys are placed only less than 20km from the coast, which was not far enough for effective evacuation of people. We thus tried to improve the system for putting the buoy much farther from the coast. First, we tried to implement, different from current baseline mode RTK-GPS, a real-time PPP analysis strategy for positioning. In addition, we tried to use a two-way satellite data transmission in contrast with current surface radio system. We have made a series of experiments for this purpose in 2013 and 2014. A buoy of about 40km south of Shikoku, southwest Japan, was used for this purpose. GEONET data were used to obtain precise orbits and clocks of satellites. Then, the information was transferred to the GNSS buoy using LEX signal of QZSS satellite system. The received information on the buoy were used for real-time PPP analysis for every second. The obtained buoy position was then transmitted to the ground base, through an engineering test satellite, ETS-VIII. The received data was then disseminated to public through the internet. Both filtered short-term and long-term waves, were separately shown on the webpage. The success of these experiments indicates that the GNSS buoy can be placed at least more than 1,500 km from the ground based tracking network. Given this success, we would now be able to deploy a new GNSS buoy array system in the wide ocean. An array in the ocean can be used for ionospheric and atmospheric research in the same region as well as tsunami or ocean bottom crustal deformation monitoring through an application to the GNSS-acoustic system. We are now designing a regional GNSS buoy array in the western Pacific as a synthetic natural hazard mitigation system.

  8. Variations in return value estimate of ocean surface waves - a study based on measured buoy data and ERA-Interim reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Naseef, T.; Sanil Kumar, V.

    2017-10-01

    An assessment of extreme wave characteristics during the design of marine facilities not only helps to ensure their safety but also assess the economic aspects. In this study, return levels of significant wave height (Hs) for different periods are estimated using the generalized extreme value distribution (GEV) and generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) based on the Waverider buoy data spanning 8 years and the ERA-Interim reanalysis data spanning 38 years. The analysis is carried out for wind-sea, swell and total Hs separately for buoy data. Seasonality of the prevailing wave climate is also considered in the analysis to provide return levels for short-term activities in the location. The study shows that the initial distribution method (IDM) underestimates return levels compared to GPD. The maximum return levels estimated by the GPD corresponding to 100 years are 5.10 m for the monsoon season (JJAS), 2.66 m for the pre-monsoon season (FMAM) and 4.28 m for the post-monsoon season (ONDJ). The intercomparison of return levels by block maxima (annual, seasonal and monthly maxima) and the r-largest method for GEV theory shows that the maximum return level for 100 years is 7.20 m in the r-largest series followed by monthly maxima (6.02 m) and annual maxima (AM) (5.66 m) series. The analysis is also carried out to understand the sensitivity of the number of observations for the GEV annual maxima estimates. It indicates that the variations in the standard deviation of the series caused by changes in the number of observations are positively correlated with the return level estimates. The 100-year return level results of Hs using the GEV method are comparable for short-term (2008 to 2016) buoy data (4.18 m) and long-term (1979 to 2016) ERA-Interim shallow data (4.39 m). The 6 h interval data tend to miss high values of Hs, and hence there is a significant difference in the 100-year return level Hs obtained using 6 h interval data compared to data at 0.5 h interval. The

  9. Mooring Line for an Oceanographic Buoy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A mooring line for an oceanographic buoy system includes four sections. The first section is a protected cable that is connectable to the buoy. The second section is...

  10. CTD, current meter, meteorological buoy, and bottle data from the Gulf of Mexico from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms in support of LATEX A from 18 March 1993 to 23 September 1993 (NODC Accession 9400149)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, current meter, meteorological buoy, and bottle data were collected from the Gulf of Mexico from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms. Data were collected by...

  11. Rip current monitoring using GPS buoy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, DongSeob; Kim, InHo; Kang, DongSoo

    2014-05-01

    The occurrence of rip current in the Haeundae beach, which is one of the most famous beaches in South Korea, has been threatening beach-goers security in summer season annually. Many coastal scientists have been investigating rip currents by using field observations and measurements, laboratory measurements and wave tank experiments, and computer and numerical modeling. Rip current velocity is intermittent and may rapidly increase within minutes due to larger incoming wave groups or nearshore circulation instabilities. It is important to understand that changes in rip current velocity occur in response to changes in incoming wave height and period as well as changes in water level. GPS buoys have been used to acquire sea level change data, atmospheric parameters and other oceanic variables in sea for the purposes of vertical datum determination, tide correction, radar altimeter calibration, ocean environment and marine pollution monitoring. Therefore, we adopted GPS buoy system for an experiment which is to investigate rip current velocity; it is sporadic and may quickly upsurge within minutes due to larger arriving wave groups or nearshore flow uncertainties. In this study, for high accurate positioning of buy equipment, a Satellite Based Argumentation System DGPS data logger was deployed to investigate within floating object, and it can be acquired three-dimensional coordinate or geodetic position of buoy with continuous NMEA-0183 protocol during 24 hours. The wave height measured by in-situ hydrometer in a cross-shore array clearly increased before and after occurrence of rip current, and wave period also was lengthened around an event. These results show that wave height and period correlate reasonably well with long-shore current interaction in the Haeundae beach. Additionally, current meter data and GPS buoy data showed that rip current velocities, about 0.2 m/s, may become dangerously strong under specific conditions. Acknowledgement This research was

  12. Physical and optical data collected from drifting buoys between May 1993 - December 1996 (NODC Accession 0000586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling and downwelling irradiances were collected from surface optical drifter buoys off the California coast (NE Pacific limit-180) from 05 May 1993 to 06...

  13. Buoy-Rope-Drum Wave Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A buoy-rope-drum wave power system is a new type of floating oscillating buoy wave power device, which absorbs energy from waves by buoy-rope-drum device. Based on the linear deep water wave theory and pure resistive load, with cylinder buoy as an example, the research sets up the theoretical model of direct-drive buoy-rope-drum wave power efficiency and analyzes the influence of the mass and load of the system on its generating efficiency. It points out the two main categories of the efficient buoy-rope-drum wave power system: light thin type and resonance type, and optimal designs of their major parameters are carried out on the basis of the above theoretical model of generating efficiency.

  14. Design of a Low-cost Oil Spill Tracking Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Hu, X.; Yu, F.; Dong, S.; Chen, G.

    2017-12-01

    As the rapid development of oil exploitation and transportation, oil spill accidents, such as Prestige oil spill, Gulf of Mexico oil spill accident and so on, happened frequently in recent years which would result in long-term damage to the environment and human life. It would be helpful for rescue operation if we can locate the oil slick diffusion area in real time. Equipped with GNSS system, current tracking buoys(CTB), such as Lagrangian drifting buoy, Surface Velocity Program (SVP) drifter, iSLDMB (Iridium self locating datum marker buoy) and Argosphere buoy, have been used as oil tracking buoy in oil slick observation and as validation tools for oil spill simulation. However, surface wind could affect the movement of oil slick, which couldn't be reflected by CTB, thus the oil spill tracking performance is limited. Here, we proposed an novel oil spill tracking buoy (OSTB) which has a low cost of less than $140 and is equipped with Beidou positioning module and sails to track oil slick. Based on hydrodynamic equilibrium model and ocean dynamic analysis, the wind sails and water sails are designed to be adjustable according to different marine conditions to improve tracking efficiency. Quick release device is designed to assure easy deployment from air or ship. Sea experiment was carried out in Jiaozhou Bay, Northern China. OSTB, SVP, iSLDMB, Argosphere buoy and a piece of oil-simulated rubber sheet were deployed at the same time. Meanwhile, oil spill simulation model GNOME (general NOAA operational modeling environment) was configured with the wind and current field, which were collected by an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) mounted with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) and wind speed and direction sensors. Experimental results show that the OSTB has better relevance with rubber sheet and GNOME simulation results, which validate the oil tracking ability of OSTB. With low cost and easy deployment, OSTB provides an effective way for oil spill numerical

  15. IPAB Antarctic Drifting Buoy Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), through participating research organizations in various countries,...

  16. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Gricius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys, which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  17. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  18. Evidence that grey seals (Halichoerus grypus use above-water vision to locate baited buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Fjälling

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishing gear in the Baltic is often raided by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus. The seals remove the fish and damage the nets, or entangle themselves and drown. In order to develop ways of mitigating the seals-fisheries conflict, it is important to know exactly how the seals locate the fishing gear. A field experiment was conducted in order to clarify whether seals use their vision above water to do this. Bait (herring; Clupea harengus was attached to the anchor lines of buoys of the type that is commonly used to mark the position of fishing gear. In all, 643 buoys were set. Some of the buoys (210 were also fitted with camera traps. Weather data were collected from official weather stations nearby. Bait loss (mean 18% was significantly correlated with buoy size (P = 0.002 and wind speed (P = 0.04. There was a significant association between bait loss and seal observations near the buoys (P = 0.05. Five photos of grey seals were obtained from the camera traps. No fish-eating birds, such as cormorants or mergansers, were ever observed near the buoys or caught on camera. It was concluded that a main cause of missing bait was scavenging by grey seals, and that they did use above-water vision to locate the buoys. It was also concluded that wind strength (i.e. wave action contributed tothe bait loss. The camera trap buoys had a somewhat lower bait loss than the other buoys (P = 0.054, which was attributed to a scaring effect. Neither the number of seal observations nor the bait loss differed significantly between the 2 study areas in the experiment (P = 0.43 and P = 0.83, respectively. Bait loss was not affected by the buoy colour (red, white, or grey; P = 0.87. We suggest that the findings of this experiment could be put into practice in a seal-disturbed area by deploying a number of decoy buoys, or by hiding live buoys below the surface of the water. This would increase the cost of foraging for the seals, and hence discourage them from exploiting

  19. Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Green, Jennifer L.; Chau, Savio N.; Curell, Philip C.; Dempsey, Cathy A.; Patterson, Linda P.; Robbins, William; Steele, Michael A.; DAnnunzio, Anthony; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap is a guide for developing the technologies needed to enable the supportable, sustainable, and affordable exploration of the Moon and other destinations beyond Earth. Supportability is defined in terms of space maintenance, repair, and related logistics. This report considers the supportability lessons learned from NASA and the Department of Defense. Lunar Outpost supportability needs are summarized, and a supportability technology strategy is established to make the transition from high logistics dependence to logistics independence. This strategy will enable flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. The supportability roadmap defines the general technology selection criteria. Technologies are organized into three categories: diagnostics, test, and verification; maintenance and repair; and scavenge and recycle. Furthermore, "embedded technologies" and "process technologies" are used to designate distinct technology types with different development cycles. The roadmap examines the current technology readiness level and lays out a four-phase incremental development schedule with selection decision gates. The supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop technologies with the widest possible capability and utility while minimizing the impact on crew time and training and remaining within the time and cost constraints of the program.

  20. Design of self-supporting surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vouga, Etienne

    2012-07-01

    Self-supporting masonry is one of the most ancient and elegant techniques for building curved shapes. Because of the very geometric nature of their failure, analyzing and modeling such strutures is more a geometry processing problem than one of classical continuum mechanics. This paper uses the thrust network method of analysis and presents an iterative nonlinear optimization algorithm for efficiently approximating freeform shapes by self-supporting ones. The rich geometry of thrust networks leads us to close connections between diverse topics in discrete differential geometry, such as a finite-element discretization of the Airy stress potential, perfect graph Laplacians, and computing admissible loads via curvatures of polyhedral surfaces. This geometric viewpoint allows us, in particular, to remesh self-supporting shapes by self-supporting quad meshes with planar faces, and leads to another application of the theory: steel/glass constructions with low moments in nodes. © 2012 ACM 0730-0301/2012/08-ART87.

  1. Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a transform incident offshore swell-spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

  2. On the Optimization of Point Absorber Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A point absorbing wave energy converter (WEC is a complicated dynamical system. A semi-submerged buoy drives a power take-off device (PTO, which acts as a linear or non-linear damper of the WEC system. The buoy motion depends on the buoy geometry and dimensions, the mass of the moving parts of the system and on the damping force from the generator. The electromagnetic damping in the generator depends on both the generator specifications, the connected load and the buoy velocity. In this paper a velocity ratio has been used to study how the geometric parameters buoy draft and radius, assuming constant generator damping coefficient, affects the motion and the energy absorption of a WEC. It have been concluded that an optimal buoy geometry can be identified for a specific generator damping. The simulated WEC performance have been compared with experimental values from two WECs with similar generators but different buoys. Conclusions have been drawn about their behaviour.

  3. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Elizabeth; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Dumville, Jo C; Middleton, Victoria; Cullum, Nicky

    2015-09-03

    Pressure ulcers (i.e. bedsores, pressure sores, pressure injuries, decubitus ulcers) are areas of localised damage to the skin and underlying tissue. They are common in the elderly and immobile, and costly in financial and human terms. Pressure-relieving support surfaces (i.e. beds, mattresses, seat cushions etc) are used to help prevent ulcer development. This systematic review seeks to establish:(1) the extent to which pressure-relieving support surfaces reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers compared with standard support surfaces, and,(2) their comparative effectiveness in ulcer prevention. In April 2015, for this fourth update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 15 April 2015) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials, published or unpublished, that assessed the effects of any support surface for prevention of pressure ulcers, in any patient group or setting which measured pressure ulcer incidence. Trials reporting only proxy outcomes (e.g. interface pressure) were excluded. Two review authors independently selected trials. Data were extracted by one review author and checked by another. Where appropriate, estimates from similar trials were pooled for meta-analysis. For this fourth update six new trials were included, bringing the total of included trials to 59.Foam alternatives to standard hospital foam mattresses reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in people at risk (RR 0.40 95% CI 0.21 to 0.74). The relative merits of alternating- and constant low-pressure devices are unclear. One high-quality trial suggested that alternating-pressure mattresses may be more cost effective than alternating-pressure overlays in a UK context.Pressure-relieving overlays on the operating table reduce postoperative pressure ulcer incidence

  4. FOULING ORGANISMS OF BUOYS WITHIN MAKHACHKALA SEAPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Imachova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is investigated biofouling buoys within Makhachkala seaport. Seasonal dynamics of development of community, structure species and trophic structure is revealed. It is established vertical zonality in distribution of fouling.

  5. Worldwide Buoy Technology Survey. Volume 1. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    WB Weiseler Bojen (Germany - Manufacturer) WGDB Wine Glass Discrepancy Buoy WHOI Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ZLBC Zeni Lite Buoy Co. (Japan...de Nantes - St, Nazaire, Port Autonome de Bordeaux , and Port Autonome de Marseille. Overseas locations also include Antigua and St. Frias in the...navigation. The navigation aids used along the Norwegian coast are tailored to the needs of the specific geographic and climatic conditions prevailing

  6. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19781122 to 19810113 (NODC Accession 8600071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 359 Drifting Surface Buoys were deployed in the Southern Hemisphere oceans from November 22, 1978 to January 13, 1981 as part of the First Global Atmospheric...

  7. IABP Drifting Buoy Pressure, Temperature, Position, and Interpolated Ice Velocity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) maintains a network of drifting buoys to provide meteorological and oceanographic data for real-time operational...

  8. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  9. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b) Transmitters...

  10. Pacific Ocean buoy temperature date - TAO/TRITON database & National Buoy Data Center database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pacific Ocean buoy temperature data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Carbone, F., M. Landis, C.N. Gencarelli, A. Naccarato, F. Sprovieri,...

  11. Pressure relieving support surfaces: a randomised evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, J; Nelson, E A; Cranny, G; Iglesias, C P; Hawkins, K; Cullum, N A; Phillips, A; Spilsbury, K; Torgerson, D J; Mason, S

    2006-07-01

    To determine differences between alternating pressure overlays and alternating pressure replacement mattresses with respect to the development of new pressure ulcers, healing of existing pressure ulcers, patient acceptability and cost-effectiveness of the different pressure-relieving surfaces. Also to investigate the specific additional impact of pressure ulcers on patients' well-being. A multicentre, randomised, controlled, open, fixed sample, parallel-group trial with equal randomisation was undertaken. The trial used remote, concealed allocation and intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis. The main trial design was supplemented with a qualitative study involving a purposive sample of 20-30 patients who developed pressure ulcers, to assess the impact of the pressure ulcers on their well-being. In addition, a focus group interview was carried out with clinical research nurses, who participated in the PRESSURE (Pressure RElieving Support SUrfaces: a Randomised Evaluation) Trial, to explore the experiences of their role and observations of pressure area care. The study took place in 11 hospital-based research centres within six NHS trusts in England. Acute and elective patients aged 55 years or older and admitted to vascular, orthopaedic, medical or care of the elderly wards in the previous 24 hours were investigated. Patients were randomised to either an alternating pressure overlay or an alternating pressure mattress replacement, with mattress specifications clearly defined to enable the inclusion of centres using products from different manufacturers, and to exclude hybrid mattress systems (which either combine foam or constant low pressure with alternating pressure in one mattress, or can be used as either an overlay or a replacement mattress). Development of a new pressure ulcer (grade pressures ulcers, patient acceptability and cost-effectiveness. In total, 6155 patients were assessed for eligibility to the trial and 1972 were randomised: 990 to the alternating

  12. Drifting buoy data collected by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) in oceans world-wide from 1984-05-01 to 1998-10-27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains drifting buoy data collected from May 1984 through October 1998 from buoys deployed by the National Data Buoy Center, Stennis Space Center,...

  13. High frequency monitoring of the coastal marine environment using the MAREL buoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, S; Guillou, J; Tréguer, P; Woerther, P; Delauney, L; Follenfant, E; Gontier, O; Hamon, M; Leilde, B; Masson, A; Tartu, C; Vuillemin, R

    2004-06-01

    The MAREL Iroise data buoy provides physico-chemical measurements acquired in surface marine water in continuous and autonomous mode. The water is pumped 1.5 m from below the surface through a sampling pipe and flows through the measuring cell located in the floating structure. Technological innovations implemented inside the measuring cell atop the buoy allow a continuous cleaning of the sensor, while injection of chloride ions into the circuit prevents biological fouling. Specific sensors for temperature, salinity, oxygen and fluorescence investigated in this paper have been evaluated to guarantee measurement precision over a 3 month period. A bi-directional link under Internet TCP-IP protocols is used for data, alarms and remote-control transmissions with the land-based data centre. Herein, we present a 29 month record for 4 parameters measured using a MAREL buoy moored in a coastal environment (Iroise Sea, Brest, France). The accuracy of the data provided by the buoy is assessed by comparison with measurements of sea water weekly sampled at the same site as part of SOMLIT (Service d'Observation du Milieu LIToral), the French network for monitoring of the coastal environment. Some particular events (impact of intensive fresh water discharges, dynamics of a fast phytoplankton bloom) are also presented, demonstrating the worth of monitoring a highly variable environment with a high frequency continuous reliable system.

  14. Strategies to Support Exploration of Mars' Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L.; Sykes, M.; Farr, T.; Adams, J.; Blaney, D.

    2003-01-01

    Surface Visible infrared spectroscopy has a long history of providing fundamental compositional discoveries in the solar system. However, we are entering a new era of Mars exploration in which missions will take place nearly every 2 years.The visible infrared spectral community thus faces a more rapid influx in data volume and variety than it has previously handled.Visible- infrared instruments are on the 1996 Mars Global Surveyor, 2001 Mars Odyssey 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers, 2003 Mars Express, 2005 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter; and likely on the 2007 and 2009 missions. Interpretations of those data sets provide a critical foundation for geologic and climatic interpretations as well as an opportunity to select landing sites.

  15. An improvement of the GPS buoy system for detecting tsunami at far offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Koshimura, S.; Matsushita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for detecting a tsunami before its arrival at coasts and thereby mitigating tsunami disaster. The system was first deployed in 1997 for a short period in the Sagami bay, south of Tokyo, for basic experiments, and then deployed off Ofunato city, northeastern part of Japan, for the period 2001-2004. The system was then established at about 13km south of Cape Muroto, southwestern part of Japan, since 2004. Five tsunamis of about 10cm have been observed in these systems, including 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.3), 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3), 2004 Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw7.4), 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). These experiments clearly showed that GPS buoy is capable of detecting tsunami with a few centimeter accuracy and can be monitored in near real time by applying an appropriate filter, real-time data transmission using radio and dissemination of obtained records of sea surface height changes through internet. Considering that the system is a powerful tool to monitor sea surface variations due to wind as well as tsunami, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism implemented the system in a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information network for Ports and HArbourS (NOWPHAS) system and deployed the system at 15 sites along the coasts around the Japanese Islands. The system detected the tsunami due to the 11th March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with higher than 6m of tsunami height at the site Off South Iwate (Kamaishi). The Japan Meteorological Agency that was monitoring the record updated the level of the tsunami warning to the greatest value due to the result. Currently, the GPS buoy system uses a RTK-GPS which requires a land base for obtaining precise location of the buoy by a baseline analysis. This algorithm limits the distance of the buoy to, at most, 20km from the coast as the accuracy of positioning gets much worse as the baseline distance becomes longer

  16. The November 2011 irruption of buoy barnacles Dosima fascicularis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dissection failed to reveal foreign attachment sites in 40 floats, but digesting 70 floats in potassium hydroxide revealed small plastic fragments in eight floats, one tar ball and one Velella skeleton. The 100 study colonies were comprised solely of buoy barnacles, but a Janthina shell had one buoy barnacle and 18 Lepas ...

  17. System Identification and Control of a Joint-Actuated Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    servomotors does not impart any motion on the vessel. Frye et al. [2] have done work to point a directional antenna from a floating buoy. Their...Patent No. 6433736B1, August 2006. [2] K. Doherty D. Frye and A. Hinton. Design and Evaluation of a Directional Antenna for Ocean Buoys. Technical

  18. Temperature profile and pressure data collected using moored buoy from the Atlantic Ocean with support from the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 04 May to 18 December 1975 (NODC Accession 7601247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and pressure data were collected using moored buoy from the Atlantic Ocean from May 4, 1975 to December 18, 1975. Data were submitted by...

  19. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Acceleration Signals Measured from a Wave Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals. PMID:23966188

  20. Support Surface and Attention Focus Effects on Elderly Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sarhadi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Verbal instructions related to directing the focus of attention to the movement itself or to its effects on or outcomes in the environment affects learning and performing movement skills. The pattern of these effects differs with increase in task difficulty. The goal of this study was to explore the effects of support surface and attention focus on the balance in elderly. Methods & Materials: Twenty-eight elderly (65 & older with a history of one or more falls in the last year were participated in the study. The design of the study was two factors within group with repeated measures. Participants were tested in two conditions of moving and stable support surface and three conditions of baseline, internal, and external focus of attention. Results: Difference in support surface from stable to moving (i.e. increasing task difficulty generally decreased the level of performance. There was a strong interaction between conditions off support surface and conditions of attention focus (P<0.001. The maximum decrease in performance happened in internal focus of attention/moving support surface and the minimum decrease occurred in external focus of attention/moving support surface. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the external focus of attention was most significant and more beneficial to the balance performance in the moving unstable support surface (increased task difficulty than other conditions of attention focus. The interesting finding was that not instructing at all is more effective on balance performance than internal focus of attention instruction in elderly people with a history of falling.

  1. Surface meteorological data collected from Offshore Buoy by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2004-05-17 to 2017-08-01 (NCEI Accession 0162183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162183 contains biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected at Offshore Buoy, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  2. Buoy perspective of a high-resolution global ocean vector wind analysis constructed from passive radiometers and active scatterometers (1987-present)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lisan; Jin, Xiangze

    2012-11-01

    The study used 126 buoy time series as a benchmark to evaluate a satellite-based daily, 0.25-degree gridded global ocean surface vector wind analysis developed by the Objectively Analyzed airs-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project. The OAFlux winds were produced from synthesizing wind speed and direction retrievals from 12 sensors acquired during the satellite era from July 1987 onward. The 12 sensors included scatterometers (QuikSCAT and ASCAT), passive microwave radiometers (AMSRE, SSMI and SSMIS series), and the passive polarimetric microwave radiometer from WindSat. Accuracy and consistency of the OAFlux time series are the key issues examined here. A total of 168,836 daily buoy measurements were assembled from 126 buoys, including both active and archive sites deployed during 1988-2010. With 106 buoys from the tropical array network, the buoy winds are a good reference for wind speeds in low and mid-range. The buoy comparison shows that OAFlux wind speed has a mean difference of -0.13 ms-1 and an RMS difference of 0.71 ms-1, and wind direction has a mean difference of -0.55 degree and an RMS difference of 17 degrees. Vector correlation of OAFlux and buoy winds is of 0.9 and higher over almost all the sites. Influence of surface currents on the OAFlux/buoy mean difference pattern is displayed in the tropical Pacific, with higher (lower) OAFlux wind speed in regions where wind and current have the opposite (same) sign. Improved representation of daily wind variability by the OAFlux synthesis is suggested, and a decadal signal in global wind speed is evident.

  3. Saildrone fleet could help replace aging buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In April, two semiautonomous drones, developed by Saildrone, a marine tech startup based in Alameda, California, in close collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington, D.C., are set to return from an 8-month tour of the Pacific Ocean. This the first scientific test for the drones, which are powered only by the wind and sun, in the Pacific Ocean. The voyage is an important step in showing that such drones, carrying 15 different sensors, could help replace an aging and expensive array of buoys that are the main way scientists sniff out signs of climate-disrupting El Niño events. If successful, scientists envision fleets of similar drones spreading across the ocean, inviting thoughts of what it could be like to do oceanography without a ship.

  4. Curves and surfaces represented by polynomial support functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sir, Z.; Gravesen, Jens; Juttler, B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies shapes (curves and surfaces) which can be described by (piecewise) polynomial support functions. The class of these shapes is closed under convolutions, offsetting, rotations and translations. We give a geometric discussion of these shapes and present methods for the approximat...

  5. An overview of a moored ocean data buoy programme

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    This paper addresses the rationale. history, strategy and management techniques used in the developmcnt of NIO oceanographic data buoy programme. The system is used for short term as well as long term oceanographic observations. The technical...

  6. Determination of wave direction using an orbital following buoy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Almeida, A; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Vethamony, P.

    Software has been developed in FORTRAN language using a personal computer for the determination of wave direction from time series measurements of heave, pitch and roll of an orbital following buoy. The method of digital band pass filtering describ...

  7. Directional waverider buoy in Indian waters - Experiences of NIO

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    parameters except the wave direction. Using the advanced technology, M/s Datawell bv, Netherlands, has developed directional waverider buoy which enables to measure the wave direction in addition to wave height and period. To augument this latest measurement...

  8. Response of Land-Sea Interface in Xiamen Bay to Extreme Weather Events Observed with the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a Multifunctional Sensors System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Hong, H.; Pan, W.; Zhang, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent climate observations suggest that global climate change may result in an increase of extreme weather events (such as tropical cyclones, intense precipitation i.e. heavy rains) in frequency and/or intensity in certain world regions. Subtropical coastal regions are often densely populated areas experiencing rapid development and widespread changes to the aquatic environment. The biogeochemical and ecological responses of coastal systems to extreme weather events are of increasing concern. Enhanced river nutrients input following rain storms has been linked to the ecological responses at land-sea interface. These land-sea interactions can be studied using multifunctional sensors systems. In our study, the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a monitoring system with multiple sensors, was deployed in Xiamen Bay for near real time measurements of different parameters. The Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array is a deep water net cage which functions in long-term synchronous observation of dynamic ecological characteristics with the support of an aerograph, water-watch, LOBO (Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory), ADCP, CTD chain system, YSI vertical profiler, flow cytometer, sea surface camera, and "communication box". The study showed that rain storms during multiple typhoons resulted in greater fluctuations of salinity, N concentration, and other water environmental conditions, which might have been connected with algal blooms (so-called red tide) in Xiamen Bay.

  9. A Lunar Surface System Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Taleghani, barmac K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a Supportability Technology Development Roadmap as a guide for developing capabilities intended to allow NASA s Constellation program to enable a supportable, sustainable and affordable exploration of the Moon and Mars. Presented is a discussion of supportability, in terms of space facility maintenance, repair and related logistics and a comparison of how lunar outpost supportability differs from the International Space Station. Supportability lessons learned from NASA and Department of Defense experience and their impact on a future lunar outpost is discussed. A supportability concept for future missions to the Moon and Mars that involves a transition from a highly logistics dependent to a logistically independent operation is discussed. Lunar outpost supportability capability needs are summarized and a supportability technology development strategy is established. The resulting Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Strategy defines general criteria that will be used to select technologies that will enable future flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. This strategy also introduces the concept of exploiting flight hardware as a supportability resource. The technology roadmap involves development of three mutually supporting technology categories, Diagnostics Test and Verification, Maintenance and Repair, and Scavenging and Recycling. The technology roadmap establishes two distinct technology types, "Embedded" and "Process" technologies, with different implementation and thus different criteria and development approaches. The supportability technology roadmap addresses the technology readiness level, and estimated development schedule for technology groups that includes down-selection decision gates that correlate with the lunar program milestones. The resulting supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop a set

  10. The wave buoy analogy - estimating high-frequency wave excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the wave buoy analogy where a ship is considered as a wave buoy, so that measured ship responses are used as a basis to estimate wave spectra and associated sea state parameters. The study presented follows up on a previous paper, Nielsen [Nielsen UD. Response-based estimation...... be estimated reasonably well, even considering high-frequency wave components of a wind sea wave spectrum....

  11. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of small, essentially molecular metal complexes and metal clusters on support surfaces have brought new insights to catalysis and point the way to systematic catalyst design. We summarize recent work unraveling effects of key design variables of site-isolated catalysts: the metal, metal nuclearity, support, and other ligands on the metals, also considering catalysts with separate, complementary functions on supports. The catalysts were synthesized with the goal of structural simplicity and uniformity to facilitate incisive characterization. Thus, they are essentially molecular species bonded to porous supports chosen for their high degree of uniformity; the supports are crystalline aluminosilicates (zeolites) and MgO. The catalytic species are synthesized in reactions of organometallic precursors with the support surfaces; the precursors include M(L)2(acetylacetonate)1-2, with M = Ru, Rh, Ir, or Au and the ligands L = C2H4, CO, or CH3. Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 are used as precursors of supported metal clusters, and some such catalysts are made by ship-in-a-bottle syntheses to trap the clusters in zeolite cages. The simplicity and uniformity of the supported catalysts facilitate precise structure determinations, even in reactive atmospheres and during catalysis. The methods of characterizing catalysts in reactive atmospheres include infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and complementary methods include density functional theory and atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging of individual metal atoms. IR, NMR, XANES, and microscopy data demonstrate the high degrees of uniformity of well-prepared supported species. The characterizations determine the compositions of surface metal complexes and clusters, including the ligands and the metal-support

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030806-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10283, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020315-20021024.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030826-20040809.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020224-20040208.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030812-20040926.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81593, Lat: 27.85397 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040927-20060912.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020918-20030811.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20011026-20020917.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020922-20030806.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63378, Lat: 25.44642 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060907-20080918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20051016-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040208-20060307.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030718-20030826.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20010920-20020612.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34457, Lat: 28.41858 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20041005-20060917.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060917-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72285, Lat: 15.23750 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030819-20050921.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040924-20051015.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040919-20050411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20050411-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030824-20040922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020911-20030718.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. Review of 5kW wave energy LOPF buoy design study and test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia

    The purpose of this project was to document the mechanical power production against a target power curve of a 5kW grid connected wave energy buoy in Nissum Bredning at Helligsø. This test site is typically used for open sea testing of scale 1:10 devices in irregular waves. In order to better adapt...... to the moderate wave height, the buoy was down sized by a factor of 3 and a new lower target power curve for the buoy was agreed to. Downsizing the project also had the advantage that it is more cost effective and fast to experiment with small wave energy devices than with big devices, at an early development...... stage, in line with the TRL and four phases development (proof of concept, design and feasibility study, field trials and half or full‐scale trials) promoted by AAU and supported by the marine renewable energy sector. To complement this, the IEC 114 standards define 3 stages of testing (1=small scale...

  17. Heaving buoys, point absorbers and arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnes, Johannes; Hals, Jørgen

    2012-01-28

    Absorption of wave energy may be considered as a phenomenon of interference between incident and radiated waves generated by an oscillating object; a wave-energy converter (WEC) that displaces water. If a WEC is very small in comparison with one wavelength, it is classified as a point absorber (PA); otherwise, as a 'quasi-point absorber'. The latter may be a dipole-mode radiator, for instance an immersed body oscillating in the surge mode or pitch mode, while a PA is so small that it should preferably be a source-mode radiator, for instance a heaving semi-submerged buoy. The power take-off capacity, the WEC's maximum swept volume and preferably also its full physical volume should be reasonably matched to the wave climate. To discuss this matter, two different upper bounds for absorbed power are applied in a 'Budal diagram'. It appears that, for a single WEC unit, a power capacity of only about 0.3 MW matches well to a typical offshore wave climate, and the full physical volume has, unfortunately, to be significantly larger than the swept volume, unless phase control is used. An example of a phase-controlled PA is presented. For a sizeable wave-power plant, an array consisting of hundreds, or even thousands, of mass-produced WEC units is required.

  18. Physical profile data collected in the Equatorial Pacific during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys, February 23 - December 16, 2005 (NODC Accession 0002644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 2005, CTD data were collected in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys to support...

  19. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from MTU1 Buoy by Michigan Technological University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123646)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123646 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  20. Support surfaces: beds, mattresses, overlays-oh my!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Dianne

    2005-06-01

    The prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers are major concerns for health care providers across the care continuum. The selection of a support surface is an important component of a comprehensive pressure ulcer prevention program. The accepted standard in clinical practice for pre-venting pressure ulcers and other complications of immobility is to either turn patients manually at frequent intervals or to use a pressure-reducing device. The longer a patient is immobilized, the more profound will be the systemic complications. The costs associated with the complications of immobility are staggering in terms of human suffering, physiologic damage,and real dollars. A variety of specialty beds, mattresses, and overlays have been designed to address pressure, shear, friction, and moisture. Limited data exist regarding the efficacy of these products. Clinicians want to choose a support surface for their patients on the basis of product performance. With the push toward establishing standards for testing methods and reporting information, clinicians can look forward to making support surface decisions based on the evidence and outcome data resulting from controlled clinical studies and expert opinion and consensus.

  1. Autonomous Ice Mass Balance Buoys for Seasonal Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, J. D.; Planck, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Parno, J. T.; Elder, B. C.; Richter-Menge, J.; Polashenski, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    The ice mass-balance represents the integration of all surface and ocean heat fluxes and attributing the impact of these forcing fluxes on the ice cover can be accomplished by increasing temporal and spatial measurements. Mass balance information can be used to understand the ongoing changes in the Arctic sea ice cover and to improve predictions of future ice conditions. Thinner seasonal ice in the Arctic necessitates the deployment of Autonomous Ice Mass Balance buoys (IMB's) capable of long-term, in situ data collection in both ice and open ocean. Seasonal IMB's (SIMB's) are free floating IMB's that allow data collection in thick ice, thin ice, during times of transition, and even open water. The newest generation of SIMB aims to increase the number of reliable IMB's in the Arctic by leveraging inexpensive commercial-grade instrumentation when combined with specially developed monitoring hardware. Monitoring tasks are handled by a custom, expandable data logger that provides low-cost flexibility for integrating a large range of instrumentation. The SIMB features ultrasonic sensors for direct measurement of both snow depth and ice thickness and a digital temperature chain (DTC) for temperature measurements every 2cm through both snow and ice. Air temperature and pressure, along with GPS data complete the Arctic picture. Additionally, the new SIMB is more compact to maximize deployment opportunities from multiple types of platforms.

  2. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  3. GPS buoys for stage monitoring of large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, H.; Hung, N. G.; Thoss, H.; Schöne, T.

    2012-01-01

    SummaryMonitoring of river stages is one of the basic observations required for understanding catchment hydrology and hydraulic systems. There are numerous measurement techniques available for this purpose, but in case of large rivers technical as well as financial problems often restrict the use of traditional techniques, e.g. pressure probes or float gauges. We explored the potential of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) based water level measurements for stage monitoring by developing small and easy to handle buoys equipped with high-quality geodetic GNSS receivers. The design of the buoys was particularly suited to the requirements of application in rivers, distinguishing them from typical wave rider buoys used in marine offshore applications. The advantages of buoys include the freedom of positioning and their quick and easy deployment. The developed buoys were tested in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, at two different locations: on the Mekong river under high currents, and the second in a small nearby lake with hydraulic connections to a major channel with negligible currents. For this study, only data of the Global Positioning System (GPS) was collected and processed. Processing was undertaken in baseline mode using a nearby reference station and validated against standard pressure gauge data. The recorded stages proved to be of high quality (i.e. mean absolute error position changes of the buoy and thus water movement. In the presented case study alternating currents caused by ocean tides could be detected, thus providing additional information about the hydraulic system. We conclude that the developed buoys add well to the existing hydrological monitoring pool and are a good option for the monitoring in rivers where traditional methods are technically difficult to deploy or too costly.

  4. Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy: Stage 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi

    This report presents the results of the first stage of the project "Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy". The objectives of this stage are to develop a numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy, a self-reacting wave energy device consisting of two heaving bodies, and to investigate a number...... and a summary of the main findings is presented. A numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy has been developed in the frequency domain using two alternative formulations of the equations of motion. The model is capable of predicting the power capture, motion response, and power take-off loads of the device...... configuration are imposed to give a more realistic prediction of the power capture and help ensure a fair comparison. Recommendations with regard to the HAB design are finally suggested....

  5. Meteorological buoy measurements in the Iceland Sea, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún

    2017-10-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) conducted meteorological buoy measurements in the central Iceland Sea in the time period 2007-2009, specifically in the northern Dreki area on the southern segment of the Jan Mayen Ridge. Due to difficulties in deployment and operations, in situ measurements in this region are sparse. Here the buoy, deployment and measurements are described with the aim of giving a future user of the data set information that is as comprehensive as possible. The data set has been quality-checked, suspect data removed and the data set made publicly available from PANGAEA Data Publisher (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.876206).

  6. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    two buoys moved north and the third moved south. Over the open sea regime the buoys moved with a speed of approximately 30 cm/s at an angle of about 35 degrees to the left of the wind. The overall tendencies seen in the buoy drift are similar to those...

  7. Assessment of patient support surfaces: principle, practice and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rithalia, S

    2005-01-01

    Pressure ulcers cause great pain and suffering to patients as well as unnecessary strain on nursing staff. Their treatment is both costly and time consuming. Every effort therefore should be directed towards their prevention. Understanding of the aetiology of pressure ulcers is still incomplete and assessment of devices aimed at prevention is difficult. Over the years, numerous parameters, including interface pressure and transcutaneous blood gas measurements, have been used to evaluate mattresses and cushions. However, the quality of the data gathered is variable and its clinical interpretation remains unsatisfactory. It could be said that the science of evaluation of support surfaces is still at a formative stage, as clinical validation of many of the approaches has yet to be carried out.

  8. Surface Modifications of Support Partitions for Stabilizing Biomimetic Membrane Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius

    2011-01-01

    Black lipid membrane (BLM) formation across apertures in an ethylene tetra-fluoroethylene (ETFE) partition separating two aqueous compartments is an established technique for the creation of biomimetic membranes. Recently multi-aperture BLM arrays have attracted interest and in order to increase...... with a high signal-to-noise (s/n) ratio. We demonstratesd this by reconstituting gA and α-hemolysin (α-HL) into BLM arrays. The improvement in membrane array lifetime and s/n ratio demonstrates that surface plasma polymerization of the supporting partition can be used to increase the stability of biomimetic...... modified partitions were similar and significantly lower than for arrays formed using untreated ETFE partitions. For single side n-hexene modification average membrane array lifetimes were not significantly changed compared to untreated ETFE. Double-sided n-hexene modification greatly improved average...

  9. Postural Stability Margins as a Function of Support Surface Slopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder

    Full Text Available This investigation examined the effects of slope of the surface of support (35°, 30°, 20°, 10° Facing(Toe Down, 0° Flat and 10°, 20°, 25° Facing (Toe Up and postural orientation on the margins of postural stability in quiet standing of young adults. The findings showed that the center of pressure-CoP (displacement, area and length had least motion at the baseline (0° Flat platform condition that progressively increased as a function of platform angle in both facing up and down directions. The virtual time to collision (VTC dynamics revealed that the spatio-temporal margins to the functional stability boundary were progressively smaller and the VTC time series also more regular (SampEn-Sample Entropy as slope angle increased. Surface slope induces a restricted stability region with lower dimension VTC dynamics that is more constrained when postural orientation is facing down the slope. These findings provide further evidence that VTC acts as a control variable in standing posture that is influenced by the emergent dynamics of the individual-environment-task interaction.

  10. Oceansat-2 and RAMA buoy winds: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gators also state that the errors induced, excluding atmospheric stability, are small in comparison to other errors, related to the satellite's measure- ments. To account for the lack of temperature and humidity data, buoy wind has been converted to 10 m height using the minimal error profile method (Peixoto and Oort 1992).

  11. Oceansat–2 and RAMA buoy winds: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 6. Oceansat–2 and RAMA buoy winds: A ... In the complete annual cycle (2011), the monthly mean root mean square differences in the wind speed and wind direction were less than ∼2.5 ms−1 and ∼20°, respectively. The better match between the ...

  12. Model Predictive Control of Buoy Type Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces the Wavestar wave energy converter and presents the implementation of model predictive controller that maximizes the power generation. The ocean wave power is extracted using a hydraulic electric generator which is connected to an oscillating buoy. The power generator is an a...

  13. Air Deployable Underwater Glider and Buoy Development for Arctic and Oceanographic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnos, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    LBI developed under a NOAA SBIR the AXIB (Airborne eXpendable Ice Buoy). The initial buoy was developed to collect barometric pressure, air temperature two meters above the surface and sea surface or ice temperature. A number of these AXIBs have been successfully deployed in the Arctic and Antarctic. Currently we are in the process of integrating additional sensors to include an anemometer, thermistor chain and hydrophones. Further development is in process for the integration of solar and wind recharging systems and lower power sensors and processing LBI developed under an ONR SBIR Grant two Air Deployable Underwater Gliders. They are primarily designed for air deployment from Navy P-3 or P-8 Aircraft though easily deployed from other aircraft or helicopters. The A-size (4 7/8'dia. X 36' long) and the 12 ¾ (12 ¾' dia. X 9' 9' long). On the development side we are in the process of integrating sensors and enhancing the battery storage capacity. We anticipate a broad range of Oceanographic sensing missions for these Gliders.

  14. Optimization of wave energy capture of wave-powered navigational lighting buoys of seadromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Guangda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper proposes an optimized design for wave-power navigational lighting buoys of seadromes.[Methods] Based on the theory of three-dimensional potential flow, the buoyant motion response of a buoy is calculated. A type of array of wave-power navigational lighting buoys located in an offshore seadrome is proposed,and a procedure for the design optimization of its component buoys is presented. Matching the best Power Take-Off(PTO damping, the diameter to draft ratio and array distance with the best energy capture width ratio are acquired, and the energy capture for the short-term forecast of the buoy array is accomplished. On this basis, combined with the actual sea conditions, energy capture for the long-term forecast of an individual buoy is accomplished. The influence of the buoy diameter, buoy draft and array distance on the energy capture width ratio is discussed.[Results] The results show that the energy capture width ratio is at its greatest when the diameter to draft ratio is between 2.4-2.6; the smaller the distance between array buoys, the greater the energy capture width of each buoy.[Conclusions] The results can provide a reference and suggestions for the optimization of the design of wave energy generation for arrays buoy.

  15. Small Flux Buoy for Characterizing Marine Surface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    platform for air-sea interaction study since early 1960s (Fisher and Spiess 1963). It was designed to be a stable platform for mounting various types of...COARE algorithm. J. of Climate, 16, 571–591. Fisher F. H., and F. N. Spiess , 1963: FLIP-floating instrument platform. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 35, 1633

  16. Online decision support system for surface irrigation management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenchao; Cui, Yuanlai

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation has played an important role in agricultural production. Irrigation decision support system is developed for irrigation water management, which can raise irrigation efficiency with few added engineering services. An online irrigation decision support system (OIDSS), in consist of in-field sensors and central computer system, is designed for surface irrigation management in large irrigation district. Many functions have acquired in OIDSS, such as data acquisition and detection, real-time irrigation forecast, water allocation decision and irrigation information management. The OIDSS contains four parts: Data acquisition terminals, Web server, Client browser and Communication system. Data acquisition terminals are designed to measure paddy water level, soil water content in dry land, ponds water level, underground water level, and canals water level. A web server is responsible for collecting meteorological data, weather forecast data, the real-time field data, and manager's feedback data. Water allocation decisions are made in the web server. Client browser is responsible for friendly displaying, interacting with managers, and collecting managers' irrigation intention. Communication system includes internet and the GPRS network used by monitoring stations. The OIDSS's model is based on water balance approach for both lowland paddy and upland crops. Considering basic database of different crops water demands in the whole growth stages and irrigation system engineering information, the OIDSS can make efficient decision of water allocation with the help of real-time field water detection and weather forecast. This system uses technical methods to reduce requirements of user's specialized knowledge and can also take user's managerial experience into account. As the system is developed by the Browser/Server model, it is possible to make full use of the internet resources, to facilitate users at any place where internet exists. The OIDSS has been applied in

  17. FIRE_AX_SOF_BUOY_DFT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Surface of the Ocean, Fluxes and Interaction with the Atmosphere (SOFIA)...

  18. A new integrated oceanographic/atmospheric facility in the central Mediterranean: the instrumented buoy contributing to the Lampedusa Climate Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Bommarito, Carlo; Meloni, Daniela; Monteleone, Francesco; Pace, Giandomenico; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Anello, Fabrizio; Artale, Vincenzo; Bergamasco, Alessandro; Colella, Simone; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Marullo, Salvatore; Piacentino, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Volpe, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    The Station for Climate Observations on the island of Lampedusa (35.52°N, 12.63°E; http://www.lampedusa.enea.it) has been operational since 1997 in the central Mediterranean Sea and is dedicated at long-term measurements of atmospheric parameters related to climate. Measurements, also made in collaboration with different international Institutes, contribute to several global networks (GAW/WMO; NOAA Cooperative air sampling network; AERONET; ICOS, etc.). As an integration of the climate observatory, an oceanographic buoy was deployed in August 2015 about 3.3 miles South West of the island of Lampedusa, at 35.49°N, 12.47°E. The buoy was developed within the Italian RITMARE flagship project. The ocean depth at the buoy site is 74 m. Primary scientific objectives of the marine observatory are: to investigate air sea interactions in the central Mediterranean; to study the surface energy budget; to characterize the oceanic optical properties, and to investigate links with the carbon cycle. The site will act as a cal/val facility for satellite observations. A first set of measurements of downwelling shortwave and longwave irradiances were activated in September 2015, and more than 1 year of continuous measurements are now available. The other instruments are presently being installed and will become operational soon. They include CTD, O2, and temperature sensors at various depths; 7-band upwelling and downwelling radiation sensors at two depths; downwelling and upwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared (broadband) irradiances at the surface; meteorological parameters. Additional developments are linked to the measurement of oceanic pCO2 and atmospheric turbulence, including sensible heat fluxes. The buoy is open to further expansions and developments.

  19. Pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial: cost effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Cynthia; Nixon, Jane; Cranny, Gillian; Nelson, E Andrea; Hawkins, Kim; Phillips, Angela; Torgerson, David; Mason, Su; Cullum, Nicky

    2006-06-17

    To assess the cost effectiveness of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients admitted to hospital. Cost effectiveness analysis carried out alongside the pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial; a multicentre UK based pragmatic randomised controlled trial. 11 hospitals in six UK NHS trusts. Intention to treat population comprising 1971 participants. Kaplan Meier estimates of restricted mean time to development of pressure ulcers and total costs for treatment in hospital. Alternating pressure mattresses were associated with lower overall costs (283.6 pounds sterling per patient on average, 95% confidence interval--377.59 pounds sterling to 976.79 pounds sterling) mainly due to reduced length of stay in hospital, and greater benefits (a delay in time to ulceration of 10.64 days on average,--24.40 to 3.09). The differences in health benefits and total costs for hospital stay between alternating pressure mattresses and alternating pressure overlays were not statistically significant; however, a cost effectiveness acceptability curve indicated that on average alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays were associated with an 80% probability of being cost saving. Alternating pressure mattresses for the prevention of pressure ulcers are more likely to be cost effective and are more acceptable to patients than alternating pressure overlays.

  20. Neutron reflectometry of soft films supported on electrified surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, A.I. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemistry, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Vezvaie, M. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Burgess, I.J., E-mail: ian.burgess@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Dept. of Chemistry, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The specular reflection of neutrons is a non-destructive, nuclear-based technique, sensitive to low atomic number elements, has a high penetration depth, and can distinguish between isotopes of the same element. This makes neutron reflectometry (NR) especially effective for the study of biological membranes, soft films and buried interfaces. Furthermore, commonly used NR substrates such as silicon and quartz single-crystals can be modified with thin metallic layers to form conductive supports allowing for the precise control of the electrical state of the interface. The coupling of NR with in-situ electrochemical control provides a powerful tool to study the composition of soft and/or buried interfaces under conditions that mimic, for example, transmembrane potentials or corrosion potentials. Here we report our recent efforts to perform in situ electrochemical NR studies and the previous experimental framework from which they were developed. The talk will address technical and infrastructure challenges but emphasize scientific highlights from our work with biomimetic phospholipid membranes. 'Isotopic variation has been applied to quantify the electroporation and distribution of water as a function of surface charge density in lipid bilayers. These studies have more recently been extended to study the location of redox-active ubiquinone (coenzyme Q{sub 10}) in biomimetic lipid bilayers as a function of potential and temperature. To probe the location of ubiquinone, a phospholipid bilayer was prepared on a gold coated solid substrate using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett and vesicle fusion techniques. The combination of these two methods allowed for the composition of the inner and outer membrane leaflets to be varied. Preliminary results show sensitivity to the location of a small biologically relevant molecule. (author)

  1. UpTempO Buoys for Understanding and Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-28

    order to better understand the details of ice - albedo feedback. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sea ice , retreat, Arctic Ocean, UpTempO, Upper Temperature of...fall cooling, and interannually as sea ice retreats and the warming season lengthens. The effort was a contribution to the multi-investigator ONR...relationships between sea ice retreat and upper ocean warming. ACCOMPLISHED I. Buoy deployments and data: We worked with the Pacific Gyre (PG

  2. An intelligent subsurface buoy design for measuring ocean ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Wang, Lei

    2012-11-01

    A type of ultra-low power subsurface buoy system is designed to measure and record ocean ambient noise data. The buoy utilizes a vector hydrophone (pass band 20Hz-1.2kHz) and a 6-element vertical hydrophone array (pass band 20Hz-2kHz) to measure ocean ambient noise. The acoustic signals are passed through an automatically modified gain, a band pass filter, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion module. They are then stored in high-capacity flash memory. In order to identify the direction of noise source, the vector sensor measuring system has integrated an electric-magnetic compass. The system provides a low-rate underwater acoustic communication system which is used to report the buoy state information and a high-speed USB interface which is used to retrieve the recorded data on deck. The whole system weighs about 125kg and can operate autonomously for more than 72 hours. The system's main architecture and the sea-trial test results are provided in this paper.

  3. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations, 1998-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  4. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and

  5. Evaluating the Effectiveness of DART® Buoy Networks Based on Forecast Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B.; Denbo, Donald W.; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y.; Mofjeld, Harold O.; Spillane, Michael C.; Titov, Vasily V.

    2018-03-01

    A performance measure for a DART® tsunami buoy network has been developed. DART® buoys are used to detect tsunamis, but the full potential of the data they collect is realized through accurate forecasts of inundations caused by the tsunamis. The performance measure assesses how well the network achieves its full potential through a statistical analysis of simulated forecasts of wave amplitudes outside an impact site and a consideration of how much the forecasts are degraded in accuracy when one or more buoys are inoperative. The analysis uses simulated tsunami amplitude time series collected at each buoy from selected source segments in the Short-term Inundation Forecast for Tsunamis database and involves a set for 1000 forecasts for each buoy/segment pair at sites just offshore of selected impact communities. Random error-producing scatter in the time series is induced by uncertainties in the source location, addition of real oceanic noise, and imperfect tidal removal. Comparison with an error-free standard leads to root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for DART® buoys located near a subduction zone. The RMSEs indicate which buoy provides the best forecast (lowest RMSE) for sections of the zone, under a warning-time constraint for the forecasts of 3 h. The analysis also shows how the forecasts are degraded (larger minimum RMSE among the remaining buoys) when one or more buoys become inoperative. The RMSEs provide a way to assess array augmentation or redesign such as moving buoys to more optimal locations. Examples are shown for buoys off the Aleutian Islands and off the West Coast of South America for impact sites at Hilo HI and along the US West Coast (Crescent City CA and Port San Luis CA, USA). A simple measure (coded green, yellow or red) of the current status of the network's ability to deliver accurate forecasts is proposed to flag the urgency of buoy repair.

  6. A study of the optimum draft of multiple resonance power buoys for maximizing electric power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To maximize electric power production using wave energy extractions from resonance power buoys, the maximum motion displacement spectra of the buoys can primarily be obtained under a given wave condition. In this study, wave spectra observed in shoaling water were formulated. Target resonance frequencies were established from the arithmetic means of modal frequency bands and the peak frequencies. The motion characteristics of the circular cylindrical power buoys with corresponding drafts were then calculated using numerical models without considering PTO damping force. Results showed that the heave motions of the power buoys in shoaling waters with insufficient drafts produced greater amplification effects than those in deep seas with sufficient drafts.

  7. Support mechanism for a mirrored surface or other arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1987-01-01

    An adjustment mechanism such as a three point spherical mount for adjustably supporting a planer mirror or other type of arrangement relative to a plane defined by a given pair of intersecting perpendicular axes is disclosed herein. This mechanism includes first means for fixedly supporting the mirror or other arrangement such that the latter is positionable within the plane defined by the given pair of intersecting perpendicular axes. This latter means and the mirror or other such arrangement are supported by second means for limited movement back and forth about either of the intersecting axes. Moreover, this second means supports the first means and the mirror or other arrangement such that the latter is not movable in any other way whereby the point on the mirror or other arrangement coinciding with the intersection of the given axes does not move or float, thereby making the ability to adjust the mirror or other such arrangement more precise and accurate.

  8. Parametric estimation in the wave buoy analogy - an elaborated approach based on energy considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2014-01-01

    An accurate estimation of the ocean wave directional spectrum at the location of an advancing ship is very useful for the ship master to improve operation and safety in a seaway. Research has been conducted to obtain sea state estimates by the Wave Buoy Analogy. The method deals with processing...... the ship’s wave-induced responses based on different statistical inferences including parametric and non-parametric approaches. This paper considers a concept to improve the estimate obtained by the parametric method for sea state estimation. The idea is illustrated by an analysis made on full...... are considered as the input of the estimation process. A comparison is made between the results and also with some in-hand outputs from other estimation sources, e.g., wave radar measurements and sea surface elevation by microwave sensors. The discussed and analyzed procedure could also lead to an automatic...

  9. A Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device and Numerical Study on Buoy Shape and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyin Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wave and current energy can be harnessed in the East China Sea and South China Sea; however, both areas are subject to high frequencies of typhoon events. To improve the safety of the ocean energy conversion device, a Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device (FOECD with a single mooring system is proposed, which can be towed to avoid severe ocean conditions or for regular maintenance. In this paper, the structure of the FOECD is introduced, and it includes a catamaran platform, an oscillating buoy part, a current turbine blade, hydraulic energy storage and an electrical generation part. The numerical study models the large catamaran platform as a single, large buoy, while the four floating buoys were modeled simply as small buoys. Theoretical models on wave energy power capture and efficiency were established. To improve the suitability of the buoy for use in the FOECD and its power harvesting capability, a numerical simulation of the four buoy geometries was undertaken. The shape profiles examined in this paper are cylindrical, turbinate (V-shaped and U-shaped cone with cylinder, and combined cylinder-hemisphere buoys. Simulation results reveal that the suitability of a turbinate buoy is the best of the four types. Further simulation models were carried out by adjusting the tip radius of the turbinate buoy. Three performance criteria including suitability, power harvesting capability and energy capture efficiency were analyzed. It reveals that the turbinate buoy has almost the same power harvesting capabilities and energy capture efficiency, while its suitability is far better than that of a cylindrical buoy.

  10. Schrodinger operators with delta-interactions supported on conical surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Behrndt, J.; Exner, Pavel; Lotoreichik, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 35 (2014), s. 355202 ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S; GA MŠk 7AMB13AT010 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Schrödinger operator * delta potential * infinite discrete spectrum Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2014

  11. Moball-Buoy Network: A Near-Real-Time Ground-Truth Distributed Monitoring System to Map Ice, Weather, Chemical Species, and Radiations, in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, F.; Shahabi, C.; Burdick, J.; Rais-Zadeh, M.; Menemenlis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The work had been funded by NASA HQ's office of Cryospheric Sciences Program. Recent observations of the Arctic have shown that sea ice has diminished drastically, consequently impacting the environment in the Arctic and beyond. Certain factors such as atmospheric anomalies, wind forces, temperature increase, and change in the distribution of cold and warm waters contribute to the sea ice reduction. However current measurement capabilities lack the accuracy, temporal sampling, and spatial coverage required to effectively quantify each contributing factor and to identify other missing factors. Addressing the need for new measurement capabilities for the new Arctic regime, we propose a game-changing in-situ Arctic-wide Distributed Mobile Monitoring system called Moball-buoy Network. Moball-buoy Network consists of a number of wind-propelled self-powered inflatable spheres referred to as Moball-buoys. The Moball-buoys are self-powered. They use their novel mechanical control and energy harvesting system to use the abundance of wind in the Arctic for their controlled mobility and energy harvesting. They are equipped with an array of low-power low-mass sensors and micro devices able to measure a wide range of environmental factors such as the ice conditions, chemical species wind vector patterns, cloud coverage, air temperature and pressure, electromagnetic fields, surface and subsurface water conditions, short- and long-wave radiations, bathymetry, and anthropogenic factors such as pollutions. The stop-and-go motion capability, using their novel mechanics, and the heads up cooperation control strategy at the core of the proposed distributed system enable the sensor network to be reconfigured dynamically according to the priority of the parameters to be monitored. The large number of Moball-buoys with their ground-based, sea-based, satellite and peer-to-peer communication capabilities would constitute a wireless mesh network that provides an interface for a global

  12. Sensor Buoy System for Monitoring Renewable Marine Energy Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Emilio; Quiles, Eduardo; Correcher, Antonio; Morant, Francisco

    2018-03-22

    In this paper we present a multi-sensor floating system designed to monitor marine energy parameters, in order to sample wind, wave, and marine current energy resources. For this purpose, a set of dedicated sensors to measure the height and period of the waves, wind, and marine current intensity and direction have been selected and installed in the system. The floating device incorporates wind and marine current turbines for renewable energy self-consumption and to carry out complementary studies on the stability of such a system. The feasibility, safety, sensor communications, and buoy stability of the floating device have been successfully checked in real operating conditions.

  13. Oceanographic temperature and salinity measurements collected using drifting buoys in the Arctic Ocean from 2003 to 2006 (NODC Accession 0014672)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic temperature and salinity measurements collected using drifting buoys in the Arctic Ocean. Data from JAMSTEC drifting buoys which were deployed both as...

  14. System for supporting conception in the field of surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evrard, J.M.; Gras, M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of the techniques issued from artificial intelligence for assisting the development of a computer technical memory on a representative subject, which is the surface treatments and coating in tribology, is illustrated. The development of the system is composed of several steps: data acquisition and formatting representation, data validation and software. Particular attention is given to the dialogue between the user and the system. The study shows that the development of the following points are indispensable: the possibility of following the user's reasoning and coming back to previous steps or exploring several parallel ways [fr

  15. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  16. Drifting buoy data observed during 1985 through 1989 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9100057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 2 January 1985 to 31 December 1989. Data were processed by...

  17. Drifting buoy data observed during 1992 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 01 January 1992 to 31 December 1992. Data were processed by...

  18. Oceanographic profile Temperature and Salinity measurements collected during the Arctic Buoy Program using drifting buoy in the Arctic from 1985-1994 (NODC Accession 0001497)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between 1985 and 1994, the Polar Science Center at the University of Washington deployed 24 ARGOS data buoys in ice floes on the Arctic Ocean, from which six...

  19. Comparison of AMSR-2 wind speed and sea surface temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Nanda Kishore Reddy

    2018-02-14

    Feb 14, 2018 ... Arabian Sea (AS), hereafter called as the North- ern Indian Ocean (NIO). In the tropics, the surface ... dated AMSR-2 data over the Atlantic and Pacific. Oceans and inferred that the data are in good ... Location of moored buoys in the North Indian Ocean. Latitude and longitude of each buoy is mentioned in ...

  20. Support surfaces in the prevention of pressure ulcers in surgical patients: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Karoline Faria; Nascimento, Kleiton Gonçalves; Nicolussi, Adriana Cristina; Chavaglia, Suzel Regina Ribeiro; de Araújo, Cleudmar Amaral; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2017-08-01

    To assess the scientific evidence about the types of support surfaces used in intraoperative surgical practice in the prevention of pressure ulcers due to surgical positioning. This is an integrative literature review. The electronic databases Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Lilacs, and CINAHL were used. The descriptors surgical patients, support surfaces, perioperative care, patient positioning, and pressure ulcer were used in the search strategy. Articles that addressed the use of support surfaces intraoperatively, published between 1990 and 2016, were selected. The PRISMA guidelines were used to structure the review. Of 18 evaluated studies, most were in English, followed by Portuguese and Spanish; most were performed by nurses. The most commonly cited support surfaces were viscoelastic polymer, micropulse mattresses, gel based mattresses, and foam devices. There are gaps in knowledge regarding the most efficient support surfaces and the specifications of the products used to prevent pressure ulcers due to surgical positioning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Spectral asymptotics of a strong δ′ interaction supported by a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exner, Pavel; Jex, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Attractive δ ′ interactions supported by a smooth surface are considered. • Surfaces can be either infinite and asymptotically planar, or compact and closed. • Spectral asymptotics is determined by the geometry of the interaction support. - Abstract: We derive asymptotic expansion for the spectrum of Hamiltonians with a strong attractive δ ′ interaction supported by a smooth surface in R 3 , either infinite and asymptotically planar, or compact and closed. Its second term is found to be determined by a Schrödinger type operator with an effective potential expressed in terms of the interaction support curvatures

  2. A Wave Power Device with Pendulum Based on Ocean Monitoring Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui; Guan, Wanchun; Wan, Xiaozheng; Li, Xuanqun; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Shixuan

    2018-01-01

    The ocean monitoring buoy usually exploits solar energy for power supply. In order to improve power supply capacity, this paper proposes a wave power device according to the structure and moving character of buoy. The wave power device composes of pendulum mechanism that converts wave energy into mechanical energy and energy storage mechanism where the mechanical energy is transferred quantitatively to generator. The hydrodynamic equation for the motion of buoy system with generator devise is established based on the potential flow theory, and then the characteristics of pendulum motion and energy conversion properties are analysed. The results of this research show that the proposed wave power devise is able to efficiently and periodically convert wave energy into power, and increasing the stiffness of energy storage spring is benefit for enhancing the power supply capacity of the buoy. This study provides a theory reference for the development of technology on wave power generator for ocean monitoring buoy.

  3. Land Surface Modeling and Data Assimilation to Support Physical Precipitation Retrievals for GPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Tian. Yudong; Kumar, Sujay; Geiger, James; Choudhury, Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this proposal is to provide a routine land surface modeling and data assimilation capability for GPM in order to provide global land surface states that are necessary to support physical precipitation retrieval algorithms over land. It is well-known that surface emission, particularly over the range of frequencies to be included in GPM, is sensitive to land surface states, including soil properties, vegetation type and greenness, soil moisture, surface temperature, and snow cover, density, and grain size. Therefore, providing a robust capability to routinely provide these critical land states is essential to support GPM-era physical retrieval algorithms over land.

  4. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention: A network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chunhu; Dumville, Jo C; Cullum, Nicky

    2018-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a prevalent and global issue and support surfaces are widely used for preventing ulceration. However, the diversity of available support surfaces and the lack of direct comparisons in RCTs make decision-making difficult. To determine, using network meta-analysis, the relative effects of different support surfaces in reducing pressure ulcer incidence and comfort and to rank these support surfaces in order of their effectiveness. We conducted a systematic review, using a literature search up to November 2016, to identify randomised trials comparing support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Two reviewers independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We grouped the support surfaces according to their characteristics and formed evidence networks using these groups. We used network meta-analysis to estimate the relative effects and effectiveness ranking of the groups for the outcomes of pressure ulcer incidence and participant comfort. GRADE was used to assess the certainty of evidence. We included 65 studies in the review. The network for assessing pressure ulcer incidence comprised evidence of low or very low certainty for most network contrasts. There was moderate-certainty evidence that powered active air surfaces and powered hybrid air surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence compared with standard hospital surfaces (risk ratios (RR) 0.42, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.29 to 0.63; 0.22, 0.07 to 0.66, respectively). The network for comfort suggested that powered active air-surfaces are probably slightly less comfortable than standard hospital mattresses (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.94; moderate-certainty evidence). This is the first network meta-analysis of the effects of support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Powered active air-surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence, but are probably less comfortable than standard hospital surfaces. Most prevention evidence was of low or

  5. Supporting constructed wetlands in P removal efficiency from surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Agnieszka; Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    The research investigated the implementation of suspended reactive filters to support the phosphorus (P) removal efficiency of constructed wetlands (CWs). The reactive material (RM) used in this study was autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). The laboratory experiment consists of four plastic boxes filled with the volume of 10 L of artificial P solution with three variants of RM mass to volume ratio: 1:1 (g:L), 5:1 (g:L), 10:1 (g:L), and the blind probe 0:1 (g:L) as a reference. AAC of different weights (10, 50 and 100 g) was wrapped in a filter bag, put into boxes, and suspended. After 30 days of the laboratory experiment, AAC was able to reduce the P-PO 4 concentration from 2.972 mg·L -1 to: 0.341 mgPO 4 -P·L -1 , 0.006 mgPO 4 -P·L -1 and 0.004 mgPO 4 -P·L -1 for 10 g, 50 g and 100 g mass variant, respectively. This concentration reduction corresponds to unit sorption of: 2.53 mgP-PO 4 ·g -1 , 0.58 mgP-PO 4 ·g -1 and 0.30 mgP-PO 4 ·g -1 for 10 g, 50 g and 100 g, respectively. Based on the obtained data, the CW supporting filter was dimensioned to reduce the outflow P concentration to 0.01 mg·L -1 . P removal efficiency prediction was calculated for Cetynia River, Poland.

  6. Automatic inspection of textured surfaces by support vector machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbin, Sina; Bovik, Alan C.; Pérez, Eduardo; Nair, Dinesh

    2009-08-01

    Automatic inspection of manufactured products with natural looking textures is a challenging task. Products such as tiles, textile, leather, and lumber project image textures that cannot be modeled as periodic or otherwise regular; therefore, a stochastic modeling of local intensity distribution is required. An inspection system to replace human inspectors should be flexible in detecting flaws such as scratches, cracks, and stains occurring in various shapes and sizes that have never been seen before. A computer vision algorithm is proposed in this paper that extracts local statistical features from grey-level texture images decomposed with wavelet frames into subbands of various orientations and scales. The local features extracted are second order statistics derived from grey-level co-occurrence matrices. Subsequently, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is trained to learn a general description of normal texture from defect-free samples. This algorithm is implemented in LabVIEW and is capable of processing natural texture images in real-time.

  7. METHANE DRY REFORMING OVER Ni SUPPORTED ON PINE SAWDUST ACTIVATED CARBON: EFFECTS OF SUPPORT SURFACE PROPERTIES AND METAL LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael García

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of metal loading and support surface functional groups (SFG on methane dry reforming (MDR over Ni catalysts supported on pine-sawdust derived activated carbon were studied. Using pine sawdust as the catalyst support precursor, the smallest variety and lowest concentration of SFG led to best Ni dispersion and highest catalytic activity, which increased with Ni loading up to 3 Ni atoms nm-2. At higher Ni loading, the formation of large metal aggregates was observed, consistent with a lower "apparen" surface area and a decrease in catalytic activity. The H2/CO ratio rose with increasing reaction temperature, indicating that increasingly important side reactions were taking place in addition to MDR.

  8. Fuel Cell Platinum Catalysts Supported on Mediate Surface Area Carbon Black Supports

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaluža, Luděk; Larsen, M.J.; Zdražil, Miroslav; Gulková, Daniela; Odgaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2015 (2015), s. 913-918 ISSN 1974-9791. [International Conference on Chemical and Process Engineering - ICheaP12 /12./. Milano, 19.05.2015-22.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7HX13003 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 303466 - IMMEDIATE Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : carbon black * platinum catalyst * fuel cell Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  9. Electropolished Titanium Implants with a Mirror-Like Surface Support Osseointegration and Bone Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Larsson Wexell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work characterises the ultrastructural composition of the interfacial tissue adjacent to electropolished, commercially pure titanium implants with and without subsequent anodisation, and it investigates whether a smooth electropolished surface can support bone formation in a manner similar to surfaces with a considerably thicker surface oxide layer. Screw-shaped implants were electropolished to remove all topographical remnants of the machining process, resulting in a thin spontaneously formed surface oxide layer and a smooth surface. Half of the implants were subsequently anodically oxidised to develop a thickened surface oxide layer and increased surface roughness. Despite substantial differences in the surface physicochemical properties, the microarchitecture and the composition of the newly formed bone were similar for both implant surfaces after 12 weeks of healing in rabbit tibia. A close spatial relationship was observed between osteocyte canaliculi and both implant surfaces. On the ultrastructural level, the merely electropolished surface showed the various stages of bone formation, for example, matrix deposition and mineralisation, entrapment of osteoblasts within the mineralised matrix, and their morphological transformation into osteocytes. The results demonstrate that titanium implants with a mirror-like surface and a thin, spontaneously formed oxide layer are able to support bone formation and remodelling.

  10. USGS HYDRoacoustic dataset in support of the Surface Water Oceanographic Topography satellite mission (HYDRoSWOT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — HYDRoSWOT – HYDRoacoustic dataset in support of Surface Water Oceanographic Topography – is a data set that aggregates channel and flow data collected from the USGS...

  11. Kinematic strategies in newly walking toddlers stepping over different support surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominici, Nadia; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Cappellini, Germana; Zampagni, Maria Luisa; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    In adults, locomotor movements are accommodated to various support surface conditions by means of specific anticipatory locomotor adjustments and changes in the intersegmental coordination. Here we studied the kinematic strategies of toddlers at the onset of independent walking when negotiating

  12. Catalog of Existing Small Tools for Surface Preparation and Support Equipment for Blasters and Painters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peart, John; Unthank, H. D

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to provide supervisors of shipyard surface preparation and coating operators with a catalog of the small tools and support equipment used by blasters and painters...

  13. Laboratory measurement of the interface pressures applied by active therapy support surfaces: a consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    A key element in pressure ulcer prevention and management is the selection of appropriate pressure redistributing (PR) patient support surfaces for use while seated and in bed. However little explicit guidance exists allowing standardised quantitative comparison of different PR surfaces based upon their ability to redistribute pressure from anatomical landmarks such as the heels and sacrum. In 2008 a working group was established in Europe through the US National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) support surface standardisation initiative (S3I) and under the aegis of the European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel with the specific remit of developing test methods for the evaluation of active therapy support surfaces (alternating pressure air mattresses). This report describes a consensus development process to agree test methods appropriate to compare active therapy surfaces based upon their ability to redistribute pressure from the sacrum and the heels. Copyright 2009 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Applications to marine disaster prevention spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent results of the research project funded by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 23226017) from FY 2011 to FY 2015 on an autonomous spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system and its applications to marine disaster prevention systems from a scientific point of view. This book spotlights research on marine disaster prevention systems related to incidents involving oil tankers and offshore platforms, approaching these problems from new scientific and technological perspectives. The most essential aspect of this book is the development of a deep-sea underwater robot for real-time monitoring of blowout behavior of oil and gas from the seabed and of a new type of autonomous surface vehicle for real-time tracking and monitoring of oil spill spread and drift on the sea surface using an oil sensor. The mission of these robots is to provide the simulation models for gas and oil blowouts or spilled oil drifting on the sea surface w...

  15. Design, fabrication and systems integration of a satellite tracked, free-drifting ocean data buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. W.; Cox, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering details are presented of a small free-drifting buoy configuration designed for use in the study of continental shelf water circulation patterns in the Chesapeake Bight of the Western North Atlantic Ocean. The buoy incoporated French instrumentation and was interrogated by the French EOLE satellite to provide position and four channels of temperature data. The buoy design included a variable depth drogue and a power supply sufficient for six weeks of continuous operations. Proof tests of the configuration indicated an adequate design and subsequent field experiments verified the proper functioning of the system.

  16. Power Production Analysis of the OE Buoy WEC for the CORES Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    which a total of 39 hours of power production data was collected. A data acquisition system was used to sample the sensors on board and the generator shaft power time-series data was used in the analysis here. A wave-rider buoy, located at the site of OE Buoy and operated by the Marine Institute Ireland......, was used to determine the wave statistics for the sea conditions which coincided with the OE Buoy device data, in order to estimate the efficiency of the device as a function of the sea state (for example as a function of the mean zero down period, Tz, and, significant wave height, Hs) as described below...

  17. Satellite monitoring of the global ocean surface during 1987-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David

    1992-01-01

    Long-term simultaneous global coverage of AVHRR sea surface temperature, SSMI surface wind speed, GEOSAT sea surface height, and ARGOS buoy drift began in 1987. Methodology to create annual atlases of monthly mean distributions is described.

  18. [Analysis of statutory health insurance data concerning utilization of support surfaces for pressure ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Scharnetzky, Elke; Deitermann, Bernhilde; Glaeske, Gerd

    2006-10-01

    Support surfaces are commonly used to prevent and treat pressure ulcers. Up to now little is known about their application in Germany. We conducted a cross-sectional study using claims data of the Gmuender ErsatzKasse (GEK) for the year 2004 to analyse the utilization of support surfaces for pressure ulcers in primary care. Based on age- and sex-specific treatment prevalences for individuals with at least one prescription, prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated. A total of 1999 subjects with a mean age of 63.4 years (SD: 20.7) received support surfaces for pressure ulcers. With respect to the numbers of prescriptions (n = 2421) alternating pressure mattresses (31.6%), air-filled rings (13.5%) and various seat cushions (13.0%) were used frequently, whereas foam mattresses only came to 4.7%. The treatment prevalence increases continuously with age with no sex-specific differences. Using the 50-59 year olds as a reference, men aged 90+ (PR: 43.94; 95% CI: 31.46-61.37) as well as women aged 90+ (PR: 40.61; 95% CI: 30.77-53.60) received approximately 40-times more often support surfaces for pressure ulcers. Support surfaces for pressure ulcers are commonly used in the elderly. Our study suggests that their application does not correspond to the best available evidence. Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers as well as the selection of support surfaces should be seen as an interdisciplinary task.

  19. Visual Information and Support Surface for Postural Control in Visual Search Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia-Chun; Yang, Chih-Mei

    2016-10-01

    When standing on a reduced support surface, people increase their reliance on visual information to control posture. This assertion was tested in the current study. The effects of imposed motion and support surface on postural control during visual search were investigated. Twelve participants (aged 21 ± 1.8 years; six men and six women) stood on a reduced support surface (45% base of support). In a room that moved back and forth along the anteroposterior axis, participants performed visual search for a given letter in an article. Postural sway variability and head-room coupling were measured. The results of head-room coupling, but not postural sway, supported the assertion that people increase reliance on visual information when standing on a reduced support surface. Whether standing on a whole or reduced surface, people stabilized their posture to perform the visual search tasks. Compared to a fixed target, searching on a hand-held target showed greater head-room coupling when standing on a reduced surface. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention: A network meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhu Shi

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are a prevalent and global issue and support surfaces are widely used for preventing ulceration. However, the diversity of available support surfaces and the lack of direct comparisons in RCTs make decision-making difficult.To determine, using network meta-analysis, the relative effects of different support surfaces in reducing pressure ulcer incidence and comfort and to rank these support surfaces in order of their effectiveness.We conducted a systematic review, using a literature search up to November 2016, to identify randomised trials comparing support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Two reviewers independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We grouped the support surfaces according to their characteristics and formed evidence networks using these groups. We used network meta-analysis to estimate the relative effects and effectiveness ranking of the groups for the outcomes of pressure ulcer incidence and participant comfort. GRADE was used to assess the certainty of evidence.We included 65 studies in the review. The network for assessing pressure ulcer incidence comprised evidence of low or very low certainty for most network contrasts. There was moderate-certainty evidence that powered active air surfaces and powered hybrid air surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence compared with standard hospital surfaces (risk ratios (RR 0.42, 95% confidence intervals (CI 0.29 to 0.63; 0.22, 0.07 to 0.66, respectively. The network for comfort suggested that powered active air-surfaces are probably slightly less comfortable than standard hospital mattresses (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.94; moderate-certainty evidence.This is the first network meta-analysis of the effects of support surfaces for pressure ulcer prevention. Powered active air-surfaces probably reduce pressure ulcer incidence, but are probably less comfortable than standard hospital surfaces. Most prevention evidence was

  1. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity from JCAD-6 drifting buoy 2003-2004 (NODC Accession 0002236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using a drifting buoy in the Arctic from 2003 to 2004 (NODC Accession 0002236).

  2. NODC Standard Format Drifting Buoy (F156) Data (1975-1994) (NODC Accession 0014200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type contains time series ocean circulation data determined by tracking the movement of drifting buoys, drogues or other instrumented devices. Movement is...

  3. Validation of Operational Global Wave Prediction Models With Spectral Buoy Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wingeart, Karen

    2001-01-01

    .... In this study, the fidelity of frequency-directional spectra predicted by WAM and WAVEWATCH III at the operational centers is examined with data from 3-meter discus and 6-meter nomad buoys operated...

  4. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 04 (WQB-04): Hilo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  5. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 03 (WQB-03): Kiholo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  6. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy KN (WQB-KN): Kilo Nalu, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  7. Operations, engineering, and modification rework of the M. I. T. (Smile) buoy. [Meteorology station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huszagh, D.W.; Fink, S.

    1976-07-01

    The MIT/Navy buoy was loaned by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute to BNL late in 1975 for the implementation of meteorological studies off the south coast of Long Island. It was destructively dismembered at Woods Hole and transported overland to BNL in December, 1975. Extensive repairs and modifications to the buoy structure were undertaken to simplify transport, improve trim control, and enhance instrument access and security. Minor modifications leading to greater personnel safety were also made. The refurbished buoy was carried in sections to the Shinnecock inlet area by motor truck. Following dockside assembly, the buoy was launched on May 21, 1976, whereupon it was towed through the inlet and moored in 85 feet of water off Tiana Beach, New York.

  8. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database Webdisc (7 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0090141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This CD-ROM set contains the historic archive of meteorological and oceanographic data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN stations operated by the NOAA National...

  9. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy AW (WQB-AW): Ala Wai, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  10. Surface based factory for the production of life support and technology support products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a manned space colony on Mars may be expected to involve three phases in the utilization of planetary resources: (1) survival phase in which air, water, and food are produced, (2) self sufficiency phase in which chemicals, fuels, pharmaceuticals, polymers, and metals are produced, and (3) export to earth of materials and technology 1 phase in which the unique advantage of the extraterrestrial environment is fully exploited. The Advanced Design Project is administered as an interdisciplinary effort involving students and faculty throughout the College of Engineering. Senior students from Chemical, Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering are participating as a team. Multi discipline interfacing and coordination are stressed throughout the project. An interdisciplinary senior design course was developed and offered in the Spring of 1987. The first task of the survival phase is that of providing a supply of water and air adequate to support a ten person colony. The project has been divided into three subgroups: (1) design of a manufacturing and storage facility for air, (2) search and drill for water or water-bearing materials, and (3) retrieve, purify, and store potable water. The conceptual design phase has been completed and the project is being documented. The second task of the survival phase is that of providing a replenish able food supply. This task has two requirements: producing a supply of protein and providing an environment for growing plants for food. For the first requirement, we considered the design of a bioreactor system capable of growing beef cells for protein production. For the second, a design must be developed for a manufacturing system to produce materials needed to build a greenhouse farm.

  11. Integration of Ground, Buoys, Satellite and Model data to map the Changes in Meteorological Parameters Associated with Harvey Hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A.; Sarkar, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    The coastal areas have dense onshore and marine observation network and are also routinely monitored by constellation of satellites. The monitoring of ocean, land and atmosphere through a range of meteorological parameters, provides information about the land and ocean surface. Satellite data also provide information at different pressure levels that help to access the development of tropical storms and formation of hurricanes at different categories. Integration of ground, buoys, satellite and model data showing the changes in meteorological parameters during the landfall stages of hurricane Harvey will be discussed. Hurricane Harvey was one of the deadliest hurricanes at the Gulf coast which caused intense flooding from the precipitation. The various observation networks helped city administrators to evacuate the coastal areas, that minimized the loss of lives compared to the Galveston hurricane of 1900 which took 10,000 lives. Comparison of meteorological parameters derived from buoys, ground stations and satellites associated with Harvey and 2005 Katrina hurricane present some of the interesting features of the two hurricanes.

  12. Directional Bias of TAO Daily Buoy Wind Vectors in the Central Equatorial Pacific Ocean from November 2008 to January 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article documents a systematic bias in surface wind directions between the TAO buoy measurements at 0°, 170°W and the ECMWF analysis and forecasts. This bias was of the order 10° and persisted from November 2008 to January 2010, which was consistent with a post-recovery calibration drift in the anemometer vane. Unfortunately, the calibration drift was too time-variant to be used to correct the data so the quality flag for this deployment was adjusted to reflect low data quality. The primary purpose of this paper is to inform users in the modelling and remote-sensing community about this systematic, persistent wind directional bias, which will allow users to make an educated decision on using the data and be aware of its potential impact to their downstream product quality. The uncovering of this bias and its source demonstrates the importance of continuous scientific oversight and effective user-data provider communication in stewarding scientific data. It also suggests the need for improvement in the ability of buoy data quality control procedures of the TAO and ECMWF systems to detect future wind directional systematic biases such as the one described here.

  13. Development of an Indian Ocean moored buoy array for climate studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    McPhaden, M.J.; Kuroda, Y.; Murty, V.S.N.

    Volume No. 3 September 2004Volume 9 No.3 September 2004Volume 11 No.4 October 2006 ships of opportunity, and biogeochemical sensors on the basin- scale mooring array and Argo floats. Clearly, full implementation of IndOOS will require a well- coordinated... and implementation strategies for each of the observing system components. These include Argo floats, drifting buoys, tide gauge stations, ship-of-opportunity expendable bathythermograph (XBT) lines, a basin scale moored buoy array, and specialized measurement...

  14. Analysis of Floating Buoy of a Wave Power Generating Jack-Up Platform Haiyuan 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Date Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the performance of floating buoys of a wave power generating jack-up platform called Haiyuan 1, in order to work out the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The performance of the buoy, especially its delivered power, is an important issue in designing oscillating buoy wave energy converter. In this case, major factors affect the performance including incident wave, designed draft, and hydraulic pressure on the buoy. To find out the relationship among design draft, hydraulic pressure, and delivered power, the key point is to precisely estimate wave induced motion of the buoy. Three-dimensional theory and time domain method based on potential theory were adopted in the paper. Unlike ship and other floating structures, motion of wave energy converter (WEC buoy in wave will be weakened because of energy take-off, which will cause significant draft changing with time. Thus, draft changing should be taken into consideration as well. In addition, green water problem occurs more frequently than that in ship and other floating structures and also might the reduce delivered power. Therefore, green water problem will also be taken into account when choosing the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The calculation indicates that the optimum designed draft is 0.935 m, while the optimum designed hydraulic pressure is 30 kN.

  15. Experimental study of wave energy extraction by a dual-buoy heaving system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentric dual-buoy Wave Energy Converter (WEC, which consists of external buoy (hallow-cylinder with toroidal appendage and cylindrical internal buoy within the moon-pool is suggested in this research and its performance in various wave conditions is studied. The Linear Electric Generator (LEG, consisting of a permanent magnet and coils, is used as a direct Power Take-Off (PTO system. To maximize the electrical energy extracted from the PTO system, the relative heave motions between the dual buoys must be highly amplified by the multiple resonance phenomena of dual-buoy and internal-fluid motions. The high-performance range can be widened by distributing those natural frequencies with respect to the peak frequency of the wave spectrum. The performance of the newly developed dual-buoy WEC was measured throughout the systematic 1:5.95-model test in regular and irregular waves conducted in a wave tank at Seoul National University. The model-test results are also validated by an independently developed numerical method.

  16. Mars Relays Satellite Orbit Design Considerations for Global Support of Robotic Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Rolf; Cesarone, Robert; Cook, Richard; Knocke, Phillip; McOmber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses orbit design considerations for Mars relay satellite (MRS)support of globally distributed robotic surface missions. The orbit results reported in this paper are derived from studies of MRS support for two types of Mars robotic surface missions: 1) the mars Environmental Survey (MESUR) mission, which in its current definition would deploy a global network of up to 16 small landers, and 2)a Small Mars Sample Return (SMSR) mission, which included four globally distributed landers, each with a return stage and one or two rovers, and up to four additional sets of lander/rover elements in an extended mission phase.

  17. Comparison of bacterial cells and amine-functionalized abiotic surfaces as support for Pd nanoparticle synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Corte, Simon; Bechstein, Stefanie; Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing demand for catalytic Pd nanoparticles has motivated the search for sustainable production methods. An innovative approach uses bacterial cells as support material for synthesizing Pd nanoparticles by reduction of Pd(II) with e.g. hydrogen or formate. Nevertheless, drawbacks...... nanoparticles, and that abiotic surfaces could support the Pd particle synthesis as efficiently as bacteria. In this study, we explore the possibility of replacing bacteria with amine-functionalized materials, and we compare different functionalization strategies. Pd nanoparticles formed on the support...... on these surfaces was higher than for Pd particles formed on Shewanella oneidensis cells. Smaller Pd nanoparticles generally have better catalytic properties, and previous studies have shown that the particle size can be lowered by increasing the amount of support material used during Pd particle formation. However...

  18. DRIFTER Web App Development Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Derrick D.; Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2015-01-01

    During my 2015 internship at Stennis Space Center (SSC) I supported the development of a web based tool to enable user interaction with a low-cost environmental monitoring buoy called the DRIFTER. DRIFTERs are designed by SSC's Applied Science and Technology Projects branch and are used to measure parameters such as water temperature and salinity. Data collected by the buoys help verify measurements by NASA satellites, which contributes to NASA's mission to advance understanding of the Earth by developing technologies to improve the quality of life on or home planet. My main objective during this internship was to support the development of the DRIFTER by writing web-based software that allows the public to view and access data collected by the buoys. In addition, this software would enable DRIFTER owners to configure and control the devices.

  19. The Study of Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Its Design, Efficiency, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a Surface Computer Supported Cooperative Work paradigm is proposed. Recently, multitouch technology has become widely available for human-computer interaction. We found it has great potential to facilitate more awareness of human-to-human interaction than personal computers (PCs) in colocated collaborative work. However, other…

  20. Surface characterization and antibacterial response of silver nanowire arrays supported on laser-treated polyethylene naphthalate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polívková, M.; Štrublová, V.; Hubáček, Tomáš; Rimpelová, S.; Švorčík, V.; Siegel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 72, March (2017), s. 512-518 ISSN 0928-4931 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : silver * polyethylene naphthalate * surface properties * laser patterning * vacuum evaporation Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 4.164, year: 2016

  1. Spectral asymptotics of a strong delta ' interaction supported by a surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Exner, Pavel; Jex, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 378, 30-31 (2014), s. 2091-2095 ISSN 0375-9601 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : delta ' surface interaction * strong coupling expansion Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.683, year: 2014

  2. Preparation of MgO Catalytic Support in Shaped Mesoporous High Surface Area Form

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gulková, Daniela; Šolcová, Olga; Zdražil, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 76, 1-3 (2004), s. 137-149 ISSN 1387-1811 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : MgO support * sigh Surface area * texture Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2004

  3. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  4. Linear and nonlinear surface spectroscopy of supported size selected metal clusters and organic adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaemer, Martin Georg

    2012-03-08

    The spectroscopic investigation of supported size selected metal clusters over a wide wavelength range plays an important role for understanding their outstanding catalytic properties. The challenge which must be overcome to perform such measurements is the difficult detection of the weak spectroscopic signals from these samples. As a consequence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are applied, such as surface Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and surface Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic apparatus developed is shown to have a sensitivity which is high enough to detect sub-monolayer coverages of adsorbates on surfaces. In the measured spectra of small supported silver clusters of the sizes Ag{sub 4}2, Ag{sub 2}1, Ag{sub 9}, and Ag atoms a stepwise transition from particles with purely metallic character to particles with molecule-like properties can be observed within this size range.

  5. Heaving displacement amplification characteristics of a power buoy in shoaling water with insufficient draft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The resonance power buoy is a convincing tool that can increase the extraction efficiency of wave energy. The buoy needs a corresponding draft, to move in resonance with waves within the peak frequency band where wave energy is concentrated. However, it must still be clarified if the buoy acts as an effective displacement amplifier, when there is insufficient water depth. In this study, the vertical displacement of a circular cylinder-type buoy was calculated, with the spectrum data observed in a real shallow sea as the external wave force, and with the corresponding draft, according to the mode frequency of normal waves. Such numerical investigation result, without considering Power Take-Off (PTO damping, confirmed that the area of the heave responses spectrum can be amplified by up to about tenfold, compared with the wave energy spectrum, if the draft corresponds to the peak frequency, even with insufficient water depth. Moreover, the amplification factor of the buoy varied, according to the seasonal changes in the wave spectra.

  6. REAL-TIME high-resolution urban surface water flood mapping to support flood emergency management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, M.; Yu, D.; Wilby, R.

    2016-12-01

    Strong evidence has shown that urban flood risks will substantially increase because of urbanisation, economic growth, and more frequent weather extremes. To effectively manage these risks require not only traditional grey engineering solutions, but also a green management solution. Surface water flood risk maps based on return period are useful for planning purposes, but are limited for application in flood emergencies, because of the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of rainfall and complex urban topography. Therefore, a REAL-TIME urban surface water mapping system is highly beneficial to increasing urban resilience to surface water flooding. This study integrated numerical weather forecast and high-resolution urban surface water modelling into a real-time multi-level surface water mapping system for Leicester City in the UK. For rainfall forecast, the 1km composite rain radar from the Met Office was used, and we used the advanced rainfall-runoff model - FloodMap to predict urban surface water at both city-level (10m-20m) and street-level (2m-5m). The system is capable of projecting 3-hour urban surface water flood, driven by rainfall derived from UK Met Office radar. Moreover, this system includes real-time accessibility mapping to assist the decision-making of emergency responders. This will allow accessibility (e.g. time to travel) from individual emergency service stations (e.g. Fire & Rescue; Ambulance) to vulnerable places to be evaluated. The mapping results will support contingency planning by emergency responders ahead of potential flood events.

  7. CO2 sorption on surface-modified carbonaceous support: Probing the influence of the carbon black microporosity and surface polarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, Valentina; Alfè, Michela; Ammendola, Paola; Raganati, Federica; Chirone, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CO 2 -sorbent materials preparation by surface modification of CB. • CB functionalization (amino-groups), CB coating (Fe 3 O 4 ), CB impregnation (ionic liquid). • Sorbents bearing basic functionalities exhibit the higher CO 2 sorption capacity. • Microporous supporting material limits the CO 2 accessibility toward the adsorbing material. - Abstract: The use of solid sorbents is a convenient option in post-combustion CO 2 capture strategies. Sorbents selection is a key point because the materials are required to be both low-cost and versatile in typical post-combustion conditions in order to guarantee an economically advantageous overall process. This work compares strategies to tailor the chemico-physical features of carbon black (CB) by surface-modification and/or coating with a CO 2 -sorbent phase. The influence of the CB microporosity, enhanced by chemical/thermal treatments, is also taken into account. Three CB surface modifications are performed and compared: (i) oxidation and functionalization with amino-groups, (ii) coating with iron oxides and (iii) impregnation with an ionic liquid (IL). The CO 2 capture performance is evaluated on the basis of the breakthrough curves measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature in a lab-scale fixed bed micro-reactor. Most of tested solids adsorb a CO 2 amount significantly higher than a 13X zeolite and DARCO FGD (Norit) activated carbon (up to 4 times more in the best case). The sorbents bearing basic functionalities (amino-groups and IL) exhibit the highest CO 2 sorption capacity. The use of a microporous carbonaceous support limits the accessibility of CO 2 toward the adsorbing phase (IL or FM) lowering the number of accessible binding sites for CO 2 .

  8. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO2 permeability and decreased CO2/H2 selectivity, CO2/CH4 selectivity, and CO2/N2 selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO2 permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  9. Effect of Surface Treatment Condition of Aminosilane on Ethylene Polymerization of Supported Metallocene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Lee, Jeong Suk; Ko, Young Soo [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The effects of surface treatment method of unreacted N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (2NS), N{sup 1}-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine (3NS), and 3-cyanopropyltriethoxysilane (1NCy) after grafting on the surface of silica and of the surface treatment temperature on ethylene polymerization were investigated. The Zr content of supported catalyst employing filtering method was higher than that of washing method, and the activities of supported catalysts prepared by washing method were higher than those of filtering methods significantly. Regardless of surface treatment methods the activities were in order by SiO{sub 2}/2NS/(n-BuCp){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2}>SiO{sub 2}/1NCy/(n-BuCp){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2}>SiO{sub 2}/3NS/(n-BuCp){sub 2}ZrCl{sub 2}. The ethylene polymerization activity was increased as the surface treatment temperature of aminosilane on silica increased.

  10. Wave observations from an array of directional buoys over the southern Brazilian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Henrique Patricio Prado; Violante-Carvalho, Nelson; Nogueira, Izabel Christina Martins; Babanin, Alexander; Liu, Qingxiang; de Pinho, Uggo Ferreira; Nascimento, Fabio; Parente, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that the majority of buoy measurements are located around the US coast and along some Europeans countries. The lack of long-term and densely spaced in situ measurements in the Southern Hemisphere in general, and the South Atlantic in particular, hinders several investigations due to the lack of detailed metocean information. Here, we present an effort to overcome this limitation, with a dense network of buoys along the Brazilian coast, equipped with several meteorological and oceanographic sensors. Out of ten currently operational buoys, three are employed to present the main characteristics of waves in the Southern part of the network. For the first time, sensor characteristics and settings are described, as well as the methods applied to the raw wave data. Statistics and distributions of wave parameters, swell propagating events, comparison with a numerical model and altimeters and a discussion about the occurrence of freak waves are presented.

  11. Storm wave buoy equipped with micromechanical inertial unit: Results of development and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryazin, D. G.; Staroselcev, L. P.; Belova, O. O.; Gleb, K. A.

    2017-07-01

    The article describes the results of developing a wave buoy to measure the statistical characteristics of waves and the characteristics of directional spectra of three-dimensional waves. The device is designed for long-term measurements lasting up to a season, which can help solve problems in forecasting waves and preventing emergencies from wave impact on offshore platforms, hydraulic structures, and other marine facilities. The measuring unit involves triads of micromechanical gyroscopes, accelerometers, and a three-component magnetometer. A description of the device, results of laboratory research of its characteristics, and bench and full-scale tests are offered. It is noted that to assess the performance characteristics, comparative tests of the Storm wave buoy were conducted with a standard string wave probe installed on an offshore platform. It is shown that the characteristics and capabilities of the wave buoy make it possible to oust foreign devices from the domestic market.

  12. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun, E-mail: juncheng@zju.edu.cn; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Amino group was introduced to improve surface polarity of PDMS membrane. • The water contact angle of PDMS membrane decreased after the modification. • The concentration of N atom on surface of PDMS membrane reached up to ∼6%. • The density of PDMS membrane decreased while the swelling degree increased. • CO{sub 2} permeability increased while selectivity decreased after the modification. - Abstract: This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO{sub 2} permeability and decreased CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} selectivity, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity, and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO{sub 2} permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  13. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Amino group was introduced to improve surface polarity of PDMS membrane. • The water contact angle of PDMS membrane decreased after the modification. • The concentration of N atom on surface of PDMS membrane reached up to ∼6%. • The density of PDMS membrane decreased while the swelling degree increased. • CO 2 permeability increased while selectivity decreased after the modification. - Abstract: This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO 2 permeability and decreased CO 2 /H 2 selectivity, CO 2 /CH 4 selectivity, and CO 2 /N 2 selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO 2 permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  14. Application of Buoy Observations in Determining Characteristics of Several Typhoons Passing the East China Sea in August 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningli Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The buoy observation network in the East China Sea is used to assist the determination of the characteristics of tropical cyclone structure in August 2012. When super typhoon “Haikui” made landfall in northern Zhejiang province, it passed over three buoys, the East China Sea Buoy, the Sea Reef Buoy, and the Channel Buoy, which were located within the radii of the 13.9 m/s winds, 24.5 m/s winds, and 24.5 m/s winds, respectively. These buoy observations verified the accuracy of typhoon intensity determined by China Meteorological Administration (CMA. The East China Sea Buoy had closely observed typhoons “Bolaven” and “Tembin,” which provided real-time guidance for forecasters to better understand the typhoon structure and were also used to quantify the air-sea interface heat exchange during the passage of the storm. The buoy-measured wind and pressure time series were also used to correct the intensity of “Damrey” initially determined by CMA.

  15. 77 FR 29254 - Safety Zones, Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... transit the Lower Mississippi River between mile marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA and the Southwest Pass Sea...; Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

  16. On theory and simulation of heaving-buoy wave-energy converters with control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidsmoen, H.

    1995-12-01

    Heaving-buoy wave-energy converters with control were studied. The buoy is small compared to the wavelength. The resonance bandwidth is then narrow and the energy conversion in irregular waves can be significantly increased if the oscillatory motion of the device can be actively controlled, and the power output from the converter will vary less with time than the wave power transport. A system of two concentric cylinders of the same radius, oscillating in heave only, is analysed in the frequency-domain. The mathematical model can be used to study a tight-moored buoy, as well as a buoy reacting against a submerged body. The knowledge of the frequency-domain hydrodynamic parameters is used to develop frequency-domain and time-domain mathematical models of heaving-buoy wave energy converters. The main emphasis is on using control to maximize the energy production and to protect the machinery of the wave-energy converter in very large waves. Three different methods are used to study control. (1) In the frequency-domain explicit analytical expressions for the optimum oscillation are found, assuming a continuous sinusoidal control force, and from these expressions the optimum time-domain oscillation can be determined. (2) The second method uses optimal control theory, using a control variable as the instrument for the optimisation. Unlike the first method, this method can include non-linearities. But this method gives numerical time series for the state variables and the control variable rather than analytical expressions for the optimum oscillation. (3) The third method is time-domain simulation. Non-linear forces are included, but the method only gives the response of the system to a given incident wave. How the different methods can be used to develop real-time control is discussed. Simulations are performed for a tight-moored heaving-buoy converter with a high-pressure hydraulic system for energy production and motion control. 147 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs.

  17. Support surface interface pressure, microenvironment, and the prevalence of pressure ulcers: an analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reger, Steven I; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Sahgal, Vinod

    2007-10-01

    External pressure is the most frequently considered stress factor in the formation of ulcers. A review and analysis of existing literature addressing the relationship between pressure ulcer prevalence and interface pressures at various anatomic sites was conducted. Results suggest a nearly non-existent or slightly negative correlation between interface pressure and ulcer prevalence in general and spinal cord injured populations, respectively. Despite limitations of the analysis methods used, the observed lack of a direct relationship confirms the results of other studies and suggests that ulcer formation also may involve factors secondary to pressure and mechanical factors (eg, temperature, moisture, duration of the applied load, atrophy, and posture). Based on currently available information, clinicians should include these considerations when selecting a support surface. Studies directly relating primary stress factors and tissue viability with prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers are needed to better understand the benefits of pressure-relieving support surfaces and to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment.

  18. Surface tailored single walled carbon nanotubes as catalyst support for direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeti, Kota V. M. K.; Jha, Neetu

    2017-10-01

    A strategy for tuning the surface property of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) for enhanced methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) along with methanol tolerance is presented. The surface functionality is tailored using controlled acid and base treatment. Acid treatment leads to the attachment of carboxylic carbon (CC) fragments to SWNT making it hydrophilic (P3-SWNT). Base treatment of P3-SWNT with 0.05 M NaOH reduces the CCs and makes it hydrophobic (P33-SWNT). Pt catalyst supported on the P3-SWNT possesses enhanced MOR whereas that supported on P33-SWNT not only enhances ORR kinetics but also possess good tolerance towards methanol oxidation as verified by the electrochemical technique.

  19. Real-time and on-demand buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Imano, M.; Hino, R.

    2017-12-01

    We develop real-time and on-demand buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal displacement. It is indispensable for observation of crustal displacement to understand changes of stress field related to future large earthquakes. The current status of the observation is carried out by using a vessel with an interval of a few times per a year. When a large earthquake occurs, however, we need dense or on-demand observation of the crustal displacement to grasp nature of the slow slip after the rupture. Therefore, we constructed buoy system with a buoy station, wire-end station, seafloor unit and acoustic transponders for crustal displacement, and we installed a pressure sensor on the seafloor unit and GNSS system on the buoy in addition to measurement of e distance between the buoy and the seafloor acoustic transponders. Tsunami is evaluated using GNSS data and pressure data sent from seafloor. Observation error of the GNSS is about 10 cm. The crustal displacement is estimated using pressure sensor for vertical and acoustic measurement for horizontal. Using current slack ratio of 1.58, the observation error for the measurement of the crustal displacement is about 10 cm. We repeated three times sea trials and confirmed the data acquisition with high data quality, mooring without dredging anchor in the strong sea current with a speed of 5.5 knots. Current issues to be resolved we face are removing noises on the acoustic data transmission, data transmission between the buoy and wire-end stations, electrical consumption on the buoy station and large observation error on the crustal displacement due to large slack ratio. We consider the change of the acoustic transmission for pressure data, replace of a GNSS data logger with large electrical consumption, and reduce of the slack ratio, and search method to reduce resistance of the buoy on the sea water. In this presentation, we introduce the current status of the technical development and tsunami waveforms recorded on our

  20. Saipan 2005 Sea Surface Temperature and Meteorological Enhanced Mooring - CRED CREWS Near Real Time and Historical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site Saipan, CNMI (15.2375N, 145.72283W) ARGOS Buoy ID 26105 Time series data from this mooring provide high resolution sea surface temperature, and surface...

  1. Electronic structure of surface-supported bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) single molecular magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Lucia; Fabris, Stefano; Conte, Adriano Mosca; Brink, Susan; Ruben, Mario; Baroni, Stefano; Kern, Klaus

    2008-10-01

    The electronic structure of isolated bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium(III) molecules, a novel single-molecular-magnet (SMM), supported on the Cu(111) surface has been characterized by density functional theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. These studies reveal that the interaction with the metal surface preserves both the molecular structure and the large spin magnetic moment of the metal center. The 4f electron states are not perturbed by the adsorption while a strong molecular/metal interaction can induce the suppression of the minor spin contribution delocalized over the molecular ligands. The calculations show that the inherent spin magnetic moment of the molecule is only weakly affected by the interaction with the surface and suggest that the SMM character might be preserved.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of ejecta production from sinusoidal tin surfaces under supported and unsupported shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bao; Wu, FengChao; Zhu, YinBo; Wang, Pei; He, AnMin; Wu, HengAn

    2018-04-01

    Micro-ejecta, an instability growth process, occurs at metal/vacuum or metal/gas interface when compressed shock wave releases from the free surface that contains surface defects. We present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the ejecta production from tin surface shocked by supported and unsupported waves with pressures ranging from 8.5 to 60.8 GPa. It is found that the loading waveforms have little effect on spike velocity while remarkably affect the bubble velocity. The bubble velocity of unsupported shock loading remains nonzero constant value at late time as observed in experiments. Besides, the time evolution of ejected mass in the simulations is compared with the recently developed ejecta source model, indicating the suppressed ejection of unmelted or partial melted materials. Moreover, different reference positions are chosen to characterize the amount of ejecta under different loading waveforms. Compared with supported shock case, the ejected mass of unsupported shock case saturates at lower pressure. Through the analysis on unloading path, we find that the temperature of tin sample increases quickly from tensile stress state to zero pressure state, resulting in the melting of bulk tin under decaying shock. Thus, the unsupported wave loading exhibits a lower threshold pressure causing the solid-liquid phase transition on shock release than the supported shock loading.

  3. Evaluation of SARAL/AltiKa performance using GNSS/IMU equipped buoy in Sajafi, Imam Hassan and Kangan Ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Alireza A.; Jazireeyan, Iraj; Abdi, Naser; Rezvani, Mohammad-Hadi

    2018-03-01

    Performance of SARAL/AltiKa mission has been evaluated within 2016 altimeter calibration/validation framework in Persian Gulf through three campaigns conducted in the offshore waters of Sajafi, Imam Hassan and Kangan Ports, while the altimeter overflew the passes 470, 111 and 25 on 13 Feb, 7 March and 17 June 2016, respectively. As the preparation, a lightweight buoy was equipped with a GNSS receiver/choke-ring antenna and a MEMS-based IMU to measure independent datasets in the field operations. To obtain accurate sea surface height (SSH) time series, the offset of the onboard antenna from the equilibrium sea level was predetermined through surveying operations as the buoy was deploying in the onshore waters of Kangan Port. Accordingly, the double-difference carrier phase observations have been processed via the Bernese GPS Software v. 5.0 so as to provide the GNSS-derived time series at the comparison points of the calibration campaigns, once the disturbing effects due to the platform tilt and heave have been eliminated. Owing to comparing of the SSH time series and the associating altimetry 1 Hz GDR-T datasets, the calibration/validation of the SARAL/AltiKa has been performed in the both cases of radiometer and ECMWF wet troposphere corrections so as to identify potential land contamination. An agreement of the present findings in comparison with those attained in other international calibrations sites confirms the promising feasibility of Persian Gulf as a new dedicated site for calibration/validation of ongoing and future altimetry missions.

  4. Evaluation of wind vectors measured by QuikSCAT using ocean buoy data along the Galician coast (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I.; Gomez-Gesteira, M.; deCastro, M.; Sousa, M. C.; Dias, J. M.; Santos, F.

    2012-04-01

    Wind above sea surface constitutes a key parameter to analyze coastal phenomena, like upwelling in the NW part of the Iberian Peninsula. The present work analyzes the accuracy of QuikSCAT for the period 2000-2009 by comparing satellite data with in situ data from three buoys placed along the NW coast of the Iberian Peninsula. The use of these long data series has two main objectives, on the one hand, the margin of error diminishes with the extent of the series and, on the other hand, it allows capturing the high inter-annual variability of the area. According to previous studies, the wet season is characterized by a high variability, in such a way that wind patterns change from year to year. The comparison confirms a low skill of QuikSCAT for low speed winds (<3 m/s) as previously pointed out by other authors. Once these winds were discarded, QuikSCAT revealed a higher accuracy for winds within the range 6-12 m/s. In direction, winds blowing from coast seem to be less accurately calculated by the satellite. Statistical results were similar for the three buoys in spite of the different coastal orientations. In average, the RMSE and bias for wind speed were 1.5 m/s and 0.2 m/s, respectively. Statistical data were also similar for wind direction, with the mean RMSE on the order of 34° and the mean bias on the order of 4° in absolute value. These statistical parameters are at least as accurate as those calculated in other near-shore areas all over the world. In particular, the bias was observed to be lower (in absolute value) than measured by most of the authors, which is possibly due to the high percentage of sampled winds lying within the interval [6-12] m/s, where satellite measurements are more accurate.

  5. CO2 sorption on surface-modified carbonaceous support: Probing the influence of the carbon black microporosity and surface polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Valentina; Alfè, Michela; Ammendola, Paola; Raganati, Federica; Chirone, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    The use of solid sorbents is a convenient option in post-combustion CO2 capture strategies. Sorbents selection is a key point because the materials are required to be both low-cost and versatile in typical post-combustion conditions in order to guarantee an economically advantageous overall process. This work compares strategies to tailor the chemico-physical features of carbon black (CB) by surface-modification and/or coating with a CO2-sorbent phase. The influence of the CB microporosity, enhanced by chemical/thermal treatments, is also taken into account. Three CB surface modifications are performed and compared: (i) oxidation and functionalization with amino-groups, (ii) coating with iron oxides and (iii) impregnation with an ionic liquid (IL). The CO2 capture performance is evaluated on the basis of the breakthrough curves measured at atmospheric pressure and room temperature in a lab-scale fixed bed micro-reactor. Most of tested solids adsorb a CO2 amount significantly higher than a 13X zeolite and DARCO FGD (Norit) activated carbon (up to 4 times more in the best case). The sorbents bearing basic functionalities (amino-groups and IL) exhibit the highest CO2 sorption capacity. The use of a microporous carbonaceous support limits the accessibility of CO2 toward the adsorbing phase (IL or FM) lowering the number of accessible binding sites for CO2.

  6. Transportation-Driven Mars Surface Operations Supporting an Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toups, Larry; Brown, Kendall; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study evaluating options for supporting a series of human missions to a single Mars surface destination. In this scenario the infrastructure emplaced during previous visits to this site is leveraged in following missions. The goal of this single site approach to Mars surface infrastructure is to enable "Steady State" operations by at least 4 crew for up to 500 sols at this site. These characteristics, along with the transportation system used to deliver crew and equipment to and from Mars, are collectively known as the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). Information in this paper is presented in the sequence in which it was accomplished. First, a logical buildup sequence of surface infrastructure was developed to achieve the desired "Steady State" operations on the Mars surface. This was based on a concept of operations that met objectives of the EMC. Second, infrastructure capabilities were identified to carry out this concept of operations. Third, systems (in the form of conceptual elements) were identified to provide these capabilities. This included top-level mass, power and volume estimates for these elements. Fourth, the results were then used in analyses to evaluate three options (18t, 27t, and 40t landed mass) of Mars Lander delivery capability to the surface. Finally, Mars arrival mass estimates were generated based upon the entry, descent, and landing requirements for inclusion in separate assessments of in-space transportation capabilities for the EMC.

  7. First principles surface thermodynamics of industrial supported catalysts in working conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybaud, P.; Costa, D.; Corral Valero, M.; Arrouvel, C.; Digne, M.; Sautet, P.; Toulhoat, H.

    2008-02-01

    Ever stronger environmental concerns prompt the research in the area of heterogeneous catalysis to play an ever more crucial role to produce ever cleaner fuel from the refining of petroleum effluents. The catalytic active phase is often used in a dispersed state over a porous oxide material. This paper is a review of recent progress brought by periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations in the area of two relevant industrial supported catalysts. We focus on two important supports used in the refining industry: anatase-TiO2 and γ-alumina. According to the various reaction conditions, the presence of H2O, H2 and H2S may change the surface states of the support. In particular, it is crucial to know and control the hydroxylation state depending on temperature and partial pressure of reactants (H2O, H2, H2S). The support effects on the catalytic active phases are presented for MoS2 particles, used in hydrodesulfurization catalysis, and for Pd particles, used in hydrogenation catalysis. It is shown how the wetting property and equilibrium morphology of the active phase depend on the support. A discussion on the impact for catalytic activities is provided.

  8. HAB Buoy: a new instrument for in situ monitoring and early warning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HAB Buoy: a new instrument for in situ monitoring and early warning of harmful algal bloom events. PF Culverhouse, R Williams, B Simpson, C Gallienne, B Reguera, M Cabrini, S Fonda-Umani, T Parisini, FA Pellegrino, Y Pazos, H Wang, L Escalera, A Moroño, M Hensey, J Silke, A Pellegrini, D Thomas, D James, MA ...

  9. A Combined Radio and Underwater Wireless Optical Communication System based on Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuhang; Tong, Zheng; Cong, Bo; Yu, Xiangyu; Kong, Meiwei; Lin, Aobo

    2016-02-01

    We propose a system of combining radio and underwater wireless optical communication based on buoys for real-time image and video transmission between underwater vehicles and the base station on the shore. We analysis how the BER performance is affected by the link distance and the deflection angle of the light source using Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. The role of casein in supporting the operation of surface bound kinesin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancock William O

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microtubules and associated motor proteins such as kinesin are envisioned for applications such as bioseparation and molecular sorting to powering hybrid synthetic mechanical devices. One of the challenges in realizing such systems is retaining motor functionality on device surfaces. Kinesin motors adsorbed onto glass surfaces lose their functionality or ability to interact with microtubules if not adsorbed with other supporting proteins. Casein, a milk protein, is commonly used in microtubule motility assays to preserve kinesin functionality. However, the mechanism responsible for this preservation of motor function is unknown. To study casein and kinesin interaction, a series of microtubule motility assays were performed where whole milk casein, or its αs1 and αs2, β or κ subunits, were introduced or omitted at various steps of the motility assay. In addition, a series of epifluorescence and total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF experiments were conducted where fluorescently labeled casein was introduced at various steps of the motility assay to assess casein-casein and casein-glass binding dynamics. From these experiments it is concluded that casein forms a bi-layer which supports the operation of kinesin. The first tightly bound layer of casein mainly performs the function of anchoring the kinesin while the second more loosely bound layer of casein positions the head domain of the kinesin to more optimally interact with microtubules. Studies on individual casein subunits indicate that β casein was most effective in supporting kinesin functionality while κ casein was found to be least effective.

  11. Toward Improved Land Surface Initialization in Support of Regional WRF Forecasts at the Kenya Meteorological Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case. Jonathan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Kabuchanga, Eric; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding and drought are two key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Department (KMD). Atmospheric processes leading to excessive precipitation and/or prolonged drought can be quite sensitive to the state of the land surface, which interacts with the boundary layer of the atmosphere providing a source of heat and moisture. The development and evolution of precipitation systems are affected by heat and moisture fluxes from the land surface within weakly-sheared environments, such as in the tropics and sub-tropics. These heat and moisture fluxes during the day can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content. Therefore, it is important to represent the land surface state as accurately as possible in numerical weather prediction models. Enhanced regional modeling capabilities have the potential to improve forecast guidance in support of daily operations and high-end events over east Africa. KMD currently runs a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in real time to support its daily forecasting operations, invoking the Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (NMM) dynamical core. They make use of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / National Weather Service Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) to manage and produce the WRF-NMM model runs on a 7-km regional grid over eastern Africa. Two organizations at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, SERVIR and the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, have established a working partnership with KMD for enhancing its regional modeling capabilities. To accomplish this goal, SPoRT and SERVIR will provide experimental land surface initialization datasets and model verification capabilities to KMD. To produce a land-surface initialization more consistent with the resolution of the KMD-WRF runs, the NASA Land Information System (LIS

  12. Use of Alternatives to Air-Fluidized Support Surfaces in the Care of Complex Wounds in Postflap and Postgraft Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia A.; Rappl, Laurie M.; Simman, Richard; Titterington, Virginia; Conwill, Jill; Koerner, Cathy; Locke, Pam; Bechtold, Dawn; Papantonio, Cathie; Gray, Deborah P.; Lawrence, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Air-fluidized support surface therapy has many drawbacks, such as dehydration, in an already difficult recovery for those wound patients who have undergone flap and graft surgery. In addition, patient care and handling are also problematic. Patients complain of discomfort, and the instability of the surface interferes with patient stability in side lying and semi-Fowler's positions. Alternative support surfaces can be considered for postflap or postgraft patients. Such technologies as alterna...

  13. Development of Surface Modification Methods for Religaheart® Cardiac Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major R.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The work is a review of the methods of the surface modification performed by the authors dedicated for for cardiac support system. It presents the evolution of designing the surface dedicated to direct contact with blood. Initially thin and ultrathin coatings were developed. They were designed as a blood-polymer barrier. The pneumatic heart assist devices are made of a medical grade polyurethane. A major milestone was to create advanced ceramic thin films expressing the flexible effects deposited by physical techniques. Coatings have evolved. Another milestone was the surface reproducing the microenvironment to capture progenitor cells from the bloodstream. Thin coatings were prepared, using methods of ion been, controlled residual stresses were introduced. Wrinkles appeared without cracking. This enabled taking control over the process of cell differentiation. Alternatively, the tissue inspired structure resulted of the coating in the form of extracellular matrix. The outer surface was modified with synthetic materials. This enabled the effective proteins docking to induce cell growth, recreating the luminal side of the blood vessel. Coagulation processes have been slowed down. In addition, it was found pro-angiogenic effect.

  14. Optical sensing characteristics of nanostructures supporting multiple localized surface plasmon resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehru, Neha; Hastings, J. Todd

    2013-02-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) have been extensively investigated for label free detection of various biological and chemical interactions. When compared to traditional propagating surface plasmon based sensors, LSPR sensors offer extensive wavelength tunability, greater electric field enhancement and sensing in reduced volumes. However, these sensors also suffer from a major disadvantage - LSPR sensors remain highly susceptible to interference because they respond to both solution refractive index changes and non-specific binding as well as specific binding of the target analyte. These interactions can compromise the measurement of the target analyte in a complex unknown media and hence limit the applicability and impact of the sensor. Despite the extensive amount of work done in this field, there has been an absence of optical techniques that make these sensors immune to interfering effects. Recently, our group experimentally demonstrated a multi-mode LSPR sensor that exploits three resonances of a U-shaped gold nanostructure to differentiate the target interaction from bulk and surface interfering effects. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive description of the electric field profiles of the three resonances of the U-shaped nanostructure. We will also evaluate the sensitivities of the nanostructure to the various bulk and surface interactions using numerical simulations.

  15. Kinetic Control of Histidine-Tagged Protein Surface Density on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-28

    Nickel-chelating lipids are general tools for anchoring polyhistidine-tagged proteins to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), but controversy exists over the stability of the protein-lipid attachment. In this study, we show that chelator lipids are suitable anchors for building stable, biologically active surfaces but that a simple Langmuirian model is insufficient to describe their behavior. Desorption kinetics from chelator lipids are governed by the valency of surface binding: monovalently bound proteins desorb within minutes (t1/2 ≈ 6 min), whereas polyvalently bound species remain bound for hours (t1/2 ≈ 12 h). Evolution between surface states is slow, so equilibrium is unlikely to be reached on experimental timescales. However, by tuning incubation conditions, the populations of each species can be kinetically controlled, providing a wide range of protein densities on SLBs with a single concentration of chelator lipid. In conclusion, we propose guidelines for the assembly of SLB surfaces functionalized with specific protein densities and demonstrate their utility in the formation of hybrid immunological synapses.

  16. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from 45171, Granite Island Buoy, by Northern Michigan University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-07-09 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130588 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  17. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from UMD Coastal Buoy by University of Minnesota - Duluth and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123648)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123648 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from time series and surface observations using Moored Autonomous Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (MADIC) System, Sunburst SAMI2 pH sensor, and other instruments from Kewalo Buoy near the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii from 2013-10-31 to 2014-06-15 (NCEI Accession 0132048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To expand the number of tools available for autonomous carbonate system observations, we have developed a robust surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)...

  19. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories Bio Buoy by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123645)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123645 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  20. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories Bio Buoy by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0123660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123660 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  1. Historic and ongoing buoy wave measurements, time series, spectral analysis, and other parameters (sea surface temperature, air temperature and pressure, wind speed and direction), worldwide, mostly US coastal, from November 1975 through present, from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contain raw and processed values concerning wave size and direction, energy spectral data (both original and processed), and, where available, sea surface...

  2. Identifying the Right Surface for the Right Patient at the Right Time: Generation and Content Validation of an Algorithm for Support Surface Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, Laurie; Watts, Carolyn; Mackey, Dianne; Beitz, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    Support surfaces are an integral component of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, but there is insufficient evidence to guide clinical decision making in this area. In an effort to provide clinical guidance for selecting support surfaces based on individual patient needs, the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society (WOCN®) set out to develop an evidence- and consensus-based algorithm. A Task Force of clinical experts was identified who: 1) reviewed the literature and identified evidence for support surface use in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers; 2) developed supporting statements for essential components for the algorithm, 3) developed a draft algorithm for support surface selection; and 4) determined its face validity. A consensus panel of 20 key opinion leaders was then convened that: 1.) reviewed the draft algorithm and supporting statements, 2.) reached consensus on statements lacking robust supporting evidence, 3.) modified the draft algorithm and evaluated its content validity. The Content Validity Index (CVI) for the algorithm was strong (0.95 out of 1.0) with an overall mean score of 3.72 (out of 1 to 4), suggesting that the steps were appropriate to the purpose of the algorithm. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence and consensus based algorithm for support surface selection that has undergone content validation. PMID:25549306

  3. Identifying the right surface for the right patient at the right time: generation and content validation of an algorithm for support surface selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNichol, Laurie; Watts, Carolyn; Mackey, Dianne; Beitz, Janice M; Gray, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    Support surfaces are an integral component of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, but there is insufficient evidence to guide clinical decision making in this area. In an effort to provide clinical guidance for selecting support surfaces based on individual patient needs, the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society (WOCN®) set out to develop an evidence- and consensus-based algorithm. A Task Force of clinical experts was identified who: 1) reviewed the literature and identified evidence for support surface use in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers; 2) developed supporting statements for essential components for the algorithm, 3) developed a draft algorithm for support surface selection; and 4) determined its face validity. A consensus panel of 20 key opinion leaders was then convened that: 1.) reviewed the draft algorithm and supporting statements, 2.) reached consensus on statements lacking robust supporting evidence, 3.) modified the draft algorithm and evaluated its content validity. The Content Validity Index (CVI) for the algorithm was strong (0.95 out of 1.0) with an overall mean score of 3.72 (out of 1 to 4), suggesting that the steps were appropriate to the purpose of the algorithm. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence and consensus based algorithm for support surface selection that has undergone content validation.

  4. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissel, Tobias, E-mail: wissel@rob.uni-luebeck.de [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Erdmann, Christian [Institute for Neuroradiology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Deutz, Christin-Sophie [Clinic for Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Sack, Benjamin [Department of Neurology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Manit, Jirapong [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); and others

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  5. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissel, Tobias; Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin; Bruder, Ralf; Erdmann, Christian; Deutz, Christin-Sophie; Sack, Benjamin; Manit, Jirapong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  6. Differential control of abdominal muscles during multi-directional support-surface translations in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Mark G; Tokuno, Craig D; Thorstensson, Alf; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2008-07-01

    The current study aimed to understand how deep and superficial abdominal muscles are coordinated with respect to activation onset times and amplitudes in response to unpredictable support-surface translations delivered in multiple directions. Electromyographic (EMG) data were recorded intra-muscularly using fine-wire electrodes inserted into the right rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI) and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles. Twelve young healthy male subjects were instructed to maintain their standing balance during 40 support surface translations (peak acceleration 1.3 m s(-2); total displacement 0.6 m) that were counter-balanced between four different directions (forward, backward, leftward, rightward). Differences between abdominal muscles in EMG onset times were found for specific translation directions. The more superficial RA (backward translations) and OE (forward and leftward translations) muscles had significantly earlier EMG onsets compared to TrA. EMG onset latencies were dependent on translation direction in RA, OE and OI, but independent of direction in TrA. EMG amplitudes in RA and OE were dependent on translation direction within the first 100 ms of activity, whereas responses from the two deeper muscles (TrA and OI) were independent of translation direction during this interval. The current results provide new insights into how abdominal muscles contribute to postural reactions during human stance. Response patterns of deep and superficial abdominal muscles during support surface translations are unlike those previously described during upper-body perturbations or voluntary arm movements, indicating that the neural mechanisms controlling individual abdominal muscles are task-specific to different postural demands.

  7. Detiding DART® Buoy Data for Real-Time Extraction of Source Coefficients for Operational Tsunami Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B.; Denbo, Donald W.; Eblé, Marie C.; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y.; Mofjeld, Harold O.; Spillane, Michael C.; Titov, Vasily V.; Tolkova, Elena I.

    2015-06-01

    US Tsunami Warning Centers use real-time bottom pressure (BP) data transmitted from a network of buoys deployed in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans to tune source coefficients of tsunami forecast models. For accurate coefficients and therefore forecasts, tides and background noise at the buoys must be accounted for through detiding. In this study, five methods for coefficient estimation are compared, each of which handles detiding differently. The first three subtract off a tidal prediction based on (1) a localized harmonic analysis involving 29 days of data immediately preceding the tsunami event, (2) 68 preexisting harmonic constituents specific to each buoy, and (3) an empirical orthogonal function fit to the previous 25 h of data. Method (4) is a Kalman smoother that uses method (1) as its input. These four methods estimate source coefficients after detiding. Method (5) estimates the coefficients simultaneously with a two-component harmonic model that accounts for the tides. The five methods are evaluated using archived data from 11 DART® buoys, to which selected artificial tsunami signals are superimposed. These buoys represent a full range of observed tidal conditions and background BP noise in the Pacific and Atlantic, and the artificial signals have a variety of patterns and induce varying signal-to-noise ratios. The root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of least squares estimates of source coefficients using varying amounts of data are used to compare the five detiding methods. The RMSE varies over two orders of magnitude among detiding methods, generally decreasing in the order listed, with method (5) yielding the most accurate estimate of the source coefficient. The RMSE is substantially reduced by waiting for the first full wave of the tsunami signal to arrive. As a case study, the five methods are compared using data recorded from the devastating 2011 Japan tsunami.

  8. Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Nitride: Influence of Surface Hydroxyls on Low Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Joseph A [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Li, Meijun [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of 2.5 nm gold clusters on the oxygen free and chemically labile support carbon nitride (C3N4). Despite having small particle sizes and high enough water partial pressure these Au/C3N4 catalysts are inactive for the gas phase and liquid phase oxidation of carbon monoxide. The reason for the lack of activity is attributed to the lack of surface OH groups on the C3N4. These OH groups are argued to be responsible for the activation of CO in the oxidation of CO. The importance of basic OH groups explains the well document dependence of support isoelectric point versus catalytic activity.

  9. Near-surface circulation and kinetic energy in the tropical Indian Ocean derived from lagrangian drifters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Saji, P.K.; Almeida, A.M.

    Trajectories of 412 satellite-tracked drifting buoys deployed in the tropical Indian Ocean have been analyzed to document the surface circulation and kinetic energy field. Only drifters drogued at 15 m depth and having drag area ratio greater than...

  10. Characterization of a surface modified carbon cryogel and a carbon supported Pt catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BILJANA M. BABIĆ

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbon cryogel, synthesized by carbonization of a resorcinol/formaldehyde cryogel and oxidized in nitric acid, was used as catalyst support for Pt nano-particles. The Pt/C catalyst was prepared by a modified polyol synthesis method in an ethylene glycol (EG solution. Characterization by nitrogen adsorption showed that the carbon cryogel support and the Pt/C catalyst were mesoporous materials with high specific surface areas (SBET > 400 m2 g-1 and large mesoporous volumes. X-Ray diffraction of the catalyst demonstrated the successful reduction of the Pt precursor to metallic form. TEM Images of the Pt/C catalyst and Pt particle size distribution showed that the mean Pt particle size was about 3.3 nm. Cyclic voltammetry (CV experiments at various scan rates (from 2 to 200 mV s-1 were performed in 0.5 mol dm-3 HClO4 solution. The large capacitance of the oxidized carbon cryogel electrode, which arises from a combination of the double-layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, associated with the participation of surface redox-type reactions was demonstrated. For the oxidized carbon cryogel, the total specific capacitance determined by 1/C vs. ν0.5 extrapolation method was found to be 386 F g-1. The hydrogen oxidation reaction at the investigated Pt/C catalyst proceeded as an electrochemically reversible, two-electron direct discharge reaction.

  11. Operational use of ocean surface drifters for tracking spilled oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamo, O. M.; Jensen, H.

    1997-01-01

    The use of Argos-positioned surface drifters by Norwegian engineers to monitor oil slicks in the North Sea was discussed. The system that was tested in June 1996 during the Norwegian Clean Seas Association oil-on-water exercise consisted of several GPS-positioned Argos drift trackers, an Argos receiver, a GPS navigator for the ship's position, and a PC with software for logging and displaying positions. Results of the field trial have been positive in that the system worked as expected. The range of direct transmission of signals from the buoys to the ship was about three nautical miles. The degree of accuracy of the relative positioning between the buoy GPS and the ship-borne GPS navigator was similar to the absolute positioning of single buoys. For best results, a minimum of two buoys and the use of lithium cells to increase battery capacity, were recommended. 3 refs., 5 figs

  12. Homogeneity of Surface Sites in Supported Single-Site Metal Catalysts: Assessment with Band Widths of Metal Carbonyl Infrared Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Adam S; Fang, Chia-Yu; Gates, Bruce C

    2016-10-06

    Determining and controlling the uniformity of isolated metal sites on surfaces of supports are central goals in investigations of single-site catalysts because well-defined species provide opportunities for fundamental understanding of the surface sites. CO is a useful probe of surface metal sites, often reacting with them to form metal carbonyls, the infrared spectra of which provide insights into the nature of the sites and the metal-support interface. Metals bonded to various support surface sites give broad bands in the spectra, and when narrow bands are observed, they indicate a high degree of uniformity of the metal sites. Much recent work on single-site catalysts has been done with supports that are inherently nonuniform, giving supported metal species that are therefore nonuniform. Herein we summarize values of ν CO data characterizing supported iridium gem-dicarbonyls, showing that the most nearly uniform of them are those supported on zeolites and the least uniform are those supported on metal oxides. Guided by ν CO data of supported iridium gem-dicarbonyls, we have determined new, general synthesis methods to maximize the degree of uniformity of iridium species on zeolites and on MgO. We report results for a zeolite HY-supported iridium gem-dicarbonyl with full width at half-maximum values of only 4.6 and 5.2 cm -1 characterizing the symmetric and asymmetric CO stretches and implying that this is the most nearly uniform supported single-site metal catalyst.

  13. Geospatial Data Fusion and Multigroup Decision Support for Surface Water Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A. Y.; Osidele, O.; Green, R. T.; Xie, H.

    2010-12-01

    Social networking and social media have gained significant popularity and brought fundamental changes to many facets of our everyday life. With the ever-increasing adoption of GPS-enabled gadgets and technology, location-based content is likely to play a central role in social networking sites. While location-based content is not new to the geoscience community, where geographic information systems (GIS) are extensively used, the delivery of useful geospatial data to targeted user groups for decision support is new. Decision makers and modelers ought to make more effective use of the new web-based tools to expand the scope of environmental awareness education, public outreach, and stakeholder interaction. Environmental decision processes are often rife with uncertainty and controversy, requiring integration of multiple sources of information and compromises between diverse interests. Fusing of multisource, multiscale environmental data for multigroup decision support is a challenging task. Toward this goal, a multigroup decision support platform should strive to achieve transparency, impartiality, and timely synthesis of information. The latter criterion often constitutes a major technical bottleneck to traditional GIS-based media, featuring large file or image sizes and requiring special processing before web deployment. Many tools and design patterns have appeared in recent years to ease the situation somewhat. In this project, we explore the use of Web 2.0 technologies for “pushing” location-based content to multigroups involved in surface water quality management and decision making. In particular, our granular bottom-up approach facilitates effective delivery of information to most relevant user groups. Our location-based content includes in-situ and remotely sensed data disseminated by NASA and other national and local agencies. Our project is demonstrated for managing the total maximum daily load (TMDL) program in the Arroyo Colorado coastal river basin

  14. Neutron reflectivity study of substrate surface chemistry effects on supported phospholipid bilayer formation on (1120) sapphire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleson, Timothy A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sahai, Nita [University of Akron; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Dura, Joseph A [ORNL; Majkrzak, Charles F [ORNL; Giuffre, Anthony J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Oxide-supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) used as biomimetric membranes are significant for a broad range of applications including improvement of biomedical devices and biosensors, and in understanding biomineralization processes and the possible role of mineral surfaces in the evolution of pre-biotic membranes. Continuous-coverage and/or stacjed SPBs retain properties (e.,g. fluidity) more similar to native biological membranes, which is desirable for most applications. Using neutron reflectivity, we examined face coverage and potential stacking of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers on the (1120) face of sapphire (a-Al2O3). Nearly full bilayers were formed at low to neutral pH, when the sapphire surface is positively charged, and at low ionic strength (l=15 mM NaCl). Coverage decreased at higher pH, close to the isoelectric point of sapphire, and also at high I>210mM, or with addition of 2mM Ca2+. The latter two effects are additive, suggesting that Ca2+ mitigates the effect of higher I. These trends agree with previous results for phospholipid adsorption on a-Al2O3 particles determined by adsorption isotherms and on single-crystal (1010) sapphire by atomic force microscopy, suggesting consistency of oxide surface chemistry-dependent effects across experimental techniques.

  15. Meteorological, oceanographic, and buoy data from JAMSTEC from five drifting buoys, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter) in the Arctic Ocean from 2000 to 2003 (NODC Accession 0002201)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1999, JAMSTEC and MetOcean Data System Ltd. developed a new drifting buoy, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter), to conduct long-term observations in the...

  16. Drifting and moored buoy data observed during 2015 and assembled by the Global Data Assembly Center for Drifting Buoy Data (formerly Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC)), Canada (NCEI Accession 0156004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Buoy data is available in real time to platform operators via telecommunications providers and distributed on the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World...

  17. Advances in the Application of Surface Drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Rick; Özgökmen, Tamay; Centurioni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Surface drifting buoys, or drifters, are used in oceanographic and climate research, oil spill tracking, weather forecasting, search and rescue operations, calibration and validation of velocities from high-frequency radar and from altimeters, iceberg tracking, and support of offshore drilling operations. In this review, we present a brief history of drifters, from the message in a bottle to the latest satellite-tracked, multisensor drifters. We discuss the different types of drifters currently used for research and operations as well as drifter designs in development. We conclude with a discussion of the various properties that can be observed with drifters, with heavy emphasis on a critical process that cannot adequately be observed by any other instrument: dispersion in the upper ocean, driven by turbulence at scales from waves through the submesoscale to the large-scale geostrophic eddies.

  18. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database 1993 with Updates (19 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0095199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CD-ROMs holds marine meteorological, oceanographic, and wave spectra data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN (Coastal-Marine Automated Network) stations...

  19. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19910101 to 19910331 (NODC Accession 9100101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Gerald P Lesblam, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format...

  20. Method for Extracting Tidal and Inertial Motion from ARGOS Ice Buoys Applied to the Barents Sea during CEAREX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turet, P

    1993-01-01

    A harmonic analysis of tidal and inertial action was applied to observations of position of ARGOS buoys deployed on drifting multiyear sea ice in the Eastern Arctic-Barents Sea during CEAREX (1988-89...

  1. Directional wave and temperature data from seven buoys at Point Reyes, CA, 1996-2002 (NODC Accession 0000760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from 7 buoys in Point Reyes, California, from 06 December 1996 to 25 July 2002. Data were collected as part of the Coastal Data Information...

  2. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Waimea Bay, North Shore, Oahu during December 2001 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Directional Waverider Buoy roughly 5 km...

  3. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Kailua Bay, Windward Oahu, Hawaii during August 2000 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Mark 2 Directional Waverider Buoy roughly...

  4. Study of the solid-solid surface adsorption of Eu2O3 on various Al2O3 supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rongchuan; Yu Zhi; Zhou Yuan; Yoshitake Yamazaki

    1997-12-01

    Solid-solid surface interactions of Eu 2 O 3 on various oxide substrates are investigated with X-ray and Moessbauer experiments. The results indicate that the interaction of Eu 2 O 3 on the complex support differs from that having simple support. An incorporation model is used to explain how Eu 2 O 3 disperses onto the surface of γ-alumina or η-alumina

  5. Controlled Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles using Solid-support for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyejin; Chae, Jinjoo; Jeong, Hong; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoonsik

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated small clusters of gold nanoparticles by using solid-supported aggregation of gold nanoparticles. The fabricated Au nanoclusters consisting mainly of dimers showed homogeneous characteristics in cluster size and SERS intensity. The SERS enhancement of 4-ABT molecules in an effective area within 2-nm gap appeared to be approximately 10. Detachment process by ultrasonication was successively carried out in order to use the nanoclusters as SERS probes. The possibility of these clusters as SERS probe was proved in terms of signal and cluster size. Single molecule-level sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was known approximately fifteen years ago. Ever since there have been many different applications benefiting from the ultra-high sensitivity such as single molecule detection, chemical sensing and bio-molecular probes. Especially, SERS has drawn much attention in bio-multiplexing probes owing to its unique optical characteristics claiming extremely narrow bandwidth, high sensitivity of light signals, and non-bleaching feature

  6. Static Air Support Surfaces to Prevent Pressure Injuries: A Multicenter Cohort Study in Belgian Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraes, Brecht; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors for developing pressure injuries (PIs) in patients placed on a static air support surfaces: mattress overlay, heel wedge, and seat cushion. Multicenter cohort study. The sample comprised 176 residents; their mean age was 87 (SD = 6.76) years; their mean Braden Scale score was 14 (SD = 2.54). The study was performed on a convenience sample of 6 nursing homes in Belgium. Data were collected on 23 care units. The primary outcome measure, cumulative PI incidence (category [stage] II-IV) over a 30-day observation period, was calculated. Pressure injury occurrence was defined according to the 2014 European and US National Pressure Injury Advisory panels, Pan Pacific Pressure Injury Alliance classification system. The PI incidence for category (stage) II-IV was 5.1%. Six residents (3.4%) developed a category II PI, and 3 (1.7%) developed a category III PI; no category IV ulcers occurred. No significant risk factors for category II-IV PIs were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Time of sitting in a chair was found to be a risk factor for development of nonblanchable erythema (category I PI) (odds ratio = 21.608; 95% confidence interval [CI], 20.510-22.812; P = .013). The median time to develop a category II-IV PI was 16 days (interquartile range = 2-26). The interrater reliability between the observations of the researcher and nurses on-site was almost perfect (0.86; 95% CI, 0.81-0.91). We found a low incidence of PIs when using a static air overlay mattress for patients at risk in a nursing home population. Static air support surfaces, alongside patient-tailored patient repositioning protocols, should be considered to prevent PIs in this patient population.

  7. Analytical Study on an Oscillating Buoy Wave Energy Converter Integrated into a Fixed Box-Type Breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanlie Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating buoy wave energy converter (WEC integrated to an existing box-type breakwater is introduced in this study. The buoy is installed on the existing breakwater and designed to be much smaller than the breakwater in scale, aiming to reduce the construction cost of the WEC. The oscillating buoy works as a heave-type WEC in front of the breakwater towards the incident waves. A power take-off (PTO system is installed on the topside of the breakwater to harvest the kinetic energy (in heave mode of the floating buoy. The hydrodynamic performance of this system is studied analytically based on linear potential-flow theory. Effects of the geometrical parameters on the reflection and transmission coefficients and the capture width ratio (CWR of the system are investigated. Results show that the maximum efficiency of the energy extraction can reach 80% or even higher. Compared with the isolated box-type breakwater, the reflection coefficient can be effectively decreased by using this oscillating buoy WEC, with unchanged transmission coefficient. Thus, the possibility of capturing the wave energy with the oscillating buoy WEC integrated into breakwaters is shown.

  8. MONITORING HIGH-FREQUENCY OCEAN SIGNALS USING LOW-COST GNSS/IMU BUOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS or Precise Point Positioning (PPP solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  9. Ultra-high vacuum surface analysis study of rhodopsin incorporation into supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Roger; Subramaniam, Varuni; McArthur, Sally L; Bondurant, Bruce; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, Henry K; Brown, Michael F; Ross, Eric E; Saavedra, S Scott; Castner, David G

    2008-05-06

    Planar supported lipid bilayers that are stable under ambient atmospheric and ultra-high-vacuum conditions were prepared by cross-linking polymerization of bis-sorbylphosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to investigate bilayers that were cross-linked using either redox-initiated radical polymerization or ultraviolet photopolymerization. The redox method yields a more structurally intact bilayer; however, the UV method is more compatible with incorporation of transmembrane proteins. UV polymerization was therefore used to prepare cross-linked bilayers with incorporated bovine rhodopsin, a light-activated, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). A previous study (Subramaniam, V.; Alves, I. D.; Salgado, G. F. J.; Lau, P. W.; Wysocki, R. J.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Hruby, V. J.; Brown, M. F.; Saavedra, S. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5320-5321) showed that rhodopsin retains photoactivity after incorporation into UV-polymerized bis-SorbPC, but did not address how the protein is associated with the bilayer. In this study, we show that rhodopsin is retained in supported bilayers of poly(bis-SorbPC) under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, on the basis of the increase in the XPS nitrogen concentration and the presence of characteristic amino acid peaks in the ToF-SIMS data. Angle-resolved XPS data show that the protein is inserted into the bilayer, rather than adsorbed on the bilayer surface. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of ultra-high-vacuum techniques for structural studies of supported proteolipid bilayers.

  10. Oceanographic Multisensor Buoy Based on Low Cost Sensors for Posidonia Meadows Monitoring in Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some underwater areas with high ecological interest that should be monitored. Posidonia and seagrasses exert considerable work in protecting the coastline from erosion. In these areas, many animals and organisms live and find the grassland food and the protection against predators. It is considered a bioindicator of the quality of coastal marine waters. It is important to monitor them and maintain these ecological communities as clean as possible. In this paper, we present an oceanographic buoy for Posidonia meadows monitoring. It is based on a set of low cost sensors which are able to collect data from water such as salinity, temperature, and turbidity and from the weather as temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall, among others. The system is mounted in a buoy which keeps it isolated to possible oxidation problems. Data gathered are processed using a microcontroller. Finally the buoy is connected with a base station placed on the mainland through a wireless connection using a FlyPort module. The network performance is checked in order to ensure that no delays will be generated on the data transmission. This proposal could be used to monitor other areas with special ecological interest and for monitoring and supervising aquaculture activities.

  11. Using Buoy and Radar Data to Study Sudden Wind Gusts Over Coastal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, Georgios; Chronis, Themis; Lang, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Significant sudden wind gusts can pose a threat to aviation near the coastline, as well as small (sailing) boats and commercial ships approaching the ports. Such cases can result in wind speed changes of more than an order of magnitude within 5 minutes, which can then last up to 20 minutes or more. Although the constellation of scatterometers is a good means of studying maritime convection, those sudden gusts are not easily captured because of the low time resolution. The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) provides continuous measurements of wind speed and direction along the US coastal regions every 6 minutes. Buoys are platforms placed at specific places on the seas, especially along coastlines, providing data for atmospheric and oceanic studies. Next Generation Radars (NEXRADs), after the recent upgrade of the network to dual-pol systems, offer enhanced capabilities to study atmospheric phenomena. NEXRADs provide continuous full-volume scans approximately every 5 minutes and therefore are close to the time resolution of the buoy measurements. Use of single- Doppler retrievals might also provide a means of further validation.

  12. Coastal Response to Latitudinal Shifts in Wave Climate in Southeast Australia using a Surrogate Buoy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, T.; Goodwin, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    Most Global Climate Models (GCM) agree that an expansion of the tropics will continue with greenhouse warming, although the magnitude of this expansion is largely under-estimated. A first-order impact is wave climate and coastal response in the sub-tropics. We use a latitudinal array of mid-shelf wave buoy observations along the Southeast Australian Shelf (SEAS) to forecast wave climate change with tropical expansion. We suggest that the present-day modal wave climate from more equatorward SEAS buoys can be used as surrogate data to project future wave climate change at more poleward locations. This approach allows multiple scenarios of the magnitude of future tropical expansion to be examined, based on the latitudinal separation between buoys. We use the modal wave climate typology of Mortlock and Goodwin (2015) to relate wave climate change to synoptic climate. We then use a coupled spectral wave and morphodynamic model to evaluate wave climate change scenarios for an idealised headland-bay beach setting. The method provides an alternative to the downscaling approach for wave climate forecasting, which inherits and adds to the uncertainty of the GCM projections. Our results are relevant for other Southern Hemisphere east coasts in South America and Africa, and Northern Hemisphere west coasts in North America and Europe with similar mid-shelf wave climate and sediment transport regimes in the sub-tropics.

  13. Surface water pesticide modelling for decision support in drinking water production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Nele; Dams, Jef; Bronders, Jan; Peleman, Gisèle; Verdickt, Liesbeth

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of pesticides and other contaminants in river systems may compromise the use of surface water for drinking water production. To reduce the cost of removal of pesticides from the raw water, drinking water companies can: search for other raw water sources, invest in water storage capacity to overcome periods with high pesticide concentrations (often related to the application period), or impose measures to reduce the emission of pesticides to surface water (i.e. sustainable application strategies or use restrictions). To select the most appropriate water management options, the costs and effects of the aforementioned actions need to be evaluated. This evaluation requires knowledge on the concentrations and loads of pesticides at the point of drinking water abstraction, as well as insight in the contribution and the temporal variability of different sources or subbasins. In such a case, a modelling approach can assist in generating measurement-based datasets and to compare different scenarios for water management. We illustrate how a modelling approach can provide decision support for water management related to drinking water abstraction from surface water in a catchment that suffers from elevated pesticide concentrations. The study area is a water production center (WPC) located in northwestern Belgium. The WPC abstracts raw water from the river IJzer or from a natural pond and its connected streams. The available quantities as well as the quality of the water vary throughout the year. The WPC uses a reservoir of 3 million m³ to capture and store raw water to overcome periods with limited water availability and/or poor water quality. However, the pressure on water increases and in the future this buffering capacity might be no longer sufficient to fulfill the drinking water production demand. A surface water quality model for the area is set up using InfoWorks RS. The model is applied to obtain insight in the concentrations and loads at the different

  14. The Effect of Microporous Polymeric Support Modification on Surface and Gas Transport Properties of Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsu A. Akhmetshina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microporous polymers based on anionic macroinitiator and toluene 2,4-diisocyanate were used as a support for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6] and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide ([emim][Tf2N] immobilization. The polymeric support was modified by using silica particles associated in oligomeric media, and the influence of the modifier used on the polymeric structure was studied. The supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs were tested for He, N2, NH3, H2S, and CO2 gas separation and ideal selectivities were calculated. The high values of ideal selectivity for ammonia-based systems with permanent gases were observed on polymer matrixes immobilized with [bmim][PF6] and [emim][Tf2N]. The modification of SILMs by nanosize silica particles leads to an increase of NH3 separation relatively to CO2 or H2S.

  15. Optical and physical data collected by drifters during June 2000 - March 2001 in support of the Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics program (NODC Accession 0000581)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling and downwelling irradiance data were collected from surface drifter buoys off the California and Oregon coast from 04 June 2000 to 24 March 2001 (non...

  16. Effects of Trunk Stabilization Exercises on Different Support Surfaces on the Cross-sectional Area of the Trunk Muscles and Balance Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Sea Hyun; Lee, Hong Gyun; Kim, Young Eok; Kim, Gye Yeop; Jung, Hyun Woo; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects on stroke patients of trunk stabilization exercise on different support surfaces. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen stroke patients with onset of stroke six months earlier or longer were randomly and equally assigned to group I (exercise performed on a stable support surface) and group II (exercise performed on an unstable support surface). The two groups conducted the trunk stabilization exercises on the respective support surfaces,...

  17. Near Surface Soil Moisture Controls Beyond the Darcy Support Scale: A Remote Sensing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, B.; Gaur, N.

    2014-12-01

    Variability observed in near-surface soil moisture is a function of spatial and temporal scale and an understanding of the same is required in numerous environmental and hydrological applications. Past literature has focused largely on the Darcy support scale of measurement for generating knowledge about soil moisture variability and the factors causing it. With the advent of a remote sensing era, it is essential to develop a comprehensive understanding of soil moisture variability and the factors creating it at the remote sensing footprint scale. This understanding will facilitate knowledge transfer between scales which remains an area of active research. In this study, we have presented the hierarchy of controls that physical factors namely, soil, vegetation and topography exert on soil moisture distributions from airborne remote sensor footprint scale (~800 m) to a satellite footprint scale (12800 m) across 3 hydro-climates- humid (Iowa), sub-humid (Oklahoma) and semi-arid (Arizona). We evaluated the effect of physical factors on soil moisture variability at coarse spatial support scales but fine (daily) temporal spacing scales which are typical of remotely sensed soil moisture data. The hierarchy or ranking scheme defined in the study is a function of the areal extent of controls of the different physical factors and the magnitude of their effect in creating spatial variability of soil moisture. We found that even though the areal influence of soil on soil moisture variability remained significant at all scales, it decreased as we went from airborne scale to coarser scales whereas the influence of topography and vegetation increased for all three hydro-climates. The magnitude of the effect of these factors, however, was dependent on antecedent soil moisture conditions and hydro-climate.

  18. Theoretical Investigation of the Structural Stabilities of Ceria Surfaces and Supported Metal Nanocluster in Vapor and Aqueous Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhibo [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Liu, Ning [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Chen, Biaohua [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Li, Jianwei [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China; Mei, Donghai [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2018-01-25

    Understanding the structural stability and dynamics at the interface between the solid metal oxide and aqueous phase is significant in a variety of industrial applications including heterogeneous catalysis and environmental remediation. In the present work, the stabilities of three low-index ceria (CeO2) surfaces, i.e., (111), (110) and (100) in vapor and aqueous phases were studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Gibbs surface free energies as a function of temperature, water partial pressure, and water coverages were calculated using DFT based atomistic thermodynamic approach. On the basis of surface free energies, the morphology and exposed surface structures of the CeO2 nanoparticle were predicted using Wulff construction principle. It is found that the partially hydroxylated (111) and (100) are two major surface structures of CeO2 nanoparticles in vapor phase at ambient temperature (300 K). As the temperature increases, the fully dehydrated (111) surface gradually becomes the most dominant surface structure. While in aqueous phase, the exposed surface of the CeO2 nanoparticle is dominated by the hydroxylated (110) structure at 393 K. Finally, the morphology and stability of a cuboctahedron Pt13 nanocluster supported on CeO2 surfaces in both gas and aqueous phases were investigated. In gas phase, the supported Pt13 nanocluster has the tendency to wetting the CeO2 surface due to the strong metal-support interaction. The calculated interaction energies suggest the CeO2(110) surface provides the best stability for the Pt13 nanocluster. The CeO2 supported Pt13 nanoclusters are oxidized. Compared to the gas phase, the morphology of the CeO2 supported Pt13 nanocluster is less distorted due to the solvation effect provided by surrounding water molecules in aqueous phase. More electrons are transferred from the Pt13 nanocluster to the CeO2 support, implying the supported Pt13 nanocluster is further

  19. [Extraction Optimization of Rhizome of Curcuma longa by Response Surface Methodology and Support Vector Regression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei-pei; Shan, Jin-feng; Jiang, Jian-lan

    2015-12-01

    To optimize the optimal microwave-assisted extraction method of curcuminoids from Curcuma longa. On the base of single factor experiment, the ethanol concentration, the ratio of liquid to solid and the microwave time were selected for further optimization. Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Central Composite Design-Response Surface Methodology (CCD) algorithm were utilized to design and establish models respectively, while Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was introduced to optimize the parameters of SVR models and to search optimal points of models. The evaluation indicator, the sum of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin by HPLC, were used. The optimal parameters of microwave-assisted extraction were as follows: ethanol concentration of 69%, ratio of liquid to solid of 21 : 1, microwave time of 55 s. On those conditions, the sum of three curcuminoids was 28.97 mg/g (per gram of rhizomes powder). Both the CCD model and the SVR model were credible, for they have predicted the similar process condition and the deviation of yield were less than 1.2%.

  20. Support vectors machine classification of surface electromyography for non-invasive naturally controlled hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    The scientific researches in human rehabilitation techniques have continually evolved to offer again the mobility and freedom lost to disability. Many systems managed by myoelectric signals intended to mimic the movement of the human arm still have results considered partial, which makes it subject of many researches. The use of Natural Interfaces Signal Processing methods makes possible to design systems capable of offering prosthesis in a more natural and intuitive way. This paper presents a study investigating the use of forearm surface electromyography (sEMG) signals for classification of specific movements of hand using 12 sEMG channels and support vector machine (SVM). The system acquired the sEMG signal using a virtual model as a visual stimulus in order to demonstrate to the volunteer the hand movements which must be replicated by them. The Root Mean Square (RMS) value feature is extracted of the signal and it serves as input data for the classification with SVM. The classification stage used three types of kernel functions (linear, polynomial, radial basis) for comparison of the results. The average accuracy reached for the classification of seventeen distinct movements of 83.7% was achieved using the SVM linear classifier, 80.8% was achieved using the SVM polynomial classifier and 85.1% was achieved using the SVM radial basis classifier.

  1. Evaluation of HY-2A Scatterometer Wind Vectors Using Data from Buoys, ERA-Interim and ASCAT during 2012–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xing

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The first Chinese operational Ku-band scatterometer on board Haiyang-2A (HY-2A, launched in August 2011, is designed for monitoring the global ocean surface wind. This study estimates the quality of the near-real-time (NRT retrieval wind speed and wind direction from the HY-2A scatterometer for 36 months from 2012 to 2014. We employed three types of sea-surface wind data from oceanic moored buoys operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC and the Tropical Atmospheric Ocean project (TAO, the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-Interim, and the advanced scatterometer (ASCAT to calculate the error statistics including mean bias, root mean square error (RMSE, and standard deviation. In addition, the rain effects on the retrieval winds were investigated using collocated Climate Prediction Center morphing method (CMORPH precipitation data. All data were collocated with the HY-2A scatterometer wind data for comparison. The quality performances of the HY-2A NRT wind vectors data (especially the wind speeds were satisfactory throughout the service period. The RMSEs of the HY-2A wind speeds relative to the NDBC, TAO, ERA-Interim, and ASCAT data were 1.94, 1.73, 2.25, and 1.62 m·s−1, respectively. The corresponding RMSEs of the wind direction were 46.63°, 43.11°, 39.93°, and 47.47°, respectively. The HY-2A scatterometer overestimated low wind speeds, especially under rainy conditions. Rain exerted a diminishing effect on the wind speed retrievals with increasing wind speed, but its effect on wind direction was robust at low and moderate wind speeds. Relative to the TAO buoy data, the RMSEs without rain effect were reduced to 1.2 m·s−1 and 39.68° for the wind speed direction, respectively, regardless of wind speed. By investigating the objective laws between rain and the retrieval winds from HY-2A, we could improve the quality of wind retrievals through future studies.

  2. Comparison of air-fluidized therapy with other support surfaces used to treat pressure ulcers in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Rachel F; Horn, Susan D; van Rijswijk, Lia; Pietsch, Catherine; Smout, Randall J

    2005-02-01

    To provide empirical evidence comparing pressure ulcer healing rates between different support surfaces, data were analyzed from eligible residents with pressure ulcers (N = 664) enrolled in the National Pressure Ulcer Long-Term Care Study, a retrospective pressure ulcer prevention and treatment study. Support surfaces were categorized as: Group 1 (static overlays and replacement mattresses), Group 2 (low-air-loss beds, alternating pressure, and powered/non-powered overlays/mattresses), and Group 3 (air-fluidized beds). Calculation of healing rates, using the largest ulcer from each resident, found mean healing rates greatest for air-fluidized therapy (Group 3) (mean = 5.2 cm(2)/week) versus Group 1 (mean =1.5 cm(2)/week) and Group 2 (mean = 1.8 cm(2)/week) surfaces (P = 0.007). Healing rates also were assessed using 7- to 10-day "episodes"; each ulcer generated separate episode(s) that included all ulcers when residents had multiple ulcers. Mean healing rates were significantly greater for Stage III/IV ulcers on Group 3 surfaces (mean = 3.1 cm(2)/week) versus Group 1 (mean = 0.6 cm(2)/week) and Group 2 (mean = 0.7 cm(2)/week) surfaces (Group 2 versus Group 3: P = 0.0211). This finding persisted for ulcers with comparable initial baseline areas (20 cm(2) to 75 cm(2)) on Group 2 and Group 3 surfaces; healing improved on Group 3 surfaces (+2.3 cm(2)/week) versus Group 2 surfaces (-2.1 cm(2)/week, P = 0.0399). Residents on Group 3 (6 out of 82; 7.3%) and Group 1 (47 out of 461; 10.2%) surfaces had fewer hospitalizations and emergency room visits than those on Group 2 surfaces (23 out of 121; 19.0%, P = 0.01) despite significantly greater illness in residents on Group 2 and 3 versus Group 1 surfaces (P is less than 0.0001). Despite limitations inherent in retrospective studies, ulcers on Group 3 surfaces versus Groups 1 and Group 2 surfaces had statistically significant faster healing rates (particularly for Stage III/IV ulcers) with significantly fewer

  3. Antimicrobial design of titanium surface that kill sessile bacteria but support stem cells adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Bao, Ni-Rong; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-12-01

    Implant-related bacterial infection is one of the most severe postoperative complications in orthopedic or dental surgery. In this context, from the perspective of surface modification, increasing efforts have been made to enhance the antibacterial capability of titanium surface. In this work, a hierarchical hybrid surface architecture was firstly constructed on titanium surface by two-step strategy of acid etching and H2O2 aging. Then silver nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the hierarchical surface by ion implantation, showing no detectable release of silver ions from surface. The designed titanium surface showed good bioactivity. More importantly, this elaborately designed titanium surface can effectively inactivate the adherent S. aureus on surface by virtue of a contact-killing mode. Meanwhile, the designed titanium surface can significantly facilitate the initial adhesion and spreading behaviors of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on titanium. The results suggested that, the elaborately designed titanium surface might own a cell-favoring ability that can help mammalian cells win the initial adhesion race against bacteria. We hope the present study can provide a new insight for the better understanding and designing of antimicrobial titanium surface, and pave the way to satisfying clinical requirements.

  4. H2 INTERACTION WITH BIMETALLIC DIMERS SUPPORTED ON THE MgO(100) SURFACE: A DFT CLUSTER MODEL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    PIOTR MATCZAK

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between the H2 molecule and the PdAg, PdAu, PtAg and PtAu bimetallic dimers deposited on the MgO(100) surface is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The bimetallic dimers, whose molecular axes are considered to be perpendicular to the support surface, are adsorbed on top of an oxygen atom. Within this adsorption mode, the dimers prefer the orientation in which their Pd or Pt end is closer to the oxygen atom. The Ag and Au ends of the MgO-supported dimers captur...

  5. The application of supported liquid extraction in the analysis of benzodiazepines using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Erika L; McCord, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed medicines for anxiety disorders and are present in many toxicological screens. These drugs are often administered in the commission of drug facilitated sexual assaults due their effects on the central nervous system. Due to the potency of the drugs, only small amounts are usually given to victims; therefore, the target detection limit for these compounds in biological samples has been set at 50 ng/mL. Currently the standard screening method for detection of this class of drug is the immunoassay; however, screening methods that are more sensitive and selective than immunoassays are needed to encompass the wide range of structural variants of this class of compounds. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be highly sensitive and has been shown to permit analysis of various benzodiazepines with limits of detection as low as 6 ng/mL. This technique permits analytical results in less than 2 min when used on pure drug samples. For biological samples, a key issue for analysis by SERS is removal of exogenous salts and matrix components. In this paper we examine supported liquid extraction as a useful preparation technique for SERS detection. Supported liquid extraction has many of the benefits of liquid-liquid extraction along with the ability to be automated. This technique provides a fast and clean extraction for benzodiazepines from urine at a pH of 5.0, and does not produce large quantities of solvent waste. To validate this procedure we have determined figures of merit and examined simulated urine samples prepared with commonly appearing interferences. It was shown that at a pH 5.0 many drugs that are prevalent in urine samples can be removed, permitting a selective detection of the benzodiazepine of interest. This technique has been shown to provide rapid (less than 20 min), sensitive, and specific detection of benzodiazepines with limits of detection between 32 and 600 ng/mL and dynamic range of 32

  6. Collagen fiber with surface-grafted polyphenol as a novel support for Pd(0) nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hao [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wu Chao [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); He Qiang [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: sibitannin@vip.163.com [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this study is to use collagen fiber (CF) as a natural polymeric support to synthesize a novel palladium (Pd) nanoparticle catalyst. To achieve a stable immobilization of Pd on CF support, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a typical plant polyphenol, was grafted onto CF surface, acting both as dispersing and stabilizing agent for Pd nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed that this catalyst was in ordered fibrous state with high flexibility. The presence of EGCG grafted on CF and the interaction mechanism of Pd ions with support was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy offered evidence that the well-dispersed Pd nanoparticles were generated on the outer surface of CF. By using the hydrogenation of allyl alcohol as a model reaction, the synthesized catalyst presented remarkably improved activity, selectivity and reusability as compared with the Pd catalyst supported by CF without grafting of EGCG.

  7. Pressure-Redistributing Support Surface Use and Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Amr, Sania; Miller, Ram; Baumgarten, Mona

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association between pressure-redistributing support surface (PRSS) use and incident pressure ulcers in older adults with hip fracture. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from prospective cohort with assessments performed as soon as possible after hospital admission and on alternating days for 21 days. SETTING Nine hospitals in the Baltimore Hip Studies network and 105 postacute facilities to which participants were discharged. PARTICIPANTS Six hundred fifty-eight people aged 65 and older who underwent surgery for hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Full-body examination for pressure ulcers; bedbound status; and PRSS use, recorded as none, powered (alternating pressure mattresses, low-air-loss mattresses, and alternating pressure overlays), or nonpowered (high-density foam, static air, or gel-filled mattresses or pressure-redistributing overlays except for alternating pressure overlays). RESULTS Incident pressure ulcers (IPUs), Stage 2 or higher, were observed at 4.2% (195/4,638) of visits after no PRSS use, 4.5% (28/623) of visits after powered PRSS use, and 3.6% (54/1,496) of visits after nonpowered PRSS use. The rate of IPU per person-day of follow-up did not differ significantly between participants using powered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs. The rate also did not differ significantly between participants using nonpowered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs, except in the subset of bedbound participants (incidence rate ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.1–0.7). CONCLUSION PRSS use was not associated with a lower IPU rate. Clinical guidelines may need revision for the limited effect of PRSS use, and it may be appropriate to target PRSS use to bedbound patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:21649630

  8. Improvement of tsunami detection in timeseries data of GPS buoys with the Continuous Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Y.; Takagawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    The observation data of GPS buoys which are installed in the offshore of Japan are used for monitoring not only waves but also tsunamis in Japan. The real-time data was successfully used to upgrade the tsunami warnings just after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Huge tsunamis can be easily detected because the signal-noise ratio is high enough, but moderate tsunami is not. GPS data sometimes include the error waveforms like tsunamis because of changing accuracy by the number and the position of GPS satellites. To distinguish the true tsunami waveforms from pseudo-tsunami ones is important for tsunami detection. In this research, a method to reduce misdetections of tsunami in the observation data of GPS buoys and to increase the efficiency of tsunami detection was developed.Firstly, the error waveforms were extracted by using the indexes of position dilution of precision, reliability of GPS satellite positioning and satellite number for calculation. Then, the output from this procedure was used for the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyze the time-frequency characteristics of error waveforms and real tsunami waveforms.We found that the error waveforms tended to appear when the accuracy of GPS buoys positioning was low. By extracting these waveforms, it was possible to decrease about 43% error waveforms without the reduction of the tsunami detection rate. Moreover, we found that the amplitudes of power spectra obtained from the error waveforms and real tsunamis were similar in the component of long period (4-65 minutes), on the other hand, the amplitude in the component of short period (< 1 minute) obtained from the error waveforms was significantly larger than that of the real tsunami waveforms. By thresholding of the short-period component, further extraction of error waveforms became possible without a significant reduction of tsunami detection rate.

  9. Thin ice and storms: Sea ice deformation from buoy arrays deployed during N-ICE2015

    OpenAIRE

    Itkin, Polona; Spreen, Gunnar; Cheng, Bin; Doble, Martin; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Haapala, Jari; Hughes, Nick; Kaleschke, Lars; Nicolaus, Marcel; Wilkinson, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Arctic sea ice has displayed significant thinning as well as an increase in drift speed in recent years. Taken together this suggests an associated rise in sea ice deformation rate. A winter and spring expedition to the sea ice covered region north of Svalbard – the Norwegian young sea ICE 2015 expedition (N-ICE2015) - gave an opportunity to deploy extensive buoy arrays and to monitor the deformation of the first- and second-year ice now common in the majority of the Arctic Basin. During the ...

  10. Prevention of pressure ulcers in the intensive care unit: a randomized trial of 2 viscoelastic foam support surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurek, Pakize; Yavuz, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare whether differences exist between 2 viscoelastic foam support surfaces in the development of new pressure ulcers. There is evidence to support the use of viscoelastic foam over standard hospital foam to reduce pressure. A comparative effectiveness study was done to compare 2 viscoelastic foam support surfaces. A randomized controlled trial was carried out. The study was performed in 2 intensive care units between October 1, 2008, and January 4, 2010. Patients (n = 105) admitted to intensive care unit were randomly assigned to viscoelastic foam 1 (n = 53) or viscoelastic foam 2 support surface (n = 52). In total, 42.8% of all patients developed a new pressure ulcer of stage 1 or worse. By stages, pressure ulcer incidence was 28.6%, 13.3%, and 1.0% for stages 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was no significant difference in pressure ulcer incidence between the viscoelastic foam 1 and 2 groups (X2 = 0.07, df = 1, P > .05). No difference was found between 2 different viscoelastic foam surfaces in the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients treated in intensive care. Pressure ulcer incidence in critically ill patients remains high. Nurses must compare current products for effectiveness and develop innovative systems, processes, or devices to deliver best practices.

  11. Effect of support surface treatment on the synthesis, structure, and performance of Co/CNT Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschemann, Thomas O.; Lamme, Wouter S.; Manchester, Rene L.; Parmentier, Tanja E.; Cognigni, Andrea; Ronning, Magnus; de Jong, Krijn P.

    We report the preparation of supported cobalt catalysts (9 wt% Co) on untreated (CNT) and surface-oxidized (CNT-ox) carbon nanotube materials by incipient wetness impregnation with solutions of cobalt nitrate in water, ethanol, or 1-propanol. The results show that by a judicious selection of solvent

  12. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. 165.812 Section 165.812 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. Within the Lower Mississippi...

  13. Interviews with Apollo Lunar Surface Astronauts in Support of EVA Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Dean

    2010-01-01

    A 3-person team interviewed 8 of the 11 surviving Apollo crewmembers in a series of focused interviews to discuss their experiences on the lunar surface. Eppler presented the results of these interviews, along with recommendations for the design of future lunar surface systems.

  14. Surface Modeling to Support Small-Body Spacecraft Exploration and Proximity Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Joseph E.; Mastrodemos, Nickolaos; Gaskell, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to simulate physically plausible surfaces that represent geologically evolved surfaces, demonstrating demanding surface-relative guidance navigation and control (GN&C) actions, such surfaces must be made to mimic the geological processes themselves. A report describes how, using software and algorithms to model body surfaces as a series of digital terrain maps, a series of processes was put in place that evolve the surface from some assumed nominal starting condition. The physical processes modeled in this algorithmic technique include fractal regolith substrate texturing, fractally textured rocks (of empirically derived size and distribution power laws), cratering, and regolith migration under potential energy gradient. Starting with a global model that may be determined observationally or created ad hoc, the surface evolution is begun. First, material of some assumed strength is layered on the global model in a fractally random pattern. Then, rocks are distributed according to power laws measured on the Moon. Cratering then takes place in a temporal fashion, including modeling of ejecta blankets and taking into account the gravity of the object (which determines how much of the ejecta blanket falls back to the surface), and causing the observed phenomena of older craters being progressively buried by the ejecta of earlier impacts. Finally, regolith migration occurs which stratifies finer materials from coarser, as the fine material progressively migrates to regions of lower potential energy.

  15. Extracellular matrix inspired surface functionalization with heparin, fibronectin and VEGF provides an anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Liu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an (China); Chen, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Kun [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); School of Life Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Hohe Str. 06, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Pan, Changjiang [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Interventional Medical Devices, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huai’an (China); Chen, Junying, E-mail: chenjy@263.net [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China); Huang, Nan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials of Chinese Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF could selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • The bioactivity of biomolecules was more efficiently maintained via specific intermolecular interaction. • Poly-l-lysine interlayer was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: The biocompatibility of currently used coronary artery stent is still far from perfect, which closely related to insufficient endothelialization and thrombus formation. In this study, heparin, fibronectin and VEGF were immobilized on Ti surface to construct a multifunctional microenvironment with favorable properties to inhibit thrombosis formation and promote endothelialization simultaneously. The microenvironment on Ti surface was characterized in detail and demonstrated that the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was constructed successfully on Ti surface. The influence of surface properties such as chemical composition, roughness, hydrophilicity, and binding density of biomolecules on the performances of hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility was evaluated and discussed. Modified surface significantly enhanced the AT III binding density and prolonged the clotting time. In vitro platelet adhesion and activation assays further proved that the modified surface presented favorable anti-coagulant property. In addition, the proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) on the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. In conclusion, the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was successfully constructed with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting properties. This work may provide a promising approach for biofunctional surface modification of coronary artery stent to acquire a desired multifunctional microenvironment.

  16. Extracellular matrix inspired surface functionalization with heparin, fibronectin and VEGF provides an anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xue; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Kun; Maitz, Manfred F.; Pan, Changjiang; Chen, Junying; Huang, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface modification with fibronectin, heparin and VEGF could selectively anticoagulant and promote endothelialization. • The bioactivity of biomolecules was more efficiently maintained via specific intermolecular interaction. • Poly-l-lysine interlayer was more feasible and the degradation product had no harm to human body. - Abstract: The biocompatibility of currently used coronary artery stent is still far from perfect, which closely related to insufficient endothelialization and thrombus formation. In this study, heparin, fibronectin and VEGF were immobilized on Ti surface to construct a multifunctional microenvironment with favorable properties to inhibit thrombosis formation and promote endothelialization simultaneously. The microenvironment on Ti surface was characterized in detail and demonstrated that the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was constructed successfully on Ti surface. The influence of surface properties such as chemical composition, roughness, hydrophilicity, and binding density of biomolecules on the performances of hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility was evaluated and discussed. Modified surface significantly enhanced the AT III binding density and prolonged the clotting time. In vitro platelet adhesion and activation assays further proved that the modified surface presented favorable anti-coagulant property. In addition, the proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) on the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was significantly promoted. In conclusion, the Hep/Fn/VEGF biofunctional coating was successfully constructed with desirable anticoagulant and endothelialization supporting properties. This work may provide a promising approach for biofunctional surface modification of coronary artery stent to acquire a desired multifunctional microenvironment

  17. Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind recorders from AIRCRAFT and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic Experiment/Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial (SEQUAL/FOCAL) project from 1980-01-25 to 1985-12-18 (NODC Accession 8700111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data were collected from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind...

  18. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quality of the surface wind analysis at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (NCMRWF), New Delhi over the tropical Indian Ocean and its improvement in 2001 are examined by comparing it with in situ buoy measurements and satellite derived surface winds from NASA QuikSCAT satellite (QSCT) ...

  19. Auto-correlation analysis of ocean surface wind vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nature of the inherent temporal variability of surface winds is analyzed by comparison of winds obtained through different measurement methods. In this work, an auto-correlation analysis of a time series data of surface winds measured in situ by a deep water buoy in the Indian Ocean has been carried out. Hourly time ...

  20. Determination of the surface area and sizes of supported copper nanoparticles through organothiol adsorption—ñhemisorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndolomingo, Matumuene Joe; Meijboom, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cu on γ-Al 2 O 3 catalysts were prepared and characterized. • The ligand sorption-based technique was used for the determination of specific surface area and particle sizes. • The ligand packing density on Cu nanoparticles was quantified. • A fair agreement was found between the Cu particle sizes obtained from ligand adsorption and TEM methods. • The oxidation of morin by hydrogen peroxide was used to evaluate the catalytic activities of the Cu supported catalysts. - Abstract: The mechanisms involving the nanoparticle surfaces in catalytic reactions are more difficult to elucidate due to the nanoparticle surface unevenness, size distributions, and morphological irregularity. True surface area and particle sizes determination are key aspects of the activity of metal nanoparticle catalysts. Here we report on the organothiol adsorption-based technique for the determination of specific surface area of Cu nanoparticles, and their resultant sizes on γ-Al 2 O 3 supports. Quantification of ligand packing density on copper nanoparticles is also reported. The concentration of the probe ligand, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) before and after immersion of supported copper catalysts was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV–vis). The amount of ligand adsorbed was found to be proportional to the copper nanoparticles surface area. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), N 2 -physisorption (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used for the characterization of the catalysts. A fair agreement was found between particle sizes obtained from ligand adsorption and TEM methods. The catalytic activity of the copper nanoparticles related to their inherent surface area was evaluated using the model reaction of the oxidation of morin by hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Determination of the surface area and sizes of supported copper nanoparticles through organothiol adsorption—ñhemisorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndolomingo, Matumuene Joe; Meijboom, Reinout, E-mail: rmeijboom@uj.ac.za

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Cu on γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared and characterized. • The ligand sorption-based technique was used for the determination of specific surface area and particle sizes. • The ligand packing density on Cu nanoparticles was quantified. • A fair agreement was found between the Cu particle sizes obtained from ligand adsorption and TEM methods. • The oxidation of morin by hydrogen peroxide was used to evaluate the catalytic activities of the Cu supported catalysts. - Abstract: The mechanisms involving the nanoparticle surfaces in catalytic reactions are more difficult to elucidate due to the nanoparticle surface unevenness, size distributions, and morphological irregularity. True surface area and particle sizes determination are key aspects of the activity of metal nanoparticle catalysts. Here we report on the organothiol adsorption-based technique for the determination of specific surface area of Cu nanoparticles, and their resultant sizes on γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supports. Quantification of ligand packing density on copper nanoparticles is also reported. The concentration of the probe ligand, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI) before and after immersion of supported copper catalysts was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV–vis). The amount of ligand adsorbed was found to be proportional to the copper nanoparticles surface area. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), N{sub 2}-physisorption (BET), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used for the characterization of the catalysts. A fair agreement was found between particle sizes obtained from ligand adsorption and TEM methods. The catalytic activity of the copper nanoparticles related to their inherent surface area was evaluated using the model reaction of the oxidation of morin by hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Improving the corrosion resistance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell carbon supports by pentafluorophenyl surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouzandeh, Farisa; Li, Xiaoan; Banham, Dustin W.; Feng, Fangxia; Joseph Kakanat, Abraham; Ye, Siyu; Birss, Viola

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effect of surface functionalization on the electrochemical corrosion resistance of a high surface area, mesoporous colloid imprinted carbon powder (CIC), as well as microporous Vulcan carbon (VC, serving as the benchmark), was demonstrated, primarily for PEM fuel cell applications. CIC-22, which is highly hydrophilic and was synthesized with 22 nm silica colloid templates, and as-received, mildly hydrophobic, VC powders, were functionalized with 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl (-PhF5) surface groups using a straightforward diazonium reduction reaction. These carbons were then subjected to corrosion testing, involving a potential cycling-step sequence in room temperature 0.5 M H2SO4. Using cyclic voltammetry and charge/time analysis, the double layer and pseudo-capacitive gravimetric charges of the carbons, prior to and after the application of these potential steps, were tracked in order to obtain information about surface area changes and the extent of carbon oxidation, respectively. It is shown that the corrosion resistance was improved by ca. 50-80% by surface functionalization, likely due to a combination of surface passivation (loss of carbon active sites) and increased surface hydrophobicity.

  3. Environment-Dependent Surface Dynamics of Supported Gold Nanoparticles Studied by High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Pei

    of surfaces and interfaces of cerium dioxide supported gold nanoparticles under a variety of atmospheric conditions, at the atomic scale which is are of great importance to reveal the catalytic mechanisms. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy has the capability to image structures with sub...... from sub-Ångström to nanometers on a model system of gold on cerium dioxide have been systematically investigated. Surface atom diffusion is observed under most conditions and normally reversible. Under some conditions the diffusing atoms on the surface move in a concerted manner, suggesting...... under exposure to different gases, and the surfaces are more active in oxygen than in hydrogen. Secondly, thermally activated layer appearance-disappearance fluctuations have been observed in different gases. In hydrogen and carbon monoxide the (100) facet fluctuates, while in oxygen the fluctuation...

  4. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2006-01-01

    protein (GFP) as reporter proteins, proved that the 169 N-terminal amino acids are sufficient to target the protein to the cell surface. Furthermore, the enolase-GFP fusion co-localized with a plasma membrane marker. Enolase was also identified among membrane proteins obtained by a purification protocol...... that different experimental approaches (genetics, cellular biology and proteomics) show that yeast enolase can reach the cell surface and describe the protein regions involved in its cell surface targeting. Hybrid enolase truncates, fused at their C terminus with the yeast internal invertase or green fluorescent...

  5. Bayesian inference of earthquake parameters from buoy data using a polynomial chaos-based surrogate

    KAUST Repository

    Giraldi, Loic

    2017-04-07

    This work addresses the estimation of the parameters of an earthquake model by the consequent tsunami, with an application to the Chile 2010 event. We are particularly interested in the Bayesian inference of the location, the orientation, and the slip of an Okada-based model of the earthquake ocean floor displacement. The tsunami numerical model is based on the GeoClaw software while the observational data is provided by a single DARTⓇ buoy. We propose in this paper a methodology based on polynomial chaos expansion to construct a surrogate model of the wave height at the buoy location. A correlated noise model is first proposed in order to represent the discrepancy between the computational model and the data. This step is necessary, as a classical independent Gaussian noise is shown to be unsuitable for modeling the error, and to prevent convergence of the Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler. Second, the polynomial chaos model is subsequently improved to handle the variability of the arrival time of the wave, using a preconditioned non-intrusive spectral method. Finally, the construction of a reduced model dedicated to Bayesian inference is proposed. Numerical results are presented and discussed.

  6. Reliable Autonomous Surface Mobility (RASM) in Support of Human Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC and Carnegie Mellon University have formed a partnership to commercially develop rover-autonomy technologies into Reliable Autonomous Surface...

  7. Reliable Autonomous Surface Mobility (RASM) in Support of Human Exploration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC and Carnegie Mellon University have formed a partnership to commercially develop rover-autonomy technologies into Reliable Autonomous Surface...

  8. Ultraviolet Raman Spectral Signatures in Support of Lisa (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J; Finfrock, Charles C; Christesen, Steve; Chyba, Tom; Higdon, Scott

    2003-01-01

    ... (Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents). This engineering, testing and evaluation effort uses a novel mini-Raman lidar technique for on-the-move, short-range, non-contact detection and identification of chemical agents on the battlefield...

  9. Effects of support surface stability on feedback control of trunk posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulou, Georgia; Maaswinkel, Erwin; Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the interactions of visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile sensory manipulations and sitting on either a stable or an unstable surface on mediolateral (ML) trunk sway. Fifteen individuals were measured. In each trial, subjects sat as quiet as possible, on a stable or unstable surface, with or without each of four sensory manipulations: visual (eyes open/closed), vestibular (left and right galvanic vestibular stimulation alternating at 0.25 Hz), proprioceptive (left and right paraspinal muscle vibration alternating at 0.25 Hz), and tactile (minimal finger contact with object moving in the frontal plane at 0.25 Hz). The root mean square (RMS) and the power at 0.25 Hz (P25) of the ML trunk acceleration were the dependent variables. The latter was analyzed only for the rhythmic sensory manipulations and the reference condition. RMS was always significantly larger on the unstable than the stable surface. Closing the eyes caused a significant increase in RMS, more so on the unstable surface. Vestibular stimulation significantly increased RMS and P25 and more so on the unstable surface. Main effects of the proprioceptive manipulation were significant, but the interactions with surface condition were not. Finally, also tactile manipulation increased RMS and P25, but did not interact with surface condition. Sensory information in feedback control of trunk posture appears to be reweighted depending on stability of the environment. The absolute effects of visual and vestibular manipulations increase on an unstable surface, suggesting a relative decrease in the weights of proprioceptive and tactile information.

  10. "Intelligent Ensemble" Projections of Precipitation and Surface Radiation in Support of Agricultural Climate Change Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Patrick C.; Baker, Noel C.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's climate is changing and will continue to change into the foreseeable future. Expected changes in the climatological distribution of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation will significantly impact agriculture. Adaptation strategies are, therefore, required to reduce the agricultural impacts of climate change. Climate change projections of precipitation, surface temperature, and surface solar radiation distributions are necessary input for adaption planning studies. These projections are conventionally constructed from an ensemble of climate model simulations (e.g., the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5)) as an equal weighted average, one model one vote. Each climate model, however, represents the array of climate-relevant physical processes with varying degrees of fidelity influencing the projection of individual climate variables differently. Presented here is a new approach, termed the "Intelligent Ensemble, that constructs climate variable projections by weighting each model according to its ability to represent key physical processes, e.g., precipitation probability distribution. This approach provides added value over the equal weighted average method. Physical process metrics applied in the "Intelligent Ensemble" method are created using a combination of NASA and NOAA satellite and surface-based cloud, radiation, temperature, and precipitation data sets. The "Intelligent Ensemble" method is applied to the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 anthropogenic climate forcing simulations within the CMIP5 archive to develop a set of climate change scenarios for precipitation, temperature, and surface solar radiation in each USDA Farm Resource Region for use in climate change adaptation studies.

  11. Lectin-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(vinyldimethyl azlactone) surface supports for high avidity microbial capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Ryan R [ORNL; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan P [ORNL; Shubert, Katherine R [ORNL; Morrell, Jennifer L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Kilbey, II, S Michael [ORNL; Lokitz, Bradley S [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) play a critical and dynamic role in shaping the interactions between microbial community members and their local environment. The capture of targeted microbes using surface immobilized lectins that recognize specific extracellular oligosaccharide moieties offers a non-destructive method for functional characterization based on EPS content. In this report, we evaluate the use of the block co-polymer, poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (PGMA-b-PVDMA), as a surface support for lectin-specific microbial capture. Arrays of circular polymer supports ten micron in diameter were generated on silicon substrates to provide discrete, covalent coupling sites for Triticum vulgare and Lens culinaris lectins. These supports promoted microbe adhesion and colony formation in a lectin-specific manner. Silicon posts with similar topography containing only physisorbed lectins showed significantly less activity. These results demonstrate that micropatterned PGMA-b-PVDMA supports provide a unique platform for microbial capture and screening based on EPS content by combining high avidity lectin surfaces with three-dimensional topography.

  12. Strategies for Balance maintenance in Different Support Surfaces - Mechanisms, Trainability and Transfer to Single-Leg Landing Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Priscila de Brito

    2016-01-01

    Well-adapted control of posture is crucial for the human body function. Postural control relates to coordination of body segments to maintain or restore balance, making the execution of a task safer with less effort. This PhD thesis focuses on the effects of different support surfaces on postural...... that postural control strategies are affected by surface stability and optimized with training, but also that the adaptations to training are transferred to movement strategies of sports gestures not involved in the training. This thesis offers a new perspective on how balance training provides protective...

  13. A qualitative study of parents' experiences using family support services: applying the concept of surface and depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Karen A; Cox, Pat; Thomas, Nigel; Cocker, Karen

    2014-09-01

    United Kingdom policy and practice endorses family support for child well-being. Achieving such support requires multi-agency approaches that consider all aspects of parents' and children's lives and which offer practical, social and emotional help. The potential for services to make a positive impact on parents and their families will depend in part on the level and nature of engagement. In this paper, a case is made for the application of the two-part surface and depth concept for understanding how practitioners engage with families and how they might improve the chances of supporting sustainable differences for parents and families. To illustrate, qualitative data from a review of family centre support provided by a north of England local authority are presented. The review was commissioned to explore why families often need to re-engage with intensive support services. Data were drawn from interviews with parents (n = 18, recruited following a survey of all those registered with the service during April-May 2009) and discussions with family centre support workers (n = 4), and following thematic analysis, three dominant themes emerged--resources available, staff approach and real life--which were appraised in the light of the surface and depth concept. Much of the work with parents effectively dealt with pressing needs. This felt gratifying for both parent and worker and supported immediate service engagement. However, each noted that the more complex issues in parents' lives went unchallenged and thus the sustainability of progress in terms of parenting practice was questionable. A strengths focused approach by staff that understood needs in the context of parents' real-life circumstances was important to parent engagement. Thus, longer term benefits from family support require practitioners to work with parents to problem solve immediate issues while also digging deeper to acknowledge and seek to resolve the more complex challenges parents face in their real

  14. Well-Defined Molybdenum Oxo Alkyl Complex Supported on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Highly Active Olefin Metathesis Precatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Nicolas

    2016-12-05

    The well-defined silica-supported molybdenum oxo alkyl species (SiO−)MoO(CH Bu) was selectively prepared by grafting of MoO(CH Bu)Cl onto partially dehydroxylated silica (silica) using the surface organometallic chemistry approach. This surface species was fully characterized by elemental analysis and DRIFT, solid-state NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopy. This new material is related to the active species of industrial supported MoO/SiO olefin metathesis catalysts. It displays very high activity in propene self-metathesis at mild (turnover number = 90 000 after 25 h). Remarkably, its catalytic performance outpaces those of the parent imido derivative and its tungsten oxo analogue.

  15. Well-Defined Molybdenum Oxo Alkyl Complex Supported on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Highly Active Olefin Metathesis Precatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas; Le Quéméner, Frédéric; Bouhoute, Yassine; Szeto, Kai C; De Mallmann, Aimery; Barman, Samir; Samantaray, Manoja K; Delevoye, Laurent; Gauvin, Régis M; Taoufik, Mostafa; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-02-15

    The well-defined silica-supported molybdenum oxo alkyl species (≡SiO-)MoO(CH 2 t Bu) 3 was selectively prepared by grafting of MoO(CH 2 t Bu) 3 Cl onto partially dehydroxylated silica (silica 700 ) using the surface organometallic chemistry approach. This surface species was fully characterized by elemental analysis and DRIFT, solid-state NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopy. This new material is related to the active species of industrial supported MoO 3 /SiO 2 olefin metathesis catalysts. It displays very high activity in propene self-metathesis at mild (turnover number = 90 000 after 25 h). Remarkably, its catalytic performance outpaces those of the parent imido derivative and its tungsten oxo analogue.

  16. Downscaling of Aircraft, Landsat, and MODIS-bases Land Surface Temperature Images with Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    High spatial resolution Land Surface Temperature (LST) images are required to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) at a field scale for irrigation scheduling purposes. Satellite sensors such as Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) can offer images at s...

  17. Preparation and Support of a Tap Test on the Leading Edge Surfaces of the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on a Tap test for the leading edge surfaces of the Space Shuttle. A description of the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) flight system is given, and the rationale and approach for improving the WLEIDS system. The three phases of the strategy of the test project amd the results of the tests are reviewed.

  18. Effects of support surface stability on feedback control of trunk posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreopoulou, G.; Maaswinkel, E.; Cofre Lizama, L.E.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the interactions of visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, and tactile sensory manipulations and sitting on either a stable or an unstable surface on mediolateral (ML) trunk sway. Fifteen individuals were measured. In each trial, subjects sat as quiet as possible, on a

  19. Design of the dual-buoy wave energy converter based on actual wave data of East Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongrok Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new conceptual dual-buoy Wave Energy Converter (WEC for the enhancement of energy extraction efficiency is suggested. Based on actual wave data, the design process for the suggested WEC is conducted in such a way as to ensure that it is suitable in real sea. Actual wave data measured in Korea’s East Sea (position: 36.404 N° and 129.274 E° from May 1, 2002 to March 29, 2005 were used as the input wave spectrum for the performance estimation of the dual-buoy WEC. The suggested WEC, a point absorber type, consists of two concentric floating circular cylinders (an inner and a hollow outer buoy. Multiple resonant frequencies in proposed WEC affect the Power Ttake-off (PTO performance of the WEC. Based on the numerical results, several design strategies are proposed to further enhance the extraction efficiency, including intentional mismatching among the heave natural frequencies of dual buoys, the natural frequency of the internal fluid, and the peak frequency of the input wave spectrum.

  20. Design of the dual-buoy wave energy converter based on actual wave data of East Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongrok; Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Jeong, Weon-Mu; Cho, Il-Hyoung; Cho, Hong-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    A new conceptual dual-buoy Wave Energy Converter (WEC) for the enhancement of energy extraction efficiency is suggested. Based on actual wave data, the design process for the suggested WEC is conducted in such a way as to ensure that it is suitable in real sea. Actual wave data measured in Korea's East Sea (position: 36.404 N° and 129.274 E°) from May 1, 2002 to March 29, 2005 were used as the input wave spectrum for the performance estimation of the dual-buoy WEC. The suggested WEC, a point absorber type, consists of two concentric floating circular cylinders (an inner and a hollow outer buoy). Multiple resonant frequencies in proposed WEC affect the Power Ttake-off (PTO) performance of the WEC. Based on the numerical results, several design strategies are proposed to further enhance the extraction efficiency, including intentional mismatching among the heave natural frequencies of dual buoys, the natural frequency of the internal fluid, and the peak frequency of the input wave spectrum.

  1. Pressure RElieving Support SUrfaces: a Randomised Evaluation 2 (PRESSURE 2): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Sarah; Smith, Isabelle L.; Brown, Julia M.; Hulme, Claire; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Stubbs, Nikki; Nelson, E. Andrea; Muir, Delia; Rutherford, Claudia; Walker, Kay; Henderson, Valerie; Wilson, Lyn; Gilberts, Rachael; Collier, Howard; Fernandez, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers represent a major burden to patients, carers and the healthcare system, affecting approximately 1 in 17 hospital and 1 in 20 community patients. They impact greatly on an individual?s functional status and health-related quality of life. The mainstay of pressure ulcer prevention practice is the provision of pressure redistribution support surfaces and patient repositioning. The aim of the PRESSURE 2 study is to compare the two main mattress types utilised within the...

  2. On eigenvalue asymptotics for strong delta-interactions supported by surfaces with boundaries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dittrich, Jaroslav; Exner, Pavel; Kuhn, C.; Pankrashkin, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 97, 1-2 (2016), s. 1-25 ISSN 0921-7134 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : singular Schrodinger operator * delta-interaction * strong coupling * eigenvalue Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.933, year: 2016

  3. Carbon Support Surface Effects in the Gold-Catalyzed Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donoeva, Baira; Masoud, Nazila; De Jongh, Petra E.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural into 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid is an important transformation for the production of bio-based polymers. Carbon-supported gold catalysts hold great promise for this transformation. Here we demonstrate that the activity, selectivity, and stability of the

  4. Transverse magnetic surface plasmons and complete absorption supported by doped graphene in Otto configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ramos-Mendieta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available High sensitivity of the Attenuated Total Reflectance technique for exciting transverse magnetic surface plasmons in free-standing doped graphene is reported; complete agreement with the electromagnetic dispersion relation is numerically demonstrated in the terahertz regime. By reducing the air gap between prism and graphene in the Otto configuration we found that the surface plasmon excitation is weakened, but interference effects arise producing perfect absorption. At 5 THz two dips of zero-reflection were found, one of them with residual plasmonic contribution. Consequently, the reflection can be suppressed by changing the separation between prism and graphene; it is not needed to modify the graphene doping level. Conditions for destructive interference leading to complete absorption are presented and a particular behavior of the evanescent magnetic fields just at perfect absorption is reported

  5. H2 Interaction with Bimetallic Dimers Supported on the MgO(100) Surface: a DFT Cluster Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczak, Piotr

    2012-08-01

    The interaction between the H2 molecule and the PdAg, PdAu, PtAg and PtAu bimetallic dimers deposited on the MgO(100) surface is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). The bimetallic dimers, whose molecular axes are considered to be perpendicular to the support surface, are adsorbed on top of an oxygen atom. Within this adsorption mode, the dimers prefer the orientation in which their Pd or Pt end is closer to the oxygen atom. The Ag and Au ends of the MgO-supported dimers capture the H2 molecule with small exoenergetic effects. The spontaneous dissociation of H2 on these ends does not occur. Thus, the MgO support decreases the ability of the dimers to adsorb and dissociate the H2 molecule. From a catalytic viewpoint, it means that the activity of small bimetallic clusters toward the dissociative adsorption of H2 is reduced when they are arranged on MgO. On the other hand, the results of our calculations show that the presence of the MgO support strengthens the binding of H atoms inside the PdAu, PtAg and PtAu dimers.

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Skin Friction on Smooth Surfaces Supporting Air Bearing Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    existing knowledge. LABORATORY TECHNICAL REPORTS (LTR): Information receiving limited distribution because of preliminary data, security classification...LISSES PORTEUSES DE CANAUX ANTI-FROTTEMENT by/par M. Khalid National Aeronautical Establishment AERONAUTICAL NOTE OTTAWA NAE-AN-39 JULY 1986 NRC NO...installant sur la surface des canaux qui agissent comme des valiers d’air. Les mesures ont &t prises A l’aide d’une balance de mesure du frottement

  7. Surface Lander Missions to Mars: Support via Analysis of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F.C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the near-surface martian wind environment as calculated with a set of numerical simulations carried out with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (Mars GCM). These wind environments are intended to offer future spacecraft missions to the martian surface a data base from which to choose those locations which meet the mission's criteria for minimal near surface winds to enable a successful landing. We also became involved in the development and testing of the wind sensor which is currently onboard the Mars-bound Pathfinder lander. We began this effort with a comparison of Mars GCM produced winds with those measured by the Viking landers during their descent through the martian atmosphere and their surface wind measurements during the 3+ martian year lifetime of the mission. Unexpected technical difficulties in implementing the sophisticated Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) scheme of Haberle et al. (1993) within the Mars GCM precluded our carrying out this investigation with the desired improvement to the model's treatment of the PBL. Thus, our results from this effort are not as conclusive as we had anticipated. As it turns out, similar difficulties have been experienced by other Mars modelling groups in attempting to implement very similar PBL routines into their GCMs (Mars General Circulation Model Intercomparison Workshop, held at Oxford University, United Kingdom, July 22-24, 1996; organized by J. Murphy, J. Hollingsworth, M. Joshi). These problems, which arise due to the nature of the time stepping in each of the models, are near to being resolved at the present. The model discussions which follow herein are based upon results using the existing, less sophisticated PBL routine. We fully anticipate implementing the tools we have developed in the present effort to investigate GCM results with the new PBL scheme implemented, and thereafter producing the technical document detailing results from the analysis tools developed during this

  8. Perancangan Sistem Prediktor Daya Pada Panel Photovoltaic di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Prisilia Susanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Buoy weather station merupakan stasiun informasi cuaca yang banyak dijumpai di pelabuhan, khususnya di Surabaya. Untuk mengoperasikannya diperlukan sumber daya listrik berupa panel photovoltaic. Efek fotolistrik pada PV mampu merubah energi cahaya menjadi energi listrik. Besarnya daya yang dihasilkan tergantung dari intensitas matahari, temperatur permukaan, dan keadaan geografis setempat. Untuk memprediksi daya keluaran per setengah jam yang dihasilkan oleh panel PV maka digunakan metode jaringan syaraf tiruan dengan algoritma backpropagation pada software Matlab. Variabel yang digunakan berupa data daya yang diperoleh dari tegangan dan arus yang dihasilkan oleh panel PV di daerah Surabaya. Data daya selama 3 hari per setengah jam tersebut dijadikan data input dan target pada Matlab. Hasil terbaik perancangan sistem prediksi daya keluaran panel PV menggunakan JST pada Matlab yaitu Mean Square Error (MSE sebesar 0,0113 dan akurasi ketepatan prediksi sebesar 99,81%.

  9. Tensile-Creep Test Specimen Preparation Practices of Surface Support Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Dogukan; Ozturk, Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Ground support has always been considered as a challenging issue in all underground operations. Many forms of support systems and supporting techniques are available in the mining/tunnelling industry. In the last two decades, a new polymer based material, Thin Spray-on Liner (TSL), has attained a place in the market as an alternative to the current areal ground support systems. Although TSL provides numerous merits and has different application purposes, the knowledge on mechanical properties and performance of this material is still limited. In laboratory studies, since tensile rupture is the most commonly observed failure mechanism in field applications, researchers have generally studied the tensile testing of TSLs with modification of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D-638 standards. For tensile creep testing, specimen preparation process also follows the ASTM standards. Two different specimen dimension types (Type I, Type IV) are widely preferred in TSL tensile testing that conform to the related standards. Moreover, molding and die cutting are commonly used specimen preparation techniques. In literature, there is a great variability of test results due to the difference in specimen preparation techniques and practices. In this study, a ductile TSL product was tested in order to investigate the effect of both specimen preparation techniques and specimen dimensions under 7-day curing time. As a result, ultimate tensile strength, tensile yield strength, tensile modulus, and elongation at break values were obtained for 4 different test series. It is concluded that Type IV specimens have higher strength values compared to Type I specimens and moulded specimens have lower results than that of prepared by using die cutter. Moreover, specimens prepared by molding techniques have scattered test results. Type IV specimens prepared by die cutter technique are suggested for preparation of tensile test and Type I specimens prepared by die cutter technique

  10. Fully nonlinear time-domain simulation of a backward bent duct buoy floating wave energy converter using an acceleration potential method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Rok Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A floating Oscillating Water Column (OWC wave energy converter, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB, was simulated using a state-of-the-art, two-dimensional, fully-nonlinear Numerical Wave Tank (NWT technique. The hydrodynamic performance of the floating OWC device was evaluated in the time domain. The acceleration potential method, with a full-updated kernel matrix calculation associated with a mode decomposition scheme, was implemented to obtain accurate estimates of the hydrodynamic force and displacement of a freely floating BBDB. The developed NWT was based on the potential theory and the boundary element method with constant panels on the boundaries. The mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL approach was employed to capture the nonlinear free surfaces inside the chamber that interacted with a pneumatic pressure, induced by the time-varying airflow velocity at the air duct. A special viscous damping was applied to the chamber free surface to represent the viscous energy loss due to the BBDB's shape and motions. The viscous damping coefficient was properly selected using a comparison of the experimental data. The calculated surface elevation, inside and outside the chamber, with a tuned viscous damping correlated reasonably well with the experimental data for various incident wave conditions. The conservation of the total wave energy in the computational domain was confirmed over the entire range of wave frequencies.

  11. A Preliminary Study of a Buoy System for Acquisition, Transmission, and Management of Hydrological Data Obtained from In-situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for a system of remotely located, data collection buoys are considered first for a prototype system to be used in conjunction with the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-A), and then for a more advanced system. The necessary sensor characteristics for compatibility with the ERTS-A data collection platforms are considered, as well as possible sites for location of the prototype buoys. The advanced system is considered from the standpoint of continuous data collection both through satellite data relay and ground telemetry systems. Management of the data from a buoy system is analyzed, especially with regard to the advanced system.

  12. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  13. Solid-supported synthesis: From pharmacologically relevant heterocycles to biologically active surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.

    The present PhD thesis consists of an introduction part and two separate parts covering selected research projects during the PhD study. The introduction part describes the concept of solid-supported synthesis and combinatorial chemistry. The chapter covers recent achievements in materials...... nucleophiles bring about a second cyclization and the formation of a fused , bicyclic ring system. The second part of the thesis deals with the topical problem of bacterial biofilm-related infections in manufacturing and use of indwelling medical devices, such as catheters and imp lants. . In Chapter 2.1, new...

  14. Carbon monoxide oxidation on Pt-Ru electrocatalysts supported on high surface area carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colmati Jr. Flavio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the preparation and characterization of Pt-Ru alloys dispersed on high surface area carbon, which were evaluated for CO oxidation on thin porous coating rotating disk electrodes and for hydrogen oxidation on polymer electrolyte fuel cells fed with hydrogen containing 100 ppm CO. A thermal treatment (H2, 300 ºC applied to the catalysts improves the tolerance to small quantities of CO and, in some cases, reduces the potential necessary to promote the CO oxidation during a linear potential scan. Under operational conditions in a fuel cell in the presence of CO it was observed that the best results were obtained when the Pt-Ru/C alloy was prepared by simultaneous reduction of the ions Pt (IV and Ru (III, as opposed to a sequential reduction.

  15. Surface-Supported Robust 2D Lanthanide-Carboxylate Coordination Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgel, José I; Cirera, Borja; Wang, Yang; Auwärter, Willi; Otero, Roberto; Gallego, José M; Alcamí, Manuel; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Martín, Fernando; Miranda, Rodolfo; Ecija, David; Barth, Johannes V

    2015-12-16

    Lanthanide-based metal-organic compounds and architectures are promising systems for sensing, heterogeneous catalysis, photoluminescence, and magnetism. Herein, the fabrication of interfacial 2D lanthanide-carboxylate networks is introduced. This study combines low- and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations addressing their design and electronic properties. The bonding of ditopic linear linkers to Gd centers on a Cu(111) surface gives rise to extended nanoporous grids, comprising mononuclear nodes featuring eightfold lateral coordination. XPS and DFT elucidate the nature of the bond, indicating ionic characteristics, which is also manifest in appreciable thermal stability. This study introduces a new generation of robust low-dimensional metallosupramolecular systems incorporating the functionalities of the f-block elements. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Technical work plan for Surface Impoundments Operable Unit engineering support studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a comprehensive work plan which, when utilized as a data collection guide for field activities, will provide the necessary information required to complete a report on geotechnical properties of the sediments contained in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Detailed guidance is provided for the following activities: collection of samples from the impoundments; compressive strength testing of the raw sediments; compressive strength testing of the structurally modified (lime and cement additives) sediments; testing for sediment physical properties and settling rates; testing for sediment dewatering characteristics; testing for radiation activity during the field work; testing for polymer additions that may enhance settling. The work plan additionally provides guidance and examples for the preparation of documents necessary to establish readiness for safe and satisfactory performance of the field activities. An outline for the format requested for a report of these data is also provided

  17. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mohammad Abrisham

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  18. The Effect of Abutment Surface Roughness on the Retention of Implant-Supported Crowns Cemented with Provisional Luting Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ganbarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface roughness can increase the retention of castings by ridges and grooves that are microretentive. This study compared the retention of implant-supported crowns when used with 3 different surface roughness abutments and one temporary cement. Methods: Thirty solid abutments (ITI, 4 mm high, were divided into three groups randomly. In the first group, 10 abutments were roughened with sandblast (50-µm aluminum oxide and in the second group, 10 abutments were roughened with diamond bur. The third group had no surface treatment. Then, thirty implant fixture analogs (ITI were placed in the center of acrylic cylinders. After that a solid abutment was tightened on the each fixture analog with 35 N/cm force. Thirty base metal crowns were made on the 4 mm ITI abutment analogs using plastic coping. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by TempBond temporary cement and finally, crowns were pulled from the abutment in a universal test machine at a cross speed of 0.5cm/min. Results: The mean tensile strength in sandblasted, bur treated, and control group were 64.38±8, 91.37±7.19, and 58.61±1.93, respectively. Bur treated group showed higher tensile strength in comparison with two other groups. Conclusion: Surface modification of implant abutment by diamond bur may be an effective method to increase retention of crown when TempBond is used.

  19. Preventing pressure ulcers--Are pressure-redistributing support surfaces effective? A Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Elizabeth; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Bell-Syer, Sally; Dumville, Jo; Cullum, Nicky

    2012-03-01

    To undertake a systematic review of the effectiveness of pressure redistributing support surfaces in the prevention of pressure ulcers. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Cochrane Wound Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. The reference sections of included trials were searched for further trials. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials, published or unpublished, which assessed the effects of support surfaces in preventing pressure ulcers (of any grade), in any patient group, in any setting compared to any other support surface, were sought. Two reviewers extracted and summarised details of eligible trials using a standardised form and assessed the methodological quality of each trial using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Fifty-three eligible trials were identified with a total of 16,285 study participants. Overall the risk of bias in the included trials was high. Pooled analysis showed that: (i) foam alternatives to the standard hospital foam mattress reduce the incidence of pressure ulcers in people at risk (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.21-0.74) and Australian standard medical sheepskins prevent pressure ulcers compared to standard care (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.31-0.74). Pressure-redistributing overlays on the operating table compared to standard care reduce postoperative pressure ulcer incidence (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.33-0.85). While there is good evidence that higher specification foam mattresses, sheepskins, and that some overlays in the operative setting are effective in preventing pressure ulcers, there is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the value of seat cushions, limb protectors and various constant low pressure devices. The relative merits of higher-tech constant low pressure and alternating pressure for prevention are unclear. More robust trials are required to address these research gaps. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of supported TiO{sub 2} by selective surface modification of zeolite Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guesh, Kiros [Chemistry-Department, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Mizan-Tepi University, P.O. Box 260, Mizan-Teferi (Ethiopia); Márquez-Álvarez, Carlos [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Chebude, Yonas [Chemistry-Department, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Díaz, Isabel, E-mail: idiaz@icp.csic.es [Chemistry-Department, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa (Ethiopia); Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, c/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • XPS analysis confirmed that 50% of the Al was removed from the surface of zeolite Y. • Loaded TiO{sub 2} on the treated zeolites showed 12 times higher TORm than the parent zeolite. • Supported TiO{sub 2} showed very low leaching of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles than non supported. - Abstract: Zeolite Y was treated using ammonium acetate and ammonium fluoride sequentially. As a consequence the aluminum from the surface was selectively removed. Then, loading with TiO{sub 2} (20 wt%) led to a final photocatalyst. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental analysis (ICP-OES), N{sub 2} adsorption, diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that 50% of the Al atoms were removed from the surface of the zeolite without affecting the framework structure. The TiO{sub 2}/treated zeolite sample yielded 92% photocatalytic degradation of 10 ppm methyl orange (MO), a model pollutant, while the TiO{sub 2}/parent zeolite converted only 7.6%. The mass normalized turnover rate (TOR{sub m}) of the treated zeolite loaded with TiO{sub 2} was about 12 times higher than that of the parent zeolite loaded with the same amount of TiO{sub 2} precursor. This higher photocatalytic activity of the TiO{sub 2} supported on treated zeolite can be attributed to a more efficient interaction of the TiO{sub 2} with the zeolite leading to higher adsorption capacity. Reusability of the photocatalysts was assessed by performing three consecutive reaction cycles that showed no significant loss of photocatalytic activity.

  1. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to QuikSCAT and moored buoy winds. B N Goswami1 and E N Rajagopal2. 1Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. 2National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, Department of ...

  2. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics

  3. Auto-correlation analysis of ocean surface wind vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    In this work, an auto-correlation analysis of a time series data of surface winds measured in situ by a deep water buoy in the Indian Ocean has been carried out. Hourly time series data available for 240 hours in the month of May, 1999 were subjected to an auto-correlation analysis. The analysis indicates an exponential fall ...

  4. Electron Spectroscopy Studies of Iron, Iron Sulfides and Supported Iron Surfaces: Chemisorption of Simple Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yiu Chung

    EELS was used to investigate the chemisorption of oxygen and carbon on iron. The EELS spectra of oxidized iron show characteristic features with strong enhancement of the interband transitions involving the Fe 3d band (4.6 and 7.5 eV) and moderate enhancement of the M(,2,3) transition doublet (54.4 and 58.2 eV). The changes in the electron energy loss structures with an overlayer of graphitic or carbidic carbon were investigated. The adsorption and growth of iron on Ni(100) has been studied using the combined techniques of LEED and EELS. Initially iron grows by a layer-by-layer mechanism for the first few layers. High iron coverages result in the observation of complex LEED patterns with satellites around the main (1 x 1) diffraction sports. This is due to the formation of b.c.c. Fe(110) crystallites arranged in domains with different orientations. EELS studies show the presence of three stages in the growth of iron on Ni(100): low-coverage, film-like and bulk-like. Auger and EELS were used to study the iron sulfide (FeS(,2), Fe(,7)S(,8) and FeS) surfaces. A characteristic M(,2,3) VV Auger doublet with a separation of 5.0 eV was observed on the sulfides. An assignment of the electron energy loss peaks was made based on the energy dependence of the loss peaks and previous photoemission results. The effect of argon ion bombardment was studied. Peaks with strong iron and sulfur character were observed. Heating the damaged sulfides results in reconstruction of the sulfide surfaces. The reactions of the sulfides with simple gases, such as H(,2), CO, CH(,4), C(,2)H(,4), NH(,3) and O(,2) were also studied. Using XPS, the chemisorption of SO(,2) on CaO(100) has been studied. The chemical state of sulfur has been identified as that of sulfate. The kinetics of SO(,2) chemisorption on CaO are discussed. The binding states of Fe and Na on CaO were determined to be Fe('2+) and Na('+) respectively. At low Fe or Na coverages (< 0.5 ML), there is a large increase in the rate of

  5. CO2 activation through silylimido and silylamido zirconium hydrides supported on N-donor chelating SBA15 surface ligand

    KAUST Repository

    Pasha, Fahran Ahmad

    2016-01-04

    Density functional theory calculations and 2D 1H-13C HETCOR solid state NMR spectroscopy prove that CO2 can probe, by its own reactivity, different types of N-donor surface ligands on SBA15-supported ZrIV hydrides: [(≡Si-O-)(≡Si-N=)[Zr]H] and [(≡Si-NH-)(≡Si-X-)[Zr]H2] (X = O or NH). Moreover, [(≡Si-O-)(≡Si-N=)[Zr]H] activates CO2 more efficiently than the other complexes and leads to a carbimato Zr formate.

  6. Polymeric ionic liquid and carbon black composite as a reusable supporting electrolyte: modification of the electrode surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Joon; Li, Long-Ji; Zeng, Cheng-Chu; Little, R Daniel

    2015-03-16

    One of the major impediments to using electroorganic synthesis is the need for large amounts of a supporting electrolyte to ensure the passage of charge. Frequently this causes separation and waste problems. To address these issues, a polymeric ionic liquid-Super P carbon black composite has been formulated. The system enables electrolyses to be performed without adding an additional supporting electrolyte, and its efficient recovery and reuse. In addition, the ability of the composite to modify the electrode surface in situ leads to improved kinetics. A practical consequence is that one can decrease catalyst loading without sacrificing efficiency. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. New Surface Aspects towards Photocatalytic Activity of Doped Supported Titanium Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia A. Kosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to synthesize nanoscale well dispersed TiO2/SiO2 and TiO2/Al2O3 nanoparticle photocatalysts via an impregnation method for the removal of methyl orange, which was used as a model compound of organic pollutant in wastewater, from an aqueous medium. Also within this frame work, La and Ce metals were loaded onto the surfaces of TiO2/SiO2 and TiO2/Al2O3 by an impregnation method to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the nanoparticles; the activities and physicochemical properties of the photocatalysts were compared before and after loading of metallic La and Ce. The oxide system was characterized by different techniques, including XRD, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM, and EDX spectroscopy. Finally, the optimal conditions to complete the photocatalytic oxidation of methyl orange dye were studied. This work holds promise for the efficient photodegradation of pollutants by nanoparticle photocatalysts.

  8. Temperature data from buoy casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from 01 August 1928 to 04 September 1932 (NODC Accession 0000242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using buoy casts from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from August 1, 1928 to September 4, 1932 in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were...

  9. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and pressure measurements collected using moored buoy in the Indian Ocean from 2001-2006 (NODC Accession 0002733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements in the Equatorial Indian from 2001 to 2006 from the TRITON (TRIANGLE TRANS-OCEAN BUOY NETWORK); JAPAN AGENCY FOR MARINE-EARTH...

  10. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19921208 to 19930719 (NODC Accession 9500059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The drifting buoy data set in this accession was collected from TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) in Equatorial Pacific, North of Australia as part of Tropical...

  11. Temperature, salinity, and other data from buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993 (NODC Accession 9800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993. Data were collected by the...

  12. The effect of thiolated phospholipids on formation of supported lipid bilayers on gold substrates investigated by surface-sensitive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Abdulhalim; Fazeli Jadidi, M; Özer, Hakan Özgür; Kök, Fatma Neşe

    2017-12-01

    Most of the model lipid membrane studies on gold involve the usage of various surface-modification strategies to rupture liposomes and induce lipid bilayer formation since liposomes with polar surfaces do not interact with bare, hydrophobic gold. In this study, a thiol-modified phospholipid, 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphothioethanol (DPPTE) was incorporated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) based liposomes to form supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on gold surfaces without further modification. The binding kinetics of liposomes with different DPPTE ratio (0.01 to 100%mol/mol) and diameters were monitored by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). The dissipation change per frequency change, i.e. acoustic ratio, which is evaluated as a degree of the viscoelasticity, considerably decreased with the presence of DPPTE (from 162.3GHz -1 for flattened PC liposomes to ca. 89.5GHz -1 for 100% DPPTE liposomes) when compared to the results of two reference rigid monolayers and two viscoelastic layers. To assess the quality of SLB platform, the interpretation of QCM-D data was also complemented with Surface Plasmon Resonance. The optimum thiolated-lipid ratio (1%, lower thiol ratio and higher rigidity) was then used to determine the dry-lipid mass deposition, the water content and the thickness values of the SLB via viscoelastic modelling. Further surface characterization studies were performed by Atomic Force Microscopy with high spatial resolution. The results suggested that model membrane was almost continuous with minimum defects but showed more dissipative/soft nature compared to an ideal bilayer due to partially fused liposomes/overlapped lipid bilayers/multilayer islands. These local elevations distorted the planarity and led the increase of overall membrane thickness to ∼7.0nm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Toward Improved Land Surface Initialization in Support of Regional WRF Forecasts at the Kenya Meteorological Service (KMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Johnathan L.; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Kabuchanga, Eric; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.

    2014-01-01

    Flooding and drought are two key forecasting challenges for the Kenya Meteorological Service (KMS). Atmospheric processes leading to excessive precipitation and/or prolonged drought can be quite sensitive to the state of the land surface, which interacts with the planetary boundary layer (PBL) of the atmosphere providing a source of heat and moisture. The development and evolution of precipitation systems are affected by heat and moisture fluxes from the land surface, particularly within weakly-sheared environments such as in the tropics and sub-tropics. These heat and moisture fluxes during the day can be strongly influenced by land cover, vegetation, and soil moisture content. Therefore, it is important to represent the land surface state as accurately as possible in land surface and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Enhanced regional modeling capabilities have the potential to improve forecast guidance in support of daily operations and high-impact weather over eastern Africa. KMS currently runs a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) NWP model in real time to support its daily forecasting operations, making use of the NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) to manage and produce the KMS-WRF runs on a regional grid over eastern Africa. Two organizations at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, SERVIR and the Shortterm Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, have established a working partnership with KMS for enhancing its regional modeling capabilities through new datasets and tools. To accomplish this goal, SPoRT and SERVIR is providing enhanced, experimental land surface initialization datasets and model verification capabilities to KMS as part of this collaboration. To produce a land-surface initialization more consistent with the resolution of the KMS-WRF runs, the NASA Land Information System (LIS) is run at a comparable

  14. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 4. Fracture surface analyses of an experimental model, all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M C; Sornsuwan, T; Swain, M V

    2013-06-01

    In the previous three papers, the authors sought to conduct a thorough analysis of the feasibility for the use of zirconia in inlay supported, fixed partial dentures via finite element analysis (FEA). Correlating the response of the numerical model against the experimental model has never been satisfactorily performed for an anatomically accurate ceramic bridge; such validation is crucial if the results from the FEA are to be confidently relied upon. Part 4 of this series is a detailed fractographic analysis of the zirconia bridge that was the model for the experimental validation, performed in order to confirm the fracture origin/s and fracture trajectory as predicted from the FEA. Established fractographic techniques involving optical examination followed by examination with scanning electron microscopy were conducted. The porous, granular surface of zirconia (both partially and fully sintered) does not lend itself to easy surface analysis but the classic fractographic signs (hackle lines, wake hackle lines and compression curl) are present. Use of linear fracture elastic mechanics allowed the calculation of theoretical critical flaw size and a comparison to two defects or inclusions found at the primary origin of fracture. Excellent agreement between the fracture sites and paths of travel as predicted in the numerical analysis exist with fractographic analysis. Furthermore, the calculated critical flaw size of 30 μm to 40 μm equates very well with defects seen at the general vicinity of the primary fracture origin and the general observed size of critical flaws in machined ceramics which range between 20 μm to 50 μm, thus providing further confirmation. The fractographic analysis detailed in this study provides validation of the 'zones of failure' as predicted in our FEA. Additionally, the excellent correlation between the calculated critical flaw size and the defects observed at the primary fracture site demonstrates that field of experimental mechanics is

  15. Overview of physiological principles to support thermal balance and comfort of astronauts in open space and on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscheyev, Victor S.; Coca, Aitor; Leon, Gloria R.

    2007-02-01

    Although specialists have attempted to improve the space suit to provide better protection in open space or on planetary surfaces, there has been a relative lack of attention to features of human thermoregulatory processes that influence comfort and therefore have an impact on the effectiveness of protective equipment. Our findings showed that different body tissues transfer heat in/out of the body in a different manner. There are also individual differences in thermal transfer through body areas with different proportions of tissues; therefore, data on the thermal profile of each astronaut needs to be used to estimate the optimal body areas for heat/cold transfer in and out of the body in an individually tailored cooling/warming garment. Principles for supporting thermal comfort in space were formulated based on a series of studies to evaluate the human body's response to uniform/nonuniform thermal conditions on the body surface. We conclude that future space suit design and comfort support of astronauts can be easier and more effective if these principles are incorporated.

  16. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST): Significance and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. F.

    2006-05-01

    Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth's surface and control the global climate. Quoted global mean temperature values and trends, largely based on land thermometers, differ substantially -" mainly because of uncertainties about SST. The ongoing controversy about the relative importance of natural climate changes and Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) revolves mainly around disparities between temperature trends of the atmosphere and surface (in the tropics and SH, i.e. mostly SST). Accurate measurement of SST is difficult. Geographic coverage is poor and there are many different techniques, each with its own problems and uncertainties: Water temperatures from buckets and ship-engine inlets; fixed and floating buoys; air temperatures from shipboard and island stations; and remote sensing from satellites using IR and microwaves. As is evident, each technique refers to a different level below the air-water interface. Drifter buoys (at around 50 cm) measure temperatures in the euphotic layers that are generally warmer than the bulk mixed layer sampled by ships (typically around 10 m). The IR emission arises from a 10-micron-thick skin that interacts dynamically with the underlying "mixed layer." The microwave data depend also on emissivity and therefore on surface roughness and sea state. SST data derived from corals provide some support for instrumental data but are not conclusive. The majority of corals show a warming trend since 1979; others show cooling or are ambiguous. There are different ways of interpreting this result. Physical optics dictates that the downwelling IR radiation from atmospheric greenhouse gases is absorbed in the first instance within the skin. Only direct measurements can establish how much of this energy is shared with the bulk mixed layer (to which the usual SST values refer.). SST controls evaporation and therefore global precipitation. SST influences tropical cyclones and sea-level rise; but there is lively debate on those issues. Changes in

  17. ASSIMILATION OF REAL-TIME DEEP SEA BUOY DATA FOR TSUNAMI FORECASTING ALONG THAILAND’S ANDAMAN COASTLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seree Supharatid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami enhanced the necessity for a tsunami early warning system for countries bordering the Indian Ocean, including Thailand. This paper describes the assimilation of real-time deep sea buoy data for tsunami forecasting along Thailand’s Andaman coastline. Firstly, the numerical simulation (by the linear and non-linear shallow water equations was carried out for hypothetical cases of tsunamigenic earthquakes with epicenters located in the Andaman micro plate. Outputs of the numerical model are tsunami arrival times and the maximum wave height that can be expected at 58 selected communities along Thailand Andaman coastline and two locations of DART buoys in the Indian Ocean. Secondly, a “neural” network model (GRNN was developed to access the data from the numerical computations for subsequent construction of a tsunami database that can be displayed on a web-based system. This database can be updated with the integration from two DART buoys and from several GRNN models.

  18. Cuckoo Search Algorithm with Lévy Flights for Global-Support Parametric Surface Approximation in Reverse Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Iglesias

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns several important topics of the Symmetry journal, namely, computer-aided design, computational geometry, computer graphics, visualization, and pattern recognition. We also take advantage of the symmetric structure of the tensor-product surfaces, where the parametric variables u and v play a symmetric role in shape reconstruction. In this paper we address the general problem of global-support parametric surface approximation from clouds of data points for reverse engineering applications. Given a set of measured data points, the approximation is formulated as a nonlinear continuous least-squares optimization problem. Then, a recent metaheuristics called Cuckoo Search Algorithm (CSA is applied to compute all relevant free variables of this minimization problem (namely, the data parameters and the surface poles. The method includes the iterative generation of new solutions by using the Lévy flights to promote the diversity of solutions and prevent stagnation. A critical advantage of this method is its simplicity: the CSA requires only two parameters, many fewer than any other metaheuristic approach, so the parameter tuning becomes a very easy task. The method is also simple to understand and easy to implement. Our approach has been applied to a benchmark of three illustrative sets of noisy data points corresponding to surfaces exhibiting several challenging features. Our experimental results show that the method performs very well even for the cases of noisy and unorganized data points. Therefore, the method can be directly used for real-world applications for reverse engineering without further pre/post-processing. Comparative work with the most classical mathematical techniques for this problem as well as a recent modification of the CSA called Improved CSA (ICSA is also reported. Two nonparametric statistical tests show that our method outperforms the classical mathematical techniques and provides equivalent results to ICSA

  19. The comparison of provisional luting agents and abutment surface roughness on the retention of provisional implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsik; Yamashita, Junro; Shotwell, Jeffrey L; Chong, Kok-Heng; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2006-06-01

    In immediate implant loading, it is important to keep provisional restorations in place during early-phase healing. Current luting agents for provisional restorations may provide inadequate retention, creating a clinical challenge. This study compared the retention of provisional autopolymerizing acrylic resin implant-supported single restorations with combinations of different implant abutment surface conditions and provisional luting agents. Thirty solid titanium implant abutments (ITI), 4 mm high, were divided into 3 groups. Ten abutments were unaltered, 10 were airborne-particle abraded with 50-microm aluminum oxide, and 10 were roughened with a medium-roughness diamond rotary cutting instrument. Thirty implant analogs (ITI) were mounted in autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. A solid titanium implant abutment was placed in each implant analog and torqued to 35 N.cm. After fabrication of 4 provisional acrylic resin crowns for each abutment, provisional luting agents TempBond, TempBond NE, Life, and Zone were used to secure the provisional crowns to the respective abutments. All specimens were luted with one of the provisional luting agents for a given test. After ultrasonic cleaning of the abutments, another provisional crown was luted with another luting agent. All specimens were stored in 100% humidity environment for 1 day at 37 degrees C prior to testing. Each provisional acrylic resin crown was pulled from the abutment with a 500-kg load cell in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/minute, and tensile strength was recorded (N). Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Scheffe test (alpha=.05). Tensile strength was significantly higher for Life and TempBond NE than for TempBond and Zone, regardless of the surface conditions (P=.0001). The result of the 2-way ANOVA indicated that a significant interaction existed between the provisional luting agents and surface conditions (P=.0039). TempBond NE showed

  20. About New Maps of Surface Currents of the World Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, O. P.; Kasyanov, S. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Using the example of the surface currents map constructed for the Northern Atlantic on the basis of data of modern observations by means of drifting buoys, it is shown that the previously published maps of ocean surface currents, based on ship drift data, have become outdated and require an update. The influence of the bottom relief on the directions of surface layer currents is shown.

  1. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, P; Van Sebille, E

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the ...

  2. Rancang Bangun Maximum Power Point Tracking pada Panel Photovoltaic Berbasis Logika Fuzzy di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Prima Juliansyah Putra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu aplikasi yang sering digunakan dalam bidang energi terbarukan adalah panel photovoltaic. Panel ini memiliki prinsip kerja berdasarkan efek photovoltaic dimana lempengan logam akan menghasilkan energi listrik apabila diberi intensitas cahaya. Untuk menghasilkan daya keluaran panel yang maksimal, maka diperlukan suatu algoritma yang biasa disebut Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT.MPPT yang diterapkan pada sistem photovoltaic berfungsi untuk mengatur nilai tegangan keluaran panel sehingga titik ker-janya beroperasi pada kondisi maksimal. Algoritma MPPT pada panel ini telah dilakukan dengan menggunakan logika fuzzy melalui mikrokontroler Arduino Uno sebagai pem-bangkit sinyal Pulse Width Modulation (PWM yang akan dikirimkan menuju DC-DC Buck Boost Converter. Keluaran dari buck boost converterakan dihubungkan secara langsung dengan buoy weather station untuk menyuplai energi listrik tiap komponen yang berada di dalamnya. Untuk menguji performansi dari algoritma MPPT yang telah dirancang, maka sistem akan diuji menggunakan variasi beban antara metode direct-coupled dengan MPPT menggunakan logika fuzzy. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa MPPT dengan logika fuzzy dapat menghasilkan daya maksimum daripada direct-coupled. Pada sistem panel photovoltaic ini memiliki range efisiensi 33.07589 % hingga 74.25743 %. Daya mak-simal dapat dicapai oleh sistem untuk tiap variasi beban dan efisiensi maksimal dapat dicapai pada beban 20 Ohm dari hasil pengujian sistem MPPT.

  3. Surface-supported Ag islands stabilized by a quantum size effect: Their interaction with small molecules relevant to ethylene epoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Dahai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    This dissertation focuses on how QSE-stabilized, surface-supported Ag nanoclusters will interact with ethylene or oxygen. Experiments are performed to determine whether the QSE-mediated Ag islands react differently toward adsorption of ethylene or oxygen, or whether the adsorption of these small molecules will affect the QSE-mediated stability of Ag islands. Studies of the interaction of oxygen with Ag/Si(111)-7×7 were previously reported, but these studies were performed at a low Ag coverage where 3D Ag islands were not formed. So the study of such a system at a higher Ag coverage will be a subject of this work. The interaction of ethylene with Ag/Si(111)-7×7, as well as the interaction of oxygen with Ag/NiAl(110) are also important parts of this study.

  4. Tracing high time-resolution fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon using satellite and buoy observations: Case study in Lake Taihu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changchun; Yunmei, Li; Liu, Ge; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Hao; Zhu, A.-xing; Song, Ting; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Mingli; Shi, Kun

    2017-10-01

    Field measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and remote-sensing reflectance were conducted to develop a regional, empirical red-blue algorithm to retrieve surface DOC from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) data for Lake Taihu, China. The auxiliary data (in-situ observations of the optical properties and water quality, buoy measurements of hydrodynamic data and water chemical parameters) were used to investigate the spatial and temporal variations in DOC. GOCI was shown to be capable of successfully obtaining hourly variations in DOC, with a root mean square error percentage (RMSP) of 17.29% (RMSE = 0.69 mg/L) for the match-up data. The GOCI-derived DOC in Lake Taihu confirms that the highest DOC concentration is in northwest Lake Taihu, followed by Meiliang Bay, Gonghu Bay and northeast Lake Taihu. Hourly DOC variation is significant and presents a different trend for each lake segment due to the variety of influencing factors. Discharge of DOC from surrounding rivers is an important factor to the variation of DOC in northeast Lake Taihu. However, organic products of algae will be the primary contributor to DOC when algal bloom occurred. During the period of algal bloom, high DOC levels in Lake Taihu can lead to hypoxia when coupled with high temperatures and low disturbance.

  5. Design of supported bi-metallic nanoparticles based on Platinum and Palladium using Surface Organometallic Chemistry (SOMC)

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shareef, Reem A.

    2017-11-01

    Well-defined silica supported bimetallic catalysts Pt100-x Pdx (where x is the molar ratio of Pd) are prepared by Surface Organometallic Chemistry (SOMC) via controlled decomposition of Pd2(allyl)2Cl2 on Pt/SiO2. For comparison purposes, Pt100-x Pdx bimetallic catalysts is also prepared by ion-exchange (IE). According to the results of STEM, XAS and H2 chemisorption, all bimetallic nanoparticles, prepared using neither SOMC nor IE, produce discrete formation of monometallic species (either Pt or Pd). Most catalysts exhibit a narrow particle size distribution with an average diameter ranging from 1 to 3 nm for samples prepared by IE and from 2 to 5 nm for the ones synthesized by SOMC. For all catalysts investigated in the present work, iso-butane reaction with hydrogen under differential conditions (conversions below 5%) leads to the formation of methane and propane (hydrogenolysis), n-butane (isomerization), and traces of iso-butylene (dehydrogenation). The total rate of reaction decreases with increasing the Pd loading for both catalysts series as a result of decreasing turnover rate (expressed as moles converted per total surface metal per second) of both isomerization and hydrogenolysis. In the case of Pt100-x Pdx(SOMC) catalysts, the results suggest a selective coverage of Pt (100) surface by a Pd layer, followed by a buildup of Pd overcoat onto a Pd layer assuming that each metal keeps its intrinsic catalytic properties. There is no mutual electronic charge transfer between the two metals (DFT). For the PtPd catalysts prepared by IE, the catalytic behavior cannot simply be explained by a surface coverage of highly active Pt metal by less active Pd (not observed), suggesting there is formation of a surface alloy between Pt and Pd collaborated by EXAFS and DFT. The catalytic results are explained by a simple structure activity relationship based on the previously proposed mechanism of C-H bond and C-C Bond activation and cleavage for iso-butane hydrogenolysis

  6. Nitrogen-doped graphene network supported copper nanoparticles encapsulated with graphene shells for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; Li, Jiajun; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Chunnian

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we demonstrated nitrogen-doped graphene network supported few-layered graphene shell encapsulated Cu nanoparticles (NPs) (Cu@G-NGNs) as a sensing platform, which were constructed by a simple and scalable in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique with the assistance of a self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) NaCl template. Compared with pure Cu NPs and graphene decorated Cu NPs, the graphene shells can strengthen the plasmonic coupling between graphene and Cu, thereby contributing to an obvious improvement in the local electromagnetic field that was validated by finite element numerical simulations, while the 3D nitrogen-doped graphene walls with a large surface area facilitated molecule adsorption and the doped nitrogen atoms embedded in the graphene lattice can reduce the surface energy of the system. With these merits, a good surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) activity of the 3D Cu@G-NGN painting film on glass was demonstrated using rhodamine 6G and crystal violet as model analytes, exhibiting a satisfactory sensitivity, reproducibility and stability. As far as we know, this is the first report on the in situ synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene/copper nanocomposites and this facile and low-cost Cu-based strategy tends to be a good supplement to Ag and Au based substrates for SERS applications.In this study, we demonstrated nitrogen-doped graphene network supported few-layered graphene shell encapsulated Cu nanoparticles (NPs) (Cu@G-NGNs) as a sensing platform, which were constructed by a simple and scalable in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique with the assistance of a self-assembled three-dimensional (3D) NaCl template. Compared with pure Cu NPs and graphene decorated Cu NPs, the graphene shells can strengthen the plasmonic coupling between graphene and Cu, thereby contributing to an obvious improvement in the local electromagnetic field that was validated by finite element numerical simulations, while the 3D nitrogen

  7. Application of an Environmental Decision Support System to a Water Quality Trading Program Affected by Surface Water Diversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obropta, Christopher C.; Niazi, Mehran; Kardos, Josef S.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental decision support systems (EDSSs) are an emerging tool used to integrate the evaluation of highly complex and interrelated physicochemical, biological, hydrological, social, and economic aspects of environmental problems. An EDSS approach is developed to address hot-spot concerns for a water quality trading program intended to implement the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for phosphorus in the Non-Tidal Passaic River Basin of New Jersey. Twenty-two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) spread throughout the watershed are considered the major sources of phosphorus loading to the river system. Periodic surface water diversions to a major reservoir from the confluence of two key tributaries alter the natural hydrology of the watershed and must be considered in the development of a trading framework that ensures protection of water quality. An EDSS is applied that enables the selection of a water quality trading framework that protects the watershed from phosphorus-induced hot spots. The EDSS employs Simon’s (1960) three stages of the decision-making process: intelligence, design, and choice. The identification of two potential hot spots and three diversion scenarios enables the delineation of three management areas for buying and selling of phosphorus credits among WWTPs. The result shows that the most conservative option entails consideration of two possible diversion scenarios, and trading between management areas is restricted accordingly. The method described here is believed to be the first application of an EDSS to a water quality trading program that explicitly accounts for surface water diversions.

  8. Magnetite nanoparticles supported on organically modified montmorillonite for adsorptive removal of iodide from aqueous solution: Optimization using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jiseon; Lee, Dae Sung

    2018-02-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles supported on organically modified montmorillonite (MNP-OMMTs) were successfully synthesized by a facile coprecipitation method. The surface of natural clay was modified using a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium. The synthesized MNP-OMMTs were used as an adsorbent to remove iodide from aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was 322.42mg/g, which is much higher than other previously reported adsorbents for removing iodide in aqueous solution. The experimental data were well fitted to a pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the adsorption behavior followed the Langmuir isotherm. A thermodynamic study indicated that iodide adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. The individual and combined effects of key process parameters (pH, temperature, and initial iodide concentration) were studied using a response surface methodology. The maximum iodide removal efficiency of 93.81% was obtained under the optimal conditions of pH3.9, a temperature of 41.3°C, and an initial iodide concentration of 113.8mg/L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Laser ablative fabrication of nanocrowns and nanojets on the Cu supported film surface using femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchmizhak, A.A., E-mail: ku4mijak@dvo.ru [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Pavlov, D.V. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Vitrik, O.B. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Kulchin, Yu. N. [Institute of Automation and Control Processes, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 5 Radio Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Formation dynamics of the laser-induced nanojets and nanocrowns on the Cu film surface was studied. • The key role of subsurface boiling on the metal film–substrate interface was revealed. • Five-fold plasmon enhancement of the Rh6G photoluminescence signal was demonstrated. • Plasmonic nature of enhancement was proved by measuring of the emission spectra of the Rh6G near the nanocrowns. - Abstract: Formation dynamics of the nanojets and nanocrowns induced on the surface of the Cu supported films of different thickness under the impact of tightly focused femtosecond pulses was studied in detail. We show that the single-shot fs-pulse irradiation of the 120-nm-thick Cu film results in formation of a single nanojet, which splits at increased pulse energy into two and then into a plurality of periodically arranged nanospikes eventually acquiring the form of the so-called nanocrown. The number of nanospike in the nanocrown was found to be linearly dependent on the pulse energy and nanocrown radius. The key role of subsurface boiling occurring on the metal film–substrate interface in the formation process of crown-like nanostructures was revealed by comparing the obtained results with the formation dynamics studied for thinner 60-nm and 20-nm-thick Cu films. In addition, the applicability of the fabricated nanostructures as low-cost substrate for photoluminescence signal enhancement of the organic dyes is also discussed in this paper.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of self-assembled thiol monolayers and supported lipid membranes on thin anodic porous alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salerno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin anodic porous alumina (tAPA was fabricated from a 500 nm thick aluminum (Al layer coated on silicon wafers, through single-step anodization performed in a Teflon electrochemical cell in 0.4 M aqueous phosphoric acid at 110 V. Post-fabrication etching in the same acid allowed obtaining tAPA surfaces with ≈160 nm pore diameter and ≈80 nm corresponding wall thickness to be prepared. The tAPA surfaces were made SERS-active by coating with a thin (≈25 nm gold (Au layer. The as obtained tAPA–Au substrates were incubated first with different thiols, namely mercaptobenzoic acid (MbA and aminothiol (AT, and then with phospholipid vesicles of different composition to form a supported lipid bilayer (SLB. At each step, the SERS substrate functionality was assessed, demonstrating acceptable enhancement (≥100×. The chemisorption of thiols during the first step and the formation of SLB from the vesicles during the second step, were independently monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D technique. The SLB membranes represent a simplified model system of the living cells membranes, which makes the successful observation of SERS on these films promising in view of the use of tAPA–Au substrates as a platform for the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS biosensors on living cells. In the future, these tAPA–Au-SLB substrates will be investigated also for drug delivery of bioactive agents from the APA pores.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of gold nanoparticles supported on copper foil with graphene as a nanometer gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Quan; Zhu, Xupeng; Chen, Yiqin; Duan, Huigao

    2016-01-01

    Gaps with single-nanometer dimensions (<10 nm) between metallic nanostructures enable giant local field enhancements for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Monolayer graphene is an ideal candidate to obtain a sub-nanometer gap between plasmonic nanostructures. In this work, we demonstrate a simple method to achieve a sub-nanometer gap by dewetting a gold film supported on monolayer graphene grown on copper foil. The Cu foil can serve as a low-loss plasmonically active metallic film that supports the imaginary charge oscillations, while the graphene can not only create a stable sub-nanometer gap for massive plasmonic field enhancements but also serve as a chemical enhancer. We obtained higher SERS enhancements in this graphene-gapped configuration compared to those in Au nanoparticles on Cu film or on graphene–SiO 2 –Si. Also, the Raman signals measured maintained their fine features and intensities over a long time period, indicating the stability of this Au–graphene–Cu hybrid configuration as an SERS substrate. (paper)

  12. Preparation, surface characterization and performance of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst of cobalt supported on silica nanosprings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kengne, Blaise-Alexis Fouetio; Alayat, Abdulbaset M.; Luo, Guanqun; McDonald, Armando G.; Brown, Justin; Smotherman, Hayden; McIlroy, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Determined that the reduction of Co nanoparticles on silica nanosprings 200 °C higher than the reduction temperature of Co in a solgel support. • The high reduction temperature of Co supported on silica nanosprings is attributed to the heat transfer properties of the nanosprings due to their high surface area. Co-silica nanospring Fischer-Tropsch catalyst can be used to produce drop in fuels such as JP-4. - Abstract: The reduction of cobalt (Co) catalyst supported on silica nanosprings for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has been monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compared to FT catalytic activity. The cobalt is present in the starting catalyst as a Co 3 O 4 spinel phase. A two-step reduction of Co 3 O 4 to CoO and then to Co 0 is observed, which is consistent with the results of H 2 -temperature programmed reduction. During the reduction the two steps occur concurrently. The deconvolution of the Co 2p core level state for the catalyst reduced at 385 °C and 1.0 × 10 −6 Torr of H 2 revealed signatures of Co 0 , CoO, and Co 3 O 4 . The reduction saturates at a Co o concentration of approximately 41% after 20 h, which correlates with the activity and lifetime of the catalyst during FTS testing. Conversely, at 680 °C and 10 Torr of H 2 , the catalyst is completely reduced after 10 h. The evolution of the Co d-band at the Fermi level in the valence band XPS spectrum definitively verifies the metallic phase of Co. FTS evaluation of the Co/NS catalyst reduced at 609 °C showed higher production rate (3-fold) of C 6 -C 17 hydrocarbons than the catalyst reduced at 409 °C and is consistent with the XPS analysis.

  13. Assessing the Impact of Surface and Upper-Air Observations on the Forecast Skill of the ACCESS Numerical Weather Prediction Model over Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Soldatenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s in situ observations (land and sea surface observations, upper air observations by radiosondes, pilot balloons, wind profilers, and aircraft observations on the short-term forecast skill provided by the ACCESS (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator global numerical weather prediction (NWP system is evaluated using an adjoint-based method. This technique makes use of the adjoint perturbation forecast model utilized within the 4D-Var assimilation system, and is able to calculate the individual impact of each assimilated observation in a cycling NWP system. The results obtained show that synoptic observations account for about 60% of the 24-h forecast error reduction, with the remainder accounted for by aircraft (12.8%, radiosondes (10.5%, wind profilers (3.9%, pilot balloons (2.8%, buoys (1.7% and ships (1.2%. In contrast, the largest impact per observation is from buoys and aircraft. Overall, all observation types have a positive impact on the 24-h forecast skill. Such results help to support the decision-making process regarding the evolution of the observing network, particularly at the national level. Consequently, this 4D-Var-based approach has great potential as a tool to assist the design and running of an efficient and effective observing network.

  14. Mars surface-based factory: Computer control of a water treatment system to support a space colony on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, R.; Mosley, J.; Willis, D.; Coleman, K.; Martin, C.; Shelby, L.; Kelley, U.; Renfro, E.; Griffith, G.; Warsame, A.

    1989-01-01

    In a continued effort to design a surface-based factory on Mars for the production of oxygen and water, the Design Group at Prairie View A&M University made a preliminary study of the surface and atmospheric composition on Mars and determined the mass densities of the various gases in the martian atmosphere. Based on the initial studies, the design group determined oxygen and water to be the two products that could be produced economically under the martian conditions. Studies were also made on present production techniques to obtain water and oxygen. Analyses were made to evaluate the current methods of production that were adaptable to the martian conditions. The detailed report was contained in an Interim Report submitted to NASA/USRA in Aug. of 1986. Even though the initial effort was the production of oxygen and water, we found it necessary to produce some diluted gases that can be mixed with oxygen to constitute 'breathable' air. In Phase 2--Task 1A, the Prairie View A&M University team completed the conceptual design of a breathable-air manufacturing system, a means of drilling for underground water, and storage of water for future use. The design objective of the team for the 1987-1988 academic year was the conceptual design of an integrated system for the supply of quality water for biological consumption, farming, and residential and industrial use. The design has also been completed. Phase 2--Task 1C is the present task for the Prairie View Design Team. This is a continuation of the previous task, and the continuation of this effort is the investigation into the extraction of water from beneath the surface and an alternative method of extraction from ice formations on the surface of Mars if accessible. In addition to investigation of water extraction, a system for computer control of extraction and treatment was developed with emphasis on fully automated control with robotic repair and maintenance. It is expected that oxygen- and water-producing plants

  15. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  16. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brajkovic, Denis; Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Kisic, Danilo; Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija; Rakocevic, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  17. Surface characterization of the cement for retention of implant supported dental prostheses: In vitro evaluation of cement roughness and surface free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brajkovic, Denis [Clinic for Dentistry, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Svetozara Markovica 69, 34000 Kragujevac (Serbia); Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kisic, Danilo [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Zelic, Ksenija; Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute of Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 4/2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rakocevic, Zlatko, E-mail: zlatkora@vinca.rs [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface free energy and surface roughness influence bacterial adhesion. • Bacterial colonization causes periimplantitis and implant loss. • Zinc-based, glass-ionomers and resin-cements were investigated. • Glass-ionomers-cements present the lowest values of surface free energy and roughness. • Glass-ionomer-cements surface properties result with reduced bacterial adhesion. - Abstract: Background: Material surface free energy and surface roughness strongly influence the bacterial adhesion in oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze these two parameters in various commercial luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Materials and methods: Zinc-based, glass-ionomers, resin modified glass-ionomer and resin-cements were investigated. Contact angle and surface free energy were measured by contact angle analyzer using Image J software program. Materials’ average roughness and fractal dimension were calculated based on Atomic Force Microscope topography images. Results: Zinc phosphate cements presented significantly higher total surface free energy and significantly lower dispersive component of surface free energy compared to other groups, while resin-cements showed significantly lower polar component than other groups. The surface roughness and fractal dimension values were statistically the highest in the zinc phosphate cements and the lowest for the glass-ionomers cements. Conclusion: Glass-ionomers-cements presented lower values of surface free energy and surface roughness than zinc phosphate and resin cements, indicating that their surfaces are less prone to biofilm adhesion. Practical implications: Within limitations of an in vitro trial, our results indicate that glass-ionomers-cements could be the cements of choice for fixation of cement retained implant restorations due to superior surface properties compared to zinc phosphate and resin cements, which may result in reduced plaque formation

  18. Field evaluation of remote wind sensing technologies: Shore-based and buoy mounted LIDAR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, Thomas [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-03

    In developing a national energy strategy, the United States has a number of objectives, including increasing economic growth, improving environmental quality, and enhancing national energy security. Wind power contributes to these objectives through the deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic energy. To achieve U.S. wind generation objectives, the Wind and Water Power Program within the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) instituted the U.S. Offshore Wind: Removing Market Barriers Program in FY 2011. Accurate and comprehensive information on offshore wind resource characteristics across a range of spatial and temporal scales is one market barrier that needs to be addressed through advanced research in remote sensing technologies. There is a pressing need for reliable offshore wind-speed measurements to assess the availability of the potential wind energy resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring spatial variability in the offshore wind resource that may impact the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components and to provide a verification program to validate the “bankability” of the output of these alternative technologies for use by finance institutions for the financing of offshore wind farm construction. The application of emerging remote sensing technologies is viewed as a means to cost-effectively meet the data needs of the offshore wind industry. In particular, scanning and buoy mounted LIDAR have been proposed as a means to obtain accurate offshore wind data at multiple locations without the high cost and regulatory hurdles associated with the construction of offshore meteorological towers. However; before these remote sensing technologies can be accepted the validity of the measured data must be evaluated to ensure their accuracy. The proposed research will establish a unique coastal ocean test-bed in the Mid-Atlantic for

  19. Environmental Support to Amphibious Craft, Patrol Boats, and Coastal Ships: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-05

    maintained by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. 11. Boyd, Jeremy D., 2006. Evaluation of ADCP Wave Measurements, Masters Degree Thesis ...utility of wave buoys to support planing craft, hovercraft , and sea state limited operations such as surf zone breaching. Dr. Porter is key

  20. Preparation, surface characterization and performance of a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst of cobalt supported on silica nanosprings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kengne, Blaise-Alexis Fouetio [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); Alayat, Abdulbaset M. [Environmental Science Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3006 (United States); Luo, Guanqun [Department of Forest, Rangeland & Fire Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1132 (United States); McDonald, Armando G. [Environmental Science Program, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3006 (United States); Department of Forest, Rangeland & Fire Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1132 (United States); Brown, Justin; Smotherman, Hayden [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States); McIlroy, David N., E-mail: dmcilroy@uidaho.edu [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-0903 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Determined that the reduction of Co nanoparticles on silica nanosprings 200 °C higher than the reduction temperature of Co in a solgel support. • The high reduction temperature of Co supported on silica nanosprings is attributed to the heat transfer properties of the nanosprings due to their high surface area. Co-silica nanospring Fischer-Tropsch catalyst can be used to produce drop in fuels such as JP-4. - Abstract: The reduction of cobalt (Co) catalyst supported on silica nanosprings for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) has been monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compared to FT catalytic activity. The cobalt is present in the starting catalyst as a Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel phase. A two-step reduction of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} to CoO and then to Co{sup 0} is observed, which is consistent with the results of H{sub 2}-temperature programmed reduction. During the reduction the two steps occur concurrently. The deconvolution of the Co 2p core level state for the catalyst reduced at 385 °C and 1.0 × 10{sup −6} Torr of H{sub 2} revealed signatures of Co{sup 0}, CoO, and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The reduction saturates at a Co{sup o} concentration of approximately 41% after 20 h, which correlates with the activity and lifetime of the catalyst during FTS testing. Conversely, at 680 °C and 10 Torr of H{sub 2}, the catalyst is completely reduced after 10 h. The evolution of the Co d-band at the Fermi level in the valence band XPS spectrum definitively verifies the metallic phase of Co. FTS evaluation of the Co/NS catalyst reduced at 609 °C showed higher production rate (3-fold) of C{sub 6}-C{sub 17} hydrocarbons than the catalyst reduced at 409 °C and is consistent with the XPS analysis.

  1. Integration of the Response Surface Methodology with the Compromise Decision Support Problem in Developing a General Robust Design Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Tsui, Kwok-Leung; Allen, Janet K.; Mistree, Farrokh

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a comprehensive and rigorous robust design procedure to overcome some limitations of the current approaches. A comprehensive approach is general enough to model the two major types of robust design applications, namely, robust design associated with the minimization of the deviation of performance caused by the deviation of noise factors (uncontrollable parameters), and robust design due to the minimization of the deviation of performance caused by the deviation of control factors (design variables). We achieve mathematical rigor by using, as a foundation, principles from the design of experiments and optimization. Specifically, we integrate the Response Surface Method (RSM) with the compromise Decision Support Problem (DSP). Our approach is especially useful for design problems where there are no closed-form solutions and system performance is computationally expensive to evaluate. The design of a solar powered irrigation system is used as an example. Our focus in this paper is on illustrating our approach rather than on the results per se.

  2. Wave propagation in the marginal ice zone - Model predictions and comparisons with buoy and synthetic aperture radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Antony K.; Holt, Benjamin; Vachon, Paris W.

    1991-01-01

    Ocean wave dispersion relation and viscous attenuation by a sea ice cover are studied for waves propagating into the marginal ice zone (MIZ). The Labrador ice margin experiment (LIMEX), conducted on the MIZ off the east coast of Newfoundland, Canada in March 1987, provided aircraft SAR imagery, ice property and wave buoy data. Wave energy attenuation rates are estimated from SAR data and the ice motion package data that were deployed at the ice edge and into the ice pack, and compared with a model. It is shown that the model data comparisons are quite good for the ice conditions observed during LIMEX 1987.

  3. The first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell as a viable power supply: Powering a meteorological buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tender, Leonard M.; Gray, Sam A.; Groveman, Ethan; Lowy, Daniel A.; Kauffman, Peter; Melhado, Julio; Tyce, Robert C.; Flynn, Darren; Petrecca, Rose; Dobarro, Joe

    2008-05-01

    Here we describe the first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a practical alternative to batteries for a low-power consuming application. The specific application reported is a meteorological buoy (ca. 18-mW average consumption) that measures air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and water temperature, and that is configured for real-time line-of-sight RF telemetry of data. The specific type of MFC utilized in this demonstration is the benthic microbial fuel cell (BMFC). The BMFC operates on the bottom of marine environments, where it oxidizes organic matter residing in oxygen depleted sediment with oxygen in overlying water. It is maintenance free, does not deplete (i.e., will run indefinitely), and is sufficiently powerful to operate a wide range of low-power marine-deployed scientific instruments normally powered by batteries. Two prototype BMFCs used to power the buoy are described. The first was deployed in the Potomac River in Washington, DC, USA. It had a mass of 230 kg, a volume of 1.3 m3, and sustained 24 mW (energy equivalent of ca. 16 alkaline D-cells per year at 25 °C). Although not practical due to high cost and extensive in-water manipulation required to deploy, it established the precedence that a fully functional scientific instrument could derive all of its power from a BMFC. It also provided valuable lessons for developing a second, more practical BMFC that was subsequently used to power the buoy in a salt marsh near Tuckerton, NJ, USA. The second version BMFC has a mass of 16 kg, a volume of 0.03 m3, sustains ca. 36 mW (energy equivalent of ca. 26 alkaline D-cells per year at 25 °C), and can be deployed by a single person from a small craft with minimum or no in-water manipulation. This BMFC is being further developed to reduce cost and enable greater power output by electrically connecting multiple units in parallel. Use of this BMFC powering the meteorological buoy highlights the potential impact of BMFCs to enable long

  4. Survey of Technology with Possible Applications to United States Coast Guard Buoy Tenders. Volume 2. Literature Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    34THV MERMAID ." Vessel particular: LOA - 80.4 m, Beam moulded - 14.5 m, Draft - 4.0 m, speed 12 kts, complement - 24, power - diesel electric 2x 860 kW...Beacons. Included in this yearbook is a 2-page spread with particulars on the newest buoy tender "THV MERMAID " recently completed by Hyundai Heavy...suppliers. A little short on detailed design information. Covers all self-propelled OSV’s over 60ft LOA except for pure tugs. Patton, L.M., "The

  5. Effects of Trunk Stabilization Exercises on Different Support Surfaces on the Cross-sectional Area of the Trunk Muscles and Balance Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sea Hyun; Lee, Hong Gyun; Kim, Young Eok; Kim, Gye Yeop; Jung, Hyun Woo; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects on stroke patients of trunk stabilization exercise on different support surfaces. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen stroke patients with onset of stroke six months earlier or longer were randomly and equally assigned to group I (exercise performed on a stable support surface) and group II (exercise performed on an unstable support surface). The two groups conducted the trunk stabilization exercises on the respective support surfaces, in addition to existing rehabilitation exercises five times per week for 12 weeks. Changes in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles were examined using computed tomography (CT), and changes in the balance ability were assessed using a measuring system and the trunk impairment scale (TIS). [Results] In group I, there was a significant increase in the CSA of the mulifidus muscle on the side contralateral to the brain lesion and in the paravertebral and multifidus muscles on the side ipsilateral to the brain lesion. In group II, there was a significant increase in the CSA of the paravertebral and multifidus muscles on the side contralateral to the brain lesion and on the side ipsilateral to the brain lesion. In terms of changes in balance ability, the sway path (SP) and TIS significantly improved in group I, and the SP, sway area (SA), and TIS significantly improved in group II . [Conclusion] Exercise on the unstable support surface enhanced the size of the cross-sectional area of the trunk muscles and balance ability significantly more than exercise on the stable support surface.

  6. Pressure RElieving Support SUrfaces: a Randomised Evaluation 2 (PRESSURE 2): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sarah; Smith, Isabelle L; Brown, Julia M; Hulme, Claire; McGinnis, Elizabeth; Stubbs, Nikki; Nelson, E Andrea; Muir, Delia; Rutherford, Claudia; Walker, Kay; Henderson, Valerie; Wilson, Lyn; Gilberts, Rachael; Collier, Howard; Fernandez, Catherine; Hartley, Suzanne; Bhogal, Moninder; Coleman, Susanne; Nixon, Jane E

    2016-12-20

    Pressure ulcers represent a major burden to patients, carers and the healthcare system, affecting approximately 1 in 17 hospital and 1 in 20 community patients. They impact greatly on an individual's functional status and health-related quality of life. The mainstay of pressure ulcer prevention practice is the provision of pressure redistribution support surfaces and patient repositioning. The aim of the PRESSURE 2 study is to compare the two main mattress types utilised within the NHS: high-specification foam and alternating pressure mattresses, in the prevention of pressure ulcers. PRESSURE 2 is a multicentre, open-label, randomised, double triangular, group sequential, parallel group trial. A maximum of 2954 'high-risk' patients with evidence of acute illness will be randomised on a 1:1 basis to receive either a high-specification foam mattress or alternating-pressure mattress in conjunction with an electric profiling bed frame. The primary objective of the trial is to compare mattresses in terms of the time to developing a new Category 2 or above pressure ulcer by 30 days post end of treatment phase. Secondary endpoints include time to developing new Category 1 and 3 or above pressure ulcers, time to healing of pre-existing Category 2 pressure ulcers, health-related quality of life, cost-effectiveness, incidence of mattress change and safety. Validation objectives are to determine the responsiveness of the Pressure Ulcer Quality of Life-Prevention instrument and the feasibility of having a blinded endpoint assessment using photography. The trial will have a maximum of three planned analyses with unequally spaced reviews at event-driven coherent cut-points. The futility boundaries are constructed as non-binding to allow a decision for stopping early to be overruled by the Data Monitoring and Ethics Committee. The double triangular, group sequential design of the PRESSURE 2 trial will provide an efficient design through the possibility of early stopping for

  7. Adhesion and Atomic Structures of Gold on Ceria Nanostructures:The Role of Surface Structure and Oxidation State of Ceria Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuyuan [Northwestern University, Evanston; Wu, Zili [ORNL; Wen, Jianguo [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R [Northwestern University, Evanston; Marks, Laurence D [Northwestern University, Evanston

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in heterogeneous catalysis have demonstrated that oxides supports with the same material but different shapes can result in metal catalysts with distinct catalytic properties. The shape-dependent catalysis was not well-understood owing to the lack of direct visualization of the atomic structures at metal-oxide interface. Herein, we utilized aberration-corrected electron microscopy and revealed the atomic structures of gold particles deposited on ceria nanocubes and nanorods with {100} or {111} facets exposed. For the ceria nanocube support, gold nanoparticles have extended atom layers at the metal-support interface. In contrast, regular gold nanoparticles and rafts are present on the ceria nanorod support. After hours of water gas shift reaction, the extended gold atom layers and rafts vanish, which is associated with the decrease of the catalytic activities. By understanding the atomic structures of the support surfaces, metal-support interfaces, and morphologies of the gold particles, a direct structure-property relationship is established.

  8. Bimetallic nickel-cobalt nanosized layers supported on polar ZnO surfaces: metal-support interaction and alloy effects studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Law, Y.T.; Skála, T.; Pis, I.; Nehasil, V.; Vondráček, Martin; Zafeiratos, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 18 (2012), s. 10048-10056 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06058; GA ČR GD202/09/H041 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : mc fuel-cell * hydrogen -production * oxide surfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  9. Development physicochemical and catalytic characteristics of Mo-containing catalysts for hydrotreatment based on various supports. 1. Adsorption of molybdate anions on the support surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lur'e, M.A.; Kurest, I.Z.; Krasnopol'skaya, S.M.; Reznikov, S.A.; Babikov, A.F.; Shmidt, F.K.

    1994-01-01

    The amounts of basic OH-groups were determined by means of exchange by F-ions and the adsorption of Mo from acid and alkali ammonium paramolybdate (APM) solutions was investigated on the surface of hydrated titanium dioxide, γ-Al 2 O 3 and palygorskite-montmorillonite clay. The process is adequately described by the exchange equation at pH value of APM solution in excess of the isoelectric point (IEP) of the surface. At opposite correlation between pH of the solution and IEP the Langmuir model is adaptable. They concluded, on experimental data, that in the latter case OH-groups replaced by molybdate-anion stage of synthesis of catalyst. 22 refs., 3 figs

  10. Hamilton-Jacobi theory for continuation of magnetic field across a toroidal surface supporting a plasma pressure discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGann, M.; Hudson, S.R.; Dewar, R.L.; Nessi, G. von

    2010-01-01

    The vanishing of the divergence of the total stress tensor (magnetic plus kinetic) in a neighborhood of an equilibrium plasma containing a toroidal surface of discontinuity gives boundary and jump conditions that strongly constrain allowable continuations of the magnetic field across the surface. The boundary conditions allow the magnetic fields on either side of the discontinuity surface to be described by surface magnetic potentials, reducing the continuation problem to that of solving a Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The characteristics of this equation obey Hamiltonian equations of motion, and a necessary condition for the existence of a continued field across a general toroidal surface is that there exist invariant tori in the phase space of this Hamiltonian system. It is argued from the Birkhoff theorem that existence of such an invariant torus is also, in general, sufficient for continuation to be possible. An important corollary is that the rotational transform of the continued field on a surface of discontinuity must, generically, be irrational.

  11. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  12. From nanodroplets to continuous films: how the morphology of polyelectrolyte multilayers depends on the dielectric permittivity and the surface charge of the supporting substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Zahn, Raphael; Lindhoud, Saskia; Graf, Norma; Voros, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2011-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated how the morphology of layer-by-layer deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers is influenced by the physical properties of the supporting substrate. The surface coverage of the assembly and its topography were found to be dependent on the dielectric

  13. A comparison of three approaches for simulating fine-scale surface winds in support of wildland fire management: Part I. Model formulation and comparison against measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason M. Forthofer; Bret W. Butler; Natalie S. Wagenbrenner

    2014-01-01

    For this study three types of wind models have been defined for simulating surface wind flow in support of wildland fire management: (1) a uniform wind field (typically acquired from coarse-resolution (,4 km) weather service forecast models); (2) a newly developed mass-conserving model and (3) a newly developed mass and momentumconserving model (referred to as the...

  14. 26-year follow-up of screw-retained fixed dental prostheses supported by machined-surface Brånemark implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2011-01-01

    Rough-surface implants have become very popular during the last 10 years due to greater reported bone-implant-contact and bone volume between implant threads compared to machined-surface implants. The aim of this clinical report is to present the 26-year clinical outcomes of machined-surface implants supporting screw-retained fixed dental prostheses in a 77-year-old woman. A 51-year-old woman received five mandibular and six maxillary implants supporting screw-retained fixed dental prostheses. The original machined-surface regular platform Branemark implants were placed using a two-stage surgical approach. No implants were lost, and average marginal bone levels between the implant platform and the first bone-implant contact for maxillary and mandibular implants were 3.3 +/- 0.6 mm and 1.7 +/- 0.3 mm after 26 years. The following prosthetic complications were recorded during the follow up period; a) broken acrylic denture tooth (four times), b) loose prosthetic screw (three times), c) loose abutment screw (two times). This case report shows that machined-surface dental implants can successfully support screw-retained fixed dental prostheses over 26 years, which makes dental implants an important dental treatment option compared to the traditional prosthetic treatment methods, especially in elderly edentulous patients.

  15. Validation of High Frequency Radar Used in Ocean Surface Current Mapping via in-situ Drifting Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    President Codar Ocean Sensors, Ltd. Los Altos, California 8. Dr. Newell Garfield, Director Romberg Tiburon Center San Francisco State...University Tiburon , California 9. Dr. Jack Harlan NOAA IOOS Program Silver Springs, Maryland 88 10. Dr. Glenn Watabushy NOAA ERD Seattle

  16. Comparison of gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission satellite altimetry wave heights with in situ near-shore buoy data.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Hithin, N.K.

    The applicability of altimeter data for the coastal region is examined by comparing the gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission significant wave height (SWH) data with the in situ buoy measurements at four stations off the east and west...

  17. Design of a surface-based factory for the production of life support and technology support products. Phase 2: Integrated water system for a space colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Phase 2 of a conceptual design of an integrated water treatment system to support a space colony is presented. This includes a breathable air manufacturing system, a means of drilling for underground water, and storage of water for future use. The system is to supply quality water for biological consumption, farming, residential and industrial use and the water source is assumed to be artesian or subsurface and on Mars. Design criteria and major assumptions are itemized. A general block diagram of the expected treatment system is provided. The design capacity of the system is discussed, including a summary of potential users and the level of treatment required; and, finally, various treatment technologies are described.

  18. Uncertainty quantification and inference of Manning's friction coefficients using DART buoy data during the Tōhoku tsunami

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Tsunami computational models are employed to explore multiple flooding scenarios and to predict water elevations. However, accurate estimation of water elevations requires accurate estimation of many model parameters including the Manning\\'s n friction parameterization. Our objective is to develop an efficient approach for the uncertainty quantification and inference of the Manning\\'s n coefficient which we characterize here by three different parameters set to be constant in the on-shore, near-shore and deep-water regions as defined using iso-baths. We use Polynomial Chaos (PC) to build an inexpensive surrogate for the G. eoC. law model and employ Bayesian inference to estimate and quantify uncertainties related to relevant parameters using the DART buoy data collected during the Tōhoku tsunami. The surrogate model significantly reduces the computational burden of the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) sampling of the Bayesian inference. The PC surrogate is also used to perform a sensitivity analysis.

  19. Circulation and hydrological characteristics of the North Aegean Sea: a contribution from real-time buoy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. NITTIS

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the POSEIDON Project, a network of open sea oceanographic buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors has been operational in the Aegean Sea since 1998. The analysis of upper-ocean physical data (currents at 3m, temperature and salinity at 3-40m depths collected during the last 2 years from the stations of the North Aegean basin indicates a strong temporal variability of flow field and hydrological characteristics in both synoptic and seasonal time scales. The northern part of the basin is mainly influenced by the Black Sea Water outflow and the mesoscale variability of the corresponding thermohaline fronts, while the southern stations are influenced by the general circulation of the Aegean Sea with strong modulations caused by the seasonally varying atmospheric forcing.

  20. Toward Improved Land Surface Initialization in Support of Regional WRF Forecasts at the Kenya Meteorological Service (KMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Kabuchanga, Eric; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.

    2014-01-01

    SPoRT/SERVIR/RCMRD/KMS Collaboration: Builds off strengths of each organization. SPoRT: Transition of satellite, modeling and verification capabilities; SERVIR-Africa/RCMRD: International capacity-building expertise; KMS: Operational organization with regional weather forecasting expertise in East Africa. Hypothesis: Improved land-surface initialization over Eastern Africa can lead to better temperature, moisture, and ultimately precipitation forecasts in NWP models. KMS currently initializes Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with NCEP/Global Forecast System (GFS) model 0.5-deg initial / boundary condition data. LIS will provide much higher-resolution land-surface data at a scale more representative to regional WRF configuration. Future implementation of real-time NESDIS/VIIRS vegetation fraction to further improve land surface representativeness.

  1. Quantifying Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Environment Using Measurements From A Small Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Additionally, MOST is limited in its application to surfaces, such as ocean waves, that have their own dynamic structures ( Hill 1989). Foken...campaign. Figure 6 shows the general measurement area with the green stars (Points A1 and A2) denoting the locations of the surface floats used to tether...deployments during CASPER-East. 21 The two green stars denote the locations of the surface super sites (Point A1 and Point A2) at 16 nm and 34 nm

  2. Bioactive support for cell cultivation and potential grafting. Part1. Surface modification of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate hydrogels for avidin immobilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobzová, Radka; Přádný, Martin; Zhunusbekova, Nazym M.; Širc, Jakub; Guryča, Vilém; Michálek, Jiří

    -, 043 (2011), s. 1-17 ISSN 1618-7229 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS400500558 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : hydrogel * poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) * surface modification Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.515, year: 2011 http://www.e-polymers.org/journal/abstract.cfm?abstract_Id=3616

  3. Apollo experience report: A use of network simulation techniques in the design of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, R. A.; Wilkes, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    A case study of data-communications network modeling and simulation is presented. The applicability of simulation techniques in early system design phases is demonstrated, and the ease with which model parameters can be changed and comprehensive statistics gathered is shown. The discussion of the model design and application also yields an insight into the design and implementation of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package ground-support system.

  4. Analysis of tank 4 (FTF-4-15-22, 23) surface and subsurface supernatant samples in support of enrichment control, corrosion control and evaporator feed qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-09

    This report provides the results of analyses on Savannah River Site Tank 4 surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the Enrichment Control Program (ECP), the Corrosion Control Program (CCP) and the Evaporator Feed Qualification (EFQ) Program. The purpose of the ECP sample taken from Tank 4 in August 2015 was to determine if the supernatant liquid would be “acceptable feed” to the 2H and 3H evaporator systems.

  5. Fixed Full Arches Supported by Tapered Implants with Knife-Edge Thread Design and Nanostructured, Calcium-Incorporated Surface: A Short-Term Prospective Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Bechara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, and complications affecting fixed full-arch (FFA restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface. Methods. Between January 2013 and December 2015, all patients referred for implant-supported FFA restorations were considered for enrollment in this study. All patients received implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, South Korea were restored with FFA restorations and enrolled in a recall program. The final outcomes were implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, biologic/prosthetic complications, and “complication-free” survival of restorations. Results. Twenty-four patients were selected. Overall, 215 implants were inserted (130 maxilla, 85 mandible, 144 in extraction sockets and 71 in healed ridges. Thirty-six FFAs were delivered (21 maxilla, 15 mandible: 27 were immediately loaded and 9 were conventionally loaded. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. Two fixtures failed, yielding an implant survival rate of 95.9% (patient-based. A few complications were registered, for a “complication-free” survival of restorations of 88.9%. Conclusions. FFA restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface are successful in the short term, with high survival and low complication rates; long-term studies are needed to confirm these outcomes.

  6. Fixed Full Arches Supported by Tapered Implants with Knife-Edge Thread Design and Nanostructured, Calcium-Incorporated Surface: A Short-Term Prospective Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Soheil; Lukosiunas, Algirdas; Kubilius, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, and complications affecting fixed full-arch (FFA) restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface. Methods. Between January 2013 and December 2015, all patients referred for implant-supported FFA restorations were considered for enrollment in this study. All patients received implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (Anyridge®, Megagen, South Korea) were restored with FFA restorations and enrolled in a recall program. The final outcomes were implant survival, peri-implant bone loss, biologic/prosthetic complications, and “complication-free” survival of restorations. Results. Twenty-four patients were selected. Overall, 215 implants were inserted (130 maxilla, 85 mandible), 144 in extraction sockets and 71 in healed ridges. Thirty-six FFAs were delivered (21 maxilla, 15 mandible): 27 were immediately loaded and 9 were conventionally loaded. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. Two fixtures failed, yielding an implant survival rate of 95.9% (patient-based). A few complications were registered, for a “complication-free” survival of restorations of 88.9%. Conclusions. FFA restorations supported by implants with a knife-edge thread design and nanostructured, calcium-incorporated surface are successful in the short term, with high survival and low complication rates; long-term studies are needed to confirm these outcomes. PMID:28246595

  7. Comparing the effects of 3 different pressure ulcer prevention support surfaces on the structure and function of heel and sacral skin: An exploratory cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova-Simitchieva, Tsenka; Lichterfeld-Kottner, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2017-12-26

    Special support surfaces are key in pressure ulcer prevention. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of 3 different types of mattresses (reactive gel, active alternating air, basic foam) on skin properties of the sacral and heel skin after 2 hours loading. Fifteen healthy females (median age 66 years) were included. Transepidermal water loss, skin surface temperature, erythema, stratum corneum hydration, epidermal hydration, skin extensibility, elastic function, and recovery as well as skin roughness parameters were measured under controlled room conditions before loading, immediately after loading, and 20 minutes post-loading in the supine position on the different mattresses. The highest increases in transepidermal water loss, skin temperature, and erythema were observed for the foam mattress after loading, indicating higher deformation and occlusion. Cutaneous stiffness decreased in all 3 groups, indicating structural changes during loading. There was a substantial decrease of mean roughness at the heel skin in the foam group, leading to a flattening of the skin surface. Study results indicate that the type of support surface influences skin structure and function during loading. The gel and air mattress appeared to be more protective compared with the foam mattress, but the differences between the gel and air were minor. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Towards a highly-efficient fuel-cell catalyst: optimization of Pt particle size, supports and surface-oxygen group concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Navaneethan; de la Fuente, Jose Luis Gomez; Ochal, Piotr; Giri, Rajiv; Raaen, Steinar; Sunde, Svein; Rønning, Magnus; Chen, De

    2013-03-21

    In the present work, methanol oxidation reaction was investigated on Pt particles of various diameters on carbon-nanofibers and carbon-black supports with different surface-oxygen concentrations, aiming for a better understanding of the relationship between the catalyst properties and the electrochemical performance. The pre-synthesized Pt nanoparticles in ethylene glycol, prepared by the polyol method without using any capping agents, were deposited on different carbon supports. Removal of oxygen-groups from the carbon supports had profound positive effects on not only the Pt dispersion but also the specific activity. The edge structures on the stacked graphene sheets in the platelet carbon-nanofibers provided a strong interaction with the Pt particles, significantly reconstructing them in the process. Such reconstruction resulted in the formation of more plated Pt particles on the CNF than on the carbon-black and exposure of more Pt atoms with relatively high co-ordination numbers, and thereby higher specific activity. Owing to the combined advantages of optimum Pt particle diameter, an oxygen-free surface and the unique properties of CNFs, Pt supported on heat-treated CNFs exhibited a higher mass activity twice of that of its commercial counterpart.

  9. Computer models to support investigations of surface subsidence and associated ground motion induced by underground coal gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, B. C.; Langland, R. T.

    1981-08-01

    Surface subsidence induced by underground coal gasification at Hoe Creek, Wyoming, and Centralia, Washington were compared. Calculations with the STEALTH explicit finite difference code match equivalent, implicit finite element method solutions for the removal of underground material. Effects of removing roof material, varying elastic constants, investigating thermal shrinkage, and burning multiple coal seams are studied. A coupled, finite difference continuum rigid block caving code is used to model underground opening behavior. The two methods, numerical and empirical, are most effective when used together.

  10. The Effect of Nitrogen Surface Ligands on Propane Metathesis: Design and Characterizations of N-modified SBA15-Supported Schrock-type Tungsten Alkylidyne

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Ahmed A.

    2014-04-01

    Catalysis, which is primarily a molecular phenomenon, is an important field of chemistry because it requires the chemical conversion of molecules into other molecules. It also has an effect on many fields, including, but not limited to, industry, environment and life Science[1]. Surface Organometallic Chemistry is an effective methodology for Catalysis as it imports the concept and mechanism of organometallic chemistry, to surface science and heterogeneous catalysis. So, it bridges the gap between homogenous and heterogeneous catalysis[1]. The aim of the present research work is to study the effect of Nitrogen surface ligands on the activity of Alkane, Propane in particular, metathesis. Our approach is based on the preparation of selectively well-defined group (VI) transition metal complexes supported onto mesoporous materials, SBA15 and bearing amido and/or imido ligands. We choose nitrogen ligands because, according to the literature, they showed in some cases better catalytic properties in homogenous catalysis in comparison with their oxygen counterparts[2]. The first section covers the modification of a highly dehydroxylated SBA15 surface using a controlled ammonia treatment. These will result in the preparation of two kind of Nitrogen surface ligands: -\\tOne with vicinal silylamine/silanol, (≡SiNH2)(≡SiOH), noted [N,O]SBA15 and, -\\tAnother\\tone\\twith\\tvicinal\\tbis-silylamine moieties (≡SiNH2)2, noted [N,N]SBA15[3]. The second section covers the reaction of Schrock type Tungsten Carbyne [W(≡C- tBu)(CH2-tBu)3] with those N-surface ligands and their characterizations by FT-IR, multiple quantum solid state NMR (1H, 13C), elemental analysis and gas phase analysis. The third section covers the generation of the active site, tungsten hydride species. Their performance toward propane metathesis reaction using the dynamic reactor technique PID compared toward previous well-known catalysts supported on silica oxide or mesoporous materials[4]. A fairly good

  11. Physical profile data collected in the Equatorial Pacific during cruises to service the TAO array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys, from 2007-04-07 to the present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) Program, the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) was responsible for the at-sea collection, quality control and...

  12. Temperature, current meter, and other data from moored buoy as part of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project, 30 July 1974 - 14 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, current meter, and other data were collected using moored buoy from the CAPRICORNE from July 30, 1974 to August 14, 1974. Data were collected as part of...

  13. Bacteriology data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean during the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS-Mid Atlantic Ocean) project, 1976-11-05 to 1977-08-16 (NODC Accession 7800207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 5, 1976 to August 16, 1977....

  14. Temperature, current meter, and other data from moored buoy from the HUMBOLDT as part of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project, 28 July 1974 - 18 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, current meter, and other data were collected using moored buoy from the HUMBOLDT from July 28, 1974 to August 18, 1974. Data were submitted by US Coast...

  15. Physical and fluorescence data collected using moored buoy casts as part of the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 07 December 1975 to 03 January 1977 (NODC Accession 7700569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and fluorescence data were collected using moored buoy from May 4, 1975 to December 18, 1975. Data were submitted by Massachusetts Institute of Technology;...

  16. Physical and meteorological data from buoys from the NW Pacific (limit-180) by the Japan Meteorological Agency and other institutions from 01 January 1978 to 31 December 1991 (NODC Accession 9400143)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Buoy data was collected in the NW Pacific (limit-180) from 01 January 1978 to 31 December 1991. Data were collected by the Japan Meteorological Agency and other...

  17. Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-02-01 to 1979-05-03 (NODC Accession 7900247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1978...

  18. CURRENT DIRECTION, ICE - MOVEMENT - DIRECTION and other data from DRIFTING BUOY in the World-Wide Distribution from 1990-01-01 to 1991-03-31 (NODC Accession 9100102)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Jean Gagron, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format for...

  19. Significant Wave Heights, Periods, and Directions, and Air and Sea Temperature Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Diamond Head, Oahu during March-April 2000 (NODC Accession 0000475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A directional waverider buoy located about one nautical mile south of Diamond Head, Oahu, provided an approximately 10-day time series of wave characteristics and...

  20. Physical and chemical data collected using CTD and buoy casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and GILLIS from 1974-08-29 to 1974-09-16 (NODC Accession 7601660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using CTD and buoy casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and GILLIS from 29 August 1974 to 16 September 1974. Data were submitted...

  1. Current meter and temperature profile data from current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 27 April 1993 to 09 June 1994 (NODC Accession 9700042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and temperature profile data were collected using current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 27 April 1993 to 09 June 1994....

  2. Physical profile and meteorological data from CTD casts during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON buoys in the equatorial Pacific from 02 March 2002 to 22 November 2002 (NODC Accession 0000945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data and meteorological data were collected from CTD casts in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during cruises to to service the TAO/TRITON buoy array....

  3. Insight into the Role of Surface Wettability in Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reactions Using Light-Sensitive Nanotubular TiO2 Supported Pt Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chenhui; Wang, Bing; Gao, Ziyue; Liu, Zhaoyue; Zhang, Qianqian; Zhai, Jin

    2017-02-01

    Surface wettability is of importance for electrochemical reactions. Herein, its role in electrochemical hydrogen evolution reactions is investigated using light-sensitive nanotubular TiO2 supported Pt as hydrogen evolution electrodes (HEEs). The HEEs are fabricated by photocatalytic deposition of Pt particles on TiO2 nanotubes followed by hydrophobization with vaporized octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTS) molecules. The surface wettability of HEEs is subsequently regulated in situ from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity by photocatalytic decomposition of OTS molecules using ultraviolet light. It is found that hydrophilic HEEs demonstrate a larger electrochemical active area of Pt and a lower adhesion force to a gas bubble when compared with hydrophobic ones. The former allows more protons to react on the electrode surface at small overpotential so that a larger current is produced. The latter leads to a quick release of hydrogen gas bubbles from the electrode surface at large overpotential, which ensures the contact between catalysts and electrolyte. These two characteristics make hydrophilic HEEs generate a much high current density for HERs. Our results imply that the optimization of surface wettability is of significance for improving the electrocatalytic activity of HEEs.

  4. The effect of bridge exercise accompanied by the abdominal drawing-in maneuver on an unstable support surface on the lumbar stability of normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wontae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study sought to investigate the influence on static and dynamic lumbar stability of bridge exercise accompanied by an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) performed on an uneven support surface. [Subjects] A total of 30 participants were divided into an experimental group (15 participants) and a control group (15 participants). [Methods] The experimental group performed bridge exercise on an unstable surface, whereas the control group performed bridge exercise on a stable surface. The respective bridge exercises were performed for 30 minutes, 3 times per week, for 6 weeks. The static lumbar stability (SLS) and dynamic lumbar stability (DLS) of both the experimental group and the control group were measured using a pressure biofeedback unit. [Results] In the comparison of the initial and final results of the experimental and control groups, only the SLS and DLS of the experimental group were found to be statistically significant. [Conclusion] The results of the present study show that when using bridge exercise to improve SLS and DLS, performing the bridge exercise accompanied by ADIM on an uneven surface is more effective than performing the exercise on a stable surface.

  5. Use of activated carbon as a support medium for H2S biofiltration and effect of bacterial immobilization on available pore surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Y L; Yan, R; Chen, X G; Geng, A L; Gould, W D; Liang, D T; Koe, L C C

    2004-12-01

    The use of support media for the immobilization of microorganisms is widely known to provide a surface for microbial growth and a shelter that protects the microorganisms from inhibitory compounds. In this study, activated carbon is used as a support medium for the immobilization of microorganisms enriched from municipal sewage activated sludge to remove gas-phase hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a major odorous component of waste gas from sewage treatment plants. A series of designed experiments is used to examine the effect on bacteria-immobilized activated carbon (termed "biocarbon") due to physical adsorption, chemical reaction, and microbial degradation in the overall removal of H2S. H2S breakthrough tests are conducted with various samples, including microbe-immobilized carbon and Teflon discs, salts-medium-washed carbon, and ultra-pure water-washed carbon. The results show a higher removal capacity for the microbe-immobilized activated carbon compared with the activated carbon control in a batch biofilter column. The increase in removal capacity is attributed to the role played by the immobilized microorganisms in metabolizing adsorbed sulfur and sulfur compounds on the biocarbon, hence releasing the adsorption sites for further H2S uptake. The advantage for activated carbon serving as the support medium is to adsorb a high initial concentration of substrate and progressively release this for microbial degradation, hence acting as a buffer for the microorganisms. Results obtained from surface area and pore size distribution analyses of the biocarbon show a correlation between the available surface area and pore volume with the extent of microbial immobilization and H2S uptake. The depletion of surface area and pore volume is seen as one of the factors which cause the onset of column breakthrough. Microbial growth retardation is due to the accumulation of metabolic products (i.e., sulfuric acid); and a lack of water and nutrient salts in the batch biofilter are other

  6. Gli artisti di Supports/Surfaces e l’esperienza del limite. Dalla decostruzione del quadro alla dialettica dello spazio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Giacobbe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available At the end of  the 1960s “Supports/Surfaces” artists start deconstructing paintings to jeopardize their representational qualities. Claude Viallat and Daniel Dezeuze, for example, process canvases and frames to highlight their phisical aspect as opposed to the illusionistic realm or representation. This way polarities such as form/space and illusionistic space/real space start having a new, dialectic relationship.

  7. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal-metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Ioakeimidis, Zisis

    2014-11-01

    Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal-metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO2, La2O3, Sm2O3), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce1-xSmxOδ) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu-Co/CeO2). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal-metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  8. Boosted surface acidity in TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} nanotubes as catalytic supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camposeco, R. [Molecular Engineering Program, Mexican Institute of Petroleum, 07730, México, D.F. (Mexico); Department of Chemistry, UAM-A, 55534, México, D.F. (Mexico); Castillo, S., E-mail: scastill@imp.mx [Molecular Engineering Program, Mexican Institute of Petroleum, 07730, México, D.F. (Mexico); Department of Chemical Engineering, ESIQIE-IPN, 75876, México, D.F. (Mexico); Mejía-Centeno, Isidro; Navarrete, J.; Nava, N. [Molecular Engineering Program, Mexican Institute of Petroleum, 07730, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Surface acidity of NTs was modified by adding alumina. • Brönsted acid sites remain constant but Lewis acid sites are increased remarkably. • IR characterization by lutidine and pyridine confirms the surface acidity of NTs. • 98% of NO conversion was reached between 380 and 480 °C on NT-5Al. • The boosted surface acidity of NT-Al improves the catalytic activity for SCR-NO. - Abstract: In this study, titanate nanotubes (NT) and titanate nanotubes with alumina (NT-Al) were studied as solid acid catalytic supports to show the relationship between the kind of acidity and catalytic activity. The supports were characterized by XRD, TEM, FTIR, XPS, and tested in the SCR-NO with NH{sub 3}. It was found that the amount of Brönsted acid sites was maintained and the Lewis acid sites were significantly affected by the addition of alumina (1, 3, 5 and 10 wt.%); such acidity was higher than that of the titanate nanotubes (NT) by two-fold. To confirm the formation of titanate nanotubes and titanate nanotubes with alumina, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the formation of the H{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9}·H{sub 2}O phase. All NT and NT-Al supports presented catalytic activity to remove NO with NH{sub 3} under lean conditions, confirming the presence of an important amount of Brönsted and Lewis acid sites in both NT and NT-Al supports.

  9. Support for ACS COLL Division Symposium on: Patchy Particles and Surfaces of Engineered Heterogeneity: Synthesis to Dynamic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision, unless so designated by other documentation. 12... Microcapsules ” This talk explored the creation of patchy hydrogel particles and their use in targeted release applications. T.A. Camesano “Role of LPS...materials  design  and mechanical behavior  to  synthesis and processing.   Patchy  colloidal particles  and  surfaces  comprise  a new means  for

  10. Detection of open water dynamics with ENVISAT ASAR in support of land surface modelling at high latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bartsch

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are generally accepted as being the largest but least well quantified single source of methane (CH4. The extent of wetland or inundation is a key factor controlling methane emissions, both in nature and in the parameterisations used in large-scale land surface and climate models. Satellite-derived datasets of wetland extent are available on the global scale, but the resolution is rather coarse (>25 km. The purpose of the present study is to assess the capability of active microwave sensors to derive inundation dynamics for use in land surface and climate models of the boreal and tundra environments. The focus is on synthetic aperture radar (SAR operating in C-band since, among microwave systems, it has comparably high spatial resolution and data availability, and long-term continuity is expected.

    C-band data from ENVISAT ASAR (Advanced SAR operating in wide swath mode (150 m resolution were investigated and an automated detection procedure for deriving open water fraction has been developed. More than 4000 samples (single acquisitions tiled onto 0.5° grid cells have been analysed for July and August in 2007 and 2008 for a study region in Western Siberia. Simple classification algorithms were applied and found to be robust when the water surface was smooth. Modification of input parameters results in differences below 1 % open water fraction. The major issue to address was the frequent occurrence of waves due to wind and precipitation, which reduces the separability of the water class from other land cover classes. Statistical measures of the backscatter distribution were applied in order to retrieve suitable classification data. The Pearson correlation between each sample dataset and a location specific representation of the bimodal distribution was used. On average only 40 % of acquisitions allow a separation of the open water class. Although satellite data are available every 2–3 days over the Western Siberian

  11. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, J.W.

    1995-01-17

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

  12. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinpyo Hong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG, mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine’s motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT, the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  13. Investigation of oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction activity of PtAu nano-alloy on surface modified porous hybrid nanocarbon supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parambath Vinayan, Bhaghavathi; Nagar, Rupali; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the electrocatalytic activity of PtAu alloy nanoparticles supported on various chemically modified carbon morphologies towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The surface-modification of graphene nanosheets (f-G), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWNTs) and (graphene nanosheets-carbon nanotubes) hybrid support (f-G-MWNTs) were carried out by soft functionalization method using a cationic polyelectrolyte poly-(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride). The Pt and PtAu alloy nanoparticles were dispersed over chemically modified carbon supports by sodium-borohydride assisted modified polyol reduction method. The electrochemical performance of all electrocatalysts were studied by half- and full-cell proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) measurements and PtAu/f-G-MWNTs catalyst comparatively yielded the best catalytic performance. PEMFC full cell measurements of PtAu/f-G-MWNTs cathode electrocatalyst yield a maximum power density of 319 mW cm-2 at 60 °C without any back pressure,which is 2.1 times higher than that of cathode electrocatalyst Pt on graphene support. The high ORR and MOR activity of PtAu/f-G-MWNTs electrocatalyst is due to the alloying effect and inherent beneficial properties of porous hybrid nanocarbon support.

  14. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of gold nanoparticles supported on copper foil with graphene as a nanometer gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Quan; Zhu, Xupeng; Chen, Yiqin; Duan, Huigao

    2016-02-19

    Gaps with single-nanometer dimensions (foil. The Cu foil can serve as a low-loss plasmonically active metallic film that supports the imaginary charge oscillations, while the graphene can not only create a stable sub-nanometer gap for massive plasmonic field enhancements but also serve as a chemical enhancer. We obtained higher SERS enhancements in this graphene-gapped configuration compared to those in Au nanoparticles on Cu film or on graphene-SiO2-Si. Also, the Raman signals measured maintained their fine features and intensities over a long time period, indicating the stability of this Au-graphene-Cu hybrid configuration as an SERS substrate.

  15. A Fault Diagnosis Model of Surface to Air Missile Equipment Based on Wavelet Transformation and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhheng Ni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, the fault signals of surface to air missile equipment are hard to collect and the accuracy of fault diagnosis is very low. To solve the above problems, based on the superiority of wavelet transformation on processing non-stationary signals and the advantage of SVM on pattern classification, this paper proposes a fault diagnosis model and takes the typical analog circuit diagnosis of one power distribution system as an example to verify the fault diagnosis model based on Wavelet Transformation and SVM. The simulation results show that the model is able to achieve fault diagnosis based on a small amount of training samples, which improves the accuracy of fault diagnosis.

  16. Mechanisms for SAR imaging of ocean surface phenomena: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding the SAR response to surface wave is a central issue in the analysis of SAR ocean images. The imaging mechanism for gravity waves and the practical question of just which characteristics of the ocean wave field can be measured remotely using SAR were examined. Assessments of wave imaging theory are based primarily on comparisons of the directional wave height variance spectrum psi (K) measured by in situ buoys with estimates from SAR images. Other criteria are also recommended, e.g., the effects of focus adjustments. It is assumed that fluctuations in SAR image intensity are proportional to fluctuations in ocean surface height. If this were true, the Fourier power spectrum of a SAR image and corresponding surface measurements of psi would coincide. Differences between SAR estimates based on this hypothesis and buoy measurements of psi are then used to begin the assessment of rival wave imaging theories.

  17. Developing Probabilistic Operating Rules for Real-time Conjunctive Use of Surface and Groundwater Resources:Application of Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Bazargan-Lari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing optimal operating policies for conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources when different decision makers and stakeholders with conflicting objectives are involved is usually a challenging task. This problem would be more complex when objectives related to surface and groundwater quality are taken into account. In this paper, a new methodology is developed for real time conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources. In the proposed methodology, a well-known multi-objective genetic algorithm, namely Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II is employed to develop a Pareto front among the objectives. The Young conflict resolution theory is also used for resolving the conflict of interests among decision makers. To develop the real time conjunctive use operating rules, the Probabilistic Support Vector Machines (PSVMs, which are capable of providing probability distribution functions of decision variables, are utilized. The proposed methodology is applied to Tehran Aquifer inTehran metropolitan area,Iran. Stakeholders in the study area have some conflicting interests including supplying water with acceptable quality, reducing pumping costs, improving groundwater quality and controlling the groundwater table fluctuations. In the proposed methodology, MODFLOW and MT3D groundwater quantity and quality simulation models are linked with NSGA-II optimization model to develop Pareto fronts among the objectives. The best solutions on the Pareto fronts are then selected using the Young conflict resolution theory. The selected solution (optimal monthly operating policies is used to train and verify a PSVM. The results show the significance of applying an integrated conflict resolution approach and the capability of support vector machines for the real time conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources in the study area. It is also shown that the validation accuracy of the proposed operating rules is higher that 80

  18. Heterotrophic Fe-Oxidizing Bacteria Associated With Basalt Surfaces Supporting Life On Vailulu'u Seamount, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haucke, L.; Templeton, A.; Bailey, B.; Tebo, B.; Staudigel, H.

    2005-12-01

    Fe, the fourth-most abundant element in the Earth's crust, is also one of the most biologically essential ones. The reduced form, Fe(II), is often considered to be biologically limiting as a result of its low solubility and rapid chemical oxidation to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides at circumneutral pH. The alteration of basaltic glass, enriched in Fe(II), however, provides an abundant supply of reduced iron and, thus, has a major influence on local ocean chemistry and Fe bioavailability. Despite the fact that chemical Fe(II) oxidation takes place very rapidly, we demonstrate that alteration processes of freshly formed basaltic glass can be crucially enhanced by microbial activity.Cultivation of bacteria from basalt surfaces collected from two active submarine volcanoes, Loihi (Hawaii) and Vailulu'u (American Samoa) show a large number of heterotrophic bacteria capable of oxidizing Fe(II) and that these bacteria. not only enhance basalt dissolution but also play a major role in precipitating large amounts of thick Fe(hydr)oxides mats on Vailulu'u Seamount, particularly in the vicinity of low temperature hydrothermal vents. These mats contain substantial quantities of organic carbon that may serve as food sources for some of the macrobiological life on Vailulu'u Seamount. This very prominently includes a substantial population of eels that is found in close spatial association with up to 1m thick Fe oxide/microbial mat at Nafanua volcano, a recent volcanic cone that grew from the crater floor of the seamount. Microbial community analysis on different substrates ranging from basalt surfaces to microbial mats were performed on specially designed culturing media for detection and isolation of heterotrophic bacteria capable of Fe(II)-oxidation. Clone libraries from microbial mats originating from an eel dominated area of Vailulu'u crater are being compared to libraries made from eel guts in order to provide information to what extent these mats are being used as a food source in

  19. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces Among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients Across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged ≥65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research nurses at baseline and on alternating days for 21 days. Information on PRSS use and pressure ulcer risk factors was recorded at each assessment visit. Other information was o...

  20. Data in support of dual-functionalized cellulose nanofibrils prepared through TEMPO-mediated oxidation and surface-initiated ATRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzung-Yung Tsai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously studied a suitably 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs that can be further functionalized with initiating sites and overcame the obstacle of performing atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP in the presence of neutral carboxylic acid sodium salt groups [1]. Herein, characterization of the modified TOCNs and of the products from surface-initiated (SI ATRP of the (nanocelluloses with styrene (St was performed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, and contact angle (CA measurements. From the analysis of 1H NMR, a high purity of sacrificial initiator (i.e., 2-hydroxyethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate (HEBiB was confirmed. HEBiB was utilized to trace the SI ATRP with the generated free PSt. Gradually molecular weight evaluations were revealed from GPC analysis (ca. Mn=21,000 and Đ=1.10 using different TOCNs, implying the insignificant contribution to the kinetics from the grafted initiating sites. The TOCN-g-PSts were further characterized by contact angles and displayed an obvious reversibility between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity in tens of minutes. These results illustrated a simple and facile approach for controlling the graft length and composition of TOCNs through SI ATRP.

  1. Optimization of CO2 adsorption capacity and cyclical adsorption/desorption on tetraethylenepentamine-supported surface-modified hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pintuyothin, Nuthapol; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate CO 2 adsorption capacity of tetraethylenepentamine-functionalized basic-modified calcined hydrotalcite (TEPA/b-cHT) sorbents at atmospheric pressure formed under varying TEPA loading levels, temperatures, sorbent weight to total gaseous flow rate (W/F) ratios and CO 2 concentrations in the influent gas. The TEPA/b-cHT sorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) analysis of nitrogen (N 2 ) adsorption/desorption and carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen (CHN) elemental analysis. Moreover, a full 2 4 factorial design with three central points at a 95% confidence interval was used to screen important factor(s) on the CO 2 adsorption capacity. It revealed that 85.0% variation in the capacity came from the influence of four main factors and the 15.0% one was from their interactions. A face-centered central composite design response surface method (FCCCD-RSM) was then employed to optimize the condition, the maximal capacity of 5.5-6.1mmol/g was achieved when operating with a TEPA loading level of 39%-49% (W/W), temperature of 76-90°C, W/F ratio of 1.7-2.60(g·sec)/cm 3 and CO 2 concentration of 27%-41% (V/V). The model fitted sufficiently the experimental data with an error range of ±1.5%. From cyclical adsorption/desorption and selectivity at the optimal condition, the 40%TEPA/b-cHT still expressed its effective performance after eight cycles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The practical use of surface electromyography during running: does the evidence support the hype? A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbu, R; Weiler, R; Whyte, G

    2015-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is a commonly used technique to investigate muscle activation and fatigue, which is non-invasive and can allow for continuous measurement. Systematic research on the use of sEMG in the sporting environment has been on-going for many years and predominantly based on cycling and rowing activities. To date there have been no reviews assessing the validity and reliability in sEMG exclusively in running activities specifically during on-field testing. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the use of sEMG in the practical context and whether this be translated to on-field testing. Electronic literature searches were performed using the Cochrane Library, PUBMED, CINAHL and PeDro without restrictions on the study date to identify the relevant current English language literature. 10 studies were relevant after title and content review. All the studies identified were all level three evidence based. The general trends of the sEMG activity appear to correlate with running velocity and muscle fatigue seems almost always the consequence of prolonged, dynamic activity. However, these changes are not consistently measured or statistically significant throughout the studies raising the question of the accuracy and reliability when analysing sEMG measurements and making assumptions about the cause of fatigue. An agreed consensus when measuring and analysing sEMG data during running activities particularly in field testing with the most appropriate study design and reliable methodology is yet to be determined and further studies are required.

  3. Multilayer perceptron neural network-based approach for modeling phycocyanin pigment concentrations: case study from lower Charles River buoy, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) to predict phycocyanin (PC) pigment using water quality variables as predictor. In the proposed model, four water quality variables that are water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance were selected as the inputs for the MLPNN model, and the PC as the output. To demonstrate the capability and the usefulness of the MLPNN model, a total of 15,849 data measured at 15-min (15 min) intervals of time are used for the development of the model. The data are collected at the lower Charles River buoy, and available from the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). For comparison purposes, a multiple linear regression (MLR) model that was frequently used for predicting water quality variables in previous studies is also built. The performances of the models are evaluated using a set of widely used statistical indices. The performance of the MLPNN and MLR models is compared with the measured data. The obtained results show that (i) the all proposed MLPNN models are more accurate than the MLR models and (ii) the results obtained are very promising and encouraging for the development of phycocyanin-predictive models.

  4. Optimization and Annual Average Power Predictions of a Backward Bent Duct Buoy Oscillating Water Column Device Using the Wells Turbine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Willits, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fontaine, Arnold A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This Technical Report presents work completed by The Applied Research Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University, in conjunction with Sandia National Labs, on the optimization of the power conversion chain (PCC) design to maximize the Average Annual Electric Power (AAEP) output of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device. The design consists of two independent stages. First, the design of a floating OWC, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), and second the design of the PCC. The pneumatic power output of the BBDB in random waves is optimized through the use of a hydrodynamically coupled, linear, frequency-domain, performance model that links the oscillating structure to internal air-pressure fluctuations. The PCC optimization is centered on the selection and sizing of a Wells Turbine and electric power generation equipment. The optimization of the PCC involves the following variables: the type of Wells Turbine (fixed or variable pitched, with and without guide vanes), the radius of the turbine, the optimal vent pressure, the sizing of the power electronics, and number of turbines. Also included in this Technical Report are further details on how rotor thrust and torque are estimated, along with further details on the type of variable frequency drive selected.

  5. ILWS program support by the OBSTANOVKA International Experiment onboard ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, S.; Korepanov, V.; Belyayev, S.; Lizunov, G.; Stanev, G.; Georgieva, K.; Kirov, B.; Gough, P.; Alleyne, H.; Balikhin, M.; Obstanovka Team

    International Living With a Star program is aimed at the creation of a global monitoring system allowing us to observe in a continuous way the Sun's activity and to follow its development and influence on numerous Earth structures - natural, industrial and especially human ones. Such an efficiently operating system has to include regular observations at every stage of the Sun-Earth interaction - from far space to the Earth's surface. The International Space Station (ISS) is well located as a long term ionospheric monitoring site. To this end, an international team headed by Space Research Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences agreed to create a system of space buoys and to install it onboard the Russian segment of ISS with the goal of studying the ISS environment (OBSTANOVKA in Russian). The "OBSTANOVKA-1" stage will be carried out first (launch in 2006) to provide a databank of electromagnetic fields and plasma-wave processes occurring in the ISS near-surface zone in order to study the plasma component features of near-Earth space. To achieve these goals the Plasma-Wave Complex (PWC) of scientific instrumentation will be created this year. The international cooperation (listed by the authors above) allows us not only to decrease the cost of instrumentation for every participating party but also to raise the scientific and technological level of the experiment. The main scientific premises of the OBSTANOVKA-1 experiment, realization schedule and a detailed description of PWC composition and measured parameters are given in this report. This work is partially supported by NSAU Contract No 1-02/03.

  6. Support surfaces for intraoperative prevention of pressure ulcers in patients undergoing surgery: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ba'; Teague, Laura; Mahoney, James; Goodman, Laurie; Paulden, Mike; Poss, Jeff; Li, Jianli; Sikich, Nancy Joan; Lourenco, Rosemarie; Ieraci, Luciano; Carcone, Steven; Krahn, Murray

    2011-07-01

    Patients who undergo prolonged surgical procedures are at risk of developing pressure ulcers. Recent systematic reviews suggest that pressure redistribution overlays on operating tables significantly decrease the associated risk. Little is known about the cost effectiveness of using these overlays in a prevention program for surgical patients. Using a Markov cohort model, we evaluated the cost effectiveness of an intraoperative prevention strategy with operating table overlays made of dry, viscoelastic polymer from the perspective of a health care payer over a 1-year period. We simulated patients undergoing scheduled surgical procedures lasting ≥90 min in the supine or lithotomy position. Compared with the current practice of using standard mattresses on operating tables, the intraoperative prevention strategy decreased the estimated intraoperative incidence of pressure ulcers by 0.51%, corresponding to a number-needed-to-treat of 196 patients. The average cost of using the operating table overlay was $1.66 per patient. Compared with current practice, this intraoperative prevention strategy would increase slightly the quality-adjusted life days of patients and by decreasing the incidence of pressure ulcers, this strategy would decrease both hospital and home care costs for treating fewer pressure ulcers originated intraoperatively. The cost savings was $46 per patient, which ranged from $13 to $116 by different surgical populations. Intraoperative prevention was 99% likely to be more cost effective than the current practice. In patients who undergo scheduled surgical procedures lasting ≥90 min, this intraoperative prevention strategy could improve patients' health and save hospital costs. The clinical and economic evidence support the implementation of this prevention strategy in settings where it has yet to become current practice. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of activated carbon as a support medium for H{sub 2}S biofiltration and effect of bacterial immobilization on available pore surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.L.; Yan, R.; Chen, X.G.; Geng, A.L.; Liang, D.T.; Koe, L.C.C. [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore); Gould, W.D. [Environmental Lab., CANMET, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    The use of support media for the immobilization of micro-organisms widely known to provide a surface for microbial growth and a shelter that protects the microorganisms from inhibitory compounds. In this study, activated carbon is used as a support medium for the immobilization of microorganisms enriched from municipal sewage activated sludge to remove gas-phase hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a major odorous component of waste gas from sewage treatment plants. A series of designed experiments is used to examine the effect on bacteria-immobilized activated carbon (termed ''biocarbon'') due to physical adsorption, chemical reaction and microbial degradation in the overall removal of H{sub 2}S. H{sub 2}S breakthrough tests are conducted with various samples, including micro-immobilized carbon and Teflon discs, salts-medium-washed carbon, and ultra-pure water-washed carbon. The results show a higher removal capacity for the microbe-immobilized activated carbon compared with the activated carbon control in a batch biofilter column. The increase in removal capacity is attributed to the role played by the immobilized micro-organisms in metabolizing adsorbed sulfur and sulfur compounds on the biocarbon, hence releasing the adsorption sites for further H{sub 2}S uptake. The advantage for activated carbon serving as the support medium is to adsorb a high initial concentration of substrate and progressively release this for microbial degradation, hence acting as a buffer for the microorganisms. Results obtained from surface area and pore size distribution analyses of the biocarbon show a correlation between the available surface area and pore volume with the extent of microbial immobilization and H{sub 2}S uptake. The depletion of surface area and pore volume is seen as one of the factors which cause the onset of column breakthrough. Microbial growth retardation is due to the accumulation of metabolic products (i.e., sulfuric acid); and a lack of water and

  8. Beam-hardening correction by a surface fitting and phase classification by a least square support vector machine approach for tomography images of geological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.

    2015-12-01

    In X-ray computed microtomography (μXCT) image processing is the most important operation prior to image analysis. Such processing mainly involves artefact reduction and image segmentation. We propose a new two-stage post-reconstruction procedure of an image of a geological rock core obtained by polychromatic cone-beam μXCT technology. In the first stage, the beam-hardening (BH) is removed applying a best-fit quadratic surface algorithm to a given image data set (reconstructed slice), which minimizes the BH offsets of the attenuation data points from that surface. The final BH-corrected image is extracted from the residual data, or the difference between the surface elevation values and the original grey-scale values. For the second stage, we propose using a least square support vector machine (a non-linear classifier algorithm) to segment the BH-corrected data as a pixel-based multi-classification task. A combination of the two approaches was used to classify a complex multi-mineral rock sample. The Matlab code for this approach is provided in the Appendix. A minor drawback is that the proposed segmentation algorithm may become computationally demanding in the case of a high dimensional training data set.

  9. Extraction and Analysis of Mega Cities’ Impervious Surface on Pixel-based and Object-oriented Support Vector Machine Classification Technology: A case of Bombay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. S.; Sun, Z. C.; Sun, L.; Wu, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    The object of this paper is to study the impervious surface extraction method using remote sensing imagery and monitor the spatiotemporal changing patterns of mega cities. Megacity Bombay was selected as the interesting area. Firstly, the pixel-based and object-oriented support vector machine (SVM) classification methods were used to acquire the land use/land cover (LULC) products of Bombay in 2010. Consequently, the overall accuracy (OA) and overall Kappa (OK) of the pixel-based method were 94.97% and 0.96 with a running time of 78 minutes, the OA and OK of the object-oriented method were 93.72% and 0.94 with a running time of only 17s. Additionally, OA and OK of the object-oriented method after a post-classification were improved up to 95.8% and 0.94. Then, the dynamic impervious surfaces of Bombay in the period 1973-2015 were extracted and the urbanization pattern of Bombay was analysed. Results told that both the two SVM classification methods could accomplish the impervious surface extraction, but the object-oriented method should be a better choice. Urbanization of Bombay experienced a fast extending during the past 42 years, implying a dramatically urban sprawl of mega cities in the developing countries along the One Belt and One Road (OBOR).

  10. Comparison of wind data from QuikSCAT and buoys in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Satheesan, K.; Sarkar, A.; Parekh, A.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Kuroda, Y.

    stream_size 24759 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Int_J_Remote_Sens_28_2375p.pdf.txt stream_source_info Int_J_Remote_Sens_28_2375p.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1... help a wide variety of studies of oceanic processes and improve weather forecast via data assimilation in the operational models (Goswami and Rajagopal, 2003). The idea of remote sensing of ocean surface winds was based on the hypothesis...

  11. Morphology and magnetism of Fe monolayers and small Fe{sub n} clusters (n 2-19) supported on the Ni(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, R C [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); MartInez, E [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Dieguez, O [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Vega, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Gallego, L J [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2007-02-07

    Using the modified embedded atom model in conjunction with a self-consistent tight-binding method, we investigated the lowest-energy structures of Fe monolayers and isolated Fe{sub n} clusters (n = 2-19) supported on the Ni(111) surface. In keeping with experimental findings, our calculations predict that the atoms of the monolayer occupy face-centred cubic (fcc) rather than hexagonal close-packed (hcp) sites. Likewise in agreement with experiment we found that Fe layers stack with a pseudomorphic fcc structure up to two monolayers, beyond which they stack as bcc(110). The structures of supported Fe clusters are predicted to be two-dimensional islands maximizing the number of nearest-neighbour bonds among the adsorbed Fe atoms, and their average magnetic moments per atom decrease towards that of the supported Fe monolayer almost monotonically as n increases. Finally, a pair of Fe{sub 3} clusters on Ni(111) were found to exhibit virtually no interaction with each other even when separated by only one atomic row, i.e. so long as they do not coalesce they retain their individual magnetic properties.

  12. Stretched membrane heliostats: design and structural analysis of reflectance module and support of a heliostats of 9 m. diaform and 60 m''3 of reflectance surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figarola Torres, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    After having designed and built at CIEMAT a first prototype of a Btretched membrane heliostats of 3 m. diameter, the design and the structural analysis of the different components included in the reflectance module and support of another heliostats, this one of 9 m. diameter and 60 m2. of reflectance surface, are shown In this report. This last heliostats will be mounted on a pedestal and its driving device at the Solar Platform of Almeria. In order to optimize design and performance, the structural analysis of its basic components has been analyzed with the finite elements program ANSYS. The following elements have been subject to analysis: the membrane and their ring supports, stretching system and the structural support. A similar scheme to the one applied to the previous prototype has been used on the focus control system. That includes a linear transducer, a variable frequency and a fan. Finally it has to be pointed out that substantial improvements have been achieved with respect to the first prototype concerning design and cost. (Author) 5 refs

  13. Near Infrared Multispectral Mapping of Venus Supports the Hypothesis that Tessera Plateau Material was Formed in the Presence of Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, N. T.; Tsang, C.; Nunes, D. C.; Helbert, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    The VIRTIS instrument on Venus Express observed surface thermal emission from the surface. Studies of 1020nm data showed that tessera plateaus, intensely tectonically deformed highlands that predate most other terrains, have significantly lower thermal emission than other highlands. Lower thermal emission could be due either to lower surface emissivity, supporting the hypothesis that tessera are analogous to continental crust on Earth, or to a bias of Magellan altimetry, which does not fully resolve the topographic relief of tessera terrain. To eliminate this ambiguity, we additionally investigate the spectral windows at 1100 and 1180nm. Data are reduced to surface emissivity using an atmospheric radiative transfer model to account for atmospheric scattering and absorption/emission. Magellan altimetry was used to model atmospheric column height and surface temperature. The model uses a binary (collision-induced) absorption coefficient for each window. It fits absolute radiance and gradient with surface elevation reasonably well, although there are indications that the assumed adiabatic temperature lapse rate is not appropriate globally. The 1100nm band has a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio at the latitudes of the tessera plateaus, but Alpha Regio is visible in both the 1020 and the 1180nm band. The difference in emissivity between Alpha and the adjacent corona Eve, which has a similar elevation as Alpha, is 3.6% at 1020nm, but only 2% at 1180nm. The altimetry bias equivalent to the 1020nm deviation is 230 m, while the equivalent is only 70m at 1180nm. An altimetry bias therefore cannot fully explain the observations, and there must be a real difference in emissivity. The observations are consistent with the hypothesis that Alpha Regio has a more felsic composition. The emissivity spectra of granites at Venus temperatures are lower than those of basalt at 1020nm, but the difference decreases or vanishes towards the 1180nm window. The most plausible explanation

  14. Synthesis of Supported NiPt Bimetallic Nanoparticles, Methods for Controlling the Surface Coverage of Ni Nanoparticles With Pt, Methods Of Making NiPt Multilayer Core-Shell Structures and Application of the Supported Catalysts for CO2 Reforming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-06-25

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles, compositions including supported NiPt nanoparticles, methods of making supported NiPt nanoparticles, methods of using supported NiPt nanoparticles, and the like.

  15. A 2-year report on maxillary and mandibular fixed partial dentures supported by Astra Tech dental implants. A comparison of 2 implants with different surface textures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, U; Gotfredsen, K; Olsson, C

    1998-01-01

    In 50 partially edentulous patients, 133 (48 maxillary; 85 mandibular) Astra Tech dental implants of 2 different surface textures (machined; TiO-blasted) were alternately installed, supporting 52 fixed partial dentures (FPDs). Before abutment connection 2 machined implants (1 mandibular; 1...... maxillary) were found to be non-osseointegrated and were replaced. Another implant could not be restored due to a technical complication. Two FPDs were remade because of technical complications, both because of abutment fractures. Thus, after 2 years in function, the cumulative survival rates were 97.......7% and 95.7% for implants and prostheses, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in survival rate between the 2 types of implants, 100% (TiO-blasted) vs 95.3% (machined), P = 0.24. After 2 years in function, when both jaw and type of implants were combined, the mean (SD) marginal...

  16. Classifying low-grade and high-grade bladder cancer using label-free serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjiao; Lai, Xiaoping; Zeng, Qiuyao; Li, Linfang; Lin, Lin; Li, Shaoxin; Liu, Zhiming; Su, Chengkang; Qi, Minni; Guo, Zhouyi

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to classify low-grade and high-grade bladder cancer (BC) patients using serum surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms. Serum SERS spectra are acquired from 88 serum samples with silver nanoparticles as the SERS-active substrate. Diagnostic accuracies of 96.4% and 95.4% are obtained when differentiating the serum SERS spectra of all BC patients versus normal subjects and low-grade versus high-grade BC patients, respectively, with optimal SVM classifier models. This study demonstrates that the serum SERS technique combined with SVM has great potential to noninvasively detect and classify high-grade and low-grade BC patients.

  17. Supported organoactinides. Surface chemistry and catalytic properties of alumina-bound (Cyclopentadienyl)- and (Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)thorium and -uranium hydrocarbyls and hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, M.Y.; Xiong, G.; Toscano, P.J.; Burwell, R.L. Jr.; Marks, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a detailed, quantitative investigation are reported of surface chemistry and catalysis involving selected organoactinides and partially dehydroxylated (PDA) or dehydroxylated (DA) alumina supports. For the complexes Cp' 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 and Cp' 2 M(CD 3 ) 2 (Cp' = eta 5 - (CH 3 ) 5 ; M = Th, U), methane-evolving surface reaction pathways are identified as M-CH 3 protonolysis via surface OH (especially on PDA), Cp' H atom abstraction, and intramolecular elimination of methane within M(CH 3 ) 2 units. This latter process is proposed on the basis of methylene transfer to acetone and some olefin metathesis activity to result in Al 3+ -stabilized alkylidenes. Hydogenolysis studies indicate that ca. 25% of the Cp' 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 /DA surface M-CH 3 groups are removable as methane; reduction of methyl chloride to methane confirms the presence of surface M-H groups produced by hydrogenolysis. The Cp' 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 /DA complexes are active catalysts for propylene hydrogenation following a variety of pretreatment conditions, with N/sub t/ approx. = 0.5 s -1 in a flow reactor at -63 0 C (about 10 times more active than typical Pt/SiO 2 catalysts under the same conditions). M = Th and U are comparable in hydrogenation activity, and CO poisoning experiments indicate that ca. 3% of the adsorbed molecules are catalytically active. Cp' 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 complexes on PDA and silica gel are considerably less active catalysts. The Cp' 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 /DA systems are also active catalysts for ethylene polymerization and weakly active for butene isomerization. Experiments with Cp' 2 Th[CH 2 C(CH 3 ) 3 ] 2 and [Cp' 2 Th(μ-H)H] 2 on DA reveal activity for propylene hydrogenation comparable to the Cp' 2 M(CH 3 ) 2 systems. In contrast, more coordinatively saturated Cp 3 UCH 3 and Cp 3 Th(n-C 4 H 9 ) (Cp = eta 5 -C 5 H 5 ) are far less active, while Cp'Th(CH 2 C 6 H 5 ) 3 is far more active (N/sub t/ approx. = 10 s -1 )

  18. Sub-inertial variability in the Cretan Sea from the M3A buoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cardin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One year of continuous records of temperature, salinity data at various depths, and currents obtained from by an upward looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP moored at a site in the Cretan Sea were analyzed. Temperature and salinity data revealed the influence of a multi-scale circulation pattern prevailing in this area. This pattern consists of mesoscale cyclonic and anticyclonic vortices moving together as a dipole, and inducing downwelling and upwelling in the water column. The dipole movements, which control the circulation in the area, have been evidenced from horizontal current variability in the upper 250 m. The basin-scale circulation also shows a prominent seasonal variability. The Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis applied to either zonal or meridional components of the currents, confirmed the prevalence of a depth-independent mode over the baroclinic-like one for the whole period of measurements and for both current components. Nevertheless, the depth-dependent structure indicated the out-of-phase behaviour of the upper 250 m layer with respect to the deeper one. The first mode of the temperature EOF analysis, which accounts for most of the variance, represents the seasonal heating of the water column being principally associated with the surface mixed layer at the level of the seasonal thermocline. Key words. Oceanography: physical (currents, eddies and mesoscale processes, general circulation

  19. Sub-inertial variability in the Cretan Sea from the M3A buoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cardin

    Full Text Available One year of continuous records of temperature, salinity data at various depths, and currents obtained from by an upward looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP moored at a site in the Cretan Sea were analyzed. Temperature and salinity data revealed the influence of a multi-scale circulation pattern prevailing in this area. This pattern consists of mesoscale cyclonic and anticyclonic vortices moving together as a dipole, and inducing downwelling and upwelling in the water column. The dipole movements, which control the circulation in the area, have been evidenced from horizontal current variability in the upper 250 m. The basin-scale circulation also shows a prominent seasonal variability. The Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis applied to either zonal or meridional components of the currents, confirmed the prevalence of a depth-independent mode over the baroclinic-like one for the whole period of measurements and for both current components. Nevertheless, the depth-dependent structure indicated the out-of-phase behaviour of the upper 250 m layer with respect to the deeper one. The first mode of the temperature EOF analysis, which accounts for most of the variance, represents the seasonal heating of the water column being principally associated with the surface mixed layer at the level of the seasonal thermocline.

    Key words. Oceanography: physical (currents, eddies and mesoscale processes, general circulation

  20. Time Resolved Operando X-ray Techniques in Catalysis, a Case Study: CO Oxidation by O2 over Pt Surfaces and Alumina Supported Pt Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Newton

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic oxidation of CO by O2 to form CO2 over Pt surfaces and supported catalysts is one of the most studied catalytic reactions from both fundamental and applied points of view. This review aims to show how the application of a range of time resolved, X-ray based techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, Surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD, total X-ray scattering/pair distribution function (PDF, X-ray absorption (XAFS, X-ray emission (XES, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS, applied under operando conditions and often coupled to adjunct techniques (for instance mass spectrometry (MS and infrared spectroscopy (IR have shed new light on the structures and mechanisms at work in this most studied of systems. The aim of this review is therefore to demonstrate how a fusion of the operando philosophy with the ever augmenting capacities of modern synchrotron sources can lead to new insight and catalytic possibilities, even in the case of a process that has been intensely studied for almost 100 years.

  1. Source apportionment of trace element pollution in surface sediments using positive matrix factorization combined support vector machines: application to the Jinjiang River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Song, Liuting; Zuo, Rui

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a method of positive matrix factorization (PMF) combined support vector machines (SVMs) was adopted to identify possible sources and apportion contributions for trace element pollution in surface sediments from the Jinjiang River, Southeastern China. Utilizing diagnostics tools, four significant factors were extracted from sediment samplers, which were collected in December 2010 at 15 different sites. By treating source identification as a pattern recognition problem, the factor loadings derived from PMF were classified by SVM classifiers which have been trained and validated with fingerprints of eight potential source categories. Using SVM, industrial wastewater from lead ore mining and metal handcraft manufacture, atmospheric deposition, and natural background were identified as main sources of trace element pollution in surface sediments from the Jinjiang River, which were affirmed by visually comparing compound patterns and the differences between the predicted and actual fractional compositions. Apportionment results showed that source of lead ore mining made the largest contribution (33.62 %), followed by atmospheric deposition (30.99 %), metal handcraft manufacture (30.09 %), and natural background (5.29 %).

  2. Investigation of Surface Alkylation Strategy in SOMC: In Situ Generation of a Silica-Supported Tungsten Methyl Catalyst for Cyclooctane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2016-07-28

    An efficient and potentially scalable method is described for the synthesis of the silica-supported complexes [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] and [(≡Si-O-)WMe2(≡CH)] obtained by in situ alkylation of the surface-grafted tungsten chloride [(≡Si-O-)WCl5] (1). [(≡Si-O-)WCl5] can be readily prepared by the reaction of commercially available and stable tungsten hexachloride WCl6 with partially dehydroxylated silica at 700 °C (SiO2-700). Further reaction with ZnMe2 at room temperature rapidly forms a mixture of surface-alkylated tungsten complexes. They were fully characterized by microanalysis, FTIR, mass balance, and solid-state NMR (1H, 13C, 1H-13C HETCOR, 1H-1H double quantum and triple quantum) and identified as [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] and another product, [(≡Si-O-)WMe2(≡CH)]. The latter might have been generated by partial decomposition of the tungsten methyl chloride compound, which is formed during the stepwise alkylation of [(≡Si-O-)WCl5]. DFT calculations were carried out to check the relative stability of the tungsten methyl chloride intermediates and the feasibility of the reaction and corroborate the experimental results. This tungsten complex and its derivative were found to be active catalysts for the metathesis of cyclooctane. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  3. Surface Species and Metal Oxidation State during H2-Assisted NH3-SCR of NOx over Alumina-Supported Silver and Indium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ström

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alumina-supported silver and indium catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR of NOx with ammonia. Particularly, we focus on the active phase of the catalyst and the formation of surface species, as a function of the gas environment. Diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy was used to follow the oxidation state of the silver and indium phases, and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS was used to elucidate the formation of surface species during SCR conditions. In addition, the NOx reduction efficiency of the materials was evaluated using H2-assisted NH3-SCR. The DRIFTS results show that the Ag/Al2O3 sample forms NO-containing surface species during SCR conditions to a higher extent compared to the In/Al2O3 sample. The silver sample also appears to be more reduced by H2 than the indium sample, as revealed by UV-vis spectroscopic experiments. Addition of H2, however, may promote the formation of highly dispersed In2O3 clusters, which previously have been suggested to be important for the SCR reaction. The affinity to adsorb NH3 is confirmed by both temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD and in situ DRIFTS to be higher for the In/Al2O3 sample compared to Ag/Al2O3. The strong adsorption of NH3 may inhibit (self-poison the NH3 activation, thereby hindering further reaction over this catalyst, which is also shown by the lower SCR activity compared to Ag/Al2O3.

  4. [(≢SiO)TaVCl2Me2]: A well-defined silica-supported tantalum(V) surface complex as catalyst precursor for the selective cocatalyst-free trimerization of ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2012-10-22

    On the surface of it: In the absence of co-catalyst, a well-defined silica-supported surface organometallic complex [(≢SiO)Ta VCl2Me2] selectively catalyzes the oligomerization of ethylene. The use of surface organometallic species allows three different pathways to be determined for the reduction of TaV to TaIII species under pressure of ethylene. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Error estimates for CCMP ocean surface wind data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, R. M.; Hoffman, R. N.; Ardizzone, J.; Leidner, S.; Jusem, J.; Smith, D. K.; Gombos, D.

    2011-12-01

    The cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind data sets are now available at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center from July 1987 through December 2010. These data support wide-ranging air-sea research and applications. The main Level 3.0 data set has global ocean coverage (within 78S-78N) with 25-kilometer resolution every 6 hours. An enhanced variational analysis method (VAM) quality controls and optimally combines multiple input data sources to create the Level 3.0 data set. Data included are all available RSS DISCOVER wind observations, in situ buoys and ships, and ECMWF analyses. The VAM is set up to use the ECMWF analyses to fill in areas of no data and to provide an initial estimate of wind direction. As described in an article in the Feb. 2011 BAMS, when compared to conventional analyses and reanalyses, the CCMP winds are significantly different in some synoptic cases, result in different storm statistics, and provide enhanced high-spatial resolution time averages of ocean surface wind. We plan enhancements to produce estimated uncertainties for the CCMP data. We will apply the method of Desroziers et al. for the diagnosis of error statistics in observation space to the VAM O-B, O-A, and B-A increments. To isolate particular error statistics we will stratify the results by which individual instruments were used to create the increments. Then we will use cross-validation studies to estimate other error statistics. For example, comparisons in regions of overlap for VAM analyses based on SSMI and QuikSCAT separately and together will enable estimating the VAM directional error when using SSMI alone. Level 3.0 error estimates will enable construction of error estimates for the time averaged data sets.

  6. Two or three machined vs roughened surface dental implants loaded immediately supporting total fixed prostheses: 1-year results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Gherlone, Enrico; Vinci, Raffaele; Loi, Ignazio; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    both groups losing marginal bone in a statistically significant way (0.35 ± 0.23 mm for machined and 0.42 ± 0.27 mm for roughened surface). These preliminary results suggest that immediately loaded cross-arch prostheses can be supported by only two mandibular or three maxillary dental implants at least up to 1 year post-loading, independently of the type of implant surface used. Longer follow-ups are needed to understand whether one of the two-implant surfaces is preferable.

  7. Utilization of specific and non-specific peptide interactions with inorganic nanomaterials on the surface of bacteriophage M13: Methodologies towards phage supported bi-functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Kendra Nicole

    the phage with a negative charge on which nanomaterials can be supported. Metal salt precursors reduced in the presence of WT M13 are studied in this chapter. Metal salt precursors of Fe, Co, Ru, Rh and Pd seem to be the most effective at coating the surface of the phage based on the positively charged metal-aquo complexes formed in water, which are attracted to the negative pVIII region. Other types of reactions are explored with WT phage as a scaffold such as conversion chemistry in a polyol solvent to access several intermetallic phases as well as co-precipitation reactions to access ternary oxides. Chapter 4 focuses on combining research from chapter 2 and chapter 3 to create a bi-functional material that utilizes both specific and non-specific peptide interactions with inorganic materials on the surface of M13 to attach two different types of nanomaterials. The example provided here is a magnetically recoverable hydrogenation catalyst made up of a pVIII region coated with rhodium nanoparticles held in place by non-specific peptide interactions and a pIII region attached to iron oxide nanoparticles via specific peptide interactions. This is the first example in the literature of a commercially available pIII bioengineered M13 bacteriophage forming a bi-functional material. This research provides a methodology to design and build single and multi-component materials on the surface of bacteriophage M13 without the necessity for additional bioengineering and library characterization. The simplicity of use will make the technique available to a wider variety of researchers in the materials science community.

  8. Unraveling the role of support surface hydroxyls and its effect on the selectivity of C2 species over Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst in syngas conversion: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Riguang; Duan, Tian; Wang, Baojun; Ling, Lixia

    2016-08-01

    The supported Rh-based catalysts exhibit the excellent catalytic performances for syngas conversion to C2 species. In this study, all possible elementary steps leading to C2 species from syngas have been explored to identify the role of support and its surface hydroxyls over Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst; Here, the results are obtained using density functional theory (DFT) method. Two models: Rh4 cluster supported on the dry γ-Al2O3(110) surface, D(Rh4), and on the hydroxylated γ-Al2O3(110) surface, H(Rh4), have been used to model Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Our results show that CO prefers to be hydrogenated to CHO, subsequently, starting from CHO species, CH and CH2 species are the dominate monomers among CHx(x = 1-3) species rather than CH3 and CH3OH on D(Rh4) and H(Rh4) surfaces, suggesting that γ-Al2O3-supported Rh catalyst exhibits the high selectivity towards CHx formation compared to the pure Rh catalyst. On the other hand, D(Rh4) is more favorable for C2 hydrocarbon (C2H2) formation, whereas H(Rh4) surface easily produces C2 hydrocarbon (C2H2) and C2 oxygenates (CHCO,CH2CHO), indicating that the surface hydroxyls of support can affect the selectivity of C2 species over Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst in syngas conversion. Moreover, compared to the pure Rh(111) surface, Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalyst can achieve the excellent catalytic performances for syngas conversion to C2 species.

  9. PEO-generated Surfaces Support Attachment and Growth of Cells In Vitro with No Additional Benefit for Micro-roughness in Sa (0.2-4 μm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ole; Smeets, Ralf; Kopp, Alexander; Porchetta, Dario; Hiester, Philipp; Heiland, Max; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Precht, Clarissa; Hanken, Henning; Gröbe, Alexander; Hartjen, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), also known as micro-arc oxidation, is a promising electrochemical surface treatment technique for metals which has been used for the generation of various material surfaces and has been the focus of recent biomaterial research. It has been hypothesized that rough PEO surfaces should generally have properties that support cellular attachment and proliferation. However, this has not yet been demonstrated in systematically conducted studies. The present study investigated fibroblast cell proliferation and attachment to ground, electric discharge machining (EDM) and PEO-treated titanium surfaces differing in roughness and porosity. Three surface variants with 'smoother', 'medium-coarse' and 'rough' surface topographies were generated by PEO and EDM on specimens of titanium alloy (with 6 wt% aluminum and 4 wt% vanadium) for comparison with more smoothly ground specimens. The in vitro effects on cellular attachment and proliferation were determined in 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and live/dead staining assays with L929 fibroblasts cultivated directly on the metal specimens. Cytocompatibility was determined in accordance with DIN 10993-5/-12 regulations by extract assays. Besides cytocompatibility, all PEO specimens exhibited similar biocompatibility and attachment properties, with vital, spindle-shaped adherent cells growing on the surface, regardless of their surface topology. There were no significant differences in cellular proliferation between the different surfaces and negative controls (cells growing in cell-culture plates). With no differences in cellular proliferation and attachment between PEO surfaces with different roughness, we find no evidence to support the notion that rougher PEO surfaces are more favorable for cellular growth of fibroblasts in vitro. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G

  10. Reactivity of palladium nano-particles supported in hydrogenation: role of particles surface density; Reactivite des nanoparticules de palladium supportees en hydrogenation: role de la densite surfacique de particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkhaled, M.

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the influence of the particle surface density on the hydrogenation of polyunsaturated compounds (buta-1,3-diene, ortho-xylene). Highly dispersed Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ({gamma} and {delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) catalysts were prepared from Pd(nitrite) complexes (size < 7 angstrom, controlled by TEM, HAADF, EXAFS and CO chemisorption). Increasing the particle surface density from 2240 to 12880 particles/{mu}m{sup 2} leads to a modification of the electronic properties as evidenced by CO-FTIR, XPS and XANES. By contrast, the comparison of the supports at iso-density showed no significant difference of the physico-chemical properties of the supported metal particles. In parallel, the catalytic performances in hydrogenation of butadiene and butenes are very sensitive both to the nature of the support for the same density and to the surface density for the same support. It was shown that the reactions of hydrogenation could be controlled at the same time by the electronic properties of the metal nano-particles but also by the phenomenon of hydrogen diffusion around the particles on a zone of support. In this case, the support can play the part of hydrogen tank. (author)

  11. Label-free blood serum detection by using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and support vector machine for the preoperative diagnosis of parotid gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing; Li, Bo; Wen, Zhining; Luo, Xianyang; Xue, Lili; Li, Longjiang

    2015-10-05

    It is difficult for the parotid gland neoplasms to make an accurate preoperative diagnosis due to the restriction of biopsy in the parotid gland neoplasms. The aim of this study is to apply the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) method for the blood serum biochemical detection and use the support vector machine for the analysis in order to develop a simple but accurate blood serum detection for preoperative diagnosis of the parotid gland neoplasms. The blood serums were collected from four groups: the patients with pleomorphic adenoma, the patients with Warthin's tumor, the patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma and the volunteers without parotid gland neoplasms. Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) were mixed with the blood serum as the SERS active nanosensor to enhance the Raman scattering signals produced by the various biochemical materials and high quality SERS spectrum were obtained by using the Raman microscope system. Then the support vector machine was utilized to analyze the differences of the SERS spectrum from the blood serum of different groups and established a diagnostic model to discriminate the different groups. It was demonstrated that there were different intensities of SERS peaks assigned to various biochemical changes in the blood serum between the parotid gland tumor groups and normal control group. Compared with the SERS spectra of the normal serums, the intensities of peaks assigned to nucleic acids and proteins increased in the SERS spectra of the parotid gland tumor serums, which manifested the differences of the biochemical metabolites in the serum from the patients with parotid gland tumors. When the leave-one-sample-out method was used, support vector machine (SVM) played an outstanding performance in the classification of the SERS spectra with the high accuracy (84.1 % ~ 88.3 %), sensitivity (82.2 % ~ 97.4 %) and specificity (73.7 % ~ 86.7 %). Though the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity decreased in the leave

  12. Understanding the Effects of Surface Chemistry and Microstructure on the Activity and Stability of Pt Electrocatalysts on Non-Carbon Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustain, William [Univ. of Conneticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-02-12

    The objective of this project is to elucidate the effects of the chemical composition and microstructure of the electrocatalyst support on the activity, stability and utilization of supported Pt clusters.

  13. Investigating alkoxysilane coverage and dynamics on the (104) and (110) surfaces of MgCl 2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Credendino, Raffaele

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a systematic DFT analysis of the effect of surface coverage on the coordination properties of alkoxysilanes to the (104) and (110) surfaces of MgCl 2. Furthermore, we investigated several possible migration pathways for alkoxysilane migration on the same surfaces. Our study clearly shows that complete coverage of the Mg vacancies on the surface by coordinating alkoxysilanes is hampered by steric repulsion between vicinally coordinated donor molecules. Our study clearly indicates that alkoxysilane migration between different MgCl 2 monolayers on the (104) and (110) surfaces requires donor dissociation. The same holds for alkoxysilane migration on a single (110) MgCl 2 monolayer. However, in the case of the (104) surface we found a very low energy pathway for alkoxysilane migration along the same monolayer. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Backtracking drifting objects using surface currents from high-frequency (HF) radar technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Ana Julia; Castanedo, Sonia; Fernández, Vicente; Medina, Raúl

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the benefits of high-frequency (HF) radar ocean observation technology for backtracking drifting objects are analysed. The HF radar performance is evaluated by comparison of trajectories between drifter buoys versus numerical simulations using a Lagrangian trajectory model. High-resolution currents measured by a coastal HF radar network combined with atmospheric fields provided by numerical models are used to backtrack the trajectory of two dataset of surface-drifting buoys: group I (with drogue) and group II (without drogue). A methodology based on optimization methods is applied to estimate the uncertainty in the trajectory simulations and to optimize the search area of the backtracked positions. The results show that, to backtrack the trajectory of the buoys in group II, both currents and wind fields were required. However, wind fields could be practically discarded when simulating the trajectories of group I. In this case, the optimal backtracked trajectories were obtained using only HF radar currents as forcing. Based on the radar availability data, two periods ranging between 8 and 10 h were selected to backtrack the buoy trajectories. The root mean squared error (RMSE) was found to be 1.01 km for group I and 0.82 km for group II. Taking into account these values, a search area was calculated using circles of RMSE radii, obtaining 3.2 and 2.11 km2 for groups I and II, respectively. These results show the positive contribution of HF radar currents for backtracking drifting objects and demonstrate that these data combined with atmospheric models are of value to perform backtracking analysis of drifting objects.

  15. Application of SMAP Data for Ocean Surface Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Tang, W.; Stiles, B. W.; Hayashi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched January 31st, 2015. It is designed to measure the soil moisture over land using a combined active / passive L-band system. Due to the Aquarius mission, L-band model functions for ocean winds and salinity are mature and are directly applicable to the SMAP mission. In contrast to Aquarius, the higher resolution and scanning geometry of SMAP allow for wide-swath ocean winds and salinities to be retrieved. In this talk we present the SMAP Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) and extreme winds dataset and its performance. First we discuss the heritage of SMAP SSS algorithms, showing that SMAP and Aquarius show excellent agreement in the ocean surface roughness correction. Then, we give an overview of some newly developed algorithms that are only relevant to the SMAP system; a new galaxy correction and land correction enabling SSS retrievals up to 40 km from coast. We discuss recent improvements to the SMAP data processing for version 4.0. Next we compare the performance of the SMAP SSS to in-situ salinity measurements obtained from ARGO floats, tropical moored buoys, and ship-based data. SMAP SSS has accuracy of 0.2 PSU on a monthly basis compared to ARGO gridded data in tropics and mid-latitudes. In tropical oceans, time series comparison of salinity measured at 1 m depth by moored buoys indicates SMAP can track large salinity changes within a month. Synergetic analysis of SMAP, SMOS, and Argo data allows us to identify and exclude erroneous buoy data from assessment of SMAP SSS. The resulting SMAP-buoy matchup analysis gives a mean standard deviation (STD) of 0.22 PSU and correlation of 0.73 on weekly scale; at monthly scale the mean STD decreased to 0.17 PSU and the correlation increased to 0.8. In addition to SSS, SMAP provides a view into tropical cyclones having much higher sensitivity than traditional scatterometers. We validate the high-winds using collocations with SFMR during tropical cyclones as well as

  16. From single-site tantalum complexes to nanoparticles of TaxNy and TaOxNy supported on silica: elucidation of synthesis chemistry by dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Mohandas, Janet Chakkamadathil

    2017-06-08

    Air-stable catalysts consisting of tantalum nitride nanoparticles represented as a mixture of TaxNy and TaOxNy with diameters in the range of 0.5 to 3 nm supported on highly dehydroxylated silica were synthesized from TaMe5 (Me = methyl) and dimeric Ta-2(OMe)(10) with guidance by the principles of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). Characterization of the supported precursors and the supported nanoparticles formed from them was carried out by IR, NMR, UV-Vis, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies complemented with XRD and high-resolution TEM, with dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy being especially helpful by providing enhanced intensities of the signals of H-1, C-13, Si-29, and N-15 at their natural abundances. The characterization data provide details of the synthesis chemistry, including evidence of (a) O-2 insertion into Ta-CH3 species on the support and (b) a binuclear to mononuclear transformation of species formed from Ta-2(OMe)(10) on the support. A catalytic test reaction, cyclooctene epoxidation, was used to probe the supported nanoparticles, with 30% H2O2 serving as the oxidant. The catalysts gave selectivities up to 98% for the epoxide at conversions as high as 99% with a 3.4 wt% loading of Ta present as TaxNy/TaOxNy.

  17. Investigating phthalate and 1,3-diether coverage and dynamics on the (104) and (110) surfaces of MgCl2-supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Credendino, Raffaele

    2014-04-17

    In this work we present a systematic DFT analysis of the effect of surface coverage on the coordination properties of two industrial Lewis bases, dimethyl phthalate and 9,9-bis(methoxymethyl)fluorene, to the (104) and (110) surfaces of MgCl2. Further, we investigated several possible migration pathways for the migration of the Lewis bases on the same MgCl2 monolayer. Our study clearly shows that complete coverage of the Mg vacancies on the surface by coordinating dimethyl phthalate or 9,9-bis(methoxymethyl)fluorene is hampered by steric repulsion between vicinally coordinated donor molecules. Further, our study clearly indicates that both dimethyl phthalate and 9,9-bis(methoxymethyl) fluorene migration on the same MgCl2 monolayer on the (104) and (110) surfaces basically requires donor dissociation. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  18. Optimal estimation of sea surface temperature from AMSR-E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Høyer, Jacob L.; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2018-01-01

    The Optimal Estimation (OE) technique is developed within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI) to retrieve subskin Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AQUA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). A comprehensive matchup database with drift......The Optimal Estimation (OE) technique is developed within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI) to retrieve subskin Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AQUA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). A comprehensive matchup database...... with drifting buoy observations is used to develop and test the OE setup. It is shown that it is essential to update the first guess atmospheric and oceanic state variables and to perform several iterations to reach an optimal retrieval. The optimal number of iterations is typically three to four in the current...... and larger sensitivity for warmer waters. The OE SSTs are evaluated against drifting buoy measurements during 2010. The results show an average difference of 0.02 K with a standard deviation of 0.47 K when considering the 64% matchups, where the simulated and observed brightness temperatures are most...

  19. Temperature profile and other data collected using current meter, profiling floats, and drifting buoy from the Atlantic Ocean as part of the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 18 July 1977 to 18 October 1979 (NODC Accession 8100508)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, pressure, and other data were collected using current meter, profiling floats, and drifting buoy in the Atlantic Ocean from July 18, 1977 to October 18,...

  20. Current speed data collected using drifting buoy in the TOGA area as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment / Hawaii-Tahiti Shuttle (IDOE/NORPAX/HITIS) project from 07 February 1979 to 17 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8200021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains data from Drifting Buoys deployed during the Hawaii/Tahiti Shuttle Experiment between February 7, 1979 and December 17, 1980. Data consists...