WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface buoy includes

  1. Development of a GNSS Buoy for Monitoring Water Surface Elevations in Estuaries and Coastal Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Pin; Huang, Ching-Jer; Chen, Sheng-Hsueh; Doong, Dong-Jiing; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2017-01-18

    In this work, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) buoy that utilizes a Virtual Base Station (VBS) combined with the Real-Time Kinematic (RTK) positioning technology was developed to monitor water surface elevations in estuaries and coastal areas. The GNSS buoy includes a buoy hull, a RTK GNSS receiver, data-transmission devices, a data logger, and General Purpose Radio Service (GPRS) modems for transmitting data to the desired land locations. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to test the capability of the buoy and verify the accuracy of the monitored water surface elevations. For the field tests, the GNSS buoy was deployed in the waters of Suao (northeastern part of Taiwan). Tide data obtained from the GNSS buoy were consistent with those obtained from the neighboring tide station. Significant wave heights, zero-crossing periods, and peak wave directions obtained from the GNSS buoy were generally consistent with those obtained from an accelerometer-tilt-compass (ATC) sensor. The field tests demonstrate that the developed GNSS buoy can be used to obtain accurate real-time tide and wave data in estuaries and coastal areas.

  2. Response of surface buoy moorings in steady and wave flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anand, N.M.; Nayak, B.U.; SanilKumar, V.

    A numerical model has been developed to evaluate the dynamics of surface buoy mooring systems under wave and current loading. System tension response and variation of tension in the mooring line at various depths have been evaluated for deep water...

  3. Automated calculation of surface energy fluxes with high-frequency lake buoy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Hamilton, David P.; Maberly, Stephen C; Muroaka, Kohji; Read, Jordan S.; Smyth, Robyn L; Winslow, Luke A.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is a program used for calculating the surface energy fluxes in lakes according to established literature methodologies. The program was developed in MATLAB for the rapid analysis of high-frequency data from instrumented lake buoys in support of the emerging field of aquatic sensor network science. To calculate the surface energy fluxes, the program requires a number of input variables, such as air and water temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and short-wave radiation. Available outputs for Lake Heat Flux Analyzer include the surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat and their corresponding transfer coefficients, incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation. Lake Heat Flux Analyzer is open source and can be used to process data from multiple lakes rapidly. It provides a means of calculating the surface fluxes using a consistent method, thereby facilitating global comparisons of high-frequency data from lake buoys.

  4. System for Monitoring, Determining, and Reporting Directional Spectra of Ocean Surface Waves in Near Realtime from a Moored Buoy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A moored buoy floating at the ocean surface and anchored to the seafloor precisely measures acceleration, pitch, roll, and Earth's magnetic flux field of the buoy...

  5. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Measurement of Near-Surface Salinity, Temperature and Directional Wave Spectra using a Novel Wave-Following, Lagrangian Surface Contact Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Results from a surface contact drifter buoy which measures near-surface conductivity ( 10 cm depth), sea state characteristics and near-surface water temperature ( 2 cm depth) are described. This light (autonomous, with low power requirements and solar panel battery recharging. Onboard sensors include an inductive toroidal conductivity probe for salinity measurement, a nine-degrees-of-freedom motion package for derivation of directional wave spectra and a thermocouple for water temperature measurement. Data retrieval for expendable, ocean-going operation uses an onboard Argos transmitter. Scientific results as well as data processing algorithms are presented from laboratory and field experiments which support qualification of buoy platform measurements. These include sensor calibration experiments, longer-term dock-side biofouling experiments during 2013-2014 and a series of short-duration ocean deployments in the Gulf Stream in 2014. In addition, a treatment method will be described which appears to minimize the effects of biofouling on the inductive conductivity probe when in coastal surface waters. Due to its low cost and ease of deployment, scores, perhaps hundreds of these novel instruments could be deployed from ships or aircraft during process studies or to provide surface validation for satellite-based measurements, particularly in high precipitation regions.

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-11-20 to 2007-05-08 (NODC Accession 0117495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117495 includes Surface underway, biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South...

  8. Water temperature, salinity, and surface meteorology measurements collected from the Tropical Moored Buoys Array in the equatorial oceans from November 1977 to March 2017. (NODC Accession 0078936)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array Program is a multi-national effort to provide data in real-time for climate research and forecasting. Major components include...

  9. Mooring Line for an Oceanographic Buoy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A mooring line for an oceanographic buoy system includes four sections. The first section is a protected cable that is connectable to the buoy. The second section is...

  10. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1991 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free-drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components of the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  11. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, ARGOS buoy drift, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, D.; Knauss, W.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1993-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1990 are proposed with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (US) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft; Cartesian components of free drifting buoys which are tracked by the ARGOS navigation system on NOAA satellites; and Cartesian components on the 10-m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation values are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34402, Lat: 28.21788 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020724-20020920.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020911-20030305.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040622-20040808.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040919-20050411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060326-20071017.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020224-20020420.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20070902.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020918-20030314.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050413-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10283, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020315-20021023.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020424-20020802.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011020-20011225.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040629-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72288, Lat: 15.23746 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050921-20060525.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040924-20051014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81595, Lat: 27.85396 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.91m; Data Range: 20060915-20080828.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.50m; Data Range: 20030801-20030810.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MID; Long: -177.34402, Lat: 28.21788 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011022-20020325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020922-20030316.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20050411-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20020505-20020810.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040209-20041002.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051016-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20030812-20040428.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060918-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10289, Lat: 05.88463 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20080401-20100410.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10289, Lat: 05.88463 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20080401-20090515.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060917-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20011017-20020120.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74252, Lat: 25.77290 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20030724-20040923.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  5. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TUT; Long: -170.56228, Lat: -14.28372 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20060218-20080223.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Supplemental Sea Surface Temperature Recorder (SBE39); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20051020-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; CNMI, GUA; Long: 144.79778, Lat: 13.51902 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20030924-20040531.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  8. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91588, Lat: 25.96764 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20090910-20100922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  9. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; CNMI, GUA; Long: 144.80048, Lat: 13.52900 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.19m; Data Range: 20070513-20090405.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  10. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; AMSM, TAU; Long: -169.50890, Lat: -14.24409 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20060304-20080229.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20021001-20030321.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoy; NWHI, LAY; Long: -171.74250, Lat: 25.77240 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.33m; Data Range: 20040924-20060910.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data from Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED), NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Buoys provide a time series of...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Sea Surface Temperature and Conductivity Recorder (SBE37); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10280, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 1.00m; Data Range: 20060326-20080401.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. Upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) from Satellite-tracked drifting buoys (drifters) as part of the Global Drifter Program for Hawaii region 1980/02/01 - 2009/03/31 (NODC Accession 0063296)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Satellite-tracked drifting buoys ("drifters") collect measurements of upper ocean currents and sea surface temperatures (SST) around the world as part of the Global...

  15. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  16. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  17. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, 1992-present, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  18. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  19. Worldwide Buoy Technology Survey. Volume 1. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    WB Weiseler Bojen (Germany - Manufacturer) WGDB Wine Glass Discrepancy Buoy WHOI Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ZLBC Zeni Lite Buoy Co. (Japan...de Nantes - St, Nazaire, Port Autonome de Bordeaux , and Port Autonome de Marseille. Overseas locations also include Antigua and St. Frias in the...navigation. The navigation aids used along the Norwegian coast are tailored to the needs of the specific geographic and climatic conditions prevailing

  20. Development of drifting buoys

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.; Peshwe, V.B.; Tengali, S.

    transmeters. This paper discusses the design aspects and performance characteristics of these buoys presenting a small fraction of the considerable data set acquired. The requiremnts for further inclusion of certain sensors and hardware are described...

  1. Vibration of Piezoelectric Nanowires Including Surface Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, surface and piezoelectric effects on the vibration behavior of nanowires (NWs are investigated by using a Timoshenko beam model. The electric field equations and the governing equations of motion for the piezoelectric NWs are derived with the consideration of surface effects. By the exact solution of the governing equations, an expression for the natural frequencies of NWs with simply-supported boundary conditions is obtained. The effects of piezoelectricity and surface effects on the vibrational behavior of Timoshenko NWs are graphically illustrated. A comparison is also made between the predictions of Timoshenko beam model and those of its Euler-Bernoulli counterpart. Additionally, the present results are validated through comparison with the available data in the literature.

  2. IPAB Antarctic Drifting Buoy Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), through participating research organizations in various countries,...

  3. NDBC Standard Meteorological Buoy Data, 1970-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) distributes meteorological data from moored buoys maintained by NDBC and others. Moored buoys are the weather sentinels of the...

  4. Buoy perspective of a high-resolution global ocean vector wind analysis constructed from passive radiometers and active scatterometers (1987-present)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lisan; Jin, Xiangze

    2012-11-01

    The study used 126 buoy time series as a benchmark to evaluate a satellite-based daily, 0.25-degree gridded global ocean surface vector wind analysis developed by the Objectively Analyzed airs-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project. The OAFlux winds were produced from synthesizing wind speed and direction retrievals from 12 sensors acquired during the satellite era from July 1987 onward. The 12 sensors included scatterometers (QuikSCAT and ASCAT), passive microwave radiometers (AMSRE, SSMI and SSMIS series), and the passive polarimetric microwave radiometer from WindSat. Accuracy and consistency of the OAFlux time series are the key issues examined here. A total of 168,836 daily buoy measurements were assembled from 126 buoys, including both active and archive sites deployed during 1988-2010. With 106 buoys from the tropical array network, the buoy winds are a good reference for wind speeds in low and mid-range. The buoy comparison shows that OAFlux wind speed has a mean difference of -0.13 ms-1 and an RMS difference of 0.71 ms-1, and wind direction has a mean difference of -0.55 degree and an RMS difference of 17 degrees. Vector correlation of OAFlux and buoy winds is of 0.9 and higher over almost all the sites. Influence of surface currents on the OAFlux/buoy mean difference pattern is displayed in the tropical Pacific, with higher (lower) OAFlux wind speed in regions where wind and current have the opposite (same) sign. Improved representation of daily wind variability by the OAFlux synthesis is suggested, and a decadal signal in global wind speed is evident.

  5. Downwelling radiation at the sea surface in the central Mediterranean: one year of shortwave and longwave irradiance measurements on the Lampedusa buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Bommarito, Carlo; Anello, Fabrizio; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Meloni, Daniela; Monteleone, Francesco; Pace, Giandomenico; Piacentino, Salvatore; Sferlazzo, Damiano

    2017-04-01

    An oceanographic buoy has been developed and deployed in August 2015 about 3.3 miles South West of the island of Lampedusa, at 35.49°N, 12.47°E, in the central Mediterranean Sea. The buoy was developed within the Italian RITMARE flagship project, and contributes to the Italian fixed-point oceanographic observation network. The buoy is an elastic beacon type and is intended to study air-sea interactions, propagation of radiation underwater, and oceanographic properties. The buoy measurements complement the atmospheric observations carried out at the long-term Station for Climate Observations on the island of Lampedusa (www.lampedusa.enea.it; 35.52°N, 12.63°E), which is located about 15 km E-NE of the buoy. Underwater instruments and part of the atmospheric sensors are presently being installed on the buoy. Measurements of downwelling shortwave, SW, and longwave, LW, irradiance, have been made since September 2015 with a Kipp and Zonen CMP21 pyranometer and a Kipp and Zonen CGR4 pyrgeometer, respectively. The radiometers are mounted on a small platform at about 7 m above sea level, on an arm protruding southward of the buoy. High time resolution data, at 1 Hz, have been acquired since December 2015, together with the sensors' attitude. Data from the period December 2015-December 2016 are analyzed and compared with measurements made on land at the Station for Climate Observations at 50 m above mean sea level. This study aims at deriving high quality determinations of the downwelling radiation over sea in the central Mediterranean. The following aspects will be discussed: - representativeness of time averaging of irradiance measurements over moving platforms; - comparison of downwelling irradiance measurements made over land and over ocean, and identification of possible correction strategies to infer irradiances over the ocean from close by measurements made over land; - influence of dome cleaning on the quality of measurements; - envisaging possible corrections

  6. Numerical simulation and experimental analysis for a Risers Uphold Sub-Surface Buoy (BSR); Simulacao numerica e ensaio experimental da Boia de Sub-superficie de Suporte de Risers - BSSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Jairo B. de; Almeida, Jose Carlos L. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rangel, Marcos; Fernandes, Antonio C.; Santos, Melquisedec F. dos; Sales Junior, Joel Sena [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents results, numeric and experimental, due to installation operation of a Risers Uphold Sub-Surface Buoy, (BSR). This kind of installation developed by PETROBRAS is unique in the world. The work of BSR installation was based on a numeric pre analysis to verify the system and determine the main parameters to be experimentally verified. The second phase of the work was the experimental analysis in a deep water ocean basin. s. The work describes the BSR and their main accessories, the experimental environment and the model constructed in aluminum in a 1:12 scale and the main results. (author)

  7. An improvement of the GPS buoy system for detecting tsunami at far offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Koshimura, S.; Matsushita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for detecting a tsunami before its arrival at coasts and thereby mitigating tsunami disaster. The system was first deployed in 1997 for a short period in the Sagami bay, south of Tokyo, for basic experiments, and then deployed off Ofunato city, northeastern part of Japan, for the period 2001-2004. The system was then established at about 13km south of Cape Muroto, southwestern part of Japan, since 2004. Five tsunamis of about 10cm have been observed in these systems, including 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.3), 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3), 2004 Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw7.4), 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). These experiments clearly showed that GPS buoy is capable of detecting tsunami with a few centimeter accuracy and can be monitored in near real time by applying an appropriate filter, real-time data transmission using radio and dissemination of obtained records of sea surface height changes through internet. Considering that the system is a powerful tool to monitor sea surface variations due to wind as well as tsunami, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism implemented the system in a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information network for Ports and HArbourS (NOWPHAS) system and deployed the system at 15 sites along the coasts around the Japanese Islands. The system detected the tsunami due to the 11th March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with higher than 6m of tsunami height at the site Off South Iwate (Kamaishi). The Japan Meteorological Agency that was monitoring the record updated the level of the tsunami warning to the greatest value due to the result. Currently, the GPS buoy system uses a RTK-GPS which requires a land base for obtaining precise location of the buoy by a baseline analysis. This algorithm limits the distance of the buoy to, at most, 20km from the coast as the accuracy of positioning gets much worse as the baseline distance becomes longer

  8. GNSS Buoy Array in the Ocean for Natural Hazard Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Yamamoto, S. I.; Iwakiri, N.; Toyoshima, M.; Koshikawa, N.; Motohashi, O.; Hashimoto, G.; Wada, A.

    2015-12-01

    The GNSS buoy system for tsunami early warning has been developed in Japan. The system has been implemented as a national wave monitoring system and its record was used to update the tsunami warning at the 3.11 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The lessons learned in this experience was that the buoys are placed only less than 20km from the coast, which was not far enough for effective evacuation of people. We thus tried to improve the system for putting the buoy much farther from the coast. First, we tried to implement, different from current baseline mode RTK-GPS, a real-time PPP analysis strategy for positioning. In addition, we tried to use a two-way satellite data transmission in contrast with current surface radio system. We have made a series of experiments for this purpose in 2013 and 2014. A buoy of about 40km south of Shikoku, southwest Japan, was used for this purpose. GEONET data were used to obtain precise orbits and clocks of satellites. Then, the information was transferred to the GNSS buoy using LEX signal of QZSS satellite system. The received information on the buoy were used for real-time PPP analysis for every second. The obtained buoy position was then transmitted to the ground base, through an engineering test satellite, ETS-VIII. The received data was then disseminated to public through the internet. Both filtered short-term and long-term waves, were separately shown on the webpage. The success of these experiments indicates that the GNSS buoy can be placed at least more than 1,500 km from the ground based tracking network. Given this success, we would now be able to deploy a new GNSS buoy array system in the wide ocean. An array in the ocean can be used for ionospheric and atmospheric research in the same region as well as tsunami or ocean bottom crustal deformation monitoring through an application to the GNSS-acoustic system. We are now designing a regional GNSS buoy array in the western Pacific as a synthetic natural hazard mitigation system.

  9. Variations in return value estimate of ocean surface waves - a study based on measured buoy data and ERA-Interim reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Naseef, T.; Sanil Kumar, V.

    2017-10-01

    An assessment of extreme wave characteristics during the design of marine facilities not only helps to ensure their safety but also assess the economic aspects. In this study, return levels of significant wave height (Hs) for different periods are estimated using the generalized extreme value distribution (GEV) and generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) based on the Waverider buoy data spanning 8 years and the ERA-Interim reanalysis data spanning 38 years. The analysis is carried out for wind-sea, swell and total Hs separately for buoy data. Seasonality of the prevailing wave climate is also considered in the analysis to provide return levels for short-term activities in the location. The study shows that the initial distribution method (IDM) underestimates return levels compared to GPD. The maximum return levels estimated by the GPD corresponding to 100 years are 5.10 m for the monsoon season (JJAS), 2.66 m for the pre-monsoon season (FMAM) and 4.28 m for the post-monsoon season (ONDJ). The intercomparison of return levels by block maxima (annual, seasonal and monthly maxima) and the r-largest method for GEV theory shows that the maximum return level for 100 years is 7.20 m in the r-largest series followed by monthly maxima (6.02 m) and annual maxima (AM) (5.66 m) series. The analysis is also carried out to understand the sensitivity of the number of observations for the GEV annual maxima estimates. It indicates that the variations in the standard deviation of the series caused by changes in the number of observations are positively correlated with the return level estimates. The 100-year return level results of Hs using the GEV method are comparable for short-term (2008 to 2016) buoy data (4.18 m) and long-term (1979 to 2016) ERA-Interim shallow data (4.39 m). The 6 h interval data tend to miss high values of Hs, and hence there is a significant difference in the 100-year return level Hs obtained using 6 h interval data compared to data at 0.5 h interval. The

  10. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  11. GPS buoys for stage monitoring of large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, H.; Hung, N. G.; Thoss, H.; Schöne, T.

    2012-01-01

    SummaryMonitoring of river stages is one of the basic observations required for understanding catchment hydrology and hydraulic systems. There are numerous measurement techniques available for this purpose, but in case of large rivers technical as well as financial problems often restrict the use of traditional techniques, e.g. pressure probes or float gauges. We explored the potential of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) based water level measurements for stage monitoring by developing small and easy to handle buoys equipped with high-quality geodetic GNSS receivers. The design of the buoys was particularly suited to the requirements of application in rivers, distinguishing them from typical wave rider buoys used in marine offshore applications. The advantages of buoys include the freedom of positioning and their quick and easy deployment. The developed buoys were tested in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, at two different locations: on the Mekong river under high currents, and the second in a small nearby lake with hydraulic connections to a major channel with negligible currents. For this study, only data of the Global Positioning System (GPS) was collected and processed. Processing was undertaken in baseline mode using a nearby reference station and validated against standard pressure gauge data. The recorded stages proved to be of high quality (i.e. mean absolute error position changes of the buoy and thus water movement. In the presented case study alternating currents caused by ocean tides could be detected, thus providing additional information about the hydraulic system. We conclude that the developed buoys add well to the existing hydrological monitoring pool and are a good option for the monitoring in rivers where traditional methods are technically difficult to deploy or too costly.

  12. Monitoring of tritium-contaminated surfaces, including skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, R.A.; Wood, M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We have examined various commercially available tritium surface contamination monitors along with different swipe media and techniques for direct and indirect (swipe) monitoring of contaminated surfaces, including skin. None of the methods or instruments evaluated were more sensitive than the swipe and liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method. Swipe measurements with open-window proportional counters were, in general, less than half as sensitive as LSC, but have the advantages of having the results available almost immediately, and no sample preparation is required. The Nuclear Measurement Corporation's PC-55 is the most suitable instrument we tested for the analysis of routine swipe measurement. The PC-55 was about one third as sensitive as LSC when used with Ontario Hydro filter paper swipe media. Surface contamination measurement results can be obtained within minutes using the PC-55, compared to hours using LSC. The selection of swipe media for use with proportional counter-based instruments is critical. A medium that is electrically insulating can develop an electrostatic charge on its surface; this may alter the field gradient in the detector and may adversely influence the results. Although the PC-55 is sufficiently sensitive and very convenient, operational experience with the instrument is needed before recommending that it replace current LSC methods. The PC-55's susceptibility to internal tritium contamination may limit its practical usefulness. Because of the complexity of using live animals to evaluate direct and indirect methods for assessing skin contamination, pig skin was investigated as a possible substitute. We concluded that, for the first few hours post-exposure, pig skin mimics the kinetics of animal skin that has contacted a tritium-contaminated surface. (author). 30 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  13. A Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device and Numerical Study on Buoy Shape and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyin Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wave and current energy can be harnessed in the East China Sea and South China Sea; however, both areas are subject to high frequencies of typhoon events. To improve the safety of the ocean energy conversion device, a Floating Ocean Energy Conversion Device (FOECD with a single mooring system is proposed, which can be towed to avoid severe ocean conditions or for regular maintenance. In this paper, the structure of the FOECD is introduced, and it includes a catamaran platform, an oscillating buoy part, a current turbine blade, hydraulic energy storage and an electrical generation part. The numerical study models the large catamaran platform as a single, large buoy, while the four floating buoys were modeled simply as small buoys. Theoretical models on wave energy power capture and efficiency were established. To improve the suitability of the buoy for use in the FOECD and its power harvesting capability, a numerical simulation of the four buoy geometries was undertaken. The shape profiles examined in this paper are cylindrical, turbinate (V-shaped and U-shaped cone with cylinder, and combined cylinder-hemisphere buoys. Simulation results reveal that the suitability of a turbinate buoy is the best of the four types. Further simulation models were carried out by adjusting the tip radius of the turbinate buoy. Three performance criteria including suitability, power harvesting capability and energy capture efficiency were analyzed. It reveals that the turbinate buoy has almost the same power harvesting capabilities and energy capture efficiency, while its suitability is far better than that of a cylindrical buoy.

  14. Physical and optical data collected from drifting buoys between May 1993 - December 1996 (NODC Accession 0000586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling and downwelling irradiances were collected from surface optical drifter buoys off the California coast (NE Pacific limit-180) from 05 May 1993 to 06...

  15. Buoy-Rope-Drum Wave Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A buoy-rope-drum wave power system is a new type of floating oscillating buoy wave power device, which absorbs energy from waves by buoy-rope-drum device. Based on the linear deep water wave theory and pure resistive load, with cylinder buoy as an example, the research sets up the theoretical model of direct-drive buoy-rope-drum wave power efficiency and analyzes the influence of the mass and load of the system on its generating efficiency. It points out the two main categories of the efficient buoy-rope-drum wave power system: light thin type and resonance type, and optimal designs of their major parameters are carried out on the basis of the above theoretical model of generating efficiency.

  16. Design of a Low-cost Oil Spill Tracking Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Hu, X.; Yu, F.; Dong, S.; Chen, G.

    2017-12-01

    As the rapid development of oil exploitation and transportation, oil spill accidents, such as Prestige oil spill, Gulf of Mexico oil spill accident and so on, happened frequently in recent years which would result in long-term damage to the environment and human life. It would be helpful for rescue operation if we can locate the oil slick diffusion area in real time. Equipped with GNSS system, current tracking buoys(CTB), such as Lagrangian drifting buoy, Surface Velocity Program (SVP) drifter, iSLDMB (Iridium self locating datum marker buoy) and Argosphere buoy, have been used as oil tracking buoy in oil slick observation and as validation tools for oil spill simulation. However, surface wind could affect the movement of oil slick, which couldn't be reflected by CTB, thus the oil spill tracking performance is limited. Here, we proposed an novel oil spill tracking buoy (OSTB) which has a low cost of less than $140 and is equipped with Beidou positioning module and sails to track oil slick. Based on hydrodynamic equilibrium model and ocean dynamic analysis, the wind sails and water sails are designed to be adjustable according to different marine conditions to improve tracking efficiency. Quick release device is designed to assure easy deployment from air or ship. Sea experiment was carried out in Jiaozhou Bay, Northern China. OSTB, SVP, iSLDMB, Argosphere buoy and a piece of oil-simulated rubber sheet were deployed at the same time. Meanwhile, oil spill simulation model GNOME (general NOAA operational modeling environment) was configured with the wind and current field, which were collected by an unmanned surface vehicle (USV) mounted with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) and wind speed and direction sensors. Experimental results show that the OSTB has better relevance with rubber sheet and GNOME simulation results, which validate the oil tracking ability of OSTB. With low cost and easy deployment, OSTB provides an effective way for oil spill numerical

  17. Exploration Technology Development including Surface Acoustic Wave RFID chips

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is focused on maturing future surface exploration technologies and instrumentation and working towards flight instrumentation and systems to support...

  18. IPAB Antarctic Drifting Buoy Data, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) International Programme for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), through participating research organizations in various countries,...

  19. Olkiluoto surface hydrological modelling: Update 2012 including salt transport modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, T.

    2013-11-01

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing a final disposal program for spent nuclear fuel of its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj and Fortum Power and Heat Oy. The spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed at a depth of about 400-450 meters in the crystalline bedrock at the Olkiluoto site. Leakages located at or close to spent fuel repository may give rise to the upconing of deep highly saline groundwater and this is a concern with regard to the performance of the tunnel backfill material after the closure of the tunnels. Therefore a salt transport sub-model was added to the Olkiluoto surface hydrological model (SHYD). The other improvements include update of the particle tracking algorithm and possibility to estimate the influence of open drillholes in a case where overpressure in inflatable packers decreases causing a hydraulic short-circuit between hydrogeological zones HZ19 and HZ20 along the drillhole. Four new hydrogeological zones HZ056, HZ146, BFZ100 and HZ039 were added to the model. In addition, zones HZ20A and HZ20B intersect with each other in the new structure model, which influences salinity upconing caused by leakages in shafts. The aim of the modelling of long-term influence of ONKALO, shafts and repository tunnels provide computational results that can be used to suggest limits for allowed leakages. The model input data included all the existing leakages into ONKALO (35-38 l/min) and shafts in the present day conditions. The influence of shafts was computed using eight different values for total shaft leakage: 5, 11, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 l/min. The selection of the leakage criteria for shafts was influenced by the fact that upconing of saline water increases TDS-values close to the repository areas although HZ20B does not intersect any deposition tunnels. The total limit for all leakages was suggested to be 120 l/min. The limit for HZ20 zones was proposed to be 40 l/min: about 5 l/min the present day leakages to access tunnel, 25 l/min from

  20. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  1. A new integrated oceanographic/atmospheric facility in the central Mediterranean: the instrumented buoy contributing to the Lampedusa Climate Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Bommarito, Carlo; Meloni, Daniela; Monteleone, Francesco; Pace, Giandomenico; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Anello, Fabrizio; Artale, Vincenzo; Bergamasco, Alessandro; Colella, Simone; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Marullo, Salvatore; Piacentino, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Volpe, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    The Station for Climate Observations on the island of Lampedusa (35.52°N, 12.63°E; http://www.lampedusa.enea.it) has been operational since 1997 in the central Mediterranean Sea and is dedicated at long-term measurements of atmospheric parameters related to climate. Measurements, also made in collaboration with different international Institutes, contribute to several global networks (GAW/WMO; NOAA Cooperative air sampling network; AERONET; ICOS, etc.). As an integration of the climate observatory, an oceanographic buoy was deployed in August 2015 about 3.3 miles South West of the island of Lampedusa, at 35.49°N, 12.47°E. The buoy was developed within the Italian RITMARE flagship project. The ocean depth at the buoy site is 74 m. Primary scientific objectives of the marine observatory are: to investigate air sea interactions in the central Mediterranean; to study the surface energy budget; to characterize the oceanic optical properties, and to investigate links with the carbon cycle. The site will act as a cal/val facility for satellite observations. A first set of measurements of downwelling shortwave and longwave irradiances were activated in September 2015, and more than 1 year of continuous measurements are now available. The other instruments are presently being installed and will become operational soon. They include CTD, O2, and temperature sensors at various depths; 7-band upwelling and downwelling radiation sensors at two depths; downwelling and upwelling solar (broadband and spectral) and infrared (broadband) irradiances at the surface; meteorological parameters. Additional developments are linked to the measurement of oceanic pCO2 and atmospheric turbulence, including sensible heat fluxes. The buoy is open to further expansions and developments.

  2. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Gricius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys, which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  3. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  4. Design, fabrication and systems integration of a satellite tracked, free-drifting ocean data buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J. W.; Cox, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering details are presented of a small free-drifting buoy configuration designed for use in the study of continental shelf water circulation patterns in the Chesapeake Bight of the Western North Atlantic Ocean. The buoy incoporated French instrumentation and was interrogated by the French EOLE satellite to provide position and four channels of temperature data. The buoy design included a variable depth drogue and a power supply sufficient for six weeks of continuous operations. Proof tests of the configuration indicated an adequate design and subsequent field experiments verified the proper functioning of the system.

  5. Evidence that grey seals (Halichoerus grypus use above-water vision to locate baited buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Fjälling

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishing gear in the Baltic is often raided by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus. The seals remove the fish and damage the nets, or entangle themselves and drown. In order to develop ways of mitigating the seals-fisheries conflict, it is important to know exactly how the seals locate the fishing gear. A field experiment was conducted in order to clarify whether seals use their vision above water to do this. Bait (herring; Clupea harengus was attached to the anchor lines of buoys of the type that is commonly used to mark the position of fishing gear. In all, 643 buoys were set. Some of the buoys (210 were also fitted with camera traps. Weather data were collected from official weather stations nearby. Bait loss (mean 18% was significantly correlated with buoy size (P = 0.002 and wind speed (P = 0.04. There was a significant association between bait loss and seal observations near the buoys (P = 0.05. Five photos of grey seals were obtained from the camera traps. No fish-eating birds, such as cormorants or mergansers, were ever observed near the buoys or caught on camera. It was concluded that a main cause of missing bait was scavenging by grey seals, and that they did use above-water vision to locate the buoys. It was also concluded that wind strength (i.e. wave action contributed tothe bait loss. The camera trap buoys had a somewhat lower bait loss than the other buoys (P = 0.054, which was attributed to a scaring effect. Neither the number of seal observations nor the bait loss differed significantly between the 2 study areas in the experiment (P = 0.43 and P = 0.83, respectively. Bait loss was not affected by the buoy colour (red, white, or grey; P = 0.87. We suggest that the findings of this experiment could be put into practice in a seal-disturbed area by deploying a number of decoy buoys, or by hiding live buoys below the surface of the water. This would increase the cost of foraging for the seals, and hence discourage them from exploiting

  6. Potential energy surface for ? dissociation including spin-orbit effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Matthew R.; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Granucci, Giovanni; Hase, William L.

    2012-10-01

    Previous experiments [J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 2833 (2012)] have studied the dissociation of 1,2-diiodoethane radical cation ( ? ) and found a one-dimensional distribution of translational energy, an odd finding considering most product relative translational energy distributions are two-dimensional. The goal of this study is to obtain an accurate understanding of the potential energy surface (PES) topology for the unimolecular decomposition reaction ? → C2H4I+ + I•. This is done through comparison of many single-reference electronic structure methods, coupled-cluster single-point (energy) calculations, and multi-reference energy calculations used to quantify spin-orbit (SO) coupling effects. We find that the structure of the ? reactant has a substantial effect on the role of the SO coupling on the reaction energy. Both the BHandH and MP2 theories with an ECP/6-31++G** basis set, and without SO coupling corrections, provide accurate models for the reaction energetics. MP2 theory gives an unsymmetric structure with different C-I bond lengths, resulting in a SO energy for ? similar to that for the product I-atom and a negligible SO correction to the reaction energy. In contrast, DFT gives a symmetric structure for ? , similar to that of the neutral C2H4I2 parent, resulting in a substantial SO correction and increasing the reaction energy by 6.0-6.5 kcalmol-1. Also, we find that, for this system, coupled-cluster single-point energy calculations are inaccurate, since a small change in geometry can lead to a large change in energy.

  7. On the Optimization of Point Absorber Buoys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Sjökvist

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A point absorbing wave energy converter (WEC is a complicated dynamical system. A semi-submerged buoy drives a power take-off device (PTO, which acts as a linear or non-linear damper of the WEC system. The buoy motion depends on the buoy geometry and dimensions, the mass of the moving parts of the system and on the damping force from the generator. The electromagnetic damping in the generator depends on both the generator specifications, the connected load and the buoy velocity. In this paper a velocity ratio has been used to study how the geometric parameters buoy draft and radius, assuming constant generator damping coefficient, affects the motion and the energy absorption of a WEC. It have been concluded that an optimal buoy geometry can be identified for a specific generator damping. The simulated WEC performance have been compared with experimental values from two WECs with similar generators but different buoys. Conclusions have been drawn about their behaviour.

  8. Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a transform incident offshore swell-spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

  9. Development of an Indian Ocean moored buoy array for climate studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    McPhaden, M.J.; Kuroda, Y.; Murty, V.S.N.

    Volume No. 3 September 2004Volume 9 No.3 September 2004Volume 11 No.4 October 2006 ships of opportunity, and biogeochemical sensors on the basin- scale mooring array and Argo floats. Clearly, full implementation of IndOOS will require a well- coordinated... and implementation strategies for each of the observing system components. These include Argo floats, drifting buoys, tide gauge stations, ship-of-opportunity expendable bathythermograph (XBT) lines, a basin scale moored buoy array, and specialized measurement...

  10. Air Deployable Underwater Glider and Buoy Development for Arctic and Oceanographic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnos, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    LBI developed under a NOAA SBIR the AXIB (Airborne eXpendable Ice Buoy). The initial buoy was developed to collect barometric pressure, air temperature two meters above the surface and sea surface or ice temperature. A number of these AXIBs have been successfully deployed in the Arctic and Antarctic. Currently we are in the process of integrating additional sensors to include an anemometer, thermistor chain and hydrophones. Further development is in process for the integration of solar and wind recharging systems and lower power sensors and processing LBI developed under an ONR SBIR Grant two Air Deployable Underwater Gliders. They are primarily designed for air deployment from Navy P-3 or P-8 Aircraft though easily deployed from other aircraft or helicopters. The A-size (4 7/8'dia. X 36' long) and the 12 ¾ (12 ¾' dia. X 9' 9' long). On the development side we are in the process of integrating sensors and enhancing the battery storage capacity. We anticipate a broad range of Oceanographic sensing missions for these Gliders.

  11. FOULING ORGANISMS OF BUOYS WITHIN MAKHACHKALA SEAPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Imachova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is investigated biofouling buoys within Makhachkala seaport. Seasonal dynamics of development of community, structure species and trophic structure is revealed. It is established vertical zonality in distribution of fouling.

  12. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19781122 to 19810113 (NODC Accession 8600071)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 359 Drifting Surface Buoys were deployed in the Southern Hemisphere oceans from November 22, 1978 to January 13, 1981 as part of the First Global Atmospheric...

  13. Analysis of Floating Buoy of a Wave Power Generating Jack-Up Platform Haiyuan 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Date Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the performance of floating buoys of a wave power generating jack-up platform called Haiyuan 1, in order to work out the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The performance of the buoy, especially its delivered power, is an important issue in designing oscillating buoy wave energy converter. In this case, major factors affect the performance including incident wave, designed draft, and hydraulic pressure on the buoy. To find out the relationship among design draft, hydraulic pressure, and delivered power, the key point is to precisely estimate wave induced motion of the buoy. Three-dimensional theory and time domain method based on potential theory were adopted in the paper. Unlike ship and other floating structures, motion of wave energy converter (WEC buoy in wave will be weakened because of energy take-off, which will cause significant draft changing with time. Thus, draft changing should be taken into consideration as well. In addition, green water problem occurs more frequently than that in ship and other floating structures and also might the reduce delivered power. Therefore, green water problem will also be taken into account when choosing the optimum designed draft and hydraulic pressure. The calculation indicates that the optimum designed draft is 0.935 m, while the optimum designed hydraulic pressure is 30 kN.

  14. IABP Drifting Buoy Pressure, Temperature, Position, and Interpolated Ice Velocity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP) maintains a network of drifting buoys to provide meteorological and oceanographic data for real-time operational...

  15. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  16. 47 CFR 90.248 - Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wildlife and ocean buoy tracking. 90.248... and ocean buoy tracking. (a) The frequency bands 40.66-40.70 MHz and 216-220 MHz may be used for the tracking of, and the telemetry of scientific data from, ocean buoys and animal wildlife. (b) Transmitters...

  17. Pacific Ocean buoy temperature date - TAO/TRITON database & National Buoy Data Center database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Pacific Ocean buoy temperature data. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Carbone, F., M. Landis, C.N. Gencarelli, A. Naccarato, F. Sprovieri,...

  18. Parametric estimation in the wave buoy analogy - an elaborated approach based on energy considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montazeri, Najmeh; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2014-01-01

    An accurate estimation of the ocean wave directional spectrum at the location of an advancing ship is very useful for the ship master to improve operation and safety in a seaway. Research has been conducted to obtain sea state estimates by the Wave Buoy Analogy. The method deals with processing...... the ship’s wave-induced responses based on different statistical inferences including parametric and non-parametric approaches. This paper considers a concept to improve the estimate obtained by the parametric method for sea state estimation. The idea is illustrated by an analysis made on full...... are considered as the input of the estimation process. A comparison is made between the results and also with some in-hand outputs from other estimation sources, e.g., wave radar measurements and sea surface elevation by microwave sensors. The discussed and analyzed procedure could also lead to an automatic...

  19. Drifting buoy data collected by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) in oceans world-wide from 1984-05-01 to 1998-10-27

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains drifting buoy data collected from May 1984 through October 1998 from buoys deployed by the National Data Buoy Center, Stennis Space Center,...

  20. On theory and simulation of heaving-buoy wave-energy converters with control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidsmoen, H.

    1995-12-01

    Heaving-buoy wave-energy converters with control were studied. The buoy is small compared to the wavelength. The resonance bandwidth is then narrow and the energy conversion in irregular waves can be significantly increased if the oscillatory motion of the device can be actively controlled, and the power output from the converter will vary less with time than the wave power transport. A system of two concentric cylinders of the same radius, oscillating in heave only, is analysed in the frequency-domain. The mathematical model can be used to study a tight-moored buoy, as well as a buoy reacting against a submerged body. The knowledge of the frequency-domain hydrodynamic parameters is used to develop frequency-domain and time-domain mathematical models of heaving-buoy wave energy converters. The main emphasis is on using control to maximize the energy production and to protect the machinery of the wave-energy converter in very large waves. Three different methods are used to study control. (1) In the frequency-domain explicit analytical expressions for the optimum oscillation are found, assuming a continuous sinusoidal control force, and from these expressions the optimum time-domain oscillation can be determined. (2) The second method uses optimal control theory, using a control variable as the instrument for the optimisation. Unlike the first method, this method can include non-linearities. But this method gives numerical time series for the state variables and the control variable rather than analytical expressions for the optimum oscillation. (3) The third method is time-domain simulation. Non-linear forces are included, but the method only gives the response of the system to a given incident wave. How the different methods can be used to develop real-time control is discussed. Simulations are performed for a tight-moored heaving-buoy converter with a high-pressure hydraulic system for energy production and motion control. 147 refs., 38 figs., 22 tabs.

  1. High frequency monitoring of the coastal marine environment using the MAREL buoy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, S; Guillou, J; Tréguer, P; Woerther, P; Delauney, L; Follenfant, E; Gontier, O; Hamon, M; Leilde, B; Masson, A; Tartu, C; Vuillemin, R

    2004-06-01

    The MAREL Iroise data buoy provides physico-chemical measurements acquired in surface marine water in continuous and autonomous mode. The water is pumped 1.5 m from below the surface through a sampling pipe and flows through the measuring cell located in the floating structure. Technological innovations implemented inside the measuring cell atop the buoy allow a continuous cleaning of the sensor, while injection of chloride ions into the circuit prevents biological fouling. Specific sensors for temperature, salinity, oxygen and fluorescence investigated in this paper have been evaluated to guarantee measurement precision over a 3 month period. A bi-directional link under Internet TCP-IP protocols is used for data, alarms and remote-control transmissions with the land-based data centre. Herein, we present a 29 month record for 4 parameters measured using a MAREL buoy moored in a coastal environment (Iroise Sea, Brest, France). The accuracy of the data provided by the buoy is assessed by comparison with measurements of sea water weekly sampled at the same site as part of SOMLIT (Service d'Observation du Milieu LIToral), the French network for monitoring of the coastal environment. Some particular events (impact of intensive fresh water discharges, dynamics of a fast phytoplankton bloom) are also presented, demonstrating the worth of monitoring a highly variable environment with a high frequency continuous reliable system.

  2. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-01-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin–Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  3. Nonlocal continuum-based modeling of breathing mode of nanowires including surface stress and surface inertia effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-05-01

    Nonlocal and surface effects significantly influence the mechanical response of nanomaterials and nanostructures. In this work, the breathing mode of a circular nanowire is studied on the basis of the nonlocal continuum model. Both the surface elastic properties and surface inertia effect are included. Nanowires can be modeled as long cylindrical solid objects. The classical model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen and Gurtin-Murdoch surface continuum elasticity formalism. A new frequency equation for the breathing mode of nanowires, including small scale effect, surface stress and surface inertia is presented by employing the Bessel functions. Numerical results are computed, and are compared to confirm the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of nonlocal parameter, the surface stress, the surface inertia and the nanowire orientation on the breathing mode of several types of nanowires with size ranging from 0.5 to 4 nm. Our results reveal that the combined surface and small scale effects are significant for nanowires with diameter smaller than 4 nm.

  4. Nanocoating of titanium implant surfaces with organic molecules. Polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurzawska, Katarzyna Aleksandra; Svava, Rikke; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2012-01-01

    Long-term stability of titanium implants are dependent on a variety of factors. Nanocoating with organic molecules is one of the method used to improve osseointegration. Nanoscale modification of titanium implants affects surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, biochemical bonding capacity...... with focus on polysaccharides including glycosaminoglycans, and how these molecules change surface properties, cell reactions and affect on osseointegartion. The included in vitro studies demonstrated increased cell adhesion, proliferation and mineralization of a number of the tested polysaccharide...

  5. An autonomous drifting buoy system for long term pCO2 observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Fujiki, T.; Wakita, M.; Azetsu-Scott, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have been carried out around the world to understand what happens to carbon dioxide (CO2) once it is emitted into the atmosphere, and how it relates to long-term climate change. However, the sea surface pCO2 observations on volunteer observation ships and research vessels concentrated in the North Atlantic and North Pacific. To assess the spatial and temporal variations of surface pCO2 in the global ocean, new automated pCO2 sensor which can be used in platform systems such as buoys or moorings is strongly desired. We have been developing the small drifting buoy system (diameter 250-340 mm, length 470 mm, weight 15 kg) for pCO2 measurement, with the support of the Japan EOS Promotion Program (JEPP), the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The objective is to provide simplified, automated measurements of pCO2 over all the world's oceans, an essential factor in understanding how the ocean responds to climate change. The measurement principle for the pCO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry (e.g. Lefèvre et al., 1993; Degrandpre et al., 1995). The CO2 in the surrounding seawater equilibrates with the indicator solution across the gas permeable membranes. The equilibration process causes a change of pH in the indicator solution, which results in the change of optical absorbance. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. In our analytical system, we used an amorphous fluoropolymer tubing form of AF-2400 by DuPontTM for the gas permeable membrane due to its high gas permeability coefficients. The measurement system of the sensor consisted mainly of a LED light source, optical fibers, a CCD detector, and a downsized PC. The measured data were transmitted to the laboratory by satellite communication (Argos system). In the laboratory experiment, we obtained a high response time (less than 2 minutes) and a precision

  6. A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, R.H.; Sweatt, W.

    1985-11-21

    A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

  7. Rip current monitoring using GPS buoy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, DongSeob; Kim, InHo; Kang, DongSoo

    2014-05-01

    The occurrence of rip current in the Haeundae beach, which is one of the most famous beaches in South Korea, has been threatening beach-goers security in summer season annually. Many coastal scientists have been investigating rip currents by using field observations and measurements, laboratory measurements and wave tank experiments, and computer and numerical modeling. Rip current velocity is intermittent and may rapidly increase within minutes due to larger incoming wave groups or nearshore circulation instabilities. It is important to understand that changes in rip current velocity occur in response to changes in incoming wave height and period as well as changes in water level. GPS buoys have been used to acquire sea level change data, atmospheric parameters and other oceanic variables in sea for the purposes of vertical datum determination, tide correction, radar altimeter calibration, ocean environment and marine pollution monitoring. Therefore, we adopted GPS buoy system for an experiment which is to investigate rip current velocity; it is sporadic and may quickly upsurge within minutes due to larger arriving wave groups or nearshore flow uncertainties. In this study, for high accurate positioning of buy equipment, a Satellite Based Argumentation System DGPS data logger was deployed to investigate within floating object, and it can be acquired three-dimensional coordinate or geodetic position of buoy with continuous NMEA-0183 protocol during 24 hours. The wave height measured by in-situ hydrometer in a cross-shore array clearly increased before and after occurrence of rip current, and wave period also was lengthened around an event. These results show that wave height and period correlate reasonably well with long-shore current interaction in the Haeundae beach. Additionally, current meter data and GPS buoy data showed that rip current velocities, about 0.2 m/s, may become dangerously strong under specific conditions. Acknowledgement This research was

  8. The November 2011 irruption of buoy barnacles Dosima fascicularis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dissection failed to reveal foreign attachment sites in 40 floats, but digesting 70 floats in potassium hydroxide revealed small plastic fragments in eight floats, one tar ball and one Velella skeleton. The 100 study colonies were comprised solely of buoy barnacles, but a Janthina shell had one buoy barnacle and 18 Lepas ...

  9. System Identification and Control of a Joint-Actuated Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    servomotors does not impart any motion on the vessel. Frye et al. [2] have done work to point a directional antenna from a floating buoy. Their...Patent No. 6433736B1, August 2006. [2] K. Doherty D. Frye and A. Hinton. Design and Evaluation of a Directional Antenna for Ocean Buoys. Technical

  10. Full-dimensional diabatic potential energy surfaces including dissociation: the ²E″ state of NO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, Wolfgang; Vieuxmaire, Olivier; Viel, Alexandra

    2014-06-14

    A scheme to produce accurate full-dimensional coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces including dissociative regions and suitable for dynamical calculations is proposed. The scheme is successfully applied to model the two-sheeted surface of the (2)E″ state of the NO3 radical. An accurate potential energy surface for the NO₃⁻ anion ground state is developed as well. Both surfaces are based on high-level ab initio calculations. The model consists of a diabatic potential matrix, which is expanded to higher order in terms of symmetry polynomials of symmetry coordinates. The choice of coordinates is key for the accuracy of the obtained potential energy surfaces and is discussed in detail. A second central aspect is the generation of reference data to fit the expansion coefficients of the model for which a stochastic approach is proposed. A third ingredient is a new and simple scheme to handle problematic regions of the potential energy surfaces, resulting from the massive undersampling by the reference data unavoidable for high-dimensional problems. The final analytical diabatic surfaces are used to compute the lowest vibrational levels of NO₃⁻ and the photo-electron detachment spectrum of NO₃⁻ leading to the neutral radical in the (2)E″ state by full dimensional multi-surface wave-packet propagation for NO3 performed using the Multi-Configuration Time Dependent Hartree method. The achieved agreement of the simulations with available experimental data demonstrates the power of the proposed scheme and the high quality of the obtained potential energy surfaces.

  11. Continuous Wavelet Transform Analysis of Acceleration Signals Measured from a Wave Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Laurence Zsu-Hsin; Wu, Li-Chung; Wang, Jong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Accelerometers, which can be installed inside a floating platform on the sea, are among the most commonly used sensors for operational ocean wave measurements. To examine the non-stationary features of ocean waves, this study was conducted to derive a wavelet spectrum of ocean waves and to synthesize sea surface elevations from vertical acceleration signals of a wave buoy through the continuous wavelet transform theory. The short-time wave features can be revealed by simultaneously examining the wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The in situ wave signals were applied to verify the practicality of the wavelet-based algorithm. We confirm that the spectral leakage and the noise at very-low-frequency bins influenced the accuracies of the estimated wavelet spectrum and the synthetic sea surface elevations. The appropriate thresholds of these two factors were explored. To study the short-time wave features from the wave records, the acceleration signals recorded from an accelerometer inside a discus wave buoy are analysed. The results from the wavelet spectrum show the evidence of short-time nonlinear wave events. Our study also reveals that more surface profiles with higher vertical asymmetry can be found from short-time nonlinear wave with stronger harmonic spectral peak. Finally, we conclude that the algorithms of continuous wavelet transform are practical for revealing the short-time wave features of the buoy acceleration signals. PMID:23966188

  12. Improving weather predictability by including land-surface model parameter uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    The land surface forms an important component of Earth system models and interacts nonlinearly with other parts such as ocean and atmosphere. To capture the complex and heterogenous hydrology of the land surface, land surface models include a large number of parameters impacting the coupling to other components of the Earth system model. Focusing on ECMWF's land-surface model HTESSEL we present in this study a comprehensive parameter sensitivity evaluation using multiple observational datasets in Europe. We select 6 poorly constrained effective parameters (surface runoff effective depth, skin conductivity, minimum stomatal resistance, maximum interception, soil moisture stress function shape, total soil depth) and explore their sensitivity to model outputs such as soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff using uncoupled simulations and coupled seasonal forecasts. Additionally we investigate the possibility to construct ensembles from the multiple land surface parameters. In the uncoupled runs we find that minimum stomatal resistance and total soil depth have the most influence on model performance. Forecast skill scores are moreover sensitive to the same parameters as HTESSEL performance in the uncoupled analysis. We demonstrate the robustness of our findings by comparing multiple best performing parameter sets and multiple randomly chosen parameter sets. We find better temperature and precipitation forecast skill with the best-performing parameter perturbations demonstrating representativeness of model performance across uncoupled (and hence less computationally demanding) and coupled settings. Finally, we construct ensemble forecasts from ensemble members derived with different best-performing parameterizations of HTESSEL. This incorporation of parameter uncertainty in the ensemble generation yields an increase in forecast skill, even beyond the skill of the default system. Orth, R., E. Dutra, and F. Pappenberger, 2016: Improving weather predictability by

  13. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  14. Surface meteorological data collected from Offshore Buoy by Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) and assembled by Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observation Systems (NANOOS) in the Columbia River Estuary and North East Pacific Ocean from 2004-05-17 to 2017-08-01 (NCEI Accession 0162183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0162183 contains biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected at Offshore Buoy, a fixed station in the Columbia River estuary -...

  15. Saildrone fleet could help replace aging buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In April, two semiautonomous drones, developed by Saildrone, a marine tech startup based in Alameda, California, in close collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington, D.C., are set to return from an 8-month tour of the Pacific Ocean. This the first scientific test for the drones, which are powered only by the wind and sun, in the Pacific Ocean. The voyage is an important step in showing that such drones, carrying 15 different sensors, could help replace an aging and expensive array of buoys that are the main way scientists sniff out signs of climate-disrupting El Niño events. If successful, scientists envision fleets of similar drones spreading across the ocean, inviting thoughts of what it could be like to do oceanography without a ship.

  16. Design of Buoys for Mounting Wind Turbines at Exposed Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Beytullah; Çelıkkol, Barbaros; Swift, Robinson

    2018-04-01

    In this study, two designs for a buoy capable of supporting a 10 kW wind turbine and its tower were developed to operate at the University of New Hampshire's Center of Ocean Renewable Energy testing site located off the Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire. The buoys are to be moored by a catenary chain system. To evaluate wave response, two Froude-scaled models were constructed, tested, and compared at the Ocean Engineering wave tank at the University of New Hampshire. These buoys have been implemented and compared with wave tank measurements of the spar displacement at a reference elevation 2.44 m above the mean water level.

  17. Evaluation of the susceptibility to pitting corrosion of structural steels, including steels with modified surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunarska, E.; Nikiforow, K.

    2001-01-01

    Although the low alloy ferrite-perlite and bainite-martensite steels mostly undergo the general corrosion, pitting corrosion occurring under certain conditions jeopardizes the safety of installations, causing perforation of walls or initiation of crack. On the basis of electrochemical, corrosion and microscopic examinations, the conditions simulating typical industrial corrosion environments, containing Cl - ions have been selected, to which the parts of machines, devices and installation are subjected. The test parameters provide the preferential pitting corrosion without prevailing general corrosion, and provide the similar type of corrosion of different kinds of ferrite-perlite and bainite-martensite steels, including steels with modified surface layer. The proposed express method allows to evaluate the susceptibility to pitting corrosion and to evaluate the effect of surface modification on susceptibility to pitting corrosion in environments containing Cl - ions. The method may be applied for the proper selection of materials exploited under pitting corrosion conditions and for preparation of precorroded samples for mechanical testing. (author)

  18. SHARC: ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Surface Hopping in the Adiabatic Representation Including Arbitrary Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Martin; Marquetand, Philipp; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Sola, Ignacio; González, Leticia

    2011-05-10

    We present a semiclassical surface-hopping method which is able to treat arbitrary couplings in molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. A reformulation of the standard surface-hopping scheme in terms of a unitary transformation matrix allows for the description of interactions like spin-orbit coupling or transitions induced by laser fields. The accuracy of our method is demonstrated in two systems. The first one, consisting of two model electronic states, validates the semiclassical approach in the presence of an electric field. In the second one, the dynamics in the IBr molecule in the presence of spin-orbit coupling after laser excitation is investigated. Due to an avoided crossing that originates from spin-orbit coupling, IBr dissociates into two channels: I + Br((2)P3/2) and I + Br*((2)P1/2). In both systems, the obtained results are in very good agreement with those calculated from exact quantum dynamical simulations.

  19. A novel technique for including surface tension in PLIC-VOF methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, M.; Yadigaroglu, G. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Nuclear Engineering Lab. ETH-Zentrum, CLT, Zurich (Switzerland); Smith, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Thermal-Hydraulics

    2002-02-01

    Various versions of Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) methods have been used successfully for the numerical simulation of gas-liquid flows with an explicit tracking of the phase interface. Of these, Piecewise-Linear Interface Construction (PLIC-VOF) appears as a fairly accurate, although somewhat more involved variant. Including effects due to surface tension remains a problem, however. The most prominent methods, Continuum Surface Force (CSF) of Brackbill et al. and the method of Zaleski and co-workers (both referenced later), both induce spurious or 'parasitic' currents, and only moderate accuracy in regards to determining the curvature. We present here a new method to determine curvature accurately using an estimator function, which is tuned with a least-squares-fit against reference data. Furthermore, we show how spurious currents may be drastically reduced using the reconstructed interfaces from the PLIC-VOF method. (authors)

  20. An overview of a moored ocean data buoy programme

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    This paper addresses the rationale. history, strategy and management techniques used in the developmcnt of NIO oceanographic data buoy programme. The system is used for short term as well as long term oceanographic observations. The technical...

  1. Determination of wave direction using an orbital following buoy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A; Almeida, A; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Vethamony, P.

    Software has been developed in FORTRAN language using a personal computer for the determination of wave direction from time series measurements of heave, pitch and roll of an orbital following buoy. The method of digital band pass filtering describ...

  2. Directional waverider buoy in Indian waters - Experiences of NIO

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AshokKumar, K.; Diwan, S.G.

    parameters except the wave direction. Using the advanced technology, M/s Datawell bv, Netherlands, has developed directional waverider buoy which enables to measure the wave direction in addition to wave height and period. To augument this latest measurement...

  3. Consistent retrieval of land surface radiation products from EO, including traceable uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Thomas; Pinty, Bernard; Voßbeck, Michael; Lopatka, Maciej; Gobron, Nadine; Robustelli, Monica

    2017-05-01

    Earth observation (EO) land surface products have been demonstrated to provide a constraint on the terrestrial carbon cycle that is complementary to the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide. We present the Joint Research Centre Two-stream Inversion Package (JRC-TIP) for retrieval of variables characterising the state of the vegetation-soil system. The system provides a set of land surface variables that satisfy all requirements for assimilation into the land component of climate and numerical weather prediction models. Being based on a 1-D representation of the radiative transfer within the canopy-soil system, such as those used in the land surface components of advanced global models, the JRC-TIP products are not only physically consistent internally, but they also achieve a high degree of consistency with these global models. Furthermore, the products are provided with full uncertainty information. We describe how these uncertainties are derived in a fully traceable manner without any hidden assumptions from the input observations, which are typically broadband white sky albedo products. Our discussion of the product uncertainty ranges, including the uncertainty reduction, highlights the central role of the leaf area index, which describes the density of the canopy. We explain the generation of products aggregated to coarser spatial resolution than that of the native albedo input and describe various approaches to the validation of JRC-TIP products, including the comparison against in situ observations. We present a JRC-TIP processing system that satisfies all operational requirements and explain how it delivers stable climate data records. Since many aspects of JRC-TIP are generic, the package can serve as an example of a state-of-the-art system for retrieval of EO products, and this contribution can help the user to understand advantages and limitations of such products.

  4. The wave buoy analogy - estimating high-frequency wave excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the wave buoy analogy where a ship is considered as a wave buoy, so that measured ship responses are used as a basis to estimate wave spectra and associated sea state parameters. The study presented follows up on a previous paper, Nielsen [Nielsen UD. Response-based estimation...... be estimated reasonably well, even considering high-frequency wave components of a wind sea wave spectrum....

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030806-20041005.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10283, Lat: 05.88468 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020315-20021024.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030826-20040809.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020224-20040208.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030812-20040926.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  10. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81593, Lat: 27.85397 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040927-20060912.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  11. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81612, Lat: 27.85325 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020918-20030811.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  12. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, PHR; Long: -175.81590, Lat: 27.85408 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20011026-20020917.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  13. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34455, Lat: 28.41863 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020922-20030806.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  14. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63378, Lat: 25.44642 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060907-20080918.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  15. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); PRIA, PAL; Long: -162.10282, Lat: 05.88467 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040330-20060325.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  16. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20051016-20060907.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  17. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16018, Lat: -14.55140 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040208-20060307.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  18. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030718-20030826.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  19. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, LIS; Long: -173.91608, Lat: 25.96767 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20010920-20020612.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  20. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34457, Lat: 28.41858 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20041005-20060917.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  1. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, KUR; Long: -178.34453, Lat: 28.41852 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060917-20080929.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  2. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); CNMI, SAI; Long: 145.72285, Lat: 15.23750 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030819-20050921.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  3. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44643 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040924-20051015.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  4. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20040919-20050411.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  5. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20050411-20060904.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  6. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); AMSM, ROS; Long: -168.16025, Lat: -14.55134 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20060307-20080312.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  7. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Standard Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, MAR; Long: -170.63382, Lat: 25.44652 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20030824-20040922.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Standard (CREWS-STD) buoys are equipped to measure sea surface water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  8. CRED Coral Reef Early Warning System (CREWS) Enhanced Buoy, Environmental Data Logger (EDL); NWHI, FFS; Long: -166.27183, Lat: 23.85678 (WGS84); Sensor Depth: 0.00m; Data Range: 20020911-20030718.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CREWS Enhanced (CREWS-ENH) buoys are equipped to sea surface measure water temperature and conductivity (Sea-Bird Model SBE37-SM, Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc.,...

  9. Heaving buoys, point absorbers and arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnes, Johannes; Hals, Jørgen

    2012-01-28

    Absorption of wave energy may be considered as a phenomenon of interference between incident and radiated waves generated by an oscillating object; a wave-energy converter (WEC) that displaces water. If a WEC is very small in comparison with one wavelength, it is classified as a point absorber (PA); otherwise, as a 'quasi-point absorber'. The latter may be a dipole-mode radiator, for instance an immersed body oscillating in the surge mode or pitch mode, while a PA is so small that it should preferably be a source-mode radiator, for instance a heaving semi-submerged buoy. The power take-off capacity, the WEC's maximum swept volume and preferably also its full physical volume should be reasonably matched to the wave climate. To discuss this matter, two different upper bounds for absorbed power are applied in a 'Budal diagram'. It appears that, for a single WEC unit, a power capacity of only about 0.3 MW matches well to a typical offshore wave climate, and the full physical volume has, unfortunately, to be significantly larger than the swept volume, unless phase control is used. An example of a phase-controlled PA is presented. For a sizeable wave-power plant, an array consisting of hundreds, or even thousands, of mass-produced WEC units is required.

  10. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from MTU1 Buoy by Michigan Technological University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123646)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123646 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  11. Autonomous Ice Mass Balance Buoys for Seasonal Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, J. D.; Planck, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Parno, J. T.; Elder, B. C.; Richter-Menge, J.; Polashenski, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    The ice mass-balance represents the integration of all surface and ocean heat fluxes and attributing the impact of these forcing fluxes on the ice cover can be accomplished by increasing temporal and spatial measurements. Mass balance information can be used to understand the ongoing changes in the Arctic sea ice cover and to improve predictions of future ice conditions. Thinner seasonal ice in the Arctic necessitates the deployment of Autonomous Ice Mass Balance buoys (IMB's) capable of long-term, in situ data collection in both ice and open ocean. Seasonal IMB's (SIMB's) are free floating IMB's that allow data collection in thick ice, thin ice, during times of transition, and even open water. The newest generation of SIMB aims to increase the number of reliable IMB's in the Arctic by leveraging inexpensive commercial-grade instrumentation when combined with specially developed monitoring hardware. Monitoring tasks are handled by a custom, expandable data logger that provides low-cost flexibility for integrating a large range of instrumentation. The SIMB features ultrasonic sensors for direct measurement of both snow depth and ice thickness and a digital temperature chain (DTC) for temperature measurements every 2cm through both snow and ice. Air temperature and pressure, along with GPS data complete the Arctic picture. Additionally, the new SIMB is more compact to maximize deployment opportunities from multiple types of platforms.

  12. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  13. MONITORING HIGH-FREQUENCY OCEAN SIGNALS USING LOW-COST GNSS/IMU BUOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-L. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In oceans there are different ocean signals covering the multi-frequencies including tsunami, meteotsunami, storm surge, as sea level change, and currents. These signals have the direct and significant impact on the economy and life of human-beings. Therefore, measuring ocean signals accurately becomes more and more important and necessary. Nowadays, there are many techniques and methods commonly used for monitoring oceans, but each has its limitation. For example, tide gauges only measure sea level relative to benchmarks and are disturbed unevenly, and satellite altimeter measurements are not continuous and inaccurate near coastal oceans. In addition, high-frequency ocean signals such as tsunami and meteotsunami cannot be sufficiently detected by 6-minutes tide gauge measurements or 10-day sampled altimetry data. Moreover, traditional accelerometer buoy is heavy, expensive and the low-frequency noise caused by the instrument is unavoidable. In this study, a small, low-cost and self-assembly autonomous Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU that independently collects continuous acceleration and angular velocity data is mounted on a GNSS buoy to provide the positions and tilts of the moving buoy. The main idea is to integrate the Differential GNSS (DGNSS or Precise Point Positioning (PPP solutions with IMU data, and then evaluate the performance by comparing with in situ tide gauges. The validation experiments conducted in the NCKU Tainan Hydraulics Laboratory showed that GNSS and IMU both can detect the simulated regular wave frequency and height, and the field experiments in the Anping Harbor, Tainan, Taiwan showed that the low-cost GNSS buoy has an excellent ability to observe significant wave heights in amplitude and frequency.

  14. Technology of surface wastewater purification, including high-rise construction areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyba, Anna; Skolubovich, Yury

    2018-03-01

    Despite on the improvements in the quality of high-rise construction areas and industrial wastewater treatment, the pollution of water bodies continues to increase. This is due to the organized and unorganized surface untreated sewage entry into the reservoirs. The qualitative analysis of some cities' surface sewage composition is carried out in the work. Based on the published literature review, the characteristic contamination present in surface wastewater was identified. The paper proposes a new technology for the treatment of surface sewage and presents the results of preliminary studies.

  15. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Microwave effective surface impedance of structures including a high-Tc superconducting film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, P.

    1992-01-01

    The microwave effective surface impedances of different stacks made of high-temperature superconducting films, dielectric materials and bulk normal metals were computed. The calculations were based on the two-fluid model of superconductors and the conventional transmission line theory. These effective impedances are compared to the calculated intrinsic surface impedances of the stacked superconducting films. The considered superconducting material has been the oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 epitaxially grown on crystalline substrates (MgO, LaAlO 3 , SrTiO 3 ), the film thickness ranging from a few nm to 1μm. Discrepancies between the effective surface resistances or reactances and the corresponding intrinsic values were determined at 10 GHz for non resonant or resonant structures. At resonance the surface resistance discrepancy exhibits a sharp peak which reaches 10 4 or more in relative value according to the geometry and the used materials. Obviously the effective surface reactance shows also huge variations about the resonance and may be negative. Moreover geometries allowing to obtain an effective resistance smaller than the film intrinsic value have been found. The effects of the resonance phenomenon on the electromagnetic wave reflectivity and reflection phase shift are investigated. Therefore the reported theoretical results demonstrate that the effective surface impedance of YBCO films with a thickness smaller than 500 nm can be very different from the intrinsic film impedance according to the structures. (Author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy: Stage 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurniawan, Adi

    This report presents the results of the first stage of the project "Numerical modelling of the HAB Energy Buoy". The objectives of this stage are to develop a numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy, a self-reacting wave energy device consisting of two heaving bodies, and to investigate a number...... and a summary of the main findings is presented. A numerical model of the HAB Energy Buoy has been developed in the frequency domain using two alternative formulations of the equations of motion. The model is capable of predicting the power capture, motion response, and power take-off loads of the device...... configuration are imposed to give a more realistic prediction of the power capture and help ensure a fair comparison. Recommendations with regard to the HAB design are finally suggested....

  18. Design of the dual-buoy wave energy converter based on actual wave data of East Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongrok Kim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new conceptual dual-buoy Wave Energy Converter (WEC for the enhancement of energy extraction efficiency is suggested. Based on actual wave data, the design process for the suggested WEC is conducted in such a way as to ensure that it is suitable in real sea. Actual wave data measured in Korea’s East Sea (position: 36.404 N° and 129.274 E° from May 1, 2002 to March 29, 2005 were used as the input wave spectrum for the performance estimation of the dual-buoy WEC. The suggested WEC, a point absorber type, consists of two concentric floating circular cylinders (an inner and a hollow outer buoy. Multiple resonant frequencies in proposed WEC affect the Power Ttake-off (PTO performance of the WEC. Based on the numerical results, several design strategies are proposed to further enhance the extraction efficiency, including intentional mismatching among the heave natural frequencies of dual buoys, the natural frequency of the internal fluid, and the peak frequency of the input wave spectrum.

  19. Design of the dual-buoy wave energy converter based on actual wave data of East Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongrok; Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Jeong, Weon-Mu; Cho, Il-Hyoung; Cho, Hong-Yeon

    2015-07-01

    A new conceptual dual-buoy Wave Energy Converter (WEC) for the enhancement of energy extraction efficiency is suggested. Based on actual wave data, the design process for the suggested WEC is conducted in such a way as to ensure that it is suitable in real sea. Actual wave data measured in Korea's East Sea (position: 36.404 N° and 129.274 E°) from May 1, 2002 to March 29, 2005 were used as the input wave spectrum for the performance estimation of the dual-buoy WEC. The suggested WEC, a point absorber type, consists of two concentric floating circular cylinders (an inner and a hollow outer buoy). Multiple resonant frequencies in proposed WEC affect the Power Ttake-off (PTO) performance of the WEC. Based on the numerical results, several design strategies are proposed to further enhance the extraction efficiency, including intentional mismatching among the heave natural frequencies of dual buoys, the natural frequency of the internal fluid, and the peak frequency of the input wave spectrum.

  20. Meteorological buoy measurements in the Iceland Sea, 2007-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nína Petersen, Guðrún

    2017-10-01

    The Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO) conducted meteorological buoy measurements in the central Iceland Sea in the time period 2007-2009, specifically in the northern Dreki area on the southern segment of the Jan Mayen Ridge. Due to difficulties in deployment and operations, in situ measurements in this region are sparse. Here the buoy, deployment and measurements are described with the aim of giving a future user of the data set information that is as comprehensive as possible. The data set has been quality-checked, suspect data removed and the data set made publicly available from PANGAEA Data Publisher (https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.876206).

  1. Simultaneous measurements of work function and H‒ density including caesiation of a converter surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, S.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources rely on the surface conversion of neutral atomic hydrogen and positive hydrogen ions to H-. The efficiency of this process depends on the actual work function of the converter surface. By introducing caesium into the source the work function decreases, enhancing the negative ion yield. In order to study the impact of the work function on the H- surface production at similar conditions to the ones in ion sources for fusion devices like ITER and DEMO, fundamental investigations are performed in a flexible laboratory experiment. The work function of the converter surface can be absolutely measured by photoelectric effect, while a newly installed cavity ring-down spectroscopy system (CRDS) measures the H- density. The CRDS is firstly tested and characterized by investigations on H- volume production. Caesiation of a stainless steel sample is then performed in vacuum and the plasma effect on the Cs layer is investigated also for long plasma-on times. A minimum work function of (1.9±0.1) eV is reached after some minutes of plasma treatment, resulting in a reduction by a value of 0.8 eV compared to vacuum measurements. The H- density above the surface is (2.1±0.5)×1015 m-3. With further plasma exposure of the caesiated surface, the work function increases up to 3.75 eV, due to the impinging plasma particles which gradually remove the Cs layer. As a result, the H- density decreases by a factor of at least 2.

  2. Satellite-tracked drifting buoy observations in the south equatorial current in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Michael, G.S.

    two buoys moved north and the third moved south. Over the open sea regime the buoys moved with a speed of approximately 30 cm/s at an angle of about 35 degrees to the left of the wind. The overall tendencies seen in the buoy drift are similar to those...

  3. Surface wave site characterization at 27 locations near Boston, Massachusetts, including 2 strong-motion stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The geotechnical properties of the soils in and around Boston, Massachusetts, have been extensively studied. This is partly due to the importance of the Boston Blue Clay and the extent of landfill in the Boston area. Although New England is not a region that is typically associated with seismic hazards, there have been several historical earthquakes that have caused significant ground shaking (for example, see Street and Lacroix, 1979; Ebel, 1996; Ebel, 2006). The possibility of strong ground shaking, along with heightened vulnerability from unreinforced masonry buildings, motivates further investigation of seismic hazards throughout New England. Important studies that are pertinent to seismic hazards in New England include source-parameter studies (Somerville and others, 1987; Boore and others, 2010), wave-propagation studies (Frankel, 1991; Viegas and others, 2010), empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) for computing ground-motion intensity (Tavakoli and Pezeshk, 2005; Atkinson and Boore, 2006), site-response studies (Hayles and others, 2001; Ebel and Kim, 2006), and liquefaction studies (Brankman and Baise, 2008). The shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles collected for this report are pertinent to the GMPE, site response, and liquefaction aspects of seismic hazards in the greater Boston area. Besides the application of these data for the Boston region, the data may be applicable throughout New England, through correlations with geologic units (similar to Ebel and Kim, 2006) or correlations with topographic slope (Wald and Allen, 2007), because few VS measurements are available in stable tectonic regions.Ebel and Hart (2001) used felt earthquake reports to infer amplification patterns throughout the greater Boston region and noted spatial correspondence with the dominant period and amplification factors obtained from ambient noise (horizontal-to-vertical ratios) by Kummer (1998). Britton (2003) compiled geotechnical borings in the area and produced a

  4. On the modelling of semi-insulating GaAs including surface tension and bulk stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, W.; Duderstadt, F.

    2004-07-01

    Necessary heat treatment of single crystal semi-insulating Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which is deployed in micro- and opto- electronic devices, generate undesirable liquid precipitates in the solid phase. The appearance of precipitates is influenced by surface tension at the liquid/solid interface and deviatoric stresses in the solid. The central quantity for the description of the various aspects of phase transitions is the chemical potential, which can be additively decomposed into a chemical and a mechanical part. In particular the calculation of the mechanical part of the chemical potential is of crucial importance. We determine the chemical potential in the framework of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law which gives an appropriate stress/strain relation for many solids in the small strain regime. We establish criteria, which allow the correct replacement of the St. Venant-Kirchhoff law by the simpler Hooke law. The main objectives of this study are: (i) We develop a thermo-mechanical model that describes diffusion and interface motion, which both are strongly influenced by surface tension effects and deviatoric stresses. (ii) We give an overview and outlook on problems that can be posed and solved within the framework of the model. (iii) We calculate non-standard phase diagrams, i.e. those that take into account surface tension and non-deviatoric stresses, for GaAs above 786 C, and we compare the results with classical phase diagrams without these phenomena. (orig.)

  5. Oceansat-2 and RAMA buoy winds: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gators also state that the errors induced, excluding atmospheric stability, are small in comparison to other errors, related to the satellite's measure- ments. To account for the lack of temperature and humidity data, buoy wind has been converted to 10 m height using the minimal error profile method (Peixoto and Oort 1992).

  6. Oceansat–2 and RAMA buoy winds: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 6. Oceansat–2 and RAMA buoy winds: A ... In the complete annual cycle (2011), the monthly mean root mean square differences in the wind speed and wind direction were less than ∼2.5 ms−1 and ∼20°, respectively. The better match between the ...

  7. Model Predictive Control of Buoy Type Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces the Wavestar wave energy converter and presents the implementation of model predictive controller that maximizes the power generation. The ocean wave power is extracted using a hydraulic electric generator which is connected to an oscillating buoy. The power generator is an a...

  8. Optimization of wave energy capture of wave-powered navigational lighting buoys of seadromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Guangda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper proposes an optimized design for wave-power navigational lighting buoys of seadromes.[Methods] Based on the theory of three-dimensional potential flow, the buoyant motion response of a buoy is calculated. A type of array of wave-power navigational lighting buoys located in an offshore seadrome is proposed,and a procedure for the design optimization of its component buoys is presented. Matching the best Power Take-Off(PTO damping, the diameter to draft ratio and array distance with the best energy capture width ratio are acquired, and the energy capture for the short-term forecast of the buoy array is accomplished. On this basis, combined with the actual sea conditions, energy capture for the long-term forecast of an individual buoy is accomplished. The influence of the buoy diameter, buoy draft and array distance on the energy capture width ratio is discussed.[Results] The results show that the energy capture width ratio is at its greatest when the diameter to draft ratio is between 2.4-2.6; the smaller the distance between array buoys, the greater the energy capture width of each buoy.[Conclusions] The results can provide a reference and suggestions for the optimization of the design of wave energy generation for arrays buoy.

  9. Determining surface wave attenuation by modeling surface wave amplitudes including finite-frequency focusing and defocusing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a technique that uses cluster analysis method to efficiently measure Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude anomalies. Amplitude anomaly measurements have been made on the vertical components of all permanent stations recording LHZ data from IRIS. We currently consider earthquakes with Ms>5.5 between 1990 and 2004 and correct for source phase and magnitude according to the CMT. This technique leads to a large set of amplitude measurements at 7mHz, 10mHz, 15mHz and 20mHz. We discard data with erroneously large amplitude anomalies (|dlnA|>1) and inconsistent instrument responses and we only use earthquakes recorded by more than 30 stations. Out of about 250000 raw measurements for each frequency, about 140000 measurements are retained for inverting for attenuation structure. Similar to Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), phase and amplitude data are inverted together for phase velocity maps, attenuation maps, and source and receiver terms. However, we use the 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel of Zhou et al, (2004) to model the focusing-defocusing effects. Ray theory, which has been used to date, gives amplitude anomaly predictions which depend strongly on short wavelength structure and so are very sensitive to how phase velocity maps are smoothed. Our resulting attenuation maps show structures correlating well with surface tectonics, with high attenuation in regions of ridges, back-arc basins and western North America, and low attenuation in stable continental shields. The success of getting reasonable attenuation structures demonstrates the feasibility of applying 2D finite frequency amplitude kernel to real data.

  10. Evaluation of HY-2A Scatterometer Wind Vectors Using Data from Buoys, ERA-Interim and ASCAT during 2012–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyong Xing

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The first Chinese operational Ku-band scatterometer on board Haiyang-2A (HY-2A, launched in August 2011, is designed for monitoring the global ocean surface wind. This study estimates the quality of the near-real-time (NRT retrieval wind speed and wind direction from the HY-2A scatterometer for 36 months from 2012 to 2014. We employed three types of sea-surface wind data from oceanic moored buoys operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC and the Tropical Atmospheric Ocean project (TAO, the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-Interim, and the advanced scatterometer (ASCAT to calculate the error statistics including mean bias, root mean square error (RMSE, and standard deviation. In addition, the rain effects on the retrieval winds were investigated using collocated Climate Prediction Center morphing method (CMORPH precipitation data. All data were collocated with the HY-2A scatterometer wind data for comparison. The quality performances of the HY-2A NRT wind vectors data (especially the wind speeds were satisfactory throughout the service period. The RMSEs of the HY-2A wind speeds relative to the NDBC, TAO, ERA-Interim, and ASCAT data were 1.94, 1.73, 2.25, and 1.62 m·s−1, respectively. The corresponding RMSEs of the wind direction were 46.63°, 43.11°, 39.93°, and 47.47°, respectively. The HY-2A scatterometer overestimated low wind speeds, especially under rainy conditions. Rain exerted a diminishing effect on the wind speed retrievals with increasing wind speed, but its effect on wind direction was robust at low and moderate wind speeds. Relative to the TAO buoy data, the RMSEs without rain effect were reduced to 1.2 m·s−1 and 39.68° for the wind speed direction, respectively, regardless of wind speed. By investigating the objective laws between rain and the retrieval winds from HY-2A, we could improve the quality of wind retrievals through future studies.

  11. Small Flux Buoy for Characterizing Marine Surface Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    platform for air-sea interaction study since early 1960s (Fisher and Spiess 1963). It was designed to be a stable platform for mounting various types of...COARE algorithm. J. of Climate, 16, 571–591. Fisher F. H., and F. N. Spiess , 1963: FLIP-floating instrument platform. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 35, 1633

  12. FIRE_AX_SOF_BUOY_DFT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Surface of the Ocean, Fluxes and Interaction with the Atmosphere (SOFIA)...

  13. Improvement of tsunami detection in timeseries data of GPS buoys with the Continuous Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Y.; Takagawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    The observation data of GPS buoys which are installed in the offshore of Japan are used for monitoring not only waves but also tsunamis in Japan. The real-time data was successfully used to upgrade the tsunami warnings just after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Huge tsunamis can be easily detected because the signal-noise ratio is high enough, but moderate tsunami is not. GPS data sometimes include the error waveforms like tsunamis because of changing accuracy by the number and the position of GPS satellites. To distinguish the true tsunami waveforms from pseudo-tsunami ones is important for tsunami detection. In this research, a method to reduce misdetections of tsunami in the observation data of GPS buoys and to increase the efficiency of tsunami detection was developed.Firstly, the error waveforms were extracted by using the indexes of position dilution of precision, reliability of GPS satellite positioning and satellite number for calculation. Then, the output from this procedure was used for the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyze the time-frequency characteristics of error waveforms and real tsunami waveforms.We found that the error waveforms tended to appear when the accuracy of GPS buoys positioning was low. By extracting these waveforms, it was possible to decrease about 43% error waveforms without the reduction of the tsunami detection rate. Moreover, we found that the amplitudes of power spectra obtained from the error waveforms and real tsunamis were similar in the component of long period (4-65 minutes), on the other hand, the amplitude in the component of short period (< 1 minute) obtained from the error waveforms was significantly larger than that of the real tsunami waveforms. By thresholding of the short-period component, further extraction of error waveforms became possible without a significant reduction of tsunami detection rate.

  14. Expansion Hamiltonian model for a diatomic molecule adsorbed on a surface: Vibrational states of the CO/Cu(100) system including surface vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, 116023 Dalian (China); Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universität Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    Molecular-surface studies are often done by assuming a corrugated, static (i.e., rigid) surface. To be able to investigate the effects that vibrations of surface atoms may have on spectra and cross sections, an expansion Hamiltonian model is proposed on the basis of the recently reported [R. Marquardt et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074108 (2010)] SAP potential energy surface (PES), which was built for the CO/Cu(100) system with a rigid surface. In contrast to other molecule-surface coupling models, such as the modified surface oscillator model, the coupling between the adsorbed molecule and the surface atoms is already included in the present expansion SAP-PES model, in which a Taylor expansion around the equilibrium positions of the surface atoms is performed. To test the quality of the Taylor expansion, a direct model, that is avoiding the expansion, is also studied. The latter, however, requests that there is only one movable surface atom included. On the basis of the present expansion and direct models, the effects of a moving top copper atom (the one to which CO is bound) on the energy levels of a bound CO/Cu(100) system are studied. For this purpose, the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree calculations are carried out to obtain the vibrational fundamentals and overtones of the CO/Cu(100) system including a movable top copper atom. In order to interpret the results, a simple model consisting of two coupled harmonic oscillators is introduced. From these calculations, the vibrational levels of the CO/Cu(100) system as function of the frequency of the top copper atom are discussed.

  15. UpTempO Buoys for Understanding and Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-28

    order to better understand the details of ice - albedo feedback. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sea ice , retreat, Arctic Ocean, UpTempO, Upper Temperature of...fall cooling, and interannually as sea ice retreats and the warming season lengthens. The effort was a contribution to the multi-investigator ONR...relationships between sea ice retreat and upper ocean warming. ACCOMPLISHED I. Buoy deployments and data: We worked with the Pacific Gyre (PG

  16. An intelligent subsurface buoy design for measuring ocean ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Wang, Lei

    2012-11-01

    A type of ultra-low power subsurface buoy system is designed to measure and record ocean ambient noise data. The buoy utilizes a vector hydrophone (pass band 20Hz-1.2kHz) and a 6-element vertical hydrophone array (pass band 20Hz-2kHz) to measure ocean ambient noise. The acoustic signals are passed through an automatically modified gain, a band pass filter, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion module. They are then stored in high-capacity flash memory. In order to identify the direction of noise source, the vector sensor measuring system has integrated an electric-magnetic compass. The system provides a low-rate underwater acoustic communication system which is used to report the buoy state information and a high-speed USB interface which is used to retrieve the recorded data on deck. The whole system weighs about 125kg and can operate autonomously for more than 72 hours. The system's main architecture and the sea-trial test results are provided in this paper.

  17. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations, 1998-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  18. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of DART® Buoy Networks Based on Forecast Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B.; Denbo, Donald W.; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y.; Mofjeld, Harold O.; Spillane, Michael C.; Titov, Vasily V.

    2018-03-01

    A performance measure for a DART® tsunami buoy network has been developed. DART® buoys are used to detect tsunamis, but the full potential of the data they collect is realized through accurate forecasts of inundations caused by the tsunamis. The performance measure assesses how well the network achieves its full potential through a statistical analysis of simulated forecasts of wave amplitudes outside an impact site and a consideration of how much the forecasts are degraded in accuracy when one or more buoys are inoperative. The analysis uses simulated tsunami amplitude time series collected at each buoy from selected source segments in the Short-term Inundation Forecast for Tsunamis database and involves a set for 1000 forecasts for each buoy/segment pair at sites just offshore of selected impact communities. Random error-producing scatter in the time series is induced by uncertainties in the source location, addition of real oceanic noise, and imperfect tidal removal. Comparison with an error-free standard leads to root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for DART® buoys located near a subduction zone. The RMSEs indicate which buoy provides the best forecast (lowest RMSE) for sections of the zone, under a warning-time constraint for the forecasts of 3 h. The analysis also shows how the forecasts are degraded (larger minimum RMSE among the remaining buoys) when one or more buoys become inoperative. The RMSEs provide a way to assess array augmentation or redesign such as moving buoys to more optimal locations. Examples are shown for buoys off the Aleutian Islands and off the West Coast of South America for impact sites at Hilo HI and along the US West Coast (Crescent City CA and Port San Luis CA, USA). A simple measure (coded green, yellow or red) of the current status of the network's ability to deliver accurate forecasts is proposed to flag the urgency of buoy repair.

  20. A study of the optimum draft of multiple resonance power buoys for maximizing electric power production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To maximize electric power production using wave energy extractions from resonance power buoys, the maximum motion displacement spectra of the buoys can primarily be obtained under a given wave condition. In this study, wave spectra observed in shoaling water were formulated. Target resonance frequencies were established from the arithmetic means of modal frequency bands and the peak frequencies. The motion characteristics of the circular cylindrical power buoys with corresponding drafts were then calculated using numerical models without considering PTO damping force. Results showed that the heave motions of the power buoys in shoaling waters with insufficient drafts produced greater amplification effects than those in deep seas with sufficient drafts.

  1. ASSIMILATION OF REAL-TIME DEEP SEA BUOY DATA FOR TSUNAMI FORECASTING ALONG THAILAND’S ANDAMAN COASTLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seree Supharatid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami enhanced the necessity for a tsunami early warning system for countries bordering the Indian Ocean, including Thailand. This paper describes the assimilation of real-time deep sea buoy data for tsunami forecasting along Thailand’s Andaman coastline. Firstly, the numerical simulation (by the linear and non-linear shallow water equations was carried out for hypothetical cases of tsunamigenic earthquakes with epicenters located in the Andaman micro plate. Outputs of the numerical model are tsunami arrival times and the maximum wave height that can be expected at 58 selected communities along Thailand Andaman coastline and two locations of DART buoys in the Indian Ocean. Secondly, a “neural” network model (GRNN was developed to access the data from the numerical computations for subsequent construction of a tsunami database that can be displayed on a web-based system. This database can be updated with the integration from two DART buoys and from several GRNN models.

  2. Moball-Buoy Network: A Near-Real-Time Ground-Truth Distributed Monitoring System to Map Ice, Weather, Chemical Species, and Radiations, in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, F.; Shahabi, C.; Burdick, J.; Rais-Zadeh, M.; Menemenlis, D.

    2014-12-01

    The work had been funded by NASA HQ's office of Cryospheric Sciences Program. Recent observations of the Arctic have shown that sea ice has diminished drastically, consequently impacting the environment in the Arctic and beyond. Certain factors such as atmospheric anomalies, wind forces, temperature increase, and change in the distribution of cold and warm waters contribute to the sea ice reduction. However current measurement capabilities lack the accuracy, temporal sampling, and spatial coverage required to effectively quantify each contributing factor and to identify other missing factors. Addressing the need for new measurement capabilities for the new Arctic regime, we propose a game-changing in-situ Arctic-wide Distributed Mobile Monitoring system called Moball-buoy Network. Moball-buoy Network consists of a number of wind-propelled self-powered inflatable spheres referred to as Moball-buoys. The Moball-buoys are self-powered. They use their novel mechanical control and energy harvesting system to use the abundance of wind in the Arctic for their controlled mobility and energy harvesting. They are equipped with an array of low-power low-mass sensors and micro devices able to measure a wide range of environmental factors such as the ice conditions, chemical species wind vector patterns, cloud coverage, air temperature and pressure, electromagnetic fields, surface and subsurface water conditions, short- and long-wave radiations, bathymetry, and anthropogenic factors such as pollutions. The stop-and-go motion capability, using their novel mechanics, and the heads up cooperation control strategy at the core of the proposed distributed system enable the sensor network to be reconfigured dynamically according to the priority of the parameters to be monitored. The large number of Moball-buoys with their ground-based, sea-based, satellite and peer-to-peer communication capabilities would constitute a wireless mesh network that provides an interface for a global

  3. Sensor Buoy System for Monitoring Renewable Marine Energy Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Emilio; Quiles, Eduardo; Correcher, Antonio; Morant, Francisco

    2018-03-22

    In this paper we present a multi-sensor floating system designed to monitor marine energy parameters, in order to sample wind, wave, and marine current energy resources. For this purpose, a set of dedicated sensors to measure the height and period of the waves, wind, and marine current intensity and direction have been selected and installed in the system. The floating device incorporates wind and marine current turbines for renewable energy self-consumption and to carry out complementary studies on the stability of such a system. The feasibility, safety, sensor communications, and buoy stability of the floating device have been successfully checked in real operating conditions.

  4. Oceanographic temperature and salinity measurements collected using drifting buoys in the Arctic Ocean from 2003 to 2006 (NODC Accession 0014672)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic temperature and salinity measurements collected using drifting buoys in the Arctic Ocean. Data from JAMSTEC drifting buoys which were deployed both as...

  5. Meteorological and oceanographic data collected from the National Data Buoy Center Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) and moored (weather) buoys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) established the Coastal-Marine Automated Network (C-MAN) for the National Weather Service in the early 1980's. NDBC has...

  6. Drifting buoy data observed during 1985 through 1989 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9100057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 2 January 1985 to 31 December 1989. Data were processed by...

  7. Drifting buoy data observed during 1992 and assembled by the Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC) for Drifting Buoy Data (NODC Accession 9300091)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and meteorological data were collected from drifting buoys from a World-Wide distribution from 01 January 1992 to 31 December 1992. Data were processed by...

  8. Oceanographic profile Temperature and Salinity measurements collected during the Arctic Buoy Program using drifting buoy in the Arctic from 1985-1994 (NODC Accession 0001497)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between 1985 and 1994, the Polar Science Center at the University of Washington deployed 24 ARGOS data buoys in ice floes on the Arctic Ocean, from which six...

  9. Comparison of AMSR-2 wind speed and sea surface temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Nanda Kishore Reddy

    2018-02-14

    Feb 14, 2018 ... Arabian Sea (AS), hereafter called as the North- ern Indian Ocean (NIO). In the tropics, the surface ... dated AMSR-2 data over the Atlantic and Pacific. Oceans and inferred that the data are in good ... Location of moored buoys in the North Indian Ocean. Latitude and longitude of each buoy is mentioned in ...

  10. A Wave Power Device with Pendulum Based on Ocean Monitoring Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui; Guan, Wanchun; Wan, Xiaozheng; Li, Xuanqun; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Shixuan

    2018-01-01

    The ocean monitoring buoy usually exploits solar energy for power supply. In order to improve power supply capacity, this paper proposes a wave power device according to the structure and moving character of buoy. The wave power device composes of pendulum mechanism that converts wave energy into mechanical energy and energy storage mechanism where the mechanical energy is transferred quantitatively to generator. The hydrodynamic equation for the motion of buoy system with generator devise is established based on the potential flow theory, and then the characteristics of pendulum motion and energy conversion properties are analysed. The results of this research show that the proposed wave power devise is able to efficiently and periodically convert wave energy into power, and increasing the stiffness of energy storage spring is benefit for enhancing the power supply capacity of the buoy. This study provides a theory reference for the development of technology on wave power generator for ocean monitoring buoy.

  11. Surface potential based modeling of charge, current, and capacitances in DGTFET including mobile channel charge and ambipolar behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-08-01

    We present a surface potential based analytical model for double gate tunnel field effect transistor (DGTFET) for the current, terminal charges, and terminal capacitances. The model accounts for the effect of the mobile charge in the channel and captures the device physics in depletion as well as in the strong inversion regime. The narrowing of the tunnel barrier in the presence of mobile charges in the channel is incorporated via modeling of the inverse decay length, which is constant under channel depletion condition and bias dependent under inversion condition. To capture the ambipolar current behavior in the model, tunneling at the drain junction is also included. The proposed model is validated against TCAD simulation data and it shows close match with the simulation data.

  12. Applications to marine disaster prevention spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent results of the research project funded by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 23226017) from FY 2011 to FY 2015 on an autonomous spilled oil and gas tracking buoy system and its applications to marine disaster prevention systems from a scientific point of view. This book spotlights research on marine disaster prevention systems related to incidents involving oil tankers and offshore platforms, approaching these problems from new scientific and technological perspectives. The most essential aspect of this book is the development of a deep-sea underwater robot for real-time monitoring of blowout behavior of oil and gas from the seabed and of a new type of autonomous surface vehicle for real-time tracking and monitoring of oil spill spread and drift on the sea surface using an oil sensor. The mission of these robots is to provide the simulation models for gas and oil blowouts or spilled oil drifting on the sea surface w...

  13. Power Production Analysis of the OE Buoy WEC for the CORES Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    which a total of 39 hours of power production data was collected. A data acquisition system was used to sample the sensors on board and the generator shaft power time-series data was used in the analysis here. A wave-rider buoy, located at the site of OE Buoy and operated by the Marine Institute Ireland......, was used to determine the wave statistics for the sea conditions which coincided with the OE Buoy device data, in order to estimate the efficiency of the device as a function of the sea state (for example as a function of the mean zero down period, Tz, and, significant wave height, Hs) as described below...

  14. Survey of Technology with Possible Applications to United States Coast Guard Buoy Tenders. Volume 2. Literature Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    34THV MERMAID ." Vessel particular: LOA - 80.4 m, Beam moulded - 14.5 m, Draft - 4.0 m, speed 12 kts, complement - 24, power - diesel electric 2x 860 kW...Beacons. Included in this yearbook is a 2-page spread with particulars on the newest buoy tender "THV MERMAID " recently completed by Hyundai Heavy...suppliers. A little short on detailed design information. Covers all self-propelled OSV’s over 60ft LOA except for pure tugs. Patton, L.M., "The

  15. Satellite monitoring of the global ocean surface during 1987-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David

    1992-01-01

    Long-term simultaneous global coverage of AVHRR sea surface temperature, SSMI surface wind speed, GEOSAT sea surface height, and ARGOS buoy drift began in 1987. Methodology to create annual atlases of monthly mean distributions is described.

  16. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity from JCAD-6 drifting buoy 2003-2004 (NODC Accession 0002236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using a drifting buoy in the Arctic from 2003 to 2004 (NODC Accession 0002236).

  17. NODC Standard Format Drifting Buoy (F156) Data (1975-1994) (NODC Accession 0014200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data type contains time series ocean circulation data determined by tracking the movement of drifting buoys, drogues or other instrumented devices. Movement is...

  18. Validation of Operational Global Wave Prediction Models With Spectral Buoy Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wingeart, Karen

    2001-01-01

    .... In this study, the fidelity of frequency-directional spectra predicted by WAM and WAVEWATCH III at the operational centers is examined with data from 3-meter discus and 6-meter nomad buoys operated...

  19. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 04 (WQB-04): Hilo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  20. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy 03 (WQB-03): Kiholo Bay, Big Island, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  1. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy KN (WQB-KN): Kilo Nalu, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  2. Operations, engineering, and modification rework of the M. I. T. (Smile) buoy. [Meteorology station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huszagh, D.W.; Fink, S.

    1976-07-01

    The MIT/Navy buoy was loaned by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute to BNL late in 1975 for the implementation of meteorological studies off the south coast of Long Island. It was destructively dismembered at Woods Hole and transported overland to BNL in December, 1975. Extensive repairs and modifications to the buoy structure were undertaken to simplify transport, improve trim control, and enhance instrument access and security. Minor modifications leading to greater personnel safety were also made. The refurbished buoy was carried in sections to the Shinnecock inlet area by motor truck. Following dockside assembly, the buoy was launched on May 21, 1976, whereupon it was towed through the inlet and moored in 85 feet of water off Tiana Beach, New York.

  3. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database Webdisc (7 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0090141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This CD-ROM set contains the historic archive of meteorological and oceanographic data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN stations operated by the NOAA National...

  4. PacIOOS Water Quality Buoy AW (WQB-AW): Ala Wai, Oahu, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water quality buoys are part of the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) and are designed to measure a variety of ocean parameters at fixed points....

  5. Integration of Ground, Buoys, Satellite and Model data to map the Changes in Meteorological Parameters Associated with Harvey Hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A.; Sarkar, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    The coastal areas have dense onshore and marine observation network and are also routinely monitored by constellation of satellites. The monitoring of ocean, land and atmosphere through a range of meteorological parameters, provides information about the land and ocean surface. Satellite data also provide information at different pressure levels that help to access the development of tropical storms and formation of hurricanes at different categories. Integration of ground, buoys, satellite and model data showing the changes in meteorological parameters during the landfall stages of hurricane Harvey will be discussed. Hurricane Harvey was one of the deadliest hurricanes at the Gulf coast which caused intense flooding from the precipitation. The various observation networks helped city administrators to evacuate the coastal areas, that minimized the loss of lives compared to the Galveston hurricane of 1900 which took 10,000 lives. Comparison of meteorological parameters derived from buoys, ground stations and satellites associated with Harvey and 2005 Katrina hurricane present some of the interesting features of the two hurricanes.

  6. Directional Bias of TAO Daily Buoy Wind Vectors in the Central Equatorial Pacific Ocean from November 2008 to January 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article documents a systematic bias in surface wind directions between the TAO buoy measurements at 0°, 170°W and the ECMWF analysis and forecasts. This bias was of the order 10° and persisted from November 2008 to January 2010, which was consistent with a post-recovery calibration drift in the anemometer vane. Unfortunately, the calibration drift was too time-variant to be used to correct the data so the quality flag for this deployment was adjusted to reflect low data quality. The primary purpose of this paper is to inform users in the modelling and remote-sensing community about this systematic, persistent wind directional bias, which will allow users to make an educated decision on using the data and be aware of its potential impact to their downstream product quality. The uncovering of this bias and its source demonstrates the importance of continuous scientific oversight and effective user-data provider communication in stewarding scientific data. It also suggests the need for improvement in the ability of buoy data quality control procedures of the TAO and ECMWF systems to detect future wind directional systematic biases such as the one described here.

  7. Experimental study of wave energy extraction by a dual-buoy heaving system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentric dual-buoy Wave Energy Converter (WEC, which consists of external buoy (hallow-cylinder with toroidal appendage and cylindrical internal buoy within the moon-pool is suggested in this research and its performance in various wave conditions is studied. The Linear Electric Generator (LEG, consisting of a permanent magnet and coils, is used as a direct Power Take-Off (PTO system. To maximize the electrical energy extracted from the PTO system, the relative heave motions between the dual buoys must be highly amplified by the multiple resonance phenomena of dual-buoy and internal-fluid motions. The high-performance range can be widened by distributing those natural frequencies with respect to the peak frequency of the wave spectrum. The performance of the newly developed dual-buoy WEC was measured throughout the systematic 1:5.95-model test in regular and irregular waves conducted in a wave tank at Seoul National University. The model-test results are also validated by an independently developed numerical method.

  8. Statistical investigation of surface bound ions and further development of BION server to include pH and salt dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Zhang, Min; Alexov, Emil

    2015-12-15

    Ions are engaged in multiple biological processes in cells. By binding to the macromolecules or being mobile in the solvent, they maintain the integrity of the structure of macromolecules; participate in their enzymatic activity; or screen electrostatic interactions. While experimental methods are not always able to assign the exact location of ions, computational methods are in demand. Although the majority of computational methods are successful in predicting the position of ions buried inside macromolecules, they are less effective in deciphering positions of surface bound ions. Here, we propose the new BION algorithm (http://compbio.clemson.edu/bion_server_ph/) that predicts the location of the surface bound ions. It is more efficient and accurate compared to the previous version since it uses more advanced clustering algorithm in combination with pairing rules. In addition, the BION webserver allows specifying the pH and the salt concentration in predicting ions positions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Measuring evapotranspiration: comparison of in situ micrometeorological methods including eddy covariance, scintillometer, Bowen ratio, and surface renewal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznikova, G.; Fischer, M.; Orsag, M.; Trnka, M.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying evapotranspiration (ET) is a challenging task as different methods can induce large discrepancies. Comparisons of various techniques are not rare, however it is demanding to maintain several in situ measurements for longer time. In our study, we aimed to compare four micrometeorological methods measuring ET at relatively large homogeneous area. The study took place on a winter wheat field in Polkovice, the Czech Republic (49°23'42.8"N 17°14'47.3"E) from Jul 1st 2015 until Sep 15th 2015. In the centre of 26-ha experimental field we deployed the eddy covariance (EC) system, the Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) system, thermocouples for surface renewal technique, and the surface layer scintillometer with 106 m path length. Additionally, we installed the large aperture scintillometer with 617 m path length across the field. Our results showed good agreement of compared methods during the wetter periods of the measurements with slight overestimation of the scintillometry. The BREB method agreed the best with EC. Both scintillometers gave very consistent results throughout the whole measurement period. The EC tended to underestimate other methods. One of potential reasons is energy balance disclosure which reached 27.4 % for the measured period. The surface renewal method showed good potential however, need to be further tested in our conditions. Our experimental locality is one of several we are running as a part of ground based measurement network for ET estimation. Gained results helped us to enhance and optimise our network to ensure effective and reliable data acquisition for future validation of airborne images (satellite based drought monitoring).

  10. Radiation-curing of acrylate composites including carbon fibres: A customized surface modification for improving mechanical performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Arnaud; Pietras-Ozga, Dorota; Ponsaud, Philippe; Kowandy, Christelle; Barczak, Mariusz; Defoort, Brigitte; Coqueret, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The lower transverse mechanical properties of radiation-cured acrylate-based composites reinforced with carbon-fibre with respect to the thermosettable analogues was investigated from the viewpoint of chemical interactions at the interface between the matrix and the carbon material. XPS analysis of representative commercial carbon fibres revealed the presence of a significant amount of chemical functions potentially exerting an adverse effect on the initiation and propagation of the free radical polymerization initiated under high energy radiation. The EB-induced polymerization of n-butyl acrylate as a simple model monomer was conducted in the presence of various aromatic additives exhibiting a strong inhibiting effect, whereas thiols efficiently sensitize the initiation mechanism and undergo transfer reactions. A method based on the surface modification of sized fibres by thiomalic acid is proposed for overcoming the localized inhibition phenomenon and for improving the mechanical properties of the resulting acrylate-based composites. - Highlights: • Surface functions of C-fibres are analyzed for their effect on radical reaction. • Irradiation of nBu-acrylate in presence of aromatic additives reveals inhibition. • Thiol groups sensitize the radiation-initiated polymerization of nBu-acrylate. • Modification of C-fibres with thiomalic acid enhances composite properties

  11. A neural network potential energy surface for the F + CH4reaction including multiple channels based on coupled cluster theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Xin; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H

    2018-03-22

    We report here a new global and full dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the F + CH4 reaction. This PES was constructed by using neural networks (NN) fitting to about 99 000 ab initio energies computed at the UCCSD(T)-F12a/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory, and the correction terms considering the influence of a larger basis set as well as spin-orbit couplings were further implemented with a hierarchial scheme. This PES, covering both the abstraction and substitution channels, has an overall fitting error of 8.24 meV in total, and 4.87 meV for energies within 2.5 eV using a segmented NN fitting method, and is more accurate than the previous PESs.

  12. Heaving displacement amplification characteristics of a power buoy in shoaling water with insufficient draft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuck-Min Kweon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The resonance power buoy is a convincing tool that can increase the extraction efficiency of wave energy. The buoy needs a corresponding draft, to move in resonance with waves within the peak frequency band where wave energy is concentrated. However, it must still be clarified if the buoy acts as an effective displacement amplifier, when there is insufficient water depth. In this study, the vertical displacement of a circular cylinder-type buoy was calculated, with the spectrum data observed in a real shallow sea as the external wave force, and with the corresponding draft, according to the mode frequency of normal waves. Such numerical investigation result, without considering Power Take-Off (PTO damping, confirmed that the area of the heave responses spectrum can be amplified by up to about tenfold, compared with the wave energy spectrum, if the draft corresponds to the peak frequency, even with insufficient water depth. Moreover, the amplification factor of the buoy varied, according to the seasonal changes in the wave spectra.

  13. Locating critical points on multi-dimensional surfaces by genetic algorithm: test cases including normal and perturbed argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Pinaki; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1999-03-01

    It is demonstrated that Genetic Algorithm in a floating point realisation can be a viable tool for locating critical points on a multi-dimensional potential energy surface (PES). For small clusters, the standard algorithm works well. For bigger ones, the search for global minimum becomes more efficient when used in conjunction with coordinate stretching, and partitioning of the strings into a core part and an outer part which are alternately optimized The method works with equal facility for locating minima, local as well as global, and saddle points (SP) of arbitrary orders. The search for minima requires computation of the gradient vector, but not the Hessian, while that for SP's requires the information of the gradient vector and the Hessian, the latter only at some specific points on the path. The method proposed is tested on (i) a model 2-d PES (ii) argon clusters (Ar 4-Ar 30) in which argon atoms interact via Lennard-Jones potential, (iii) Ar mX, m=12 clusters where X may be a neutral atom or a cation. We also explore if the method could also be used to construct what may be called a stochastic representation of the reaction path on a given PES with reference to conformational changes in Ar n clusters.

  14. SWRT: A package for semi-analytical solutions of surface wave propagation, including mode conversion, across transversely aligned vertical discontinuities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Datta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a suite of programs that implement decades-old algorithms for computation of seismic surface wave reflection and transmission coefficients at a welded contact between two laterally homogeneous quarter-spaces. For Love as well as Rayleigh waves, the algorithms are shown to be capable of modelling multiple mode conversions at a lateral discontinuity, which was not shown in the original publications or in the subsequent literature. Only normal incidence at a lateral boundary is considered so there is no Love–Rayleigh coupling, but incidence of any mode and coupling to any (other mode can be handled. The code is written in Python and makes use of SciPy's Simpson's rule integrator and NumPy's linear algebra solver for its core functionality. Transmission-side results from this code are found to be in good agreement with those from finite-difference simulations. In today's research environment of extensive computing power, the coded algorithms are arguably redundant but SWRT can be used as a valuable testing tool for the ever evolving numerical solvers of seismic wave propagation. SWRT is available via GitHub (https://github.com/arjundatta23/SWRT.git.

  15. SWRT: A package for semi-analytical solutions of surface wave propagation, including mode conversion, across transversely aligned vertical discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arjun

    2018-03-01

    We present a suite of programs that implement decades-old algorithms for computation of seismic surface wave reflection and transmission coefficients at a welded contact between two laterally homogeneous quarter-spaces. For Love as well as Rayleigh waves, the algorithms are shown to be capable of modelling multiple mode conversions at a lateral discontinuity, which was not shown in the original publications or in the subsequent literature. Only normal incidence at a lateral boundary is considered so there is no Love-Rayleigh coupling, but incidence of any mode and coupling to any (other) mode can be handled. The code is written in Python and makes use of SciPy's Simpson's rule integrator and NumPy's linear algebra solver for its core functionality. Transmission-side results from this code are found to be in good agreement with those from finite-difference simulations. In today's research environment of extensive computing power, the coded algorithms are arguably redundant but SWRT can be used as a valuable testing tool for the ever evolving numerical solvers of seismic wave propagation. SWRT is available via GitHub (https://github.com/arjundatta23/SWRT.git).

  16. Measured Properties of Turbulent Premixed Flames for Model Assessment, Including Burning Velocities, Stretch Rates, and Surface Densities (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    conditions was stabilized on a large two-dimensional slot Bunsen burner . It was found that the turbulent burning velocity of Bunsen flames depends...burning velocity of Bunsen flames are inadequate because they should include two additional parameters: mean velocity Ū and burner width W. These...corru- gated) flame with well-defined boundary conditions was stabilized on a large two-dimensional slot Bunsen burner . It was found that the turbulent

  17. Wave observations from an array of directional buoys over the southern Brazilian coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Henrique Patricio Prado; Violante-Carvalho, Nelson; Nogueira, Izabel Christina Martins; Babanin, Alexander; Liu, Qingxiang; de Pinho, Uggo Ferreira; Nascimento, Fabio; Parente, Carlos Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that the majority of buoy measurements are located around the US coast and along some Europeans countries. The lack of long-term and densely spaced in situ measurements in the Southern Hemisphere in general, and the South Atlantic in particular, hinders several investigations due to the lack of detailed metocean information. Here, we present an effort to overcome this limitation, with a dense network of buoys along the Brazilian coast, equipped with several meteorological and oceanographic sensors. Out of ten currently operational buoys, three are employed to present the main characteristics of waves in the Southern part of the network. For the first time, sensor characteristics and settings are described, as well as the methods applied to the raw wave data. Statistics and distributions of wave parameters, swell propagating events, comparison with a numerical model and altimeters and a discussion about the occurrence of freak waves are presented.

  18. Storm wave buoy equipped with micromechanical inertial unit: Results of development and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryazin, D. G.; Staroselcev, L. P.; Belova, O. O.; Gleb, K. A.

    2017-07-01

    The article describes the results of developing a wave buoy to measure the statistical characteristics of waves and the characteristics of directional spectra of three-dimensional waves. The device is designed for long-term measurements lasting up to a season, which can help solve problems in forecasting waves and preventing emergencies from wave impact on offshore platforms, hydraulic structures, and other marine facilities. The measuring unit involves triads of micromechanical gyroscopes, accelerometers, and a three-component magnetometer. A description of the device, results of laboratory research of its characteristics, and bench and full-scale tests are offered. It is noted that to assess the performance characteristics, comparative tests of the Storm wave buoy were conducted with a standard string wave probe installed on an offshore platform. It is shown that the characteristics and capabilities of the wave buoy make it possible to oust foreign devices from the domestic market.

  19. Application of Buoy Observations in Determining Characteristics of Several Typhoons Passing the East China Sea in August 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningli Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The buoy observation network in the East China Sea is used to assist the determination of the characteristics of tropical cyclone structure in August 2012. When super typhoon “Haikui” made landfall in northern Zhejiang province, it passed over three buoys, the East China Sea Buoy, the Sea Reef Buoy, and the Channel Buoy, which were located within the radii of the 13.9 m/s winds, 24.5 m/s winds, and 24.5 m/s winds, respectively. These buoy observations verified the accuracy of typhoon intensity determined by China Meteorological Administration (CMA. The East China Sea Buoy had closely observed typhoons “Bolaven” and “Tembin,” which provided real-time guidance for forecasters to better understand the typhoon structure and were also used to quantify the air-sea interface heat exchange during the passage of the storm. The buoy-measured wind and pressure time series were also used to correct the intensity of “Damrey” initially determined by CMA.

  20. 77 FR 29254 - Safety Zones, Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0; New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... transit the Lower Mississippi River between mile marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA and the Southwest Pass Sea...; Large Cruise Ships; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

  1. Real-time and on-demand buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Suzuki, K.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Imano, M.; Hino, R.

    2017-12-01

    We develop real-time and on-demand buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal displacement. It is indispensable for observation of crustal displacement to understand changes of stress field related to future large earthquakes. The current status of the observation is carried out by using a vessel with an interval of a few times per a year. When a large earthquake occurs, however, we need dense or on-demand observation of the crustal displacement to grasp nature of the slow slip after the rupture. Therefore, we constructed buoy system with a buoy station, wire-end station, seafloor unit and acoustic transponders for crustal displacement, and we installed a pressure sensor on the seafloor unit and GNSS system on the buoy in addition to measurement of e distance between the buoy and the seafloor acoustic transponders. Tsunami is evaluated using GNSS data and pressure data sent from seafloor. Observation error of the GNSS is about 10 cm. The crustal displacement is estimated using pressure sensor for vertical and acoustic measurement for horizontal. Using current slack ratio of 1.58, the observation error for the measurement of the crustal displacement is about 10 cm. We repeated three times sea trials and confirmed the data acquisition with high data quality, mooring without dredging anchor in the strong sea current with a speed of 5.5 knots. Current issues to be resolved we face are removing noises on the acoustic data transmission, data transmission between the buoy and wire-end stations, electrical consumption on the buoy station and large observation error on the crustal displacement due to large slack ratio. We consider the change of the acoustic transmission for pressure data, replace of a GNSS data logger with large electrical consumption, and reduce of the slack ratio, and search method to reduce resistance of the buoy on the sea water. In this presentation, we introduce the current status of the technical development and tsunami waveforms recorded on our

  2. Saipan 2005 Sea Surface Temperature and Meteorological Enhanced Mooring - CRED CREWS Near Real Time and Historical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site Saipan, CNMI (15.2375N, 145.72283W) ARGOS Buoy ID 26105 Time series data from this mooring provide high resolution sea surface temperature, and surface...

  3. Evaluation of SARAL/AltiKa performance using GNSS/IMU equipped buoy in Sajafi, Imam Hassan and Kangan Ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Alireza A.; Jazireeyan, Iraj; Abdi, Naser; Rezvani, Mohammad-Hadi

    2018-03-01

    Performance of SARAL/AltiKa mission has been evaluated within 2016 altimeter calibration/validation framework in Persian Gulf through three campaigns conducted in the offshore waters of Sajafi, Imam Hassan and Kangan Ports, while the altimeter overflew the passes 470, 111 and 25 on 13 Feb, 7 March and 17 June 2016, respectively. As the preparation, a lightweight buoy was equipped with a GNSS receiver/choke-ring antenna and a MEMS-based IMU to measure independent datasets in the field operations. To obtain accurate sea surface height (SSH) time series, the offset of the onboard antenna from the equilibrium sea level was predetermined through surveying operations as the buoy was deploying in the onshore waters of Kangan Port. Accordingly, the double-difference carrier phase observations have been processed via the Bernese GPS Software v. 5.0 so as to provide the GNSS-derived time series at the comparison points of the calibration campaigns, once the disturbing effects due to the platform tilt and heave have been eliminated. Owing to comparing of the SSH time series and the associating altimetry 1 Hz GDR-T datasets, the calibration/validation of the SARAL/AltiKa has been performed in the both cases of radiometer and ECMWF wet troposphere corrections so as to identify potential land contamination. An agreement of the present findings in comparison with those attained in other international calibrations sites confirms the promising feasibility of Persian Gulf as a new dedicated site for calibration/validation of ongoing and future altimetry missions.

  4. Evaluation of wind vectors measured by QuikSCAT using ocean buoy data along the Galician coast (NW Iberian Peninsula)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I.; Gomez-Gesteira, M.; deCastro, M.; Sousa, M. C.; Dias, J. M.; Santos, F.

    2012-04-01

    Wind above sea surface constitutes a key parameter to analyze coastal phenomena, like upwelling in the NW part of the Iberian Peninsula. The present work analyzes the accuracy of QuikSCAT for the period 2000-2009 by comparing satellite data with in situ data from three buoys placed along the NW coast of the Iberian Peninsula. The use of these long data series has two main objectives, on the one hand, the margin of error diminishes with the extent of the series and, on the other hand, it allows capturing the high inter-annual variability of the area. According to previous studies, the wet season is characterized by a high variability, in such a way that wind patterns change from year to year. The comparison confirms a low skill of QuikSCAT for low speed winds (<3 m/s) as previously pointed out by other authors. Once these winds were discarded, QuikSCAT revealed a higher accuracy for winds within the range 6-12 m/s. In direction, winds blowing from coast seem to be less accurately calculated by the satellite. Statistical results were similar for the three buoys in spite of the different coastal orientations. In average, the RMSE and bias for wind speed were 1.5 m/s and 0.2 m/s, respectively. Statistical data were also similar for wind direction, with the mean RMSE on the order of 34° and the mean bias on the order of 4° in absolute value. These statistical parameters are at least as accurate as those calculated in other near-shore areas all over the world. In particular, the bias was observed to be lower (in absolute value) than measured by most of the authors, which is possibly due to the high percentage of sampled winds lying within the interval [6-12] m/s, where satellite measurements are more accurate.

  5. Uncertainty quantification and inference of Manning's friction coefficients using DART buoy data during the Tōhoku tsunami

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Tsunami computational models are employed to explore multiple flooding scenarios and to predict water elevations. However, accurate estimation of water elevations requires accurate estimation of many model parameters including the Manning\\'s n friction parameterization. Our objective is to develop an efficient approach for the uncertainty quantification and inference of the Manning\\'s n coefficient which we characterize here by three different parameters set to be constant in the on-shore, near-shore and deep-water regions as defined using iso-baths. We use Polynomial Chaos (PC) to build an inexpensive surrogate for the G. eoC. law model and employ Bayesian inference to estimate and quantify uncertainties related to relevant parameters using the DART buoy data collected during the Tōhoku tsunami. The surrogate model significantly reduces the computational burden of the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) sampling of the Bayesian inference. The PC surrogate is also used to perform a sensitivity analysis.

  6. Method for deploying and recovering a wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundon, Timothy R

    2017-05-23

    A system for transporting a buoy and a heave plate. The system includes a buoy and a heave plate. An outer surface of the buoy has a first geometrical shape. A surface of the heave plate has a geometrical shape complementary to the first geometrical shape of the buoy. The complementary shapes of the buoy and the heave plate facilitate coupling of the heave plate to the outer surface of the buoy in a transport mode.

  7. HAB Buoy: a new instrument for in situ monitoring and early warning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HAB Buoy: a new instrument for in situ monitoring and early warning of harmful algal bloom events. PF Culverhouse, R Williams, B Simpson, C Gallienne, B Reguera, M Cabrini, S Fonda-Umani, T Parisini, FA Pellegrino, Y Pazos, H Wang, L Escalera, A Moroño, M Hensey, J Silke, A Pellegrini, D Thomas, D James, MA ...

  8. A Combined Radio and Underwater Wireless Optical Communication System based on Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuhang; Tong, Zheng; Cong, Bo; Yu, Xiangyu; Kong, Meiwei; Lin, Aobo

    2016-02-01

    We propose a system of combining radio and underwater wireless optical communication based on buoys for real-time image and video transmission between underwater vehicles and the base station on the shore. We analysis how the BER performance is affected by the link distance and the deflection angle of the light source using Monte Carlo simulation.

  9. Comparing Multiple Evapotranspiration-calculating Methods, Including Eddy Covariance and Surface Renewal, Using Empirical Measurements from Alfalfa Fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, J.; Kent, E. R.; Leinfelder-Miles, M.; Lambert, J. J.; Little, C.; Paw U, K. T.; Snyder, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Eddy covariance and surface renewal measurements were used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) over a variety of crop fields in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during the 2016 growing season. However, comparing and evaluating multiple measurement systems and methods for determining ET was focused upon at a single alfalfa site. The eddy covariance systems included two systems for direct measurement of latent heat flux: one using a separate sonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer and another using a combined system (Campbell Scientific IRGASON). For these methods, eddy covariance was used with measurements from the Campbell Scientific CSAT3, the LI-COR 7500a, the Campbell Scientific IRGASON, and an additional R.M. Young sonic anemometer. In addition to those direct measures, the surface renewal approach included several energy balance residual methods in which net radiation, ground heat flux, and sensible heat flux (H) were measured. H was measured using several systems and different methods, including using multiple fast-response thermocouple measurements and using the temperatures measured by the sonic anemometers. The energy available for ET was then calculated as the residual of the surface energy balance equation. Differences in ET values were analyzed between the eddy covariance and surface renewal methods, using the IRGASON-derived values of ET as the standard for accuracy.

  10. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from 45171, Granite Island Buoy, by Northern Michigan University and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2015-07-09 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0130588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130588 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  11. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from UMD Coastal Buoy by University of Minnesota - Duluth and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123648)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123648 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from time series and surface observations using Moored Autonomous Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (MADIC) System, Sunburst SAMI2 pH sensor, and other instruments from Kewalo Buoy near the coast of Honolulu, Hawaii from 2013-10-31 to 2014-06-15 (NCEI Accession 0132048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To expand the number of tools available for autonomous carbonate system observations, we have developed a robust surface ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)...

  13. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories Bio Buoy by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NODC Accession 0123645)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123645 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  14. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from University of Michigan Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratories Bio Buoy by University of Michigan and assembled by Great Lakes Observing System (GLOS) in the Great Lakes region from 2014-07-01 to 2017-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0123660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0123660 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data in netCDF formatted files, which follow the Climate and Forecast metadata convention...

  15. Historic and ongoing buoy wave measurements, time series, spectral analysis, and other parameters (sea surface temperature, air temperature and pressure, wind speed and direction), worldwide, mostly US coastal, from November 1975 through present, from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data contain raw and processed values concerning wave size and direction, energy spectral data (both original and processed), and, where available, sea surface...

  16. Detiding DART® Buoy Data for Real-Time Extraction of Source Coefficients for Operational Tsunami Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Donald B.; Denbo, Donald W.; Eblé, Marie C.; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y.; Mofjeld, Harold O.; Spillane, Michael C.; Titov, Vasily V.; Tolkova, Elena I.

    2015-06-01

    US Tsunami Warning Centers use real-time bottom pressure (BP) data transmitted from a network of buoys deployed in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans to tune source coefficients of tsunami forecast models. For accurate coefficients and therefore forecasts, tides and background noise at the buoys must be accounted for through detiding. In this study, five methods for coefficient estimation are compared, each of which handles detiding differently. The first three subtract off a tidal prediction based on (1) a localized harmonic analysis involving 29 days of data immediately preceding the tsunami event, (2) 68 preexisting harmonic constituents specific to each buoy, and (3) an empirical orthogonal function fit to the previous 25 h of data. Method (4) is a Kalman smoother that uses method (1) as its input. These four methods estimate source coefficients after detiding. Method (5) estimates the coefficients simultaneously with a two-component harmonic model that accounts for the tides. The five methods are evaluated using archived data from 11 DART® buoys, to which selected artificial tsunami signals are superimposed. These buoys represent a full range of observed tidal conditions and background BP noise in the Pacific and Atlantic, and the artificial signals have a variety of patterns and induce varying signal-to-noise ratios. The root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of least squares estimates of source coefficients using varying amounts of data are used to compare the five detiding methods. The RMSE varies over two orders of magnitude among detiding methods, generally decreasing in the order listed, with method (5) yielding the most accurate estimate of the source coefficient. The RMSE is substantially reduced by waiting for the first full wave of the tsunami signal to arrive. As a case study, the five methods are compared using data recorded from the devastating 2011 Japan tsunami.

  17. Near-surface circulation and kinetic energy in the tropical Indian Ocean derived from lagrangian drifters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Saji, P.K.; Almeida, A.M.

    Trajectories of 412 satellite-tracked drifting buoys deployed in the tropical Indian Ocean have been analyzed to document the surface circulation and kinetic energy field. Only drifters drogued at 15 m depth and having drag area ratio greater than...

  18. Operational use of ocean surface drifters for tracking spilled oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamo, O. M.; Jensen, H.

    1997-01-01

    The use of Argos-positioned surface drifters by Norwegian engineers to monitor oil slicks in the North Sea was discussed. The system that was tested in June 1996 during the Norwegian Clean Seas Association oil-on-water exercise consisted of several GPS-positioned Argos drift trackers, an Argos receiver, a GPS navigator for the ship's position, and a PC with software for logging and displaying positions. Results of the field trial have been positive in that the system worked as expected. The range of direct transmission of signals from the buoys to the ship was about three nautical miles. The degree of accuracy of the relative positioning between the buoy GPS and the ship-borne GPS navigator was similar to the absolute positioning of single buoys. For best results, a minimum of two buoys and the use of lithium cells to increase battery capacity, were recommended. 3 refs., 5 figs

  19. Meteorological, oceanographic, and buoy data from JAMSTEC from five drifting buoys, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter) in the Arctic Ocean from 2000 to 2003 (NODC Accession 0002201)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1999, JAMSTEC and MetOcean Data System Ltd. developed a new drifting buoy, named J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter), to conduct long-term observations in the...

  20. Drifting and moored buoy data observed during 2015 and assembled by the Global Data Assembly Center for Drifting Buoy Data (formerly Responsible National Oceanographic Data Center (RNODC)), Canada (NCEI Accession 0156004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Buoy data is available in real time to platform operators via telecommunications providers and distributed on the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) of the World...

  1. Importance of including small-scale tile drain discharge in the calibration of a coupled groundwater-surface water catchment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Lausten; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun

    2013-01-01

    the catchment. In this study, a coupled groundwater-surface water model based on the MIKE SHE code was developed for the 4.7 km2 Lillebæk catchment in Denmark, where tile drain flow is a major contributor to the stream discharge. The catchment model was calibrated in several steps by incrementally including...... the observation data into the calibration to see the effect on model performance of including diverse data types, especially tile drain discharge. For the Lillebæk catchment, measurements of hydraulic head, daily stream discharge, and daily tile drain discharge from five small (1–4 ha) drainage areas exist....... The results showed that including tile drain data in the calibration of the catchment model improved its general performance for hydraulic heads and stream discharges. However, the model failed to correctly describe the local-scale dynamics of the tile drain discharges, and, furthermore, including the drain...

  2. NODC Standard Product: NOAA Marine environmental buoy database 1993 with Updates (19 disc set) (NCEI Accession 0095199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CD-ROMs holds marine meteorological, oceanographic, and wave spectra data collected by moored buoys and C-MAN (Coastal-Marine Automated Network) stations...

  3. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From World-Wide Distribution from 19910101 to 19910331 (NODC Accession 9100101)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Gerald P Lesblam, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format...

  4. Method for Extracting Tidal and Inertial Motion from ARGOS Ice Buoys Applied to the Barents Sea during CEAREX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turet, P

    1993-01-01

    A harmonic analysis of tidal and inertial action was applied to observations of position of ARGOS buoys deployed on drifting multiyear sea ice in the Eastern Arctic-Barents Sea during CEAREX (1988-89...

  5. Directional wave and temperature data from seven buoys at Point Reyes, CA, 1996-2002 (NODC Accession 0000760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from 7 buoys in Point Reyes, California, from 06 December 1996 to 25 July 2002. Data were collected as part of the Coastal Data Information...

  6. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Waimea Bay, North Shore, Oahu during December 2001 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Directional Waverider Buoy roughly 5 km...

  7. Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Kailua Bay, Windward Oahu, Hawaii during August 2000 - July 2004 (NODC Accession 0001660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through various funding channels, the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (UH) has maintained a Datawell Mark 2 Directional Waverider Buoy roughly...

  8. Field evaluation of remote wind sensing technologies: Shore-based and buoy mounted LIDAR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, Thomas [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-03

    In developing a national energy strategy, the United States has a number of objectives, including increasing economic growth, improving environmental quality, and enhancing national energy security. Wind power contributes to these objectives through the deployment of clean, affordable and reliable domestic energy. To achieve U.S. wind generation objectives, the Wind and Water Power Program within the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) instituted the U.S. Offshore Wind: Removing Market Barriers Program in FY 2011. Accurate and comprehensive information on offshore wind resource characteristics across a range of spatial and temporal scales is one market barrier that needs to be addressed through advanced research in remote sensing technologies. There is a pressing need for reliable offshore wind-speed measurements to assess the availability of the potential wind energy resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring spatial variability in the offshore wind resource that may impact the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components and to provide a verification program to validate the “bankability” of the output of these alternative technologies for use by finance institutions for the financing of offshore wind farm construction. The application of emerging remote sensing technologies is viewed as a means to cost-effectively meet the data needs of the offshore wind industry. In particular, scanning and buoy mounted LIDAR have been proposed as a means to obtain accurate offshore wind data at multiple locations without the high cost and regulatory hurdles associated with the construction of offshore meteorological towers. However; before these remote sensing technologies can be accepted the validity of the measured data must be evaluated to ensure their accuracy. The proposed research will establish a unique coastal ocean test-bed in the Mid-Atlantic for

  9. Response of Land-Sea Interface in Xiamen Bay to Extreme Weather Events Observed with the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a Multifunctional Sensors System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Hong, H.; Pan, W.; Zhang, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent climate observations suggest that global climate change may result in an increase of extreme weather events (such as tropical cyclones, intense precipitation i.e. heavy rains) in frequency and/or intensity in certain world regions. Subtropical coastal regions are often densely populated areas experiencing rapid development and widespread changes to the aquatic environment. The biogeochemical and ecological responses of coastal systems to extreme weather events are of increasing concern. Enhanced river nutrients input following rain storms has been linked to the ecological responses at land-sea interface. These land-sea interactions can be studied using multifunctional sensors systems. In our study, the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a monitoring system with multiple sensors, was deployed in Xiamen Bay for near real time measurements of different parameters. The Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array is a deep water net cage which functions in long-term synchronous observation of dynamic ecological characteristics with the support of an aerograph, water-watch, LOBO (Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory), ADCP, CTD chain system, YSI vertical profiler, flow cytometer, sea surface camera, and "communication box". The study showed that rain storms during multiple typhoons resulted in greater fluctuations of salinity, N concentration, and other water environmental conditions, which might have been connected with algal blooms (so-called red tide) in Xiamen Bay.

  10. Automatic construction of subject-specific human airway geometry including trifurcations based on a CT-segmented airway skeleton and surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to construct three-dimensional airway geometric models based on airway skeletons, or centerlines (CLs). Given a CT-segmented airway skeleton and surface, the proposed CL-based method automatically constructs subject-specific models that contain anatomical information regarding branches, include bifurcations and trifurcations, and extend from the trachea to terminal bronchioles. The resulting model can be anatomically realistic with the assistance of an image-based surface; alternatively a model with an idealized skeleton and/or branch diameters is also possible. This method systematically identifies and classifies trifurcations to successfully construct the models, which also provides the number and type of trifurcations for the analysis of the airways from an anatomical point of view. We applied this method to 16 normal and 16 severe asthmatic subjects using their computed tomography images. The average distance between the surface of the model and the image-based surface was 11% of the average voxel size of the image. The four most frequent locations of trifurcations were the left upper division bronchus, left lower lobar bronchus, right upper lobar bronchus, and right intermediate bronchus. The proposed method automatically constructed accurate subject-specific three-dimensional airway geometric models that contain anatomical information regarding branches using airway skeleton, diameters, and image-based surface geometry. The proposed method can construct (i) geometry automatically for population-based studies, (ii) trifurcations to retain the original airway topology, (iii) geometry that can be used for automatic generation of computational fluid dynamics meshes, and (iv) geometry based only on a skeleton and diameters for idealized branches. PMID:27704229

  11. Characterization of genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes with variable physicochemical properties including surface functionalizations in the FE1-Muta(TM) mouse lung epithelial cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Clausen, Per Axel; Madsen, Anne Mette; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes vary greatly in physicochemical properties. We compared cytotoxic and genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with varying physicochemical properties to identify drivers of toxic responses. The studied MWCNT included OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanomaterials (WPMN) (NM-401, NM-402, and NM-403), materials (NRCWE-026 and MWCNT-XNRI-7), and three sets of surface-modified MWCNT grouped by physical characteristics (thin, thick, and short I-III, respectively). Each Groups I-III included pristine, hydroxylated and carboxylated MWCNT. Group III also included an amino-functionalized MWCNT. The level of surface functionalization of the MWCNT was low. The level and type of elemental impurities of the MWCNT varied by <2% of the weight, with exceptions. Based on dynamic light scattering data, the MWCNT were well-dispersed in stock dispersion of nanopure water with 2% serum, but agglomerated and sedimented during exposure. FE1-Muta(TM) Mouse lung epithelial cells were exposed for 24 hr. The levels of DNA strand breaks (SB) were evaluated using the comet assay, a screening assay suitable for genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials. Exposure to MWCNT (12.5-200 µg/ml) did not induce significant cytotoxicity (viability above 92%). Cell proliferation was reduced in highest doses of some MWCNT after 24 hr, and was associated with generation of reactive oxygen species and high surface area. Increased levels of DNA SB were only observed for Group II consisting of MWCNT with large diameters and high Fe2 O3 and Ni content. Significantly, increased levels of SB were only observed at 200 µg/ml of MWCNT-042. Overall, the MWCNT were not cytotoxic and weakly genotoxic after 24 hr exposure to doses up to 200 µg/ml. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Analytical Study on an Oscillating Buoy Wave Energy Converter Integrated into a Fixed Box-Type Breakwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanlie Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An oscillating buoy wave energy converter (WEC integrated to an existing box-type breakwater is introduced in this study. The buoy is installed on the existing breakwater and designed to be much smaller than the breakwater in scale, aiming to reduce the construction cost of the WEC. The oscillating buoy works as a heave-type WEC in front of the breakwater towards the incident waves. A power take-off (PTO system is installed on the topside of the breakwater to harvest the kinetic energy (in heave mode of the floating buoy. The hydrodynamic performance of this system is studied analytically based on linear potential-flow theory. Effects of the geometrical parameters on the reflection and transmission coefficients and the capture width ratio (CWR of the system are investigated. Results show that the maximum efficiency of the energy extraction can reach 80% or even higher. Compared with the isolated box-type breakwater, the reflection coefficient can be effectively decreased by using this oscillating buoy WEC, with unchanged transmission coefficient. Thus, the possibility of capturing the wave energy with the oscillating buoy WEC integrated into breakwaters is shown.

  13. Disposal project for LLW and VLLW generated from research facilities in Japan: A feasibility study for the near surface disposal of VLLW that includes uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Hasegawa, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakatani, T.

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion and future work: • JAEA plans trench disposal of U-bearing waste with less than 100 Bq/g. • Two safety measures of trench disposal of U-bearing waste have been discussed taking into account increasing radioactivity over a long period of time. 1. First is to carry out dose assessment of site use scenario by using a conservatively stylized condition. 2. Second is to control the average concentration of U in the trench facilities based on the concept of the existing exposure situation. • We are continuously developing the method for safety measures of near surface disposal of VLLW including U-bearing waste.

  14. Review of 5kW wave energy LOPF buoy design study and test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margheritini, Lucia

    The purpose of this project was to document the mechanical power production against a target power curve of a 5kW grid connected wave energy buoy in Nissum Bredning at Helligsø. This test site is typically used for open sea testing of scale 1:10 devices in irregular waves. In order to better adapt...... to the moderate wave height, the buoy was down sized by a factor of 3 and a new lower target power curve for the buoy was agreed to. Downsizing the project also had the advantage that it is more cost effective and fast to experiment with small wave energy devices than with big devices, at an early development...... stage, in line with the TRL and four phases development (proof of concept, design and feasibility study, field trials and half or full‐scale trials) promoted by AAU and supported by the marine renewable energy sector. To complement this, the IEC 114 standards define 3 stages of testing (1=small scale...

  15. Oceanographic Multisensor Buoy Based on Low Cost Sensors for Posidonia Meadows Monitoring in Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are some underwater areas with high ecological interest that should be monitored. Posidonia and seagrasses exert considerable work in protecting the coastline from erosion. In these areas, many animals and organisms live and find the grassland food and the protection against predators. It is considered a bioindicator of the quality of coastal marine waters. It is important to monitor them and maintain these ecological communities as clean as possible. In this paper, we present an oceanographic buoy for Posidonia meadows monitoring. It is based on a set of low cost sensors which are able to collect data from water such as salinity, temperature, and turbidity and from the weather as temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall, among others. The system is mounted in a buoy which keeps it isolated to possible oxidation problems. Data gathered are processed using a microcontroller. Finally the buoy is connected with a base station placed on the mainland through a wireless connection using a FlyPort module. The network performance is checked in order to ensure that no delays will be generated on the data transmission. This proposal could be used to monitor other areas with special ecological interest and for monitoring and supervising aquaculture activities.

  16. Using Buoy and Radar Data to Study Sudden Wind Gusts Over Coastal Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priftis, Georgios; Chronis, Themis; Lang, Timothy J.

    2017-01-01

    Significant sudden wind gusts can pose a threat to aviation near the coastline, as well as small (sailing) boats and commercial ships approaching the ports. Such cases can result in wind speed changes of more than an order of magnitude within 5 minutes, which can then last up to 20 minutes or more. Although the constellation of scatterometers is a good means of studying maritime convection, those sudden gusts are not easily captured because of the low time resolution. The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) provides continuous measurements of wind speed and direction along the US coastal regions every 6 minutes. Buoys are platforms placed at specific places on the seas, especially along coastlines, providing data for atmospheric and oceanic studies. Next Generation Radars (NEXRADs), after the recent upgrade of the network to dual-pol systems, offer enhanced capabilities to study atmospheric phenomena. NEXRADs provide continuous full-volume scans approximately every 5 minutes and therefore are close to the time resolution of the buoy measurements. Use of single- Doppler retrievals might also provide a means of further validation.

  17. Coastal Response to Latitudinal Shifts in Wave Climate in Southeast Australia using a Surrogate Buoy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, T.; Goodwin, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    Most Global Climate Models (GCM) agree that an expansion of the tropics will continue with greenhouse warming, although the magnitude of this expansion is largely under-estimated. A first-order impact is wave climate and coastal response in the sub-tropics. We use a latitudinal array of mid-shelf wave buoy observations along the Southeast Australian Shelf (SEAS) to forecast wave climate change with tropical expansion. We suggest that the present-day modal wave climate from more equatorward SEAS buoys can be used as surrogate data to project future wave climate change at more poleward locations. This approach allows multiple scenarios of the magnitude of future tropical expansion to be examined, based on the latitudinal separation between buoys. We use the modal wave climate typology of Mortlock and Goodwin (2015) to relate wave climate change to synoptic climate. We then use a coupled spectral wave and morphodynamic model to evaluate wave climate change scenarios for an idealised headland-bay beach setting. The method provides an alternative to the downscaling approach for wave climate forecasting, which inherits and adds to the uncertainty of the GCM projections. Our results are relevant for other Southern Hemisphere east coasts in South America and Africa, and Northern Hemisphere west coasts in North America and Europe with similar mid-shelf wave climate and sediment transport regimes in the sub-tropics.

  18. Northerly surface winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.V.; Cayan, D.R.; Graham, N.E.; Georgakakos, K.P.

    2008-01-01

    Persistent spring and summer northerly surface winds are the defining climatological feature of the western coast of North America, especially south of the Oregon coast. Northerly surface winds are important for upwelling and a vast array of other biological, oceanic, and atmospheric processes. Intermittence in northerly coastal surface wind is characterized and wind events are quantitatively defined using coastal buoy data south of Cape Mendocino on the northern California coast. The defined wind events are then used as a basis for composites in order to explain the spatial evolution of various atmospheric and oceanic processes. Wind events involve large-scale changes in the three-dimensional atmospheric circulation including the eastern North Pacific subtropical anticyclone and southeast trade winds. Composites of QSCAT satellite scatterometer wind estimates from 1999 to 2005 based on a single coastal buoy indicate that wind events typically last 72-96 h and result in anomalies in surface wind and Ekman pumping that extend over 1000 kin from the west coast of North America. It may be useful to consider ocean circulation and dependent ecosystem dynamics and the distribution of temperature, moisture, and aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer in the context of wind events defined herein. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Second-sphere complexation of thorium(IV) by cucurbit[6]uril with included perrhenate counterions. Crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuery, Pierre [CEA, IRAMIS, UMR 3685 NIMBE, Laboratoire de Chimie Moleculaire et Catalyse pour l' Energie (LCMCE), Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-04-15

    The reaction of thorium(IV) nitrate with cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) in the presence of perrhenic acid in water gives the complex [Th(NO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}][(ReO{sub 4})(CB6)](ReO{sub 4}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O (1). Aquated cations are held at both CB6 portals by ion-dipole and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and one of the ReO{sub 4}{sup -} anions is included in the CB6 cavity. The packing displays columns of alternate cations and encapsulated anions. Hirshfeld surfaces are used to visualize short contacts between the species present. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Coherent Wave Measurement Buoy Arrays to Support Wave Energy Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spada, F.; Chang, G.; Jones, C.; Janssen, T. T.; Barney, P.; Roberts, J.

    2016-02-01

    Wave energy is the most abundant form of hydrokinetic energy in the United States and wave energy converters (WECs) are being developed to extract the maximum possible power from the prevailing wave climate. However, maximum wave energy capture is currently limited by the narrow banded frequency response of WECs as well as extended protective shutdown requirements during periods of large waves. These limitations must be overcome in order to maximize energy extraction, thus significantly decreasing the cost of wave energy and making it a viable energy source. Techno-economic studies of several WEC devices have shown significant potential to improve wave energy capture efficiency through operational control strategies that incorporate real-time information about local surface wave motions. Integral Consulting Inc., with ARPA-E support, is partnering with Sandia National Laboratories and Spoondrift LLC to develop a coherent array of wave-measuring devices to relay and enable the prediction of wave-resolved surface dynamics at a WEC location ahead of real time. This capability will provide necessary information to optimize power production of WECs through control strategies, thereby allowing for a single WEC design to perform more effectively across a wide range of wave environments. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000514.

  1. Optimization and Annual Average Power Predictions of a Backward Bent Duct Buoy Oscillating Water Column Device Using the Wells Turbine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Christopher S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Willits, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fontaine, Arnold A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This Technical Report presents work completed by The Applied Research Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University, in conjunction with Sandia National Labs, on the optimization of the power conversion chain (PCC) design to maximize the Average Annual Electric Power (AAEP) output of an Oscillating Water Column (OWC) device. The design consists of two independent stages. First, the design of a floating OWC, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB), and second the design of the PCC. The pneumatic power output of the BBDB in random waves is optimized through the use of a hydrodynamically coupled, linear, frequency-domain, performance model that links the oscillating structure to internal air-pressure fluctuations. The PCC optimization is centered on the selection and sizing of a Wells Turbine and electric power generation equipment. The optimization of the PCC involves the following variables: the type of Wells Turbine (fixed or variable pitched, with and without guide vanes), the radius of the turbine, the optimal vent pressure, the sizing of the power electronics, and number of turbines. Also included in this Technical Report are further details on how rotor thrust and torque are estimated, along with further details on the type of variable frequency drive selected.

  2. Thin ice and storms: Sea ice deformation from buoy arrays deployed during N-ICE2015

    OpenAIRE

    Itkin, Polona; Spreen, Gunnar; Cheng, Bin; Doble, Martin; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny; Haapala, Jari; Hughes, Nick; Kaleschke, Lars; Nicolaus, Marcel; Wilkinson, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Arctic sea ice has displayed significant thinning as well as an increase in drift speed in recent years. Taken together this suggests an associated rise in sea ice deformation rate. A winter and spring expedition to the sea ice covered region north of Svalbard – the Norwegian young sea ICE 2015 expedition (N-ICE2015) - gave an opportunity to deploy extensive buoy arrays and to monitor the deformation of the first- and second-year ice now common in the majority of the Arctic Basin. During the ...

  3. 33 CFR 165.812 - Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. 165.812 Section 165.812 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.812 Security Zones; Lower Mississippi River, Southwest Pass Sea Buoy to Mile Marker 96.0, New Orleans, LA. (a) Location. Within the Lower Mississippi...

  4. Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind recorders from AIRCRAFT and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the Seasonal Response of the Equatorial Atlantic Experiment/Français Océan et Climat dans l'Atlantique Equatorial (SEQUAL/FOCAL) project from 1980-01-25 to 1985-12-18 (NODC Accession 8700111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, physical, ocean circulation, wind circulation, and other data were collected from moored buoys, CTD casts, drifting buoys, and in situ wind...

  5. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The quality of the surface wind analysis at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (NCMRWF), New Delhi over the tropical Indian Ocean and its improvement in 2001 are examined by comparing it with in situ buoy measurements and satellite derived surface winds from NASA QuikSCAT satellite (QSCT) ...

  6. Auto-correlation analysis of ocean surface wind vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nature of the inherent temporal variability of surface winds is analyzed by comparison of winds obtained through different measurement methods. In this work, an auto-correlation analysis of a time series data of surface winds measured in situ by a deep water buoy in the Indian Ocean has been carried out. Hourly time ...

  7. Estimates of effective elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere using model including surface and subsurface loads and effective elastic thickness of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, A.; Yongtao, F.

    2016-12-01

    The effective elastic thickness (Te) is an important parameter that characterizes the long term strength of the lithosphere, which has great significance on understanding the mechanical properties and evolution of the lithosphere. In contrast with many controversies regarding elastic thickness of continent lithosphere, the Te of oceanic lithosphere is thought to be in a simple way that is dependent on the age of the plate. However, rescent studies show that there is no simple relationship between Te and age at time of loading for both seamounts and subduction zones. As subsurface loading is very importand and has large influence in the estimate of Te for continent lithosphere, and many oceanic features such as subduction zones also have considerable subsurface loading. We introduce the method to estimate the effective elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere using model including surface and subsurface loads by using free-air gravity anomaly and bathymetric data, together with a moving window admittance technique (MWAT). We use the multitaper spectral estimation method to calculate the power spectral density. Through tests with synthetic subduction zone like bathymetry and gravity data show that the Te can be recovered in an accurance similar to that in the continent and there is also a trade-off between spatial resolution and variance for different window sizes. We estimate Te of many subduction zones (Peru-Chile trench, Middle America trench, Caribbean trench, Kuril-Japan trench, Mariana trench, Tonga trench, Java trench, Ryukyu-Philippine trench) with an age range of 0-160 Myr to reassess the relationship between elastic thickness and the age of the lithosphere at the time of loading. The results do not show a simple relationship between Te and age.

  8. Application of atomic mutations included in nuclear reactions, 40Ar(γ, p)39Cl(β decay)39Ar, to surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkuma, Juzo

    1987-01-01

    It has been found that the nuclear transformation processes which are initiated by photonuclear reactions can be used for studying the adsorption and chemical reactions taking place on solid surfaces. Chemically reactive 39 Cl was produced by irradiating 40 Ar with high-energy bremsstrahlung, and its blow was directed onto several material surfaces. The amount of chlorine adsorption was ascertained by detecting its radioactivity. Desorption without heating the adsorber samples inevitably occurred owing to the nuclear decay of 39 Cl. The adsorption and desorption rates were compared for several elements. A fast growth of oxide islands on sample surfaces was observed during the adsorption-desorption process. (author)

  9. Bayesian inference of earthquake parameters from buoy data using a polynomial chaos-based surrogate

    KAUST Repository

    Giraldi, Loic

    2017-04-07

    This work addresses the estimation of the parameters of an earthquake model by the consequent tsunami, with an application to the Chile 2010 event. We are particularly interested in the Bayesian inference of the location, the orientation, and the slip of an Okada-based model of the earthquake ocean floor displacement. The tsunami numerical model is based on the GeoClaw software while the observational data is provided by a single DARTⓇ buoy. We propose in this paper a methodology based on polynomial chaos expansion to construct a surrogate model of the wave height at the buoy location. A correlated noise model is first proposed in order to represent the discrepancy between the computational model and the data. This step is necessary, as a classical independent Gaussian noise is shown to be unsuitable for modeling the error, and to prevent convergence of the Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler. Second, the polynomial chaos model is subsequently improved to handle the variability of the arrival time of the wave, using a preconditioned non-intrusive spectral method. Finally, the construction of a reduced model dedicated to Bayesian inference is proposed. Numerical results are presented and discussed.

  10. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  11. Perancangan Sistem Prediktor Daya Pada Panel Photovoltaic di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aini Prisilia Susanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Buoy weather station merupakan stasiun informasi cuaca yang banyak dijumpai di pelabuhan, khususnya di Surabaya. Untuk mengoperasikannya diperlukan sumber daya listrik berupa panel photovoltaic. Efek fotolistrik pada PV mampu merubah energi cahaya menjadi energi listrik. Besarnya daya yang dihasilkan tergantung dari intensitas matahari, temperatur permukaan, dan keadaan geografis setempat. Untuk memprediksi daya keluaran per setengah jam yang dihasilkan oleh panel PV maka digunakan metode jaringan syaraf tiruan dengan algoritma backpropagation pada software Matlab. Variabel yang digunakan berupa data daya yang diperoleh dari tegangan dan arus yang dihasilkan oleh panel PV di daerah Surabaya. Data daya selama 3 hari per setengah jam tersebut dijadikan data input dan target pada Matlab. Hasil terbaik perancangan sistem prediksi daya keluaran panel PV menggunakan JST pada Matlab yaitu Mean Square Error (MSE sebesar 0,0113 dan akurasi ketepatan prediksi sebesar 99,81%.

  12. Fully nonlinear time-domain simulation of a backward bent duct buoy floating wave energy converter using an acceleration potential method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Rok Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A floating Oscillating Water Column (OWC wave energy converter, a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB, was simulated using a state-of-the-art, two-dimensional, fully-nonlinear Numerical Wave Tank (NWT technique. The hydrodynamic performance of the floating OWC device was evaluated in the time domain. The acceleration potential method, with a full-updated kernel matrix calculation associated with a mode decomposition scheme, was implemented to obtain accurate estimates of the hydrodynamic force and displacement of a freely floating BBDB. The developed NWT was based on the potential theory and the boundary element method with constant panels on the boundaries. The mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian (MEL approach was employed to capture the nonlinear free surfaces inside the chamber that interacted with a pneumatic pressure, induced by the time-varying airflow velocity at the air duct. A special viscous damping was applied to the chamber free surface to represent the viscous energy loss due to the BBDB's shape and motions. The viscous damping coefficient was properly selected using a comparison of the experimental data. The calculated surface elevation, inside and outside the chamber, with a tuned viscous damping correlated reasonably well with the experimental data for various incident wave conditions. The conservation of the total wave energy in the computational domain was confirmed over the entire range of wave frequencies.

  13. A Preliminary Study of a Buoy System for Acquisition, Transmission, and Management of Hydrological Data Obtained from In-situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for a system of remotely located, data collection buoys are considered first for a prototype system to be used in conjunction with the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-A), and then for a more advanced system. The necessary sensor characteristics for compatibility with the ERTS-A data collection platforms are considered, as well as possible sites for location of the prototype buoys. The advanced system is considered from the standpoint of continuous data collection both through satellite data relay and ground telemetry systems. Management of the data from a buoy system is analyzed, especially with regard to the advanced system.

  14. Surface Tension of Binary Mixtures Including Polar Components Modeled by the Density Gradient Theory Combined with the PC-SAFT Equation of State

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinš, Václav; Planková, Barbora; Hrubý, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 5 (2013), s. 792-812 ISSN 0195-928X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760905; GA ČR(CZ) GPP101/11/P046; GA ČR GA101/09/1633 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : chemical polarity * gradient theory * surface tension Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.623, year: 2013 http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s10765-012-1207-z

  15. The Plasmodium falciparum transcriptome in severe malaria reveals altered expression of genes involved in important processes including surface antigen–encoding var genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin-Hill, Gerry Q.; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Nguyen, Hanh H. T.; Sebayang, Boni F.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Marfurt, Jutta; Cobbold, Simon A.; Rambhatla, Janavi S.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Rogerson, Stephen J.; Brown, Graham V.; Day, Karen P.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2018-01-01

    Within the human host, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is exposed to multiple selection pressures. The host environment changes dramatically in severe malaria, but the extent to which the parasite responds to—or is selected by—this environment remains unclear. From previous studies, the parasites that cause severe malaria appear to increase expression of a restricted but poorly defined subset of the PfEMP1 variant, surface antigens. PfEMP1s are major targets of protective immunity. Here, we used RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse gene expression in 44 parasite isolates that caused severe and uncomplicated malaria in Papuan patients. The transcriptomes of 19 parasite isolates associated with severe malaria indicated that these parasites had decreased glycolysis without activation of compensatory pathways; altered chromatin structure and probably transcriptional regulation through decreased histone methylation; reduced surface expression of PfEMP1; and down-regulated expression of multiple chaperone proteins. Our RNAseq also identified novel associations between disease severity and PfEMP1 transcripts, domains, and smaller sequence segments and also confirmed all previously reported associations between expressed PfEMP1 sequences and severe disease. These findings will inform efforts to identify vaccine targets for severe malaria and also indicate how parasites adapt to—or are selected by—the host environment in severe malaria. PMID:29529020

  16. Characterization of Genotoxic Response to 15 Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes with Variable Physicochemical Properties Including Surface Functionalizations in the FE1-Muta(TM) Mouse Lung Epithelial Cell Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Jensen, Keld Alstrup

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes vary greatly in physicochemical properties. We compared cytotoxic and genotoxic response to 15 multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with varying physicochemical properties to identify drivers of toxic responses. The studied MWCNT included OECD Working Party on Manufactured Nanoma...

  17. Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Indian Ocean surface winds from NCMRWF analysis as compared to QuikSCAT and moored buoy winds. B N Goswami1 and E N Rajagopal2. 1Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. 2National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, Department of ...

  18. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics

  19. Auto-correlation analysis of ocean surface wind vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    In this work, an auto-correlation analysis of a time series data of surface winds measured in situ by a deep water buoy in the Indian Ocean has been carried out. Hourly time series data available for 240 hours in the month of May, 1999 were subjected to an auto-correlation analysis. The analysis indicates an exponential fall ...

  20. Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secker, T J; Pinchin, H E; Hervé, R C; Keevil, C W

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.

  1. Renner-Teller effect in linear tetra-atomic molecules. I. Variational method including couplings between all degrees of freedom on six-dimensional potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutier, L.; Léonard, C.; Gatti, F.

    2009-04-01

    For electronically degenerate states of linear tetra-atomic molecules, a new method is developed for the variational treatment of the Renner-Teller and spin-orbit couplings. The approach takes into account all rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, the dominant couplings between the corresponding angular momenta as well as the couplings with the electronic and electron spin angular momenta. The complete rovibrational kinetic energy operator is expressed in Jacobi coordinates, where the rovibrational angular momenta ĴN have been replaced by L̂ez-Ŝ and the spin-orbit coupling has been described by the perturbative term ASO×L̂ezṡŜz. Attention has been paid on the electronic wave functions, which require additional phase for linear tetra-atomic molecules. Our implemented rovibrational basis functions and the integration of the different parts of the total Hamiltonian operator are described. This new variational approach is tested on the electronic ground state X Π2u of HCCH+ for which new six-dimensional potential energy surfaces have been computed using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method and the cc-pV5Z basis set. The calculated rovibronic energies and their comparisons with previous theoretical and experimental works are presented in the next paper.

  2. Development of symmetric composition-gradient materials including hard particles in its surface layer; Hyosobu ni koshitsu ryushi wo fukumu taishogata sosei keisha zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Development of new materials with both thermal resistance and thermal shock resistance was studied on the basis of symmetric ceramics/metal/ceramics gradient composition. Al2O3/TiC/Ni/TiC/Al2O3 was used as material model of basic composition, and the system was selected where WC-Co system alloy hard particles were dispersed into the Al2O3 ceramic surface layer. The layered material was sintered in N2 gas atmosphere by SHS/HIP method using exothermic caused by nitriding reaction. Since cracks were generated in some specimens of 5-layer structure, improved specimens of 7-layer structure were prepared. To examine the effect of a particle size on toughness, WC-Co system alloy specimens with different particle sizes were also prepared. As a result, no cracks were found, and residual stress and fracture toughness were affected by particle size. In addition, the following were studied: technique of mass production, observation of fine structures, analysis of thermal stress, thermal shock resistance, and friction and abrasion characteristics. 13 refs., 65 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Temperature data from buoy casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from 01 August 1928 to 04 September 1932 (NODC Accession 0000242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using buoy casts from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from August 1, 1928 to September 4, 1932 in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were...

  4. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and pressure measurements collected using moored buoy in the Indian Ocean from 2001-2006 (NODC Accession 0002733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements in the Equatorial Indian from 2001 to 2006 from the TRITON (TRIANGLE TRANS-OCEAN BUOY NETWORK); JAPAN AGENCY FOR MARINE-EARTH...

  5. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from DRIFTING BUOY From TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 19921208 to 19930719 (NODC Accession 9500059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The drifting buoy data set in this accession was collected from TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) in Equatorial Pacific, North of Australia as part of Tropical...

  6. Temperature, salinity, and other data from buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993 (NODC Accession 9800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993. Data were collected by the...

  7. Determination of drugs in surface water and wastewater samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: Methods and preliminary results including toxicity studies with Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, M.; Ferrer, I.; Ginebreda, A.; Figueras, M.; Olivella, L.; Tirapu, L.; Vilanova, M.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work a combined analytical method involving toxicity and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water samples. The drugs investigated were the analgesics: ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, the decomposition product of the acetyl salicylic acid: salicylic acid and one lipid lowering agent, gemfibrozil. The selected compounds are acidic substances, very polar and all of them are analgesic compounds that can be purchased without medical prescription. The developed protocol consisted, first of all, on the use Microtox?? and ToxAlert??100 toxicity tests with Vibrio fischeri for the different pharmaceutical drugs. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values and the toxicity units (TU) were determined for every compound using both systems. Sample enrichment of water samples was achieved by solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE), using the Merck LiChrolut?? EN cartridges followed by LC-ESI-MS. Average recoveries loading 1 l of samples with pH=2 varied from 69 to 91% and the detection limits in the range of 15-56 ng/l. The developed method was applied to real samples from wastewater and surface-river waters of Catalonia (north-east of Spain). One batch of samples was analyzed in parallel also by High Resolution Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HRGC-MS) and the results have been compared with the LC-ESI-MS method developed in this work. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Drone Use in Monioring Open Ocean Surface Debris, Including Paired Manta and Tucker Trawls for Relateing Sea State to Vertical Debris Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, G.

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring debris at sea presents challenges not found in beach or riverine habitats, and is typically done with trawl nets of various apertures and mesh sizes, which limits the size of debris captured and the area surveyed. To partially overcome these limitations in monitoring floating debris, a Quadcopter drone with video transmitting and recording capabilities was deployed at the beginning and the end of manta trawl transects within the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre's eastern convergence zone. Subsurface tucker trawls at 10 meters were conducted at the same time as the manta trawls, in order to assess the effect of sea state on debris dispersal. Trawls were conducted on an 11 station grid used repeatedly since 1999. For drone observations, the operator and observer were stationed on the mother ship while two researchers collected observed debris using a rigid inflatable boat (RIB). The drone was flown to a distance of approximately 100 meters from the vessel in a zigzag or circular search pattern. Here we examine issues arising from drone deployment during the survey: 1) relation of area surveyed by drone to volume of water passing through trawl; 2) retrieval of drone-spotted and associated RIB spotted debris. 3) integrating post- flight image analysis into retrieved debris quantification; and 4) factors limiting drone effectiveness at sea. During the survey, debris too large for the manta trawl was spotted by the drone, and significant debris not observed using the drone was recovered by the RIB. The combination of drone sightings, RIB retrieval, and post flight image analysis leads to improved monitoring of debris at sea. We also examine the issue of the distribution of floating debris during sea states varying from 0-5 by comparing quantities from surface manta trawls to the tucker trawls at a nominal depth of 10 meters.

  9. Validation of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Ice Surface Temperature Environmental Data Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghui Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of the surface temperature is critical to understanding and forecasting Arctic climate change; as surface temperature integrates changes in the surface energy budget. The sea-ice surface temperature (IST has been measured with optical and thermal infrared sensors for many years. With the IST Environmental Data Record (EDR available from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites; we can continue to monitor and investigate Arctic climate change. This work examines the quality of the VIIRS IST EDR. Validation is performed through comparisons with multiple datasets; including NASA IceBridge measurements; air temperature from Arctic drifting ice buoys; Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS IST; MODIS IST simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO; and surface air temperature from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Results show biases of −0.34; −0.12; 0.16; −3.20; and −3.41 K compared to an aircraft-mounted downward-looking pyrometer; MODIS; MODIS SNO; drifting buoy; and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis; respectively; root-mean-square errors of 0.98; 1.02; 0.95; 4.89; and 6.94 K; and root-mean-square errors with the bias removed of 0.92; 1.01; 0.94; 3.70; and 6.04 K. Based on the IceBridge and MODIS results; the VIIRS IST uncertainty (RMSE meets or exceeds the JPSS system requirement of 1.0 K. The product can therefore be considered useful for meteorological and climatological applications.

  10. Occurrence and Ecotoxicological Effects of Free, Conjugated, and Halogenated Steroids Including 17α-Hydroxypregnanolone and Pregnanediol in Swiss Wastewater and Surface Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Yanbin; Fent, Karl

    2017-06-06

    Apart from estrogens, the occurrence and ecotoxicity of steroids in aquatic environments is poorly known. Here, we analyzed 33 steroids, including estrogens, androgens, progestins, and glucocorticoids, in hospital wastewaters, river water, and municipal wastewater treatment plant (WTP) influents and effluents at different sites in Switzerland. In addition, wastewater from different treatment steps of two WTPs with advanced treatment, such as ozonation or pulverized activated carbon, were analyzed to study the steroid's behavior during treatment. Considerable levels of different steroids occurred in hospital and raw municipal wastewater, but they were low (lower than 1 ng/L) or below the detection level in effluents of WTPs and river water. In WTP influents, estrogens (estrone, 17β-estradiol, and estriol), androgens (androstenedione, androsterone, trans-androsterone, and testosterone), progestins and metabolites (progesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, megestrol acetate, mifepristone, pregnanediol, 17α-hydroxypregnanolone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 21α-hydroxyprogesterone) were detected and removed effectively during biological treatment. Ozonation further removed the steroids. Exposure of zebrafish embryos demonstrated negligible effects of pregnanediol and 17α-hydroxypregnanolone, while mixtures that mimic wastewater and river water composition affected embryo development and led to the alteration of steroidogenesis gene transcripts at nanogram per liter concentrations. Although steroid concentrations are low in Swiss rivers, the possibility of additive effects may be of concern.

  11. Skin physiology in men and women: in vivo evaluation of 300 people including TEWL, SC hydration, sebum content and skin surface pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, S; Krueger, N; Kerscher, M

    2013-10-01

    Evidence is given that differences in skin physiological properties exist between men and women. However, despite an assessable number of available publications, the results are still inconsistent. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study is the first systematic assessment of gender-related differences in skin physiology in men and women, with a special focus on changes over lifetime. A total of 300 healthy male and female subjects (20-74 years) were selected following strict criteria including age, sun behaviour or smoking habits. TEWL, hydration level, sebum production and pH value were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at forehead, cheek, neck, volar forearm and dorsum of hand. Until the age of 50 men's TEWL is significantly lower than the water loss of women of the same age, regardless of the location. With ageing gender-related differences in TEWL assimilate. Young men show higher SC hydration in comparison with women. But, whereas SC hydration is stable or even increasing in women over lifetime, the skin hydration in men is progressively decreasing, beginning at the age of 40. Sebum production in male skin is always higher and stays stable with increasing age, whereas sebum production in women progressively decreases over lifetime. Across all localizations and age groups, the pH value in men is below 5, the pH value of female subjects is, aside from limited expectations, higher than 5. Skin physiological distinctions between the sexes exist and are particularly remarkable with regard to sebum production and pH value. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. About New Maps of Surface Currents of the World Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, O. P.; Kasyanov, S. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    Using the example of the surface currents map constructed for the Northern Atlantic on the basis of data of modern observations by means of drifting buoys, it is shown that the previously published maps of ocean surface currents, based on ship drift data, have become outdated and require an update. The influence of the bottom relief on the directions of surface layer currents is shown.

  13. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, P; Van Sebille, E

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the ...

  14. Rancang Bangun Maximum Power Point Tracking pada Panel Photovoltaic Berbasis Logika Fuzzy di Buoy Weather Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Prima Juliansyah Putra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu aplikasi yang sering digunakan dalam bidang energi terbarukan adalah panel photovoltaic. Panel ini memiliki prinsip kerja berdasarkan efek photovoltaic dimana lempengan logam akan menghasilkan energi listrik apabila diberi intensitas cahaya. Untuk menghasilkan daya keluaran panel yang maksimal, maka diperlukan suatu algoritma yang biasa disebut Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT.MPPT yang diterapkan pada sistem photovoltaic berfungsi untuk mengatur nilai tegangan keluaran panel sehingga titik ker-janya beroperasi pada kondisi maksimal. Algoritma MPPT pada panel ini telah dilakukan dengan menggunakan logika fuzzy melalui mikrokontroler Arduino Uno sebagai pem-bangkit sinyal Pulse Width Modulation (PWM yang akan dikirimkan menuju DC-DC Buck Boost Converter. Keluaran dari buck boost converterakan dihubungkan secara langsung dengan buoy weather station untuk menyuplai energi listrik tiap komponen yang berada di dalamnya. Untuk menguji performansi dari algoritma MPPT yang telah dirancang, maka sistem akan diuji menggunakan variasi beban antara metode direct-coupled dengan MPPT menggunakan logika fuzzy. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa MPPT dengan logika fuzzy dapat menghasilkan daya maksimum daripada direct-coupled. Pada sistem panel photovoltaic ini memiliki range efisiensi 33.07589 % hingga 74.25743 %. Daya mak-simal dapat dicapai oleh sistem untuk tiap variasi beban dan efisiensi maksimal dapat dicapai pada beban 20 Ohm dari hasil pengujian sistem MPPT.

  15. Tracing high time-resolution fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon using satellite and buoy observations: Case study in Lake Taihu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changchun; Yunmei, Li; Liu, Ge; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Hao; Zhu, A.-xing; Song, Ting; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Mingli; Shi, Kun

    2017-10-01

    Field measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and remote-sensing reflectance were conducted to develop a regional, empirical red-blue algorithm to retrieve surface DOC from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) data for Lake Taihu, China. The auxiliary data (in-situ observations of the optical properties and water quality, buoy measurements of hydrodynamic data and water chemical parameters) were used to investigate the spatial and temporal variations in DOC. GOCI was shown to be capable of successfully obtaining hourly variations in DOC, with a root mean square error percentage (RMSP) of 17.29% (RMSE = 0.69 mg/L) for the match-up data. The GOCI-derived DOC in Lake Taihu confirms that the highest DOC concentration is in northwest Lake Taihu, followed by Meiliang Bay, Gonghu Bay and northeast Lake Taihu. Hourly DOC variation is significant and presents a different trend for each lake segment due to the variety of influencing factors. Discharge of DOC from surrounding rivers is an important factor to the variation of DOC in northeast Lake Taihu. However, organic products of algae will be the primary contributor to DOC when algal bloom occurred. During the period of algal bloom, high DOC levels in Lake Taihu can lead to hypoxia when coupled with high temperatures and low disturbance.

  16. Yield Surface for Bars Including Warping Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    Kreyenhagen Stragetic Air Command Columbia University ATTN: NRI-STINFO Library ATTN: H. Bleich ATTN: F. Dimaggio DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY University of Denver...TIC-Library SRI International ATTN: G. Abrahamson M & T Company ATTN: W. Wilkinson ATTN: D. McNaight ATTN: A. Florence Management Science Associates

  17. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  18. Maintenance of coastal surface blooms by surface temperature stratification and wind drift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Carmen Ruiz-de la Torre

    Full Text Available Algae blooms are an increasingly recurrent phenomenon of potentially socio-economic impact in coastal waters globally and in the coastal upwelling region off northern Baja California, Mexico. In coastal upwelling areas the diurnal wind pattern is directed towards the coast during the day. We regularly found positive Near Surface Temperature Stratification (NSTS, the resulting density stratification is expected to reduce the frictional coupling of the surface layer from deeper waters and allow for its more efficient wind transport. We propose that the net transport of the top layer of approximately 2.7 kilometers per day towards the coast helps maintain surface blooms of slow growing dinoflagellate such as Lingulodinium polyedrum. We measured: near surface stratification with a free-rising CTD profiler, trajectories of drifter buoys with attached thermographs, wind speed and direction, velocity profiles via an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, Chlorophyll and cell concentration from water samples and vertical migration using sediment traps. The ADCP and drifter data agree and show noticeable current shear within the first meters of the surface where temperature stratification and high cell densities of L. polyedrum were found during the day. Drifters with 1m depth drogue moved towards the shore, whereas drifters at 3 and 5 m depth showed trajectories parallel or away from shore. A small part of the surface population migrated down to the sea floor during night thus reducing horizontal dispersion. The persistent transport of the surface bloom population towards shore should help maintain the bloom in favorable environmental conditions with high nutrients, but also increasing the potential socioeconomic impact of the blooms. The coast wise transport is not limited to blooms but includes all dissolved and particulate constituents in surface waters.

  19. Towards closure of regional heat budgets in the North Atlantic using Argo floats and surface flux datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Wells

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The upper ocean heat budget (0–300 m of the North Atlantic from 20°–60° N is investigated using data from Argo profiling floats for 1999–2005 and the NCEP/NCAR and NOC surface flux datasets. Estimates of the different terms in the budget (heat storage, advection, diffusion and surface exchange are obtained using the methodology developed by Hadfield et al. (2007a, b. The method includes optimal interpolation of the individual profiles to produce gridded fields with error estimates at a 10°×10° grid box resolution. Closure of the heat budget is obtained within the error estimates for some regions – particularly the eastern subtropical Atlantic – but not for those boxes that include the Gulf Stream. Over the whole range considered, closure is obtained for 13 (9 out of 20 boxes with the NOC (NCEP/NCAR surface fluxes. The seasonal heat budget at 20–30° N, 35–25° W is considered in detail. Here, the NCEP based budget has an annual mean residual of −55±35 Wm−2 compared with a NOC based value of −4±35 Wm−2. For this box, the net heat divergence of 36 Wm−2 (Ekman=−4 Wm−2, geostrophic=11 Wm−2, diffusion=29 Wm−2 offsets the net heating of 32 Wm−2 from the NOC surface heat fluxes. The results in this box are consistent with an earlier evaluation of the fluxes using measurements from research buoys in the subduction array which revealed biases in NCEP but good agreement of the buoy values with the NOC fields.

  20. Sunlight Intensity Based Global Positioning System for Near-Surface Underwater Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Fernández

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Water monitoring is important in domains including documenting climate change, weather prediction and fishing. This paper presents a simple and energy efficient localization strategy for near surface buoy based sensors. Sensors can be dropped randomly in the ocean and thus self-calibrate in terms of geographic location such that geo-tagged observations of water quality can be made without the need for costly and energy consuming GPS-hardware. The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. Unlike previous localization techniques for underwater sensors, the current approach does not rely on stationary or mobile reference points.

  1. Sunlight intensity based global positioning system for near-surface underwater sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Javier V; Sandnes, Frode E; Fernández, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Water monitoring is important in domains including documenting climate change, weather prediction and fishing. This paper presents a simple and energy efficient localization strategy for near surface buoy based sensors. Sensors can be dropped randomly in the ocean and thus self-calibrate in terms of geographic location such that geo-tagged observations of water quality can be made without the need for costly and energy consuming GPS-hardware. The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. Unlike previous localization techniques for underwater sensors, the current approach does not rely on stationary or mobile reference points.

  2. Experimental Comparison Between Mahoney and Complementary Sensor Fusion Algorithm for Attitude Determination by Raw Sensor Data of Xsens Imu on Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouybari, A.; Ardalan, A. A.; Rezvani, M.-H.

    2017-09-01

    The accurate measurement of platform orientation plays a critical role in a range of applications including marine, aerospace, robotics, navigation, human motion analysis, and machine interaction. We used Mahoney filter, Complementary filter and Xsens Kalman filter for achieving Euler angle of a dynamic platform by integration of gyroscope, accelerometer, and magnetometer measurements. The field test has been performed in Kish Island using an IMU sensor (Xsens MTi-G-700) that installed onboard a buoy so as to provide raw data of gyroscopes, accelerometers, magnetometer measurements about 25 minutes. These raw data were used to calculate the Euler angles by Mahoney filter and Complementary filter, while the Euler angles collected by XSense IMU sensor become the reference of the Euler angle estimations. We then compared Euler angles which calculated by Mahoney Filter and Complementary Filter with reference to the Euler angles recorded by the XSense IMU sensor. The standard deviations of the differences between the Mahoney Filter, Complementary Filter Euler angles and XSense IMU sensor Euler angles were about 0.5644, 0.3872, 0.4990 degrees and 0.6349, 0.2621, 2.3778 degrees for roll, pitch, and heading, respectively, so the numerical result assert that Mahoney filter is precise for roll and heading angles determination and Complementary filter is precise only for pitch determination, it should be noted that heading angle determination by Complementary filter has more error than Mahoney filter.

  3. Wave propagation in the marginal ice zone - Model predictions and comparisons with buoy and synthetic aperture radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Antony K.; Holt, Benjamin; Vachon, Paris W.

    1991-01-01

    Ocean wave dispersion relation and viscous attenuation by a sea ice cover are studied for waves propagating into the marginal ice zone (MIZ). The Labrador ice margin experiment (LIMEX), conducted on the MIZ off the east coast of Newfoundland, Canada in March 1987, provided aircraft SAR imagery, ice property and wave buoy data. Wave energy attenuation rates are estimated from SAR data and the ice motion package data that were deployed at the ice edge and into the ice pack, and compared with a model. It is shown that the model data comparisons are quite good for the ice conditions observed during LIMEX 1987.

  4. The first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell as a viable power supply: Powering a meteorological buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tender, Leonard M.; Gray, Sam A.; Groveman, Ethan; Lowy, Daniel A.; Kauffman, Peter; Melhado, Julio; Tyce, Robert C.; Flynn, Darren; Petrecca, Rose; Dobarro, Joe

    2008-05-01

    Here we describe the first demonstration of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a practical alternative to batteries for a low-power consuming application. The specific application reported is a meteorological buoy (ca. 18-mW average consumption) that measures air temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and water temperature, and that is configured for real-time line-of-sight RF telemetry of data. The specific type of MFC utilized in this demonstration is the benthic microbial fuel cell (BMFC). The BMFC operates on the bottom of marine environments, where it oxidizes organic matter residing in oxygen depleted sediment with oxygen in overlying water. It is maintenance free, does not deplete (i.e., will run indefinitely), and is sufficiently powerful to operate a wide range of low-power marine-deployed scientific instruments normally powered by batteries. Two prototype BMFCs used to power the buoy are described. The first was deployed in the Potomac River in Washington, DC, USA. It had a mass of 230 kg, a volume of 1.3 m3, and sustained 24 mW (energy equivalent of ca. 16 alkaline D-cells per year at 25 °C). Although not practical due to high cost and extensive in-water manipulation required to deploy, it established the precedence that a fully functional scientific instrument could derive all of its power from a BMFC. It also provided valuable lessons for developing a second, more practical BMFC that was subsequently used to power the buoy in a salt marsh near Tuckerton, NJ, USA. The second version BMFC has a mass of 16 kg, a volume of 0.03 m3, sustains ca. 36 mW (energy equivalent of ca. 26 alkaline D-cells per year at 25 °C), and can be deployed by a single person from a small craft with minimum or no in-water manipulation. This BMFC is being further developed to reduce cost and enable greater power output by electrically connecting multiple units in parallel. Use of this BMFC powering the meteorological buoy highlights the potential impact of BMFCs to enable long

  5. Validation of High Frequency Radar Used in Ocean Surface Current Mapping via in-situ Drifting Buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    President Codar Ocean Sensors, Ltd. Los Altos, California 8. Dr. Newell Garfield, Director Romberg Tiburon Center San Francisco State...University Tiburon , California 9. Dr. Jack Harlan NOAA IOOS Program Silver Springs, Maryland 88 10. Dr. Glenn Watabushy NOAA ERD Seattle

  6. Studying the hydrological cycle in the Iberian Peninsula using the LEAFHYDRO LSM: Influence of groundwater dynamics on soil moisture and land-atmosphere coupling. Impacts of artificial water extraction in the regional water cycle, including land-surface f

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A.; Miguez-Macho, G.

    2012-04-01

    We perform long-term (10 year) simulations over the Iberian Peninsula at 2.5 km resolution with the LEAFHYDRO LSM, which includes groundwater dynamics and river routing. Atmospheric forcing comes from ERA-interim and a regional high-resolution analysis of precipitation over Spain and Portugal. The model simulates the coupled evolution of the groundwater, land surface (soil moisture and vegetation) and river reservoirs and we validate the simulation with all available observations of river flow and water table depth. In an experiment, we impose an artificial water extraction rate from the groundwater reservoir based on observations and estimations of irrigation withdrawals and we investigate the impact on the regional water cycle. The extraction rates induce a depression of the water table that over the years becomes quite significant and that matches observed decreasing rates of water table levels. The depressed water table discontinues groundwater input into rivers and the stream flow is diminished notably, in particular during the dry summer. Moreover, in areas with semiarid climate where the water table was naturally relatively shallow and connected to soil moisture and vegetation, which include most of the agricultural areas inland Spain, the depression of the water table has a significant impact on soil moisture and land-surface fluxes, with a decrease of root zone soil water availability and evapotranspiration and increasing water stress for the vegetation. The land hydrology alteration is more pronounced in the summer when there is an absence of precipitation, and as the model shows, through the induced changes in land-surface fluxes can potentially have a noticeably impact on the regional climate.

  7. Comparison of gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission satellite altimetry wave heights with in situ near-shore buoy data.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shanas, P.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Hithin, N.K.

    The applicability of altimeter data for the coastal region is examined by comparing the gridded multi-mission and along-track mono-mission significant wave height (SWH) data with the in situ buoy measurements at four stations off the east and west...

  8. Circulation and hydrological characteristics of the North Aegean Sea: a contribution from real-time buoy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. NITTIS

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the POSEIDON Project, a network of open sea oceanographic buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors has been operational in the Aegean Sea since 1998. The analysis of upper-ocean physical data (currents at 3m, temperature and salinity at 3-40m depths collected during the last 2 years from the stations of the North Aegean basin indicates a strong temporal variability of flow field and hydrological characteristics in both synoptic and seasonal time scales. The northern part of the basin is mainly influenced by the Black Sea Water outflow and the mesoscale variability of the corresponding thermohaline fronts, while the southern stations are influenced by the general circulation of the Aegean Sea with strong modulations caused by the seasonally varying atmospheric forcing.

  9. Quantifying Electromagnetic Wave Propagation Environment Using Measurements From A Small Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Additionally, MOST is limited in its application to surfaces, such as ocean waves, that have their own dynamic structures ( Hill 1989). Foken...campaign. Figure 6 shows the general measurement area with the green stars (Points A1 and A2) denoting the locations of the surface floats used to tether...deployments during CASPER-East. 21 The two green stars denote the locations of the surface super sites (Point A1 and Point A2) at 16 nm and 34 nm

  10. Physical profile data collected in the Equatorial Pacific during cruises to service the TAO array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys, from 2007-04-07 to the present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) Program, the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) was responsible for the at-sea collection, quality control and...

  11. Temperature, current meter, and other data from moored buoy as part of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project, 30 July 1974 - 14 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, current meter, and other data were collected using moored buoy from the CAPRICORNE from July 30, 1974 to August 14, 1974. Data were collected as part of...

  12. Bacteriology data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean during the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS-Mid Atlantic Ocean) project, 1976-11-05 to 1977-08-16 (NODC Accession 7800207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 5, 1976 to August 16, 1977....

  13. Temperature, current meter, and other data from moored buoy from the HUMBOLDT as part of the GARP (Global Atmospheric Research Program) Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) project, 28 July 1974 - 18 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, current meter, and other data were collected using moored buoy from the HUMBOLDT from July 28, 1974 to August 18, 1974. Data were submitted by US Coast...

  14. Physical and fluorescence data collected using moored buoy casts as part of the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 07 December 1975 to 03 January 1977 (NODC Accession 7700569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and fluorescence data were collected using moored buoy from May 4, 1975 to December 18, 1975. Data were submitted by Massachusetts Institute of Technology;...

  15. Physical and meteorological data from buoys from the NW Pacific (limit-180) by the Japan Meteorological Agency and other institutions from 01 January 1978 to 31 December 1991 (NODC Accession 9400143)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Buoy data was collected in the NW Pacific (limit-180) from 01 January 1978 to 31 December 1991. Data were collected by the Japan Meteorological Agency and other...

  16. Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-02-01 to 1979-05-03 (NODC Accession 7900247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology, wind wave spectra, and benthic organism data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1978...

  17. CURRENT DIRECTION, ICE - MOVEMENT - DIRECTION and other data from DRIFTING BUOY in the World-Wide Distribution from 1990-01-01 to 1991-03-31 (NODC Accession 9100102)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting Buoy Data from the Canadian Data Center, submitted by Mr. Jean Gagron, Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada in GF-3 format for...

  18. Significant Wave Heights, Periods, and Directions, and Air and Sea Temperature Data from a Directional Waverider Buoy off Diamond Head, Oahu during March-April 2000 (NODC Accession 0000475)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A directional waverider buoy located about one nautical mile south of Diamond Head, Oahu, provided an approximately 10-day time series of wave characteristics and...

  19. Physical and chemical data collected using CTD and buoy casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and GILLIS from 1974-08-29 to 1974-09-16 (NODC Accession 7601660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using CTD and buoy casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and GILLIS from 29 August 1974 to 16 September 1974. Data were submitted...

  20. Current meter and temperature profile data from current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 27 April 1993 to 09 June 1994 (NODC Accession 9700042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and temperature profile data were collected using current meter and buoy casts in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean from 27 April 1993 to 09 June 1994....

  1. Physical profile data collected in the Equatorial Pacific during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys, February 23 - December 16, 2005 (NODC Accession 0002644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 2005, CTD data were collected in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON array, a network of deep ocean moored buoys to support...

  2. Physical profile and meteorological data from CTD casts during cruises to service the TAO/TRITON buoys in the equatorial Pacific from 02 March 2002 to 22 November 2002 (NODC Accession 0000945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data and meteorological data were collected from CTD casts in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during cruises to to service the TAO/TRITON buoy array....

  3. CTD, current meter, meteorological buoy, and bottle data from the Gulf of Mexico from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms in support of LATEX A from 18 March 1993 to 23 September 1993 (NODC Accession 9400149)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, current meter, meteorological buoy, and bottle data were collected from the Gulf of Mexico from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms. Data were collected by...

  4. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of cantilever arms (12) contacting the surface of the test sample when performing the movement....... arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area...

  5. From Space to the Rocky Intertidal: Using NASA MODIS Sea Surface Temperature and NOAA Water Temperature to Predict Intertidal Logger Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. P. Sutton

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of satellite-derived datasets has greatly facilitated large-scale ecological studies, as in situ observations are spatially sparse and expensive undertakings. We tested the efficacy of using satellite sea surface temperature (SST collected by NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and local water temperature collected from NOAA buoys and onshore stations to estimate submerged intertidal mussel logger temperatures. Daily SST and local water temperatures were compared to mussel logger temperatures at five study sites located along the Oregon coastline. We found that satellite-derived SSTs and local water temperatures were similarly correlated to the submerged mussel logger temperatures. This finding suggests that satellite-derived SSTs may be used in conjunction with local water temperatures to understand the temporal and spatial variation of mussel logger temperatures. While there are limitations to using satellite-derived temperature for ecological studies, including issues with temporal and spatial resolution, our results are promising.

  6. An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinpyo Hong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of a SPAR buoy-type floating offshore wind turbine is presented. The effects of the Center of Gravity (COG, mooring line spring constant, and fair-lead location on the turbine’s motion in response to regular waves are investigated. Experimental results show that for a typical mooring system of a SPAR buoy-type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (FOWT, the effect of mooring systems on the dynamics of the turbine can be considered negligible. However, the pitch decreases notably as the COG increases. The COG and spring constant of the mooring line have a negligible effect on the fairlead displacement. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis show that the wind turbine motion and its sensitivity to changes in the mooring system and COG are very large near resonant frequencies. The test results can be used to validate numerical simulation tools for FOWTs.

  7. Method and apparatus for production of subsea hydrocarbon formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, J.W.

    1995-01-17

    A system for controlling, separating, processing and exporting well fluids produced from subsea hydrocarbon formations is disclosed. The subsea well tender system includes a surface buoy supporting one or more decks above the water surface for accommodating equipment to process oil, gas and water recovered from the subsea hydrocarbon formation. The surface buoy includes a surface-piercing central flotation column connected to one or more external flotation tanks located below the water surface. The surface buoy is secured to the sea bed by one or more tendons which are anchored to a foundation with piles imbedded in the sea bed. The system accommodates multiple versions on the surface buoy configuration. 20 figures.

  8. Mechanisms for SAR imaging of ocean surface phenomena: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesecky, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding the SAR response to surface wave is a central issue in the analysis of SAR ocean images. The imaging mechanism for gravity waves and the practical question of just which characteristics of the ocean wave field can be measured remotely using SAR were examined. Assessments of wave imaging theory are based primarily on comparisons of the directional wave height variance spectrum psi (K) measured by in situ buoys with estimates from SAR images. Other criteria are also recommended, e.g., the effects of focus adjustments. It is assumed that fluctuations in SAR image intensity are proportional to fluctuations in ocean surface height. If this were true, the Fourier power spectrum of a SAR image and corresponding surface measurements of psi would coincide. Differences between SAR estimates based on this hypothesis and buoy measurements of psi are then used to begin the assessment of rival wave imaging theories.

  9. Multilayer perceptron neural network-based approach for modeling phycocyanin pigment concentrations: case study from lower Charles River buoy, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) to predict phycocyanin (PC) pigment using water quality variables as predictor. In the proposed model, four water quality variables that are water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance were selected as the inputs for the MLPNN model, and the PC as the output. To demonstrate the capability and the usefulness of the MLPNN model, a total of 15,849 data measured at 15-min (15 min) intervals of time are used for the development of the model. The data are collected at the lower Charles River buoy, and available from the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). For comparison purposes, a multiple linear regression (MLR) model that was frequently used for predicting water quality variables in previous studies is also built. The performances of the models are evaluated using a set of widely used statistical indices. The performance of the MLPNN and MLR models is compared with the measured data. The obtained results show that (i) the all proposed MLPNN models are more accurate than the MLR models and (ii) the results obtained are very promising and encouraging for the development of phycocyanin-predictive models.

  10. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  11. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  12. Comparison of wind data from QuikSCAT and buoys in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Satheesan, K.; Sarkar, A.; Parekh, A.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Kuroda, Y.

    stream_size 24759 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Int_J_Remote_Sens_28_2375p.pdf.txt stream_source_info Int_J_Remote_Sens_28_2375p.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1... help a wide variety of studies of oceanic processes and improve weather forecast via data assimilation in the operational models (Goswami and Rajagopal, 2003). The idea of remote sensing of ocean surface winds was based on the hypothesis...

  13. The impact of surface currents and sea level on the wave field evolution during St. Jude storm in the eastern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marili Viitak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A third generation numerical wave model SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore was applied to study the spatio-temporal effect of surface currents and sea level height on significant wave height; and to describe the mechanisms responsible for wave–current interaction in the eastern Baltic Sea. Simulation results were validated by comparison with in situ wave measurements in deep and shallow water, carried out using the directional wave buoy and RDCP respectively, and with TerraSAR-X imagery. A hindcast period from 23 to 31 October 2013 included both a period of calm to moderate weather conditions and a severe North-European windstorm called St. Jude. The prevailing wind directions were southerly to westerly. Four simulations with SWAN were made: a control run with dynamical forcing by wind only; and simulations with additional inputs of surface currents and sea level, both separately and combined. A clear effect of surface currents and sea level on the wave field evolution was found. It manifested itself as an increase or decrease of significant wave height of up to 20%. The strength of the interaction was influenced by the propagation directions of waves and surface currents and the severity of weather conditions. An increase in the wave height was mostly seen in shallower waters and in areas where waves and surface currents were propagating in opposite directions. In deeper parts of the eastern Baltic Sea and in case of waves and surface currents propagating in the same direction a decrease occurred.

  14. Optimal Estimation of Sea Surface Temperature from AMSR-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Nielsen-Englyst

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Optimal Estimation (OE technique is developed within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI to retrieve subskin Sea Surface Temperature (SST from AQUA’s Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer—Earth Observing System (AMSR-E. A comprehensive matchup database with drifting buoy observations is used to develop and test the OE setup. It is shown that it is essential to update the first guess atmospheric and oceanic state variables and to perform several iterations to reach an optimal retrieval. The optimal number of iterations is typically three to four in the current setup. In addition, updating the forward model, using a multivariate regression model is shown to improve the capability of the forward model to reproduce the observations. The average sensitivity of the OE retrieval is 0.5 and shows a latitudinal dependency with smaller sensitivity for cold waters and larger sensitivity for warmer waters. The OE SSTs are evaluated against drifting buoy measurements during 2010. The results show an average difference of 0.02 K with a standard deviation of 0.47 K when considering the 64% matchups, where the simulated and observed brightness temperatures are most consistent. The corresponding mean uncertainty is estimated to 0.48 K including the in situ and sampling uncertainties. An independent validation against Argo observations from 2009 to 2011 shows an average difference of 0.01 K, a standard deviation of 0.50 K and a mean uncertainty of 0.47 K, when considering the best 62% of retrievals. The satellite versus in situ discrepancies are highest in the dynamic oceanic regions due to the large satellite footprint size and the associated sampling effects. Uncertainty estimates are available for all retrievals and have been validated to be accurate. They can thus be used to obtain very good retrieval results. In general, the results from the OE retrieval are very encouraging and demonstrate that passive microwave

  15. Sub-inertial variability in the Cretan Sea from the M3A buoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cardin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One year of continuous records of temperature, salinity data at various depths, and currents obtained from by an upward looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP moored at a site in the Cretan Sea were analyzed. Temperature and salinity data revealed the influence of a multi-scale circulation pattern prevailing in this area. This pattern consists of mesoscale cyclonic and anticyclonic vortices moving together as a dipole, and inducing downwelling and upwelling in the water column. The dipole movements, which control the circulation in the area, have been evidenced from horizontal current variability in the upper 250 m. The basin-scale circulation also shows a prominent seasonal variability. The Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis applied to either zonal or meridional components of the currents, confirmed the prevalence of a depth-independent mode over the baroclinic-like one for the whole period of measurements and for both current components. Nevertheless, the depth-dependent structure indicated the out-of-phase behaviour of the upper 250 m layer with respect to the deeper one. The first mode of the temperature EOF analysis, which accounts for most of the variance, represents the seasonal heating of the water column being principally associated with the surface mixed layer at the level of the seasonal thermocline. Key words. Oceanography: physical (currents, eddies and mesoscale processes, general circulation

  16. Sub-inertial variability in the Cretan Sea from the M3A buoy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Cardin

    Full Text Available One year of continuous records of temperature, salinity data at various depths, and currents obtained from by an upward looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP moored at a site in the Cretan Sea were analyzed. Temperature and salinity data revealed the influence of a multi-scale circulation pattern prevailing in this area. This pattern consists of mesoscale cyclonic and anticyclonic vortices moving together as a dipole, and inducing downwelling and upwelling in the water column. The dipole movements, which control the circulation in the area, have been evidenced from horizontal current variability in the upper 250 m. The basin-scale circulation also shows a prominent seasonal variability. The Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis applied to either zonal or meridional components of the currents, confirmed the prevalence of a depth-independent mode over the baroclinic-like one for the whole period of measurements and for both current components. Nevertheless, the depth-dependent structure indicated the out-of-phase behaviour of the upper 250 m layer with respect to the deeper one. The first mode of the temperature EOF analysis, which accounts for most of the variance, represents the seasonal heating of the water column being principally associated with the surface mixed layer at the level of the seasonal thermocline.

    Key words. Oceanography: physical (currents, eddies and mesoscale processes, general circulation

  17. Performance Tests of Snow-Related Variables Over the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas Using a New Version of NASA GEOS-5 Land Surface Model that Includes the Snow Darkening Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Tppei J.; Lau, K.-U.; Koster, Randal D.; Suarez, Max; Mahanama, Sarith; Dasilva, Arlindo M.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The snow darkening effect, i.e. the reduction of snow albedo, is caused by absorption of solar radiation by absorbing aerosols (dust, black carbon, and organic carbon) deposited on the snow surface. This process is probably important over Himalayan and Tibetan glaciers due to the transport of highly polluted Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). This effect has been incorporated into the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric transport model. The Catchment land surface model (LSM) used in GEOS-5 considers 3 snow layers. Code was developed to track the mass concentration of aerosols in the three layers, taking into account such processes as the flushing of the compounds as liquid water percolates through the snowpack. In GEOS-5, aerosol emissions, transports, and depositions are well simulated in the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GO CART) module; we recently made the connection between GOCART and the GEOS-5 system fitted with the revised LSM. Preliminary simulations were performed with this new system in "replay" mode (i.e., with atmospheric dynamics guided by reanalysis) at 2x2.5 degree horizontal resolution, covering the period 1 November 2005 - 31 December 2009; we consider the final three years of simulation here. The three simulations used the following variants of the LSM: (1) the original Catchment LSM with a fixed fresh snowfall density of 150 kg m-3 ; (2) the LSM fitted with the new snow albedo code, used here without aerosol deposition but with changes in density formulation and melting water effect on snow specific surface area, (3) the LSM fitted with the new snow albedo code as same as (2) but with fixed aerosol deposition rates (computed from GOCART values averaged over the Tibetan Plateau domain [Ion.: 60-120E; lat.: 20-50N] during March-May 2008) applied to all grid points at every time step. For (2) and (3), the same setting on the fresh snowfall density as in (1

  18. Performance tests of snow-related variables over the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas using a new version of NASA GEOS-5 land surface model that includes the snow darkening effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, T. J.; Lau, W. K.; Koster, R. D.; Suarez, M.; Mahanama, S. P.; da Silva, A.; Colarco, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    The snow darkening effect, i.e. the reduction of snow albedo, is caused by absorption of solar radiation by absorbing aerosols (dust, black carbon, and organic carbon) deposited on the snow surface. This process is probably important over Himalayan and Tibetan glaciers due to the transport of highly polluted Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). This effect has been incorporated into the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric transport model. The Catchment land surface model (LSM) used in GEOS-5 considers 3 snow layers. Code was developed to track the mass concentration of aerosols in the three layers, taking into account such processes as the flushing of the compounds as liquid water percolates through the snowpack. In GEOS-5, aerosol emissions, transports, and depositions are well simulated in the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) module; we recently made the connection between GOCART and the GEOS-5 system fitted with the revised LSM. Preliminary simulations were performed with this new system in "replay" mode (i.e., with atmospheric dynamics guided by reanalysis) at 2x2.5 degree horizontal resolution, covering the period 1 November 2005 - 31 December 2009; we consider the final three years of simulation here. The three simulations used the following variants of the LSM: (1) the original Catchment LSM with a fixed fresh snowfall density of 150 kg m-3; (2) the LSM fitted with the new snow albedo code, used here without aerosol deposition but with changes in density formulation and melting water effect on snow specific surface area, (3) the LSM fitted with the new snow albedo code as same as (2) but with fixed aerosol deposition rates (computed from GOCART values averaged over the Tibetan Plateau domain [lon.: 60-120E; lat.: 20-50N] during March-May 2008) applied to all grid points at every time step. For (2) and (3), the same setting on the fresh snowfall density as in (1) was

  19. Sea Ice Mass Balance Buoys (IMBs): First Results from a Data Processing Intercomparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Tiemann, Louisa; Itkin, Polona

    2017-04-01

    IMBs are autonomous instruments able to continuously monitor the growth and melt of sea ice and its snow cover at a single point on an ice floe. Complementing field expeditions, remote sensing observations and modelling studies, these in-situ data are crucial to assess the mass balance and seasonal evolution of sea ice and snow in the polar oceans. Established subtypes of IMBs combine coarse-resolution temperature profiles through air, snow, ice and ocean with ultrasonic pingers to detect snow accumulation and ice thermodynamic growth. Recent technological advancements enable the use of high-resolution temperature chains, which are also able to identify the surrounding medium through a „heating cycle". The temperature change during this heating cycle provides additional information on the internal properties and processes of the ice. However, a unified data processing technique to reliably and accurately determine sea ice thickness and snow depth from this kind of data is still missing, and an unambiguous interpretation remains a challenge. Following the need to improve techniques for remotely measuring sea ice mass balance, an international IMB working group has recently been established. The main goals are 1) to coordinate IMB deployments, 2) to enhance current IMB data processing and -interpretation techniques, and 3) to provide standardized IMB data products to a broader community. Here we present first results from two different data processing algorithms, applied to selected IMB datasets from the Arctic and Antarctic. Their performance with regard to sea ice thickness and snow depth retrieval is evaluated, and an uncertainty is determined. Although several challenges and caveats in IMB data processing and -interpretation are found, such datasets bear great potential and yield plenty of useful information about sea ice properties and processes. It is planned to include many more algorithms from contributors within the working group, and we explicitly invite

  20. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  1. Error estimates for CCMP ocean surface wind data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlas, R. M.; Hoffman, R. N.; Ardizzone, J.; Leidner, S.; Jusem, J.; Smith, D. K.; Gombos, D.

    2011-12-01

    The cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind data sets are now available at the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center from July 1987 through December 2010. These data support wide-ranging air-sea research and applications. The main Level 3.0 data set has global ocean coverage (within 78S-78N) with 25-kilometer resolution every 6 hours. An enhanced variational analysis method (VAM) quality controls and optimally combines multiple input data sources to create the Level 3.0 data set. Data included are all available RSS DISCOVER wind observations, in situ buoys and ships, and ECMWF analyses. The VAM is set up to use the ECMWF analyses to fill in areas of no data and to provide an initial estimate of wind direction. As described in an article in the Feb. 2011 BAMS, when compared to conventional analyses and reanalyses, the CCMP winds are significantly different in some synoptic cases, result in different storm statistics, and provide enhanced high-spatial resolution time averages of ocean surface wind. We plan enhancements to produce estimated uncertainties for the CCMP data. We will apply the method of Desroziers et al. for the diagnosis of error statistics in observation space to the VAM O-B, O-A, and B-A increments. To isolate particular error statistics we will stratify the results by which individual instruments were used to create the increments. Then we will use cross-validation studies to estimate other error statistics. For example, comparisons in regions of overlap for VAM analyses based on SSMI and QuikSCAT separately and together will enable estimating the VAM directional error when using SSMI alone. Level 3.0 error estimates will enable construction of error estimates for the time averaged data sets.

  2. Backtracking drifting objects using surface currents from high-frequency (HF) radar technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Ana Julia; Castanedo, Sonia; Fernández, Vicente; Medina, Raúl

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the benefits of high-frequency (HF) radar ocean observation technology for backtracking drifting objects are analysed. The HF radar performance is evaluated by comparison of trajectories between drifter buoys versus numerical simulations using a Lagrangian trajectory model. High-resolution currents measured by a coastal HF radar network combined with atmospheric fields provided by numerical models are used to backtrack the trajectory of two dataset of surface-drifting buoys: group I (with drogue) and group II (without drogue). A methodology based on optimization methods is applied to estimate the uncertainty in the trajectory simulations and to optimize the search area of the backtracked positions. The results show that, to backtrack the trajectory of the buoys in group II, both currents and wind fields were required. However, wind fields could be practically discarded when simulating the trajectories of group I. In this case, the optimal backtracked trajectories were obtained using only HF radar currents as forcing. Based on the radar availability data, two periods ranging between 8 and 10 h were selected to backtrack the buoy trajectories. The root mean squared error (RMSE) was found to be 1.01 km for group I and 0.82 km for group II. Taking into account these values, a search area was calculated using circles of RMSE radii, obtaining 3.2 and 2.11 km2 for groups I and II, respectively. These results show the positive contribution of HF radar currents for backtracking drifting objects and demonstrate that these data combined with atmospheric models are of value to perform backtracking analysis of drifting objects.

  3. Numerical simulations and observations of surface wave fields under an extreme tropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Wright, C.W.; Walsh, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the wave model WAVEWATCH III under a very strong, category 5, tropical cyclone wind forcing is investigated with different drag coefficient parameterizations and ocean current inputs. The model results are compared with field observations of the surface wave spectra from an airborne scanning radar altimeter, National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) time series, and satellite altimeter measurements in Hurricane Ivan (2004). The results suggest that the model with the original drag coefficient parameterization tends to overestimate the significant wave height and the dominant wavelength and produces a wave spectrum with narrower directional spreading. When an improved drag parameterization is introduced and the wave-current interaction is included, the model yields an improved forecast of significant wave height, but underestimates the dominant wavelength. When the hurricane moves over a preexisting mesoscale ocean feature, such as the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico or a warm-and cold-core ring, the current associated with the feature can accelerate or decelerate the wave propagation and significantly modulate the wave spectrum. ?? 2009 American Meteorological Society.

  4. Surfaces of Building Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Surynková, Petra

    2009-01-01

    My diploma thesis Surfaces of Building Practice deals with the basic properties of surfaces, their mathematical description, categorization, and application in technical practice. Each studied surface is defined and its process of construction and parametrical description is listed. The thesis studies selected types of surfaces in details - these surfaces include surfaces of revolution, ruled surfaces, screw surfaces, and translational surfaces. An application of each studied surfaces is show...

  5. ECMWF and SSMI Global Surface Wind Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David; Hollingsworth, Anthony; Wentz, Frank

    1993-01-01

    Monthly mean, 2.5 deg - x 2.5 deg-resolution, 10-m height wind speeds from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) instrument and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) forecast-analysis system are compared between 60 deg S and 60 deg N during 1988-1991. The SSMI data were uniformly processed while numerous changes were made to the ECMWF forecast-analysis system. The SSMI measurements, which were compared with moored-buoy wind observations, were considered to be a reference data set to evaluate the influence of the changes made to the ECMWF system upon the ECMWF surface wind speed over the ocean. A demonstrable yearly decrease of the difference between SSMI and ECMWF wind speeds occurred in the 10 deg S - 10 deg N region, including the 5 deg S - 5 deg N zone of the Pacific Ocean, where nearly all of the variations occurred in the 160 deg E - 160 deg W region. The apparent improvement of the ECMWF wind speed occurred at the same time as the yearly decrease of the equatorial Pacific SSMI wind speed, which was associated with the natural transition from La Nina to El Nino conditions. In the 10 deg S - 10 deg N tropical Atlantic, the ECMWF wind speed had a 4-year trend, which was not expected nor was it duplicated with the SSMI data. No yearly trend was found in the difference between SSMI and ECMWF surface wind speeds in middle latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. The magnitude of the differences between SSMI and ECMWF was 0.4 m s^(-1) or 100 percent larger in the northern than in the southern hemisphere extratropics. In two areas (Arabian Sea and North Atlantic Ocean) where ECMWF and SSMI wind speeds were compared to ship measurements, the ship data had much better agreement with the ECMWF analyses compared to SSMI data. In the 10 deg S - 10 deg N area the difference between monthly standard deviations of the daily wind speeds dropped significantly from 1988 to 1989, but remained constant at about 30 percent for the remaining

  6. Application of SMAP Data for Ocean Surface Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Tang, W.; Stiles, B. W.; Hayashi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched January 31st, 2015. It is designed to measure the soil moisture over land using a combined active / passive L-band system. Due to the Aquarius mission, L-band model functions for ocean winds and salinity are mature and are directly applicable to the SMAP mission. In contrast to Aquarius, the higher resolution and scanning geometry of SMAP allow for wide-swath ocean winds and salinities to be retrieved. In this talk we present the SMAP Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) and extreme winds dataset and its performance. First we discuss the heritage of SMAP SSS algorithms, showing that SMAP and Aquarius show excellent agreement in the ocean surface roughness correction. Then, we give an overview of some newly developed algorithms that are only relevant to the SMAP system; a new galaxy correction and land correction enabling SSS retrievals up to 40 km from coast. We discuss recent improvements to the SMAP data processing for version 4.0. Next we compare the performance of the SMAP SSS to in-situ salinity measurements obtained from ARGO floats, tropical moored buoys, and ship-based data. SMAP SSS has accuracy of 0.2 PSU on a monthly basis compared to ARGO gridded data in tropics and mid-latitudes. In tropical oceans, time series comparison of salinity measured at 1 m depth by moored buoys indicates SMAP can track large salinity changes within a month. Synergetic analysis of SMAP, SMOS, and Argo data allows us to identify and exclude erroneous buoy data from assessment of SMAP SSS. The resulting SMAP-buoy matchup analysis gives a mean standard deviation (STD) of 0.22 PSU and correlation of 0.73 on weekly scale; at monthly scale the mean STD decreased to 0.17 PSU and the correlation increased to 0.8. In addition to SSS, SMAP provides a view into tropical cyclones having much higher sensitivity than traditional scatterometers. We validate the high-winds using collocations with SFMR during tropical cyclones as well as

  7. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  8. Optimal estimation of sea surface temperature from AMSR-E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Høyer, Jacob L.; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2018-01-01

    The Optimal Estimation (OE) technique is developed within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI) to retrieve subskin Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AQUA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). A comprehensive matchup database with drift......The Optimal Estimation (OE) technique is developed within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI) to retrieve subskin Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AQUA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). A comprehensive matchup database...... with drifting buoy observations is used to develop and test the OE setup. It is shown that it is essential to update the first guess atmospheric and oceanic state variables and to perform several iterations to reach an optimal retrieval. The optimal number of iterations is typically three to four in the current...... and larger sensitivity for warmer waters. The OE SSTs are evaluated against drifting buoy measurements during 2010. The results show an average difference of 0.02 K with a standard deviation of 0.47 K when considering the 64% matchups, where the simulated and observed brightness temperatures are most...

  9. Advances in the Application of Surface Drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Rick; Özgökmen, Tamay; Centurioni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Surface drifting buoys, or drifters, are used in oceanographic and climate research, oil spill tracking, weather forecasting, search and rescue operations, calibration and validation of velocities from high-frequency radar and from altimeters, iceberg tracking, and support of offshore drilling operations. In this review, we present a brief history of drifters, from the message in a bottle to the latest satellite-tracked, multisensor drifters. We discuss the different types of drifters currently used for research and operations as well as drifter designs in development. We conclude with a discussion of the various properties that can be observed with drifters, with heavy emphasis on a critical process that cannot adequately be observed by any other instrument: dispersion in the upper ocean, driven by turbulence at scales from waves through the submesoscale to the large-scale geostrophic eddies.

  10. Temperature profile and other data collected using current meter, profiling floats, and drifting buoy from the Atlantic Ocean as part of the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 18 July 1977 to 18 October 1979 (NODC Accession 8100508)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, pressure, and other data were collected using current meter, profiling floats, and drifting buoy in the Atlantic Ocean from July 18, 1977 to October 18,...

  11. Current speed data collected using drifting buoy in the TOGA area as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment / Hawaii-Tahiti Shuttle (IDOE/NORPAX/HITIS) project from 07 February 1979 to 17 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8200021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains data from Drifting Buoys deployed during the Hawaii/Tahiti Shuttle Experiment between February 7, 1979 and December 17, 1980. Data consists...

  12. Temperature profile and pressure data collected using moored buoy from the Atlantic Ocean with support from the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 04 May to 18 December 1975 (NODC Accession 7601247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and pressure data were collected using moored buoy from the Atlantic Ocean from May 4, 1975 to December 18, 1975. Data were submitted by...

  13. Physical and chemical data from CTD, current meter, and buoy casts from the XIANG YANG HONG 14 and NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER in the TOGA area of Pacific Ocean (30 N to 30 S) from 25 January 1987 to 24 October 1987 (NODC Accession 8700356)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using current meter, CTD, and buoy casts in the TOGA area of the Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER and R/V...

  14. Wave data from buoy deployments from the R/V KEXUE #1 as part of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) and Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) projects from 1992-11-01 to 1993-02-20 (NODC Accession 9600021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave data were collected from buoy deployments from the R/V KEXUE #1 as part of the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) and Tropical Ocean Global...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients collected from profile, discrete sampling, and time series observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from R/V Gulf Challenger near a buoy off the coast of New Hampshire, U.S. in the Gulf of Maine from 2011-01-11 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0142327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains discrete measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients collected at the buoy off...

  16. Temperature and pressure data collected using drifting buoy and profiling floats from the North Atlantic Ocean in part of the IDOE/POLYMODE (International Decade of Ocean Exploration / combination of USSR POLYGON project and US MODE) from 1975-01-10 to 1981-05-31 (NODC Accession 8700121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and pressure data were collected using drifting buoy and profiling floats from CHAIN, GILLISS, OCEANUS, and ENDEAVOR from the North Atlantic Ocean from...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, and other variables collected from time series and profile observations using CTD, Niskin bottle,and other instruments near CenGOOS buoy off the coast of Mississippi in the Gulf of Mexico from 2012-10-15 to 2014-04-22 (NCEI Accession 0131199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains time series profile (discrete bottle) data that were collected at the GenGOOS buoy off the coast of Mississippi. The CenGOOS 3-m...

  18. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 28638 Data, Saipan in the Marianas Archipelago, 200308-200503 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 28638 was deployed in the region of Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  19. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 35651 Data Rose Atoll, American Samoa, 200202-200411 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 35651 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  20. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 35645 Data Tutuila, American Samoa, 200202-200301 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 35645 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  1. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30147 Data Nihoa, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200209-200501 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30147 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  2. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30114 Data Gardner Pinnacles, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200209-200210 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30114 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  3. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 52299 Data, Arakane in the Marianas Archipelago, 200509-200607 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 52299 was deployed in the region of the Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. drifter data files...

  4. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 35646 Data in the American Samoa, 200202-200302 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 35646 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  5. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29108 Data, Agrihan in the Marianas Archipelago, 200309-200401 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29108 was deployed in the region of Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  6. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 35647 Data Tutuila, American Samoa, 200202-200307 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 35647 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  7. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29938 Data in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200209-200312 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29938 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  8. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30340 Data Kauai Channel, Main Hawaiian Islands, 200210-200409 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30340 was deployed in the region of Main Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  9. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29100 Data, Guam in the Marianas Archipelago, 200309-200403 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29100 was deployed in the region of Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  10. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 35649 Data Tutuila, American Samoa, 200202-200308 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 35649 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  11. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30291 Data in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 20020920-20050105 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30291 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  12. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30225 Data in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200209-200401 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30225 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  13. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 24666 Data in the American Samoa, 200309-200503 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 24666 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  14. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 35650 Swain's Atoll, American Samoa, 200202-200211 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 35650 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  15. NODC Standard Format Ocean Wind Time Series from Buoys (F101) Data (1975-1985) (NODC Accession 0014194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This file type contains time series measurements of wind and other surface meteorological parameters taken at fixed locations. The instrument arrays may be deployed...

  16. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 44765 Data, Manua in the American Samoa, 200402-200406 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 44765 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  17. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29099 Data, Rota in the Marianas Archipelago, 200309-200402 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29099 was deployed in the region of Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  18. Evaluation of satellite and reanalysis-based global net surface energy flux and uncertainty estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard; Liu, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    The net surface energy flux is central to the climate system yet observational limitations lead to substantial uncertainty (Trenberth and Fasullo, 2013; Roberts et al., 2016). A combination of satellite-derived radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) adjusted using the latest estimation of the net heat uptake of the Earth system, and the atmospheric energy tendencies and transports from the ERA-Interim reanalysis are used to estimate surface energy flux globally (Liu et al., 2015). Land surface fluxes are adjusted through a simple energy balance approach using relations at each grid point with the consideration of snowmelt to improve regional realism. The energy adjustment is redistributed over the oceans using a weighting function to avoid meridional discontinuities. Uncertainties in surface fluxes are investigated using a variety of approaches including comparison with a range of atmospheric reanalysis input data and products. Zonal multiannual mean surface flux uncertainty is estimated to be less than 5 Wm-2 but much larger uncertainty is likely for regional monthly values. The meridional energy transport is calculated using the net surface heat fluxes estimated in this study and the result shows better agreement with observations in Atlantic than before. The derived turbulent fluxes (difference between the net heat flux and the CERES EBAF radiative flux at surface) also have good agreement with those from OAFLUX dataset and buoy observations. Decadal changes in the global energy budget and the hemisphere energy imbalances are quantified and present day cross-equator heat transports is re-evaluated as 0.22±0.15 PW southward by the atmosphere and 0.32±0.16 PW northward by the ocean considering the observed ocean heat sinks (Roemmich et al., 2006) . Liu et al. (2015) Combining satellite observations and reanalysis energy transports to estimate global net surface energy fluxes 1985-2012. J. Geophys. Res., Atmospheres. ISSN 2169-8996 doi: 10.1002/2015JD

  19. Estimation of the Characterized Tsunami Source Model considering the Complicated Shape of Tsunami Source by Using the observed waveforms of GPS Buoys in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, S.; Takahashi, T.

    2017-12-01

    In the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami disaster, the delay of understanding damage situation increased the human damage. To solve this problem, it is important to search the severe damaged areas. The tsunami numerical modeling is useful to estimate damages and the accuracy of simulation depends on the tsunami source. Seto and Takahashi (2017) proposed a method to estimate the characterized tsunami source model by using the limited observed data of GPS buoys. The model consists of Large slip zone (LSZ), Super large slip zone (SLSZ) and background rupture zone (BZ) as the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan (below COGJ) reported after the Tohoku tsunami. At the beginning of this method, the rectangular fault model is assumed based on the seismic magnitude and hypocenter reported right after an earthquake. By using the fault model, tsunami propagation is simulated numerically, and the fault model is improved after comparing the computed data with the observed data repeatedly. In the comparison, correlation coefficient and regression coefficient are used as indexes. They are calculated with the observed and the computed tsunami wave profiles. This repetition is conducted to get the two coefficients close to 1.0, which makes the precise of the fault model higher. However, it was indicated as the improvement that the model did not examine a complicated shape of tsunami source. In this study, we proposed an improved model to examine the complicated shape. COGJ(2012) assumed that possible tsunami source region in the Nankai trough consisted of the several thousands small faults. And, we use these small faults to estimate the targeted tsunami source in this model. Therefore, we can estimate the complicated tsunami source by using these small faults. The estimation of BZ is carried out as a first step, and LSZ and SLSZ are estimated next as same as the previous model. The proposed model by using GPS buoy was applied for a tsunami scenario in the Nankai Trough. As a result

  20. Temperature, salinity, velocity including ADCP ice tracking, and bottom pressure collected from moored buoys in Bering Strait from 2011-07-14 to 2013-07-05 (NCEI Accession 0138173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an archive of data from moorings deployed in the US waters of the Bering Strait from summer 2011 to summer 2013 (with mooring servicing in summer 2012). For...

  1. Evidence of zooplankton vertical migration from continuous Southern Adriatic buoy current-meter records (E2-M3A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursella, Laura; Cardin, Vanessa; Batistić, Mirna

    2017-04-01

    The E2-M3A Station is deployed in the southern Adriatic Sea, at about 1200 m depth, in the center of the cyclonic gyre where deep convection process takes place, involving both the atmosphere and the ocean dynamics and forming new dense and oxygenated waters, thus triggering the solubility and the biological pump. In particular, the E2M3A is equipped with an upward looking 150 kHz RDI-Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) positioned between 265 and 320 m depth, with a vertical resolution of 5 m and a range of 250-300 m. The mooring line has been in water since November 2006, with an interruption from September 2010 until May 2011. ADCP backscattering signal is very useful in determining zooplankton distribution and variability at various time scales, including seasonal/annual behavior and diel vertical migration (DVM). From ADCP backscattering signal, backscattering strength (Sv) was calculated for the entire dataset. Sv permits to quantify qualitatively the scatters present in the water, i.e. the particulate and/or the phyto/zoo-plankton. Zooplankton distribution is dependent on phytoplankton presence and blooms, which on its own depend on nutrients availability (related to wind-induced vertical mixing), but also on sunlight. The variation in time of Sv together with vertical velocity allows for measuring DVM of zooplankton and its variability with seasons and years. Alternation of high and low values for Sv are present all year long with differences in intensities in particular in the surface layer. Quite high values for Sv are found in spring and summer; in spring they are found along a large part of the water column, while in summer they are detected prevalently in the upper part of the measurement range. This behavior is related to the conditions of the water column, i.e. mixing and nutrients availability, which influence phytoplankton blooms and therefore zooplankton growing and movements. Correlating Net Primary Production obtained from model and Mixed

  2. Comparison of the two-dimensional directional wave spectra retrieved from spaceborne synthetic aperture radar images using the MPI scheme against directional buoy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Violante-Carvalho

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR is to date the only source of two-dimensional directional wave spectra with continuous and global coverage when operated in the so-called SAR Wave Mode (SWM. Since the launch in 1991 of the first European Remote Sensing Satellite ERS-1, and more recently with ENVISAT, millions of SWM imagettes containing detailed spectral information are now available in quasi-real time. This huge amount of directional wave data has opened up many exciting possibilities for the improvement of our knowledge of the dynamics of ocean waves. However, the retrieval of wave spectra from SAR images is not a trivial exercise due to the nonlinearities involved in the mapping mechanism. In this paper we review the main features of the SAR ocean wave imaging mechanisms and give a detailed description of the Max-Planck Institut (MPI retrieval algorithm which is running operationally at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Some examples of retrieved spectra are compared against directional buoy measurements obtained in deep water in the South Atlantic and against WAM spectra. The main characteristics of the MPI retrieval scheme are discussed and some of its deficiencies and strengths are identified.

  3. Verification of model wave heights with long-term moored buoy data: Application to wave field over the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samiksha, S.V.; Polnikov, V.G.; Vethamony, P.; Rashmi, R.; Pogarskii, F.; Sudheesh, K.

    have been successful in predicting the sea state reasonably accurately on global as well as regional scales. It may be noted that besides the time required for the calculations, the issue of model accuracy is the most important, since... important source terms governing the dynamics of the surface gravity wave evolution (for e.g., Hasselmann et al., 1973; Phillips, 1977, 1985; Komen et al., 1994; Janssen, 2004, Violante- Carvalho et al., 2004). The physics of these source functions...

  4. Validation of sea surface temperature, wind speed and integrated water vapour from MSMR measurements. Project report

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    IRS-P4 (OCEANSAT-1) is the first operational oceanographic satellite that India has launched. An extensive validation campaign was unleashed immediately after its launch in May 1999. Various platforms (viz., ship, moored buoy, drifting buoy...

  5. Poleward propagating subinertial alongshore surface currents off the U.S. West Coast

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung Yong

    2013-12-01

    The network comprising 61 high-frequency radar systems along the U.S. West Coast (USWC) provides a unique, high resolution, and broad scale view of ocean surface circulation. Subinertial alongshore surface currents show poleward propagating signals with phase speeds of O(10) and O(100-300) km d -1 that are consistent with historical in situ observations off the USWC and that can be possibly interpreted as coastally trapped waves (CTWs). The propagating signals in the slow mode are partly observed in southern California, which may result from scattering and reflection of higher-mode CTWs due to curvature of shoreline and bathymetry near Point Conception, California. On the other hand, considering the order of the phase speed in the slow mode, the poleward propagating signals may be attributed to alongshore advection or pressure-driven flows. A statistical regression of coastal winds at National Data Buoy Center buoys on the observed surface currents partitions locally and remotely wind-forced components, isolates footprints of the equatorward propagating storm events in winter off the USWC, and shows the poleward propagating signals year round. Key Points A unique resource to examine synoptic-scale alongshore variability Isolation of equatorward wind events in winter using a statistical model Poleward propagating surface signals year-round © 2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  7. Recent increase in surface fCO2 in the western subtropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongseon; Choi, Yujeong; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Geun-Ha

    2017-09-01

    We observed unusually high levels (> 440 μatm) of carbon dioxide fugacity (fCO2) in surface seawater in the western subtropical North Pacific, the area where Subtropical Mode Water is formed, during summer 2015. The NOAA Kuroshio Extension Observatory moored buoy located in this region also measured high CO2 values, up to 500 μatm during this period. These high sea surface fCO2 (fCO2SW) values are explained by much higher normalized total dissolved inorganic carbon and slightly higher normalized total alkalinity concentrations in this region compared to the equatorial Pacific. Moreover, these values are much higher than the climatological CO2 values, even considering increasing atmospheric CO2, indicating a recent large increase in sea surface CO2 concentrations. A large seasonal change in sea surface temperature contributed to higher surface fCO2SW in the summer of 2015.

  8. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  9. Malignant lymphomas (including myeloproliferative disorders)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, I.D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter deals with the radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy of the malignant lymphomas. Included within this group are Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, mycosis fungoides, and chronic lymphatic leukaemia. A further section deals with the myeloproliferative disorders, including granulocytic leukaemia, polycythaemia vera, and primary thrombocythaemia. Excluded are myeloma and reticulum cell sarcoma of bone and acute leukaemia. With regard to Hodgkin's disease, the past 25 years have seen general recognition of the curative potential of radiotherapy, at least in the local stages, and, more recently, awareness of the ability to achieve long-term survival after combination chemotherapy in generalised or in recurrent disease. At the same time the importance of staging has become appreciated and the introduction of procedures such as lymphography, staging laparotomy, and computer tomography (CT) has enormously increased its reliability. Advances have not been so dramatic in the complex group of non-Hodgkins's lymphomas, but are still very real

  10. Comparison of several databases of downward solar daily irradiation data at ocean surface with PIRATA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolliet, Mélodie; Wald, Lucien

    2017-04-01

    The solar radiation impinging at sea surface is an essential variable in climate system. There are several means to assess the daily irradiation at surface, such as pyranometers aboard ship or on buoys, meteorological re-analyses and satellite-derived databases. Among the latter, assessments made from the series of geostationary Meteosat satellites offer synoptic views of the tropical and equatorial Atlantic Ocean every 15 min with a spatial resolution of approximately 5 km. Such Meteosat-derived databases are fairly recent and the quality of the estimates of the daily irradiation must be established. Efforts have been made for the land masses and must be repeated for the Atlantic Ocean. The Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) network of moorings in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean is considered as a reference for oceanographic data. It consists in 17 long-term Autonomous Temperature Line Acquisition System (ATLAS) buoys equipped with sensors to measure near-surface meteorological and subsurface oceanic parameters, including downward solar irradiation. Corrected downward solar daily irradiation from PIRATA were downloaded from the NOAA web site and were compared to several databases: CAMS RAD, HelioClim-1, HelioClim-3 v4 and HelioClim-3 v5. CAMS-RAD, the CAMS radiation service, combines products of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) on gaseous content and aerosols in the atmosphere together with cloud optical properties deduced every 15 min from Meteosat imagery to supply estimates of the solar irradiation. Part of this service is the McClear clear sky model that provides estimates of the solar irradiation that should be observed in cloud-free conditions. The second and third databases are HelioClim-1 and HelioClim-3 v4 that are derived from Meteosat images using the Heliosat-2 method and the ESRA clear sky model, based on the Linke turbidity factor. HelioClim-3 v5 is the fourth database and differs from v4 by the

  11. Sea Surface Salinity and Ocean Color Observations in the Northern Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, J. C.; Burrage, D. M.; Wang, D. W.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne mapping of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) has been performed using L-Band radiometers for over 15 years, and has been operationally practical for over a decade. Ocean scale L-band observations of SSS are now obtained by satellite. ESA's SMOS has been operational for over two years and NASA's Aquarius satellite, launched in Jun, 2011, for over 6 months. Aircraft SSS complements satellite measurements by measuring nearer to coasts and with finer (˜1 km) spatial resolution. Due to the large effective pixel size of the satellite L-Band SSS measurements(˜35-80km), SMOS measurements do not reach the coast. Land microwave brightness signal in a given pixel contaminates the measurement of sea surface brightness temperature. However, the high signal to noise ratio (salinity contrast of 7-15 psu over 10km in some cases) of the coastal salinity signal, due to large freshwater sources, may dominate land contamination effects, to allow closer than usual SMOS SSS observations of strong coastal salinity patterns. An additional method to estimate SSS near coasts is using ocean color. Very near to coasts, freshwater sources such as rivers are relatively rich in Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). As freshwater mixes with saltwater, salinity increases and CDOM concentrations fall. For conservative mixing, there is an inverse linear relation between CDOM and salinity, allowing estimates of SSS based on CDOM. The airborne sensors we use during STARRS flights include 2 SeaWifs airborne simulator sensors, one upward looking and one downward looking, as well as digital cameras, which we have used to identify color fronts. These provide ocean color measurements in addition to the STARRS microwave SSS measurements. We present results from an airborne campaign in the northern Gulf of Mexico, June 2-13, 2011. We made four types of flights. 1) Underflights of SMOS tracks at times coincident with SMOS passes. 2) Zig-zag flights along the coast, between Texas and Mississippi. 3

  12. Buoyed by geophysics : geophysics, just-in-time procurement help save millions on Ekwan pipeline buoyancy control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2005-09-01

    Large-diameter natural gas pipelines buried in wet muskeg have the potential to rise to the surface due to buoyancy. Until recently, the most reliable method to prevent this was to attach specially manufactured bolt-on concrete weights at closely spaced intervals. However, these weights significantly increase capital budgets by millions of dollars because each weight weighs 2,540 kg and costs $1,000. A less costly alternative for buoyancy control in shallow muskeg is for the contractor to simply dig a deeper ditch. Another option is to hold down the pipeline by polyester straps attached to screw anchors. The challenge of applying these less costly options is that heavy equipment cannot be brought to the site to determine ground conditions until after all procurement, assessment and design is completed. Engineers must therefore select a buoyancy control measure based only on air photos and possibly a few drill holes. However, air photos do not indicate the depth of muskeg. Although some muskeg areas may turn out to be thick enough to avoid buoyancy control altogether, once construction is underway, it is too late to opt for cheaper alternatives. EnCana Corporation's 24-inch Ekwan pipeline was recently constructed through a remote area of British Columbia to connect the Greater Sierra natural gas discovery to a tie-in point on Nova Gas Transmission's northwest mainline. Air photos indicated that half of the route was through muskeg. AMEC E and C Services Inc. was responsible for the engineering and management of the project. The company used a combination of geophysical techniques to learn about the ground conditions. Toboggan mounted portable equipment was hauled by snowmobiles along trails made earlier by the survey crews. Ground penetrating radar assessed the muskeg thickness. Fixed frequency electromagnetic surveys also enhanced the results of the ground penetrating radar. The number of bolt-on weights was reduced from 9,000 to 3,700, a savings of $3

  13. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST): Significance and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. F.

    2006-05-01

    Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth's surface and control the global climate. Quoted global mean temperature values and trends, largely based on land thermometers, differ substantially -" mainly because of uncertainties about SST. The ongoing controversy about the relative importance of natural climate changes and Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) revolves mainly around disparities between temperature trends of the atmosphere and surface (in the tropics and SH, i.e. mostly SST). Accurate measurement of SST is difficult. Geographic coverage is poor and there are many different techniques, each with its own problems and uncertainties: Water temperatures from buckets and ship-engine inlets; fixed and floating buoys; air temperatures from shipboard and island stations; and remote sensing from satellites using IR and microwaves. As is evident, each technique refers to a different level below the air-water interface. Drifter buoys (at around 50 cm) measure temperatures in the euphotic layers that are generally warmer than the bulk mixed layer sampled by ships (typically around 10 m). The IR emission arises from a 10-micron-thick skin that interacts dynamically with the underlying "mixed layer." The microwave data depend also on emissivity and therefore on surface roughness and sea state. SST data derived from corals provide some support for instrumental data but are not conclusive. The majority of corals show a warming trend since 1979; others show cooling or are ambiguous. There are different ways of interpreting this result. Physical optics dictates that the downwelling IR radiation from atmospheric greenhouse gases is absorbed in the first instance within the skin. Only direct measurements can establish how much of this energy is shared with the bulk mixed layer (to which the usual SST values refer.). SST controls evaporation and therefore global precipitation. SST influences tropical cyclones and sea-level rise; but there is lively debate on those issues. Changes in

  14. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  15. OSI SAF Sea Surface Temperature reprocessing of MSG/SEVIRI archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saux Picart, Stéphane; Legendre, Gerard; Marsouin, Anne; Péré, Sonia; Roquet, Hervé

    2017-04-01

    The Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI-SAF) of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) is planning to deliver a reprocessing of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager/Meteosat Second Generation (SEVIRI/MSG) archive (2004-2012) by the end of 2016. This reprocessing is drawing from experiences of the OSI SAF team in near real time processing of MSG/SEVIRI data. The retrieval method consist in a non-linear split-window algorithm including the algorithm correction scheme developed by Le Borgne et al. (2011). The bias correction relies on simulations of infrared brightness temperatures performed using Numerical Weather Prediction model atmospheric profiles of water vapour and temperature, and RTTOV radiative transfer model. The cloud mask used is the Climate SAF reprocessing of the MSG/SEVIRI archive. It is consistent over the period in consideration. Atmospheric Saharan dusts have a strong impact on the retrieved SST, they are taken into consideration through the computation of the Saharan Dust Index (Merchant et al., 2006) which is then used to determine an empirical correction applied to SST. The MSG/SEVIRI SST reprocessing dataset consist in hourly level 3 composite of sub-skin temperature projected onto a regular 0.05° grid over the region delimited by 60N,60S and 60W,60E. This presentation gives an overview of the data and methods used for the reprocessing, the products and validation results against drifting buoys measurements extracted from the ERA Clim dataset.

  16. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  17. Ice Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane

    2017-05-01

    Ice is a fundamental solid with important environmental, biological, geological, and extraterrestrial impact. The stable form of ice at atmospheric pressure is hexagonal ice, Ih. Despite its prevalence, Ih remains an enigmatic solid, in part due to challenges in preparing samples for fundamental studies. Surfaces of ice present even greater challenges. Recently developed methods for preparation of large single-crystal samples make it possible to reproducibly prepare any chosen face to address numerous fundamental questions. This review describes preparation methods along with results that firmly establish the connection between the macroscopic structure (observed in snowflakes, microcrystallites, or etch pits) and the molecular-level configuration (detected with X-ray or electron scattering techniques). Selected results of probing interactions at the ice surface, including growth from the melt, surface vibrations, and characterization of the quasi-liquid layer, are discussed.

  18. New method to determine initial surface water displacement at tsunami source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey; Tatarintsev, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    earthquake. However, today it is not yet possible. Ground-based sea radars. This is an effective tool for direct measurement of tsunami wave. At the same time, the wave is measured at a rather narrow area in front of the radar and does not include information about neighboring parts of the wave. Direct measurement of tsunami wave at deep water [2]. Today, this technology is certainly among the most useful and promising. The DART II® system consists of a seafloor bottom pressure recording (BPR) system, capable of detecting tsunamis as small as 1 cm, and a moored surface buoy for real-time communications. We focus our research on improving the later method, direct measurement of tsunami wave at deep water. We suggest the new way to analyze DART data, modifying the methodology originally proposed by V. Titov. Smaller system of unit sources [3] should be considered to approximate all typical shapes of initial disturbance by several suitable basis functions. To successfully implement it, performance of data analysis should be dramatically improved. This could be done by using a signal orthogonalization procedure for considered system of unit sources and calculation of Fourier coefficients of the measured time series with respect to orthogonal basis. The approach suggested was used as a part of computerized workstation for tsunami hazard monitoring [5-6]. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/honshu20110311/ National Data Buoy Center. URL: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/dart.shtml National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://sift.pmel.noaa.gov/thredds/dodsC/uncompressed/ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/model.html Alexey Romanenko, Mikhail Lavrentiev-jr, Vasily Titov, "Modern Architecture for Tsunami Hazard Mitigation" // Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS-2012), ISBN 978-981-07-2049-0 Mikhail

  19. A micromanipulation cell including a tool changer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clévy, Cédric; Hubert, Arnaud; Agnus, Joël; Chaillet, Nicolas

    2005-10-01

    This paper deals with the design, fabrication and characterization of a tool changer for micromanipulation cells. This tool changer is part of a manipulation cell including a three linear axes robot and a piezoelectric microgripper. All these parts are designed to perform micromanipulation tasks in confined spaces such as a microfactory or in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The tool changer principle is to fix a pair of tools (i.e. the gripper tips) either on the tips of the microgripper actuator (piezoceramic bulk) or on a tool magazine. The temperature control of a thermal glue enables one to fix or release this pair of tools. Liquefaction and solidification are generated by surface mounted device (SMD) resistances fixed on the surface of the actuator or magazine. Based on this principle, the tool changer can be adapted to other kinds of micromanipulation cells. Hundreds of automatic tool exchanges were performed with a maximum positioning error between two consecutive tool exchanges of 3.2 µm, 2.3 µm and 2.8 µm on the X, Y and Z axes respectively (Z refers to the vertical axis). Finally, temperature measurements achieved under atmospheric pressure and in a vacuum environment and pressure measurements confirm the possibility of using this device in the air as well as in a SEM.

  20. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R.; King, S.J.; Day, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of 26 Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 59 Ni and 129 I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs

  1. AMS at the ANU including biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); King, S.J.; Day, J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-12-31

    An extensive accelerator mass spectrometry program has been conducted on the 14UD accelerator at the Australian National University since 1986. In the two years since the previous conference, the research program has expanded significantly to include biomedical applications of {sup 26}Al and studies of landform evolution using isotopes produced in situ in surface rocks by cosmic ray bombardment. The system is now used for the measurement of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 59}Ni and {sup 129}I, and research is being undertaken in hydrology, environmental geochemistry, archaeology and biomedicine. On the technical side, a new test system has permitted the successful off-line development of a high-intensity ion source. A new injection line to the 14UD has been established and the new source is now in position and providing beams to the accelerator. 4 refs.

  2. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lamb, Bradford [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Prudell, Joseph [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hammagren, Erik [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States); Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc., Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Project aims to satisfy objectives of the DOE’s Water Power Program by completing a system detailed design (SDD) and other important activities in the first phase of a utility-scale grid-connected ocean wave energy demonstration. In early 2012, Columbia Power (CPwr) had determined that further cost and performance optimization was necessary in order to commercialize its StingRAY wave energy converter (WEC). CPwr’s progress toward commercialization, and the requisite technology development path, were focused on transitioning toward a commercial-scale demonstration. This path required significant investment to be successful, and the justification for this investment required improved annual energy production (AEP) and lower capital costs. Engineering solutions were developed to address these technical and cost challenges, incorporated into a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE), and then adapted to form the technical content and statement of project objectives of the resulting Project (DE-EE0005930). Through Project cost-sharing and technical collaboration between DOE and CPwr, and technical collaboration with Oregon State University (OSU), National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) and other Project partners, we have demonstrated experimentally that these conceptual improvements have merit and made significant progress towards a certified WEC system design at a selected and contracted deployment site at the Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) at the Marine Corps Base in Oahu, HI (MCBH).

  3. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Ken [Columbia Power Technologies, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2011-11-02

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progress and results for this project which will be used to inform the utility-scale design process, improve cost estimates, accurately forecast energy production and to observe system operation and survivability.

  4. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  5. Surface Prognostic Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Prognostic Charts are historical surface prognostic (forecast) charts created by the United States Weather Bureau. They include fronts, isobars, cloud, and...

  6. Computer aided surface representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  7. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  8. NFLUX PRE: Validation of New Specific Humidity, Surface Air Temperature, and Wind Speed Algorithms for Ascending/Descending Directions and Clear or Cloudy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    SDR ) satellite data, Environmental Data Record (EDR) readers, and direct observations (X) from buoys and ships to provide ocean surface state...are noted. Platform / Sensor QA U10 TA LTAN DMSP F16 / SSMIS SDR SDR SDR 17:22 DMSP F17 / SSMIS SDR SDR SDR 17:49 DMSP F18 / SSMIS SDR ... SDR SDR 17:06 POES N15 / AMSU SDR SDR 16:51 POES N18 / AMSU SDR SDR 15:23 POES N19 / AMSU SDR SDR

  9. Quality Control and First Insights on the Variability of Surface Wind Observations for North Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio-Eceiza, E.; González-Rouco, F. J.; Navarro Montesinos, J.; Hidalgo; Jiménez, P.; García-Bustamante, E.; Conte, J.; Casabella, N.; Beltrami, H.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades, a policy change in energy sources has been fostered in Atlantic Canada. The purpose of this has been to reduce the dependency on energy produced abroad and to propose feasible alternatives with the aim of reducing greenhouse emissions. The region offers a high potential for the development of wind energy facilities and studies within the framework of wind resource assessment are encouraged. Studies of this nature rely on the quality of observational data. Henceforth, it is essential to develop procedures that ensure the reliability of observations before they are subjected to any subsequent analysis. This work summarizes the Quality Control process applied to an observational database of surface wind module and direction in North Eastern North America. The data set consists of 525 stations compiled from three different sources: 344 land sites from Environment Canada (EC; 1940-2009) located in the provinces of Atlantic Canada and Quebec; 40 buoys distributed over the East Coast and the Canadian Great Lakes provided by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (FOC; 1988-2008); and 141 land sites over both Eastern Canada and North Eastern USA provided by the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR; 1975-2010). The process comprises different phases that: 1) unify measurement units and recording times; 2) find accidentally duplicated periods of data within a time series or between different stations; 3) check for physical consistency in the ranges of values; 4) detect time intervals of anomalous low and high variability; and 5) look for long term biases in mean and variance. The temporal extension and resolution of the quality controlled database allows to explore the wind variability at different temporal scales, from daily to multidecadal. This contribution will present a first assessment of the wind field climatology in the region, including a description of long term trends, analogous of wind circulation regimes and their relationship to large scale

  10. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures

  11. The surface drifter program for real time and off-line validation of ocean forecasts and reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Fabrice; Regnier, Charly; Drévillon, Marie

    2017-04-01

    As part of the Global Ocean Observing System, the Global Drifter Program (GDP) is comprised of an array of about 1250 drifting buoys spread over the global ocean, that provide operational, near-real time surface velocity, sea surface temperature (SST) and sea level pressure observations. This information is used mainly used for numerical weather forecasting, research, and in-situ calibration/verification of satellite observations. Since 2013 the drifting buoy SST measurements are used for near real time assessment of global forecasting systems from Canada, France, UK, USA, Australia in the frame of the GODAE OceanView Intercomparison and Validation Task. For most of these operational systems, these data are not used for assimilation, and offer an independent observation assessment. This approach mimics the validation performed for SST satellite products. More recently, validation procedures have been proposed in order to assess the surface dynamics of Mercator Océan global and regional forecast and reanalyses. Velocities deduced from drifter trajectories are used in two ways. First, the Eulerian approach where buoy and ocean model velocity values are compared at the position of drifters. Then, from discrepancies, statistics are computed and provide an evaluation of the ocean model's surface dynamics reliability. Second, the Lagrangian approach, where drifting trajectories are simulated at each location of the real drifter trajectory using the ocean model velocity fields. Then, on daily basis, real and simulated drifter trajectories are compared by analyzing the spread after one day, two days etc…. The cumulated statistics on specific geographical boxes are evaluated in term of dispersion properties of the "real ocean" as captured by drifters, and those properties in the ocean model. This approach allows to better evaluate forecasting score for surface dispersion applications, like Search and Rescue, oil spill forecast, drift of other objects or contaminant

  12. Advanced Surface Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Nielsen, Lars Pleht

    This new significant book on advanced modern surface technology in all its variations, is aimed at both teaching at engineering schools and practical application in industry. The work covers all the significant aspects of modern surface technology and also describes how new advanced techniques make...... of the components. It covers everything from biocompatible surfaces of IR absorbent or reflective surfaces to surfaces with specific properties within low friction, hardness, corrosion, colors, etc. The book includes more than 400 pages detailing virtually all analysis methods for examining at surfaces....

  13. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres. (letter)

  14. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  15. CALYPSO: a new HF RADAR network to monitor sea surface currents in the Malta-Sicily channel (Mediterranean sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosoli, S.; Ciraolo, G.; Drago, A.; Capodici, F.; Maltese, A.; Gauci, A.; Galea, A.; Azzopardi, J.; Buscaino, G.; Raffa, F.; Mazzola, S.; Sinatra, R.

    2016-12-01

    Located in one of the main shipping lanes in the Mediterranean Sea, and in a strategic region for oil extraction platforms, the Malta-Sicily channel is exposed to significant oil spill risks. Shipping and extraction activities constitute a major threat for marine areas of relevant ecological value in the area, and impacts of oil spills on the local ecosystems and the economic activities, including tourism and fisheries, can be dramatic. Damages would be even more devastating for the Maltese archipelago, where marine resources represent important economic assets. Additionally, North Africa coastal areas are also under threat, due to their proximity to the Malta-Sicily Channel. Prevention and mitigation measures, together with rapid-response and decision-making in case of emergency situations, are fundamental steps that help accomplishing the tasks of minimizing risks and reducing impacts to the various compartments. Thanks to state-of-art technology for the monitoring of sea-surface currents in real-time under all sea-state conditions, the CALYPSO network of High-Frequency Radars represents an essential and invaluable tool for the specific purpose. HF radars technology provide a unique tool to track surface currents in near-real time, and as such the dispersion of pollutants can be monitored and forecasted and their origin backtracked, for instance through data assimilation into ocean circulation models or through short-term data-driven statistical forecasts of ocean currents. The network is constituted of four SeaSonde systems that work in the 13.5MHz frequency band. The network is operative since August 2012 and has been extensively validated using a variety of independent platforms and devices, including current meter data and drifting buoys. The latter provided clear evidences of the reliability of the collected data as for tracking the drifting objects. Additionally, data have provided a new insight into the oceanographic characteristics of the region

  16. Meta-structure and tunable optical device including the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon; Papadakis, Georgia Theano; Atwater, Harry

    2017-12-26

    A meta-structure and a tunable optical device including the same are provided. The meta-structure includes a plurality of metal layers spaced apart from one another, an active layer spaced apart from the plurality of metal layers and having a carrier concentration that is tuned according to an electric signal applied to the active layer and the plurality of metal layers, and a plurality of dielectric layers spaced apart from one another and each having one surface contacting a metal layer among the plurality of metal layers and another surface contacting the active layer.

  17. Smooth polyhedral surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Günther, Felix

    2017-03-15

    Polyhedral surfaces are fundamental objects in architectural geometry and industrial design. Whereas closeness of a given mesh to a smooth reference surface and its suitability for numerical simulations were already studied extensively, the aim of our work is to find and to discuss suitable assessments of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces that only take the geometry of the polyhedral surface itself into account. Motivated by analogies to classical differential geometry, we propose a theory of smoothness of polyhedral surfaces including suitable notions of normal vectors, tangent planes, asymptotic directions, and parabolic curves that are invariant under projective transformations. It is remarkable that seemingly mild conditions significantly limit the shapes of faces of a smooth polyhedral surface. Besides being of theoretical interest, we believe that smoothness of polyhedral surfaces is of interest in the architectural context, where vertices and edges of polyhedral surfaces are highly visible.

  18. Advanced Surface Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Nielsen, Lars Pleht

    of the components. It covers everything from biocompatible surfaces of IR absorbent or reflective surfaces to surfaces with specific properties within low friction, hardness, corrosion, colors, etc. The book includes more than 400 pages detailing virtually all analysis methods for examining at surfaces.......This new significant book on advanced modern surface technology in all its variations, is aimed at both teaching at engineering schools and practical application in industry. The work covers all the significant aspects of modern surface technology and also describes how new advanced techniques make...... it possible to examine surfaces all the way down to their atomic layers and also to perform realistic durability tests. The many surface techniques are described in clear and simple language, and the book is richly illustrated with detailed drawings and photos. It also deals with replacing environmentally...

  19. Surface chemistry theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bikerman, J J

    2013-01-01

    Surface Chemistry Theory and Applications focuses on liquid-gas, liquid-liquid, solid-gas, solid-liquid, and solid-solid surfaces. The book first offers information on liquid-gas surfaces, including surface tension, measurement of surface tension, rate of capillarity rise, capillary attraction, bubble pressure and pore size, and surface tension and temperature. The text then ponders on liquid-liquid and solid-gas surfaces. Discussions focus on surface energy of solids, surface roughness and cleanness, adsorption of gases and vapors, adsorption hysteresis, interfacial tension, and interfacial t

  20. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 44770 Data, NW Tutuila in the American Samoa, 200402-200503 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 44770 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  1. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30311 Data between Nihoa and Niihau in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 200210-200402 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30311 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  2. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29103 Data, Pathfinder Reef in the Marianas Archipelago, 200309-200406 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29103 was deployed in the region of Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  3. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30288 Data near Necker in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 200209-200404 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30288 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  4. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 44769 Data, Enroute to Manua from Tutuila, in the American Samoa, 200402-200406 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 44769 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  5. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29109 Data on the south side of Swains Island, American Samoa , 200402-200606 (NODC Accession 0067474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29109 was deployed in the region of American Samoa to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files contain...

  6. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29097 Data near Nihoa Island, in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200307-200412 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29097 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  7. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 24953 Data at Laysan/Pioneer Bank in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 200110-200504 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 24953 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  8. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 24946 Data, north of Niihau, in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 200110-200209 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 24946 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  9. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29106 Data, Laysan Island in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200307-200411 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29106 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  10. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29098 Data, Necker Island in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200307-200410 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29098 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  11. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 30350 Data near Laysan Island in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 200209-200412 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 30350 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  12. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 28078 Data, Stingray Shoals in the Marianas Archipelago, 200308-200412 (NODC Accession 0067473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 28078 was deployed in the region of Marianas Archipelago to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  13. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29101 Data, Kure Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200308-200509 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29101 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  14. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29102 Data, Lisianski Island in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200307-200310 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29102 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  15. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 24961 Data, South of Necker, in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200109-200406 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 24961 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  16. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 24955 Data at Bank 8, in the NW Hawaiian Islands, 200110-200504 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 24955 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  17. CRED SVP Drifting Buoy Argos_ID 29105 Data, Gardner Pinnacles in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, 200307-200508 (NODC Accession 0049436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CRED SVP drifter Argos_ID 29105 was deployed in the region of NW Hawaiian Islands to assess ocean currents and sea surface temperature. SVP drifter data files...

  18. Surface optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, including pattern rotation akin to a surface optical Ferris wheel. Applications are envisaged to be in atom lithography, optical surface tweezers, and spanners.

  19. Surface for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Rathbone, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Make Microsoft's Surface work-and play-just the way you want it to Microsoft's Surface tablet has the features and personality you're looking for, with a robust environment for business computing that doesn't skimp on fun. Surface for Dummies, 2nd Edition explains how Windows 8.1 Pro and Windows RT differ, and helps you decide which Surface model is best for you. Step by step, this book walks you through both the hardware and software features of the Surface, including the touch cover and type cover, Windows RT and Windows 8.1 Pro operating systems, and the coveted Office Home & Student 2013 s

  20. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  1. Minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Sauvigny, Friedrich; Jakob, Ruben; Kuster, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    Minimal Surfaces is the first volume of a three volume treatise on minimal surfaces (Grundlehren Nr. 339-341). Each volume can be read and studied independently of the others. The central theme is boundary value problems for minimal surfaces. The treatise is a substantially revised and extended version of the monograph Minimal Surfaces I, II (Grundlehren Nr. 295 & 296). The first volume begins with an exposition of basic ideas of the theory of surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, followed by an introduction of minimal surfaces as stationary points of area, or equivalently

  2. Global Sea Surface Temperature: A Harmonized Multi-sensor Time-series from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the methods used to obtain a new global sea surface temperature (SST) dataset spanning the early 1980s to the present, intended for use as a climate data record (CDR). The dataset provides skin SST (the fundamental measurement) and an estimate of the daily mean SST at depths compatible with drifting buoys (adjusting for skin and diurnal variability). The depth SST provided enables the CDR to be used with in situ records and centennial-scale SST reconstructions. The new SST timeseries is as independent as possible from in situ observations, and from 1995 onwards is harmonized to an independent satellite reference (namely, SSTs from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (Advanced ATSR)). This maximizes the utility of our new estimates of variability and long-term trends in interrogating previous datasets tied to in situ observations. The new SSTs include full resolution (swath, level 2) data, single-sensor gridded data (level 3, 0.05 degree latitude-longitude grid) and a multi-sensor optimal analysis (level 4, same grid). All product levels are consistent. All SSTs have validated uncertainty estimates attached. The sensors used include all Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers from NOAA-6 onwards and the ATSR series. AVHRR brightness temperatures (BTs) are calculated from counts using a new in-flight re-calibration for each sensor, ultimately linked through to the AATSR BT calibration by a new harmonization technique. Artefacts in AVHRR BTs linked to varying instrument temperature, orbital regime and solar contamination are significantly reduced. These improvements in the AVHRR BTs (level 1) translate into improved cloud detection and SST (level 2). For cloud detection, we use a Bayesian approach for all sensors. For the ATSRs, SSTs are derived with sufficient accuracy and sensitivity using dual-view coefficients. This is not the case for single-view AVHRR observations, for which a physically based retrieval is employed, using a hybrid

  3. Multi sensor validation and error characteristics of Arctic satellite sea surface temperature observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna; Tonbo, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    in the satellite products related to observation techniques, data processing and cloud masking. Temporal and spatial error scales are derived for all satellite products using the satellite versus in situ match-up dataset. Temporal error scales are typically between 1 and 2 days and the characteristic spatial error......Six of the operational global satellite sea surface temperature products from infrared and microwave sensors are validated in a consistent way in waters north of 60° N. The 15-month validation with drifting buoy in situ observations shows that data from the Advanced Along-Tracking Scanning...... Radiometer (AATSR) on-board the ENVISAT satellite and NAVOCEANO data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on-board the NOAA 18 satellite are superior in terms of bias and standard deviation. The observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) on-board the Aqua...

  4. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  5. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  6. On rationally supported surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Jens; Juttler, B.; Sir, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the class of surfaces which are equipped with rational support functions. Any rational support function can be decomposed into a symmetric (even) and an antisymmetric (odd) part. We analyze certain geometric properties of surfaces with odd and even rational support functions....... In particular it is shown that odd rational support functions correspond to those rational surfaces which can be equipped with a linear field of normal vectors, which were discussed by Sampoli et al. (Sampoli, M.L., Peternell, M., Juttler, B., 2006. Rational surfaces with linear normals and their convolutions...... with rational surfaces. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 23, 179-192). As shown recently, this class of surfaces includes non-developable quadratic triangular Bezier surface patches (Lavicka, M., Bastl, B., 2007. Rational hypersurfaces with rational convolutions. Comput. Aided Geom. Design 24, 410426; Peternell, M...

  7. Rumble surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    National Institute for Transport and Road

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumble surfaces are intermittent short lengths of coarse-textured road surfacings on which vehicle tyres produce a rumbling sound. used in conjunction with appropriate roadsigns and markings, they can reduce accidents on rural roads by alerting...

  8. Surface thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moliner, F.

    1975-01-01

    Basic thermodynamics of a system consisting of two bulk phases with an interface. Solid surfaces: general. Discussion of experimental data on surface tension and related concepts. Adsorption thermodynamics in the Gibbsian scheme. Adsorption on inert solid adsorbents. Systems with electrical charges: chemistry and thermodynamics of imperfect crystals. Thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Simple models of charge transfer chemisorption. Adsorption heat and related concepts. Surface phase transitions

  9. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  10. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  11. Static, Lightweight Includes Resolution for PHP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hills (Mark); P. Klint (Paul); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDynamic languages include a number of features that are challenging to model properly in static analysis tools. In PHP, one of these features is the include expression, where an arbitrary expression provides the path of the file to include at runtime. In this paper we present two

  12. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  13. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  14. Levels of Cd, Cu, Pb and V in marine sediments in the vicinity of the Single Buoy Moorings (SBM3) at Mina Al Fahal in the Sultanate of Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Husaini, Issa; Abdul-Wahab, Sabah; Ahamad, Rahmalan; Chan, Keziah

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessed metal contamination in the SBM3 marine sediments of Mina Al Fahal, Oman. • Examined heavy metal concentration levels of Cd, Cu, Pb and V. • Mean concentration in the sediments, from highest to lowest, is V > Cu > Pb > Cd. • Highest concentration of V due to waste discharges from nearby heavy tanker traffic. • ICP-OES found low concentrations of all four heavy metals; SMB3 region in good quality. - Abstract: Recently in the Sultanate of Oman, there has been a rapid surge of coastal developments. These developments cause metal contamination, which may affect the habitats and communities at and near the coastal region. As a result, a study was conducted to assess the level of metal contamination and its impact on the marine sediments in the vicinity of the Single Buoy Moorings 3 (SBM3) at Mina Al Fahal in the Sultanate of Oman. Marine subtidal sediment samples were collected from six different stations of the SBM3 for the period ranging from June 2009 to April 2010. These samples were then analyzed for their level and distribution of the heavy metals of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and vanadium (V). Overall, low concentrations of all four heavy metals were measured from the marine sediments, indicating that the marine at SBM3 is of good quality

  15. Characterisation of Functional Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonardo, P.M.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Bruzzone, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Characterisation of surfaces is of fundamental importance to control the manufacturing process and the functional performance of the part. Many applications concern contact and tribology problems, which include friction, wear and lubrication. This paper presents the techniques and instruments for...

  16. Surface Weather Observations Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  17. Optimum Sea Surface Displacement and Fault Slip Distribution of the 2017 Tehuantepec Earthquake (Mw 8.2) in Mexico Estimated From Tsunami Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Mulia, Iyan E.; Satake, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    The 2017 Tehuantepec earthquake (Mw 8.2) was the first great normal fault event ever instrumentally recorded to occur in the Middle America Trench. The earthquake generated a tsunami with an amplitude of 1.8 m (height = 3.5 m) in Puerto Chiapas, Mexico. Tsunami waveforms recorded at coastal tide gauges and offshore buoy stations were used to estimate the optimum sea surface displacement without assuming any fault. Our optimum sea surface displacement model indicated that the maximum uplift of 0.5 m is located near the trench and the maximum subsidence of 0.8 m on the coastal side near the epicenter. We then estimated the fault slip distribution that can best explain the optimum sea surface displacement assuming 10 different fault geometries. The best model suggests that a compact region of large slip (3-6 m) extends from a depth of 30 km to 90 km, centered at a depth of 60 km.

  18. Surface chemistry essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Birdi, K S

    2013-01-01

    Surface chemistry plays an important role in everyday life, as the basis for many phenomena as well as technological applications. Common examples range from soap bubbles, foam, and raindrops to cosmetics, paint, adhesives, and pharmaceuticals. Additional areas that rely on surface chemistry include modern nanotechnology, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. There is extensive literature on this subject, but most chemistry books only devote one or two chapters to it. Surface Chemistry Essentials fills a need for a reference that brings together the fundamental aspects of surface chemistry w

  19. Including Organizational Cultural Parameters in Work Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Handley, Holly A; Heacox, Nancy J

    2004-01-01

    .... In order to represent the organizational impact on the work process, five organizational cultural parameters were identified and included in an algorithm for modeling and simulation of cultural...

  20. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis ... Haemophilus influenzae , including H. influenzae type b or Hib, can cause many different kinds of infections . Symptoms depend on ...

  1. Field and numerical study of wind and surface waves at short fetches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2016-04-01

    Measurements were carried out in 2012-2015 from May to October in the waters of Gorky Reservoir belonging to the Volga Cascade. The methods of the experiment focus on the study of airflow in the close proximity to the water surface. The sensors were positioned at the oceanographic Froude buoy including five two-component ultrasonic sensors WindSonic by Gill Instruments at different levels (0.1, 0.85, 1.3, 2.27, 5.26 meters above the mean water surface level), one water and three air temperature sensors, and three-channel wire wave gauge. One of wind sensors (0.1 m) was located on the float tracking the waveform for measuring the wind speed in the close proximity to the water surface. Basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer (the friction velocity u∗, the wind speed U10 and the drag coefficient CD) were calculated from the measured profiles of wind speed. Parameters were obtained in the range of wind speeds of 1-12 m/s. For wind speeds stronger than 4 m/s CD values were lower than those obtained before (see eg. [1,2]) and those predicted by the bulk parameterization. However, for weak winds (less than 3 m/s) CD values considerably higher than expected ones. The new parameterization of surface drag coefficient was proposed on the basis of the obtained data. The suggested parameterization of drag coefficient CD(U10) was implemented within wind input source terms in WAVEWATCH III [3]. The results of the numerical experiments were compared with the results obtained in the field experiments on the Gorky Reservoir. The use of the new drag coefficient improves the agreement in significant wave heights HS [4]. At the same time, the predicted mean wave periods are overestimated using both built-in source terms and adjusted source terms. We associate it with the necessity of the adjusting of the DIA nonlinearity model in WAVEWATCH III to the conditions of the middle-sized reservoir. Test experiments on the adjusting were carried out. The work was supported by the

  2. Thermochemical surface engineering of steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Steels provides a comprehensive scientific overview of the principles and different techniques involved in thermochemical surface engineering, including thermodynamics, kinetics principles, process technologies and techniques for enhanced performance of steels...

  3. Waveguiding with surface plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Zhanghua; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are electromagnetic modes propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces. Various SPP modes can be supported by flat and curved, single and multiple surfaces, exhibiting remarkable properties, including the possibility of concentrating electromagnetic fields beyon...

  4. Focal surfaces of hyperbolic cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi Hristov; Pavlov, Milen Dimov

    2017-12-01

    Cylindrical surfaces have many applications in geometric modeling, architecture and other branches of engineering. In this paper, we describe two cylindrical surfaces associated to a given hyperbolic cylinder. The first one is a focal surface which is determined by reciprocal principle curvature of the hyperbolic cylinder. The second one is a generalized focal surface obtained by reciprocal mean curvature of the same hyperbolic cylinder. In particular, we show that each of these surfaces admits three different parametric representations. As consequence, it is proved that the focal and generalized focal surfaces of the hyperbolic cylinder are rational surfaces. An illustrative example is included.

  5. The surgery of peripheral nerves (including tumors)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugleholm, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    Surgical pathology of the peripheral nervous system includes traumatic injury, entrapment syndromes, and tumors. The recent significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology and cellular biology of peripheral nerve degeneration and regeneration has yet to be translated into improved...

  6. Including Indigenous Minorities in Decision-Making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Based on theories of public sphere participation and deliberative democracy, this book presents empirical results from a study of experiences with including Aboriginal and Maori groups in political decision-making in respectively Western Australia and New Zealand...

  7. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Resources Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  8. Births and deaths including fetal deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Access to a variety of United States birth and death files including fetal deaths: Birth Files, 1968-2009; 1995-2005; Fetal death file, 1982-2005; Mortality files,...

  9. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  10. Spherical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David

    2016-01-01

    We study surfaces of constant positive Gauss curvature in Euclidean 3-space via the harmonicity of the Gauss map. Using the loop group representation, we solve the regular and the singular geometric Cauchy problems for these surfaces, and use these solutions to compute several new examples. We give...

  11. Assessing the Impact of Surface and Upper-Air Observations on the Forecast Skill of the ACCESS Numerical Weather Prediction Model over Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Soldatenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s in situ observations (land and sea surface observations, upper air observations by radiosondes, pilot balloons, wind profilers, and aircraft observations on the short-term forecast skill provided by the ACCESS (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator global numerical weather prediction (NWP system is evaluated using an adjoint-based method. This technique makes use of the adjoint perturbation forecast model utilized within the 4D-Var assimilation system, and is able to calculate the individual impact of each assimilated observation in a cycling NWP system. The results obtained show that synoptic observations account for about 60% of the 24-h forecast error reduction, with the remainder accounted for by aircraft (12.8%, radiosondes (10.5%, wind profilers (3.9%, pilot balloons (2.8%, buoys (1.7% and ships (1.2%. In contrast, the largest impact per observation is from buoys and aircraft. Overall, all observation types have a positive impact on the 24-h forecast skill. Such results help to support the decision-making process regarding the evolution of the observing network, particularly at the national level. Consequently, this 4D-Var-based approach has great potential as a tool to assist the design and running of an efficient and effective observing network.

  12. Temperature, salinity, conductivity and pressure data collected from a moored buoy in Hudson Strait from 2008-08 to 2009-09 (NODC Accession 0119894)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset includes SeaBird MicroCat-37 data that was collected on four moorings deployed in the Hudson Strait, Canada from August 2008 to September 2009. Mooring...

  13. Temperature and conductivity data collected by CTDs on moored buoys in the Sermilik Fjord, Greenland from 2008-07 to 2009-08 (NODC Accession 0123217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data included in this dataset were collected in the Sermilik Fjord, located in East Greenland in the Ammassalik district close to the town of Tasiilaq. Data...

  14. Isolators Including Main Spring Linear Guide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Ryan (Inventor); Buchele, Paul (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Ruebsamen, Dale Thomas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of isolators, such as three parameter isolators, including a main spring linear guide system are provided. In one embodiment, the isolator includes first and second opposing end portions, a main spring mechanically coupled between the first and second end portions, and a linear guide system extending from the first end portion, across the main spring, and toward the second end portion. The linear guide system expands and contracts in conjunction with deflection of the main spring along the working axis, while restricting displacement and rotation of the main spring along first and second axes orthogonal to the working axis.

  15. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  16. Comparison of coral δ18O with pseudocorals derived from in situ sea surface salinity and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, K. L.; Chaichi, N.; Maupin, C. R.; Richey, J. N.; Quinn, T. M.; Poore, R. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Paleoclimatologists use pseudocorals and forward modeling of coral oxygen isotopes (δ18O) to assess δ18O variations for comparison with climate model output in order to understand past tropical oceanic-atmospheric variability. Oxygen isotopic (δ18Ocoral) variability in shallow water coral skeletons is dependent on sea surface temperature (SST) and δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), which varies with sea surface salinity (SSS). However, measurements of δ18Osw and SSS are sparse; therefore, simulated SSS (e.g., SODA) is typically used in pseudocoral investigations. Our study site is the Dry Tortugas National Park (DRTO; 24º42'N, 82º48'W) in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where hourly SST and SSS measurements are available from NOAA buoys (1992-2002) and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS; 2011-2014). Here we use bivariate forward modeling of monthly average buoy SSS and SST to develop a time series of pseudocoral δ18O (δ18Op = -0.22(‰/ºC)SST + 0.11(‰/psu)SSS) for DRTO that are compared with δ18Ocoral variations from three Siderastrea siderea coral colonies growing in close proximity within the park. We use the relationship for δ18Osw and SSS determined for Flower Garden Banks coral reef in the northern GOM (27º52'N, 93º49'W) since no measurements of δ18Osw are currently available for DRTO. δ18Op co-varies with δ18Ocoral (r2 = 0.59) with a root mean square error (RMSE = 0.32‰) greater than the intercolony δ18Ocoral variability (r2 = 0.80; RSME = 0.07‰). Discrepancies between δ18Op and δ18Ocoral may be related to the lack of a local SSS-δ18Osw relationship for DRTO or uncertainties in subannual time assignment for δ18Ocoral. A new source of SSS is the NASA satellite Aquarius (2012-2014), which may be useful in future pseudocoral studies, that is evaluated along with high resolution simulated SSS (Global Ocean Physics Reanalysis GLORYS2V3; 1993-2012). We find similar correlation between Aquarius-derived SSS and FKNMS SSS (r2

  17. Diversification of Smallholder Tobacco Systems to include ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco is the mainstay of the economy of Malawi, accounting for over 70% of export earnings. Of the 100 000 members of the National Smallholder Farmers' Association of Malawi (NASFAM), 60% rely on tobacco for their sole source of income. Like their counterparts elsewhere, they face many difficulties, including: ...

  18. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  19. Extending flood damage assessment methodology to include ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimal and sustainable flood plain management, including flood control, can only be achieved when the impacts of flood control measures are considered for both the man-made and natural environments, and the sociological aspects are fully considered. Until now, methods/models developed to determine the influences ...

  20. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  1. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joint...

  2. Modernizing Agrifood Markets : Including Small Producers in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Against this baseline data, they will endeavor to identify success stories or examples of interventions that ensure small farmers' access to modernizing agrifood markets. The research will inform a set of policy recommendations to be promoted through policy platforms in a large number of developing countries, including but ...

  3. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  4. Numerical simulation of spark ignition including ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiele, M; Selle, S; Riedel, U; Warnatz, J; Maas, U

    2000-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the processes associated Midi spark ignition, as a first step during combustion, is of great importance fur clean operation of spark ignition engines. In the past 10 years. a growing concern for environmental protection, including low emission of pollutants, has increased

  5. Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

    2013-12-31

    The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

  6. Immunolabeling of fingermarks left on forensic relevant surfaces, including thermal paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Annemieke; van Nes, Kirsten A.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of a fingermark contains donor profiling information. Immunolabeling is a technique that can be used to retrieve this chemical information from fingermarks. Additionally, immunolabeling can be used to (re) develop fingermarks. To be of interest in the forensic field, the

  7. Fungal Communities Including Plant Pathogens in Near Surface Air Are Similar across Northwestern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogens Nicolaisen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Information on the diversity of fungal spores in air is limited, and also the content of airborne spores of fungal plant pathogens is understudied. In the present study, a total of 152 air samples were taken from rooftops at urban settings in Slagelse, DK, Wageningen NL, and Rothamsted, UK together with 41 samples from above oilseed rape fields in Rothamsted. Samples were taken during 10-day periods in spring and autumn, each sample representing 1 day of sampling. The fungal content of samples was analyzed by metabarcoding of the fungal internal transcribed sequence 1 (ITS1 and by qPCR for specific fungi. The metabarcoding results demonstrated that season had significant effects on airborne fungal communities. In contrast, location did not have strong effects on the communities, even though locations were separated by up to 900 km. Also, a number of plant pathogens had strikingly similar patterns of abundance at the three locations. Rooftop samples were more diverse than samples taken above fields, probably reflecting greater mixing of air from a range of microenvironments for the rooftop sites. Pathogens that were known to be present in the crop were also found in air samples taken above the field. This paper is one of the first detailed studies of fungal composition in air with the focus on plant pathogens and shows that it is possible to detect a range of pathogens in rooftop air samplers using metabarcoding.

  8. Fungal communities including plant pathogens in near surface air are similar across northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaisen, Mogens; West, Jonathan S.; Sapkota, Rumakanta; Canning, Gail G.M.; Schoen, Cor; Justesen, Annemarie F.

    2017-01-01

    Information on the diversity of fungal spores in air is limited, and also the content of airborne spores of fungal plant pathogens is understudied. In the present study, a total of 152 air samples were taken from rooftops at urban settings in Slagelse, DK, Wageningen NL, and Rothamsted, UK together

  9. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  10. CYGNSS Surface Wind Validation and Characteristics in the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asharaf, S.; Waliser, D. E.; Zhang, C.; Wandala, A.

    2017-12-01

    Surface wind over tropical oceans plays a crucial role in many local/regional weather and climate processes and helps to shape the global climate system. However, there is a lack of consistent high quality observations for surface winds. The newly launched NASA Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) mission provides near surface wind speed over the tropical ocean with sampling that accounts for the diurnal cycle. In the early phase of the mission, validation is a critical task, and over-ocean validation is typically challenging due to a lack of robust validation resources that a cover a variety of environmental conditions. In addition, it can also be challenging to obtain in-situ observation resources and also to extract co-located CYGNSS records for some of the more scientifically interesting regions, such as the Maritime Continent (MC). The MC is regarded as a key tropical driver for the mean global circulation as well as important large-scale circulation variability such as the Madian-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The focus of this project and analysis is to take advantage of local in-situ resources from the MC regions (e.g. volunteer shipping, marine buoys, and the Year of Maritime Continent (YMC) campaign) to quantitatively characterize and validate the CYGNSS derived winds in the MC region and in turn work to unravel the complex multi-scale interactions between the MJO and MC. This presentation will show preliminary results of a comparison between the CYGNSS and the in-situ surface wind measurements focusing on the MC region. Details about the validation methods, uncertainties, and planned work will be discussed in this presentation.

  11. Vocalization characteristics of North Atlantic right whale surface active groups in the calving habitat, southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygonis, Vasilis; Gerstein, Edmund; Moir, Jim; McCulloch, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Passive acoustic surveys were conducted to assess the vocal behavior of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the designated critical calving habitat along the shallow coastal waters of southeastern United States. Underwater vocalizations were recorded using autonomous buoys deployed in close proximity to surface active groups (SAGs). Nine main vocalization types were identified with manual inspection of spectrograms, and standard acoustic descriptors were extracted. Classification trees were used to examine the distinguishing characteristics of calls and quantify their variability within the SAG vocal repertoire. The results show that descriptors of frequency, bandwidth, and spectral disorder are the most important parameters for partitioning the SAG repertoire, contrary to duration-related measures. The reported source levels and vocalization statistics provide sound production data vital to inform regional passive acoustic monitoring and conservation for this endangered species.

  12. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  13. Power generation method including membrane separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  14. Should Trade Agreements Include Environmental Policy?

    OpenAIRE

    Josh Ederington

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which environmental and trade policies should be treated equally, or symmetrically, in international negotiations. It reviews the recent economics literature on trade and the environment to address two questions. First, should trade negotiations include negotiations over environmental policies and the setting of binding environmental standards? Second, if there are grounds for international environmental negotiations, should environmental agreements b...

  15. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  16. Revisiting Hansen Solubility Parameters by Including Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwerse, Manuel J; Maldonado, Ana; Rousseau, Simon; Moreau-Masselon, Chloe; Roux, Bernard; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2017-11-03

    The Hansen solubility parameter approach is revisited by implementing the thermodynamics of dissolution and mixing. Hansen's pragmatic approach has earned its spurs in predicting solvents for polymer solutions, but for molecular solutes improvements are needed. By going into the details of entropy and enthalpy, several corrections are suggested that make the methodology thermodynamically sound without losing its ease of use. The most important corrections include accounting for the solvent molecules' size, the destruction of the solid's crystal structure, and the specificity of hydrogen-bonding interactions, as well as opportunities to predict the solubility at extrapolated temperatures. Testing the original and the improved methods on a large industrial dataset including solvent blends, fit qualities improved from 0.89 to 0.97 and the percentage of correct predictions rose from 54 % to 78 %. Full Matlab scripts are included in the Supporting Information, allowing readers to implement these improvements on their own datasets. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Surface boxplots

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-22

    In this paper, we introduce a surface boxplot as a tool for visualization and exploratory analysis of samples of images. First, we use the notion of volume depth to order the images viewed as surfaces. In particular, we define the median image. We use an exact and fast algorithm for the ranking of the images. This allows us to detect potential outlying images that often contain interesting features not present in most of the images. Second, we build a graphical tool to visualize the surface boxplot and its various characteristics. A graph and histogram of the volume depth values allow us to identify images of interest. The code is available in the supporting information of this paper. We apply our surface boxplot to a sample of brain images and to a sample of climate model outputs.

  18. Convex surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    This exploration of convex surfaces focuses on extrinsic geometry and applications of the Brunn-Minkowski theory. It also examines intrinsic geometry and the realization of intrinsic metrics. 1958 edition.

  19. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Surface phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Wette, Frederik

    1991-01-01

    In recent years substantial progress has been made in the detection of surface phonons owing to considerable improvements in inelastic rare gas scattering tech­ niques and electron energy loss spectroscopy. With these methods it has become possible to measure surface vibrations in a wide energy range for all wave vectors in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone and thus to deduce the complete surface phonon dispersion curves. Inelastic atomic beam scattering and electron energy loss spectroscopy have started to play a role in the study of surface phonons similar to the one played by inelastic neutron scattering in the investigation of bulk phonons in the last thirty years. Detailed comparison between experimen­ tal results and theoretical studies of inelastic surface scattering and of surface phonons has now become feasible. It is therefore possible to test and to improve the details of interaction models which have been worked out theoretically in the last few decades. At this point we felt that a concise, co...