WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface breaking cracks

  1. Finite element analysis of laser-generated ultrasound for characterizing surface-breaking cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyun Jo

    2005-01-01

    A finite element method was used to simulate the wave propagation of laser-generated ultrasound and its interaction with surface breaking cracks in an elastic material. Thermoelastic laser line source on the material surface was approximated as a shear dipole and loaded as nodal forces in the plane-strain Finite Element (FE) model. The shear dipole-FE model was tested for the generation of ultrasound on the surface with no defect. The model was found to generate the Rayleigh surface wave. The model was then extended to examine the interaction of laser generated ultrasound with surface-breaking cracks of various depths. The crack-scattered waves were monitored to size the crack depth. The proposed model clearly reproduced the experimentally observed features that can be used to characterize the presence of surface-breaking cracks

  2. Detection of surface breaking cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel with ultrasonic - Inspection from the cracked side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, K.; Zetterwall, T.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of detecting surface breaking or near-surface cracks with ultrasonic techniques from the inside of centrifugally cast stainless steel pipes have been investigated by the Swedish Plant Inspectorate (SA) and AaF-Tekniska Roentgencentralen AB (AaF-TRC) on behalf of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) and the Swedish State Power Board (SV). Fifteen specimens from the international Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (SSRRT) were used in this study. All specimens were examined from the cracked side with different ultrasonic probes. The data reported here indicate that a probe with dual elements, low frequency, longitudinal waves and short focus distance can detect almost all of the intended defects with a rather good signal-to-noise ratio. (author)

  3. An investigation of penetrant techniques for detection of machining-induced surface-breaking cracks on monolithic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, G.A.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this effort was to evaluate penetrant methods for their ability to detect surface-breaking cracks in monolithic ceramic materials with an emphasis on detection of cracks generated by machining. There are two basic penetrant types, visible and fluorescent. The visible penetrant method is usually augmented by powder developers and cracks detected can be seen in visible light. Cracks detected by fluorescent penetrant are visible only under ultraviolet light used with or without a developer. The developer is basically a powder that wicks up penetrant from a crack to make it more observable. Although fluorescent penetrants were recommended in the literature survey conducted early in this effort, visible penetrants and two non-standard techniques, a capillary gaseous diffusion method under development at the institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow, and the {open_quotes}statiflux{close_quotes} method which involves use of electrically charged particles, were also investigated. SiAlON ring specimens (1 in. diameter, 3/4 in. wide) which had been subjected to different thermal-shock cycles were used for these tests. The capillary gaseous diffusion method is based on ammonia; the detector is a specially impregnated paper much like litmus paper. As expected, visible dye penetrants offered no detection sensitivity for tight, surface-breaking cracks in ceramics. Although the non-standard statiflux method showed promise on high-crack-density specimens, it was ineffective on limited-crack-density specimens. The fluorescent penetrant method was superior for surface-breaking crack detection, but successful application of this procedure depends greatly on the skill of the user. Two presently available high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrants were then evaluated for detection of microcracks on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC from different suppliers. Although 50X optical magnification may be sufficient for many applications, 200X magnification provides excellent delectability.

  4. Detection of surface breaking cracks using thermographic and non-contact ultrasonic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, S. B.; Burrows, S. E.; Dixon, S.

    2011-04-01

    A combined ultrasound and thermography defect detection system using a raster scanned Q-switched laser as a source of heat and ultrasound has been developed for identifying surface breaking defects. Heat is generated on a sample surface by a laser source and the resultant thermal image is examined by a thermal imaging camera. This can be done using a cw or a pulsed laser, but for ultrasonic generation a pulsed laser beam is required. When a defect is present, the flow of heat in the sample is disturbed and a change in shape of the thermal spot on the sample's surface can be detected. The pulsed laser beam generates simultaneously an ultrasonic wave that can be detected by a suitable transducer, which in this case is an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). The presence of a defect changes both the amplitude and frequency content of the received wave. Three dimensional finite element modelling of the interaction between Lamb waves and defects have been studied and compared with experimental data, in order to optimise source and detector positions around a defect. The approach can detect surface crack defects via the ultrasonic and thermography method in one measurement.

  5. Analytical modelling of acoustic emission from buried or surface-breaking cracks under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Khalifa, W; Jezzine, K; Hello, G; Grondel, S

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive testing method used in various industries (aerospace, petrochemical and pressure-vessel industries in general, power generation, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, etc...) for the examination of large structures subjected to various stresses (e.g. mechanical loading).The energy released by a defect under stress (the AE phenomenon) can propagate as guided waves in thin structures or as surface Rayleigh waves in thick ones. Sensors (possibly permanently) are positioned at various locations on the structure under examination and are assumed to be sensitive to these waves. Then, post-processing tools typically based on signal processing and triangulation algorithms can be used to inverse these data, allowing one to estimate the position of the defect from which emanates the waves measured. The French Atomic Energy Commission is engaged in the development of tools for simulating AE examinations. These tools are based on specific models for the AE sources, for the propagation of guided or Rayleigh waves and for the behaviour of AE sensors. Here, the coupling of a fracture mechanics based model for AE source and surface/guided wave propagation models is achieved through an integral formulation relying on the elastodynamic reciprocity principle. As a first approximation, a simple piston-like model is used to predict the sensitivity of AE sensors. Predictions computed by our simulation tool are compared to results from the literature for validation purpose.

  6. Influence of Crack Morphology on Leak Before Break Margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weilin Zang

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project is to evaluate the deterministic LBB-margins for different pipe systems in a Swedish PWR-plant and using different crack morphology parameters. Results: - The influence of crack morphology on Leak Before Break (LBB) margins is studied. The subject of the report is a number of LBB-submittals to SKI where deterministic LBB-margins are reported. These submittals typically uses a surface roughness of 0.0762 mm (300 microinch) and number of turns equal to zero and an in-house code for the leak rate evaluations. The present report has shown that these conditions give the largest LBB-margins both in terms of the quotient between the critical crack length and the leakage crack size and for the leak rate margin. - Crack morphology parameters have a strong influence on the leak rate evaluations. Using the SQUIRT code and more recent recommendations for crack morphology parameters, it is shown that in many cases the evaluated margins, using 1 gpm as the reference leak rate detection limit, are below the safety factor of 2 on crack size and 10 on leak rate, which is generally required for LBB approval. - The effect of including weld residual stresses on the LBB margins is also investigated. It is shown that for the two examples studied, weld residual stresses were important for the small diameter thin wall pipe whereas it was negligible for the large diameter thick wall pipe which had a self-balanced weld residual stress distribution

  7. Leak-before-break assessment of RBMK-1500 fuel channel in case of delayed hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimasauskas, A.; Grybenas, A.; Makarevicius, V.; Nedzinskas, L.; Levinskas, R.; Kiselev, V.

    2003-01-01

    One of the factors determining remaining lifetime of Zr-2.5% Nb fuel channel (FC) is the amount of hydrogen dissolved during corrosion process. When the concentration of hydrogen exceeds the terminal solid solubility limit zirconium hydrides are precipitated. As a result form necessary conditions for delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Data from the RBMK-1500 fuel channel tubes (removed from service) shows that hydrogen in some cases distributes unevenly and hydrogen concentration can differ several times between individual FC tubes or separate zones of the same tube and possibly, can reach dangerous levels in the future. Consequently, lacking statistical research data, it is difficult to forecast increase of hydrogen concentration and formation of DHC. So it is important to verify if under the most unfavorable situation leak before break condition will be satisfied in the case of DHC. To estimate possible DHC rates in RBMK 1500 FC pressure tubes experiments were done in the following order: hydriding of the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material to the required hydrogen concentration; hydrogen analysis; machining of specimens, fatigue crack formation in the axial direction, DHC testing; average crack length measurement and DHC velocity calculation. During the tests in average DHC values were determined at 283, 250 and 144 degC (with hydrogen concentrations correspondingly 76, 54 and 27 ppm). The fracture resistance dependence from hydrogen concentration was measured at 20 degC. To calculate leak through the postulated flaw, statistical distribution of DHC surface irregularity was determined. Leak before break analysis was carried out according to requirements of RBMK 1500 regulatory documents. J integral and crack opening were calculated using finite element method. Loading of the FC was determined using RELAP5 code. Critical crack length was calculated using R6 and J-integral methods. Coolant flow rate through the postulated crack was estimated using SQUIRT software

  8. Effects of ridge cracking and interface sliding on morphological symmetry breaking in straight-sided blisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Chen; Yu, Sen-Jiang; He, Linghui; Ni, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Complex surface patterns generated by nonlinear buckling originate from various symmetry-breaking instabilities. Identifying possible key factors that regulate the instability modes is critical to reveal the mechanism of the surface pattern selection. In this paper, how another two factors (ridge cracking and interface sliding) including Poisson's ratio influence the morphological symmetry breaking in straight-sided blisters are systematically studied. Morphology diagrams from stability analysis show that ridge cracking and low Poisson's ratio promote symmetric instability mode and favor bubble-like blisters while interface sliding and high Poisson's ratio facilitate antisymmetric instability mode and result in telephone cord buckles. The analytical predictions are evidenced by experimental observations on annealed silicon nitride films on glass substrates and confirmed by nonlinear numerical simulations. This study explains how and why the rarely observed bubble-like blisters in accompany with ridge crack can appear in brittle thin films in comparison with the ubiquitously observed telephone cord buckles that usually form as the development of an antisymmetric instability mode when straight-sided blisters undergo the super-critical isotropic compression.

  9. Evaluation of depth of surface-breaking slit by nondestructive self-calibrating technique using laser based ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Choi, Sang Woo; Ha, Sang Bong

    2002-01-01

    It is required to evaluate nondestructively the crack depth of surface-breaking cracks for the assurance of safety of structure. Optical generation of ultrasound produces well defined pulses with a repeatable frequency content, that are free of any mechanical resonances; they are broad band and are ideal for the measurement of attenuation and scattering over a wide frequency range. Self-calibrating surface signal transmission measurement is very sensitive and practical tool for surface-breaking crack depth. In his paper, the self-calibrating technique by laser-based ultrasound is used to evaluate the depth of surface-breaking crack of material. It is suggested that the relationship between the signal transmission and crack depth can be used as a practical model for predicting the surface-breaking crack depths from the signal transmission measured in structure

  10. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  11. Chloride Penetration through Cracks in High-Performance Concrete and Surface Treatment System for Crack Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seok Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For enhancing the service life of concrete structures, it is very important to minimize crack at surface. Even if these cracks are very small, the problem is to which extend these cracks may jeopardize the durability of these decks. It was proposed that crack depth corresponding with critical crack width from the surface is a crucial factor in view of durability design of concrete structures. It was necessary to deal with chloride penetration through microcracks characterized with the mixing features of concrete. This study is devoted to examine the effect of high strength concrete and reinforcement of steel fiber on chloride penetration through cracks. High strength concrete is regarded as an excellent barrier to resist chloride penetration. However, durability performance of cracked high strength concrete was reduced seriously up to that of ordinary cracked concrete. Steel fiber reinforcement is effective to reduce chloride penetration through cracks because steel fiber reinforcement can lead to reduce crack depth significantly. Meanwhile, surface treatment systems are put on the surface of the concrete in order to seal the concrete. The key-issue is to which extend a sealing is able to ensure that chloride-induced corrosion can be prevented. As a result, penetrant cannot cure cracks, however, coating and combined treatment can prevent chloride from flowing in concrete with maximum crack width of 0.06 mm and 0.08 mm, respectively.

  12. Computational modeling of ice cracking and break-up from helicopter blades

    KAUST Repository

    Shiping, Zhang

    2012-06-25

    In order to reduce the danger of impact onto components caused by break-up, it is important to analyze the shape of shed ice accumulated during flight. In this paper, we will present a 3D finite element method (FEM) to predict the shed ice shape by using a fluid-solid interaction (FSI) approach to determine the loads, and linear fracture mechanics to track crack propagation. Typical icing scenarios for helicopters are analyzed, and the possibility of ice break-up is investigated.

  13. Controlling fatigue crack paths for crack surface marking and growth investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is well known that fatigue crack growth in metals that display confined slip, such as high strength aluminium alloys, develop crack paths that are responsive to the loading direction and the local microstructural orientation, it is less well known that such paths are also responsive to the loading history. In these materials, certain loading sequences can produce highly directional slip bands ahead of the crack tip and by adjusting the sequence of loads, distinct fracture surface features or progression marks, even at very small crack depths can result. Investigating the path a crack selects in fatigue testing when particular combinations of constant and variable amplitude load sequences are applied is providing insight into crack growth. Further, it is possible to design load sequences that allow very small amounts of crack growth to be measured, at very small crack sizes, well below the conventional crack growth threshold in the aluminium alloy discussed here. This paper reports on observations of the crack path phenomenon and a novel test loading method for measuring crack growth rates for very small crack depths in aluminium alloy 7050-T7451 (an important aircraft primary structural material. The aim of this work was to firstly generate short- crack constant amplitude growth data and secondly, through the careful manipulation of the applied loading, to achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in the material being investigated. A particular focus of this work is the identification of the possible sources of crack growth retardation and closure in these small cracks. Interpreting these results suggests a possible mechanism for why small fatigue crack growth through this material under variable amplitude loading is faster than predicted from models based on constant amplitude data alone.

  14. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water

  15. Measurement of surface crack length using image processing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, Seung Hoon; Kim, Si Cheon; Kim, Yong Il; Ryu, Dae Hyun

    2001-01-01

    The development of a new experimental method is required to easily observe the growth behavior of fatigue cracks. To satisfy the requirement, an image processing technique was introduced to fatigue testing. The length of surface fatigue crack could be successfully measured by the image processing system. At first, the image data of cracks were stored into the computer while the cyclic loading was interrupted. After testing, crack length was determined using image processing software which was developed by ourselves. Block matching method was applied to the detection of surface fatigue cracks. By comparing the data measured by image processing system with the data measured by manual measurement with a microscope, the effectiveness of the image processing system was established. If the proposed method is used to monitor and observe the crack growth behavior automatically, the time and efforts for fatigue test could be dramatically reduced

  16. Seismic loads for crack stability assessment, in a review of leak-before-break (LBB) applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Hideo; Yamashita, Norimichi; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Yagawa, Genki

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to define the seismic loading conditions for use in the crack stability assessment of a BWR for the applicability of the leak-before-break (LBB) criterion. The LBB has been applied to the design of Class 1 piping in Japanese light-water reactors. Crack penetrated condition with detectable leak in the LBB applicability review is classified into the Level C service condition. Here an S 1 -earthquake (maximum design earthquake) is currently assumed, rather than an S 2 -earthquake (extreme design earthquake). In order to justify this assumption, the frequency of an S 1 -earthquake occurring during coolant leakage due to crack propagation was determined. The frequency of coolant leakage from Class 1 piping must be less than that of the Level C service condition (2.5 x 10 -2 to 1 x 10 -4 per year) in order to assume that an S 1 -earthquake is appropriate. Accordingly, the frequency of coolant leakage from Class 1 piping was calculated using a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). The results of this analysis indicate that the frequency of coolant leakage from Class 1 piping is less than the expected occurrence of an S 1 -earthquake. As the results, it is concluded that the assumption of the seismic loading employed in an LBB applicability review should be appropriate

  17. Detection of cracks on concrete surfaces by hyperspectral image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno O.; Valença, Jonatas; Júlio, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    All large infrastructures worldwide must have a suitable monitoring and maintenance plan, aiming to evaluate their behaviour and predict timely interventions. In the particular case of concrete infrastructures, the detection and characterization of crack patterns is a major indicator of their structural response. In this scope, methods based on image processing have been applied and presented. Usually, methods focus on image binarization followed by applications of mathematical morphology to identify cracks on concrete surface. In most cases, publications are focused on restricted areas of concrete surfaces and in a single crack. On-site, the methods and algorithms have to deal with several factors that interfere with the results, namely dirt and biological colonization. Thus, the automation of a procedure for on-site characterization of crack patterns is of great interest. This advance may result in an effective tool to support maintenance strategies and interventions planning. This paper presents a research based on the analysis and processing of hyper-spectral images for detection and classification of cracks on concrete structures. The objective of the study is to evaluate the applicability of several wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum for classification of cracks in concrete surfaces. An image survey considering highly discretized wavelengths between 425 nm and 950 nm was performed on concrete specimens, with bandwidths of 25 nm. The concrete specimens were produced with a crack pattern induced by applying a load with displacement control. The tests were conducted to simulate usual on-site drawbacks. In this context, the surface of the specimen was subjected to biological colonization (leaves and moss). To evaluate the results and enhance crack patterns a clustering method, namely k-means algorithm, is being applied. The research conducted allows to define the suitability of using clustering k-means algorithm combined with hyper-spectral images highly

  18. Study on municipal road cracking and surface deformation based on image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haitao; Wang, Shuai; Tan, Jizong

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, the digital image recognition technology of concrete structure cracks and deformation of binocular vision technology detection of civil engineering structure have made substantial development. As a result, people's understanding of the road engineering structure cracking and surface deformation recognition gives rise to a new situation. For the research on digital image concrete structure cracking and masonry structure surface deformation recognition technology, the key is to break through in the method, and to improve the traditional recognition technology and mode. Only in this way can we continuously improve the security level of the highway, to adapt to the new requirements of the development of new urbanization and modernization. This thesis focuses on and systematically analyzes the digital image road engineering structure cracking and key technologies of surface deformation recognition and its engineering applications. In addition, we change the concrete structure cracking and masonry structure surface deformation recognition pattern, and realize the breakthrough and innovation of the road structure safety testing means and methods.

  19. Effects of surface roughness on magnetic flux leakage testing of micro-cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiyang; Sun, Yanhua; Yang, Yun; Kang, Yihua

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) testing owns the advantages of high inspection sensitivity and stability, but its testing results are always affected by surface roughness. The relationship between the surface roughness ({{R}a} ) and detection signals for surface-breaking cracks is mainly discussed. The existence of roughness magnetic compression effect (RMCE) in present MFL testing is specially pointed out and its relevant theory is also analyzed, which manifest themselves in the compression of MFL signal in its peak value and the baseline drifts mixed with noise. An experimental investigation on surface comparators with different arithmetic average height ({{R}a} ) and artificial notch size, is performed to analyze the effects of surface roughness on detection signals of cracks. The detection limit (DL) of micro-crack is analyzed by comparing the {{B}y} noise-signal ratio ({{S}y} ) and peak-peak signals of the cracks. Meanwhile, {{S}y} increases with the {{R}a} and R{{S}m} , in this case, relatively shallow defects cannot be clearly distinguished at determined rough surface. Afterwards, a series of simulations are designed and performed to verify the effects of surface roughness on characteristic {{B}y} of the electromagnetic field, and a theoretical DL of micro-crack is presented as: DL=2.88{{R}a}+7.00 . Furthermore, the optimal lift-off value is selected for the micro-cracks’ detection to weaken the negative magnetic compression effect. MFL signals cannot reflect the accurate sizes of the cracks on rough surface due to the RMCE and its relevant phenomenon. The discovery and results will benefit the quantitative evaluation of the MFL testing.

  20. Creep fracture mechanics parameters for internal axial surface cracks in pressurized cylinders and creep crack growth analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jianfeng; Tu Shantung; Gong Jianming; Sun Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a low alloy Cr-Mo steel cylinder subjected to internal pressure at high temperature with a semi-elliptical crack located at the inner surface is considered. The creep crack driving force parameter C*-integrals calculated by finite element (FE) method, are compared with results from previous studies, which indicates that empirical equations may be inaccurate under some conditions. A total of 96 cases for wide practical ranges of geometry and material parameters are performed to obtain systematic FE results of C*-integral, which are tabulated and formulated in this paper. It is observed that the maximum C*-integral may occur neither at the deepest point nor at the surface point when the aspect ratio is large enough and the value of C*-integral is significantly sensitive to the crack depth ratio. Furthermore, based on the proposed equations for estimating C*-integrals and a step-by-step analysis procedure, crack profile development, crack depth, crack length and remaining life prediction are obtained for surface cracks with various initial aspect ratios. It is found that when the crack depth ratio is increased, there is no obvious convergence of crack aspect ratio observed. The magnitude of half crack length increment is always minor compared with the crack depth increment. In addition, the remaining life is much more dependent on the surface crack depth than on the surface crack length. - Highlights: → Existing empirical equations of C*-integral for surface cracks may be inaccurate. → Systematic FE results of C*-integral from 96 cases are tabulated and formulated. → Maximum C*-integral may not occur at deepest/surface point if a/c is large enough. → The value of C*-integral is significantly sensitive to the crack depth ratio. → Crack profile development, crack size and remaining life prediction are obtained.

  1. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Exploiting pattern formation - such as that observed in nature - in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film - having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

  2. Plasticity around an Axial Surface Crack in a Cylindrical Shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    field in an axially cracked cylindrical shell arising from use of classical eighth order shallow shell theory is removed when use is made of a tenth order shell theory which accounts for transverse shear deformations. Although the membrane stresses are only moderately affected, the influence...... and Ratwani,3–5 it generalises Dugdale's assumption of a concentrated yield zone in the plane of the crack but, contrary to that model, transverse shear effects are included and a continuous stress distribution is assumed in the yield zone. The inherent difficulties arising from the use of shell theory...... of the yield zone. The model is used to analyse published test data on surface cracked pressurised pipes. The analysis consists in COD evaluation and estimate of failure as a consequence of plastic instability. A method is proposed which deals with the problem by simultaneous analysis of a number of cracks...

  3. Effective applied moment in circumferential through-wall cracked pipes for leak-before-break evaluation considering pipe restraint effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeji; Hwang, Il-Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Jin, E-mail: yjoh2@kepco-enc.com [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Inc., Gimcheon 39660 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Effective applied moment at pipe cracked section considering the pipe restraint effect. • Verification of the proposed evaluation methods using finite element analyses. • Applicability for distributed external load of the proposed methods. - Abstract: In the leak-before-break (LBB) design of nuclear power plants, crack opening displacement (COD) is an essential element for determining the length of the leakage size crack. Recent researches regarding the evaluation of COD have indicated that the current practice of the LBB evaluation without consideration of the pressure induced bending (PIB) restraint overestimates COD, which in turn gives non-conservative results. Under a free-ended boundary condition, however, the applied moment at cracked section also can be overestimated, which has conservative effects on LBB evaluation. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate pipe restraint effects on the applied moment as well as on COD to keep the constancy. In this paper, an evaluation method for the effect of the PIB restraint on COD and an effective applied moment (=crack driving force) at cracked section was developed. Both the linear elastic and elastic–plastic behaviors of the crack were considered. By comparing the behaviors with 3-D finite element analysis results from earlier studies, it was confirmed that the proposed methods make accurate estimations of the PIB restraint effect on COD. Next, the applicability of the proposed method to other types of external loading conditions was examined.

  4. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ohara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA with a surface acoustic wave (SAW. SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs. The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation taking account of surface crack effect for stress corrosion cracking in a stainless steel SUS 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgo, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials occurs by initiation and coalescence of micro cracks, subcritical crack propagation and multiple large crack formation or final failure under the combination of materials, stress and corrosive environment. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation for the process of SCC has been proposed based on the stochastic properties of micro crack initiation and fracture mechanics concept for crack coalescence and propagation. The emphasis in the model is put on the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks. Numerical simulations are carried out based on CBB (creviced bent beam) test results of a sensitized stainless steel SUS 304 and the influence of micro crack initiation rate and coalescence condition on the simulation results is discussed. The numerical examples indicate the applicability of the present model to a prediction of the SCC behavior in real structures. (author)

  6. Induction Thermography for Surface Crack Detection and Depth Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Oswald-Tranta

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, induction thermography has been established as a non-destructive testing method for localizing surface cracks in metals. The sample to be inspected is heated with a short induced electrical current pulse, and the infrared camera records—during and after the heating pulse—the temperature distribution at the surface. Transforming the temporal temperature development for each pixel to phase information makes not only highly reliable detection of the cracks possible but also allows an estimation of its depth. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate how the phase contrast depends on parameters such as excitation frequency, pulse duration, material parameters, crack depth, and inclination angle of the crack. From these results, generalized functions for the dependency of the phase difference on all these parameters were derived. These functions can be used as an excellent guideline as to how measurement parameters should be optimized for a given material to be able to detect cracks and estimate their depth. Several experiments on different samples were also carried out, and the results compared with the simulations showed very good agreement.

  7. Elasto-plastic finite element analysis of axial surface crack in PHT piping of 500 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, D.S.; Bhate, S.R.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    The leak before break (LBB) approach in nuclear piping design envisages demonstrating that the pressurized pipe with a postulated flaw will leak at a detectable rate leading to corrective action well before catastrophic rupture would occur. This requires analysis of cracked pipe to study the crack growth and its stability. This report presents the behaviour of a surface crack in the wall of a thick primary heat transport (PHT) pipe of 500 MWe Indian PHWR. The line spring model (LSM) finite element is used to model the flawed pipe geometry. The variation of crack driving force (J-integral) across the crack front has been presented. The influence of crack geometry factors such as depth, shape, aspect ratio, and loading on peak values of J-integral as well as crack mouth opening displacement has been studied. Several crack shapes have been used to study the shape influence. The results are presented in dimensionless form so as to widen their applicability. The accuracy of the results is validated by comparison with results available in open literature. (author). 47 refs., 8 figs

  8. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spending time in a rehab facility or getting cognitive-behavioral therapy or other treatments. Right now, there are no medicines to treat a crack addiction. If you smoke crack, talking with a counselor ...

  9. Plastic collapse pressure of cylindrical vessels containing longitudinal surface cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarrabi, K. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). Sch. of Mech. and Mfg. Eng.; Zhang, H. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). Sch. of Mech. and Mfg. Eng.; Nhim, K. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). Sch. of Mech. and Mfg. Eng.

    1997-05-01

    Based on nonlinear finite element analysis, the plastic collapse pressures of cylindrical vessels with longitudinal surface cracks are computed. A general formula of plastic collapse pressure of such structures are given and compared with the literature solutions. The results of the present study could be applied for the integrity assessments, failure analyses, remanent life assessment, and licence extensions of the vessels. (orig.)

  10. Surface cracking in resistance seam welding of coated steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonyi, Y.; Kimchi, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this experimental work, the focus was on the understanding the electrode-wheel/coated steel surface phenomena by building operational lobes and by correlating the weld quality with static-and dynamic-contact-resistance variation during welding. Conventional AC, DC, and electrode-wire resistance-seam weldability of printed zinc-coated and hot-dipped tin-coated steel was performed in this work, as compared with traditional lead-tin (terne) coating used as reference material. Variables included steel substrate type, welding equipment type, electrode-wheel cleaning practice, and electrode-wire geometry. Optic and electron microscopy were used for the evaluation of specimens extracted from longitudinal cross-sections of representative welds. The size and morphology of surface cracks was characterized and correlated with variations in the above-mentioned parameters. It was found that the tin-coated (unpainted) steel sheet had a superior all-together performance to the zinc-coated steel and terne-coated steel, both in terms of wider weldability lobes and lesser surface cracking. The extent of surface cracking was greatly reduced by using the electrode-wire seam welding process using a longitudinally grooved wire profile, which also widened the corresponding weldability lobes. It was also found that the extent of cracking depended on the electrode knurl geometry, substrate type, and the presence of conductive paint applied on top of the metallic coating. An attempt was made to characterize the specific mechanisms governing the LME phenomenon for the lead-, zinc and tin-based coating systems and to assess the potential for crack propagation in the welds. The dynamic contact resistance was found to be a good measure of the welding process stability and an indicator of defect formation. It was found that the ratio between the static and dynamic contact resistances of the tin-coated sheet was considerably lower than similar ratios for bare and zinc-coated sheet.

  11. Leak before break analysis for cracking at multiple weld locations in BWR recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.

    1984-01-01

    Periodically over the past decade, intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has been found in austenitic stainless steel piping at Boiling Water Reactor facilities. The effect of IGSCC on piping integrity has been evaluated previously in various BWR Owners Group and NRC studies. In these studies, the analyses were performed assuming the presence of a crack at a single weld location in the pipe run. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the leak rate and potential for unstable crack extension associated with a throughwall crack for the following two conditions in a BWR recirculation system: (1) the recirculation piping contains part through cracks at multiple weld locations and a single throughwall crack, and (2) the piping contains only a throughwall crack at one weld location. Two type BWRs were evaluated; namely, the ring header and five individual loop designs. The results from the analyses indicate that the potential for unstable crack extension at large bending loads, and leak rate at normal operation are not affected by the presence of part through cracks at multiple weld locations. The differences in the respective calculated L/sub eff/ and leak rates for the single and multiply cracked conditions are less than 2%

  12. Effect of interaction of embedded crack and free surface on remaining fatigue life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genshichiro Katsumata

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embedded crack located near free surface of a component interacts with the free surface. When the distance between the free surface and the embedded crack is short, stress at the crack tip ligament is higher than that at the other area of the cracked section. It can be easily expected that fatigue crack growth is fast, when the embedded crack locates near the free surface. To avoid catastrophic failures caused by fast fatigue crack growth at the crack tip ligament, fitness-for-service (FFS codes provide crack-to-surface proximity rules. The proximity rules are used to determine whether the cracks should be treated as embedded cracks as-is, or transformed to surface cracks. Although the concepts of the proximity rules are the same, the specific criteria and the rules to transform embedded cracks into surface cracks differ amongst FFS codes. This paper focuses on the interaction between an embedded crack and a free surface of a component as well as on its effects on the remaining fatigue lives of embedded cracks using the proximity rules provided by the FFS codes. It is shown that the remaining fatigue lives for the embedded cracks strongly depend on the crack aspect ratio and location from the component free surface. In addition, it can be said that the proximity criteria defined by the API and RSE-M codes give overly conservative remaining lives. On the contrary, the WES and AME codes always give long remaining lives and non-conservative estimations. When the crack aspect ratio is small, ASME code gives non-conservative estimation.

  13. Computation of leak areas of circumferential cracks in piping for application in demonstrating leak-before-break behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, S.; Faidy, C.; Acker, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a simplified engineering method to evaluate lower bounds of leak areas for circumferential through-wall cracks in view of their application in demonstrating the Leak-Before-Break behaviour of pipes. Starting from the simple elastic solution in a flat plate, bulging and plasticity correction factors are applied to determine leak rates in pipes. An amplification factor due to bulging is based in Sanders' shell solutions while, for plasticity, the Dugdale-Barenblatt model is used, introducing the reference-stress concept. The method is thus applicable for a large range of diameter-to-thickness ratios and for non-uniform applied loading situations. The method is tested against a number of results obtained either numerically (finite-elements analysis) or experimentally. The results are also compared with other known simplified methods used in the USA and FRG. The simplified approach presented here, to evaluate the crack leak areas in circumferential through-cracks, has been validated on a large range of diameter-to-thickness ratios and for non-uniform applied loads. The method seems promising for demonstration of Leak-Before-Break behaviour of pipes. (orig.)

  14. Surface crack growth in cylindrical hollow specimen subject to tension and torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Shlyannikov, V.; Yarullin, R.; Ishtyryakov, I.

    2015-01-01

    The subject for studies is an aluminium cylindrical hollow specimen with external axial and part circumferential semi-elliptical surface crack undergoing fatigue loads. Both the optical microscope measurements and the crack opening displacement (COD) method are used to monitor and calculate both crack depth and crack length during the tests. The variation of crack growth behaviour is studied under cyclic axial tension, pure torsion and combined tension+torsion fatigue loading. For...

  15. Pattern recognition of concrete surface cracks and defects using integrated image processing algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbin, Jessie R.; Hortinela, Carlos C.; Garcia, Ramon G.; Baylon, Sunnycille; Ignacio, Alexander Joshua; Rivera, Marco Antonio; Sebastian, Jaimie

    2017-06-01

    Pattern recognition of concrete surface crack defects is very important in determining stability of structure like building, roads or bridges. Surface crack is one of the subjects in inspection, diagnosis, and maintenance as well as life prediction for the safety of the structures. Traditionally determining defects and cracks on concrete surfaces are done manually by inspection. Moreover, any internal defects on the concrete would require destructive testing for detection. The researchers created an automated surface crack detection for concrete using image processing techniques including Hough transform, LoG weighted, Dilation, Grayscale, Canny Edge Detection and Haar Wavelet Transform. An automatic surface crack detection robot is designed to capture the concrete surface by sectoring method. Surface crack classification was done with the use of Haar trained cascade object detector that uses both positive samples and negative samples which proved that it is possible to effectively identify the surface crack defects.

  16. Surface aspects of pitting and stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhan, J. S., Jr.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The pitting and stress corrosion cracking of a stable austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride environments were investigated using a secondary ion mass spectrometer as the primary experimental technique. The surface concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, the hydroxide, and chloride ion, magnesium or sodium, chromium and nickel were measured as a function of potential in both aqueous sodium chloride and magnesium chloride environments at room temperature and boiling temperatures. It was found that, under anodic conditions, a sharp increase in the chloride concentration was observed to occur for all environmental conditions. The increase may be associated with the formation of an iron chloride complex. Higher localized chloride concentrations at pits and cracks were also detected with an electron microprobe.

  17. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  18. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D.; Gelpi, A.

    1997-01-01

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor's primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author)

  19. Topological defects govern crack front motion and facet formation on broken surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolvin, Itamar; Cohen, Gil; Fineberg, Jay

    2018-02-01

    Cracks develop intricate patterns on the surfaces that they create. As faceted fracture surfaces are commonly formed by slow tensile cracks in both crystalline and amorphous materials, facet formation and structure cannot reflect microscopic order. Although fracture mechanics predict that slow crack fronts should be straight and form mirror-like surfaces, facet-forming fronts propagate simultaneously within different planes separated by steps. Here we show that these steps are topological defects of crack fronts and that crack front separation into disconnected overlapping segments provides the condition for step stability. Real-time imaging of propagating crack fronts combined with surface measurements shows that crack dynamics are governed by localized steps that drift at a constant angle to the local front propagation direction while their increased dissipation couples to long-ranged elasticity to determine front shapes. We study how three-dimensional topology couples to two-dimensional fracture dynamics to provide a fundamental picture of how patterned surfaces are generated.

  20. Surface crack growth subject to bending and biaxial tension-compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue surface crack growth and the in-plane and out-of-plane constraint effects are studied through experiments and computations for aluminium alloy D16T. Subjects for studies are cruciform specimens under different biaxial loading and bending central notched specimens with external semi-elliptical surface crack. Both the optical microscope measurements and the crack opening displacement (COD method are used to monitor and calculate both crack depth and crack length during the tests. The variation of crack growth rate and surface crack paths behaviour is studied under cyclic pure bending and biaxial tension-compression fatigue loading. This work is centered on the relations between crack size on the free surface of specimen considered configurations, COD and aspect ratio under different fatigue loading conditions. For the experimental surface crack paths in tested specimens the T-stress, the local triaxiality parameter h, the out-of-plane TZ factor and the governing parameter for the 3D-fields of the stresses and strains at the crack tip in the form of In-integral were calculated as a function of aspect ratio by finite element analysis to characterization of the constraint effects along semi-elliptical crack front. The plastic stress intensity factor approach is applied to the fatigue crack growth on the free surface of the tested bending and cruciform specimens as well as the deepest point of the semi-elliptical surface crack front. As result fatigue surface crack paths or crack front positions as a function of accumulated number of cycle of loading are obtained.

  1. Velocity profiles and surface roughness under breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent measurements under wave-breaking conditions in the ocean, lakes, and tanks reveal a layer immediately below the surface in which dissipation decays as depth to the power -2 to -4 and downwind velocities are approximately linear with depth. This behavior is consistent with predictions of a conventional, one-dimensional, level 2.5 turbulence closure model, in which the influence of breaking waves is parameterized as a surface source of turbulent kinetic energy. The model provides an analytic solution which describes the near-surface power law behavior and the deeper transition to the "law of the wall." The mixing length imposed in the model increases linearly away from a minimum value, the roughness length, at the surface. The surface roughness emerges as an important scaling factor in the wave-enhanced layer but is the major unknown in the formulation. Measurements in the wave-affected layer are still rare, but one exceptional set, both in terms of its accuracy and proximity to the surface, is that collected by Cheung and Street [1988] in the Stanford wind tunnel. Their velocity profiles first confirm the accuracy of the model, and, second, allow estimation, via a best fit procedure, of roughness lengths at five different wind speeds. Conclusions are tentative but indicate that the roughness length increases with wind speed and appears to take a value of approximately one sixth the dominant surface wavelength. A more traditional wall-layer model, which ignores the flux of turbulent kinetic energy, will also accurately reproduce the measured velocity profiles. In this case, enhanced surface turbulence is forced on the model by the assumption of a large surface roughness, three times that required by the full model. However, the wall-layer model cannot predict the enhanced dissipation near the surface.

  2. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  3. Effect of the surface film electric resistance on eddy current detectability of surface cracks in Alloy 600 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saario, T.; Paine, J.P.N.

    1995-01-01

    The most widely used technique for NDE of steam generator tubing is eddy current. This technique can reliably detect cracks grown in sodium hydroxide environment only at depths greater than 50% through wall. However, cracking caused by thiosulphate solutions have been detected and sized at shallower depths. The disparity has been proposed to be caused by the different electric resistance of the crack wall surface films and corrosion products in the cracks formed in different environments. This work was undertaken to clarify the role of surface film electric resistance on the disparity found in eddy current detectability of surface cracks in alloy 600 tubes. The proposed model explaining the above mentioned disparity is the following. The detectability of tightly closed cracks by the eddy current technique depends on the electric resistance of the surface films of the crack walls. The nature and resistance of the films which form on the crack walls during operation depends on the composition of the solution inside the crack and close to the crack location. During cooling down of the steam generator, because of contraction and loss of internal pressurization, the cracks are rather tightly closed so that exchange of electrolyte and thus changes in the film properties become difficult. As a result, the surface condition prevailing at high temperature is preserved. If the environment is such that the films formed on the crack walls under operating conditions have low electric resistance, eddy current technique will fail to indicate these cracks or will underestimate the size of these cracks. However, if the electric resistance of the films is high, a tightly closed crack will resemble an open crack and will be easily indicated and correctly sized by eddy current technique

  4. Numerical simulation of near surface rail cracks subject to thermal contact stress

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, D.I.

    2014-01-01

    Boundary element modelling was conducted to investigate rail cracks subject to combined thermal and contact loading such as occurs in 'stud' or 'squat type' defects in which white etching layer lies above shallow cracks formed without evidence of plastic flow. An embedded crack at 0.5. mm below the rail surface was modelled, revealing a thermal mechanism of crack opening. Stress intensity values for a range of contact temperatures were calculated. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Crack-tip Stress Field of Fully Circumferential Surface Cracked Pipe Under Combined Tension and Thermal Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Je, Jin Ho; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Yun Jae

    2014-01-01

    Under excessive plasticity, the fracture toughness of a material depends on its size and geometry. Under fully yielded conditions, the stresses in a material near its crack tip are not unique but rather depend on the geometry. Therefore, the single-parameter J-approach is limited to a high-constraint crack geometry. The JQ theory has been proposed for establishing the crack geometry constraints . This approach assumes that the crack-tip fields have two degrees of freedom. In this study, the crack-tip stress field of a fully circumferential surface-cracked pipe under combined loads is investigated on the basis of the JQ theory by using finite element analysis. The combined loads are a tensile axial force and the thermal gradient in the radial direction. Q-stresses of the crack geometry and its loading state are used to determine the constraint effects. The constraint effects of secondary loading are found to be greater than those of primary loading. Therefore, thermal shock is believed to be the most severe loading condition of constraint effects

  6. Fracture behavior of short circumferentially surface-cracked pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Scott, P.; Mohan, R.

    1995-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the work performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Comniission's (NRC) research program entitled ''Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds'' that specifically focuses on pipes with short, circumferential surface cracks. The following details are provided in this report: (i) material property deteminations, (ii) pipe fracture experiments, (iii) development, modification and validation of fracture analysis methods, and (iv) impact of this work on the ASME Section XI Flaw Evaluation Procedures. The material properties developed and used in the analysis of the experiments are included in this report and have been implemented into the NRC's PIFRAC database. Six full-scale pipe experiments were conducted during this program. The analyses methods reported here fall into three categories (i) limit-load approaches, (ii) design criteria, and (iii) elastic-plastic fracture methods. These methods were evaluated by comparing the analytical predictions with experimental data. The results, using 44 pipe experiments from this and other programs, showed that the SC.TNP1 and DPZP analyses were the most accurate in predicting maximum load. New Z-factors were developed using these methods. These are being considered for updating the ASME Section XI criteria

  7. Detection of stress corrosion cracking on the surface of stainless steel plate by DC-PDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroki; Tada, Naoya; Uchida, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the applicability of the direct-current potential difference method to detection of stress corrosion cracking, the potential difference was measured on the surface of stainless steel plates with simulated cracking. Potential difference was measured near the cracking and at the points distant from the crack to evaluate the degree of increase in the potential difference by the crack. The potential difference near the cracking area was higher than that in the other area. The normalized potential difference, which is the ratio of potential difference near the cracking to that far from the area, was 1.03 to 1.50. The result suggests that stress corrosion cracking was able to be detected by direct-current potential difference method. (author)

  8. A COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR CRACK DETECTION AND MEASUREMENT ON CONCRETE SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Crack detection and measurement in the surface of concrete structures is currently carried out manually or through Non-Destructive Testing (NDT such as imaging or scanning. The recent developments in depth (stereo cameras have presented an opportunity for cost-effective, reliable crack detection and measurement. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the new inexpensive depth camera (ZED for crack detection and measurement. This depth camera with its lightweight and portable nature produces a 3D data file of the imaged surface. The ZED camera was utilized to image a concrete surface and the 3D file was processed to detect and analyse cracks. This article describes the outcome of the experiment carried out with the ZED camera as well as the processing tools used for crack detection and analysis. Crack properties that were also of interest were length, orientation, and width. The use of the ZED camera allowed for distinction between surface and concrete cracks. The ZED high-resolution capability and point cloud capture technology helped in generating a dense 3D data in low-lighting conditions. The results showed the ability of the ZED camera to capture the crack depth changes between surface (render cracks, and crack that form in the concrete itself.

  9. a Cost-Effective Method for Crack Detection and Measurement on Concrete Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, M. M.; Ali, T. A.; Abdelfatah, A.; Yehia, S.; Elaksher, A.

    2017-11-01

    Crack detection and measurement in the surface of concrete structures is currently carried out manually or through Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) such as imaging or scanning. The recent developments in depth (stereo) cameras have presented an opportunity for cost-effective, reliable crack detection and measurement. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of the new inexpensive depth camera (ZED) for crack detection and measurement. This depth camera with its lightweight and portable nature produces a 3D data file of the imaged surface. The ZED camera was utilized to image a concrete surface and the 3D file was processed to detect and analyse cracks. This article describes the outcome of the experiment carried out with the ZED camera as well as the processing tools used for crack detection and analysis. Crack properties that were also of interest were length, orientation, and width. The use of the ZED camera allowed for distinction between surface and concrete cracks. The ZED high-resolution capability and point cloud capture technology helped in generating a dense 3D data in low-lighting conditions. The results showed the ability of the ZED camera to capture the crack depth changes between surface (render) cracks, and crack that form in the concrete itself.

  10. Mechanics of curved surfaces, with application to surface-parallel cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    The surfaces of many bodies are weakened by shallow enigmatic cracks that parallel the surface. A re-formulation of the static equilibrium equations in a curvilinear reference frame shows that a tension perpendicular to a traction-free surface can arise at shallow depths even under the influence of gravity. This condition occurs if σ11k1 + σ22k2 > ρg cosβ, where k1 and k2 are the principal curvatures (negative if convex) at the surface, σ11 and σ22 are tensile (positive) or compressive (negative) stresses parallel to the respective principal curvature arcs, ρ is material density, g is gravitational acceleration, and β is the surface slope. The curvature terms do not appear in equilibrium equations in a Cartesian reference frame. Compression parallel to a convex surface thus can cause subsurface cracks to open. A quantitative test of the relationship above accounts for where sheeting joints (prominent shallow surface-parallel fractures in rock) are abundant and for where they are scarce or absent in the varied topography of Yosemite National Park, resolving key aspects of a classic problem in geology: the formation of sheeting joints. Moreover, since the equilibrium equations are independent of rheology, the relationship above can be applied to delamination or spalling caused by surface-parallel cracks in many materials.

  11. Eddy current technique for detecting and sizing surface cracks in steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.; Sullivan, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    Cracking has occurred in pressure vessel nozzles and girth welds due to thermal fatigue. Pipe welds, welds in support structures, and welds in reactor vault liner panels in nuclear facilities have failed because of cracks. Cracking can also occur in turbine rotor bore surfaces due to high cycle fatigue. Dye penetrant, magnetic particle and other surface NDT methods are used to detect cracks but cannot be used for depth sizing. Crack depth can be measured with various NDT methods such as ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), potential drop, and eddy current. The TOFD technique can be difficult to implement on nozzle welds and is best suited for sizing deep cracks (>5 mm). The conventional eddy current method is easy to implement, but crack sizing is normally limited to shallow cracks ( 2 mm) cracks. Eddy current testing (ET) techniques are readily amenable to remote/automatic inspections. These new probes could augment present magnetic particle (MT) and dye penetrant (PT) testing through provision of reliable defect depth information. Reliable crack sizing permits identification of critical cracks for plant life extension and licensing purposes. In addition, performing PT and MT generates low level radioactive waste in some inspection applications in nuclear facilities. Replacing these techniques with ET for some components will eliminate some of this radioactive waste. (author)

  12. Near-surface modifications for improved crack tolerant behavior of high strength alloys: trends and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hettche, L.R.; Rath, B.B.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to examine the potential of surface modifications in improving the crack tolerant behavior of high strength alloys. Provides a critique of two of the most promising and versatile techniques: ion implantation and laser beam surface processing. Discusses crack tolerant properties; engineering characterization; publication trends and Department of Defense interests; and emergent surface modification techniques. Finds that the efficiency with which high strength alloys can be incorporated into a structure or component is dependent on the following crack tolerant properties: fracture toughness, fatigue resistance, sustained loading cracking resistance, fretting fatigue resistance, and hydrogen embrittlement resistance. Concludes that ion implantation and laser surface processing coupled with other advanced metallurgical procedures and fracture mechanic analyses provide the means to optimize both the bulk and surface controlled crack tolerant properties

  13. lnvestigation of Patch Coatings lnfluence on the Stress lntensity Factor for Surface Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Søren Heide; Jepsen, Michael S.; Damkilde, Lars

    2013-01-01

    layer on the surface. The stress intensity factor is computed by means of the J-integral and the FE-model is setup with a nonlinear material model to establish the upper boundary for the patch stress capacity. A reduction of the stress intensity factor of approximately 2 % and a reduction of the crack...... to damp the free end of the crack, which will reduce the stress intensity factor and subsequently reduce the crack growth. The considered patch consists of a surface layer of 0.2 mm two component adhesive Epoxy, 3M DP 460. The models described in this work contains five different crack sizes with a patch...

  14. The Effect of the Free Surface on the Singular Stress Field at the Fatigue Crack Front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oplt Tomáš

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Description of stress singularity in the vicinity of a free surface is presented. Its presence causes the retardation of the fatigue crack growth in that region and fatigue crack is being curved. Numerical model is used to study dependence of the stress singularity exponent on Poisson’s ratio. Estimated values are compared to those already published. Experimentally measured angles of fatigue crack on SENB specimens confirm the relation between Poisson’s ratio and the angle between crack front and free surface.

  15. Influence of material ductility and crack surface roughness on fracture instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khezrzadeh, Hamed; Wnuk, Michael P; Yavari, Arash

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis for fractal cracks. First, the Westergaard stress functions are proposed for semi-infinite and finite smooth cracks embedded in the stress fields associated with the corresponding self-affine fractal cracks. These new stress functions satisfy all the required boundary conditions and according to Wnuk and Yavari's (2003 Eng. Fract. Mech. 70 1659-74) embedded crack model they are used to derive the stress and displacement fields generated around a fractal crack. These results are then used in conjunction with the final stretch criterion to study the quasi-static stable crack extension, which in ductile materials precedes the global failure. The material resistance curves are determined by solving certain nonlinear differential equations and then employed in predicting the stress levels at the onset of stable crack growth and at the critical point, where a transition to the catastrophic failure occurs. It is shown that the incorporation of the fractal geometry into the crack model, i.e. accounting for the roughness of the crack surfaces, results in (1) higher threshold levels of the material resistance to crack propagation and (2) higher levels of the critical stresses associated with the onset of catastrophic fracture. While the process of quasi-static stable crack growth (SCG) is viewed as a sequence of local instability states, the terminal instability attained at the end of this process is identified with the global instability. The phenomenon of SCG can be used as an early warning sign in fracture detection and prevention.

  16. Intelligent detection of cracks in metallic surfaces using a waveguide sensor loaded with metamaterial elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdulbaset; Hu, Bing; Ramahi, Omar

    2015-05-15

    This work presents a real life experiment of implementing an artificial intelligence model for detecting sub-millimeter cracks in metallic surfaces on a dataset obtained from a waveguide sensor loaded with metamaterial elements. Crack detection using microwave sensors is typically based on human observation of change in the sensor's signal (pattern) depicted on a high-resolution screen of the test equipment. However, as demonstrated in this work, implementing artificial intelligence to classify cracked from non-cracked surfaces has appreciable impact in terms of sensing sensitivity, cost, and automation. Furthermore, applying artificial intelligence for post-processing data collected from microwave sensors is a cornerstone for handheld test equipment that can outperform rack equipment with large screens and sophisticated plotting features. The proposed method was tested on a metallic plate with different cracks and the obtained experimental results showed good crack classification accuracy rates.

  17. Viscoelastic crack propagation and closing with Lennard-Jones surface forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J A

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the opening and closing of a crack in a viscoelastic solid has been made assuming a Lennard-Jones law of force acting between the crack faces. The results are compared with those of an earlier analysis in which a simple Dugdale model of the surface forces was assumed. The approximate 'reciprocal rule' between the apparent surface energies for opening and closing cracks is confirmed. At low speeds a linear relation between the apparent surface energy and the crack speed is found. The lengths of the process zone for opening and closing cracks are found to be very similar and so presumably are not responsible for the very different values of the apparent surface energy

  18. Viscoelastic crack propagation and closing with Lennard-Jones surface forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, J A [Department of Engineering, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-21

    An analysis of the opening and closing of a crack in a viscoelastic solid has been made assuming a Lennard-Jones law of force acting between the crack faces. The results are compared with those of an earlier analysis in which a simple Dugdale model of the surface forces was assumed. The approximate 'reciprocal rule' between the apparent surface energies for opening and closing cracks is confirmed. At low speeds a linear relation between the apparent surface energy and the crack speed is found. The lengths of the process zone for opening and closing cracks are found to be very similar and so presumably are not responsible for the very different values of the apparent surface energy.

  19. Surface crack growth in cylindrical hollow specimen subject to tension and torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject for studies is an aluminium cylindrical hollow specimen with external axial and part circumferential semi-elliptical surface crack undergoing fatigue loads. Both the optical microscope measurements and the crack opening displacement (COD method are used to monitor and calculate both crack depth and crack length during the tests. The variation of crack growth behaviour is studied under cyclic axial tension, pure torsion and combined tension+torsion fatigue loading. For the particular surface flaw geometries considered, the elastic and plastic in-plane and out-of-plane constraint parameters, as well as the governing parameter for stress fields in the form of In-integral and plastic stress intensity factor, are obtained as a function of the aspect ratio, dimensionless crack length and crack depth. The combined effect of tension and torsion loading and initial surface flaw orientation on the crack growth for two type of aluminium alloys is made explicit. The experimental and numerical results of the present study provided the opportunity to explore the suggestion that fatigue crack propagation may be governed more strongly by the plastic stress intensity factor rather than the magnitude of the elastic SIFs alone. One advantage of the plastic SIF is its sensitivity to combined loading due to accounting for the plastic properties of the material.

  20. [Morphology of cracks in enamel surface produced experimentally using high and low temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Quintanilla, J; Segade, L A; González Bahillo, J

    1989-12-01

    A scanning electron microscope study was made to study the morphological changes in the human enamel surface produced by low and high temperatures. Cracked dental enamel was observed when the teeth were exposed at low and high temperatures. When the time of exposition was increased, there are more enamel cracks which may be considered as enamel fractures.

  1. Crack resistance of pvd coatings : Influence of surface treatment prior to deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoestbergen, E; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    The crack resistance of three different PVD coatings, TiN, Ti(C,N), and a multilayer system of alternating TiN and TiAlN, have been investigated. The three coating systems were deposited onto substrates with a different surface roughness to study the influence of this pretreatment on the crack

  2. Modeling of a Curvilinear Planar Crack with a Curvature-Dependent Surface Tension

    KAUST Repository

    Zemlyanova, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    An approach to modeling fracture incorporating interfacial mechanics is applied to the example of a curvilinear plane strain crack. The classical Neumann boundary condition is augmented with curvature-dependent surface tension. It is shown that the considered model eliminates the integrable crack-tip stress and strain singularities of order 1/2 present in the classical linear fracture mechanics solutions, and also leads to the sharp crack opening that is consistent with empirical observations. Unlike for the case of a straight crack, for a general curvilinear crack some components of the stresses and the derivatives of the displacements may still possess weaker singularities of a logarithmic type. Generalizations of the present study that lead to complete removal of all crack-tip singularities, including logarithmic, are the subject of a future paper. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of stress corrosion cracking on smooth surface under non-uniform stress condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Tohgo, Keiichiro; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation model for the process of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials under non-uniform stress condition has been proposed. The possible number of crack initiations is set for given space and initiation times for all cracks are assigned random numbers based on exponential distributions depending on stress level. Sites and lengths of the cracks are assigned by random numbers based on uniform distribution and normal distribution, respectively. Coalescence of cracks and subcritical crack growth are determined based on the fracture mechanics concept. Through the SCC process in the model, the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks is taken into consideration. SCC simulations were carried out on a smooth surface under two kinds of non-uniform stress conditions such as residual stress distribution around a weld line. Multiple parallel cracks and multiple cracks along narrow high stress region were obtained depending on the stress distributions, respectively. Simulation results exhibit the applicability of the model to describe the SCC behavior observed in real structures. (author)

  4. Crack path and fracture surface modifications in cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a tremendous increase in the use of high strength and high performance self-consolidating cementitious composites due to their superior workability and mechanical strengths. Cement composites are quasi-brittle in nature and possess extremely low tensile strength as compared to their compressive strength. Due to the low tensile strength capacity, cracks develop in cementitious composites due to the drying shrinkage, plastic settlements and/or stress concentrations (due to external restrains and/or applied stresses etc. These cracks developed at the nanoscale may grow rapidly due to the applied stresses and join together to form micro and macro cracks. The growth of cracks from nanoscale to micro and macro scale is very rapid and may lead to sudden failure of the cement composites. The present paper reports the modifications in the crack growth pattern of the high performance cement composites to achieve enhanced ductility and toughness. The objective was accomplished by the incorporation of the micro sized inert particulates in the cement composite matrix. The results indicate that the incorporation of micro sized inert particles acted as the obstacles in the growth of the cracks thus improving the ductility and the energy absorption capacity of the self-consolidating cementitious composites.

  5. Crack propagation in disordered materials: how to decipher fracture surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponson, L.

    For a half-century, engineers know how to describe and predict the propagation of a crack in a model elastic homogeneous medium. The case of real materials is much more complex. Indeed, we do not know how to relate their lifetime or their resistance to their microstructure. To achieve such a prediction, understanding the role of the microstructural disorder on the behavior of a crack is determinant. Fracture surfaces represent a promising field of investigation to address this question. From the study of various disordered materials, we propose a statistical description of their roughness and determine to which extent their properties are dependent of the material. We show that fracture surfaces display an anisotropic scale invariant geometry characterized by two universal exponents. Glass ceramics is then studied because its microstructure can be tuned in a controlled manner. Their fracture surfaces display the same general anisotropic properties but with surprisingly low exponents independent of the detail of the ceramics microstructure. This suggests the existence of a second universality class in failure problems. Using finally theoretical tools from out-of-equilibrium statistical physics and fracture mechanics, we relate the statistical properties of fracture surfaces with the mechanisms occurring at the microscopic scale during the failure of a material. In particular, we show that the first class of fracture surfaces results from a failure involving damage processes while the second one results from a perfectly brittle failure. Propagation de fissures dans les matériaux désordonnés : comment déchiffrer les surfaces de rupture. Depuis près d'un demi-siècle, les ingénieurs savent décrire et prévoir la propagation d'une fissure dans un milieu élastique homogène modèle. Le cas des matériaux réels est beaucoup plus complexe. En effet, on ne sait pas relier leur durée de vie ou leur résistance à leur microstructure. Passage obligé avant de telles

  6. Effect of different environmental conditions on surface crack growth in aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available . Fatigue surface crack growth is studied through experiments and computations for aluminum alloys D16T and B95AT (analogue of 2024 and 7075 aluminum. Subjects for studies are cylindrical hollow specimens with external semi-elliptical surface crack. The variation of fatigue crack growth rate and surface crack paths behavior was studied under cyclic loading for different environmental conditions. Uniaxial tension tests were carried out at low (-60°C, room (+23°C and high (+250°C temperature. For the same specimen configuration and the different crack front position as a function of cyclic loading and temperatures conditions the distributions of governing parameter of the elastic-plastic stress fields in the form of In-factor along various crack fronts was determined from numerical calculations. This governing parameter was used as the foundation of the elastic-plastic stress intensity factor (SIF. Both elastic and plastic SIF approach was applied to the fatigue crack growth rate interpretation. It is found that there is a steady relationship between the crack growth rate and the plastic SIF in the form of general curve within a relatively narrow scatter band for all tested specimens at different temperatures.

  7. Coupled Finite Volume Methods and Extended Finite Element Methods for the Dynamic Crack Propagation Modelling with the Pressurized Crack Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We model the fluid flow within the crack as one-dimensional flow and assume that the flow is laminar; the fluid is incompressible and accounts for the time-dependent rate of crack opening. Here, we discretise the flow equation by finite volume methods. The extended finite element methods are used for solving solid medium with crack under dynamic loads. Having constructed the approximation of dynamic extended finite element methods, the derivation of governing equation for dynamic extended finite element methods is presented. The implicit time algorithm is elaborated for the time descritisation of dominant equation. In addition, the interaction integral method is given for evaluating stress intensity factors. Then, the coupling model for modelling hydraulic fracture can be established by the extended finite element methods and the finite volume methods. We compare our present numerical results with our experimental results for verifying the proposed model. Finally, we investigate the water pressure distribution along crack surface and the effect of water pressure distribution on the fracture property.

  8. Vibration analysis of a plate with an arbitrarily orientated surface crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Rainah

    This research presents a vibration analysis for a thin isotropic plate containing an arbitrarily orientated surface crack. The work has been motivated by the well known applicability of various vibrational techniques for structural damage detection in which the detection and localisation of damage to thin plate structures at the earliest stage of development can optimise subsystem performance and assure a safer life, and is intended to be an enhancement to previous work on cracked plates for which the orientation of the crack angle was not included. The novelty of this research activity has been in the assimilation of a significantly enhanced crack model within the analytical model of the plate, in modal space, and taking the form of a specialised Duffing equation. The governing equation of motion of the plate model with enhanced crack modelling is proposed to represent the vibrational response of the plate and is based on classical plate theory into which a developed crack model has been assimilated.. The formulation of the angled crack is based on a simplified line-spring model, and the cracked plate is subjected to transverse harmonic excitation with arbitrarily chosen boundary conditions. In addition, the nonlinear behaviour of the cracked plate model is investigated analytically from the amplitude-frequency equation by use of the multiple scales perturbation method. For both cracked square and rectangular plate models, the influence of the boundary conditions, the crack orientation angle, crack length, and location of the point load is demonstrated. It is found that the vibration characteristics and nonlinear characteristics of the cracked plate structure can be greatly affected by the orientation of the crack in the plate. The dynamics and stability of the cracked plate model are also examined numerically using dynamical systems tools for representing the behaviour of this system for a range of parameters. Finally the validity of the developed model is shown

  9. Mesh construction and evaluation of the stress intensity factor for the semi-elliptical surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Wook; Lee, Gyu Mahn; Jeong, Kyeong Hoon; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Keun Bae

    2001-01-01

    As actual cracks found in practical structures are mostly three-dimensional surface cracks, such cracks give rise to the important problem when the structural integrity is evaluated in a viewpoint of fracture mechanics. The case of a semi-elliptical surface crack is more complicated than that of the embedded elliptical crack since the crack front intersects the free surface. Therefore, the exact expression of stress field according to the boundary condition can be the prior process for the structural integrity evaluation . The commercial code, I-DEAS does not provide the family of strain singular element for the cracked-body analysis. This means that the user cannot make use of the pre-processing function of I-DEAS effectively. But I-DEAS has the capability to hold input data in common with computational fracture mechanics program like ABAQUS. Hence, user can construct the optimized analysis method for the generation of input data of program like ABAQUS using the I-DEAS. In the present study, a procedure for the generation of input data for the optimized 3-dimensional computational fracture mechanics is developed as a series of effort to establish the structural integriyt evaluation procedure of SMART reactor vessel assembly. Input data for the finite element analysis are made using the commercial code, I-DEAS program, The stress analysis is performed using the ABAQUS. To demonstrate the validation of the developed procedure in the present sutdy, semi-elliptic surface crack in a half space subjected to uniform tension are solved, and the effects of crack configuration ratio are discussed in detail. The numerical results are presented and compared to those presented by Raju and Newman. Also, we have established the structural integrity evaluation procedure through the 3-D crack modeling

  10. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of semi-elliptical surface cracks for an API 5L X65 gas pipeline under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaari, M. S.; Akramin, M. R. M.; Ariffin, A. K.; Abdullah, S.; Kikuchi, M.

    2018-02-01

    The paper is presenting the fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of semi-elliptical surface cracks for API X65 gas pipeline using S-version FEM. A method known as global-local overlay technique was used in this study to predict the fatigue behavior that involve of two separate meshes each specifically for global (geometry) and local (crack). The pre-post program was used to model the global geometry (coarser mesh) known as FAST including the material and boundary conditions. Hence, the local crack (finer mesh) will be defined the exact location and the mesh control accordingly. The local mesh was overlaid along with the global before the numerical computation taken place to solve the engineering problem. The stress intensity factors were computed using the virtual crack closure-integral method (VCCM). The most important results is the behavior of the fatigue crack growth, which contains the crack depth (a), crack length (c) and stress intensity factors (SIF). The correlation between the fatigue crack growth and the SIF shows a good growth for the crack depth (a) and dissimilar for the crack length (c) where stunned behavior was resulted. The S-version FEM will benefiting the user due to the overlay technique where it will shorten the computation process.

  11. A study on the ductile fracture of a surface crack, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masanori; Nishio, Tamaki; Yano, Kazunori; Machida, Kenji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Ductile fracture of surface crack is studied experimentally and numerically. At first, fatigue pre-crack is introduced, and the aspect ratios of the growing fatigue crack are measured. Then the ductile fracture test is carried out and the distributions of SZW and Δa are measured. It is noted that Δa is largest where φ, the angle from surface, is nearly 30deg. J integral distribution is evaluated by the finite element method, and it is shown that the J value is also the largest where φ is nearly 30deg. (author)

  12. Condition Assessment for Wastewater Pipes: Method for Assessing Cracking and Surface Damage of Concrete Pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Hauge, Petter

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the Master Thesis has been to provide an improved method for condition assessment, which will give a better correlation between Condition class and actual Condition of concrete pipes with cracking and/or surface damages. Additionally improvement of the characterization of cracking (SR) and surface (KO) damages was a sub goal.Based on the findings described in my Thesis and my Specialization Project (Hauge 2012), I recommend that the Norwegian condition assessment method based...

  13. Physical fracture properties (fracture surfaces as information sources; crackgrowth and fracture mechanisms; exemples of cracks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meny, Lucienne.

    1979-06-01

    Fracture surfaces are considered as a useful source of informations: an introduction to fractography is presented; the fracture surface may be observed through X ray microanalysis, and other physical methods such as Auger electron spectroscopy or secundary ion emission. The mechanisms of macroscopic and microscopic crackgrowth and fracture are described, in the case of unstable fracture (cleavage, ductile with shear, intergranular brittleness) and of progressive crack propagation (creep, fatigue). Exemples of cracks are presented in the last chapter [fr

  14. Plasticity around an Axial Surface Crack in a Cylindrical Shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    field in an axially cracked cylindrical shell arising from use of classical eighth order shallow shell theory is removed when use is made of a tenth order shell theory which accounts for transverse shear deformations. Although the membrane stresses are only moderately affected, the influence...... and Ratwani,3–5 it generalises Dugdale's assumption of a concentrated yield zone in the plane of the crack but, contrary to that model, transverse shear effects are included and a continuous stress distribution is assumed in the yield zone. The inherent difficulties arising from the use of shell theory...

  15. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  16. A TESSELLATION MODEL FOR CRACK PATTERNS ON SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Nagel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of random tessellations that reflect several features of crack pattern. There are already several theoretical results derivedwhich indicate that thismodel can be an appropriate referencemodel. Some potential applications are presented in a tentative statistical study.

  17. Assessment of the stability of a surface crack in laminates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Ševčík, Martin; Náhlík, Luboš; Zouhar, Michal; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2014), s. 9-16 ISSN 0191-5665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1560 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : periodically layered composite * interface crack * generalized stress intensity factor * fracture mechanics of interface Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.473, year: 2014

  18. Detection and monitoring of surface micro-cracks by PPP-BOTDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dewei; Ansari, Farhad; Feng, Xin

    2015-06-01

    Appearance of micrometer size surface cracks is common in structural elements such as welded connections, beams, and gusset plates in bridges. Brillouin scattering-based sensors are capable of making distributed strain measurements. Pre-pump-pulse Brillouin optical time domain analysis (PPP-BOTDA) provides a centimeter-level spatial resolution, which facilitates detection and monitoring of the cracks. In the work described here, in addition to the shift in Brillouin frequency (distributed strains), change in the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) width is investigated for the detection and monitoring of surface micro-cracks. A theoretical analysis was undertaken in order to verify the rationality of the proposed method. The theoretical approach involved simulation of strain within a segment of the optical fiber traversing a crack and use of the simulated strain distribution in the opto-mechanical relations in order to numerically obtain the change in the BGS. Simulations revealed that the increase in crack opening displacements is associated with increase in BGS width and decrease in its peak power. Experimental results also indicated that the increases in crack opening displacements are accompanied with increases in BGS widths. However, it will be difficult to use the decrease in BGS power peak as another indicator due to practical difficulties in establishing generalized power amplitude in all the experiments. The study indicated that, in combination with the shift in Brillouin frequency, the increase in BGS width will provide a strong tool for detection and monitoring of surface micro-crack growths.

  19. Fatigue crack growth and fracture mechanics analysis of a working roll surface layer material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drobne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue crack growth and fracture mechanics analysis of a working roll surface layer material is presented in this paper. The research is done on a hot strip mill working roll where High Chromium Steel is used for roll’s shell material. To obtain corresponding parameters, a rectangular single edge notched bend specimens – SENB, according to standard BS 7448, were used. The fatigue crack growth analysis was done on a resonant testing machine with use of special crack gauges, while for fracture mechanics parameters the electro–mechanical testing machine was used.

  20. A review and assessment of the stress-intensity factors for surface cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The stress-intensity factor solutions proposed for a surface crack in a finite plate subjected to uniform tension are reviewed. Fourteen different solutions obtained over the past 16 years using approximate analytical methods, experimental methods, and engineering estimates are compared. The accuracy of the various solutions is assessed by correlating fracture data on surface-cracked tension specimens made of a brittle epoxy material. Fracture of the epoxy material was characterized by a constant value of stress-intensity factor as failure. Thus, the correctness of various solutions is judged by the variations in the stress-intensity factors at failure. The solutions were ranked in order of minimum standard deviation. The highest ranking solutions correlated 95% of data analyzed within + or - 10% whereas the lowest ranking solutions correlated 95% of data analyzed within + or - 20%. Some solutions could be applied to all data considered, whereas others were limited with respect to crack shapes and crack sizes that could be analyzed.

  1. The Detection of Vertical Cracks in Asphalt Using Seismic Surface Wave Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodice, M; Muggleton, J; Rustighi, E

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the location and of the extension of cracking in road surfaces is important for determining the potential level of deterioration in the road overall and the infrastructure buried beneath it. Damage in a pavement structure is usually initiated in the tarmac layers, making the Rayleigh wave ideally suited for the detection of shallow surface defects. This paper presents an investigation of two surface wave methods to detect and locate top-down cracks in asphalt layers. The aim of the study is to compare the results from the well- established Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) and the more recent Multiple Impact of Surface Waves (MISW) in the presence of a discontinuity and to suggest the best surface wave technique for evaluating the presence and the extension of vertical cracks in roads. The study is conducted through numerical simulations alongside experimental investigations and it considers the cases for which the cracking is internal and external to the deployment of sensors. MISW is found to enhance the visibility of the reflected waves in the frequency wavenumber ( f-k ) spectrum, helping with the detection of the discontinuity. In some cases, by looking at the f-k spectrum obtained with MISW it is possible to extract information regarding the location and the depth of the cracking. (paper)

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of surface crack-Hertzian stress field interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, R.; Hsu, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The results are presented of a stress intensity factor analysis of semicircular surface cracks in the inner raceway of an engine bearing. The loading consists of a moving spherical Hertzian contact load and an axial stress due to rotation and shrink fit. A 3-D linear elastic Boundary Element Method code was developed to perform the stress analysis. The element library includes linear and quadratic isoparametric surface elements. Singular quarter point elements were employed to capture the square root displacement variation and the inverse square root stress singularity along the crack front. The program also possesses the capability to separate the whole domain into two subregions. This procedure enables one to solve nonsymmetric fracture mechanics problems without having to separate the crack surfaces a priori. A wide range of configuration parameters was investigated. The ratio of crack depth to bearing thickness was varied from one-sixtieth to one-fifth for several different locations of the Hertzian load. The stress intensity factors for several crack inclinations were also investigated. The results demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the Boundary Element Method. Moreover, the results can provide the basis for crack growth calculations and fatigue life prediction.

  3. Effect of surface treatments on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanami, Masaru; Kaneda, Junya; Tamako, Hiroaki; Hato, Hisamitsu; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Effect of surface treatment on SCC susceptibility of Ni base alloys was investigated. Cracks were observed in all grinding specimens in a creviced bent beam (CBB) test. On the other hand, no cracks occurred in shot peening (SP), water jet peening (WJP) specimens. It was indicated that these surface treatments effectively reduced the SCC susceptibility of nickel-base alloys. As a result of a residual stress test, the surface of specimens with grinding had high tensile residual stress. However, SP and WJP improved surface residual stress to compressive stress. The depth of the compressive effect of WJP was almost the same as that of SP. However, the surface hardness of WJP specimens differed from that of SP and it was found that WJP had less impact on surface hardening. This difference was consistent with their surface microstructures. The surface of SP specimens had clearly the deformation region, but the surface of WJP specimens was localized. (author)

  4. Experimental and numerical investigations of stable crack growth of axial surface flaws in a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocks, W.; Krafka, H.; Mueller, W.; Wobst, K.

    1988-01-01

    In connection with the problem of the transferability of parameters obtained experimentally with the help of fracture-mechanical test specimens and used for the initiation and the stable propagation of cracks in cases of pulsating stress and of the elasto-plastic behaviour of construction components, a pressure vessel with an inside diameter of 1500 mm, a cylindrical length of 3000 mm and a wall thickness of 40 mm was hydraulically loaded with the help of internal pressure in the first stage, to attain an average crack growth of 1 mm at Δ a ≅, the loading taking place at about 21deg C. This stress-free annealed vessel exhibited an axial semielliptical vibration-induced surface crack about 181 mm long and 20 mm deep, as a test defect, in a welded circular blank made of the steel 20MnMoNi 55. The fractographic analysis of the first stable crack revealed that its growth rate of Δa was highest in the area of transition from the weak to the strong bend of the crack front (55deg m /σ v (average principal stress: σ m , Mises' reference stress: σ v v). A comparison of the experimental with the numerical results from the first stable crack shows that the local stable crack growth Δa cannot be calculated solely with reference to J, because Δa appears to depend essentially on the quotient σ m /σ v . (orig./MM) [de

  5. Surface crack formation on rails at grinding induced martensite white etching layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Carsten Jørn; Fæster, Søren; Dhar, Somrita

    2017-01-01

    The connection between profile grinding of rails, martensite surface layers and crack initiation has been investigated using visual inspection, optical microscopy and 3D X-ray computerized tomography. Newly grinded rails were extracted and found to be covered by a continuous surface layer...... of martensite with varying thickness formed by the grinding process. Worn R350HT and R200 rails were extracted from the Danish rail network as they had transverse bands resembling grinding marks on the running surface. The transverse bands were shown to consist of martensite which had extensive crack formation...

  6. Wave-Breaking Turbulence in the Ocean Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    under moderate wind speeds (Thomson et al. 2013). Assuming equilib- rium, and using a wind input formulation from Plant (1982), the TKE input is 1858...and wave direction at every frequency f of the wave energy spectrum E, and the factor of 0.04 in Plant (1982) is omitted because the adjustment of (ra...increasingly energetic wave breaking simply creates larger bubble clouds that achieve this limit. The highest dissipation rates calcu- lated here do

  7. The influence of surface stress on dislocation emission from sharp and blunt cracks in f.c.c. metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    with respect to the emission of a dislocation from the crack tip, whereas for all other metals studied the sharp crack is unstable. This result cannot be explained by existing criteria for the intrinsic ductile/brittle behaviour of crack tips, but is probably caused by surface stresses. When the crack...... is no longer atomically sharp dislocation emission becomes easier in all the studied metals. The effect is relatively strong; the critical stress intensity factor for emission to occur is reduced by up to 20%. This behaviour appears to be caused by the surface stress near the crack tip. The surface stress...... is a consequence of the many-body nature of the interatomic interactions. The enhanced dislocation emission can cause an order-of-magnitude increase in the fracture toughness of certain materials, in which a sharp crack would propagate by cleavage. Collisions with already existing dislocations will blunt the crack...

  8. Impact of surface condition on sulphide stress corrosion cracking of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, G.; Wickström, L.; Mingard, K.; Turnbull, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Heat tinting renders 316L stainless steel more susceptible to sulphide stress corrosion cracking. ► Pitting more likely at physical defects generated from specimen preparation than at inclusions. ► Cracks developed after 90 days that were not evident after the standard test duration of 30 days. ► Only shallow pitting observed due to constrained access of H 2 S to the pit recesses. ► Determination of near surface residual stress in austenitic stainless steels by XRD is unreliable. -- Abstract: The effect of surface condition on crack initiation in 316L stainless steel during laboratory testing in sour (H 2 S) environments for oil and gas applications has been investigated using the four-point bend test method. The main focus was on the effect of the degree of surface damage introduced during specimen machining and the influence of heat tinting to simulate the welding process. Detailed mapping of the surface of the four-point bend specimens before and after the tests revealed a greater tendency for pits to form at pre-existing mechanical defects than at inclusions. Perhaps surprisingly, pitting was initiated more readily on the finer ground surface. The effect of heat tinting was (i) to increase the pit density and (ii) to facilitate cracking, shifting the material from the pass to the failure domain. In all cases cracks initiated at pitting sites. A clear time dependence was observed in both the evolution of pitting and the transition from pit to crack during the four-point bend test, implying that the standard 30 day test duration may not always be sufficiently conservative. Characterisation of pitting and cracking in the specimens using electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling revealed evidence of de-alloying local to the crack. The origin of the cracks could not be identified precisely but initiation in the thinned region of the metal caused by undercutting or intense localised dissolution along slip

  9. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P. A.; Wells, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  10. Influence of tempering and contraction mismatch on crack development in ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J; DeHoff, P H; Hojjatie, B; Gray, A

    1989-07-01

    Tempering of glass produces a state of compressive stress in surface regions which can enhance the resistance to crack initiation and growth. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of tempering on the sizes of surface cracks induced within the tempered surfaces of opaque porcelain-body porcelain discs, with contraction coefficient differences (alpha O-alpha B) of +3.2, +0.7, 0.0, -0.9, and -1.5 ppm/degrees C. We fired the discs to the maturing temperature (982 degrees C) of body porcelain and then subjected them to three cooling procedures: slow cooling in a furnace (SC), fast cooling in air (FC), and tempering (T) by blasting the body porcelain surface with compressed air for 90 s. We used body porcelain discs as the thermally compatible (delta alpha = 0) control specimens. We measured the diameters of cracks induced by a microhardness indenter at an applied load of 4.9 N at 80 points along diametral lines within the surface of body porcelain. The mean values of the crack diameters varied from 75.9 microns (delta alpha = -1.5 ppm/degrees C) to 103.3 microns (delta alpha = +3.2 ppm/degrees C). The results of ANOVA indicate that significant differences in crack dimensions were controlled by cooling rate, contraction mismatch, and their combined effect (p less than 0.0001). Multiple contrast analysis (Tukey's HSD Test) revealed significantly lower (p less than 0.05) crack sizes for tempered specimens compared with those of fast-cooled and slow-cooled specimens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The transition of corrosion pitting to surface fatigue cracks in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul Nolan

    Pitting corrosion experiments were executed to characterize the dynamics. of accelerated corrosion for the combination of 2024-T3 aluminum and a 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature. Platinum was used as a counter electrode and a silver-silver chloride electrode was used as a reference. A corrosion protocol was developed to accelerate pitting corrosion on 2024-T3 aluminum. The developed protocol allowed for the relative control of pitting depth on fatigue dog-bone specimens. A pitting damage threshold was encountered for depths beyond an average value of approximately 135mum. Corrosion fatigue experiments were performed on specimens that had been prior corroded using the developed corrosion protocol. Pitting depths from approximately 40mum-200mum were examined for fatigue characterization. Corrosion pitting to surface fatigue crack transition was captured and fatigue crack growth behavior was documented. As well as the pit to crack transition, the short crack behavior to long crack behavior transition was captured and analyzed. Fractographic analysis of corrosion fatigue specimens revealed cracks nucleating, propagating and causing subsequent failure from accelerated prior pitting corrosion damage.

  12. On the Short Surface Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Fine-Grained WC-Co Cemented Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Mikado

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fatigue crack growth (FCG behavior of short surface cracks in a fine-grained cemented carbide with a length of less than 1 mm was investigated. The rotating bending and the four-point bending fatigue tests were carried out at stress ratios of R = −1 and R = 0.1 (R = maximum stress/minimum stress. It was found that a short surface crack had a longer stable fatigue crack growth area than a long through-thickness crack; the FCG behaviors of the two types of crack are clearly different. Furthermore, the FCG path of short surface cracks was investigated in detail to study the interaction between fatigue cracks and microstructures of the cemented carbide such as WC grains and the Co phase. At a low Kmax (Kmax = the maximum stress intensity factor, it was found that fatigue crack growth within WC grains is difficult because of a small driving force; instead, crack growth is along the brittle WC/WC interface. On the other hand, at a high Kmax, WC grain breakage often occurs, since the driving force of FCG is large, and the fatigue crack grows linearly.

  13. A Wireless Monitoring System for Cracks on the Surface of Reactor Containment Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring with wireless sensor networks has been increasingly popular in recent years because of the convenience. In this paper, a real-time monitoring system for cracks on the surface of reactor containment buildings is presented. Customized wireless sensor networks platforms are designed and implemented with sensors especially for crack monitoring, which include crackmeters and temperature detectors. Software protocols like route discovery, time synchronization and data transfer are developed to satisfy the requirements of the monitoring system and stay simple at the same time. Simulation tests have been made to evaluate the performance of the system before full scale deployment. The real-life deployment of the crack monitoring system is carried out on the surface of reactor containment building in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station during the in-service pressure test with 30 wireless sensor nodes.

  14. Standard practice for fracture testing with surface-crack tension specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the design, preparation, and testing of surface-crack tension (SCT) specimens. It relates specifically to testing under continuously increasing force and excludes cyclic and sustained loadings. The quantity determined is the residual strength of a specimen having a semielliptical or circular-segment fatigue crack in one surface. This value depends on the crack dimensions and the specimen thickness as well as the characteristics of the material. 1.2 Metallic materials that can be tested are not limited by strength, thickness, or toughness. However, tests of thick specimens of tough materials may require a tension test machine of extremely high capacity. The applicability of this practice to nonmetallic materials has not been determined. 1.3 This practice is limited to specimens having a uniform rectangular cross section in the test section. The test section width and length must be large with respect to the crack length. Crack depth and length should be chosen to suit the ultimate pu...

  15. A simplified approach for assessing the leak-before-break for the flawed pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, P. [Ramagundam Super Thermal Power Station, NTPC Ltd, Jyothinagar 505215 (India); Amirthagadeswaran, K.S. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Government College of Technology, Coimbatore 641013 (India); Christopher, T. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Government College of Engineering, Tirunelveli 627007 (India); Nageswara Rao, B., E-mail: bnrao52@rediffmail.com [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, School of Mechanical and Civil Sciences, K L University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram, Guntur 522502 (India)

    2016-06-15

    Surface cracks or embedded cracks in pressure vessels under service may grow and form stable through-thickness cracks causing leak prior to failure. If this leak-before-break phenomenon takes place, then there is a possibility of preventing the vessel failure. This paper presents a simplified approach for assessing the leak-before-break or failure of the flawed pressure vessels. This approach is validated through comparison of existing test data.

  16. Constraint of semi-elliptical surface cracks in T and L-joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Yil

    2001-01-01

    Critical defects in pressure vessels and pipes are generally found in the form of a semi-elliptical surface crack, and the analysis of which is consequently an important problem in engineering fracture mechanics. Furthermore, in addition to the traditional single parameter K or J-integral, the second parameter like T-stress should be measured to quantify the constraint effect. In this work, the validity of the line-spring finite element is investigated by comparing line-spring J-T solutions to the reference 3D finite element J-T solutions. A full 3D-mesh generating program for semi-elliptical surface cracks is employed to provide such reference 3D solutions. Then some structural characteristics of the surface-cracked T and L-joints are studied by mixed mode line-spring finite element. Negative T-stresses observed in T and L-joints indicate the necessity of J-T two parameter approach for analyses of surface-cracked T and L-joints

  17. Modification of the ASME code z-factor for circumferential surface crack in nuclear ferritic pipings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hwan; Chung, Yon Ki; Koh, Wan Young; Lee, Joung Bae

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to modify the ASME Code Z-Factor, which is used in the evaluation of circumferential surface crack in nuclear ferritic pipings. The ASME Code Z-Factor is a load multiplier to compensate plastic load with elasto-plastic load. The current ASME Code Z-Factor underestimates pipe maximum load. In this study, the original SC. TNP method is modified first because the original SC. TNP method has a problem that the maximum allowable load predicted from the original SC. TNP method is slightly higher than that measured from the experiment. Then the new Z-Factor is developed using the modified SC. TNP method. The desirability of both the modified SC. TNP method and the new Z-Factor is examined using the experimental results for the circumferential surface crack in pipings. The results show that (1) the modified SC. TNP method is good for predicting the circumferential surface crack behavior in pipings, and (2) the Z-Factor obtained from the modified SC. TNP method well predicts the behavior of circumferential surface crack in ferritic pipings. 30 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  18. Ligament instability of semi-elliptical surface cracks in plates and pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattheck, C.; Morawietz, P.; Munz, D.

    1983-01-01

    The critical stress for ligament yielding in a plate (e.g. austenite SS) with a semi-elliptical surface crack was calculated using the Dugdale model. The necessary stress intensity factor for the strip load was obtained with the weight function method. The quality of the analytical expression was chequed with FEM-calculations. (orig.)

  19. Sub-surface Fatigue Crack Growth at Alumina Inclusions in AISI 52100 Roller Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerullo, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Sub-surface fatigue crack growth at non metallic inclusions is studied in AISI 52100 bearing steel under typical rolling contact loads. A first 2D plane strain finite element analysis is carried out to compute the stress history in the innner race at a characteristic depth, where the Dang Van...

  20. A perfectly conducting surface in electrodynamics with Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, L. H. C.; Barone, F. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we consider a model which exhibits explicit Lorentz symmetry breaking due to the presence of a single background vector v^{μ } coupled to the gauge field. We investigate such a theory in the vicinity of a perfectly conducting plate for different configurations of v^{μ }. First we consider no restrictions on the components of the background vector and we treat it perturbatively up to second order. Next, we treat v^{μ } exactly for two special cases: the first one is when it has only components parallel to the plate, and the second one when it has a single component perpendicular to the plate. For all these configurations, the propagator for the gauge field and the interaction force between the plate and a point-like electric charge are computed. Surprisingly, it is shown that the image method is valid in our model and we argue that it is a non-trivial result. We show there arises a torque on the mirror with respect to its positioning in the background field when it interacts with a point-like charge. It is a new effect with no counterpart in theories with Lorentz symmetry in the presence of a perfect mirror.

  1. A perfectly conducting surface in electrodynamics with Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, L.H.C. [UNESP, Campus de Guaratingueta, DFQ, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Barone, F.A. [IFQ, Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    In this paper we consider a model which exhibits explicit Lorentz symmetry breaking due to the presence of a single background vector v{sup μ} coupled to the gauge field. We investigate such a theory in the vicinity of a perfectly conducting plate for different configurations of v{sup μ}. First we consider no restrictions on the components of the background vector and we treat it perturbatively up to second order. Next, we treat v{sup μ} exactly for two special cases: the first one is when it has only components parallel to the plate, and the second one when it has a single component perpendicular to the plate. For all these configurations, the propagator for the gauge field and the interaction force between the plate and a point-like electric charge are computed. Surprisingly, it is shown that the image method is valid in our model and we argue that it is a non-trivial result. We show there arises a torque on the mirror with respect to its positioning in the background field when it interacts with a point-like charge. It is a new effect with no counterpart in theories with Lorentz symmetry in the presence of a perfect mirror. (orig.)

  2. The surface morphology of retinal breaks and lattice retinal degeneration. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M R; Streeten, B W

    1986-02-01

    In 14 of 110 eye bank eyes, lesions characteristic of peripheral retinal surface pathology were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These included operculated and flap tears, trophic round holes, lattice degeneration with holes, and paravascular retinal "pitting" degeneration. By SEM, the edges of the retinal breaks were covered by smooth cellular membranes, merging peripherally with a meshwork of vitreous fibrils. The membrane cells had poorly defined borders, a pitted surface, and variable numbers of microvilli consistent with glia. Lattice surfaces and foci of paravascular retinal degeneration were covered by similar membrane, but showed characteristic differences. It appears that breaks in the internal limiting membrane always stimulate proliferation of preretinal glial membranes. Similar cellular morphology of the membranes associated with breaks is consistent with a common cell of origin. Limited proliferation of these membranes suggests that surface gliosis is normally inhibited when the cells contact either intact basement membrane or vitreous.

  3. Three-term Asymptotic Stress Field Expansion for Analysis of Surface Cracked Elbows in Nuclear Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, Fernando

    2007-04-01

    Elbows with a shallow surface cracks in nuclear pressure pipes have been recognized as a major origin of potential catastrophic failures. Crack assessment is normally performed by using the J-integral approach. Although this one-parameter-based approach is useful to predict the ductile crack onset, it depends strongly on specimen geometry or constraint level. When a shallow crack exists (depth crack-to-thickness wall ratio less than 0.2) and/or a fully plastic condition develops around the crack, the J-integral alone does not describe completely the crack-tip stress field. In this paper, we report on the use of a three-term asymptotic expansion, referred to as the J- A 2 methodology, for modeling the elastic-plastic stress field around a three-dimensional shallow surface crack in an elbow subjected to internal pressure and out-of-plane bending. The material, an A 516 Gr. 70 steel, used in the nuclear industry, was modeled with a Ramberg-Osgood power law and flow theory of plasticity. A finite deformation theory was included to account for the highly nonlinear behavior around the crack tip. Numerical finite element results were used to calculate a second fracture parameter A 2 for the J- A 2 methodology. We found that the used three-term asymptotic expansion accurately describes the stress field around the considered three-dimensional shallow surface crack.

  4. Failure Assessment for the High-Strength Pipelines with Constant-Depth Circumferential Surface Cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas transportation system over long distance, application of high-strength pipeline steels can efficiently reduce construction and operation cost by increasing operational pressure and reducing the pipe wall thickness. Failure assessment is an important issue in the design, construction, and maintenance of the pipelines. The small circumferential surface cracks with constant depth in the welded pipelines are of practical interest. This work provides an engineering estimation procedure based upon the GE/EPRI method to determine the J-integral for the thin-walled pipelines with small constant-depth circumferential surface cracks subject to tension and bending loads. The values of elastic influence functions for stress intensity factor and plastic influence functions for fully plastic J-integral estimation are derived in tabulated forms through a series of three-dimensional finite element calculations for different crack geometries and material properties. To check confidence of the J-estimation solution in practical application, J-integral values obtained from detailed finite element (FE analyses are compared with those estimated from the new influence functions. Excellent agreement of FE results with the proposed J-estimation solutions for both tension and bending loads indicates that the new solutions can be applied for accurate structural integrity assessment of high-strength pipelines with constant-depth circumferential surface cracks.

  5. Laser grooving of surface cracks on hot work tool steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of laser grooving of 1.2343 tool steel hardened to 46 HRC. The effect of laser power and grooving speed on groove shape (i.e. depth and width, the material removal rate and the purity of produced groove as a measure of groove quality was investigated and analyzed using response surface methodology. Optimal parameters of laser grooving were found, which enables pure grooves suitable for laser welding.

  6. SIMULATION OF TEMPERATURE AND TRANSPORT LOAD IMPACT ON FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF CRACKS ON ASPHALT-CONCRETE ROAD SURFACES

    OpenAIRE

    I. S. Melnikova

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of statistical data has shown that about 60 % of all types of road surface destructions and damages in the Republic of Belarus are attributed to cracks (separate, frequent and cracks network). The process of cracks formation in the asphalt concrete pavement is rather complicated and it is affected by a number of factors. The most important and determining factors are character and value of traffic loads, temperature action, road pavement structure, properties of materials used for...

  7. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M. [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed.

  8. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed

  9. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  10. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardoukhi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  11. Formation Mechanism of Surface Crack in Low Pressure Casting of A360 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-Guang; Cao, Fu-Yang; Ying, Tao; Zhao, Xin-Yi; Liu, Jing-Shun; Shen, Hong-Xian; Guo, Shu; Sun, Jian-Fei

    2017-12-01

    A surface crack defect is normally found in low pressure castings of Al alloy with a sudden contraction structure. To further understand the formation mechanism of the defect, the mold filling process is simulated by a two-phase flow model. The experimental results indicate that the main reason for the defect deformation is the mismatching between the height of liquid surface in the mold and pressure in the crucible. In the case of filling, a sudden contraction structure with an area ratio smaller than 0.5 is obtained, and the velocity of the liquid front increases dramatically with the influence of inertia. Meanwhile, the pressurizing speed in the crucible remains unchanged, resulting in the pressure not being able to support the height of the liquid level. Then the liquid metal flows back to the crucible and forms a relatively thin layer solidification shell on the mold wall. With the increasing pressure in the crucible, the liquid level rises again, engulfing the shell and leading to a surface crack. As the filling velocity is characterized by the damping oscillations, surface cracks will form at different heights. The results shed light on designing a suitable pressurizing speed for the low pressure casting process.

  12. Evaluation of Breaking Performance in Vibration-Assisted Electrostatic Surface Induction Actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemoto, Takeru; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel; Yamamoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates breaking performance of an electrostatic surface induction actuator. The actuator is equipped with piezoelectric vibrator such that the friction between the slider and the stator electrodes can be dramatically reduced by squeeze-film effect. In such an actuator, the friction ...

  13. Magnetic surface breaking in 3D MHD equilibria of 1=2 Heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Takei, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic surface breaking due to the finite pressure effect is analyzed for three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of 1=2 Heliotron configuration. Characteristics of magnetic island formation are extensively surveyed. It is found that the well-hill criterion which has been predicted by the local analysis is not always applicable for all cases. (author)

  14. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with effect of reactor temperature and catalyst weight on performance of plastic waste cracking to fuels over modified catalyst waste as well as their optimization. From optimization study, the most operating parameters affected the performance of the catalytic cracking process is reactor temperature followed by catalyst weight. Increasing the reactor temperature improves significantly the cracking performance due to the increasing catalyst activity. The optimal operating conditions of reactor temperature about 550 oC and catalyst weight about 1.25 gram were produced with respect to maximum liquid fuel product yield of 29.67 %. The liquid fuel product consists of gasoline range hydrocarbons (C4-C13 with favorable heating value (44,768 kJ/kg. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 10th July 2010, Revised: 18th September 2010, Accepted: 19th September 2010[How to Cite: I. Istadi, S. Suherman, L. Buchori. (2010. Optimization of Reactor Temperature and Catalyst Weight for Plastic Cracking to Fuels Using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 103-111. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.797.103-111][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.797.103-111 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/797

  15. Prediction of residual stress distributions due to surface machining and welding and crack growth simulation under residual stress distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Ryohei; Katsuyama, JInya; Onizawa, Kunio; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Mikami, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Masahito

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual stress distributions due to welding and machining are evaluated by XRD and FEM. → Residual stress due to machining shows higher tensile stress than welding near the surface. → Crack growth analysis is performed using calculated residual stress. → Crack growth result is affected machining rather than welding. → Machining is an important factor for crack growth. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the weld zone of the core shroud and primary loop recirculation (PLR) pipes made of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel Type 316L. The joining process of pipes usually includes surface machining and welding. Both processes induce residual stresses, and residual stresses are thus important factors in the occurrence and propagation of SCC. In this study, the finite element method (FEM) was used to estimate residual stress distributions generated by butt welding and surface machining. The thermoelastic-plastic analysis was performed for the welding simulation, and the thermo-mechanical coupled analysis based on the Johnson-Cook material model was performed for the surface machining simulation. In addition, a crack growth analysis based on the stress intensity factor (SIF) calculation was performed using the calculated residual stress distributions that are generated by welding and surface machining. The surface machining analysis showed that tensile residual stress due to surface machining only exists approximately 0.2 mm from the machined surface, and the surface residual stress increases with cutting speed. The crack growth analysis showed that the crack depth is affected by both surface machining and welding, and the crack length is more affected by surface machining than by welding.

  16. Pair-breaking effects by parallel magnetic field in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeta, Masahiro, E-mail: nabeta@mp.okayama-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Kenta K.; Onari, Seiichiro; Ichioka, Masanori

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Zeeman effect shifts superconducting gaps of sub-band system, towards pair-breaking. • Higher-level sub-bands become normal-state-like electronic states by magnetic fields. • Magnetic field dependence of zero-energy DOS reflects multi-gap superconductivity. - Abstract: We study paramagnetic pair-breaking in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity, when magnetic field is applied parallel to the surface. The calculation is performed by Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory with s-wave pairing, including the screening effect of electric fields by the induced carriers near the surface. Due to the Zeeman shift by applied fields, electronic states at higher-level sub-bands become normal-state-like. Therefore, the magnetic field dependence of Fermi-energy density of states reflects the multi-gap structure in the surface superconductivity.

  17. Pair-breaking effects by parallel magnetic field in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabeta, Masahiro; Tanaka, Kenta K.; Onari, Seiichiro; Ichioka, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Zeeman effect shifts superconducting gaps of sub-band system, towards pair-breaking. • Higher-level sub-bands become normal-state-like electronic states by magnetic fields. • Magnetic field dependence of zero-energy DOS reflects multi-gap superconductivity. - Abstract: We study paramagnetic pair-breaking in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity, when magnetic field is applied parallel to the surface. The calculation is performed by Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory with s-wave pairing, including the screening effect of electric fields by the induced carriers near the surface. Due to the Zeeman shift by applied fields, electronic states at higher-level sub-bands become normal-state-like. Therefore, the magnetic field dependence of Fermi-energy density of states reflects the multi-gap structure in the surface superconductivity.

  18. Finite element analysis of surface cracks in the Wilkins Ice Shelf using fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Carolin; Müller, Ralf; Gross, Dietmar; Humbert, Angelika; Braun, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Ice shelves, located between the warming atmosphere and the ocean, are sensitive elements of the climate system. The Wilkins Ice Shelf is situated in the south-western part of the Antarctic Peninsula, a well known hot spot of global warming. Recent break-up events exemplified the potential of disintegration of the ice shelf. A multi interdisciplinary project consisting of remote sensing, modeling of the ice dynamics and fracture mechanics intends to improve the understanding of the impacts of temperature increase on ice shelf stability. As a part of this project the aim of this presentation is to demonstrate the fracture mechanical approach using finite elements and configurational forces. For fracture mechanical purposes the material behavior of ice is treated as a brittle solid, and linear fracture mechanics is used. Crucial to all methods in linear fracture mechanics is the evaluation of the stress intensity factor K which is a measure for the load concentration at the crack tip and which depends on the geometry of the body and on the applied loading. The computed value of K can be compared to the critical stress intensity factor Kc, a material property obtained from experimental examinations, to judge whether a crack will propagate. One very effective procedure to obtain the stress intensity factor takes advantage of configurational forces, which can be easily obtained in the finite element analysis. An initial investigation is based on a 2-dimensional analysis of a single crack with a mode-I load type using a static plane strain model in the finite element analysis software COMSOL and additional routines to compute and evaluate the configurational forces. Analytical solutions of simple geometry and load cases are called on in comparison. The application to the Wilkins Ice Shelf follows by using material parameters, geometries and loading situations, which are obtained from literature values, remote sensing data analysis and modeling of the ice dynamics

  19. Recrystallization-Induced Surface Cracks of Carbon Ions Irradiated 6H-SiC after Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chao; Ran, Guang; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Qiang; Feng, Qijie; Lin, Jianxin

    2017-10-25

    Single crystal 6H-SiC wafers with 4° off-axis [0001] orientation were irradiated with carbon ions and then annealed at 900 °C for different time periods. The microstructure and surface morphology of these samples were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ion irradiation induced SiC amorphization, but the surface was smooth and did not have special structures. During the annealing process, the amorphous SiC was recrystallized to form columnar crystals that had a large amount of twin structures. The longer the annealing time was, the greater the amount of recrystallized SiC would be. The recrystallization volume fraction was accorded with the law of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. The surface morphology consisted of tiny pieces with an average width of approximately 30 nm in the annealed SiC. The volume shrinkage of irradiated SiC layer and the anisotropy of newly born crystals during annealing process produced internal stress and then induced not only a large number of dislocation walls in the non-irradiated layer but also the initiation and propagation of the cracks. The direction of dislocation walls was perpendicular to the growth direction of the columnar crystal. The longer the annealing time was, the larger the length and width of the formed crack would be. A quantitative model of the crack growth was provided to calculate the length and width of the cracks at a given annealing time.

  20. Recrystallization-Induced Surface Cracks of Carbon Ions Irradiated 6H-SiC after Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ye

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Single crystal 6H-SiC wafers with 4° off-axis [0001] orientation were irradiated with carbon ions and then annealed at 900 °C for different time periods. The microstructure and surface morphology of these samples were investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Ion irradiation induced SiC amorphization, but the surface was smooth and did not have special structures. During the annealing process, the amorphous SiC was recrystallized to form columnar crystals that had a large amount of twin structures. The longer the annealing time was, the greater the amount of recrystallized SiC would be. The recrystallization volume fraction was accorded with the law of the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami equation. The surface morphology consisted of tiny pieces with an average width of approximately 30 nm in the annealed SiC. The volume shrinkage of irradiated SiC layer and the anisotropy of newly born crystals during annealing process produced internal stress and then induced not only a large number of dislocation walls in the non-irradiated layer but also the initiation and propagation of the cracks. The direction of dislocation walls was perpendicular to the growth direction of the columnar crystal. The longer the annealing time was, the larger the length and width of the formed crack would be. A quantitative model of the crack growth was provided to calculate the length and width of the cracks at a given annealing time.

  1. Pair-breaking effects by parallel magnetic field in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeta, Masahiro; Tanaka, Kenta K.; Onari, Seiichiro; Ichioka, Masanori

    2016-11-01

    We study paramagnetic pair-breaking in electric-field-induced surface superconductivity, when magnetic field is applied parallel to the surface. The calculation is performed by Bogoliubov-de Gennes theory with s-wave pairing, including the screening effect of electric fields by the induced carriers near the surface. Due to the Zeeman shift by applied fields, electronic states at higher-level sub-bands become normal-state-like. Therefore, the magnetic field dependence of Fermi-energy density of states reflects the multi-gap structure in the surface superconductivity.

  2. Study of transverse crack formation on surface area of UO{sub 2} pellet circumference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Dionisia S.; Paneto, Lelia F.P.C.; Souza, Patricia O. de, E-mail: dionisia@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lelia@inb.gov.br, E-mail: patriciasouza@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Gerencia de Analise Tecnica do Combustivel Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Microstructure of a polycrystalline material has a considerable influence on particular properties, such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, optical transmission and magnetic susceptibility. The uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) is used in water-cooled nuclear reactors, due to its desirable ceramics characteristics as a nuclear fuel. The UO{sub 2} is used in the form of pellets manufactured by wet route by INB, where they are loaded into fuel rods to build the fuel assemblies used in pressurized water reactors of Angra 1, Angra 2 and future Angra 3 nuclear power plants, for electric energy generated from nuclear power in Brazil. The geometric and structural integrity of these pellets cause direct influence on their performance during the reactor core operating cycle, so pellets presenting surface cracks leading to the phenomenon of pellet cladding interaction-PCI, resulting in failures in the fuel rod and subsequently release of fission products in the reactor coolant. Transverse cracks on surface area of pellet circumference are detected by visual inspection during the manufacturing process. This paper presents the study of these cracks formation by content analysis conducted with the support of electron microscopy. These results here are analyzed from the point of view of materials science through observation of the microstructure, and the pressing process where the defect was probably generated. (author)

  3. Detection of surface cracks in cladded pipes by the multiple-beam technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    Standard ultrasonic techniques usually yield reliable inspection results for the steel structures of the nuclear power industry. Stainless-steel cladding of pipes, vessels, and nozzles to reduce the susceptibility of the base material to cracking has, however, led to unexpected inspection difficulties. Some solutions to the ultrasonic inspection problems of cladded pipes were found in multiple-beam transducer design and the application of novel waveform-processing and pattern-recognition methods. The paper is divided into four parts. First, the problems of standard ultrasonic inspection techniques in detecting surface and near-surface cracks are presented. Next, signal-reducing and background-interference-producing mechanisms (beam skewing, defocusing, multiple grain-boundary and clad-base-material-interface scattering, focusing, etc.) are postulated to guide attempts to improve the reliability of crack detection. The two modes of operation of the multiple-beam array featured in the multiple-beam technique (Mode I - Inspection by Threshold Detection, and Mode II - Confirmation by Pattern Recognition) are then described. Finally, the results of a detection reliability evaluation study involving the multiple-beam technique and four other detection techniques and ten cladded plates containing thirty-three thumbnail-shaped notches are cited

  4. Portable Fiber Laser System and Method to Remove Pits and Cracks on Sensitized Surfaces of Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    and Cracks on Sensitized Surfaces of Aluminum Alloys Prepared for DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Office of Naval Research For the period July 1, 2015...Cracks on Sensitized Surfaces of Aluminum Alloys 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...nanohardness, and elastic modulus of the 5052 Mg-Al alloy samples were experimentally investigated and analyzed. The phased objectives and specific

  5. Evaluations of environmental effect on micro crack initiation and propagation by surface observations of fatigue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Ryosuke; Abe, Shigeki; Nakamura, Takao; Kamaya, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of nuclear facilities tends to be decreased by the influence of reactor coolant, which is called environmental effect. The effect accelerates crack growth rate but the influence for crack initiation is not clarified. This study intends to discuss the environmental effect in crack initiation. The crack length and the number of cracks are measured from the investigation of fatigue test specimens in reactor coolant and air. The behavior of crack initiation is revealed from the measurement of number of cracks, crack sizes and fatigue life. From this study, environmental effect of reactor coolant is considered to influence crack initiation and increase the number of micro crack. It is also estimated that the coalescence of cracks influences the acceleration of crack growth. (author)

  6. A multi-scale approach for near-surface pavement cracking and failure mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-31

    Nearsurface cracking is one of the predominant distress types in flexible pavements. The occurrence of : nearsurface cracking, also sometimes referred to as topdown cracking, has increased in recent years : with the increased construction of...

  7. Relation between surface slip topography and stress corrosion cracking in Ti-8 wt % Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J. D.; Hoagland, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of Ti-8 wt % Al has been investigated in an inert environment (air), and an aggressive environment (salt water). Details of surface slip geometry were examined by high resolution surface replicas at various stages of deformation in both environments. Specimens aged to contain a fine dispersion of Ti3Al precipitates failed by subcritical crack growth in salt water, whereas specimens in the single phase condition showed no effects of environment on the yield or fracture characteristics. The Ti3Al precipitates produce little change in strength level or slip character compared to the single phase alloy, and there is no evidence of any effects of environment on the character of surface slip. Rather, the presence of trenches along slip bands on the surface of aged specimens suggest that the specific effect of the Ti3Al precipitates is to render the surface slip steps chemically active relative to the surrounding matrix by slip induced dissolution of the particles.

  8. Development of new Z-factors for the evaluation of the circumferential surface crack in nuclear pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Chung, Y.K.; Park, Y.W.; Lee, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop new Z-factors to evaluate the behavior of a circumferential surface crack in nuclear pipe. Z-factor is a load multiplier used in the Z-factor method, which is one of the ASME Code Sec. XI's recommendations for the estimation of a surface crack in nuclear pipe. It has been reported that the load carrying capacities predicted from the current ASME Code Z-factors, are not well in agreement with the experimental results for nuclear pipes with a surface crack. In this study, new Z-factors for ferritic base metal, ferritic submerged arc welding (SAW) weld metal, austenitic base metal, and austenitic SAW weld metal are obtained by use of the surface crack for thin pipe (SC.TNP) method based on GE/EPRI method. The desirability of both the SC.TNP method and the new Z-factors is examined using the results from 48 pipe fracture experiments for nuclear pipes with a circumferential surface crack. The results show that the SC.TNP method is good for describing the circumferential surface crack behavior and the new Z-factors are well in agreement with the measured Z-factors for both ferritic and austenitic pipes. (orig.)

  9. Simulation of phenomena at crack-like leaks and breaks in piping with consideration of fluid-structure interaction. Final report; Simulation der Phaenomene bei rissartigen Lecks und Bruechen in Rohrleitungen unter Beruecksichtigung der Fluid-Struktur-Kopplung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, J.; Grebner, H.; Bahr, L.; Heckmann, K.; Arndt, J.; Pallas-Moner, G.

    2013-11-15

    The evaluation of fluid flow rates through crack-like leaks in pressurized components plays an important role for assessments on break preclusion, especially leak-before-break considerations. In the framework of project RS1194 various calculation methods for the simulation of structure mechanical and thermo-hydraulic phenomena due to flows through crack-like leaks in the coolant circuit were examined and validated on selected leak rate experiments. Besides large program systems as ATHLET, CFX and ADINA also several simplified evaluation methods included in the GRS program WinLeck were applied especially for the determination of leak rates. For the validation of analysing methods, tests were selected previously conducted at the former Nuclear Research Centre (KfK) at Karlsruhe and the Power Plant Union (KWU). The review of experimental results already at disposal in regards to availability of measure d values of thermo-hydraulic parameters like flow-through rates, spatial distributions of pressure, temperature and aggregate state of the medium, velocity of the medium as well as leak openings, displacements and structure strains indicated, that the experiments in terms of quantification of thermo-hydraulic and structure mechanical phenomena as well as appropriate coupling effects do not provide sufficiently meaningful results. Due to missing experiments for validation of 3d numerical flow simulation in crack-like leaks experiments with flow through a Venturi orifice, which are relevant in this context, were chosen. Experiments with single phase flow were considered as well as ones with two phase flow. The post-calculations of the single phase flow showed a good agreement between the calculation results and the appropriate measured data. In the two phase flow, despite tests with various model variations, no satisfying agreement between calculation and test could be reached. According to the authors' opinion is the model approach available in CFX for the

  10. Validation of surface crack stress intensity factors of a tubular K-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lie, S.T.; Lee, C.K.; Chiew, S.P.; Shao, Y.B.

    2005-01-01

    Tubular K-joints are encountered widely in offshore structures, and the prediction of damaged joints depends very much on the accuracy of stress intensity factor solutions (SIFs). No parametric equations and very few results have been proposed and published in the literature for estimating the SIFs of any K-joints subjected to complex loading conditions. In this paper, a mesh generation method proposed previously for the Y-joint and T-joint has been extended to the K-joint. This method is realized by dividing the K-joint into several sub-zones with each zone consisting of different types of elements and mesh densities. This method has a distinct advantage of controlling the mesh quality, and most importantly the aspect ratio of the elements along the crack front. When the mesh of all the sub-zones has been generated automatically and completely, they are merged to form the complete model. The two most commonly used methods, namely the J-integral and displacement extrapolation, are used to evaluate the SIF values along the crack front of a typical K-joint. To validate the accuracy of these computed SIFs, a full-scale K-joint specimen was tested to failure under fatigue loading conditions. The standard alternating current potential drop (ACPD) technique was used to monitor the rate of crack propagation of the surface crack located at the hot spot stress region. Using the given material parameters C and m, the experimental SIFs were deduced, and they are found to be in good agreement with the computed SIFs obtained from the generated models. Hence, the proposed finite element models are both efficient and reliable

  11. On fatigue crack growth mechanisms of MMC: Reflection on analysis of 'multi surface initiations'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkaddem, A.; El Mansori, M.

    2009-01-01

    This work attempts to examine the mechanisms of fatigue when cracks synergetically initiate in more than one site at the specimen surface. The metal matrix composites (MMC) i.e. silicon carbide particles reinforced aluminium matrix composites (Al/SiC p -MMC), seem to be good candidates to accelerate fatigue failures following multi surface initiations (MSI). Closure effects of MSI mechanisms on the variation of fatigue behaviour are explored for various stress states. Experiments were carried out using non pre-treated and pre-treated specimens. Using an Equivalent Ellipse Method (EEM), it is shown that the aspect of surface finish of specimen plays an important role on crack growth. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) inspections have lead to distinguishing the initiation regions from propagation regions and final separation regions. It is also revealed that the total lifetime of specimens is sensitive to heat treatment. Moreover, it is found that the appearance of MSI in cycled materials is more probable at high level of fatigue loads.

  12. Effect of resin and type of surface treatment on the flexural strength of cracked feldspathic porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Porcelain restorations are often ground for clinical adjustment and this removes the surface glaze layer and introduces flaws that can grow in wet environments due to stress-corrosion, reduce the strength of porcelain and limit restoration lifetime. The aim of this study was to introduce some surface treatment methods to control the flaws of ceramic restorations external surface and improve their strength.   Materials and Methods: 40 feldspathic discs were prepared and divided into 4 groups (n=10: not indented (group 1 and others indented by vickers with 29.4 N and received different treatments: no treatment (group 2, polished (group 3 and polished-silane-resin (group 4. Biaxial flexural strength of discs was tested after water storage. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA .   Results: The mean flexural strength of specimens in group 1 (134.49±12.60, 2 (94.81±15.41, 3 (89.20±16.22 and 4 (80.67±12.01 were measured. Group 1 (not indented revealed significantly higher strength (P<0.001 than that of indented groups (2, 3 and 4 . There was no significant difference between group 2 (no treatment and 3 or 4 (treated and between treatment methods (3 and 4 (P=0.136.   Conclusion: The strength of porcelains is dependent on presence of cracks. With the limitations of this study, none of the treatment methods could strengthen the cracked ceramic.

  13. Dynamic photoelasticity as an aid to sizing surface crack by frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Burger, C.P.; Schmerr, L.W.; Zachary, L.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method using Rayleigh or surface waves for sizing surface cracks that have been modeled as machine slots is described. Dynamic photoelasticity was chosen to study the overall wave behavior and the mode conversions of a Rayleigh wave as it interacts with narrow slots cut from the edges of a two-dimensional plate model. This technique gives a full-field visualization of the stresses produced by an elastic wave traveling in a solid. The interaction between a Rayleigh wave and a slot was observed from a sequence of pictures taken with a high-speed Cranz-Schardin camera. The procedures and results are discussed. It was concluded that the ability of dynamic photoelasticity to produce full-field views of elastic stress fields can be used to provide an understanding of the ways in which the subsurface particle motions in Rayleigh waves are affected by a slot. As a consequence the Rayleigh wave property which relates the wavelength to its depth below the surface has been effectively used to find the depth of slots. The next step is to use conventional R-wave ultrasonic transducers on artificially machined slots or fatigue cracks to see how the slot depth relates to the cut-off wavelength. The transducers used should be broadband and the depth of the input R-wave should be greater than the slot depth so as to produce undercutting

  14. Near-surface traveltime tomographic inversion using multiple first break picks

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The input data for refraction traveltime tomography are the traveltimes of the first breaks, which are picked using automatic pickers. Although automatic pickers perform satisfactorily overall, no one automatic picker can be characterized as the best one; one picker might fail for traces for which other pickers are accurate and vice versa for other traces. We introduce an iterative method for traveltime tomography, which takes as input traveltimes from a number of pickers. During the inversion scheme inconsistent traveltimes are replaced with more meaningful ones to obtain a smooth near-surface velocity model. The scheme is easily parallelizable and a byproduct of the inversion scheme is a set of consistent traveltimes which is close to the actual traveltimes of the first breaks.

  15. Automated detection of cracks on the faying surface within high-load transfer bolted speciments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Gregory; Kollgaard, Jeffrey R.

    2003-07-01

    Boeing is currently conducting evaluation testing of the Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVMTM) system offered by Structural Monitoring Systems, Ltd (SMS). Initial testing has been conducted by SMS, with further test lab validations to be performed at Boeing in Seattle. Testing has been conducted on dog bone type specimens that have been cut at the center line. A notch was cut at one of the bolt holes and a CVM sensor installed on both sides of the plate. The doublers were added and a single line of 4 bolts along the longitudinal center line were used to attach the doubler plates to the dog bone type specimen. In this way, a high load transfer situation exists between the two halves of the dog bone specimen and the doubler plates. The CVM sensors are slightly over 0.004" (0.1mm) in thickness and are installed directly upon the faying surface of the dog bone specimen. Testing was conducted on an Instron 8501 Servohydraulic testing machine at the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Australia. The standard laboratory equipment offered by Structural Monitoring Systems, Ltd was used for crack detection. This equipment included the Kvac (vacuum supply) and the Sim8 (flow meter). The Sim8 was electrically connected to the Instron machine so that as soon as a crack was detected, fatigue loading was halted. The aim of the experiment was for CVM to detect a crack on the faying surface of the specimens at a length of 0.050" +/- 0.010". This was accomplished successfully. CVM has been developed on the principle that a small volume maintained at a low vacuum is extremely sensitive to any ingress of air. In addition to the load bearing sensors described above, self-adhesive, elastomeric sensors with fine channels on the adhesive face have been developed. When the sensors have been adhered to the structure under test, these fine channels, and the structure itself, form a manifold of galleries alternately at low vacuum and atmospheric pressure

  16. Element and Crack Geometry Sensitivities of Finite Element Analysis Results of Linear Elastic Stress Intensity Factor for Surface Cracked Straight Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Dongil; Bae, Kyungdong; Je, Jinho; An, Joonghyok; Kim, Yongbeum

    2013-01-01

    This study provides the elastic stress intensity factors, K, for circumferential and longitudinal surface cracked straight pipes under single or combined loads of internal pressure, bending, and torsion based on three-dimensional (3a) finite element (FE) analyses. FE results are compared with two different types of defect assessment codes (API-579-1 and RUC-MR A106) to prove the accuracy of the FE results and the differences between the codes. Through the 3a FE analysis, it is found that the stress intensity factors are sensitive to the number of elements, which they were believed to not be sensitive to because of path independence. Differences were also found between the FE analysis results for crack defining methods and the results obtained by two different types of defect assessment codes

  17. 3D characterization of rolling contact fatigue crack networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessop, Casey; Ahlström, Johan; Hammar, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) damage is becoming more frequent with increased traffic, accelerations, and loading conditions in the railway industry. Defects which are characterized by a two-lobe darkened surface and a V-shaped surface-breaking crack are defined as squats. The origination...

  18. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  19. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analyses For circumferential Part-through Surface Cracks At The Interface Between Elbows and Pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae; Oh, Chang Kyun; Kim, Jong Sung; Jin, Tae Eun

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents plastic limit loads and approximate J-integral estimates for circumferential part-through surface crack at the interface between elbows and pipes. Based on finite element limit analyses using elastic-perfectly plastic materials, plastic limit moments under in-plane bending are obtained and it is found that they are similar those for circumferential part-through surface cracks in the center of elbow. Based on present FE results, closed-form limit load solutions are proposed. Welds are not explicitly considered and all materials are assumed to be homogeneous. And the method to estimate the elastic-plastic J-integral for circumferential part-through surface cracks at the interface between elbows and straight pipes is proposed based on the reference stress approach, which was compared with corresponding solutions for straight pipes

  20. Modeling capillary bridge dynamics and crack healing between surfaces of nanoscale roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylemez, Emrecan; de Boer, Maarten P.

    2017-12-01

    Capillary bridge formation between adjacent surfaces in humid environments is a ubiquitous phenomenon. It strongly influences tribological performance with respect to adhesion, friction and wear. Only a few studies, however, assess effects due to capillary dynamics. Here we focus on how capillary bridge evolution influences crack healing rates. Experimental results indicated a logarithmic decrease in average crack healing velocity as the energy release rate increases. Our objective is to model that trend. We assume that capillary dynamics involve two mechanisms: capillary bridge growth and subsequently nucleation followed by growth. We show that by incorporating interface roughness details and the presence of an adsorbed water layer, the behavior of capillary force dynamics can be understood quantitatively. We identify three important regimes that control the healing process, namely bridge growth, combined bridge growth and nucleation, and finally bridge nucleation. To fully capture the results, however, the theoretical model for nucleation time required an empirical modification. Our model enables significant insight into capillary bridge dynamics, with a goal of attaining a predictive capability for this important microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) reliability failure mechanism.

  1. Cracks and nanodroplets produced on tungsten surface samples by dense plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticoş, C. M.; Galaţanu, M.; Galaţanu, A.; Luculescu, C.; Scurtu, A.; Udrea, N.; Ticoş, D.; Dumitru, M.

    2018-03-01

    Small samples of 12.5 mm in diameter made from pure tungsten were exposed to a dense plasma jet produced by a coaxial plasma gun operated at 2 kJ. The surface of the samples was analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after applying consecutive plasma shots. Cracks and craters were produced in the surface due to surface tensions during plasma heating. Nanodroplets and micron size droplets could be observed on the samples surface. An energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that the composition of these droplets coincided with that of the gun electrode material. Four types of samples were prepared by spark plasma sintering from powders with the average particle size ranging from 70 nanometers up to 80 μm. The plasma power load to the sample surface was estimated to be ≈4.7 MJ m-2 s-1/2 per shot. The electron temperature and density in the plasma jet had peak values 17 eV and 1.6 × 1022 m-3, respectively.

  2. Failure of heterogeneous materials: Scaling properties of fracture surfaces and implications on models of cracks in disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    While there exists a unified theoretical framework - Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) - to describe the failure of homogeneous materials, understanding and modelling the mechanical properties of heterogeneous media continue to raise significant fundamental challenges. These mechanical properties, observed at the macroscopic scale, result from microscopic processes occurring at the scale of the material. To include these local processes into a statistical description constitutes then a crucial step toward the setup of predictive macroscopic models. Crack surface roughness is a consequence of these local processes. Consequently, many fractography experiments have focussed on their analysis. In this context, it was recently evidenced that, in many materials, fracture surfaces exhibit anisotropic scaling properties reminiscent to interface growth problems, fully characterized by two couples of parameters: The roughness exponents and the characteristic length-scales measured along and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth respectively. While the characteristic length-scales do depend on the considered material, the exponents are surprisingly universal: Two distinct sets of critical exponents are observed whether the surfaces are examined at scales below or above the size of the damaged zone at the crack front. Models of crack growth in disordered media are discussed at the light of these experimental observations. In particular, one can derive a model from LEFM which describe the development of crack roughness as an ``elastic'' manifold creeping in a random media. This approach captures quantitatively the experimental observations performed at length-scales above the size of the process zone. In this approach, the onset of crack propagation can be interpreted as a dynamic phase transition while sub-critical crack growth can be assimilated to thermally-assisted depinning.

  3. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W-Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (˜0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, while a W-Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ˜0.9 MJ m-2. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  4. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W–Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, while a W–Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ∼0.9 MJ m{sup −2}. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  5. FE Calculations of J-Integrals in a Constrained Elastomeric Disk with Crack Surface Pressure and Isothermal Load

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ching, H. K; Liu, C. T; Yen, S. C

    2004-01-01

    .... For the linear analysis, material compressibility was modeled with Poisson's varying form 0.48 to 0.4999. In addition, with the presence of the crack surface pressure, the J-integral was modified by including an additional line integral...

  6. Effect of copper, tin, phosphorous and arsenic on the surface cracking of a 18-8 stainless steel during hot compression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botella, J.; Fernandez, M.T.; Fernandez de Castillo, I.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of certain different concentrations of Cu, Sn, P and As on the surface cracking of 18-8 austenitic stainless steel hot compressed specimens has been studied, at 1,123 and 1,273 K, in an oxidizing atmosphere (air). A procedure for determining surface cracking has been established, and the cracking factor obtained in this ways is correlated with the chemical composition of the materials at both temperatures. The cracking factors obtained at 1,273 K have been compared with the reduction of area drops obtained by hot tension tests at the same temperature. (Author) 5 refs

  7. A countermeasure for external stress corrosion cracking in piping components by means of residual stress improvement on the outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Umemoto, Tadahiro

    1988-01-01

    Many techniques have been proposed as countermeasures for the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) on austenitic stainless steel piping caused by sea salt particles. However, not one seems perfect. The method proposed here is an expansion of IHSI (Induction Heating Stress Improvement) which has been successfully implemented in many nuclear power plants as a remedy for Intergranular Stress Corrossion Cracking. The proposed method named EIHSI (External IHSI) can make the residual stress compressive on the outer surface of the piping components. In order to confirm the effectiveness of EIHSI, one series of tests were conducted on a weld joint between the pipe flange and the straight pipe. The measured residual stresses and also the results of the cracking test revealed that EIHSI is a superior method to suppress the ESCC. The outline of EIHSI and the verification tests are presented in this paper. (author)

  8. Sizing of near-surface fatigue cracks in cladded pressure vessels by the multiple beam-satellite pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    The stainless steel cladding of the inside surface of a reactor pressure vessel makes ultrasonic inspection for detection and sizing of cracks immediately under the cladding significantly harder. One solution to the inspection difficulty has been found in the multiple beam-satellite pulse technique. (While this technique both detects and sizes, only sizing is addressed in this paper.) The technique employs a multiple-beam transducer, which produces both longitudinal and shear waves. Novel waveform-processing and pattern-recognition methods are used in conjunction with this transducer design. The longitudinal-wave component is diffracted mainly by the upper extremity of the crack at or near the clad-base material interface, and its shear-wave components are diffracted mainly by the lower extremity of the crack in the base material. Proof-of-principle sizing results, based on the observance of a pair of satellite pulses from the diffracted beams, were obtained for three sets of planar flaws. They were (1) six side-milled underclad notches ranging in throughwall dimension from 3.1 to 12.9 mm, (2) fatigue cracks implanted in three cladded pressure vessel blocks and ranging in depth from 3.7 to 27.9 mm, and (3) six underclad fatigue cracks in the 2.7 to 8.5 mm depth range

  9. Laser Ultrasonic System for Surface Crack Visualization in Dissimilar Welds of Control Rod Drive Mechanism Assembly of Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shil Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a J-groove dissimilar weld crack visualization system based on ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI technology. A full-scale control rod drive mechanism (CRDM assembly specimen was fabricated to verify the proposed system. An ultrasonic sensor was contacted at one point of the inner surface of the reactor vessel head part of the CRDM assembly. Q-switched laser beams were scanned to generate ultrasonic waves around the weld bead. The localization and sizing of the crack were possible by ultrasonic wave propagation imaging. Furthermore, ultrasonic spectral imaging unveiled frequency components of damage-induced waves, while wavelet-transformed ultrasonic propagation imaging enhanced damage visibility by generating a wave propagation video focused on the frequency component of the damage-induced waves. Dual-directional anomalous wave propagation imaging with adjacent wave subtraction was also developed to enhance the crack visibility regardless of crack orientation and wave propagation direction. In conclusion, the full-scale specimen test demonstrated that the multiple damage visualization tools are very effective in the visualization of J-groove dissimilar weld cracks.

  10. Surface Crack Detection in Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipes Using BOTDA Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural deterioration after a period of service can induce the failure of prestressed concrete cylinder pipes (PCCPs, with microcracks in the coating leading to the corrosion of the prestressed wires. In this paper, we propose the use of Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA strain sensors for detecting the onset of microcracking in PCCP coating: the BOTDA strain sensors are mounted on the surface of the PCCP, and distributed strain measurements are employed to assess the cracks in the mortar coating and the structural state of the pipe. To validate the feasibility of the proposed approach, experimental investigations were conducted on a prototype PCCP segment, wherein the inner pressure was gradually increased to 1.6 MPa. Two types of BOTDA strain sensors—the steel wire packaged fiber optic sensor and the polyelastic packaged fiber optic sensor—were employed in the experiments. The experimental distributed measurements agreed well with the finite element computations, evidencing that the investigated strain sensors are sensitive to localized deterioration behaviors such as PCCP microcracking.

  11. Chiral symmetry breaking and surface faceting in chromonic liquid crystal droplets with giant elastic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Joonwoo; Davidson, Zoey S; Collings, Peter J; Lubensky, Tom C; Yodh, A G

    2014-02-04

    Confined liquid crystals (LC) provide a unique platform for technological applications and for the study of LC properties, such as bulk elasticity, surface anchoring, and topological defects. In this work, lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) are confined in spherical droplets, and their director configurations are investigated as a function of mesogen concentration using bright-field and polarized optical microscopy. Because of the unusually small twist elastic modulus of the nematic phase of LCLCs, droplets of this phase exhibit a twisted bipolar configuration with remarkably large chiral symmetry breaking. Further, the hexagonal ordering of columns and the resultant strong suppression of twist and splay but not bend deformation in the columnar phase, cause droplets of this phase to adopt a concentric director configuration around a central bend disclination line and, at sufficiently high mesogen concentration, to exhibit surface faceting. Observations of director configurations are consistent with Jones matrix calculations and are understood theoretically to be a result of the giant elastic anisotropy of LCLCs.

  12. Influence of Initial Inclined Surface Crack on Estimated Residual Fatigue Lifetime of Railway Axle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Pokorný, Pavel; Ševčík, Martin; Hutař, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2016), č. článku 1640007. ISSN 1756-9737. [FDM 2016 - International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics /15./. Alicante, 14.09.2016-16.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : inclined crack * railway axle * residual fatigue lifetime * fatigue crack propagation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  13. The effect of a curvature-dependent surface tension on the singularities at the tips of a straight interface crack

    KAUST Repository

    Zemlyanova, A. Y.

    2013-03-08

    A problem of an interface crack between two semi-planes made out of different materials under an action of an in-plane loading of general tensile-shear type is treated in a semi-analytical manner with the help of Dirichlet-to-Neumann mappings. The boundaries of the crack and the interface between semi-planes are subjected to a curvature-dependent surface tension. The resulting system of six singular integro-differential equations is reduced to the system of three Fredholm equations. It is shown that the introduction of the curvature-dependent surface tension eliminates both classical integrable power singularity of the order 1/2 and an oscillating singularity present in a classical linear elasticity solutions. The numerical results are obtained by solving the original system of singular integro-differential equations by approximating unknown functions with Taylor polynomials. © 2013 The Author.

  14. SIMULATION OF TEMPERATURE AND TRANSPORT LOAD IMPACT ON FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF CRACKS ON ASPHALT-CONCRETE ROAD SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Melnikova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of statistical data has shown that about 60 % of all types of road surface destructions and damages in the Republic of Belarus are attributed to cracks (separate, frequent and cracks network. The process of cracks formation in the asphalt concrete pavement is rather complicated and it is affected by a number of factors. The most important and determining factors are character and value of traffic loads, temperature action, road pavement structure, properties of materials used for its layers. Some regularities of the cracks formation and development in the asphalt-concrete layers of the pavement have been established on the basis of the physical and mathematical modeling. Application of a finite  element  method for  calculations  has made it possible to determine  numerical values of compressive and tensile stresses arising due to temperature action and traffic load, deflection of road pavement constructive layers. The paper contains recommendations for a road pavement design and repair of asphalt-concrete pavements which have been made on the basis of the obtained data analysis.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF CRACKING ON THE SURFACE POTENTIAL OF ICY GRAINS IN SATURN’S E-RING: LABORATORY STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Caixia; Bahr, David A.; Dukes, Catherine A.; Baragiola, Raúl A., E-mail: cb8nw@virginia.edu [Laboratory for Astrophysics and Surface Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-07-10

    Within Saturn's E-ring, dust grains are coated by water vapor co-released with ice grains from the geyser-like eruptions of Enceladus. These ice-coated grains have intrinsic surface potential and interact synergistically with the ions and electrons of Saturn's magnetospheric plasmas. We perform laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of water-ice growth on the surface potential, using amorphous solid water (ASW) films. We estimate the growth of the surface potential to be ∼ 2.5 mV (Earth) yr{sup 1} and 112 mV yr{sup 1} for E-ring grains at ∼4.5 R {sub s} and 3.95 R {sub s} outside Enceladus’s plume, respectively. In addition, our measurements show that the linear relationship between the surface potential and the film thickness, as described in previous studies, has an upper limit, where the film spontaneously cracks above a porosity-dependent critical thickness. Heating of the cracked films with (and without) deposited charge shows that significant positive (and negative) surface potentials are retained at temperatures above 110 K, contrary to the minimal values (roughly zero) for thin, transparent ASW films. The significant surface potentials observed on micron-scale cracked ice films after thermal cycling, (5–20) V, are consistent with Cassini measurements, which indicate a negative charge of up to 5 V for E-ring dust particles at ∼5 R {sub s}. Therefore, the native grain surface potential resulting from water-vapor coating must be included in modeling studies of interactions between E-ring icy surfaces and Saturn's magnetospheric plasma.

  16. Influence of substrate microstructure and surface finish on cracking and delamination response of TiN-coated cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jing; Odén, Magnus; Johansson-Joesaar, Mats P.; Llanes, L.

    2016-01-01

    The cracking and delamination of TiN-coated hardmetals (WC-Co cemented carbides) when subjected to Brale indentation were studied. Experimental variables were substrate microstructure related to low (6 wt% Co) and medium (13 wt% Co) binder content, and surface finishes associated with grinding and polishing stages before film deposition. Brale indentation tests were conducted on both coated and uncoated hardmetals. Emphasis has been placed on assessing substrate microstructure and subsurface ...

  17. Surface studies of iridium-alloy grain boundaries associated with weld cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosley, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium-alloy-clad vent sets in the region where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. Grain-boundary structures and compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray energy spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis and scanning Auger microprobe analysis to determine the cause of weld quench area cracking. Results suggest that weld quench area cracking may be caused by gas porosity or liquation in the grain boundaries

  18. A multi\\0x2010scale approach for near\\0x2010surface pavement cracking and failure mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    Nearsurface cracking is one of the predominant distress types in flexible pavements. The occurrence of : nearsurface cracking, also sometimes referred to as topdown cracking, has increased in recent years : with the increased construction of...

  19. Study on the change of aspect ratios of small surface cracks emanated from a toe of corner boxing; Mawashi yosetsudome tanbu kara hassei denpasuru bishi bisho hyomen kiretsu no aspect hi henka ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyosada, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Takeda, K.; Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The fatigue test of specimens with a stiffener was carried out to examine the change in aspect ratio (crack depth/length) of fatigue cracks in a stress concentration field and residual stress field. The aspect ratio of surface cracks just after generation can be represented with the single virtual surface crack with the same value as K value at the deepest point considering an interference effect from near cracks. No discontinuous change in K value is found at the deepest point even during growth and combination of cracks on a surface. The change in K value at the deepest point is thus the criterion to represent growth and combination of surface cracks considering the interference effect. The change in aspect ratio of the typical single virtual surface crack linearly decreases with an increase in crack depth. The shape of surface cracks generating and growing in a residual stress field is more flat than that in no residual stress field. In addition, in a residual stress field, surface cracks are longer at the same crack depth, and fatigue lives are shorter. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  20. The effects of compressive stress and contamination liquids on the ultrasonic detection of fatigue cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooldridge, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of compressive stress on the reflection and transmission of ultrasound has been investigated for fatigue cracks. An examination has been made of the shear wave corner echoes from surface breaking fatigue cracks which were grown at constant stress intensity factor to control the roughness of the faces. In this way a correlation has been established between the roughness of the surfaces and the ultrasonic response at both zero load and under stress. The effect of liquids in the cracks has also been studied and the results compared with theoretical predictions for a thin sided parallel gap. (author)

  1. Surface and bulk investigation of ZSM5 and Al-MCM-41 usingsynchrotron XPS, XANES, and hexane cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, P.A.; Kariapper, M.S.; Faiz, Z.; Tabet, N.; Hamdan, N.M.; Diaz, J.; Hussain, Z.

    2005-05-12

    We present a comparative study of ZSM5 and Al-MCM-41 catalysts using spectroscopic and chemical techniques. The analysis of conventional and synchrotron XPS spectra of these catalysts reveals the presence of a topmost surface-related Si peak in addition to the bulk peak. XANES results suggest structural modification upon heating Al-MCM-41 at 500 C. Depth-resolved XPS data show Al depletion from the surface of Al-MCM-41 in contrast to surface enrichment of Al in ZSM5. These surface modifications could be one of the reasons for the weak acidity of Al-MCM-41 in chemical reactions such as hexane cracking at different temperatures.

  2. Surface and bulk investigation of ZSM5 and Al-MCM-41 usingsynchrotron XPS, XANES, and hexane cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, P.A.; Kariapper, M.S.; Faiz, Z.; Tabet, N.; Hamdan, N.M.; Diaz, J.; Hussain, Z.

    2005-05-12

    We present a comparative study of ZSM5 and Al-MCM-41 catalysts using spectroscopic and chemical techniques. The analysis of conventional and synchrotron XPS spectra of these catalysts reveals the presence of a topmost surface-related Si peak in addition to the bulkpeak. XANES results suggest structural modification upon heating Al-MCM-41 at 500 C. Depth-resolved XPS data show Al depletion from the surface of Al-MCM-41 in contrast to surface enrichment of Al in ZSM5. These surface modifications could be one of the reasons for the weak acidity of Al-MCM-41 in chemical reactions such as hexane cracking at different temperatures.

  3. Development of a novel non-contact inspection technique to detect micro cracks under the surface of a glass substrate by thermal stress-induced light scattering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Yoshitaro; Terasaki, Nao; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as a chemical mechanical polishing treatment, are important techniques in glass substrate manufacturing. However, these techniques may cause micro cracks under the surface of glass substrates because they used mechanical friction. A stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM), which was combined with light scattering method and mechanical stress effects, was proposed for inspecting surfaces to detect polishing-induced micro cracks. However, in the conventional SILSM, samples need to be loaded with physical contact, and the loading point is invisible in transparent materials. Here, we introduced a novel non-contact SILSM using a heating device. A glass substrate was heated first, and then the light scattering intensity of micro cracks was detected by a cooled charge-couple device camera during the natural cooling process. Results clearly showed during the decreasing surface temperature of a glass substrate, appropriate thermal stress is generated for detecting micro cracks by using the SILSM and light scattering intensity from micro cracks changes. We confirmed that non-contact thermal SILSM (T-SILSM) can detect micro cracks under the surface of transparent materials.

  4. Surface profile evolution and fatigue crack initiation in Sanicro 25 steel at room temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, Jaroslav; Petráš, Roman; Chai, G.; Škorík, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 658, MAR (2016), s. 221-228 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Sanicro 25 steel * Fatigue crack initiation * Persistent slip markings * Extrusions * Intrusions Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016

  5. Hot Rolling Scrap Reduction through Edge Cracking and Surface Defects Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudoin, Armand [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-05-29

    The design of future aircraft must address the combined demands for fuel efficiency, reduced emissions and lower operating costs. One contribution to these goals is weight savings through the development of new alloys and design techniques for airframe structures. This research contributes to the light-weighting through fabrication of monolithic components from advanced aluminum alloys by making a link between alloy processing history and in-service performance. Specifically, this research demonstrates the link between growing cracks with features of the alloy microstructure that follow from thermo-mechanical processing. This is achieved through a computer model of crack deviation. The model is validated against experimental data from production scale aluminum alloy plate, and demonstration of the effect of changes in processing history on crack growth is made. The model is cast in the open-source finite element code WARP3D, which is freely downloadable and well documented. This project provides benefit along several avenues. First, the technical contribution of the computer model offers the materials engineer a critical means of providing guidance both upstream, to process tuning to achieve optimal properties, and downstream, to enhance fault tolerance. Beyond the fuel savings and emissions reduction inherent in the light-weighting of aircraft structures, improved fault tolerance addresses demands for longer inspection intervals over baseline, and a lower life cycle cost.

  6. Round Robin Analyses on Stress Intensity Factors of Inner Surface Cracks in Welded Stainless Steel Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Gi Han

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels (ASSs are widely used for nuclear pipes as they exhibit a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, high tensile residual stresses may occur in ASS welds because postweld heat treatment is not generally conducted in order to avoid sensitization, which causes a stress corrosion crack. In this study, round robin analyses on stress intensity factors (SIFs were carried out to examine the appropriateness of structural integrity assessment methods for ASS pipe welds with two types of circumferential cracks. Typical stress profiles were generated from finite element analyses by considering residual stresses and normal operating conditions. Then, SIFs of cracked ASS pipes were determined by analytical equations represented in fitness-for-service assessment codes as well as reference finite element analyses. The discrepancies of estimated SIFs among round robin participants were confirmed due to different assessment procedures and relevant considerations, as well as the mistakes of participants. The effects of uncertainty factors on SIFs were deducted from sensitivity analyses and, based on the similarity and conservatism compared with detailed finite element analysis results, the R6 code, taking into account the applied internal pressure and combination of stress components, was recommended as the optimum procedure for SIF estimation.

  7. Methods to introduce sub-micrometer, symmetry-breaking surface corrugation to silicon substrates to increase light trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eon; Hoard, Brittany R.; Han, Sang M.; Ghosh, Swapnadip

    2018-04-10

    Provided is a method for fabricating a nanopatterned surface. The method includes forming a mask on a substrate, patterning the substrate to include a plurality of symmetry-breaking surface corrugations, and removing the mask. The mask includes a pattern defined by mask material portions that cover first surface portions of the substrate and a plurality of mask space portions that expose second surface portions of the substrate, wherein the plurality of mask space portions are arranged in a lattice arrangement having a row and column, and the row is not oriented parallel to a [110] direction of the substrate. The patterning the substrate includes anisotropically removing portions of the substrate exposed by the plurality of spaces.

  8. 3D characterisation of RCF crack networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlström Johan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rolling contact fatigue (RCF damage is becoming more frequent with increased traffic and loading conditions in the railway industry. Defects which are characterized by a two-lobe darkened surface and a V-shaped surface-breaking crack are often so-called squats. The origination and propagation of squats in railway rails is the topic of many recent studies; the associated crack networks develop with complicated geometry near the surface of rails that is difficult to characterise using most non-destructive methods. The cracks can be examined with repeated metallographic sectioning, but the process is time-consuming and destructive. In order to reduce time, as well as information and material loss, high-resolution and high-energy X-ray imaging of railway rails was done in the current study. Combining the exposures from a range of angles using image analysis, a 3D representation of the complex crack network is achieved. The latter was complemented with metallographic sectioning to determine the accuracy of prediction of the geometrical reconstruction.

  9. Allowing for surface preparation in stress corrosion cracking modelling; Prise en compte de l`etat de surface dans la modelisation de la fissuration par corrosion sous contrainte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P.; Buisine, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France); Gelpi, A. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France)

    1997-12-31

    When a 600 alloy component is significantly deformed during installation, by welding, rolling, bending, its stress corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactor`s primary coolant, is significantly changed by the initial surface treatment. Therefore, the crack initiated time may be reduced by several orders of magnitude for certain surfaces preparations. Allowing for cold working of the surface, for which modelling is proposed, depends less on the degree of cold work then on the depths of the hardened layers. Honing hardens the metal over depths of about one micron for vessel head penetrations, for example, and has little influence on subsequent behaviour after the part deforms. On the other hand, coarser turning treatment produces cold worked layers which can reach several tens of microns and can very significantly reduce the initiation time compared to fine honing. So evaluation after depths of hardening is vital on test pieces for interpreting laboratory results as well as on service components for estimating their service life. Suppression by mechanical or chemical treatment of these layers, after deformation, seems to be the most appropriate solution for reducing over-stressing connected with surface treatment carried out before deformation. (author). 14 refs.

  10. Environmental Degradation of Materials: Surface Chemistry Related to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Parallel experiments have been performed in order to develop a comprehensive model for stress cracking (SCC) in structural materials. The central objective is to determine the relationship between the activity and selectivity of the microstructure of structural materials to their dissolution kinetics and experimentally measured SCC kinetics. Zinc was chosen as a prototype metal system. The SCC behavior of two oriented single-crystal disks of zinc in a chromic oxide/sodium sulfate solution (Palmerton solution) were determined. It was found that: (1) the dissolution rate is strongly (hkil)-dependent and proportional to the exposure time in the aggressive environment; and (2) a specific slip system is selectively active to dissolution under applied stress and this slip line controls crack initiation and propagation. As a precursor to potential microgrvity experiments, electrophoretic mobility measurements of zinc particles were obtained in solutions of sodium sulfate (0.0033 M) with concentrations of dissolved oxygen from 2 to 8 ppm. The equilibrium distribution of exposed oriented planes as well as their correlation will determine the particle mobility.

  11. Laser-induced surface wave testing: a new method for measuring the depth of cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, T.; Ochiai, M.; Kuroda, H.; Kanemoto, S.; Soramoto, S.

    2001-01-01

    A new inspection method for nuclear reactor internal components is proposed for which laser ultrasonic testing is employed, laser beams being used for both generation and detection of ultrasonic waves. It is difficult to detect cracks on reactor internals' welded bead due to complex geometry and curvature. Use of the features of the ultrasonic technique - that is, non-contacting inspection and high resolution - enables reactor internals to be inspected. To confirm the performance, feasibility tests using artificial slits on the welded bead were performed. Reflected echoes from the silts having the depth of from 1 mm to 5 mm were detected and visualized by 2-dimensional contour plots. Moreover, to estimate the depth of artificial slits, frequency analysis that uses response function to transmitted waves is performed. The results show that the performance of estimating depth is from 0.2 mm to 1.5 mm. (authors)

  12. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF PAVEMENT CRACK DETECTION USING KERNEL-BASED TECHNIQUES IN ASPHALT ROAD SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Miraliakbari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demand for the digital survey and acquisition of road pavement conditions, there is also the parallel growing need for the development of automated techniques for the analysis and evaluation of the actual road conditions. This is due in part to the resulting large volumes of road pavement data captured through digital surveys, and also to the requirements for rapid data processing and evaluations. In this study, the Canon 5D Mark II RGB camera with a resolution of 21 megapixels is used for the road pavement condition mapping. Even though many imaging and mapping sensors are available, the development of automated pavement distress detection, recognition and extraction systems for pavement condition is still a challenge. In order to detect and extract pavement cracks, a comparative evaluation of kernel-based segmentation methods comprising line filtering (LF, local binary pattern (LBP and high-pass filtering (HPF is carried out. While the LF and LBP methods are based on the principle of rotation-invariance for pattern matching, the HPF applies the same principle for filtering, but with a rotational invariant matrix. With respect to the processing speeds, HPF is fastest due to the fact that it is based on a single kernel, as compared to LF and LBP which are based on several kernels. Experiments with 20 sample images which contain linear, block and alligator cracks are carried out. On an average a completeness of distress extraction with values of 81.2%, 76.2% and 81.1% have been found for LF, HPF and LBP respectively.

  13. Effect of Surface Treatment on Enamel Cracks After Orthodontic Bracket Debonding: Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-Etching Versus Acid-Etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Hassanali; Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Baherimoghadam, Tahereh; Azmi, Amir; Rasooli, Reza

    2017-09-01

    This study sought to compare enamel cracks after orthodontic bracket debonding in the surfaces prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-galliumgarnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser and the conventional acid-etching technique. This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 60 sound human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (n=30). The teeth in group A were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, while the teeth in group B were subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation (gold handpiece, MZ8 tip, 50Hz, 4.5W, 60μs, 80% water and 60% air). Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the enamel surfaces and were then debonded in both groups. The samples were inspected under a stereomicroscope at ×38 magnification to assess the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. Independent-samples t-test was used to compare the frequency of enamel cracks in the two groups. Levene's test was applied to assess the equality of variances. No significant difference was noted in the frequency or length of enamel cracks between the two groups after debonding (P>0.05). Despite the same results of the frequency and length of enamel cracks in the two groups and by considering the side effects of acid-etching (demineralization and formation of white spot lesions), Er,Cr:YSGG laser may be used as an alternative to acid-etching for enamel surface preparation prior to bracket bonding.

  14. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  15. Fatigue and fatigue crack growth processes in hard tissues: The importance of age and surface integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, Hessam

    With the progressive increase in partially and fully dentate seniors, fracture has become an increasingly common form of restored tooth failure. Dentin undergoes progressive changes in microstructure with patient age, and studies are now suggesting that there is a reduction in fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of this tissue. This dissertation explores aging of dentin, the influence of flaws that are introduced during restorative processes on the fatigue properties of dentin, and proposes models for characterizing the damage initiation and growth process during fatigue of dentin. Results from this investigation show that the fatigue crack growth properties (Paris Law parameters (C, m) andDeltaKth) of human dentin undergo the most significant changes at a patient age of 42 years. Based on the fatigue crack growth responses, three age groups were established including young (age≤33), aged (34≤age ≤49) and old (50≤age) patients for further analysis. There were significant differences in the initiation and growth behavior between the tissues of patients from the three age groups. With regards to the influence of restorative processes, there was no influence on the quasi-static responses of dentin. However, the endurance limit of dentin treated with the dental burs (28 MPa) and abrasive air jet (35 MPa) were approximately 36% and 20% lower than that of the control (44 MPa), respectively. Both cutting processes caused a significant reduction (p≤0.0001) in fatigue strength. An accumulative damage model was developed to characterize fatigue of the control and bur treated dentin as well as provide a model for fatigue life prediction. The damage models were derived as a function of number of loading cycles (N), and ratio of applied stress to ultimate strength (r). The developed models provide estimations for the initial state of damage, the state of damage during the life, as well as the damage accumulation rate for cyclic loading of dentin

  16. Microstructure Evolution and Surface Cracking Behavior of Superheavy Forgings during Hot Forging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, superheavy forgings that are manufactured from 600 t grade ingots have been applied in the latest generation of nuclear power plants to provide good safety. However, component production is pushing the limits of the current free-forging industry. Large initial grain sizes and a low strain rate are the main factors that contribute to the deformation of superheavy forgings during forging. In this study, 18Mn18Cr0.6N steel with a coarse grain structure was selected as a model material. Hot compression and hot tension tests were conducted at a strain rate of 10−4·s−1. The essential nucleation mechanism of the dynamic recrystallization involved low-angle grain boundary formation and subgrain rotation, which was independent of the original high-angle grain boundary bulging and the presence of twins. Twins were formed during the growth of dynamic recrystallization grains. The grain refinement was not obvious at 1150°C. A lowering of the deformation temperature to 1050°C resulted in a fine grain structure; however, the stress increased significantly. Crack-propagation paths included high-angle grain boundaries, twin boundaries, and the insides of grains, in that order. For superheavy forging, the ingot should have a larger height and a smaller diameter.

  17. Real-Time Observation of Surface Bond Breaking with an X-ray Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surface Molecules Not Quite Desorbing The dynamics of molecules desorbing from or adsorbing on surfaces requires that molecules rapidly gain or lose a large amount or translational and rotational energy to enter or leave the gas phase. An intermediate precursor state has long been invoked in which...... molecules interact weakly with the surface but translate along it and exchange energy without forming localized surface bonds. Dell'Angela et al. (p. 1302) found evidence for such a state in changes in x-ray absorption and emission spectra of CO molecules adsorbed on a ruthenium surface after optical...... excitation rapidly heated the surface. The use of a free electron laser provided high time resolution for x-ray spectroscopy studies. Density function theory and modeling of high temperature states revealed a state that forms from molecules that have not overcome the desorption barrier during heating...

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary water. Component surface control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucault, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the PWR plant primary circuit, FRAMATOME-ANP uses several nickel-base alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role played by the surface state of the components in their life duration. In this paper, we present two examples of problems encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of a process for the surface control of the repair components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in terms of analysis methods to improve the surface knowledge and the control of the manufactured components. (author)

  19. Simulating the Effect of Modulated Tool-Path Chip Breaking On Surface Texture and Chip Length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.S.; McFarland, J.T.; Tursky, D. A.; Assaid, T. S.; Barkman, W. E.; Babelay, Jr., E. F.

    2010-04-30

    One method for creating broken chips in turning processes involves oscillating the cutting tool in the feed direction utilizing the CNC machine axes. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte and the Y-12 National Security Complex have developed and are refining a method to reliably control surface finish and chip length based on a particular machine's dynamic performance. Using computer simulations it is possible to combine the motion of the machine axes with the geometry of the cutting tool to predict the surface characteristics and map the surface texture for a wide range of oscillation parameters. These data allow the selection of oscillation parameters to simultaneously ensure broken chips and acceptable surface characteristics. This paper describes the machine dynamic testing and characterization activities as well as the computational method used for evaluating and predicting chip length and surface texture.

  20. BWR crack control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immel, R.

    1981-01-01

    Cooperative research by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Owners Group (BWROG) may be finding a solution to the problem of stress corrosion cracking in reactor piping, which had caused 254 cracks in BWRs around the world by 1981. Welded joints of type-304 stainless steel in BWR recirculation systems are particularly vulnerable to microscopic stress corrosion cracking, which differs from fatigue cracking because it occurs when electrochemical processes break down the protective film in the zones affected by welding heat. The cracking is not hazardous to the public because it takes place within the containment building and causes leaks that are quickly detected. About one percent of welds crack, causing downtime and personnel exposure. The EPRI-BWROG project used a model of stress, water condition, and steel sensitization to find out the causes, develop remedies, and get the remedies into the field. Among the remedies are the adaptive learning network, an automated, microprocessor-controlled ultrasonic testing system that is scheduled for field testing and utility application in 1982. 2 figures

  1. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people realize that cracking knuckles produces a funny noise and may repeat cracking just to produce the ... main areas of exercise are aerobic exercise and resistance News Categories Ankylosing Spondylitis News Fibromyalgia News Gout ...

  2. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of dissolved metallurgical sulfides in pressure vessel and piping steels has been linked to Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC), a phenomenon observed in laboratory tests that results in fatigue crack growth rates as high as 100 times that in air. Previous experimental and analytical work based on diffusion as the mass transport process has shown that surface cracks that are initially clean of sulfides will not initiate EAC in most applications. This is because the average crack tip velocity would not be sufficiently high to expose enough metallurgical sulfides per unit time and produce the sulfide concentration required for EAC. However, there is a potential concern for the case of a relatively large embedded crack breaking through to the wetted surface. Such a crack would not be initially clean of sulfides, and EAC could initiate. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on two heats of an EAC susceptible, high-sulfur, low-alloy steel in 243 degrees C low-oxygen water to further study the phenomenon of EAC persistence at low crack tip velocities. A load cycle profile that incorporated a significant load dwell period at minimum load was used. In one experiment, the fatigue cycling history was such that relatively high crack tip velocities at the start of the experiment produced a persistent case of EAC even when crack tip velocities were later reduced to levels below the EAC initiation velocity. The other series of experiments used initial crack tip velocities that were much lower and probably more realistic. Air precracking of the compact tension specimens produced an initial inventory of undissolved sulfides on the crack flanks that directly simulates the array of sulfides expected from the breakthrough of an embedded crack. In all cases, results showed EAC ceased after several hundred hours of cycling

  3. Crack arrestability of ship hull steel plate in accidental conditions: Application of high arrestability endowed ultra fine-grain surface layer steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Yukito [Oita R and D Lab. (Japan); Oshita, Shigeru [Nippon Steel Corp., Oita (Japan). Oita Works; Inoue, Takehiro [Nippon Steel Corp., Futsu, Chiba (Japan). Steel Research Labs.; Hashimoto, Kunifumi; Kuroiwa, Takashi; Tada, Masuo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Japan); Yajima, Hiroshi [Univ. of Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    A new type steel plate with ultra fine-grained surface layers (SUF steel) has been developed to improve crack arrestability. The application of this new type steel makes it possible to prevent catastrophic brittle fracture accidents of ship hull structures in emergency conditions, such as in serious collisions or groundings. It will reduce further the risk of casualties and environmental pollutions, caused by accidents of large crude oil carriers (VLCCs). The authors have investigated the validity for the application of the new type steel with ultra-high crack arrestability. Both computer simulations for collision of two VLCCs and large-scale fracture testings for crack arrestability have been carried out to study the accidental cases. The simulation results suggest that a collision generates a significant amount of plastic strain damage for the hull plate around a struck part. For example, the sheer strake plate near the struck part suffers 5 to 10% of plastic strain, before an inner-hull ruptures. Therefore, the effect of plastic strain (10% level) on crack arrestability of steel plates (the SUF plate and a conventional TMCP plate) was examined by standard ESSO tests, ultra wide-plate duplex ESSO tests, and sheer strake model tests. The test results are as follows: (1) Plastic strain deteriorates crack arrestability of steel plates. (2) Sufficient crack arrestability at 0 deg. C cannot be expected in the conventional TMCP steel plate plastically strained by about 10%. (3) The SUF plate maintains high crack arrestability even after introducing 10% plastic strain, at design temperature of 0 deg. C.

  4. Evaluation of stainless steel pipe cracking: causes and fixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.; Rybicki, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses (1) studies of impurity effects on susceptibility to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), (2) intergranular crack growth rate measurements, (3) finite-element studies of the residual stresses produced by induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) and the addition of weld overlays to flawed piping, (4) leak-before-break analyses of piping with 360 deg part-through cracks, and (5) parametric studies on the effect of through-wall residual stresses on intergranular crack growth behavior in large diameter piping weldments. The studies on the effect of impurities on IGSCC of Type 304 stainless steel show a strong synergistic interaction between dissolved oxygen and impurity concentration of the water. Low carbon stainless steels (Type 316NG) appear resistant to IGSCC even in impurity environments. However, they can become susceptible to transgranular SCC with low levels of sulfate or chloride present in the environment. The finite-element calculations show that IHSI and the weld overlay produce compressive residual stresses on the inner surface, and that the stresses at the crack tip remain compressive under design loads at least for shallow cracks. (author)

  5. Standard Test Method for Hydrophobic Surface Films by the Water-Break Test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the detection of the presence of hydrophobic (nonwetting) films on surfaces and the presence of hydrophobic organic materials in processing ambients. When properly conducted, the test will enable detection of molecular layers of hydrophobic organic contaminants. On very rough or porous surfaces, the sensitivity of the test may be significantly decreased. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The inch-pound values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. The effect of crack propagation mechanism on the fractal dimension of fracture surfaces in steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Strnadel, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2008), s. 726-738 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0646; GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : low-alloyed steel * fracture surface * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2008

  7. The surface energy, thermal vibrations of dislocation lines and the critical crack extension force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Chien.

    1979-09-01

    The connections between atomic structure and mechanical properties of metals are interested by many physicist and mechanists recently. The authors of this paper try to connect the fracture of materials with the surface energy and dislocation properties, which may be treated with lattice dynamics and electron theory of solids. It shows that to combine the knowledge of solid state physics and fracture mechanics is quite important. (author)

  8. GIS-based automated management of highway surface crack inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hung-Chi; Shinozuka, Masanobu; Soeller, Tony; Girardello, Roberto

    2004-07-01

    An automated in-situ road surface distress surveying and management system, AMPIS, has been developed on the basis of video images within the framework of GIS software. Video image processing techniques are introduced to acquire, process and analyze the road surface images obtained from a moving vehicle. ArcGIS platform is used to integrate the routines of image processing and spatial analysis in handling the full-scale metropolitan highway surface distress detection and data fusion/management. This makes it possible to present user-friendly interfaces in GIS and to provide efficient visualizations of surveyed results not only for the use of transportation engineers to manage road surveying documentations, data acquisition, analysis and management, but also for financial officials to plan maintenance and repair programs and further evaluate the socio-economic impacts of highway degradation and deterioration. A review performed in this study on fundamental principle of Pavement Management System (PMS) and its implementation indicates that the proposed approach of using GIS concept and its tools for PMS application will reshape PMS into a new information technology-based system that can provide convenient and efficient pavement inspection and management.

  9. CONDITIONS FOR STABLE CHIP BREAKING AND PROVISION OF MACHINED SURFACE QUALITY WHILE TURNING WITH ASYMMETRIC TOOL VIBRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Sheleh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a process of turning structural steel with asymmetric tool vibrations directed along feeding. Asymmetric vibrations characterized by asymmetry coefficient of vibration cycle, their frequency and amplitude are additionally transferred to the tool in the turning process with the purpose to crush chips. Conditions of stable chip breaking and obtaining optimum dimensions of chip elements have been determined in the paper. In order to reduce a negative impact of the vibration amplitude on a cutting process and quality of the machined surfaces machining must be carried out with its minimum value. In this case certain ratio of the tool vibration frequency to the work-piece rotation speed has been ensured in the paper. A formula has been obtained for calculation of this ratio with due account of the expected length of chip elements and coefficient of vibration cycle asymmetry.Influence of the asymmetric coefficient of the tool vibration cycle on roughness of the machined surfaces and cutting tool wear has been determined in the paper. According to the results pertaining to machining of work-pieces made of 45 and ШХ15 steel the paper presents mathematical relationships of machined surface roughness with cutting modes and asymmetry coefficient of tool vibration cycle. Tool feeding being one of the cutting modes exerts the most significant impact on the roughness value and increase of the tool feeding entails increase in roughness. Reduction in coefficient of vibration cycle asymmetry contributes to surface roughness reduction. However, the cutting tool wear occurs more intensive. Coefficient of the vibration cycle asymmetry must be increased in order to reduce wear rate. Therefore, the choice of the coefficient of the vibration cycle asymmetry is based on the parameters of surface roughness which must be obtained after machining and intensity of tool wear rate.The paper considers a process of turning structural steel with asymmetric

  10. Analysis of homogeneity of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel surface by laser induced break down spectroscopy (LIBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detalle, V.; Lacour, J.L.; Mauchien, P.; Wagner, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, plutonium is recycled to produce MOX fuel for use in PWR reactors. Surface inspections of mixed PuO 2 /UO 2 pellets is very important in the process. The performance of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) or Laser Ablation Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-OES) was therefore assessed for surface analysis of simulated MOX pellets containing a mixture of UO 2 and CeO 2 , and compared with results obtained with the standard Castaing microprobe analyzer technique. In LIBS, a material is ablated by focussing a laser beam, and the emission from neutral and ionized atoms can be used to determine the composition. An original experimental set up was developed to obtain a LIBS microprobe system for microanalysis of the sample surface. The instrument has three main components : a laser (quadrupled Nd YAG), an ablation head (using a microscope lens) and a detection unit (spectrometer combined with an ICCD Intensified Charge Coupled Device camera). The LIBS technique has well-known advantages particularly for nuclear applications: (1) it requires no sample preparation ; (2) only a small amount of material (craters 7 or 3 μm wide and 1 to 3 μm deep) is needed for the analysis; (3) analysis can be performed remotely via optical fiber, allowing measurements in a hostile environment and at atmospheric pressure. The experimental set-up developed demonstrated that the LIBS microprobe system can be used for surface analysis of UO 2 /CeO 2 pellets. Figure 1 shows the calibration curve obtained, with the Ce/U ratio versus Ce/U concentration. Good linearity was found and a relative standard deviation of 5 % was determined for 100 single shots. A qualitative comparison of the LIBS microanalysis set up and the Castaing microprobe analyzer is shown in Figure 2, which reveals the same features. Thus, both analytical techniques can identify the surface non-homogeneity of the pellet. While LIBS is destructive, it requires no sample preparation, is faster (2

  11. Effect of Surface Treatment on Enamel Cracks after Orthodontic Bracket Debonding: Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-Etching versus Acid-Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanali Ghaffari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to compare enamel cracks after orthodontic bracket debonding in the surfaces prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG laser and the conventional acid-etching technique.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 60 sound human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (n=30. The teeth in group A were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, while the teeth in group B were subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation (gold handpiece, MZ8 tip, 50Hz, 4.5W, 60µs, 80% water and 60% air. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the enamel surfaces and were then debonded in both groups. The samples were inspected under a stereomicroscope at ×38 magnification to assess the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. Independent-samples t-test was used to compare the frequency of enamel cracks in the two groups. Levene’s test was applied to assess the equality of variances.Results: No significant difference was noted in the frequency or length of enamel cracks between the two groups after debonding (P>0.05.Conclusions: Despite the same results of the frequency and length of enamel cracks in the two groups and by considering the side effects of acid-etching (demineralization and formation of white spot lesions, Er,Cr:YSGG laser may be used as an alternative to acid-etching for enamel surface preparation prior to bracket bonding.  

  12. Structure Crack Identification Based on Surface-mounted Active Sensor Network with Time-Domain Feature Extraction and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling DU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the condition of metallic structures are classified based on the acquired sensor data from a surface-mounted piezoelectric sensor/actuator network. The structures are aluminum plates with riveted holes and possible crack damage at these holes. A 400 kHz sine wave burst is used as diagnostic signals. The combination of time-domain S0 waves from received sensor signals is directly used as features and preprocessing is not needed for the dam age detection. Since the time sequence of the extracted S0 has a high dimension, principal component estimation is applied to reduce its dimension before entering NN (neural network training for classification. An LVQ (learning vector quantization NN is used to classify the conditions as healthy or damaged. A number of FEM (finite element modeling results are taken as inputs to the NN for training, since the simulated S0 waves agree well with the experimental results on real plates. The performance of the classification is then validated by using these testing results.

  13. Investigation of the Effect of Material on Undamped Free Vibration of Cantilever Beams with Uniform Single Surface Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufazzal, Sameera; Muzakkir, S. M.; Zakir Jafri, Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Crack detection in structures is a critical area of research where the developments have been made out since decades. Various techniques are available for early identification and quantification of cracks to predict and prevent the unexpected sudden failure of structure and ensure uninterrupted service. Use of vibration analysis for detecting crack is one of the widely used techniques which offer lots of advantages over other like it is easier and less costly method and can be used for inaccessible components. The present work attempts to use modal analysis through FEA to investigate the effect of crack on natural frequency of vibration in beams of different materials, for three different crack location. From the result, it has been inferred that among Structural Steel (SS), Aluminium alloy (Al) and Gray Cast Iron (CI), the natural frequency is highest for Al beam and lowest for CI beam. Introduction of crack reduces the natural frequency of vibration, however, the effect of crack location on frequency is not uniform for different modes. Also, the trend is similar in beams of all the materials.

  14. Cracking up: symmetry breaking in cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch, Ewa; van der Gucht, Jasper; Sykes, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    The shape of animal cells is, to a large extent, determined by the cortical actin network that underlies the cell membrane. Because of the presence of myosin motors, the actin cortex is under tension, and local relaxation of this tension can result in cortical flows that lead to deformation and polarization of the cell. Cortex relaxation is often regulated by polarizing signals, but the cortex can also rupture and relax spontaneously. A similar tension-induced polarization is observed in actin gels growing around beads, and we propose that a common mechanism governs actin gel rupture in both systems. PMID:17145960

  15. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  16. Optimizing phonon scattering by tuning surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing to break the random-alloy limit of thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Li, Wu

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cross-plane thermal conductivity κ of superlattices (SLs) as interfaces change from perfectly abrupt to totally intermixed, by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the spectral heat current calculations. We highlight the role of surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing by calculating the κ of SLs with changing interface roughness, whose tuning allows for κ values much lower than the "alloy limit" and the abrupt interface limit in same cases. The interplay between alloy and interface scattering in different frequency ranges provides a physical basis to predict a minimum of thermal conductivity. More specifically, we also explore how the interface roughness affects the thermal conductivities for SL materials with a broad span of atomic mass and bond strength. In particular, we find that (i) only when the "spacer" thickness of SLs increases up to a critical value, κ of rough SLs can break the corresponding "alloy limit," since SLs with different "spacer" thickness have different characteristic length of phonon transport, which is influenced by surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing to different extend. (ii) Whether κ changes monotonically with interface roughness strongly depends on the period length and intrinsic behavior of phonon transport for SL materials. Especially, for the SL with large period length, there exists an optimal interface roughness that can minimize the thermal conductivity. (iii) Surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing is more effective in achieving a low κ below the alloy limit for SL materials with large mass mismatch than with small one. (iv) It is possible for SL materials with large lattice mismatch (i.e., bond strength) to design an ideally abrupt interface structure with κ much below the alloy limit. These results have clear implications for optimization of thermal transport for heat management and for the development of thermoelectric materials.

  17. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    OpenAIRE

    Niken Chatarina; Siswanto Yudi; Widodo; Tjahjono Elly

    2017-01-01

    The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and s...

  18. Effect of Surface Treatment on Enamel Cracks after Orthodontic Bracket Debonding: Er,Cr:YSGG Laser-Etching versus Acid-Etching

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanali Ghaffari; Amirhossein Mirhashemi; Tahereh Baherimoghadam; Amir Azmi; Reza Rasooli

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to compare enamel cracks after orthodontic bracket debonding in the surfaces prepared with erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser and the conventional acid-etching technique.Materials and Methods: This in-vitro experimental study was conducted on 60 sound human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (n=30). The teeth in group A were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel, while the ...

  19. Simulation of stress corrosion crack growth in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, K. I.; Park, J. H.; Joo, J. W.; Shin, E. S.; Kim, H. D.; Chung, H. S.

    2000-01-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth is simulated after assuming a small axial surface crack inside a S/G tube. Internal pressure and residual stresses are considered as applied forces. Stress intensity factors along crack front, variation of crack shape and crack growth rate are obtained and discussed. It is noticed that the aspect ratio of the crack is not depend on the initial crack shape but depend on the residual stress distribution

  20. Breaking Bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Isaac-Cesar; Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    The sight of a broken bat in Major League Baseball can produce anything from a humorous dribbler in the infield to a frightening pointed projectile headed for the stands. Bats usually break at the weakest point, typically in the handle. Breaking happens because the wood gets bent beyond the breaking point due to the wave sent down the bat created…

  1. An algorithm to locate optimal bond breaking points on a potential energy surface for applications in mechanochemistry and catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofill, Josep Maria; Ribas-Ariño, Jordi; García, Sergio Pablo; Quapp, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    The reaction path of a mechanically induced chemical transformation changes under stress. It is well established that the force-induced structural changes of minima and saddle points, i.e., the movement of the stationary points on the original or stress-free potential energy surface, can be described by a Newton Trajectory (NT). Given a reactive molecular system, a well-fitted pulling direction, and a sufficiently large value of the force, the minimum configuration of the reactant and the saddle point configuration of a transition state collapse at a point on the corresponding NT trajectory. This point is called barrier breakdown point or bond breaking point (BBP). The Hessian matrix at the BBP has a zero eigenvector which coincides with the gradient. It indicates which force (both in magnitude and direction) should be applied to the system to induce the reaction in a barrierless process. Within the manifold of BBPs, there exist optimal BBPs which indicate what is the optimal pulling direction and what is the minimal magnitude of the force to be applied for a given mechanochemical transformation. Since these special points are very important in the context of mechanochemistry and catalysis, it is crucial to develop efficient algorithms for their location. Here, we propose a Gauss-Newton algorithm that is based on the minimization of a positively defined function (the so-called σ -function). The behavior and efficiency of the new algorithm are shown for 2D test functions and for a real chemical example.

  2. Simulation of Chloride Diffusion in Cracked Concrete with Different Crack Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-induced corrosion of steel rebar is one of the primary durability problems for reinforced concrete structures in marine environment. Furthermore, if the surfaces of concrete structures have cracks, additional chloride can penetrate into concrete through cracked zone. For chloride ingression into cracked concrete, former researches mainly focus on influence of crack width on chloride diffusion coefficients. Other crack characteristics, such as chloride depth, crack shape (equal-width crack or tapered crack, crack density, and spacing, are not studied in detail. To fill this gap, this paper presents a numerical procedure to simulate chloride ingression into cracked concrete with different crack geometry characteristics. Cracked concrete is divided into two parts, sound zone and cracked zone. For stress-free concrete, the diffusion coefficient of sound zone is approximately assumed to be the same as sound concrete, and the diffusion coefficient of cracked zone is expressed as a piecewise function of crack width. Two-dimensional finite element method is used to determine chloride concentration. It is found that, with the increasing of crack width, crack depth, and crack amount, chloride ingression will aggravate. The analysis results generally agree with experimental results.

  3. Probabilistic analysis of crack containing structures with the PARIS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner-Foit, A.

    1987-10-01

    The basic features of the PARIS code which has been developed for the calculation of failure probabilities of crack containing structures are explained. An important issue in the reliability analysis of cracked components is the probabilistic leak-before-break behaviour. Formulae for the leak and break probabilities are derived and it is shown how a leak detection system influences the results. An example taken from nuclear applications illustrates the details of the probabilistic leak-before-break analysis. (orig.) [de

  4. Fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with a semi-elliptical surface crack using elastic-plastic FEM-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.; Brocks, W.; Noack, D.; Veith, H.

    1983-01-01

    A three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis for stresses and strains in a pressure vessel containing two semi-elliptical surface cracks was carried out by finite element (FE) method. Results for stress distribution, spreading of plastic zones and crack opening displacements are presented and discussed. The variation of the stress intensity factor along the crack front as gained from a linear elastic FE-analysis is compared with solutions of various authors. First, the FE results are discussed according to the stress intensity concept using a plastic zone correction for small scale yielding. A Ksub(Ic) of 6900 Nmmsup(-3/2) for an operating temperature of 314 K, which was taken from the ASME code, resulted in a critical pressure of 280 bar. If the zone correction is done with plane stress approximations of IRWIN and DUGDALE, just slightly lower critical values are gained. Introducing the same two dimensional models in the COD concept gives far too conservative estimations for the critical pressure, whereas the plane strain solution agrees quite well with the FE computations. All together, the COD concept is very sensitive to different methods of determining delta. (orig.)

  5. Fracture analysis of a presure vessel with a semi-elliptical surface crack by three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.; Brocks, W.; Noack, D.; Veith, H.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional elastic-plastic analysis for stresses and strains in a pressure vessel containing two semi-elliptical surface cracks was carried out by finite element (FE) method. Results for stress distribution, spreading of plastic zones and crack opening displacements are presented and discussed. The variation of the stress intensity factor along the crack front as gained from a linear elastic FE-analysis is compared with solutions of various authors. First, the FE results are discussed according to the stress intensity concept using a plastic zone correction for small scale yielding. A Ksub(Ic) of 6900 Nmm -3 / 2 for an operating temperature of 314 K, which was taken from the ASME code, resulted in a critical pressure of 280 bar. If the zone correction is done with plane stress approximations of IRWIN and DUGDALE, just slightly lower critical values are gained. Introducing the same two dimensional models in the COD concept gives far too conservative estimations for the critical pressure, whereas the plane strain solution agrees quite well with the FE computations. All together, the COD concept is very sensitive to different methods of determining delta. (orig.) [de

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    susceptibility. Annealed and water quenched specimens were found to be immune to SCC in caustic environment. Aging treatment at 800°C gave rise to sigma and chi precipitates in the DSS. However, these sigma and chi precipitates, known to initiate cracking in DSS in chloride environment did not cause any cracking of DSS in caustic solutions. Aging of DSS at 475°C had resulted in '475°C embrittlement' and caused cracks to initiate in the ferrite phase. This was in contrast to the cracks initiating in the austenite phase in the as-received DSS. Alloy composition and microstructure of DSS as well as solution composition (dissolved ionic species) was also found to affect the electrochemical behavior and passivation of DSS which in turn plays a major role in stress corrosion crack initiation and propagation. Corrosion rates and SCC susceptibility of DSS was found to increase with addition of sulfide to caustic solutions. Corrosion films on DSS, characterized using XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicated that the metal sulfide compounds were formed along with oxides at the metal surface in the presence of sulfide containing caustic environments. These metal sulfide containing passive films are unstable and hence breaks down under mechanical straining, leading to SCC initiations. The overall results from this study helped in understanding the mechanism of SCC in caustic solutions. Favorable slip systems in the austenite phase of DSS favors slip-induced local film damage thereby initiating a stress corrosion crack. Repeated film repassivation and breaking, followed by crack tip dissolution results in crack propagation in the austenite phase of DSS alloys. Result from this study will have a significant impact in terms of identifying the alloy compositions, fabrication processes, microstructures, and environmental conditions that may be avoided to mitigate corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of DSS in caustic solutions.

  7. The effect of the singularity induced by the free surface on fatigue crack growth in thin structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 385-387, - (2008), s. 317-320 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics /7./. Seoul, 09.09.2008-11.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP106/06/P239; GA ČR GA101/08/1623 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Fatigue crack * vertex singularity * thin structures Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  8. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  9. MATLAB: break

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Interactive Media Element This interactive tutorial on MATLAB covers the use of the break function. An example demonstrates how the break function affects a for loop with if instruction embedded in the loop. An example is provided with step-by-step animated explanation. The interactions involve entering MATLAB instructions and observing the outcomes. Self-check questions are provided to help learners determine their level of understanding of the content presented. EC1010 Introduction...

  10. Recent advances in fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEvily, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the recent advances in the understanding of the fatigue crack growth process have resulted from an improved realization of the importance of fatigue crack closure in the crack growth process. Two basic crack closure processes have been identified. One of which is known as plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure (PIFCC), and the other is roughness-induced fatigue crack closure (RIFCC). Both forms occur in all alloys, but PIFCC is a surface-related process which is dominant in aluminum alloys such as 2024-T3, whereas RIFCC is dominant in most steels and titanium alloys. A proposed basic equation governing fatigue crack growth is derived where K/sub max/ is the maximum stress intensity factor in a loading cycle and K/sub op/ is the stress intensity factor at the crack opening level. is the range of the stress intensity factor at the threshold level which is taken to correspond to a crack growth rate of 10-11 m/cycle. The material constant A has units of (MPa)-2, and therefore Eq. 1 is dimensionally correct. Eq.1 has been successfully used in the analysis of both long and short cracks, but in the latter case modification is needed to account for elastic-plastic behavior, the development of crack closure, and the Kitagawa effect which shows that the fatigue strength rather than the threshold level is the controlling factor determining the rate of fatigue crack growth in the very short fatigue crack growth range. Eq. 1 is used to show that The non-propagating cracks observed by Frost and Dugdale resulted from crack closure. The behavior of cracks as short as 10 microns in length can be predicted. Fatigue notch sensitivity is related to crack closure. Very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) behavior is also associated with fatigue crack closure. (author)

  11. Conditions for Stable Chip Breaking and Provision of Machined Surface Quality While Turning with Asymmetric Tool Vibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Шелег, В. К.; Молочко, В. И.; Данильчик, С. С.

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers a process of turning structural steel with asymmetric tool vibrations directed along feeding. Asymmetric vibrations characterized by asymmetry coefficient of vibration cycle, their frequency and amplitude are additionally transferred to the tool in the turning process with the purpose to crush chips. Conditions of stable chip breaking and obtaining optimum dimensions of chip elements have been determined in the paper. In order to reduce a negative impact of the vibration a...

  12. Cracking oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelgemann, W.

    1933-12-19

    A volatile spirit suitable for use as petrol and containing aromatic and aliphatic constituents is obtained by cracking crude oils, asphalts, and creosotes, in presence of catalysts comprising a halogenated oxygen compound of nitrogen, e.g. nitrosyl chloride, and calcium oxide. The method of carrying out the process and the apparatus used are the same as described in Specification 430,748.

  13. Cracking oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelgemann, W.

    1933-12-19

    A volatile spirit suitable for use as petrol and containing aromatic and aliphatic constituents is obtained by cracking crude oils, asphalts, and creosotes, in presence of catalysts comprising a halogenated oxygen compound of nitrogen and a mixture of iron and aluminum chlorides. The method of carrying out the process and the apparatus used are the same as described in Specification 430,748.

  14. Measurement of fatigue crack growth using low-profile eddy-current sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchburn, R.J.; Ibrahim, M.E.; Burke, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Conformable spiral coils show promise as permanently mounted eddy-current sensors for the detection and monitoring of surface-breaking cracks in electrically conductive structures. Flexibility and a low profile (typically less than 0.5 mm) are key advantages that allow the sensors to be unobtrusively mounted on curved surfaces and beneath surface coatings. Furthermore, these sensors can be permanently mounted in areas that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to reach without significant disassembly. The sensors can be activated and interrogated using the same well-established electromagnetic measurement principles in eddy-current nondestructive inspection. A material test machine was used to grow through-thickness fatigue crack in a compact-tension specimen made from the aerospace-grade aluminium alloy AA2014. The growth of the crack was examined by measuring the small impedance changes of planar spiral-coil sensors attached to the specimen. The results indicate that permanently attached conformable spiral coils can be used to detect a deep crack once it has grown beneath the sensor, and then to monitor subsequent crack growth.

  15. Ultrasound excited thermography: an efficient tool for the characterization of vertical cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendioroz, A.; Celorrio, R.; Salazar, A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasound excited thermography has gained a renewed interest in the last two decades as a nondestructive testing technique aimed at detecting and characterizing surface breaking and shallow subsurface discontinuities. It is based on measurement of the IR radiation emitted by the specimen surface to detect temperature rises produced by the heating of defects under high amplitude ultrasound excitation and is primarily addressed to flaws with contacting faces, such as kissing cracks or tight delaminations. The simplicity of application and the ability to detect small cracks in challenging media makes it an attractive emerging technology, which is still in a development stage. However, it has proven to provide an opportunity for the quantitative characterization of defects, mainly of vertical cracks. In this review, we present the principles of the technique and the different experimental implementations, we put it in context with other nondestructive tests and we summarize the work done in order to improve defect detectability and test reliability, with the final goal of determining the probability of detection. Then we review the contributions aimed at characterizing vertical cracks, i.e. retrieving the geometry and location of the crack from surface temperature data, generated by ultrasonic excitation.

  16. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  17. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  18. Organic matter composition at intact biopore and crack surfaces of Luvisol B-horizons analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy and Pyrolysis-Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Martin; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Gerke, Horst H.; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In the B-horizons of Luvisols, surfaces of biopores and aggregates can be enriched in clay and organic matter (OM), relative to the bulk of the soil matrix. The OM composition of these coatings determines their bio-physico-chemical properties and is relevant for transport and transformation processes but is largely unknown at the molecular scale. The objective of this study was an extended characterization of the OM composition at intact biopore and aggregate surfaces. Specifically, we aimed to improve the interpretation of data obtained with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode (DRIFT) by combining the signals from DRIFT spectra with data from pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS) as a more detailed molecular-scale analysis. Samples were manually separated from the outermost surfaces of earthworm burrows, coated and uncoated cracks, root channels, and pinhole fillings of the B-horizons of Luvisols developed from loess and glacial till. The OM at earthworm burrow walls was characterized by a mix of chemically labile aliphatic C-rich and more stable lignin and alkylaromatic compounds whereas the OM of coated cracks and pinholes was dominated by relatively stable heterocylic N and nitriles, and high-molecular aromatic compounds (benzonitrile and naphthalene). This more recalcitrant OM likely originated from the combustion of biomass and, in case of the till-derived Luvisol, from diesel exhausts. The OM composition of pore walls reflected the differences between biopores (i.e., topsoil and plant residual, worm activity) and cracks (i.e., solutes and colloids, rapid percolation). The information of Py-FI mass spectra enabled the assignment of OM functional groups also from spectral regions of overlapping DRIFT signal intensities to specific OM compound classes. In particular, bands from C=O and C=C bonds in the infrared range of wave number 1688 … 1565 cm-1 were related to highly stable, chemically recalcitrant OM

  19. Mechanical weathering and rock erosion by climate-dependent subcritical cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Keanini, Russell

    2017-06-01

    This work constructs a fracture mechanics framework for conceptualizing mechanical rock breakdown and consequent regolith production and erosion on the surface of Earth and other terrestrial bodies. Here our analysis of fracture mechanics literature explicitly establishes for the first time that all mechanical weathering in most rock types likely progresses by climate-dependent subcritical cracking under virtually all Earth surface and near-surface environmental conditions. We substantiate and quantify this finding through development of physically based subcritical cracking and rock erosion models founded in well-vetted fracture mechanics and mechanical weathering, theory, and observation. The models show that subcritical cracking can culminate in significant rock fracture and erosion under commonly experienced environmental stress magnitudes that are significantly lower than rock critical strength. Our calculations also indicate that climate strongly influences subcritical cracking—and thus rock weathering rates—irrespective of the source of the stress (e.g., freezing, thermal cycling, and unloading). The climate dependence of subcritical cracking rates is due to the chemophysical processes acting to break bonds at crack tips experiencing these low stresses. We find that for any stress or combination of stresses lower than a rock's critical strength, linear increases in humidity lead to exponential acceleration of subcritical cracking and associated rock erosion. Our modeling also shows that these rates are sensitive to numerous other environment, rock, and mineral properties that are currently not well characterized. We propose that confining pressure from overlying soil or rock may serve to suppress subcritical cracking in near-surface environments. These results are applicable to all weathering processes.

  20. A French guideline for defect assessment at elevated temperature and leak before break analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drubay, B.; Chapuliot, St.; Lacire, M.H.; Marie, St.; Deschanels, H.; Cambefort, P.

    2001-01-01

    A large program is performed in France in order to develop, for the design and operating FBR (fast breeder reactor) plants, defect assessment procedures and Leak-Before-Break methods (L.B.B.). The main objective of this A16 guide is to propose analytical solutions at elevated temperature coherent with those proposed at low temperature by the RSE-M. The main items developed in this A16 guide for laboratory specimen, plates, pipes and elbows are the following: evaluation of ductile crack initiation and crack propagation based on the J parameter and material characteristics as J R -Δa curve or J i /G fr . Algorithms to evaluate the maximum endurable load under increasing load for through wall cracks or surface cracks are also proposed; determination of fatigue or creep-fatigue crack initiation based on the σ approach calculating stress and strain at a characteristic distance d from the crack tip; evaluation of fatigue crack growth based on da/dN-ΔK eff relationship with a ΔK eff derived from a simplified estimation of ΔJ for the cyclic load; evaluation of creep-fatigue crack growth adding the fatigue crack growth and the creep crack growth during the hold time derived from a simplified evaluation of C * ; Leak-Before-Break procedure. The fracture mechanic parameters determined in the A16 guide (K 1 , J, C * ) are derived from handbooks and formula in accordance with those proposed in the RSE-M document for in service inspection. Those are: the K I handbook for a large panel of surface and through-wall defect in plates, pipes and elbows; elastic stress and reference stress formula; analytical Js and Cs * formulations for mechanical and through thickness thermal load. The main part of the formula and assessment methodologies proposed in the A16 guide are included in a software, called MJSAM, developed under the MS Windows environment in support of the document. This allows a simple application of the analysis proposed in the document. (authors)

  1. Breaking tolerance in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) transgenic mice by vaccination with cross-reactive, natural HBsAg variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Dikopoulos, Nektarios; Kwissa, Marcin

    2003-01-01

    Processing exogenous hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) generates the K(b)-binding S(208-215) epitope 1; processing endogenous HBsAg generates the K(b)-binding S(190-197) epitope 2. Cross-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses were primed to epitope 1 but not epitope 2...... HBs-tg mice showed reduced antigenemia. Hence, vaccination with natural HBsAg variants from different HBV sero/genotypes can prime cross-reactive, specific CD8(+) T cell immunity that breaks tolerance to HBsAg....

  2. Surface water, groundwater and unified 3D-crack network as a triple coupling dynamic system for a river watershed functioning - manifestation in catastrophic floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Tulenev, Nikita; Trifonov, Dmitriy; Arakelian, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    1. Surface water and groundwater interaction model under conditions of huge level of precipitation in catastrophic floods and mudflows for mountain river watershed is introduced. Seismic processes and volcanic activity impact on the formation of disastrous floods due to dramatic change of the pressure field in groundwater horizons, is under discussion for such a triple coupling system, i.e. surface water - groundwater - crack network. Under the conception we analyze recent (2013) catastrophic water events: the catastrophic floods in Western Europe (May-June, 2013), in the Amur river basin, Russia/China (Aug.-Sept, 2013) and in Colorado, USA (Sept. 12-15,2013). In addition, a separate analysis is carried out for debris event in the Krimsk-city, Caucasus (Krasnodar) region, Russia (July 06-07, 2012). 2. There is a group of problems determined by dramatic discrepancies in water mass balance and other vital parameters, on the one hand, by estimation for different types of atmospheric precipitation (both torrential rain and continuous precipitations) and, on the other hand, for observable natural water events (i.e. catastrophic floods and/or mudflows/debris) on concrete territory. Analysis of many facts result in conclusion that we have the hard comparable/coincidence parameters under traditional conception for discussed events as an isolated/closed (river + rain) runoff-system. In contrast, the reasonable point of view does exist if we take into account the contribution of extra water source, which should be localized in river channel, i.e. functioning of open [(river + rain) + groundwater] flow-system has a principal meaning to understand the events occurrence. 3. The analysis and modeling for the events are carried out by us taking into account the following databases: (i) groundwater map dislocation, it resources and flow balance in studied areas, especially near the land surface being unstable in hydrological sense by many reasons, as well due to heavy rain

  3. Password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Χριστοφάκης, Μιχαήλ Κ.

    2014-01-01

    Information security is the next big thing in computers society because of the rapidly growing security incidents and the outcomes of those. Hacking and cracking existed even from the start of the eighties decade when there was the first step of the interconnection through the internet between humans. From then and ever after there was a big explosion of such incidents mostly because of the worldwide web which was introduced in the early nineties. Following the huge steps forward of computers...

  4. Study of Water-Oil Emulsion Breaking by Stabilized Solution Consisting of Anionic Surface Acting Agent - Soda Ash - Polymer (ASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulichkov, S. V.; Avtomonov, E. G.; Andreeva, L. V.; Solomennik, S. F.; Nikitina, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper provides a laboratory research of breaking natural water-oil emulsions: - by non-stabilized ASP; by stabilized ASP; by mixture of stabilized and non-stabilized ASP in different proportions and production of refinery water of the required quality with the use of IronGuard 2495 as flocculant. Oil-in-water emulsion is stable. Classic methods are not suitable for residual water treatment: sediment gravity flow; filtration; centrifuge test. Microemulsion formed after ASP application has low boundary tension and high pH. It contributes to transfer of oil phase into a water one, forming oil-in-water emulsion. Alkaline condition has adverse effect on demulsifying ability of agents, flocculation and boundary tension. For breaking of water-oil emulsion at EBU before the interchanger water or water-oil emulsion from the wells that were not APS-treated in ratio of 1:9 shall be delivered. Residual water after EBU must be prepared in water tanks by dilution in great volume.

  5. Elastic-Plastic J-Integral Solutions or Surface Cracks in Tension Using an Interpolation Methodology. Appendix C -- Finite Element Models Solution Database File, Appendix D -- Benchmark Finite Element Models Solution Database File

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wells, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    No closed form solutions exist for the elastic-plastic J-integral for surface cracks due to the nonlinear, three-dimensional nature of the problem. Traditionally, each surface crack must be analyzed with a unique and time-consuming nonlinear finite element analysis. To overcome this shortcoming, the authors have developed and analyzed an array of 600 3D nonlinear finite element models for surface cracks in flat plates under tension loading. The solution space covers a wide range of crack shapes and depths (shape: 0.2 less than or equal to a/c less than or equal to 1, depth: 0.2 less than or equal to a/B less than or equal to 0.8) and material flow properties (elastic modulus-to-yield ratio: 100 less than or equal to E/ys less than or equal to 1,000, and hardening: 3 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 20). The authors have developed a methodology for interpolating between the goemetric and material property variables that allows the user to reliably evaluate the full elastic-plastic J-integral and force versus crack mouth opening displacement solution; thus, a solution can be obtained very rapidly by users without elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modeling experience. Complete solutions for the 600 models and 25 additional benchmark models are provided in tabular format.

  6. CRACK REASON ANALYSIS OF DAMAGED CARBONITRIDED PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kocúrová

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of a damaged part, which was designed for use in a mechanical clutch of a car. The crack in the part was found during the production inspection. The aim of metallographic and fractography analyses of the fracture surfaces was to discover the reasons for the crack. The reason for creating the crack was the formation of smaller cracks in the production during pressing process of the semiproduct. These cracks even grew after the following thermochemical treatment. The fracture was initiated during the straightening process of quenched part.

  7. Project of integrity assessment of flawed components with structural discontinuity (IAF). Data book for estimation stress intensity factor. Surface crack on ICM housing for penetration in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    The project of Integrity Assessment of Flawed Components with Structural Discontinuity (IAF) was entrusted to Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and started from FY 2001. And then, it was taken over to Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) which was established in October 2003 and carried out until FY 2007. In the IAF project, weld joints between nickel based alloys and low alloy steels around penetrations in reactor vessel, safe-end of nozzles and shroud supports were selected from among components and pipe arrangements in nuclear power plants, where high residual stresses were generated due to welding and complex structure. Residual stresses around of the weld joints were estimated by finite element analysis method (FEM) with a general modeling method, then the reasonability and the conservativeness was evaluated. In addition, for postulated surface crack of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), a simple calculation method of stress intensity factor (K) required to estimate the crack growth was proposed and the effectiveness was confirmed. JNES compiled results of the IAF project into Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis of Weld Joint, and Data Book of Simplified Stress Intensity Factor Calculation for Penetration of Reactor as typical Structure Discontinuity, respectively. Data Books of Residual Stress Analysis in Weld Joint. 1. Butt Weld Joint of Small Diameter Cylinder (4B Sch40) (JNES-RE-2012-0005), 2. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (One-Side Groove Joint (JNES-RE-2012-0006), 3. Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint in Safe End (Large Diameter Both-Side Groove Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0007), 4. Weld Joint around Penetrations in Reactor Vessel (Insert Joint) (JNES-RE-2012-0008), 5. Weld Joint in Shroud Support (H8, H9, H10 and H11 Welds) (JNES-RE-2012-0009), 6. Analysis Model of Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint Applied Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) (JNES-RE-2012-0010). Data Book of

  8. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille

    2018-01-01

    The chapter elaborates on how to deal with one of the major challenges facing organizations worldwide; Stress. The Break enacts a quantum approach to meet the challenges by proposing a combination of three different quantum storytelling technologies; protreptic mentoring, walking and material sto...

  9. Supersymmetry breaking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    symmetry asks for the existence of a bosonic massless partner, which generically correspond to a non-compact flat direction. ... Hidden Sector nonren.int. Ti, 〈Fi〉 = 0. Let us define the strength of supersymmetry breaking by F2 = ∑ ... partners, not protected by the GIM mechanism. Solutions for FCNC problem: (i) Flavour ...

  10. Assessment of cracking in dissimilar metal welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, Anders; Norrgaard, K.; Lagerstroem, J.; Embring, G.; Tice, D.R.

    2001-08-01

    During the refueling in 2000, indications were observed by non-destructive testing at four locations in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) nozzle to safe end weld in Ringhals 4. All indications were confined to the outlet nozzle (hotleg) oriented at 25 deg, a nozzle with documented repair welding. Six boat samples were removed from the four locations, and the samples were subsequently subjected to a metallographic examination. The objectives were to establish the fracture morphology, and if possible the root cause for cracking. The examination revealed that cracks were present at all four boat sample locations and that they all were confined to the weld metal, alloy 182. Cracking extended in the axial direction of the safe-end. There was no evidence of any cracks extending into the RPV-steel, or the stainless steel safe-end. All cracking was interdendritic and significantly branched. Among others, these observations strongly suggested crack propagation mainly was caused by interdendritic stress corrosion cracking. In addition, crack type defects and isolated areas on the fracture surfaces suggested the presence of hot cracking, which would have been formed during fabrication. The reason for crack initiation could not be established based on the boat samples examined. However, increased stress levels due to repair welding, cold work from grinding, and defects produced during fabrication, e. g. hot cracks, may alone or in combination have contributed to crack initiation

  11. Electroweak breaking and supersymmetry breaking

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss the clash between the absence of fine tuning in the Higgs potential and a sufficient suppression of flavour changing neutral current transitions in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. It is pointed out that horizontal U ( 1 ) symmetry combined with the D -term supersymmetry breaking provides a ...

  12. Breaking Symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Peters

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A well-known result by Palamidessi tells us that πmix (the π-calculus with mixed choice is more expressive than πsep (its subset with only separate choice. The proof of this result argues with their different expressive power concerning leader election in symmetric networks. Later on, Gorla offered an arguably simpler proof that, instead of leader election in symmetric networks, employed the reducibility of incestual processes (mixed choices that include both enabled senders and receivers for the same channel when running two copies in parallel. In both proofs, the role of breaking (initial symmetries is more or less apparent. In this paper, we shed more light on this role by re-proving the above result - based on a proper formalization of what it means to break symmetries without referring to another layer of the distinguishing problem domain of leader election. Both Palamidessi and Gorla rephrased their results by stating that there is no uniform and reasonable encoding from πmix into πsep. We indicate how the respective proofs can be adapted and exhibit the consequences of varying notions of uniformity and reasonableness. In each case, the ability to break initial symmetries turns out to be essential.

  13. Unstable brittle crack-arrest toughness of newly developed steel plate with surface layers having ultra fine grain microstructure. Part 2. Crack-arrest toughness of the plate after plastic damage and its application to prevent crack expansion after a collision; Hyoso chosairyuko no zeisei kiretsu denpa teishi seino. 2. Sosei sonsho go no tokusei oyobi shototsugo no kiretsu kakudai boshi eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T.; Hagiwara, Y.; Inoue, T.; Oshita, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kuroiwa, T.; Hashimoto, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tada, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nagasaki (Japan). Nagasaki Technical Inst.; Yajima, H. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Use of ships with high safety and reliability that can suppress the casualties and ocean pollution accidents caused by ships failure to a minimum, are in demand. Therefore, in order to study the improvement of safety when steel plates with surface layers having ultra fine grain microstructure and having extremely improved arrest characteristic are used for ship structures, fracture simulation of collision and comparative evaluation of the arrest properties with the conventional steel plate were carried out. Firstly, fracture simulation of the ship bodycaused by the collision of very large crude oil carries (VLCC) was carried out and the plastic strain caused during the collision was quantified. After that, as for steel plate with surface layers having ultrafine grain microstructure and normal KE 36 steel plate, comparative study of arrestability of steel plate under 10% plastic strain was made. As a result, it was revealed that sufficient arrest efficiency was secured by using steel plate with surface layers having ultra fine grain structure even for the case where arrestability for long big crack is not secured in case of normal KE 36 steel plate due to the plastic strain effect on VLCC caused by collision. 11 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Application of the cracked pipe element to creep crack growth prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochard, J.; Charras, T.

    1997-04-01

    The modification of a computer code for leak before break analysis is very briefly described. The CASTEM2000 code was developed for ductile fracture assessment of piping systems with postulated circumferential through-wall cracks under static or dynamic loading. The modification extends the capabilities of the cracked pipe element to the determination of fracture parameters under creep conditions (C*, {phi}c and {Delta}c). The model has the advantage of evaluating significant secondary effects, such as those from thermal loading.

  15. Surface Properties of a Hooked Steel Fiber and their Effects on the Fiber Pullout and Composite Cracking 1. Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesers, A.; Krūmiņš, J.

    2014-09-01

    Concrete as a material is brittle, but adding short steel fibers to the matrix can significantly improve its mechanical properties. The chemical adhesion between concrete and steel is weak, and the fiber pullout properties are based on fiber geometry and frictional forces. Single-fiber pullout tests of steel fibers with toothed and smooth surfaces were performed in order to characterize the effects of fiber surface facture. The influence of fiber form, surface facture, and fiber orientation (relative to the pullout direction) on the fiber withdrawal resistance and the maximum pullout force were studied.

  16. Surface Crack Detection for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Materials Using Pulsed Eddy Current Based on Rectangular Differential Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the surface defect inspection of carbon fiber reinforced composite, the differential and the direct measurement finite element simulation models of pulsed eddy current flaw detection were built. The principle of differential pulsed eddy current detection was analyzed and the sensitivity of defect detection was compared through two kinds of measurements. The validity of simulation results was demonstrated by experiments. The simulation and experimental results show that the pulsed eddy current detection method based on rectangular differential probe can effectively improve the sensitivity of surface defect detection of carbon fiber reinforced composite material.

  17. Subsurface metals fatigue cracking without and with crack tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Shanyavskiy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Very-High-Cycle-Fatigue regime for metals was considered and mechanisms of the subsurface crack origination were introduced. In many metals first step of crack origination takes place with specific area formation because of material pressing and rotation that directed to transition in any volume to material ultra-high-plasticity with nano-structure appearing. Then by the border of the nano-structure takes place volume rotation and fracture surface creates with spherical particles which usually named Fine-Granular-Area. In another case there takes place First-Smooth-Facet occurring in area of origin due to whirls appearing by the one of the slip systems under discussed the same stress-state conditions. Around Fine-Granular-Area or First-Smooth-Facet there plastic zone appeared and, then, subsurface cracking develops by the same manner as for through cracks. In was discussed quantum-mechanical nature of fatigue crack growth in accordance with Yang’s modulus quantization for low level of deformations. New simply equation was considered for describing subsurface cracking in metals out of Fine-Granular-Area or Fist-Smooth-Facet.

  18. Popping balloons: formation of a crack network in rubber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulinet, Sebastien; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Equipe Morphogenèse et phénomènes multi-échelle Team

    2015-03-01

    Everyone can make the observation: a rubber balloon inflated until it spontaneously pop breaks into a large number of shreds. In contrast, a balloon pierced with a needle at an early stage of its inflation breaks into two large pieces. Using model latex balloons, we have experimentally investigated the transition between these two breaking regimes. We have showed that, above a threshold stress in the latex membrane, a single crack become unstable and separates into two new cracks. Then, a cascade of tip-splitting generates a network of cracks that eventually form a large number of fragments. We have observed that the instability of the crack occurs when it reaches a limit velocity that could the speed of sound. By studying the energy balance during the explosion, we can determine the intrinsic fracture energy of rubber, a measurement difficult to achieve with usual tensile testing.

  19. Cracking and corrosion recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suik, H. [Tallinn Technical University, Horizon Pulp and Paper, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The corrosion of heat surfaces and the cracking the drums are the main problems of the recovery boiler. These phenomena have been appeared during long-term operation of boiler `Mitsubishi - 315` erected at 1964. Depth of the crack is depending on the number of shutdowns and on operation time. Corrosion intensity of different heat surfaces is varying depend on the metal temperature and the conditions at place of positioning of tube. The lowest intensity of corrosion is on the bank tubes and the greatest is on the tubes of the second stage superheater and on the tubes at the openings of air ports. (orig.) 5 refs.

  20. Dye Penetrant Crack Detectability in External Corners in Presence of Fillet Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA uses special dye penetrant nondestructive evaluation process to provide reliable detection of very small cracks. Typically the surface crack lengths sizes are 0.030' and 0.050' for special dye penetrant process. Qualification requires demonstration of crack detection on a set of cracks with average crack size smaller than or equal to the qualification crack size. The demonstration is called point estimate demonstration. A set of corner cracks can be used to determine reliably detectable corner crack using the point estimate demonstration method. However, dye penetrant demonstration on surface cracks can be used to assess reliably detectable corner crack sizes by using similarity in the penetrant process. The paper provides similarity analysis approach for determining the reliably detectable corner crack sizes for given a point estimate demonstrated surface crack size.

  1. Evolution of Surface Texture and Cracks During Injection Molding of Fiber-Reinforced, Additively-Manufactured, Injection Molding Inserts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofstätter, Thomas; Mischkot, Michael; Pedersen, David Bue

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the lifetime and surfacedeterioration of additively-manufactured, injection-moulding inserts. The inserts were produced using digital light processing and were reinforcedwith oriented short carbon fibers. Theinserts were used during injection molding oflow......-density polyethylene until their failure. The molded products were used to analyse the development of the surface roughness and wear. By enhancing the lifetime of injection-molding inserts,this work contributes to the establishment of additively manufactured inserts in pilot production....

  2. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B. [Commissariat a l Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  3. Crack path in aeronautical titanium alloy under ultrasonic torsion loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses features of fatigue crack initiation and growth in aeronautical VT3-1 titanium alloy under pure torsion loading in gigacycle regime. Two materials: extruded and forged VT3-1 titanium alloys were studied. Torsion fatigue tests were performed up to fatigue life of 109 cycles. The results of the torsion tests were compared with previously obtained results under fully reversed axial loading on the same alloys. It has been shown that independently on production process as surface as well subsurface crack initiation may appear under ultrasonic torsion loading despite the maximum stress amplitude located at the specimen surface. In the case of surface crack initiation, a scenario of crack initiation and growth is similar to HCF regime except an additional possibility for internal crack branching. In the case of subsurface crack, the initiation site is located below the specimen surface (about 200 μm and is not clearly related to any material flaw. Internal crack initiation is produced by shear stress in maximum shear plane and early crack growth is in Mode II. Crack branching is limited in the case of internal crack initiation compared to surface one. A typical ‘fish-eye’ crack can be observed at the torsion fracture surface, but mechanism of crack initiation seems not to be the same than under axial fatigue loading.

  4. Cracking and interfacial debonding of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping of pre-coated boron steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yi-Sheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu, Bin, E-mail: zhubin26@gmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Cracking failure of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping process was investigated. • Microcracks initiated inside the coating during the austenitization. • Microcrack initiation in the hot deformation correlated to the Fe–Al intermetallics. • Macrocracks extended along the Mode I path led to the coating break into segments. • Macrocracks growth followed Mode II path resulted in the interfacial debonding. - Abstract: This study is focused on the mechanisms of cracks initiation, propagation and interfacial debonding of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping of the pre-coated boron steel. The investigation was performed isothermally at three deformation temperatures (700, 750, 800 °C) at a strain rate of 0.1/s. Cracking and interfacial debonding of the coating were observed with optical and scanning electron microscope, to reveal the damage evolution under applied tensile strains. Microstructures and phase inside the coating before and after austenitization were determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that austenitization led to micro-cracks and Kirkendall voids initiation inside the Al–Si coating because of thermal loading, and the cracks were arrested by α-Fe diffusion layer. When the coating on substrate system was submitted to the uniaxial tensile test, the surface coating exhibited multiple cracking normal to the tensile direction. The Kirkendall voids seemed to promote the macro-crack growth through the diffusion layer. The macro-cracks followed a Mode I path, leading to the coating deteriorates to cracked segments. The macro-cracks then continued to propagate following a Mode II path that along the diffusion layer/substrate interface because of shear stress transferred from the deformed substrate, resulting in the interfacial debonding of the coating segments. The crack density firstly increased with the increasing tensile strain and then reached saturation. Decreasing deformation

  5. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M. [SAQ Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  6. Cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tanumihardja

    2009-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome is usually found in daily dental practice. The incidence of cracks teeth tends to increasing. People are living longer and keeping their teeth longer. As a consequence, people have more complex restoration and endodontic treatment, leaving teeth more prone to cracks. In addition, stressful lives may provoke unconscious habits such as clenching and bruxism which can induce cracks in teeth. However, many cracks teeth can be saved nowadays when the character...

  7. Analysis of a bending test on a full-scale PWR hot leg elbow containing a surface crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delliou, P. le [Electricite de France, EDF, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Dept. MTC; Julisch, P.; Hippelein, K. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt; Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France, EDF, 92 - Paris la Defense (France). Direction Production Transport

    1998-11-01

    EDF, in co-operation with Framatome, has conducted a large research programme on the mechanical behaviour of thermally aged cast duplex stainless steel elbows, which are part of the main primary circuit of French PWR. One important task of this programme consisted of testing a full-scale PWR hot leg elbow. The elbow contained a semi-elliptical circumferential notch machined on the outer surface of the intrados as well as casting defects located on the flanks. To simulate the end-of-life condition of the component regarding material toughness, it had undergone a 2400 hours ageing heat treatment at 400 C. The test preparation and execution, as well as the material characterization programme, were committed to MPA. The test was conducted under constant internal pressure and in-plane bending (opening mode) at 200 C. For safety reasons, it took place on an open air-site: the Meppen military test ground. At the maximum applied moment (6000 kN.m), the notch did not initiate. This paper presents the experimental results and the fracture mechanics analysis of the test, based on finite element calculations. (orig.)

  8. Recent evaluations of crack-opening-area in circumferentially cracked pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Miura, N.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. The leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of the through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section XI. The objectives of this study were to review, evaluate, and refine current predictive models for performing crack-opening-area analyses of circumferentially cracked pipes. The results from twenty-five full-scale pipe fracture experiments, conducted in the Degraded Piping Program, the International Piping Integrity Research Group Program, and the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program, were used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess quantitatively the accuracy of the predictive models. The evaluation also involved finite element analyses for determining the crack-opening profile often needed to perform leak-rate calculations.

  9. Procedure for Automated Eddy Current Crack Detection in Thin Titanium Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2012-01-01

    This procedure provides the detailed instructions for conducting Eddy Current (EC) inspections of thin (5-30 mils) titanium membranes with thickness and material properties typical of the development of Ultra-Lightweight diaphragm Tanks Technology (ULTT). The inspection focuses on the detection of part-through, surface breaking fatigue cracks with depths between approximately 0.002" and 0.007" and aspect ratios (a/c) of 0.2-1.0 using an automated eddy current scanning and image processing technique.

  10. Microstructural features of environmentally assisted cracking in pipeline steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, B.W.; Lambert, S.B.; Zhang, X.; Plumtree, A.; Sutherby, R.

    2003-01-01

    A number of small-scale pipeline specimens containing edge or surface cracks were tested in simulated groundwater (NS4 solution) in an anaerobic environment under cyclic loading conditions. Micrographs of the crack surface showed corrosion fatigue at high frequencies and low R-ratios. Following large amounts of growth (∼200 μm) for those specimens tested at low frequencies, evidence of transgranular quasi-cleavage was detected. Green rust was found to be present at the crack tips and along their flanks. Iron sulfide, resulting from anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria and iron carbonate were also present in the NS4 solution during testing. These corrosion products retarded crack growth in the depth direction of surface cracks. Under variable amplitude loadings conditions, the accompanying increased surface crack growth rate can be accounted for by rupture of the green rust film at the crack tip. (author)

  11. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Choi, Y.H. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)]|[Swedish Plant Inspection Ltd., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs.

  12. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  13. Practical applications of the R6 leak-before-break procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    A forthcoming revision to the R6 Leak-before-Break Assessment Procedure is briefly described. Practical application of the LbB concepts to safety-critical nuclear plant is illustrated by examples covering both low temperature and high temperature (>450 degrees C) operating regimes. The examples highlight a number of issues which can make the development of a satisfactory LbB case problematic: for example, coping with highly loaded components, methodology assumptions and the definition of margins, the effect of crack closure owing to weld residual stresses, complex thermal stress fields or primary bending fields, the treatment of locally high stresses at crack intersections with free surfaces, the choice of local limit load solution when predicting ligament breakthrough, and the scope of calculations required to support even a simplified LbB case for high temperature steam pipe-work systems

  14. Practical applications of the R6 leak-before-break procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    A forthcoming revision to the R6 Leak-before-Break Assessment Procedure is briefly described. Practical application of the LbB concepts to safety-critical nuclear plant is illustrated by examples covering both low temperature and high temperature (>450{degrees}C) operating regimes. The examples highlight a number of issues which can make the development of a satisfactory LbB case problematic: for example, coping with highly loaded components, methodology assumptions and the definition of margins, the effect of crack closure owing to weld residual stresses, complex thermal stress fields or primary bending fields, the treatment of locally high stresses at crack intersections with free surfaces, the choice of local limit load solution when predicting ligament breakthrough, and the scope of calculations required to support even a simplified LbB case for high temperature steam pipe-work systems.

  15. Experimental study on critical breaking stress of float glass under elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Qingsong; Shao, Guangzheng; Chen, Haodong; Sun, Jinhua; He, Linghui; Liew, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical breaking stresses of clear, ground and coated glass were measured. • Breaking stress and strain of smooth glass were measured from 25 °C to 400 °C. • At approximately 100 °C, critical stress reached the minimum value. • Surface treatment and ambient temperature have notable effects on glass breaking. - Abstract: Cracking and subsequent fallout of glass may significantly affect fire dynamics in compartments. Moreover, the breaking tensile stress of glass, a crucial parameter for breakage occurrence, is the least well known among mechanical properties. In this work, a series of experiments were conducted, through mechanical tensile tests, to directly measure the breaking stress of float glass using Material Testing System 810 apparatus. Clear, ground and coated glass samples with a thickness of 6 mm were measured under ambient conditions, with a room temperature of 25 °C. The breaking stress of smooth glass samples was also measured at 75 °C, 100 °C, 125 °C, 150 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C and 400 °C, respectively. The results show that surface treatment may decrease the critical tensile stress of glass panes. The average breaking stress also fluctuates considerably, from 26.60 to 35.72 MPa with the temperature variations investigated here. At approximately 100 °C, critical stress reached the minimum value at which glass breakage occurs more easily. In addition, the thermal expansion coefficient was established using a thermal dilatometer, to obtain the maximum temperature difference float glass can withstand. It is intended that these results will provide some practical guidelines for fire safety engineers

  16. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  17. DBEM crack propagation for nonlinear fracture problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Citarella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional crack propagation simulation is performed by the Dual Boundary Element Method (DBEM. The Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs along the front of a semi elliptical crack, initiated from the external surface of a hollow axle, are calculated for bending and press fit loading separately and for a combination of them. In correspondence of the latter loading condition, a crack propagation is also simulated, with the crack growth rates calculated using the NASGRO3 formula, calibrated for the material under analysis (steel ASTM A469. The J-integral and COD approaches are selected for SIFs calculation in DBEM environment, where the crack path is assessed by the minimum strain energy density criterion (MSED. In correspondence of the initial crack scenario, SIFs along the crack front are also calculated by the Finite Element (FE code ZENCRACK, using COD, in order to provide, by a cross comparison with DBEM, an assessment on the level of accuracy obtained. Due to the symmetry of the bending problem a pure mode I crack propagation is realised with no kinking of the propagating crack whereas for press fit loading the crack propagation becomes mixed mode. The crack growth analysis is nonlinear because of normal gap elements used to model the press fit condition with added friction, and is developed in an iterative-incremental procedure. From the analysis of the SIFs results related to the initial cracked configuration, it is possible to assess the impact of the press fit condition when superimposed to the bending load case.

  18. Austenitic Biomaterial Cracks Evaluation by Advanced Nondestructive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Smetana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE of austenitic stainless steels. Eddy current, ultrasonic testing and non-contact magnetic field mapping methods are used for this purpose. ECA (Eddy Current Array and TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction are methods that have become widely-used in the field of NDE and this is the reason for their utilization. Magnetic field mapping is nowadays an effective method of evaluation of surface-breaking defects mainly in ferromagnetic materials. The fluxgate sensor-based measurement is presented and discussed. The artificial fatigue and stress-corrosion material’s cracks are inspected. Experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. Crack detection using image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, M.A.A

    2010-01-01

    This thesis contains five main subjects in eight chapters and two appendices. The first subject discus Wiener filter for filtering images. In the second subject, we examine using different methods, as Steepest Descent Algorithm (SDA) and the Wavelet Transformation, to detect and filling the cracks, and it's applications in different areas as Nano technology and Bio-technology. In third subject, we attempt to find 3-D images from 1-D or 2-D images using texture mapping with Open Gl under Visual C ++ language programming. The fourth subject consists of the process of using the image warping methods for finding the depth of 2-D images using affine transformation, bilinear transformation, projective mapping, Mosaic warping and similarity transformation. More details about this subject will be discussed below. The fifth subject, the Bezier curves and surface, will be discussed in details. The methods for creating Bezier curves and surface with unknown distribution, using only control points. At the end of our discussion we will obtain the solid form, using the so called NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline); which depends on: the degree of freedom, control points, knots, and an evaluation rule; and is defined as a mathematical representation of 3-D geometry that can accurately describe any shape from a simple 2-D line, circle, arc, or curve to the most complex 3-D organic free-form surface or (solid) which depends on finding the Bezier curve and creating family of curves (surface), then filling in between to obtain the solid form. Another representation for this subject is concerned with building 3D geometric models from physical objects using image-based techniques. The advantage of image techniques is that they require no expensive equipment; we use NURBS, subdivision surface and mesh for finding the depth of any image with one still view or 2D image. The quality of filtering depends on the way the data is incorporated into the model. The data should be treated with

  20. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... 69 KB) "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  1. Quantification of creep cavitation damage around a crack in a stainless steel pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, P.J.; Withers, P.J.; McDonald, S.A.; Heenan, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, metallographic sectioning and non-destructive small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are used to map the level of creep cavitation around a surface breaking crack in a stainless steel pressure vessel. The cracking developed during 65,000 h service at an operating temperature of around 525 deg. C and was promoted by the accumulation of creep strain resulting from relaxation of tensile residual stresses associated with a nozzle attachment weld. The distribution and evolution of the cavities is discussed in terms of existing models of creep cavitation failure based on a ductility exhaustion model in which the corresponding multi-axial creep ductility, expressed as the von Mises strain at failure, is a function of the strain rate and stress state. An empirical approach has been adopted for describing the effects of stress state on ductility, which takes into account cavity nucleation as well as cavity growth by creep deformation, and is similar to local approach models for ductile crack growth. Crack initiation is conceded when the creep damage parameter D c ≥1. The measured creep cavitation results are found to be in reasonable accordance with such a model

  2. Nonlinear Scattering from Partially Closed Cracks and Imperfect Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecorari, Claudio

    2004-05-01

    This project has investigated the potential offered by nonlinear scattering phenomena to detect stress-corrosion, surface-breaking cracks, and regions of extended interfaces which are often invisible to conventional inspection methods because of their partial closure and/or the high background noise generated by the surrounding microstructure. The investigation has looked into the basic physics of the interaction between ultrasonic waves and rough surfaces in contact, since the latter offers a prototypical example of a mechanical system which is characterized by a dynamics similar to that of a partially closed crack. To this end, three fundamental mechanisms which may be activated by an inspecting ultrasonic wave have been considered. The first mechanism is described by the Hertz force law which governs the interaction between asperities in contact that are subjected to a normal load. The second mechanism considers the dynamics of two spherical asperities subjected to an oscillating tangential load. To this end, the model developed by Mindlin and Deresiewizc has been used. The third mechanism accounts for the effect of forces of adhesion, and can be described by a model developed by Greenwood and Johnson. The validity of this model is rather general and covers the extreme cases of very soft and very rigid contacts. This model aims at describing the effect of fluid layers with thickness of atomic size, which may be present within a crack. Statistical models accounting for the topography of the two rough surfaces in contact have been developed, and the macroscopic stiffness of the interface recovered. These results have been used to formulate effective boundary conditions to be enforced at the interface, and the reflection and transmission problem has been solved in a variety of situations of experimental significance. The main conclusion of this part of the project is that the second harmonic component is the dominant feature of the nonlinear response of an

  3. Effects of off-centered crack and restraint of induced bending due to pressure on the crack-opening-area analysis of pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Bonora, N.

    1995-01-01

    Estimation of leak rate is an important element in developing leak-before-break (LBB) methodology for piping integrity and safety analysis of nuclear power plants. Here, current models for the crack-opening-area analysis of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks are based on various idealizations or assumption which are often necessary to simplify the mathematical formulation and numerical calculation. This paper focuses on the validity of two such assumptions involving off-centered cracks and restraint of induced bending due to pressure and quantifies their effects on the crack-opening analysis of pipes. Both finite element and/or simple estimation methods were employed to compute the center-crack-opening displacement and crack-opening shape for a through-wall-cracked pipe considering off-centered cracks and restrain of induced bending due to pressure. The results of analyses show that for both cases the crack-opening area can be reduced significantly. For pipes with off-centered cracks, the crack-opening area can be evaluated from analyses of symmetrically centered cracks and assuming elliptical profile. For pipes with complete restraint of induced bending due to pressure, the reduction of crack-opening area depends on the crack size. When the crack size is small, the restraint effects can be ignored. However, when the crack size is larger, the restrained crack-opening can be significantly smaller than the unrestrained crack-opening depending on the length of pipe involved, and hence, may be important for the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses

  4. Fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of bainitic rail steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    "The microstructuremechanical properties relationships, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth and fracture surface morphology of J6 bainitic, manganese, and pearlitic rail steels were studied. Microstructuremechanical properties correlation ...

  5. SQUIRT, Seepage in Reactor Tube Cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, D.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Rahman, S.; Krishnaswamy, P.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The SQUIRT software is designed to perform leakage rate and area of crack opening calculations for through-wall cracks in pipes. The fluid in the piping system is assumed to be water at either subcooled or saturated conditions. The development of the SQUIRT computer model enables licensing authorities and industry users to conduct the leak-rate evaluations for leak-before-break applications in a more efficient manner. 2 - Method of solution: The SQUIRT program uses a modified form of the Henry-Fauske model for the thermal-hydraulics analysis together with Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics using GE/EPRI and LBB.ENG2 methods for crack opening analysis. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Squirt requires 512 KB of conventional memory and an organized structure. Software can only be executed from the main SQUIRT23 directory where the software was installed

  6. Understanding the Risk of Chloride Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Interim Storage Containers for the Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Evolution of Brine Chemistry on the Container Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Although the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking is well known, uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that exist on the surface of the storage containers. While a diversity of salts is present in atmospheric aerosols, many of these are not stable when placed onto a heated surface. Given that the surface temperature of any container storing spent nuclear fuel will be well above ambient, it is likely that salts deposited on its surface may decompose or degas. To characterize this effect, relevant single and multi-salt mixtures are being evaluated as a function of temperature and relative humidity to establish the rates of degassing, as well as the likely final salt and brine chemistries that will remain on the canister surface.

  7. Understanding the Risk of Chloride Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Interim Storage Containers for the Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Evolution of Brine Chemistry on the Container Surface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enos, David; Bryan, Charles R.

    2015-10-01

    Although the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking is well known, uncertainties exist in terms of the environmental conditions that exist on the surface of the storage containers. While a diversity of salts is present in atmospheric aerosols, many of these are not stable when placed onto a heated surface. Given that the surface temperature of any container storing spent nuclear fuel will be well above ambient, it is likely that salts deposited on its surface may decompose or degas. To characterize this effect, relevant single and multi-salt mixtures are being evaluated as a function of temperature and relative humidity to establish the rates of degassing, as well as the likely final salt and brine chemistries that will remain on the canister surface.

  8. Crack embryo formation before crack initiation and growth in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Crack growth measurements were performed in high temperature water and in air to examine the role of creep on IGSCC growth using cold rolled non-sensitized Type316(UNS S31600), TT690 alloy, MA600 alloy, and Carbon steel (STPT42). In addition, crack initiation tests were performed also in high temperature water and in air using specially designed CT specimen. The obtained major results are as follows: (1) TT690 did crack in intergranularly in hydrogenated high temperature water if material is cold worked in heavily. (2) Cold worked carbon steel also cracked in intergranularly in dearated high temperature water. (3) Intergranular crack growth was recognized on cold worked 316, TT690, MA600, and carbon steel even in air which might be crack embryo of IGSCC. (4) Simple Arrhenius type temperature dependence was observed on IGSCC in high temperature water and creep crack growth in air. This suggested that intergranular crack growth rate was determined by some thermal activated reaction. (5) Vacancy condensation was recognized at just ahead of the crack tips of IGSCC and creep crack of cold worked steel. This showed that IGSCC and creep crack growth was controlled by same mechanism. (6) Clear evidence of vacancies condensation was recognized at just beneath the surface before crack initiation. This proved that crack did initiate as the result of diffusion of vacancies in the solid. And the incubation time seems to be controlled by the required time for the condensation of vacancies to the stress concentrated zone. (7) Diffusion of subsituational atoms was also driven by stress gradient. This is the important knowledge to evaluate the SCC initiation after long term operation in LWR's. Based on the observed results, IGSCC initiation and growth mechanism were proposed considering the diffusion process of cold worked induced vacancies. (author)

  9. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part I: Controlled Cracking of 52100 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Although most of the research performed in bearing steel metallurgy aims to prevent crack nucleation and propagation, some applications require the exact opposite in order to study the role that disconnected surfaces inside the bulk material play when load is applied, or when fluids entrapped in surface cracks propagate tensile stresses or exacerbate corrosion. Four heat treatments have been designed to create controlled arrays of crack types and distributions in quenched and untempered steel normally used in the manufacture of bearings. The varieties of cracks studied include sparsely distributed martensite-plate cracks, fine-grain-boundary cracks, abundant martensite-plate cracks, and surface cracks. The intention was to create samples which can then be subjected to appropriate mechanical testing so that phenomena such as the appearance of "white-etching areas" or "white-etching cracks," crack-lubricant interactions, or hydrogen trapping can be studied further.

  10. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification in Fatigue Crack Growth Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Sankararaman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to quantify the uncertainty in fatigue crack growth prognosis, applied to structures with complicated geometry and subjected to variable amplitude multi-axial loading. Finite element analysis is used to address the complicated geometry and calculate the stress intensity factors. Multi-modal stress intensity factors due to multi-axial loading are combined to calculate an equivalent stress intensity factor using a characteristic plane approach. Crack growth under variable amplitude loading is modeled using a modified Paris law that includes retardation effects. During cycle-by-cycle integration of the crack growth law, a Gaussian process surrogate model is used to replace the expensive finite element analysis. The effect of different types of uncertainty – physical variability, data uncertainty and modeling errors – on crack growth prediction is investigated. The various sources of uncertainty include, but not limited to, variability in loading conditions, material parameters, experimental data, model uncertainty, etc. Three different types of modeling errors – crack growth model error, discretization error and surrogate model error – are included in analysis. The different types of uncertainty are incorporated into the crack growth prediction methodology to predict the probability distribution of crack size as a function of number of load cycles. The proposed method is illustrated using an application problem, surface cracking in a cylindrical structure.

  12. Fatigue crack detection on structural steel members by using ultrasound excited thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plum, Robin Marc

    2015-07-01

    In the field of non-destructive testing (NDT), ultrasound excited thermography has been recognised as a promising technique that was successfully applied to metals, fibre composites and many more engineering materials in order to detect cracks, delaminations and other types of internal flaws. Dating back to the late 1970s, the idea of high-frequency vibration excitation of structural members combined with monitoring the surface temperature by means of infrared thermography aims at the localised energy dissipation at defect regions and its thermal detection. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential use of ultrasound excited thermography for detecting surface breaking fatigue cracks in thick-walled components relevant to steel construction. The presented research is motivated by a lack of fast and imaging crack detection methods in the field and the growing acceptance and technological progress of active thermography techniques. After introducing the concept of ultrasound excited thermography or vibrothermography, its current state of the art is described by means of a comprehensive literature review focusing on research activities towards crack detection on metals. Owing to the interdisciplinarity of the test method, all relevant technical subdisciplines from the excitation of plate vibrations via potential heat generation mechanisms and heat transfer to infrared thermography are outlined. The experimental work starts with the manufacture and fatigue loading of suitable plate specimens made from low-carbon steel S355, mostly in the high cycle fatigue regime, to generate throughthickness cracks with specified depths. Using a modified high-power ultrasonic welding generator, basic dependencies of the defect heating on frequency, coupling location and excitation duration are clarified at first. Besides of an estimation of realistic detection limits depending on the plate thickness, main issues such as the relation between vibration intensity and

  13. Fatigue crack detection on structural steel members by using ultrasound excited thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plum, Robin Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the field of non-destructive testing (NDT), ultrasound excited thermography has been recognised as a promising technique that was successfully applied to metals, fibre composites and many more engineering materials in order to detect cracks, delaminations and other types of internal flaws. Dating back to the late 1970s, the idea of high-frequency vibration excitation of structural members combined with monitoring the surface temperature by means of infrared thermography aims at the localised energy dissipation at defect regions and its thermal detection. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the potential use of ultrasound excited thermography for detecting surface breaking fatigue cracks in thick-walled components relevant to steel construction. The presented research is motivated by a lack of fast and imaging crack detection methods in the field and the growing acceptance and technological progress of active thermography techniques. After introducing the concept of ultrasound excited thermography or vibrothermography, its current state of the art is described by means of a comprehensive literature review focusing on research activities towards crack detection on metals. Owing to the interdisciplinarity of the test method, all relevant technical subdisciplines from the excitation of plate vibrations via potential heat generation mechanisms and heat transfer to infrared thermography are outlined. The experimental work starts with the manufacture and fatigue loading of suitable plate specimens made from low-carbon steel S355, mostly in the high cycle fatigue regime, to generate throughthickness cracks with specified depths. Using a modified high-power ultrasonic welding generator, basic dependencies of the defect heating on frequency, coupling location and excitation duration are clarified at first. Besides of an estimation of realistic detection limits depending on the plate thickness, main issues such as the relation between vibration intensity and

  14. LBB analysis of Indian PHWRs and BWRs crack opening area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, B.; Bandyopadhyay, S.K.; Gupta, S.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In this study, leak before break analyses for steam generator recirculation line of TAPS-1 and 2 and main steam line along with header of RAPS-5 and 6 have been undertaken. In this paper, crack opening area has been estimated. Different linear elastic-plastic fracture mechanic models (Kastner et al [1981], Wuthrich [1983], Tada-Paris [1983] and Bertholome et al. [1993]) have been harnessed for calculation of crack opening area for circumferential cracks. The plasticity correction has been incorporated through Erwih [1964] and Dugdale [1960] models. Correction for elbow effect has been accomplished by Kastner et al. [1981] model. The leak flow rates are calculated by different models as discussed by Ghosh et al [2002]. The margin of leakage size cracks using the aforementioned models are to be determined for cracks in recirculation line of TAPS-l and 2, and in main steam line of RAPS-5 and 6 for assessing the applicability of LBB

  15. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless...

  16. Numerical Study of Corrosion Crack Opening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    To determine the reliability of reinforced concrete structures based on visual inspection of corroding cracks on the surfaces of structures is of great interest. In the present study, models for the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures are presented with special emphasis on a model...... for the corrosion crack opening. Experiments and theoretical analysis by a numerical method, FEM, support that the relation between the reduction of the reinforcement bar diameter due to corrosion and the corresponding increase in crack width for a given time interval, measured on the surface of a concrete specimen...... is proportional. More recently, the constant of proportionality, the so-called crack-corrosion index, has been studied further with respect to its dependence on the diameter of the reinforcement and the concrete cover. In the present paper the above-mentioned work is presented and extended with more realistic 3D...

  17. The overlay tester (OT) : comparison with other crack test methods and recommendations for surrogate crack tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Presently, one of the principal performance concerns of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) pavements is premature : cracking, particularly of HMA surfacing mixes. Regrettably, however, while many USA transportation agencies have : implemented design-level tests t...

  18. Small fatigue cracks; Proceedings of the Second International Conference/Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, Jan. 5-10, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Lankford, J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include crack initiation and stage I growth, microstructure effects, crack closure, environment effects, the role of notches, analytical modeling, fracture mechanics characterization, experimental techniques, and engineering applications. Papers are presented on fatigue crack initiation along slip bands, the effect of microplastic surface deformation on the growth of small cracks, short fatigue crack behavior in relation to three-dimensional aspects and the crack closure effect, the influence of crack depth on crack electrochemistry and fatigue crack growth, and nondamaging notches in fatigue. Consideration is also given to models of small fatigue cracks, short crack theory, assessment of the growth of small flaws from residual strength data, the relevance of short crack behavior to the integrity of major rotating aero engine components, and the relevance of short fatigue crack growth data to the durability and damage tolerance analyses of aircraft.

  19. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  20. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  1. Breaking antidunes: Cyclic behavior due to hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deigaard, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic behavior of breaking antidunes (growth, breaking of surface wave, obliteration) is investigated by use of a numerical model. The model includes the transition between supercritical and transcritical flow. As the antidune grows the flow becomes transcritical and a hydraulic jump is form...

  2. The cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  3. Delayed hydrogen cracking test design for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto; Loberse, Antonio N.; Yawny, Alejandro A.; Riquelme, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    CANDU nuclear power stations pressure tubes of alloy Zr-2,5 % Nb present a cracking phenomenon known as delayed hydrogen cracking (DHC). This is a brittle fracture of zirconium hydrides that are developed by hydrogen due to aqueous corrosion on the metal surface. This hydrogen diffuses to the crack tip where brittle zirconium hydrides develops and promotes the crack propagation. A direct current potential decay (DCPD) technique has been developed to measure crack propagation rates on compact test (CT) samples machined from a non irradiated pressure tube. Those test samples were hydrogen charged by cathodic polarization in an acid solution and then pre cracked in a fatigue machine. This technique proved to be useful to measure crack propagation rates with at least 1% accuracy for DHC in pressure tubes. (author)

  4. An experimental study of the closure behavior of short and long cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, X.; Sharpe, W. N., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on 2024-T3 aluminum specimens. The laser-based interferometric strain/displacement optical system was used to measure crack opening displacement. The displacement data were measured near the crack tip, at the crack mouth, and at other locations along the crack line for both short and long cracks. The dependence of opening load ratio on measurement locations was observed. The ratio decreased systematically as the measurement locations moved away from the crack tip. However, the ratio stayed roughly the same for the near tip surface measurements at various crack lengths.

  5. Environmental effects of high temperature sodium of fatigue crack characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ozawa, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    In order to study fatigue crack growth characteristics in the components used in liquid sodium, fatigue tests were carried out at 550degC. This is near the system temperature used for sodium coolant in fast breeder reactors (FBRs). The factors influencing fatigue lifetime in sodium compared with that in air were investigated by observation of surface cracks in 316FR steel. Furthermore, the effects of sodium environment on fatigue were investigated based on examining the results of thermal striping tests, etc., obtained up to now. The results of the fatigue tests show that many micro cracks in the shearing direction were produced by the mid-lifetime, and micro cracks connected quickly after that. This is because an oxidation film was not formed, since sodium is of a reductive nature, and strain of the material surface tends to distribute equally. During crack progression there is no oxide formed on broken surfaces. Therefore re-combination between broken surfaces takes place, and crack progression rate falls. Furthermore, in non-propagating crack, the wedge effect by oxide between broken surfaces at the time of compression is small. Therefore, the crack closure angle is small, compression strain generated in the crack tip becomes large, and the crack cannot stop easily. As mentioned above, the main sodium influence on the fatigue characteristics are because of its reductive nature. In summary, in sodium environment, it is hard to form a crack and to get it to grow. Once started, however, it is hard to stop the crack in sodium compared with in the case of the air. (author)

  6. To Crack or Not to Crack: Strain in High Temperature Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godeke, Arno

    2007-01-01

    Round wire Bi 2212 is emerging as a viable successor of Nb3Sn in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, to generate magnetic fields that surpass the intrinsic limitations of Nb3Sn. Rather bold claims are made on achievable magnetic fields in applications using Bi 2212, due to the materials' estimated critical magnetic field of 100 Tor higher. High transport currents in high magnetic fields, however, lead to large stress on, and resulting large strain in the superconductor. The effect of strain on the critical properties of Bi-2212 is far from understood, and strain is, as with Nb3Sn, often treated as a secondary parameter in the design of superconducting magnets. Reversibility of the strain induced change of the critical surface of Nb3Sn, points to an electronic origin of the observed strain dependence. Record breaking high field magnets are enabled by virtue of such reversible behavior. Strain effects on the critical surface of Bi-2212, in contrast, are mainly irreversible and suggest a non-electronic origin of the observed strain dependence, which appears to be dominated by the formation of cracks in the superconductor volumes. A review is presented of available results on the effects of strain on the critical surface of Bi-2212, Bi-2223 and YBCO. It is shown how a generic behavior emerges for the (axial) strain dependence of the critical current density, and how the irreversible reduction of the critical current density is dominated by strain induced crack formation in the superconductor. From this generic model it becomes clear that magnets using high temperature superconductors will be strain limited far before the intrinsic magnetic field limitations will be approached, or possibly even before the magnetic field limitation of Nb3Sn can be surpassed. On a positive note, in a very promising recent result from NIST on the axial strain dependence of the critical current density in extremely well aligned YBCO, reversible behavior was observed. This

  7. Effect of notches on fatigue crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.

    1986-01-01

    Detailed results are given of the theoretical and experimental programme outline in the first report, GKSS 82/E/44. It is concluded that, in specimens of commercial engineering alloys (Steel DIN 1.6310 = 20MnMoNi 55, Al alloys) containing blunt, machined notches, the fatigue life depends on the time taken to propagate a crack from a surface defect, and the propagation rate depends on the plastic deformation range at the crack tip, which is characterised by the stress intensity range, once the crack has extended beyond the notch strain field. Areas in which this work may be extended, and refined, are discussed in detail. In particular, crack closure and environmental effects are considered, and the effect of cyclic softening is discussed. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Effects of rust in the crack face on crack detection based on Sonic-IR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harai, Y.; Izumi, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Takamatsu, T.; Sakagami, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sonic-IR, which is based on the thermographic detection of the temperature rise due to frictional heating at the defect faces under ultrasonic excitation, has an advantage in the detection of closed and small defects. However, this method has a lot of nuclear factors relating to heat generation. In this study, effects of rust in the crack faces on the crack detection based on the sonic-IR method is experimentally investigated by using crack specimens. The heat generation by ultrasonic excitation was observed regularly during rust accelerated test using original device. The distribution of temperature change around the crack was changed with the progress of rust. This change in heat generation, it believed to be due to change in the contact state of the crack surface due to rust. As a result, it was found that heat generation by ultrasonic excitation is affected by rust in the crack faces. And it was also found that crack detection can be conducted by sonic-IR even if rust was generated in the crack faces. (author)

  9. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  10. Atomistics of crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.; Massoumzadeh, B.

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamic technique is used to investigate static and dynamic aspects of crack extension. The material chosen for this study was the 2D triangular solid with atoms interacting via the Johnson potential. The 2D Johnson solid was chosen for this study since a sharp crack in this material remains stable against dislocation emission up to the critical Griffith load. This behavior allows for a meaningful comparison between the simulation results and continuum energy theorems for crack extension by appropriately defining an effective modulus which accounts for sample size effects and the non-linear elastic behavior of the Johnson solid. Simulation results are presented for the stress fields of moving cracks and these dynamic results are discussed in terms of the dynamic crack propagation theories, of Mott, Eshelby, and Freund

  11. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  12. K{sub I} formula for pipes with a semi-elliptical longitudinal or circumferential, internal or external surface crack; Formulaire de K{sub I} pour les tubes comportant un defaut de surface semi-elliptique longitudinal ou circonferentiel, interne ou externe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapuliot, St

    2000-07-01

    The report presents the K{sub I} formula realized for pipes containing a semi-elliptical longitudinal or circumferential, internal or external surface crack. It describes successively: the geometry of the studied pipes and defects with the complement realized for limit values; the finite element models used for the K{sub I} calculation; the results validation by a comparison with available solutions; the results presented in tables for the deepest point and the surface point of the semi-ellipse, and all along the crack front; the variables and the interpolation tools for the optimization of the use of the formula. All the presented results constitutes a reference data base to complete the A16 guide for defect assessment. (authors)

  13. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  14. Crack tip strain evolution and crack closure during overload of a growing fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Qiang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fatigue crack growth is retarded after an overload, which has been explained either by plasticity-induced crack closure or near-tip residual stress. However, any interpretation of overload effect is insufficient if strain evolution in front of crack tip is not properly considered. The current understanding of overload-induced retardation lacks the clarification of the relationship between crack closure at crack wake and strain evolution at crack tip. In this work, a material with low work hardening coefficient was used to study the effect of overload on crack tip strain evolution and crack closure by in-situ SEM observation and digital image correlation technique. Crack opening displacement (COD and crack tip strain were measured before and after the overload. It was observed that the evolution of crack tip strain follows the crack opening behaviour behind the crack tip, indicating a smaller influence of overload on micro-mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack growth. After the overload, plastic strain accumulation was responsible for crack growth. The strain at a certain distance to crack tip was mapped, and it was found that the crack tip plastic zone size correlated well with crack growth rate during post-overload fatigue crack propagation.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking and dealloying of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez, M.F.; Bianchi, G.L.; Galvele, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of copper-gold alloy in iodine vapor was studied and the results were analyzed under the scope of the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism. The copper-gold alloy undergoes stress corrosion cracking in iodine. Copper iodide was responsible of that behavior. The copper-gold alloy shows two processes in parallel: stress corrosion cracking and dealloying. As was predicted by the surface mobility stress corrosion cracking mechanism, the increase in strain rate induces an increase in the crack propagation rate. (Author)

  16. Evaluation of the crack plane equilibrium model for predicting plastic fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Smith, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Crack Plane Equilibium (CPE) model is a simple model for predicting the initiation of crack growth in ductile materials. The CPE model is evaluated for center-crack tension specimens and for pipe specimens containing part-through circumferential cracks emanating from the inside surface of the pipe. The model is based upon requiring equilibrium between the applied loads and an assumed stress distribution in the uncracked ligament near the crack tip. Required fracture parameters are the ultimate tensile strength and a process zone size at the crack tip that is determined from simple fracture tests. Crack growth initiation for the crack and specimen geometries studied is predicted with sufficient accuracy to warrant extending the CPE model for investigating other geometries and for predicting stable crack growth and the onset of unstable crack growth

  17. Evaluation Model for Restraint Effect of Pressure Induced Bending on the Plastic Crack Opening of Circumferential Through-Wall-Crack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin-Weon

    2006-01-01

    Most of the pipe crack evaluation procedures, including leak-before-break (LBB) analysis, assume that the cracked pipe subjected to remote bending or internal pressure is free to rotate. In this case, the pressure induced bending (PIB) enhances crack opening of a through-wall-crack (TWC) in a pipe. In a real piping system, however, the PIB will be restrained because the ends of the pipe are constrained by the rest of the piping system. Hence, the amount of restraint affects the crack opening of a TWC in a pipe, and the restraint effect on crack opening directly affects the results of LBB evaluation. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the restraint effect of PIB on crack opening displacement (COD) to quantify the uncertainties in current analysis procedures and to ensure the application of LBB concepts to nuclear piping systems. Recently, several researches were conducted to investigate the restraint effect of PIB on COD, and they proposed a simplified model to evaluate COD under restrained conditions. However, these results are quite limited because the restraint effect was evaluated only in terms of linear-elastic crack opening. In practice, the TWC in a pipe behaves plastically under normal operating loads, and the current LBB analysis methodologies require elastic-plastic crack opening evaluation. Therefore, this study evaluates the restraint effect of PIB on the plastic crack opening of a TWC in a pipe using finite element analysis under various influencing parameters. Based on these results, a closed-from model to be able to estimate the restraint effect of PIB on plastic crack opening is proposed

  18. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism in rails. Nonlinear material properties, actual wheel-rail geometries and realistic loading conditions are considered in the modelling process. Using a 3D explicit finite element analysis the transient rolling contact behaviour of wheel on rail is simulated. Employing the critical plane concept, the material points with the largest possibility of crack initiation are determined; based on which, the 3D orientations/angles of the possible squat cracks are estimated. Numerical estimations are compared with sample results of experimental observations on a rail specimen with squat from the site. The findings suggest a proper agreement between results of modelling and experiment. It is observed that squat cracks initiate at an in-plane angle around 13°-22° relative to the rail surface. The initiation angle seen on surface plane is calculated around 29°-48°, while the crack tend to initiate in angles around 25°-31° in the rail cross-section.

  19. Studies on the behavior of part-through circumferential crack at intrados in elbows under in-plane bending moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.; Prabhakaran, K.M.; Ghosh, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Behavior of cracked elbows with part-through crack at intrados under bending moment is studied. → Some part of crack always opens and some part gets closed irrespective of mode of applied moment. → Fraction of the crack that opens basically decides the weakening effect of the cracked elbow. → Results will be useful for fracture studies and limit load estimation especially for LBB. - Abstract: This paper presents the behavior of part-through circumferential crack at intrados in elbows under in-plane bending moment. This is based on detailed non-linear (both material and geometric) finite element analysis performed on various sizes of elbows (generally used in piping industry), having different crack sizes. It is observed that some part of the crack always opens and some part gets closed irrespective of the mode of applied bending moment (opening/closing). The fraction of the crack that opens basically decides the weakening effect of the cracked elbow. It is observed that there is a threshold value of crack length and crack depth, before which no crack opening is observed under opening mode. Also as elbow becomes thinner, the threshold value of above two parameters increases. Quite interestingly, the part of crack which closes in opening mode opens under closing mode. The above mentioned study on the behavior of crack will be useful for fracture studies and limit load estimation especially when leak before break concept is to be employed.

  20. Application of break preclusion concept in German nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E. [Energie-Versorgung Schwaben AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Maier, V. [Bayernwerk AG, Muenchen (Germany); Nagel, G. [PraussenElektra AG, Hannover (Germany)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The break preclusion concept is based on {open_quotes}KTA rules{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}RSK guidelines{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Rahmenspeziflkation Basissicherheit{close_quotes}. These fundamental rules containing for example requirements on material, design, calculation, manufacturing and testing procedures are explained and the technical realisation is shown by means of examples. The proof of the quality of these piping systems can be executed by means of fracture mechanics calculations by showing that in every case the leakage monitoring system already detect cracks which are clearly smaller than the critical crack. Thus the leak before break behavior and the break preclusion concept is implicitly affirmed. In order to further diminish conservativities in the fracture mechanics procedures, specific research projects are executed which are explained in this contribution.

  1. Automatic crack detection method for loaded coal in vibration failure process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwu Li

    Full Text Available In the coal mining process, the destabilization of loaded coal mass is a prerequisite for coal and rock dynamic disaster, and surface cracks of the coal and rock mass are important indicators, reflecting the current state of the coal body. The detection of surface cracks in the coal body plays an important role in coal mine safety monitoring. In this paper, a method for detecting the surface cracks of loaded coal by a vibration failure process is proposed based on the characteristics of the surface cracks of coal and support vector machine (SVM. A large number of cracked images are obtained by establishing a vibration-induced failure test system and industrial camera. Histogram equalization and a hysteresis threshold algorithm were used to reduce the noise and emphasize the crack; then, 600 images and regions, including cracks and non-cracks, were manually labelled. In the crack feature extraction stage, eight features of the cracks are extracted to distinguish cracks from other objects. Finally, a crack identification model with an accuracy over 95% was trained by inputting the labelled sample images into the SVM classifier. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has a higher accuracy than the conventional algorithm and can effectively identify cracks on the surface of the coal and rock mass automatically.

  2. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  3. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  4. Absence of spontaneous magnetism associated with a possible time-reversal symmetry breaking state beneath the surface of (110)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, H.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.; Suter, A.; Huhtinen, H.; Paturi, P.; Morenzoni, E.

    2013-11-01

    We report the results of a search for spontaneous magnetism due to a time-reversal symmetry breaking phase in the superconducting state of (110)-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ films, expected near the surface in this geometry. Zero field and weak transverse field measurements performed using the low-energy muon spin rotation technique with muons implanted a few nm inside optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ-(110) films show no appearance of spontaneous magnetic fields below the superconducting temperature down to 2.9 K. Our results give an upper limit of ˜0.02 mT for putative spontaneous internal fields.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Newman, Roger

    2010-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  7. Cracking the Gender Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennison, Betina Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Why do men continue to fill most of the senior executive positions and seats in the board of directors in Western corporations? Almost everyone agrees that diversity is good, many women are coming down the pipeline, and companies, states and international organizations and institutions have done...... in leadership management, we must become more aware and take advantage of this complexity. We must crack the codes in order to crack the curve....

  8. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  9. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  10. Development of digital image correlation method to analyse crack ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The wall deficiency is very difficult to detect in practical experiments because crack formation and development cannot be measured accurately. Therefore, the digital image correlation method is proposed in this study to observe the surface deformation of brick wall; the feasibility of applying this method for crack observation ...

  11. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300 degrees C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300 degrees C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis

  12. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  13. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Enamel Crack Behavior Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, M S; Shimada, Y; Sadr, A; Sumi, Y; Tagami, J

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to nondestructively analyze enamel crack behavior on different areas of teeth using 3D swept source-optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). Ten freshly extracted human teeth of each type on each arch ( n = 80 teeth) were inspected for enamel crack patterns on functional, contact and nonfunctional, or noncontact areas using 3D SS-OCT. The predominant crack pattern for each location on each specimen was noted and analyzed. The OCT observations were validated by direct observations of sectioned specimens under confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Cracks appeared as bright lines with SS-OCT, with 3 crack patterns identified: Type I - superficial horizontal cracks; Type II - vertically (occluso-gingival) oriented cracks; and Type III - hybrid or complicated cracks, a combination of a Type I and Type III cracks, which may or may not be confluent with each other. Type II cracks were predominant on noncontacting surfaces of incisors and canines and nonfunctional cusps of posterior teeth. Type I and III cracks were predominant on the contacting surfaces of incisors, cusps of canines, and functional cusps of posterior teeth. Cracks originating from the dental-enamel junction and enamel tufts, crack deflections, and the initiation of new cracks within the enamel (internal cracks) were observed as bright areas. CLSM observations corroborated the SS-OCT findings. We found that crack pattern, tooth type, and the location of the crack on the tooth exhibited a strong correlation. We show that the use of 3D SS-OCT permits for the nondestructive 3D imaging and analysis of enamel crack behavior in whole human teeth in vitro. 3D SS-OCT possesses potential for use in clinical studies for the analysis of enamel crack behavior.

  14. Subsurface crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in gigacycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zhiyong; Wagner, Daniele; Bathias, Claude; Paris, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    In the very high cycle regime (N f > 10 7 cycles) cracks can nucleate on inclusions, 'supergrains' and pores, which leads to fish-eye propagation around the defect. The initiation from an inclusion or other defect is almost equal to the total crack growth lifetime, perhaps much more than 99% of this lifetime in many cases. Integration of the Paris law allows one to predict the number of cycles to crack initiation. A cyclic plastic zone around the crack exists, and recording the surface temperature of the sample during the test may allow one to follow crack propagation and determine the number of cycles to crack initiation. A thermo-mechanical model has been developed. In this study several fish-eyes from various materials have been observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the fractographic results analyzed as they related to the mechanical and thermo-mechanical models.

  15. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  16. Natural zeolite bitumen cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, S.M.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Bian, J.; Wangen, E.; Koenig, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate how low cost heavy oil upgrading in the field could reduce the need for diluents while lowering the cost for pipelining. Low cost field upgrading could also contribute to lowering contaminant levels. The performance of visbreaking processes could be improved by using disposable cracking agents. In turn, the economics of field upgrading of in-situ derived bitumen would be improved. However, in order to be viable, such agents would have to be far less expensive than current commercial cracking catalysts. A platy natural zeolite was selected for modification and testing due to its unique chemical and morphological properties. A catalyst-bearing oil sand was then heat-treated for 1 hour at 400 degrees C in a sealed microreactor. Under these mild cracking conditions, the catalyst-bearing oil sand produced extractable products of much lower viscosity. The products also contained considerably more gas oil and middle distillates than raw oil sand processed under the same conditions as thermal cracking alone. According to model cracking studies using hexadecane, these modified mineral zeolites may be more active cracking agents than undiluted premium commercial FCC catalyst. These materials hold promise for partial upgrading schemes to reduce solvent requirements in the field. tabs., figs.

  17. Role of plasticity-induced crack closure in fatigue crack growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The premature contact of crack surfaces attributable to the near-tip plastic deformations under cyclic loading, which is commonly referred to as plasticity induced crack closure (PICC, has long been focused as supposedly controlling factor of fatigue crack growth (FCG. Nevertheless, when the plane-strain near-tip constraint is approached, PICC lacks of straightforward evidence, so that its significance in FCG, and even the very existence, remain debatable. To add insights into this matter, large-deformation elastoplastic simulations of plane-strain crack under constant amplitude load cycling at different load ranges and ratios, as well as with an overload, have been performed. Modeling visualizes the Laird-Smith conceptual mechanism of FCG by plastic blunting and re-sharpening. Simulation reproduces the experimental trends of FCG concerning the roles of stress intensity factor range and overload, but PICC has never been detected. Near-tip deformation patterns discard the filling-in a crack with material stretched out of the crack plane in the wake behind the tip as supposed PICC origin. Despite the absence of closure, load-deformation curves appear bent, which raises doubts about the trustworthiness of closure assessment from the compliance variation. This demonstrates ambiguities of PICC as a supposedly intrinsic factor of FCG and, by implication, favors the stresses and strains in front of the crack tip as genuine fatigue drivers.

  18. Fatigue Crack Prognostics by Optical Quantification of Defect Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K. S.; Buckner, B. D.; Earthman, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    Defect frequency, a fatigue crack prognostics indicator, is defined as the number of microcracks per second detected using a laser beam that is scanned across a surface at a constant predetermined frequency. In the present article, a mechanistic approach was taken to develop a methodology for deducing crack length and crack growth information from defect frequency data generated from laser scanning measurements made on fatigued surfaces. The method was developed by considering a defect frequency vs fatigue cycle curve that comprised three regions: (i) a crack initiation regime of rising defect frequency, (ii) a plateau region of a relatively constant defect frequency, and (iii) a region of rapid rising defect frequency due to crack growth. Relations between defect frequency and fatigue cycle were developed for each of these three regions and utilized to deduce crack depth information from laser scanning data of 7075-T6 notched specimens. The proposed method was validated using experimental data of crack density and crack length data from the literature for a structural steel. The proposed approach was successful in predicting the length or depth of small fatigue cracks in notched 7075-T6 specimens and in smooth fatigue specimens of a structural steel.

  19. 'BREAKS' Protocol for Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vijayakumar; Bista, Bibek; Koshy, Cheriyan

    2010-05-01

    Information that drastically alters the life world of the patient is termed as bad news. Conveying bad news is a skilled communication, and not at all easy. The amount of truth to be disclosed is subjective. A properly structured and well-orchestrated communication has a positive therapeutic effect. This is a process of negotiation between patient and physician, but physicians often find it difficult due to many reasons. They feel incompetent and are afraid of unleashing a negative reaction from the patient or their relatives. The physician is reminded of his or her own vulnerability to terminal illness, and find themselves powerless over emotional distress. Lack of sufficient training in breaking bad news is a handicap to most physicians and health care workers. Adherence to the principles of client-centered counseling is helpful in attaining this skill. Fundamental insight of the patient is exploited and the bad news is delivered in a structured manner, because the patient is the one who knows what is hurting him most and he is the one who knows how to move forward. Six-step SPIKES protocol is widely used for breaking bad news. In this paper, we put forward another six-step protocol, the BREAKS protocol as a systematic and easy communication strategy for breaking bad news. Development of competence in dealing with difficult situations has positive therapeutic outcome and is a professionally satisfying one.

  20. A consistent partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Jesper L.; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Nielsen, Leif Otto

    2007-01-01

    Present extended finite element method (XFEM) elements for cohesive crack growth may often not be able to model equal stresses on both sides of the discontinuity when acting as a crack-tip element. The authors have developed a new partly cracked XFEM element for cohesive crack growth with extra...... enrichments to the cracked elements. The extra enrichments are element side local and were developed by superposition of the standard nodal shape functions for the element and standard nodal shape functions for a sub-triangle of the cracked element. With the extra enrichments, the crack-tip element becomes...... capable of modelling variations in the discontinuous displacement field on both sides of the crack and hence also capable of modelling the case where equal stresses are present on each side of the crack. The enrichment was implemented for the 3-node constant strain triangle (CST) and a standard algorithm...

  1. Fatigue crack growth behavior and overload effect of AISI 304 stainless steel in different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelestemur, Mehmet Halidun

    1998-12-01

    acceleration right after the overload application was observed. However, the acceleration was not detected on the interior of the material along the crack tip. Only the surface in which the plane stress was effective showed crack propagation in acceleration zone. This result were explained by strain hardening and plastic deformation of grains at the overload zone. Discontinuous crack closure occurred following the overload. In other words, at the overload position, fracture surfaces on which stretching occurred came into contact at high stress intensity factor values and far away from the overload position. As a result of discontinuous crack closure, crack opening or closing data were very high although the fatigue crack growth rate reached its original value.

  2. Short Fatigue Crack Growth Micromechanisms in a Cast Aluminium Piston Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuya, T. O.; Crump, J.; Sinclair, I.; Soady, K. A.; Thomson, R. C.; Reed, P. A. S.

    The short fatigue crack growth behaviour of a model cast aluminium piston alloy has been investigated. This has been achieved using a combination of fatigue crack replication methods at various intervals during fatigue testing and post-mortem analysis of fracture surfaces and crack profiles. Crack-microstructure interactions have been clearly delineated using a combination of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three dimensional (3D) X-ray microtomography (SRCT). Results show that intermetallic particles play a significant role in determining the crack path and growth rate of short fatigue cracks. It is observed that the growth of short cracks is often retarded or even arrested at intermetallic particles and grain boundaries. Crack deflection at intermetallics and grain boundaries is also frequently observed. These results have been compared with the long crack growth behaviour of the alloy

  3. Probabilistic modeling of crack networks in thermal fatigue; Modelisation probabiliste de formation de reseaux de fissures de fatigue thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malesys, N

    2007-11-15

    Thermal superficial crack networks have been detected in mixing zone of cooling system in nuclear power plants. Numerous experimental works have already been led to characterize initiation and propagation of these cracks. The random aspect of initiation led to propose a probabilistic model for the formation and propagation of crack networks in thermal fatigue. In a first part, uniaxial mechanical test were performed on smooth and slightly notched specimens in order to characterize the initiation of multiple cracks, their arrest due to obscuration and the coalescence phenomenon by recovery of amplification stress zones. In a second time, the probabilistic model was established under two assumptions: the continuous cracks initiation on surface, described by a Poisson point process law with threshold, and the shielding phenomenon which prohibits the initiation or the propagation of a crack if this one is in the relaxation stress zone of another existing crack. The crack propagation is assumed to follow a Paris' law based on the computation of stress intensity factors at the top and the bottom of crack. The evolution of multiaxial cracks on the surface can be followed thanks to three quantities: the shielding probability, comparable to a damage variable of the structure, the initiated crack density, representing the total number of cracks per unit surface which can be compared to experimental observations, and the propagating crack density, representing the number per unit surface of active cracks in the network. The crack sizes distribution is also computed by the model allowing an easier comparison with experimental results. (author)

  4. Preventive effect of shot peening on stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Toshihiko; Enomoto, Kunio; Saito, Hideyo; Morinaka, Ren; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) prevention was evaluated from the viewpoints of crack initiation and propagation. It was found that the residual stress in a Type-304 stainless-steel specimen is changed - from tensile of 300 MPa to compressive of -800 MPa - by shot peening, and the effective SP depth is 0.35 mm. It was also found that the crack initiation and propagation were prevented by shot peening. The mechanism by which the shot peening prevents these phenomena is explained according to the theory of superposition and loading history. That is, the prevention of crack initiation and propagation results from the fact that the compressive residual stress caused by SP decreases the applied load on the crack surface and prevents rupturing of the oxide film on the surface. Moreover, the effects of SCC prevention were shown to be valid when cyclic loading is applied after peening. (author)

  5. Diffusion of radon through cracks in a concrete slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, K A

    1982-07-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe diffusion of radon through cracks or gaps in concrete slabs which are used in building foundations. As radon approaches the soil surface from underlying soil, it encounters a concrete slab. The radon will diffuse toward any air-filled cracks. The rate of exhalation through a portion of a cracked slab is determined and compared to the rate of exhalation from the same surface area of bare soil. In a typical case, this ratio is approx. 0.25. This is about a 20-fold increase to the ratio found when the concrete slab has no cracks. Therefore crack pathways are potentially a major source of indoor radon.

  6. The theory of viscoelastic crack propagation and healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J A

    2004-01-01

    Classical fracture mechanics applied to a viscoelastic material states that the critical stress-intensity factor at which the crack propagates depends on the instantaneous elastic modulus of the solid, and provides no mechanism for a speed dependence of the apparent surface energy. This suggests that any speed dependence must be because surface energy itself is speed-dependant. Schapery (1975) has explained how by using the Barenblatt concept of fracture mechanics, involving surface forces instead of surface energy alone, a dependence of the apparent surface energy on the crack speed is found. Here, Schapery's principles are applied to the particular case of a Maugis-Dugdale surface force law and a three-element viscoelastic solid to find the complete dependence of the apparent surface energy, both in fracture and in crack healing, on the crack velocity. To a good approximation, the apparent surface energy in crack healing is the reciprocal of the energy for fracture. Simple approximate equations relating the crack speed to the stress-intensity factor are given

  7. The theory of viscoelastic crack propagation and healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, J A [University Engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-21

    Classical fracture mechanics applied to a viscoelastic material states that the critical stress-intensity factor at which the crack propagates depends on the instantaneous elastic modulus of the solid, and provides no mechanism for a speed dependence of the apparent surface energy. This suggests that any speed dependence must be because surface energy itself is speed-dependant. Schapery (1975) has explained how by using the Barenblatt concept of fracture mechanics, involving surface forces instead of surface energy alone, a dependence of the apparent surface energy on the crack speed is found. Here, Schapery's principles are applied to the particular case of a Maugis-Dugdale surface force law and a three-element viscoelastic solid to find the complete dependence of the apparent surface energy, both in fracture and in crack healing, on the crack velocity. To a good approximation, the apparent surface energy in crack healing is the reciprocal of the energy for fracture. Simple approximate equations relating the crack speed to the stress-intensity factor are given.

  8. [Crack path in dental amalgams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oualint, S; Lagouvardos, P; Vougiouklakis, G

    1990-12-01

    The need of amalgam to resist fracture becomes a more evident necessity when restoration margins are taken into consideration. Marginal microcracks permit bacteria to pass beneath the restoration resulting in cement base dessalution, secondary caries and pulp inflammation. Fracture toughness of amalgam is usually studied indirectly from the maximum force required to fracture the amalgam, during compressive, tensile or bend stresses, through its ability to deform plastically or its surface hardness. Important information on fracture toughness of amalgams can be also taken from metallographic studies of their microstructures, during or after the formation of a crack. This study was planned to evaluate the microcracks produced on the surface of different amalgams, with a Vickers pyramid head of a hardness tester and their relation to the different phases of the amalgam structure. Seven amalgams were studied: Amalcap-F, Tytin, Cupralloy, Ana-2000 and three experimental combinations of them, in order to have in the same amalgam different alloy particles, for evaluation purposes. The result showed that the structure elements, that mainly assist crack formation and propagation, are voids and gamma 2-phase, while elements that resist fracture are alloy particles (gamma-phase) in conventional amalgams, eutectic spheres in admixed high copper amalgams and eta'-phase crystals in single melt high copper amalgams.

  9. Assessment of cracks in reinforced concrete by means of electrical resistance and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Šavija, B.; Schlangen, E.; Polder, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    The durability of cracked reinforced concrete is a serious concern in the construction industry. Cracks represent fast routes for chloride penetration, which can result in reinforcement corrosion. Bending or tapered cracks have the characteristic of being wider at the surface and becoming narrower

  10. Consistency of Trend Break Point Estimator with Underspecified Break Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the consistency of trend break point estimators when the number of breaks is underspecified. The consistency of break point estimators in a simple location model with level shifts has been well documented by researchers under various settings, including extensions such as allowing a time trend in the model. Despite the consistency of break point estimators of level shifts, there are few papers on the consistency of trend shift break point estimators in the presence of an underspecified break number. The simulation study and asymptotic analysis in this paper show that the trend shift break point estimator does not converge to the true break points when the break number is underspecified. In the case of two trend shifts, the inconsistency problem worsens if the magnitudes of the breaks are similar and the breaks are either both positive or both negative. The limiting distribution for the trend break point estimator is developed and closely approximates the finite sample performance.

  11. Nonlinear crack mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshun, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic features of the deformation and failure of actual materials in the vicinity of a crack tip are due to their physical nonlinearity in the stress-concentration zone, which is a result of plasticity, microfailure, or a nonlinear dependence of the interatomic forces on the distance. Therefore, adequate models of the failure mechanics must be nonlinear, in principle, although linear failure mechanics is applicable if the zone of nonlinear deformation is small in comparison with the crack length. Models of crack mechanics are based on analytical solutions of the problem of the stress-strain state in the vicinity of the crack. On account of the complexity of the problem, nonlinear models are bason on approximate schematic solutions. In the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale nonlinear model, one of the best known, the actual two-dimensional plastic zone (the nonlinearity zone) is replaced by a narrow one-dimensional zone, which is then modeled by extending the crack with a specified normal load equal to the yield point. The condition of finite stress is applied here, and hence the length of the plastic zone is determined. As a result of this approximation, the displacement in the plastic zone at the abscissa is nonzero

  12. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  13. Automated system for crack detection using infrared thermograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starman, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was the development of the automated system for crack detection on square steel bars used in the automotive industry for axle and shaft construction. The automated system for thermographic crack detection uses brief pulsed eddy currents to heat steel components under inspection. Cracks, if present, will disturb the current flow and so generate changes in the temperature profile in the crack area. These changes of temperature are visualized using an infrared camera. The image acquired by the infrared camera is evaluated through an image processing system. The advantages afforded by the system are its inspection time, its excellent flaw detection sensitivity and its ability to detect hidden, subsurface cracks. The automated system consists of four IR cameras (each side of steel bar is evaluated at a time), coil, high frequency generator and control place with computers. The system is a part of the inspection line where the subsurface and surface cracks are searched. If the crack is present, the cracked place is automatically marked. The components without cracks are then deposited apart from defective blocks. The system is fully automated and its ability is to evaluate four meter blocks within 20 seconds. This is the real reason for using this system in real industrial applications. (author)

  14. Concrete Crack Identification Using a UAV Incorporating Hybrid Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjun; Lee, Junhwa; Ahn, Eunjong; Cho, Soojin; Shin, Myoungsu; Sim, Sung-Han

    2017-09-07

    Crack assessment is an essential process in the maintenance of concrete structures. In general, concrete cracks are inspected by manual visual observation of the surface, which is intrinsically subjective as it depends on the experience of inspectors. Further, it is time-consuming, expensive, and often unsafe when inaccessible structural members are to be assessed. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies combined with digital image processing have recently been applied to crack assessment to overcome the drawbacks of manual visual inspection. However, identification of crack information in terms of width and length has not been fully explored in the UAV-based applications, because of the absence of distance measurement and tailored image processing. This paper presents a crack identification strategy that combines hybrid image processing with UAV technology. Equipped with a camera, an ultrasonic displacement sensor, and a WiFi module, the system provides the image of cracks and the associated working distance from a target structure on demand. The obtained information is subsequently processed by hybrid image binarization to estimate the crack width accurately while minimizing the loss of the crack length information. The proposed system has shown to successfully measure cracks thicker than 0.1 mm with the maximum length estimation error of 7.3%.

  15. Analytical Solutions for Corrosion-Induced Cohesive Concrete Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Peng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new analytical model to study the evolution of radial cracking around a corroding steel reinforcement bar embedded in concrete. The concrete cover for the corroding rebar is modelled as a thick-walled cylinder subject to axisymmetrical displacement constraint at the internal boundary generated by expansive corrosion products. A bilinear softening curve reflecting realistic concrete property, together with the crack band theory for concrete fracture, is applied to model the residual tensile stress in the cracked concrete. A governing equation for directly solving the crack width in cover concrete is established for the proposed analytical model. Closed-form solutions for crack width are then obtained at various stages during the evolution of cracking in cover concrete. The propagation of crack front with corrosion progress is studied, and the time to cracking on concrete cover surface is predicted. Mechanical parameters of the model including residual tensile strength, reduced tensile stiffness, and radial pressure at the bond interface are investigated during the evolution of cover concrete cracking. Finally, the analytical predictions are examined by comparing with the published experimental data, and mechanical parameters are analysed with the progress of reinforcement corrosion and through the concrete cover.

  16. Experimental study and local approach of cleavage crack arrest in a bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, A.

    2012-01-01

    EDF wants to complete the assessment of reactor pressure vessels, usually based on crack initiation concept, by crack arrest concept. The work aims at improving the knowledge of cleavage crack arrest in a reactor pressure vessel steel. For that purpose, isothermal crack arrest experiments were performed for temperatures ranging from - 150 C up to - 50 C on compact tensile specimens and on pre-cracked rings submitted to compressive loading. Fractographic observations revealed that the whole crack propagation and arrest occurs by cleavage even if ductile tearing occurs before initiation of the unstable crack propagation. A local cleavage crack arrest criterion is applied in finite element computations carried out in elasto-visco-plasticity and in full dynamics: the crack propagates since the largest principal stress reaches a critical stress. The application of this criterion on the experiments leads to a good prediction of the crack speed and of the crack length and shows that the critical stress increases with the temperature in relation with dissipation features observed on the fracture surfaces. Dependence to the geometry is observed; it can be due to the assumption used for the 2D computations. The study of the structural dynamic shows that the crack arrest phenomenon is very linked to the global dynamics of the structure: crack arrest and crack closure occur approximately at the same time. (author)

  17. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop an independent capability for the detection and control of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor (LWR) systems and to evaluate of the technical merits of proposed remedies for the problem. The experimental work is initially concentrated on problems related to intergranular SCC in BWR piping systems. The BWR utilities, the reactor vendors, and related research organizations have developed remedies for the pipe cracking problems and have begun to develop the crack-growth-rate data base which is needed to assure the integrity of degraded piping and to develop an adequate plan for the inspection and monitoring of such piping. The performance of the remedies in laboratory tests is quite encouraging, but there are still technical questions which must be addressed to ensure that the laboratory results will accurately reflect performance in-reactor. For existing plants even with the assurance of leak-before-break it is important to upgrade the capability to detect leaks rather than completely relying on periodic in-service inspection. Although other leak detection system (e.g., moisture-sensitive tapes) will be considered, acoustic leak detection systems seem to offer the best combination of sensitivity, ability to locate a leak, and leak-rate measurement. The assessment and development of a practical leak detection system is another important objective of this program

  19. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    The Dugdale crack model is widely used in materials science to predict strength of defective (cracked) materials. A stable Dugdale crack in an elasto-plastic material is prevented from spreading by uniformly distributed cohesive stresses acting in narrow areas at the crack tips. These stresses...... are assumed to be self created by local materials flow. The strength sigma_CR predictid by the Dugdale model is sigma_CR =(E Gamma_CR/phi1)^½ where E and 1 are Young’s modulus and crack half-length respectively of the material considered. The so-called critical strain energy rate is Gamma_CR = sigma......) by a constant flow stress (sigma_L). A number of materials, however, do not at all exhibit this kind of flow. Such materials are considered in this paper by Modified Dugdale crack models which apply for any cohesive stress distribution in crack front areas. Formally modified Dugdale crack models exhibit...

  20. Effects of crack tip plasticity on fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    A simple model for fatigue crack propagation has been proposed based on the modified Dugdale model of crack tip plasticity and energy balance approach to stable crack propagation. To verify the proposed model, fatigue tests were performed on the specimens of Type 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718. To measure the effect of crack tip bluntness on the fatigue crack propagation, specimens of different thickness were used. Results show that the theoretical prediction of fatigue crack propagation agreed well with the experimental test results. It is suggested that the prediction of fatigue crack propagation should take account of the different plasticity related to the variation of specimen thickness, stress state and material's tearing modulus in the crack tip region. (orig.)

  1. Treatment of Cracked Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalifah, Shaymaa; Alkandari, Halimah; Sharma, Prem N; Moule, Alex J

    2017-09-01

    Although many options are proposed for the treatment of cracked posterior teeth, most treatment decisions are not evidence based. Thus, considerable individual variation can occur regarding treatment recommendations for the same scenario. To our knowledge, there are no studies in the literature assessing practitioners' attitudes toward the treatment of cracked teeth. This research recorded variations between general practitioners and specialist groups regarding the treatment approaches of cracked teeth. In a cross-sectional structured questionnaire survey, 32 prosthodontists, 34 endodontists, and 29 general practitioners working in public and private dental health services in Kuwait were assessed regarding their treatment approach to 5 different clinical cracked tooth scenarios. Chosen treatment options varied greatly. Within each scenario, there was a wide range in treatment preferences across all groups and within each group, especially with respect to asymptomatic cracked teeth. Overall, treatment approaches did not relate to specialty training. Statistically significant differences were noticed between endodontists and general practitioners, in case of crowning teeth, in scenario 3 (P = .032), and in extracting teeth for scenario 5 (P = .048). This study highlights that, despite suggested guidelines, there are large differences in the approach to treatment planning for cracked teeth by practitioners and specialists, both as a whole and within each group. Further multicountry studies involving larger dental populations are needed to determine factors that influence practitioners' treatment choices and/or whether better or more widely accepted guidelines need to be established. More prospective well-controlled clinical case-based research with long-term follow-ups is required. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffraction-based study of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul K.

    The crack initiation sites and microstructure-sensitive growth of small fatigue cracks are experimentally characterized in two precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys, 7075-T651 and 7050-T7451, stressed in ambient temperature moist-air (warm-humid) and -50°C dry N2 (cold-dry) environmental conditions. Backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) of the fracture surfaces showed that Fe-Cu rich constituent particle clusters are the most common initiation sites within both alloys stressed in either environment. The crack growth within each alloy, on average, was observed to be slowed in the cold-dry environment than in the warm-humid environment, but only at longer crack lengths. Although no overwhelming effects of grain boundaries and grain orientations on small-crack growth were observed, crack growth data showed local fluctuations within individual grains. These observations are understood as crack propagation through the underlying substructure at the crack surface and frequent interaction with low/high-angle grain and subgrain boundaries, during cyclic loading, and, are further attributed to periodic changes in crack propagation path and multiple occurrences of crack-branching observed in the current study. SEM-based stereology in combination with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) established fatigue crack surface crystallography within the region from ˜1 to 50 mum of crack initiating particle clusters. Fatigue crack facets were parallel to a wide variety of crystallographic planes, with pole orientations distributed broadly across the irreducible stereographic triangle between the {001} and {101}-poles within both warm-humid and cold-dry environments. The results indicate environmentally affected fatigue cracking in both cases, given the similarity between the observed morphology and crystallography with that of a variety of aerospace aluminum alloys cracked in the presence of moist-air. There was no evidence of

  3. Probabilistic leak-before-break analysis with correlated input parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Guian; Niffenegger, Markus; Karanki, Durga Rao; Li Shuxin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The correlation of crack growth has the most significant impact on LBB behavior. ► The correlation impact increases with the correlation coefficients. ► The correlation impact increases with the number of cracks. ► Independent assumption may lead to nonconservative result. - Abstract: The paper presents a probabilistic methodology considering the correlations between the input variables for the analysis of leak-before-break (LBB) behavior of a pressure tube. A computer program based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with Nataf transformation has been developed to allow the proposed methodology to calculate both the time from the first leakage to unstable fracture and the time from leakage detection to unstable fracture. The results show that the correlation of the crack growth rates between different cracks has the most significant impact on the LBB behavior of the pressure tube. The impact of the parameters correlation on LBB behavior increases with the crack numbers. If the correlations between different parameters for an individual crack are not considered, the predicted results are nonconservative when the cumulative probability is below 50% and conservative when it is above 50%.

  4. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L r greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L r values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L r values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities

  5. Assessment of crack opening area for leak rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharples, J.K.; Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper outlines the background to recommended crack opening area solutions given in a proposed revision to leak before break guidance for the R6 procedure. Comparisons with experimental and analytical results are given for some selected cases of circumferential cracks in cylinders. It is shown that elastic models can provide satisfactory estimations of crack opening displacement (and area) but they become increasingly conservative for values of L{sub r} greater than approximately 0.4. The Dugdale small scale yielding model gives conservative estimates of crack opening displacement with increasing enhancement for L{sub r} values greater than 0.4. Further validation of the elastic-plastic reference stress method for up to L{sub r} values of about 1.0 is presented by experimental and analytical comparisons. Although a more detailed method, its application gives a best estimate of crack opening displacement which may be substantially greater than small scale plasticity models. It is also shown that the local boundary conditions in pipework need to be carefully considered when evaluating crack opening area for through-wall bending stresses resulting from welding residual stresses or geometry discontinuities.

  6. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep

  7. Margins in high temperature leak-before-break assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budden, P.J.; Hooton, D.G.

    1997-04-01

    Developments in the defect assessment procedure R6 to include high-temperature mechanisms in Leak-before-Break arguments are described. In particular, the effect of creep on the time available to detect a leak and on the crack opening area, and hence leak rate, is discussed. The competing influence of these two effects is emphasized by an example. The application to Leak-before-Break of the time-dependent failure assessment diagram approach for high temperature defect assessment is then outlined. The approach is shown to be of use in assessing the erosion of margins by creep.

  8. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  9. Influence of transverse shear on plasticity around an axial crack in a cylindrical shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenk, S.

    1977-01-01

    A plasticity model for a semi-elliptical axial surface crack is developed. It generalizes Dugdale's assumption of a concentrated yield zone in the plane of the crack, and a continuous stress distribution is assumed in the yield zone. The inherent difficulties arising from the use of shell theory to model a three-dimensional problem can be overcome when the crack is sufficiently deep and the material is so ductile that full yield of the section around the crack develops before failure. In that case the calculations confirm the initial assumption of separation of the crack surfaces and the sides of the yield zone. The model is used to analyse published test data on surface cracked pressurized pipes. The analysis consists in COD evaluation and estimate of failure as consequence of plastic instability. COD values are found at the crack front and bottom. The plastic instability treated here is due to occurence of large plastic strains around the crack causing the section to be contracted. Thus the effective crack size is somewhat larger than the initial size. For sufficiently high loads this mechanism may lead to instability. A method is proposed which deals with the problem by simultaneous analysis of a number of cracks with increasing depth. The method avoids iterations and enables for any load and crack length the calculation of the smallest crack depth, which wo

  10. CRACK2 - Modelling calcium carbonate deposition from bicarbonate solution in cracks in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodersen, K.

    2003-03-01

    The numerical CRACK2 model simulates precipitation of calcite from calcium bicarbonate solution (e.g. groundwater) passing through cracks in concrete or other cementitious materials. A summary of experimental work is followed by a detailed description of the model. Hydroxyl ions are transported by diffusion in pore systems in columns of cementitious materials. The hydroxyl is precipitating calcite from a flow of bicarbonate solution in a crack connecting the ends of a row of such columns. The cementitious material is simulated as calcium hydroxide mixed with inert material but with sodium hydroxide dissolved in the pore solution. Diffusive migration of cesium as radioactive isotope is also considered. Electrical interaction of the migrating ions is taken into account. Example calculations demonstrate effects of parameter variations on distribution of precipitated calcite in the crack and on the composition of the outflowing solution, which can be compared directly with experimental results. Leaching behavior of sodium can be used to tune the model to experimental observations. The calcite is mostly precipitated on top of the original crack surface and may under certain circumstances fill the crack. The produced thin layers of low porosity calcite act as a diffusion barrier limiting contact between cement and solution. Pore closure mechanisms in such layers are discussed. Implications for safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal are shortly mentioned. The model is also relevant for conventional uses of concrete. (au)

  11. In situ observation of interfacial fatigue crack growth in diffusion bonded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shu-xin [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130, Meilong Road, P.O. Box 402, Shanghai 200237 (China)]. E-mail: li_shuxion@163.com; Xuan, Fu-Zhen [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130, Meilong Road, P.O. Box 402, Shanghai 200237 (China); Tu, Shan-Tung [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130, Meilong Road, P.O. Box 402, Shanghai 200237 (China)]. E-mail: sttu@ecust.edu.cn

    2007-06-30

    Micro-fatigue tests were performed on 316LSS vacuum diffusion bonded joints to investigate the interfacial fatigue crack growth behavior with discrete micro-voids located ahead of a pre-existing crack tip. In situ observation of the interfacial fatigue crack propagation and micro-voids evolution was carried out during the whole fatigue testing. SEM of the fracture surface was analyzed. The results showed that the interface failure mechanism of similar diffusion bonded joints is different from that of dissimilar materials joints. A brittle mode is observed in the main crack growth. And the ridge interface formed in diffusion bonded joints due to surface roughness can be a resistance to the crack growth. The location of the fatigue crack initiation and the crack propagation direction derived from SEM observation of the fracture surface of the specimen are in consistent with those obtained from the in situ observation by using the optical microscope.

  12. Linear Cracking in Bridge Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Concrete cracking in bridge decks remains an important issue relative to deck durability. Cracks can allow increased penetration of chlorides, which can result in premature corrosion of the reinforcing steel and subsequent spalling of the concrete de...

  13. Crack initiation life analysis in notched pipe under cyclic bending loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Seong; Kwak, Sang Log; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Youn Won

    2001-01-01

    In order to improve leak-before-break methodology, more precisely the crack growth evaluation, a round robin analysis was proposed by the CEA Saclay. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the crack initiation life, penetration life and shape of through wall crack under cyclic bending loads. The proposed round robin analysis is composed of three main topic; fatigue crack initiation, crack propagation and crack penetration. This paper deals with the first topic, crack initiation in a notched pipe under four point bending. Both elastic-plastic finite element analysis and Neuber's rule were used to estimate the crack initiation life and the finite element models were verified by mesh-refinement, stress distribution and global deflection. In elastic-plastic finite element analysis, crack initiation life was determined by strain amplitude at the notch tip and strain-life curve of the material. In the analytical method, Neuber's rule with the consideration of load history and mean stress effect, was used for the life estimation. The effect of notch tip radius, strain range, cyclic hardening rule were examined in this study. When these results were compared with the experimental ones, the global deformation was a good agreement but crack initiation cycle was higher than the experimental result

  14. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  15. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebeena Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  16. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, Sivakumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-08-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  17. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, SivaKumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  18. Adsorption, desorption, and film formation of quinacridone and its thermal cracking product indigo on clean and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Lassnig, Roman; Truger, Magdalena; Resel, Roland; Leising, Günther; Winkler, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    The evaporation of quinacridone from a stainless steel Knudsen cell leads to the partial decomposition of this molecule in the cell, due to its comparably high sublimation temperature. At least one additional type of molecules, namely indigo, could be detected in the effusion flux. Thermal desorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have been used to study the co-deposition of these molecules on sputter-cleaned and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces. Desorption of indigo appears at temperatures of about 400 K, while quinacridone desorbs at around 510 K. For quinacridone, a desorption energy of 2.1 eV and a frequency factor for desorption of 1 × 10 19 s −1 were calculated, which in this magnitude is typical for large organic molecules. A fraction of the adsorbed quinacridone molecules (∼5%) decomposes during heating, nearly independent of the adsorbed amount, resulting in a surface composed of small carbon islands. The sticking coefficients of indigo and quinacridone were found to be close to unity on a carbon covered SiO 2 surface but significantly smaller on a sputter-cleaned substrate. The reason for the latter can be attributed to insufficient energy dissipation for unfavorably oriented impinging molecules. However, due to adsorption via a hot-precursor state, the sticking probability is increased on the surface covered with carbon islands, which act as accommodation centers.

  19. In situ observation of rolling contact fatigue cracks by laminography using ultrabright synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nakai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In rolling contact fatigue (RCF, cracks usually initiate from inclusions beneath the surface and propagate to the contact surface. In the present study, synchrotron radiation computed laminography (SRCL imaging was performed to observe flaking defects during the RCF of a high-strength steel. Specially fabricated inclusion-rich steel plate specimens were employed in the experiments. For the in situ observation of crack propagation, a compact RCF testing machine was developed, and a 4D analysis scheme was applied to the data obtained by SRCL. RCF tests were carried out near the measurement hatch of the beam line used SRCL to enable the successive observation of crack initiation and growth behaviors. Specimens before and after the occurrence of flaking were observed by SRCL, and flaking defects and cracks under the surface were successfully detected. As a result, details of the crack initiation and flaking process in RCF could be discussed. Shear-type horizontal cracks were found to initiate after the initiation and propagation of tensile-type vertical cracks along inclusions, where the face of the vertical cracks was perpendicular to the rolling direction and rolling surface. Therefore, the formation of vertical cracks is considered to affect shear-type crack formation and flaking, where the shape and length of inclusions also affect the initiation and propagation of vertical cracks.

  20. Crack Tip Flipping Under Mode I/III Tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, Christian Lotz; Specht Jensen, Lasse; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    Crack tip flipping, where the fracture surface alternates from side to side in 45° shear bands, seems to be an overlooked propagation mode in Mode I sheet tearing often disregarded as  “transitional” or tied to randomness in the material. In fact, such observations rarely make it to the literature....... However, crack tip flipping is a true propagation mode, but unlike those already established: i) it never settles in a steady-state as the near tip stress/strain field continuously change, and ii) the mechanism governing failure evolves behind the leading crack tip. Recent research has revealed new...... insight into this intriguing behavior of a crack propagating by the void nucleation and growth mechanism, and the work presented compiles both published and unpublished experimental and numerical findings. E.g. in a recent attempt to gain control of the flipping crack a slight Mode III was imposed...

  1. Assisted crack tip flipping under Mode I thin sheet tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, Christian Lotz; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2017-01-01

    Crack tip flipping, where the fracture surface alternates from side to side in roughly 45° shear bands, seems to be an overlooked propagation mode in Mode I thin sheet tearing. In fact, observations of crack tip flipping is rarely found in the literature. Unlike the already established modes...... such as slanting, cup-cone (rooftop), or cup-cup (bathtub) the flipping crack never settles in a steady-state as the near tip stress/strain field continuously change when the flip successively initiates and develops shear-lips. A recent experimental investigation has revealed new insight by exploiting 3D X......-ray tomography scanning of a developing crack tip flip. But, it remains to be understood what makes the crack flip systematically, what sets the flipping frequency, and under which material conditions this mode occurs. The present study aims at investigating the idea that a slight out-of-plane action (Mode III...

  2. Detecting cracks in teeth using ultrasonic excitation and infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoyan; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2001-06-01

    We describe a new technique, Thermosonics, that can be used to detect cracks in teeth. This technique was initially invented and developed for finding cracks in industrial and aerospace applications. The thermosonics technique employs a single short pulse (typically tens of milliseconds) of ultrasound excitation combined with infrared imaging. Ultrasonic waves vibrate the target material. This vibration causes rubbing and clapping between faying surfaces of any cracks which are present, resulting in a temperature rise around the cracks. An infrared camera is used to image the temperature distribution during and after the ultrasound excitation. Thus, cracks in teeth can be detected. Although this technique is still under development, it shows promise for clinical use by dentists.

  3. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  4. J-integral approximation for cracks in circular notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dankert, M.; Seeger, T.

    1994-01-01

    In the present contribution, approximation formulas for the calculation of the J-integral of cracks in circular notches were developed, which contain the special case of unnotched structures. For this purpose, it was at first necessary to calculate numerically the J-integrals for a series of significant cases as support values with the help of two- and three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element calculations by variation of crack length, notch radius, the contour of the crack front, the crack type (surface-, corner, and through-crack) and the material behaviour (elasticity module, poisson ratio, strain-hardening exponent, strain-hardening coefficient). The results of the approximation formulas for the J-integral were compared with the results of the two- and three-dimensional elastic-plastic FE calculations. Good to very good agreements were achieved. (orig.) [de

  5. BWR pipe crack and weld clad overlay studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1984-10-01

    Leaks and cracks in the heat-affected zones of weldments in austenitic stainless steel piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) have been observed since the mid-1960s. Since that time, cracking has continued to occur, and indication have been found in all parts of the recirculation system, including the largest diameter lines. Proposed solutions for the problem include procedures that produce a more favorable residual stress state on the inner surface, materials that are more resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and changes in the reactor environment that decrease the susceptibility to cracking. In addition to the evaluation of these remedies, it is also important to gain a better understanding of the weld overlay procedure, which is the most widely used short-term repair for flawed piping

  6. Locating the site of diagonal tension crack initiation and path in reinforced concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S.S. Abou El-Mal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The most favorable site of diagonal tension crack initiation has been attempted to be located. Due to the numerous interacted parameters affecting both site and angle of diagonal tension crack initiation, twelve possible sites were investigated, at midheight of the shear span and at the bottom surface near the support of the beam with vertical and diagonal orientations. The first diagonal tension crack initiated from the bottom tip of the diagonal pre-crack at midheight of the beam as a result of constraint release. To verify the previous finding, a single diagonal pre-crack has been created at midheight of only one side of the shear spans in both normal and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC beams. FRC beam showed different behavior, where couple of diagonal tension cracks initiated at both sides from the tip of flexural cracks regardless of the existence of pre-crack at one side of the beam.

  7. Comparison of experiment and theory for elastic-plastic plane strain crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, L.; Rice, J.R.

    1980-02-01

    Recent theoretical results on elastic-plastic plane strain crack growth, and experimental results for crack growth in a 4140 steel in terms of the theoretical concepts are reviewed. The theory is based on a recent asymptotic analysis of crack surface opening and strain distributions at a quasi-statically advancing crack tip in an ideally-plastic solid. The analysis is incomplete in that some of the parameters which appear in it are known only approximately, especially at large scale yielding. Nevertheless, it suffices to derive a relation between the imposed loading and amount of crack growth, prior to general yielding, based on the assumption that a geometrically similar near-tip crack profile is maintained during growth. The resulting predictions for the variation of J with crack growth are found to fit well to the experimental results obtained on deeply cracked compact specimens

  8. To Crack or Not to Crack: Strain in High TemperatureSuperconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godeke, Arno

    2007-08-22

    Round wire Bi 2212 is emerging as a viable successor ofNb3Sn in High Energy Physics and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, to generatemagnetic fields that surpass the intrinsic limitations of Nb3Sn. Ratherbold claims are made on achievable magnetic fields in applications usingBi 2212, due to the materials' estimated critical magnetic field of 100 Tor higher. High transport currents in high magnetic fields, however, leadto large stress on, and resulting large strain in the superconductor. Theeffect of strain on the critical properties of Bi-2212 is far fromunderstood, and strain is, as with Nb3Sn, often treated as a secondaryparameter in the design of superconducting magnets. Reversibility of thestrain induced change of the critical surface of Nb3Sn, points to anelectronic origin of the observed strain dependence. Record breaking highfield magnets are enabled by virtue of such reversible behavior. Straineffects on the critical surface of Bi-2212, in contrast, are mainlyirreversible and suggest a non-electronic origin of the observed straindependence, which appears to be dominated by the formation of cracks inthe superconductor volumes. A review is presented of available results onthe effects of strain on the critical surface of Bi-2212, Bi-2223 andYBCO. It is shown how a generic behavior emerges for the (axial) straindependence of the critical current density, and how the irreversiblereduction of the critical current density is dominated by strain inducedcrack formation in the superconductor. From this generic model it becomesclear that magnets using high temperature superconductors will be strainlimited far before the intrinsic magnetic field limitations will beapproached, or possibly even before the magnetic field limitation ofNb3Sn can be surpassed. On a positive note, in a very promising recentresult from NIST on the axial strain dependence of the critical currentdensity in extremely well aligned YBCO, reversible behavior was observed.This result emphasizes the

  9. Evolution of crack paths and compliance in round bars under cyclic tension and bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toribio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to calculate how the surface crack front and the dimensionless compliance evolve in cracked cylindrical bars subjected to cyclic tension or bending with different initial crack geometries (crack depths and aspect ratios. To this end, a computer application (in the Java programming language that calculates the crack front’s geometric evolution and the dimensionless compliance was made by discretizing the crack front (characterized with elliptical shape and assuming that every point advances perpendicularly to the crack front according to the Paris law, and using a three-parameter stress intensity factor (SIF. The results show that in fatigue crack propagation, relative crack depth influences more on dimensionless compliance than the aspect ratio, because the crack front tends to converge when the crack propagates from different initial geometries, showing greater values for tension than for bending. Furthermore, during fatigue crack growth, materials with higher values of the exponent of the Paris law produce slightly greater dimensionless compliance and a better convergence between the results for straight-fronted and circular initial cracks.

  10. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Choonghyun; Kunieda, Minoru

    2014-04-17

    Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  11. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyun Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of NiTi in artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqiu; Li, Nianxing; Rao, Guangbin; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2007-02-01

    This paper aimed to study the mechanism of the cracking of orthodontic NiTi wire. Two orthodontic NiTi wires were subjected: (1) optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the fracture surface; (2) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the composition of the surface product; (3) anodic polarization to remove the surface product. Samples of NiTi alloy were subjected to the constant loading test to study the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of NiTi shape memory alloy in artificial saliva. The results showed that there were three typical areas at the fracture surface of NiTi orthodontic wire. Area '1' was a tool-made notch. Crack initiated from the root of this notch and propagated to form Area '2', which was perpendicular to the wire axis and covered by surface film. This film consisted of Na, K, Cl, P, S and O except Ni and Ti. The cracking process of NiTi alloy under the constant loading test depended on the pH of saliva and applied stress. The crack length was about 262microm, the longest at 300MPa and pH 3.0. A tool-made notch in orthodontic NiTi wires can cause SCC. At high stress and low pH, this NiTi alloy was most sensitive to cracking.

  13. Interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device – Numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A novel crack arresting device is implemented in foam-cored composite sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test (STT) configuration. A finite element model of the setup is developed, and the predictions are correlated with observations and results from a recently conducted experimental...... fatigue test study. Based on a linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, the developed FE model is utilised to simulate crack propagation and arrest in foam-cored sandwich beam specimens subjected to fatigue loading conditions. The effect of the crack arresters on the fatigue life is analysed......, and the predictive results are subsequently compared with the observations from the previously conducted fatigue tests. The FE model predicts the energy release rate and the mode mixity based on the derived crack surface displacements, utilising algorithms for the prediction of accelerated fatigue crack growth...

  14. Accelerated test for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation characteristics of non-sensitized 316 austenitic stainless steel in simulated pressure water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xiangyu; Bali, Shirish Chandrakant; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Accelerated technique was developed for evaluation of stress corrosion cracking. • The effect of strain rate on stress corrosion cracking was investigated. • Typical intergranular crack feature was observed on the fracture surface. • The crack depth distribution shows two peaks feature. • The work hardened layer has a strong effect on stress corrosion cracking. - Abstract: Accelerated technique has been developed for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiation behavior of non-sensitized materials in pressure water reactor environment by means of the implementation of hollowed cylindrical specimens under slow strain rate tensile. Typical IGSCC feature was observed on the fracture surface. The crack depth distribution showed two peaks feature which relates to the worked hardened layer on the inner surface. The specimens tested at lower strain rate showed higher fraction of IGSCC, larger number of cracks initiation, shorter elongation and smaller crack opening displacement, suggesting the transition behavior of IGSCC initiation and short crack growth.

  15. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  16. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  17. Electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Higgs mechanism is reviewed in its most general form, requiring the existence of a new symmetry-breaking force and associated particles, which need not however be Higgs bosons. The first lecture reviews the essential elements of the Higgs mechanism, which suffice to establish low energy theorems for the scattering of longitudinally polarized W and Z gauge bosons. An upper bound on the scale of the symmetry-breaking physics then follows from the low energy theorems and partial wave unitarity. The second lecture reviews particular models, with and without Higgs bosons, paying special attention to how the general features discussed in lecture 1 are realized in each model. The third lecture focuses on the experimental signals of strong WW scattering that can be observed at the SSC above 1 TeV in the WW subenergy, which will allow direct measurement of the strength of the symmetry-breaking force. 52 refs., 10 figs.

  18. The Fracture of Plasma-Treated Polyurethane Surface under Fatigue Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya A. Morozov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma treatment of soft polymers is a promising technique to improve biomedical properties of the materials. The response to the deformation of such materials is not yet clear. Soft elastic polyurethane treated with plasma immersion ion implantation is subjected to fatigue uniaxial loading. The influence of the strain amplitude and the plasma treatment regime on damage character is discussed. Surface defects are studied in unloaded and stretched states of the material. As a result of fatigue loading, transverse cracks (with closed overlapping edges as well as with open edges deeply propagating into the polymer and longitudinal folds which are break and bend inward, appear on the surface. Hard edges of cracks cut the soft polymer which is squeezed from the bulk to the surface. The observed damages are related to the high stiffness of the modified surface and its transition to the polymer substrate.

  19. Delayed hydride cracking: alternative pre-cracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Ponzoni, Lucio M.E.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    The internal components of nuclear reactors built-in Zr alloys are prone to a failure mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC). This situation has triggered numerous scientific studies in order to measure the crack propagation velocity and the threshold stress intensity factor associated to DHC. Tests are carried out on fatigued pre-crack samples to ensure similar test conditions and comparable results. Due to difficulties in implementing the fatigue pre-crack method it would be desirable to replace it with a pre-crack produced by the same process of DHC, for which is necessary to demonstrate equivalence of this two methods. In this work tests on samples extracted from two Zr-2.5 Nb tubes were conducted. Some of the samples were heat treated to obtain a range in their metallurgical properties as well as different DHC velocities. A comparison between velocities measured in test samples pre-cracked by fatigue and RDIH is done, demonstrating that the pre-cracking method does not affect the measured velocity value. In addition, the incubation (t inc ), which is the time between the application of the load and the first signal of crack propagation, in samples pre-cracked by RDIH, was measured. It was found that these times are sufficiently short, even in the worst cases (lower speed) and similar to the ones of fatigued pre-cracked samples. (author)

  20. Choked flow through cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feburie, V.; Giot, M.; Granger, S.; Seynhaeve, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The leaks through steam-generator cracks are the subject of a research carried out in cooperation between EDF and UCL. A software called ECREVISSE to predict the mass flow rate has been developed and has been successfully validated. The purpose of the paper is to present the mathematical model used in ECREVISSE as well as some comparison between the results and the presently available data. The model takes into account the persistence of some metastable liquid in the crack and the special flow pattern which appears in such particular geometry. Although the model involves the use of several correlations (friction, heat transfer), no adjustment of parameters against the data has been needed, neither in the single-phase part of the flow, or in the two-phase part. (authors). 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs

  1. Distributed password cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Crumpacker, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Password cracking requires significant processing power, which in today's world is located at a workstation or home in the form of a desktop computer. Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) is the conduit to this significant source of processing power and John the Ripper is the key. BOINC is a distributed data processing system that incorporates client-server relationships to generically process data. The BOINC structu...

  2. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  3. Generator rotor dovetail cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the presentation the dovetail control and recommended arrangements of the large steam turbine generators are described. The company General Electric established a complete package comprising working schedule of rotor control and solutions of the problems of the dovetail cracking of the large steam turbine generator rotors with long-term operation. A part of the article is also the recommended packet including more items. (author)

  4. A probabilistic method for leak-before-break analysis of CANDU reactor pressure tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, M.P.; Wilkins, B.J.S.; Rigby, G.L. [Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa (Canada)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A probabilistic code for the prediction of the cumulative probability of pressure tube ruptures in CANDU type reactors is described. Ruptures are assumed to result from the axial growth by delayed hydride cracking. The BLOOM code models the major phenomena that affect crack length and critical crack length during the reactor sequence of events following the first indications of leakage. BLOOM can be used to develop unit-specific estimates of the actual probability of pressure rupture in operating CANDU reactors and supplement the existing leak before break analysis.

  5. Interface debond crack growth in tension–tension cyclic loading of single fiber polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pupurs, Andrejs; Goutianos, Stergios; Brøndsted, Povl

    2013-01-01

    Fiber/matrix interface debond crack growth from a fiber break is defined as one of the key mechanisms of fatigue damage in unidirectional composites. Considering debond as an interface crack its growth in cyclic loading is analyzed utilizing a power law, where the debond growth rate is a power...... for glass fiber/epoxy single fiber composites. Analytical method in the steady-state growth region and FEM for short debonds are combined for calculating the strain energy release rate of the growing debond crack. Interface failure parameters in fatigue are determined by fitting the modeling...

  6. A new cracks detection device for magnetic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manios E.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A portable detecting device was developed for the magnetic detection of cracks existing in railway tracks. The device is equipped with permanent magnets, which produce a uniform magnetic field inside and near the surface of the magnetically soft steel of a railway track, and GMR sensors. Due to the high sensitivity of the GMR sensors (in variations of the tangential component of the magnetic field which is parallel to the direction of motion the device is capable of producing voltage peaks or dips, for quite small deviations of the near-surface magnetic field from the uniform field of the magnets. Finite element numerical simulations showed that the tangential component of the magnetic field exhibits sharp peaks above cracks, due to the stray magnetic field produced by them. Laboratory measurements, made on pieces of railway tracks with cracks, reproduced qualitatively the results of simulations. They showed that the sensors (moving near cracks produce sharp voltage peaks with magnitude that depends on the size of the cracks. Based on these measurements, we conclude that the developed device can successfully detect cracks and defects in railway tracks and give information on their size. The method can be generalised for detection of cracks in all magnetic steels.

  7. Research on anti crack mechanism of bionic coupling brake disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lifeng; Yang, Xiao; Zheng, Lingnan; Wu, Can; Ni, Jing

    2017-09-01

    According to the biological function of fatigue resistance possessed by biology, this study designed a Bionic Coupling Brake Disc (BCBD) which can inhibit crack propagation as the result of improving fatigue property. Thermal stress field of brake disc was calculated under emergency working condition, and circumferential and radial stress field which lead to fatigue failure of brake disc were investigated simultaneously. Results showed that the maximum temperature of surface reached 890°C and the maximum residual tensile stress was 207 Mpa when the initial velocity of vehicle was 200 km/h. Based on the theory of elastic plastic fracture mechanics, the crack opening displacement and the crack front J integrals of the BCBD and traditional brake disc (TBD) with pre-cracking were calculated, and the strength of crack front was compared. Results revealed the growth behavior of fatigue crack located on surface of brake disc, and proved the anti fatigue resistance of BCBD was better, and the strength of crack resistance of BCBD was much stronger than that of TBD. This simulation research provided significant references for optimization and manufacturing of BCBD.

  8. Crack-Depth Prediction in Steel Based on Cooling Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodríguez-Martín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One criterion for the evaluation of surface cracks in steel welds is to analyze the depth of the crack, because it is an effective indicator of its potential risk. This paper proposes a new methodology to obtain an accurate crack-depth prediction model based on the combination of infrared thermography and the 3D reconstruction procedure. In order to do this, a study of the cooling rate of the steel is implemented through active infrared thermography, allowing the study of the differential thermal behavior of the steel in the fissured zone with respect to the nonfissured zone. These cooling rate data are correlated with the real geometry of the crack, which is obtained with the 3D reconstruction of the welds through a macrophotogrammetric procedure. In this way, it is possible to analyze the correlation between cooling rate and depth through the different zones of the crack. The results of the study allow the establishment of an accurate predictive depth model which enables the study of the depth of the crack using only the cooling rate data. In this way, the remote measure of the depth of the surface steel crack based on thermography is possible.

  9. Theoretical aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kwon; Macdonald, Digby D.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical aspects of the stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 22 in contact with saturated NaCl solution are explored in terms of the Coupled Environment Fracture Model (CEFM), which was calibrated upon available experimental crack growth rate data. Crack growth rate (CGR) was then predicted as a function of stress intensity, electrochemical potential, solution conductivity, temperature, and electrochemical crack length (ECL). From the dependence of the CGR on the ECL and the evolution of a semi-elliptical surface crack in a planar surface under constant loading conditions it is predicted that penetration through the 2.5-cm thick Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer of the waste package (WP) could occur 32,000 years after nucleation. Accordingly, the crack must nucleate within the first 968,000 years of storage. However, we predict that the Alloy 22 corrosion resistant layer will not be penetrated by SCC within the 10,000-year Intermediate Performance Period, even if a crack nucleates immediately upon placement of the WP in the repository.

  10. Fatigue crack growth in 2017A-T4 alloy subjected to proportional bending with torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rozumek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of tests on the fatigue crack growth for a constant moment amplitude under combined bending with torsion in the aluminium alloy AW-2017A-T4. The tests were performed under different values of the load ratio R. Plane specimens with stress concentrators in form of the external one-sided sharp notch were tested. A non-uniform fatigue cracks growth on both lateral surfaces of specimens was observed during experimental tests. Fatigue cracks were developing in the specimens in two stages; quarter-elliptic edge cracks were observed at the beginning, then evolving into through cracks

  11. Fatigue Crack Propagation in a Gear Tooth in the Presence of an Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vineet; Zagade, Pramod R.; Khan, Danish; Gautham, B. P.

    2014-05-01

    A computational model for studying the fatigue crack propagation characteristics in a gear tooth root in the presence of inclusions is presented. A step-by-step crack growth scheme is implemented to predict the crack path using the finite element method and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Paris law approach is used to model fatigue crack propagation. The effect of size and location of hard circular inclusion on the growth of a surface-initiated crack and service life in a gear tooth is studied.

  12. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part I: Controlled Cracking of 52100 Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Solano-Alvarez, W; Bhadeshia, Harshad Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the research performed in bearing steel metallurgy aims to prevent crack nucleation and propagation, some applications require the exact opposite in order to study the role that disconnected surfaces inside the bulk material play when load is applied, or when fluids entrapped in surface cracks propagate tensile stresses or exacerbate corrosion. Four heat treatments have been designed to create controlled arrays of crack types and distributions in quenched and untempered steel...

  13. Cracking susceptibility of aluminum alloys during laser welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Abbaschian

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of laser parameters in welding aluminum alloys was studied in order to reduce hot cracking. The extension of cracks at the welding surface was used as a cracking susceptibility (CS index. It has been shown that the CS changes with changing welding velocity for binary Al-Cu alloys. In general, the CS index increased until a maximum velocity and then dropped to zero, generating a typical lambda-curve. This curve is due to two different mechanisms: 1 the refinement of porosities with increasing velocity and 2 the changes in the liquid fraction due to decreasing microsegregation with increasing velocities.

  14. Morphometric analysis of polygonal cracking patterns in desiccated starch slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Yuri; Magome, Jun; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the geometry of two-dimensional polygonal cracking that forms on the air-exposed surface of dried starch slurries. Two different kinds of starches, made from potato and corn, exhibited distinguished crack evolution, and there were contrasting effects of slurry thickness on the probability distribution of the polygonal cell area. The experimental findings are believed to result from the difference in the shape and size of starch grains, which strongly influence the capillary transport of water and tensile stress field that drives the polygonal cracking.

  15. Breaking the Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Kirketerp, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The paper shortly reveals the history of a small school - the KaosPilots - dedicated to educate young people to carriers as entrepreneurs. In this contribution we want to explore how the KaosPilots managed to break the waves of institutionalised concepts and practices of teaching entrepreneurship...... pedagogical elements on which the education in entrepreneurship rests....

  16. Model Breaking Points Conceptualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, Rozy; Murray, Eileen; Star, Jon R.

    2014-01-01

    Current curriculum initiatives (e.g., National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers 2010) advocate that models be used in the mathematics classroom. However, despite their apparent promise, there comes a point when models break, a point in the mathematical problem space where the model cannot,…

  17. Predicting extension of cracks to the root from the dimensions in the crown: A preliminary in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Fu, Kaiyu; Qiao, Feng; Zhang, Xu; Fan, Yi; Wang, Lijun; Li, Peng; Wu, Zhou; Wu, Ligeng

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether extension of a tooth crack into the root can be predicted by the appearance of the crack in the crown in vitro. The authors obtained 22 cracked teeth from 22 patients who underwent extraction, and they scanned the teeth using microcomputed tomography. The length and width of the crack on the occlusal surface (LOS and WOS, respectively) and the length of the crack on the proximal surface (LCPS) were measured on 3-dimensional reconstruction images. The pulp chamber roof was penetrated and removed. A crack line visible under the microscope only on the access cavity wall rather than extending to the bottom of the pulp chamber was termed a "nonroot crack." A crack seen at the bottom of the pulp chamber or root wall was termed a "root crack." The authors analyzed the data using Pearson correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves. There was a significant correlation between the LOS and LCPS (correlation coefficient, 0.782; P crack may indicate how far the crack extends to the root. Both the LOS and WOS may be valuable for assessing whether a crack involves the root, although the LOS seems to be more useful. The dimensions of a crack in a crown provide a helpful approach for predicting the depth of the crack and its likely prognosis. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Fusing complementary images for pavement cracking measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Ming; Zhao, Zuyun; Xu, Bugao; Yao, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cracking is a major pavement distress that jeopardizes road serviceability and traffic safety. Automated pavement distress survey (APDS) systems have been developed using digital imaging technology to replace human surveys for more timely and accurate inspections. Most APDS systems require special lighting devices to illuminate pavements and prevent shadows of roadside objects that distort cracks in the image. Most artificial lighting devices are laser based, and are either hazardous to unprotected people or require dedicated power supplies on the vehicle. This study was aimed to develop a new imaging system that can scan pavement surface at highway speed and determine the level of severity of pavement cracking without using any artificial lighting. The new system consists of dual line-scan cameras that are installed side by side to scan the same pavement area as the vehicle moves. Cameras are controlled with different exposure settings so that both sunlit and shadowed areas can be visible in two separate images. The paired images contain complementary details useful for reconstructing an image in which the shadows are eliminated. This paper intends to present (1) the design of the dual line-scan camera system, (2) a new calibration method for line-scan cameras to rectify and register paired images, (3) a customized image-fusion algorithm that merges the multi-exposure images into one shadow-free image for crack detection, and (4) the results of the field tests on a selected road over a long period. (paper)

  19. Application of fracture mechanics leak-before-break analyses for protection against pipe rupture in SEP plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, J.F.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    In accordance with the latest NRC guidance the leak-before-break technique was evaluated for high-energy piping systems in a nuclear power plant. The elements of this evaluation include determination of: 1) largest crack size which will remain stable; 2) leak rate resulting from a crack with length twice the pipe wall thickness; 3) size of crack which will leak at a rate greater than 1 gpm, if 2) results in less than 1 gpm; and 4) analysis of part-through cracks for subcritical crack growth rates to establish in-service inspection (ISI) intervals. Conclusions reached are: 1) The fracture mechanics leak-before-break approach is shown as a viable option to prevent pipe rupture. 2) Austenitic stainless steel pipes possess significant toughness, and large cracks are required for rupture. 3) The net section plastic collapse analysis is more conservative than tearing modulus evaluations. 4) Leak rates are large enough to assure detection well before cracks reach a critical size. 5) In the case studied, subcritical crack growth is slow enough to require ISI intervals of about 10 years to detect part-through cracks

  20. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harzalla, S., E-mail: harzallahozil@yahoo.fr; Chabaat, M., E-mail: mchabaat@yahoo.com [Built Environmental Research Laboratory, Civil Engineering Faculty, University of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene, B.P. 32 El Alia Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad, E-mail: fbmbelgacem@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Basic Education, PAAET, Al-Aardhia (Kuwait)

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented.

  1. Non destructive technique for cracks detection by an eddy current in differential mode for steel frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harzalla, S.; Chabaat, M.; Belgacem, F. Bin Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a nondestructive technique is used as a tool to control cracks and microcracks in materials. A simulation by a numerical approach such as the finite element method is employed to detect cracks and eventually; to study their propagation using a crucial parameter such as the stress intensity factor. This approach has been used in the aircraft industry to control cracks. Besides, it makes it possible to highlight the defects of parts while preserving the integrity of the controlled products. On the other side, it is proven that the reliability of the control of defects gives convincing results for the improvement of the quality and the safety of the material. Eddy current testing (ECT) is a standard technique in industry for the detection of surface breaking flaws in magnetic materials such as steels. In this context, simulation tools can be used to improve the understanding of experimental signals, optimize the design of sensors or evaluate the performance of ECT procedures. CEA-LIST has developed for many years semi-analytical models embedded into the simulation platform CIVA dedicated to non-destructive testing. The developments presented herein address the case of flaws located inside a planar and magnetic medium. Simulation results are obtained through the application of the Volume Integral Method (VIM). When considering the ECT of a single flaw, a system of two differential equations is derived from Maxwell equations. The numerical resolution of the system is carried out using the classical Galerkin variant of the Method of Moments. Besides, a probe response is calculated by application of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. Finally, the approach itself as well as comparisons between simulation results and measured data are presented

  2. Observation and simulation of crack growth in Zry-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Graciela; Meyer, Gabriel; Perez Ipina, J

    2003-01-01

    Security and life extension of components of nuclear reactors are the most motivating aspects that encourage to study embrittlement processes of zirconium alloys by reaction with hydrogen.Here, the use of fracture mechanics tests are suitable to monitor the material resistance of components under service.Because many times is difficult to obtain normalized probes from real size components, researchers look for alternative experimental techniques or crack growth simulation from the knowledge of particular material properties.In this work we present the results obtained after experimental observation and computer simulation of crack growth in Zry-4 probes.Experimental observation were obtained by performing flexion tests in three point probes SSEN(B) of 3 x 7 x 32 mm 3 located in the chamber of a scanning electron microscope, measuring in situ the crack length and opening when an external load is applied.Using the information obtained from stress-displacement measurements after tensile tests and the empiric relationship between crack opening and crack length, the crack growth process was simulated.Displacement field in the zone close to the crack tip was obtained by finite elements technique (Castem, DMT, CEA) assuming plain stress, a plastic bilinear homogeneous material and neglecting texture or directional anisotropy.To compare experimental observation and simulation, a grid (10 x 10 μm 2 each square) was drawn in the zone close to the crack tip by selective sputtering.Following the movement of two (three) points of the surface allows to compare uni (bi) dimensional deformation.A good agreement between observation and simulation was observed: after the crack opening grew 28 times (from 1.5 to 42 μm) the base-height relationship of a triangle involving the crack tip change 40% (35%) in the experimental observation (simulation)

  3. Dynamic propagation and cleavage crack arrest in bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaj, M.

    2006-06-01

    In complement of the studies of harmfulness of defects, generally realized in term of initiation, the concept of crack arrest could be used as complementary analyses to the studies of safety. The stop occurs when the stress intensity factor becomes lower than crack arrest toughness (KIa) calculated in elasto-statics (KI ≤ KIa). The aim of this thesis is to understand and predict the stop of a crack propagating at high speed in a 18MND5 steel used in the pressure water reactor (PWR). The test chosen to study crack arrest is the disc thermal shock test. The observations under the scanning electron microscope of the fracture surface showed that the crack arrest always occurs in cleavage mode and that the critical microstructural entity with respect to the propagation and crack arrest corresponds to at least the size of the prior austenitic grain. The numerical analyses in elasto-statics confirm the conservatism of the codified curve of the RCC-M with respect to the values of KIa. The dynamic numerical analyses show that the deceleration of the crack measured at the end of the propagation is related to the global dynamic of the structure (vibrations). The transferability to components of crack arrest toughness obtained from tests analysed in static is thus not assured. The disc thermal shock tests were also modelled by considering a criterion of propagation and arrest of the type 'RKR' characterized by a critical stress sc which depends on the temperature. The results obtained account well for the crack jump measured in experiments as well as the shape of the crack arrest front. (author)

  4. Creep crack growth in phosphorus alloyed oxygen free copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rui; Seitisleam, Facredin (Swerea KIMAB (Sweden)); Sandstroem, Rolf; Jin, Lai-Zhe (Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    Using standard compact tension (CT) specimens taken from a pierce and draw cylinder, creep crack growth (CCG) has been studied in phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) parent metal at 22, 75, 175, and 215 deg C. Pre- and post-test metallography are performed. At higher temperatures the rupture time of CCG is shorter by a factor up of 65 than that of uniaxial at same stress/reference stress. At 175 and 215 deg C, crack does grow by creep about 10 mm before final instantaneous failure. In contrast, there is hardly any visible crack growth at 22 and 75 deg C. The tests were interrupted after 5000 to 13000 hours. For ruptured tests at 175 and 215 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains are observed adjacent to crack. Extensive and intergranular creep cavities and microcracks are found several mm around crack. For interrupted tests at 22 and 75 deg C, strongly elongated and deformed grains, creep cavities, as well as microcracks are observed close to crack tip. Surface cracks from both sides have initiated and grown about 45 deg to the load direction towards inside. For the interrupted tests, hardness adjacent to crack tip has more than doubled because of work hardening, or heavy deformation. This is consistent with large crack tip opening. The true strain at the crack tip is estimated to 10 and 4 for the tests at 22 and 75 deg C, respectively. The stress state behind the crack tip has been modelled with FEM. Stress relaxation after loading has also been taken into account. A model for the creep damage based on the creep strain rate has been formulated that can describe the uniaxial creep rupture data without fitting parameters. Based on the formulation for the creep damage, a model for the crack propagation has been set up. When the creep damage has reached the value unity in front of the crack tip, the crack is assumed to propagate. Taking multiaxial effects into account the observed life times of the CT specimens can be well described. The multiaxial

  5. Crack retardation by load reduction during fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Nam, Ki Woo; Ahn, Seok Hwan; Do, Jae Yoon

    2003-01-01

    Fracture life and crack retardation behavior were examined experimentally using CT specimens of aluminum alloy 5083. Crack retardation life and fracture life were a wide difference between 0.8 and 0.6 in proportion to ratio of load reduction. The wheeler model retardation parameter was used successfully to predict crack growth behavior. By using a crack propagation rule, prediction of fracture life can be evaluated quantitatively. A statistical approach based on Weibull distribution was applied to the test data to evaluate the dispersion in the retardation life and fracture life by the change of load reduction

  6. Crack luminescence as an innovative method for detection of fatigue damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Makris

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional non-destructive testing methods for crack detection provide just a snapshot of fatigue crack evolution at a specific location in the moment of examination. The crack luminescence coating realizes a clear visibility of the entire crack formation. The coating consists of two layers with different properties and functions. The bottom layer emits light as fluorescence under UV radiation. The top layer covers the fluorescing one and prevents the emitting of light in case of no damage at the surface. Several different experiments show that due to the sensitive coating even the early stage of crack formation can be detected. That makes crack luminescence helpful for investigating the incipient crack opening behavior. Cracks can be detected and observed during operation of a structure, making it also very interesting for continuous monitoring. Crack luminescence is a passive method and no skilled professionals are necessary to detect cracks, as for conventional methods. The luminescent light is clearly noticeable by unaided eye observations and also by standard camera equipment, which makes automated crack detection possible as well. It is expected that crack luminescence can reduce costs and time for preventive maintenance and inspection.

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth in Several 7050T7451 Aluminium Alloy Thick Section Plates with Aircraft Manufacturer's and Laboratory Surface Finishes Representing Some Regions of the F/A-18 Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barter, Simon

    2003-01-01

    ... of finished components has on service fatigue crack initiation and life. This report examines a series of fatigue test specimens that were cut from three different 7050 plates, including two aircraft manufacturers' plates...

  8. Cracking behavior of tungsten armor under ELM-like thermal shockloads II: A revised prediction for crack appearance map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muyuan Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the surface cracking features of tungsten armor under thermal shock loads by edge-localized mode (ELM were investigated by means of computational fracture mechanics analysis. For the simulation it was assumed that a small crack was initiated at low temperature after the shut-off of thermal load in contrast to the previous studies where the presence of a crack before thermal loading was assumed. The threshold power density for surface cracking was predicted to range between 0.3 and 0.6GW/m2 while the threshold of base temperature lay between 200 and 400°C. The theoretically predicted damage map agreed well with the experimental data from electron beam irradiation tests. The current simulation model turned out to match better to the real experimental observation than the previous predictions where the threshold base temperature lies roughly between 400 and 600°C.

  9. Crack deflection in brittle media with heterogeneous interfaces and its application in shale fracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaguang; Wei, Yujie

    Driven by the rapid progress in exploiting unconventional energy resources such as shale gas, there is growing interest in hydraulic fracture of brittle yet heterogeneous shales. In particular, how hydraulic cracks interact with natural weak zones in sedimentary rocks to form permeable cracking networks is of significance in engineering practice. Such a process is typically influenced by crack deflection, material anisotropy, crack-surface friction, crustal stresses, and so on. In this work, we extend the He-Hutchinson theory (He and Hutchinson, 1989) to give the closed-form formulae of the strain energy release rate of a hydraulic crack with arbitrary angles with respect to the crustal stress. The critical conditions in which the hydraulic crack deflects into weak interfaces and exhibits a dependence on crack-surface friction and crustal stress anisotropy are given in explicit formulae. We reveal analytically that, with increasing pressure, hydraulic fracture in shales may sequentially undergo friction locking, mode II fracture, and mixed mode fracture. Mode II fracture dominates the hydraulic fracturing process and the impinging angle between the hydraulic crack and the weak interface is the determining factor that accounts for crack deflection; the lower friction coefficient between cracked planes and the greater crustal stress difference favor hydraulic fracturing. In addition to shale fracking, the analytical solution of crack deflection could be used in failure analysis of other brittle media.

  10. Understanding the edge crack phenomenon in ceramic laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ševeček

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Layered ceramic materials (also referred to as “ceramic laminates” are becoming one of the most promising areas of materials technology aiming to improve the brittle behavior of bulk ceramics. The utilization of tailored compressive residual stresses acting as physical barriers to crack propagation has already succeeded in many ceramic systems. Relatively thick compressive layers located below the surface have proven very effective to enhance the fracture resistance and provide a minimum strength for the material. However, internal compressive stresses result in out-of plane stresses at the free surfaces, what can cause cracking of the compressive layer, forming the so-called edge cracks. Experimental observations have shown that edge cracking may be associated with the magnitude of the compressive stresses and with the thickness of the compressive layer. However, an understanding of the parameters related to the onset and extension of such edge cracks in the compressive layers is still lacking. In this work, a 2D parametric finite element model has been developed to predict the onset and propagation of an edge crack in ceramic laminates using a coupled stress-energy criterion. This approach states that a crack is originated when both stress and energy criteria are fulfilled simultaneously. Several designs with different residual stresses and a given thickness in the compressive layers have been computed. The results predict the existence of a lower bound, below no edge crack will be observed, and an upper bound, beyond which the onset of an edge crack would lead to the complete fracture of the layer

  11. A stochastic analysis of glass crack initiation under thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qingsong; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Haodong; Sun, Jinhua; He, Linghui

    2014-01-01

    Window glass breakage plays a key role in compartment fire development as it opens a new vent for fresh air that accelerates the fire. To explore the correlation between temperature change and crack initiation, a series of experiments were preformed for float and Low-E glasses under uniform radiation conditions in a well designed facility. At the time of crack, the critical temperature differences of float glass and Low-E glass are 95 °C and 108 °C, respectively, with a same central temperature of 152 °C. The critical breaking stress occurs at 51 MPa and 70 MPa for float and Low-E glass, respectively. Detailed Weibull distribution functions on temperature and stress are obtained by fitting the experimental data. Failure probability function, survival probability function, probability density function are obtained and used to predict the glass failure with the survival probability at 0.9 and failure probability at 0.1. These results may be used to predict the crack probability of a glass bearing certain temperature and stress distributions. - Highlights: •20 Float and 21 Low-E glass panes are heated to crack under uniform radiation conditions in a well-designed facility. •Central temperature, temperature difference, and breaking stress are analyzed to investigate the glass breaking behavior. •The experimental data agree well with both two-parameter and three-parameter Weibull distribution. •Failure probability, survival probability, and probability density functions are obtained to predict the glass failure

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-based alloys in PWR primary water. Component surface control; Corrosion sous contrainte des alliages a base nickel en milieu primaire des reacteurs a eaux pressurisee. Maitrise de la surface des composants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foucault, M. [AREVA, Centre Technique Framatome ANP, Dept. Corrosion Chimie, 71 - Le Creusot (France)

    2004-06-01

    In the PWR plant primary circuit, FRAMATOME-ANP uses several nickel-base alloys or austenitic stainless steels for the manufacture of safety components. The experience feedback of the last twenty years allows us to point out the major role played by the surface state of the components in their life duration. In this paper, we present two examples of problems encountered and solved by a surface study and the definition and implementation of a process for the surface control of the repair components. Then, we propose some ideas about the present needs in terms of analysis methods to improve the surface knowledge and the control of the manufactured components. (author)

  13. Finite element limit analysis based plastic limit pressure solutions for cracked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Do Jun; Huh, Nam Su; Kim, Yun Jae; Kim, Young Jin

    2002-01-01

    Based on detailed FE limit analyses, the present paper provides tractable approximations for plastic limit pressure solutions for axial through-wall cracked pipe; axial (inner) surface cracked pipe; circumferential through-wall cracked pipe; and circumferential (inner) surface cracked pipe. Comparisons with existing analytical and empirical solutions show a large discrepancy in circumferential short through-wall cracks and in surface cracks (both axial and circumferential). Being based on detailed 3-D FE limit analysis, the present solutions are believed to be the most accurate, and thus to be valuable information not only for plastic collapse analysis of pressurised piping but also for estimating non-linear fracture mechanics parameters based on the reference stress approach

  14. Controlled Mechanical Cracking of Metal Films Deposited on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Polywka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stretchable large area electronics conform to arbitrarily-shaped 3D surfaces and enables comfortable contact to the human skin and other biological tissue. There are approaches allowing for large area thin films to be stretched by tens of percent without cracking. The approach presented here does not prevent cracking, rather it aims to precisely control the crack positions and their orientation. For this purpose, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is hardened by exposure to ultraviolet radiation (172 nm through an exposure mask. Only well-defined patterns are kept untreated. With these soft islands cracks at the hardened surface can be controlled in terms of starting position, direction and end position. This approach is first investigated at the hardened PDMS surface itself. It is then applied to conductive silver films deposited from the liquid phase. It is found that statistical (uncontrolled cracking of the silver films can be avoided at strain below 35%. This enables metal interconnects to be integrated into stretchable networks. The combination of controlled cracks with wrinkling enables interconnects that are stretchable in arbitrary and changing directions. The deposition and patterning does not involve vacuum processing, photolithography, or solvents.

  15. Effects of crust and cracks on simulated catchment discharge and soil loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, J.; Ritsema, C.J.; Roo, de A.P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Sealing, crusting and cracking of crusts of the soil surface has been observed in many parts of the world in areas with sandy, silty and loamy soils. Sealing and crust formation occurs under the influence of rain storm and drying weather. With prolonged drying, surface crusts might crack, leading to

  16. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, W.; Turnbull, A.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.03 and is structured as follows: General aspects of SCC testing; Non-precracked specimens; Precracked specimens - the fracture mechanics approach to SCC; Crack growth measurement; Limitations of the LEFM approach to SCC; The use of SCC data; Guide to selection of mechanical scc test method

  18. Cryptography cracking codes

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    While cracking a code might seem like something few of us would encounter in our daily lives, it is actually far more prevalent than we may realize. Anyone who has had personal information taken because of a hacked email account can understand the need for cryptography and the importance of encryption-essentially the need to code information to keep it safe. This detailed volume examines the logic and science behind various ciphers, their real world uses, how codes can be broken, and the use of technology in this oft-overlooked field.

  19. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    provides us with the following two research questions: How does the category of breaking news fit into Tuchmans typology related to time, planning and technology? What types of stories are providing journalistic capital and how are online news stories categorised relatively within the journalistic field?......The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...

  20. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  1. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”...

  3. Analitical electron mycroscopy (AEM) investigations of primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.S.; Perry, D.J.; Lewis, N.; Thompson, C.D.; Yang, W.J.S.

    1997-08-01

    The microstructure of nickel alloys, particularly the grain boundary composition and intergranular precipitates, plays an important role in high temperature primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) performance. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to examine SCC cracks in Alloys 600 and X-750 to investigate the role of grain boundary precipitates, dislocations and oxides in primary water SCC (PWSCC). Analysis of oxides by AEM and ESCA/Auger indicates that the crack tip oxides are different than the oxides formed on the outer surfaces. Comparison of heats with good and poor SCC resistance has identified metallurgical features that affect cracking. These AEM results show that the mechanism of PWSCC in nickel-base alloys does not involve void formation or blunting of the crack tip near intergranular carbides. The role of grain boundary composition, the interaction of cracks with carbides and other intergranular precipitates, and observations from AEM examinations ahead of the crack tip are discussed in relation to the mechanism of SCC

  4. Statistical analysis of process parameters to eliminate hot cracking of fiber laser welded aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Hui-Ping; Wang, Xiaojie; Cui, Haichao; Lu, Fenggui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates hot cracking rate in Al fiber laser welding under various process conditions and performs corresponding process optimization. First, effects of welding process parameters such as distance between welding center line and its closest trim edge, laser power and welding speed on hot cracking rate were investigated experimentally with response surface methodology (RSM). The hot cracking rate in the paper is defined as ratio of hot cracking length over the total weld seam length. Based on the experimental results following Box-Behnken design, a prediction model for the hot cracking rate was developed using a second order polynomial function considering only two factor interaction. The initial prediction result indicated that the established model could predict the hot cracking rate adequately within the range of welding parameters being used. The model was then used to optimize welding parameters to achieve cracking-free welds.

  5. Accelerated crack growth, residual stress, and a cracked zinc coated pressure shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittman, Daniel L.; Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Howard G.

    1987-01-01

    During a partial inspection of a 42 year old, operating, pressurized wind tunnel at NASA-Ames Research Center, a surface connected defect 114 in. long having an indicated depth of a 0.7 in. was detected. The pressure shell, constructed of a medium carbon steel, contains approximately 10 miles of welds and is cooled by flowing water over its zinc coated external surface. Metallurgical and fractographic analysis showed that the actual detect was 1.7 in. deep, and originated from an area of lack of weld penetration. Crack growth studies were performed on the shell material in the laboratory under various loading rates, hold times, and R-ratios with a simulated shell environment. The combination of zinc, water with electrolyte, and steel formed an electrolytic cell which resulted in an increase in cyclic crack growth rate by as much as 500 times over that observed in air. It was concluded that slow crack growth occurred in the pressure shell by a combination of stress corrosion cracking due to the welding residual stress and corrosion fatigue due to the cyclic operating stress.

  6. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  7. Mechanism of crack initiation and crack growth under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utz, S.; Soppa, E.; Silcher, H.; Kohler, C.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on the experimental investigations and numerical simulations of the deformation behaviour and crack development in the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal and mechanical cyclic loading in HCF and LCF regimes. The main objective of this research is the understanding of the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage and the development of simulation methods, which can be applied further in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modelling of crack initiation and crack growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal or mechanical loads are of particular interest. The mechanisms of crack initiation depend among other things on the type of loading, microstructure, material properties and temperature. The Nb-stabilized austenitic stainless steel in the solution-annealed condition was chosen for the investigations. Experiments with two kinds of cyclic loading - pure thermal and pure mechanical - were carried out and simulated. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal loading was studied within the framework of the joint research project [4]. Interrupted thermal cyclic tests in the temperature range of 150 C to 300 C combined with non-destructive residual stress measurements (XRD) and various microscopic investigations, e.g. in SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), were used to study the effects of thermal cyclic loading on the material. This thermal cyclic loading leads to thermal induced stresses and strains. As a result intrusions and extrusions appear inside the grains (at the surface), at which microcracks arise and evolve to a dominant crack. Finally, these microcracks cause a continuous and significant decrease of residual stresses. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under mechanical loading at room temperature was studied within the framework of the research project [5], [8]. With a combination of interrupted LCF tests and EBSD

  8. Mechanism of crack initiation and crack growth under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utz, S.; Soppa, E.; Silcher, H.; Kohler, C. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Materials Testing Inst.

    2013-07-01

    The present contribution is focused on the experimental investigations and numerical simulations of the deformation behaviour and crack development in the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal and mechanical cyclic loading in HCF and LCF regimes. The main objective of this research is the understanding of the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage and the development of simulation methods, which can be applied further in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modelling of crack initiation and crack growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal or mechanical loads are of particular interest. The mechanisms of crack initiation depend among other things on the type of loading, microstructure, material properties and temperature. The Nb-stabilized austenitic stainless steel in the solution-annealed condition was chosen for the investigations. Experiments with two kinds of cyclic loading - pure thermal and pure mechanical - were carried out and simulated. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal loading was studied within the framework of the joint research project [4]. Interrupted thermal cyclic tests in the temperature range of 150 C to 300 C combined with non-destructive residual stress measurements (XRD) and various microscopic investigations, e.g. in SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), were used to study the effects of thermal cyclic loading on the material. This thermal cyclic loading leads to thermal induced stresses and strains. As a result intrusions and extrusions appear inside the grains (at the surface), at which microcracks arise and evolve to a dominant crack. Finally, these microcracks cause a continuous and significant decrease of residual stresses. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under mechanical loading at room temperature was studied within the framework of the research project [5], [8]. With a combination of interrupted LCF tests and EBSD

  9. Crack Tip Parameters for Growing Cracks in Linear Viscoelastic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the problem of describing the asymptotic fields around a slowly growing crack in a linearly viscoelastic material is considered. It is shown that for plane mixed mode problems the asymptotic fields must be described by 6 parameters: 2 stress intensity factors and 4 deformation...... intensity factors. In the special case of a constant Poisson ratio only 2 deformation intensity factors are needed. Closed form solutions are given both for a slowly growing crack and for a crack that is suddenly arrested at a point at the crack extension path. Two examples are studied; a stress boundary...... value problem, and a displacement boundary value problem. The results show that the stress intensity factors and the displacement intensity factors do not depend explicitly upon the velocity of the crack tip....

  10. Internal shear cracking in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an uncoupled ductile damage criterion for modelling the opening and propagation of internal shear cracks in bulk metal forming. The criterion is built upon the original work on the motion of a hole subjected to shear with superimposed tensile stress triaxiality and its overall...... performance is evaluated by means of side-pressing formability tests in Aluminium AA2007-T6 subjected to different levels of pre-strain. Results show that the new proposed criterionis able to combine simplicity with efficiency for predicting the onset of fracture and the crack propagation path for the entire...... set of test cases regardless the amount of pre-strain derived from previous upsetting under near frictionless conditions. The new proposed criterion can be easily implemented in existing finite element programs and its scope of application allows extending previous work on the opening modes in surface...

  11. Analysis of WWER 1000 collector cracking mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matocha, K.; Wozniak, J. [Vitkovice J.S.C., Ostrava (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation reviews the large experimental program, started in 1993 in Vitkovice, where the main aim was: (1) a detailed study of strain and thermal ageing, dissolved oxygen content and temperature on subcritical crack growth in 10NiMo8.5 (10GN2MFA) steel, (2) a detailed study of the effect of high temperature water and tube expansion technology on fracture behaviour of ligaments between holes for heat exchange tubes, and (3) a detailed study of the effect of drilling, tube expansion technology and heat treatment on residual stresses on the surface of holes for heat exchange tubes. The aim of all these investigations was to find a dominant damage mechanism responsible for collector cracking to be able to judge the efficiency of implemented modifications and suggested countermeasures and to answer a very important question whether proper operation conditions (mainly water chemistry) make the operation of steam generators made in Vitcovice safe throughout the planned lifetime. 10 refs.

  12. 3-D analysis of fatigue crack behaviour in a shot peened steam turbine blade material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, B.Y., E-mail: Binyan.he@soton.ac.uk [Engineering Materials, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Katsamenis, O.L. [muVIS X-ray Imaging Centre, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Mellor, B.G.; Reed, P.A.S. [Engineering Materials, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-26

    Serial mechanical sectioning and high resolution X-ray tomography have been used to study the three-dimensional morphology of small fatigue cracks growing in a 12 Cr tempered martensitic steam turbine blade material. A range of surface conditions has been studied, namely polished and shot peened (with varying levels of intensity). In the polished (unpeened) condition, inclusions (alumina and manganese sulphide) played an important role in initiating and controlling early fatigue crack behaviour. When fatigue cracks initiated from an alumina stringer, the crack morphology was normally dominated by single stringers, which were always in the centre of the fatigue crack, indicating its primary role in initiation. Manganese sulphide inclusion groups however seemed to dominate and affect the crack path along both the surface and depth crack growth directions. The more intensely shot peened condition did not however evidence inclusion or stringer affected fatigue crack initiation or growth behaviour; sub-surface crack coalescence being clearly observed by both serial sectioning and computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques at a depth of about 150–180 μm. These sub-surface crack coalescences can be linked to both the extent of the compressive residual stress as well as the depth of the plastic deformation arising from the intense shot peening process. Shot peening appears to provide a different defect population that initiates fatigue cracks and competes with the underlying metallurgical defect populations. The most beneficial shot peening process would in this case appear to “deactivate” the original metallurgical defect population and substitute a known defect distribution from the shot peening process from which fatigue cracks grow rather slowly in the strain hardened surface layer which also contains compressive residual stresses. A benefit to fatigue life in bending, even under Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) conditions, has been observed in these tests if a

  13. 3-D analysis of fatigue crack behaviour in a shot peened steam turbine blade material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, B.Y.; Katsamenis, O.L.; Mellor, B.G.; Reed, P.A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Serial mechanical sectioning and high resolution X-ray tomography have been used to study the three-dimensional morphology of small fatigue cracks growing in a 12 Cr tempered martensitic steam turbine blade material. A range of surface conditions has been studied, namely polished and shot peened (with varying levels of intensity). In the polished (unpeened) condition, inclusions (alumina and manganese sulphide) played an important role in initiating and controlling early fatigue crack behaviour. When fatigue cracks initiated from an alumina stringer, the crack morphology was normally dominated by single stringers, which were always in the centre of the fatigue crack, indicating its primary role in initiation. Manganese sulphide inclusion groups however seemed to dominate and affect the crack path along both the surface and depth crack growth directions. The more intensely shot peened condition did not however evidence inclusion or stringer affected fatigue crack initiation or growth behaviour; sub-surface crack coalescence being clearly observed by both serial sectioning and computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques at a depth of about 150–180 μm. These sub-surface crack coalescences can be linked to both the extent of the compressive residual stress as well as the depth of the plastic deformation arising from the intense shot peening process. Shot peening appears to provide a different defect population that initiates fatigue cracks and competes with the underlying metallurgical defect populations. The most beneficial shot peening process would in this case appear to “deactivate” the original metallurgical defect population and substitute a known defect distribution from the shot peening process from which fatigue cracks grow rather slowly in the strain hardened surface layer which also contains compressive residual stresses. A benefit to fatigue life in bending, even under Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) conditions, has been observed in these tests if a

  14. Effect of residual stress on crack-tip for fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo

    1995-02-01

    Fatigue tests were performed in cyclic loading at 10Hz and stress ratios, R of 0.1 and 0.2 at room temperature. The type 304 stainless steel specimens are prepared into two different thickness (3mm and 25mm). The fatigue crack growth rate of 25mm thick specimen is faster than that of 3mm thick specimen, and this result is attributed to the difference of plasticity in the crack tip region from the elastic-plastic fracture mechanical analysis. The residual stress fields are induced by the surface hardening treatments by induction heating at temperatures of ∼600 .deg. C, 750 .deg. C and 900 .deg. C, and the induced residual stresses are verified by the X-ray measurements of the induction heating treated specimen at 750 .deg. C. It is observed that the tensile residual stress is formed at heat affected zone and, behind this zone, the compressive residual stress is formed with maximum value of ∼200 MPa. The results of fatigue tests showed the acceleration of the growth rate in tensile region, and the retardation in compressive region. The results of constant stress intensity tests illustrated that the variations of the crack growth rate are related with the change of crack closure level. A simple model for fatigue crack propagation of materials is derived with energy balance approach on the basis of the Dugdale model, and this model is verified through the experiments of two kinds of materials (type 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718). The energy balance model demonstrated that the variations of material's tearing modulus results in the change of fatigue crack propagation

  15. Sealing And Filling Cracks In Asphalt Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The primary objective of the crack treatment experiment was to determine the most effective and economical materials and methods for conducting crack-sealing and crack-filling operations. Secondary objectives included the identification of performanc...

  16. Cracking in thin films of colloidal particles on elastomeric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    The drying of thin colloidal films of particles is a common industrial problem (e.g paint drying, ceramic coatings). An often undesirable side effect is the appearance of cracks. As the liquid in a suspension evaporates, particles are forced into contact both with each other and the substrate, forming a fully wetted film. Under carefully controlled conditions the observed cracks grow orthogonal to the drying front, spaced at regular intervals along it. In this work we investigated the role of the substrate in constraining the film. Atomic force microscopy, was used to image the particle arrangements on the top and bottom surfaces of films, dried on liquid and glass substrates. We present convincing evidence that the interface prevents particle rearrangements at the bottom of the film, leading to a mismatch strain between upper and lower surfaces of the film which appears to drive cracking. We show that when the modulus of the substrate becomes comparable to the stresses measured in the films, the crack spacing is significantly altered. We also show that cracks do not form on liquid substrates. These combined experiments highlight the importance of substrate constraint in the crack formation mechanism.[4pt] [1] M.I. Smith, J.S. Sharp, Langmuir 27, 8009 (2011)

  17. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  18. Modeling of crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks is a problem that has not yet been addressed properly. To investigate it, a cracked half-infinite disk of concrete is strengthened with a linear elastic material bonded to the surface, and analyzed using two different finite element modeling...... approaches. The first method is 3D modeling of strengthening, interface and disk, and the second method is modeling of an equivalent disk in 2D, with an effective cohesive crack, equivalent thickness and equivalent stiffness. The 2D modeling approach simplifies modeling of the problem significantly...... and reduces the computational efforts and time. A good prediction of the cracking response, global response and load was obtained with the 2D model, whereas prediction of the size and shape of the interface debond was only approximate. It is concluded that the effective cohesive modeling approach can be used...

  19. Constitutive mixed mode model for cracks in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Poulsen, P.N.; Olesen, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to set up a constitutive mixed mode model for cracks in concrete. The model is formulated at macro level and includes the most important micro scale effects. An associated plasticity model inspired by the modified Cam clay model is established. The hardening parameters...... are based on the standard Mode I tensile softening response and the response for Mode I crushing. The roughness of the crack is included through a topographic description of the crack surface. The constitutive behavior is based on the integration of local contributions. The local mixed mode ratio...... is determined from the topographic information and the constitutive model is thereby purely mechanically based. Using the actual topographic description the model is validated against experimental results for mixed mode crack openings....

  20. The application of leak before break concept to W7-X target module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dundulis, G., E-mail: gintas@mail.lei.lt; Janulionis, R.; Karalevičius, R.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • LBB application to Wendelstein 7-X fusion reactor. • R6 method application to crack analysis. • Through wall crack opening analysis. • Determination of leak rate function. • Crack growth analysis. -- Abstract: Fusion is the energy production technology, which could potentially solve problems with growing energy demand of population in the future. Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is an experimental stellarator of the helias type fusion reactor currently being built in Greifswald, Germany. This experimental stellarator is a complex structure, such as nuclear power plants and high level of safety requirements should be used for structural integrity analysis. It is thus not possible to obtain simple solutions for general cases, therefore sophisticated methods are necessary for the analysis. Inside the Plasma Vessel (PV) of W7-X there is a number of different components such as pipes, divertors, baffles and targets. A guillotine failure of one component is very dangerous for structural integrity of surrounding components located in PV. For this reason it is very important to evaluate possibility to apply “leak before break” (LBB) concept for W7-X. The LBB concept is widely used in the nuclear industry to describe the idea that in the piping carrying the coolant of a power reactor a leak will occur before a catastrophic break will occurred. LBB allows to conduct the structural design without considering the loads due to postulated line breaks. The LBB analysis was made for the case when plasma vessel is operating in “baking” mode. “Baking” is the mode, when the cooling system is working as a warming system and it heats the plasma vessel structures up to 160 °C in order to release the absorbed gases from the surfaces and to pump them out of the plasma vessel before plasma operation. The LBB analysis was performed for most loaded component of target module. According to the results of the analysis it is possible to conclude that target module 1H

  1. Stresses and Cracks in Surface Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    2000-01-01

    This extended abstract of the talk to be given at the Danish Metallurgical Society, Winter Meeting 1999, gives an outline of the areas of interest in current projects in wear and corrosion resistant coatings at Materials Technology, Technical University of Denmark (IPT, Materialeteknologi, DTU......). It also briefly describes our method of approach in analysing new coating / substrate combinations or new materials processing techniques for producing a given coating. We strive to combine, often in collaboration with others, a fundamental understanding of microstructure, mechanical properties...

  2. Fatigue crack closure: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, R. M. J.

    1990-09-01

    The phenomenon of fatigue crack closure is now recognized as one of the most influential mechanisms operating during fatigue. This literature survey traces the development of research into fatigue crack closure and has been divided to present the two major approaches. The first part covers early work carried out between 1970 to 1980 which, broadly speaking, adopted a 'continuum' approach. The second part covers the period 1980 to 1988 when a mechanistic approach was widely adopted. The survey has highlighted, firstly, the critical nature of experimental technique in the achievement of a meaningful measurement of crack closure load and secondly, that a diversity of mechanisms may operate to produce closure. Particular attention has been given to crack closure in aluminum alloys and also to work relating crack closure to the corrosion fatigue situation.

  3. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  4. Coping with cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, F W

    1996-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome typically poses a diagnostic challenge for the dentist. Symptoms include tenderness to biting on certain foods, often poorly localized, and occasional thermal sensitivity. Knowing where to look for this entity, especially in the mandibular molar region, can be especially helpful. Treatment of the tooth depends on the degree of pulpal involvement and the extent of the crack. Cuspal coverage is required of all cracked posterior teeth that are retainable. Root canal therapy is included if symptoms persist or if pulpal pathosis exists at the outset. Cracks extending beyond the osseous crest indicate a poor prognosis. Armed with this knowledge, the dentist can overcome many cracked tooth dilemmas, resulting in satisfaction for both patient and practitioner alike.

  5. Thermally-Induced Crack Evaluation in H13 Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Abdulrssoul Abdulhadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study reported the effect of thermal wear on cylindrical tool steel (AISI H13 under aluminum die-casting conditions. The AISIH13 steels were immersed in the molten aluminum alloy at 700 °C before water-quenching at room temperature. The process involved an alternating heating and cooling of each sample for a period of 24 s. The design of the immersion test apparatus stylistically simulated aluminum alloy dies casting conditions. The testing phase was performed at 1850, 3000, and 5000 cycles. The samples were subjected to visual inspection after each phase of testing, before being examined for metallographic studies, surface crack measurement, and hardness characteristics. Furthermore, the samples were segmented and examined under optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The areas around the crack zones were additionally examined under Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS. The crack’s maximum length and Vickers hardness profiles were obtained; and from the metallographic study, an increase in the number of cycles during the testing phase resulted in an increase in the surface crack formation; suggesting an increase in the thermal stress at higher cycle numbers. The crack length of Region I (spherically shaped was about 47 to 127 µm, with a high oxygen content that was analyzed within 140 µm from the surface of the sample. At 700 °C, there is a formation of aluminum oxides, which was in contact with the surface of the H13 sample. These stresses propagate the thermal wear crack length into the tool material of spherically shaped Region I and cylindrically shape Region II, while hardness parameters presented a different observation. The crack length of Region I was about 32% higher than the crack length of Region II.

  6. Tensile cracks in creeping solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, H.; Rice, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The loading parameter determining the stress and strain fields near a crack tip, and thereby the growth of the crack, under creep conditions is discussed. Relevant loading parameters considered are the stress intensity factor K/sub I/, the path-independent integral C*, and the net section stress sigma/sub net/. The material behavior is modelled as elastic-nonlinear viscous where the nonlinear term describes power law creep. At the time t = 0 load is applied to the cracked specimen, and in the first instant the stress distribution is elastic. Subsequently, creep deformation relaxes the initial stress concentration at the crack tip, and creep strains develop rapidly near the crack tip. These processes may be analytically described by self-similar solutions for short times t. Small scale yielding may be defined. In creep problems, this means that elastic strains dominate almost everywhere except in a small creep zone which grows around the crack tip. If crack growth ensues while the creep zone is still small compared with the crack length and the specimen size, the stress intensity factor governs crack growth behavior. If the calculated creep zone becomes larger than the specimen size, the stresses become finally time-independent and the elastic strain rates can be neglected. In this case, the stress field is the same as in the fully-plastic limit of power law hardening plasticity. The loading parameter which determines the near tip fields uniquely is then the path-independent integral C*.K/sub I/ and C* characterize opposite limiting cases. The case applied in a given situation is decided by comparing the creep zone size with the specimen size and the crack length. Besides several methods of estimating the creep zone size, a convenient expression for a characteristic time is derived, which characterizes the transition from small scale yielding to extensive creep of the whole specimen

  7. Buckling Analysis of Edge Cracked Sandwich Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Mohammed Hussein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents mainly the buckling load of sandwich plates with or without crack for different cases. The buckling loads are analyzed experimentally and numerically by using ANSYS 15. The experimental investigation was to fabricate the cracked sandwich plate from stainless steel and PVC to find mechanical properties of stainless steel and PVC such as young modulus. The buckling load for different aspect ratio, crack length, cracked location and plate without crack found. The experimental results were compared with that found from ANSYS program. Present of crack is decreased the buckling load and that depends on crack size, crack location and aspect ratio.

  8. Low temperature spalling of silicon: A crack propagation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoni, Mariana; Uberg Naerland, Tine; Stoddard, Nathan; Guimera Coll, Pablo

    2017-06-08

    Spalling is a promising kerfless method for cutting thin silicon wafers while doubling the yield of a silicon ingot. The main obstacle in this technology is the high total thickness variation of the spalled wafers, often as high as 100% of the wafer thickness. It has been suggested before that a strong correlation exists between low crack velocities and a smooth surface, but this correlation has never been shown during a spalling process in silicon. The reason lies in the challenge associated to measuring such velocities. In this contribution, we present a new approach to assess, in real time, the crack velocity as it propagates during a low temperature spalling process. Understanding the relationship between crack velocity and surface roughness during spalling can pave the way to attain full control on the surface quality of the spalled wafer.

  9. Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-03-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

  10. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  11. Bootstrap Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Shu Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the emergence of a 125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, we explore the possibility of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by strong Yukawa coupling of very heavy new chiral quarks Q . Taking the 125 GeV object to be a dilaton with suppressed couplings, we note that the Goldstone bosons G exist as longitudinal modes V L of the weak bosons and would couple to Q with Yukawa coupling λ Q . With m Q ≳ 700  GeV from LHC, the strong λ Q ≳ 4 could lead to deeply bound Q Q ¯ states. We postulate that the leading “collapsed state,” the color-singlet (heavy isotriplet, pseudoscalar Q Q ¯ meson π 1 , is G itself, and a gap equation without Higgs is constructed. Dynamical symmetry breaking is affected via strong λ Q , generating m Q while self-consistently justifying treating G as massless in the loop, hence, “bootstrap,” Solving such a gap equation, we find that m Q should be several TeV, or λ Q ≳ 4 π , and would become much heavier if there is a light Higgs boson. For such heavy chiral quarks, we find analogy with the π − N system, by which we conjecture the possible annihilation phenomena of Q Q ¯ → n V L with high multiplicity, the search of which might be aided by Yukawa-bound Q Q ¯ resonances.

  12. The effect of several intact or broken stringers of the stress intensity factor in a cracked sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    The stringers which are continuously attached to the plate and placed perpendicular to the crack may be partially debonded due to high stress concentrations. Since the stringers may even break under excessive loading conditions, both intact and broken stringers are considered to investigate the effect of rupture. The continuity of displacements along the bond lines leads to an integral equation which is solved to give the shear stress distribution in the adhesive and the stress intensity factors at the crack tips.

  13. Crack propagation behaviour in stainless steel AISI 316L at elevated temperatures under static and cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental investigations of crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions are presented. The experiments were performed with the austenitic steel AISI 316L, that will be used in fast breeder reactors. A comparison of crack propagation behaviour at temperatures of T = 550deg C and T = 700deg C in common through-thickness cracked specimens and in plates containing surface cracks is carried out by application of several fracture mechanics parameters. The quantitative description of crack initiation times and crack velocities is persued particularly. The propagation rate of one-dimensional cracks under cyclic loading conditions at T = 550deg C is also treated with fracture mechanical methods. The influence of the hold periods on crack speed is discussed. (orig.) [de

  14. A new modeling method for natural PWSCC cracking simulation in a dissimilar metal weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Heqin; Mahmoud, Samer; Nana, Ashok; Killian, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Cracks found in a nuclear power plant reactor coolant system (RCS), such as primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), usually have natural crack front shapes that can be very different from the idealized semi-elliptical or rectangular shapes considered in engineering handbooks and other analytical solutions based on limited shapes. Simplifications towards semi-elliptical shape or rectangular shape may potentially introduce unnecessary conservatism when the simplified shape has to contain the actual crack shape. On the other hand, it is very time-consuming to create a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model to simulate crack propagation in a natural shape using existing public-domain software like ABAQUS or ANSYS. In this study, a local deformation-based mesh-mapping (LDMM) method is proposed to model cracks with a natural front shape in any 3D structures. This methodology is first applied to model circumferential surface cracks with a natural crack front shape in the cross-sectional plane of a cylinder. The proposed new method can be applied to simulate both shallow and deep cracks. Also discussed in this paper is a direct method to reproduce welding residual stresses in the crack model using temperature fields combined with other sustained loads to predict crack propagations. With this novel LDMM method, natural crack fronts and non-planar crack faces can be easily modeled. The proposed new method can be used to generate a high-quality finite element model that can be used for both linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and elastic–plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) analyses. The study case illustrates that the proposed LDMM method is easy to implement and more efficient than the existing commercial software

  15. Threshold intensity factors as lower boundaries for crack propagation in ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Per-Ole

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Slow crack growth can be described in a v (crack velocity versus KI (stress intensity factor diagram. Slow crack growth in ceramics is attributed to corrosion assisted stress at the crack tip or at any pre-existing defect in the ceramic. The combined effect of high stresses at the crack tip and the presence of water or body fluid molecules (reducing surface energy at the crack tip induces crack propagation, which eventually may result in fatigue. The presence of a threshold in the stress intensity factor, below which no crack propagation occurs, has been the subject of important research in the last years. The higher this threshold, the higher the reliability of the ceramic, and consequently the longer its lifetime. Methods We utilize the Irwin K-field displacement relation to deduce crack tip stress intensity factors from the near crack tip profile. Cracks are initiated by indentation impressions. The threshold stress intensity factor is determined as the time limit of the tip stress intensity when the residual stresses have (nearly disappeared. Results We determined the threshold stress intensity factors for most of the all ceramic materials presently important for dental restorations in Europe. Of special significance is the finding that alumina ceramic has a threshold limit nearly identical with that of zirconia. Conclusion The intention of the present paper is to stress the point that the threshold stress intensity factor represents a more intrinsic property for a given ceramic material than the widely used toughness (bend strength or fracture toughness, which refers only to fast crack growth. Considering two ceramics with identical threshold limits, although with different critical stress intensity limits, means that both ceramics have identical starting points for slow crack growth. Fast catastrophic crack growth leading to spontaneous fatigue, however, is different. This growth starts later in those ceramic materials

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking mechanisms in repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1987-02-01

    This paper assesses how environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) mechanisms in candidate container materials can be identified to enhance the accuracy of long-term projections of performance in the repository. In low and intermediate strength steels, the role of the two principal mechanisms, slip dissolution/film rupture (SD/FR) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE), is a very complex and controversial issue. No unanimity exists concerning the operative cracking mechanisms, and there is no unique or rigorous approach that would be persuasive in selecting an appropriate model. Both of the proposed mechanisms have common rate controlling processes such as surface adsorption rate, passivation rate, and oxidation rupture rate, which makes it difficult to identify the operative mechanism. Development of a quantitative model for predicting environmental effects for low-carbon steels in repository environments would provide a theoretical basis for assuring the long-term structural integrity of waste-package containment. To date, only one quantitative model has been developed. The agreement between predicted and observed behavior suggests that SD/FR processes control the environmental acceleration in crack growth rates for this class of materials. Deviations from predicted behavior due to HE effects should be uncovered experimentally. 59 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Design and fabrication of an apparatus to study stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscarlet, Carol

    1977-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first gives a large overview of tests methods of stress corrosion cracking: definition and generalities, stress corrosion cracking in the laboratory (test methods with imposed deformation, load or strain rate, theories of hydrogen embrittlement, of adsorption, of film breaking, and electrochemical theories), stress corrosion cracking in alkaline environment (in light water reactors, of austenitic stainless steels), and conventional tests on polycrystals and monocrystals of stainless steels in sodium hydroxide. The next parts address the core of this research, i.e. the design of an autoclave containing a tensile apparatus, the fabrication of this apparatus, the stress application device, the sample environment, pressurization, control and command, preliminary tests in a melt salt, and the first cracking tests [fr

  18. Application of the virtual crack closure technique to calculate stress intensity factors for through cracks with an oblique elliptical crack front

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fawaz, S.

    1998-01-01

    Fractographic observations on fatigue tested 2024 T3 clad aluminium riveted lap-splice joints indicate oblique fronts after the initial surface or corner crack at a rivet hole has penetrated through the sheet thichness. No stress intensity factor solutions are available for this geometry subjected

  19. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  20. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marková

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceability limit states indicated in Eurocode 1. Analysis of sensitivity factors of basic variables enables to find out variables significantly affecting the total crack width.

  1. Multispecimen fatigue crack propagation testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermi, A.M.; Bauer, R.E.; Chin, B.A.; Straalsund, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Chains of miniature center-cracked-tension specimens were tested on a conventional testing machine and on a prototypic in-reactor fatigue machine as part of the fusion reactor materials alloy development program. Annealed and 20 percent cold-worked 316 stainless steel specimens were cycled under various conditions of temperature, frequency, stress ratio and chain length. Crack growth rates determined from multispecimen visual measurements and from an electrical potential technique were consistent with those obtained by conventional test methods. Results demonstrate that multispecimen chain testing is a valid method of obtaining fatigue crack propagation information for alloy development. 8 refs

  2. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  3. GPR application to investigate soil crack persistence in Cianjur landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, S.; Aly, R. R.; Syahputra, R.; Kristyanto, T. H. W.; Tempesy, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    Cianjur region, located in West Java, is one of regions in Indonesia with high intensity of rain, where medium land movement may be inevitable. The presence of joints on sandstone outcrops conducts as water access and accelerates weathering process. The survey aims to study the continuity of the soil cracks that develop in the body of slope its density. This survey used Ground Penetrating Radar method to study landslides in both favorable and unfavorable light. Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR, is the method that adopts electromagnetic wave propagation to map subsurface properties. GPR is one of the effective methods to delineate subsurface with the highest resolution in the shallow depth, even it has highly variation results corresponded to complex of geological features and clay-rich materials. The result section showed soil crack continuation into deeper part of the layer with GPR's frequency 40MHz, most of section then showed the crack occurrence is dominated in the upper 200 ns. Crack density could be affected by mineral composition and other factors. This study resulted two lines GPR data which has different altitude. Line A which is lower than Line B has loose crack density rather than B, about approximately 40%. The area was approximately affected by landslides that usually exhibited dramatic spatial and temporal variations of lithological and hydrogeological conditions. It will need further survey to know the effect of soil crack toward the sliding surface of the landslide from other surveys.

  4. Effect of copper on crack propagation in beryllium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldinger, F.; Wilhelm, M.

    The effect of copper additives on the fracture energy and the development of cracks parallel to the basal plane was studied in zone-refined single crystalline beryllium. At 77 0 K the cleavage planes are very smooth, so the crack propagation energy, which is independent of copper content (less than 2 at. percent Cu) in the range of measurement accuracy, is only a little higher than the surface energy of the basal plane. At room temperature, due to intense plastic processes taking place in front of the crack tip, the fracture energy is an order of magnitude higher than at low temperatures. The effect of copper on the plastic processes can be divided into two regions. In region I (less than 1.2 at. percent Cu), in which the crack propagation energy increases sharply with increasing copper content, crack propagation is controlled by prism slips. The decrease in crack propagation energy in region II (greater than 1.2 at. percent Cu) can be attributed to a reduction of beryllium twinning energy with increasing copper content. (auth)

  5. Fatigue crack propagation in self-assembling nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingler, Andreas; Wetzel, Bernd [Institute for Composite Materials (IVW GmbH) Technical University of Kaiserslautern, 67633 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembling block-copolymers allow the easy manufacturing of nanocomposites due to the thermodynamically driven in situ formation of nanosized phases in thermosetting resins during the curing process. Complex mechanical dispersion processes can be avoided. The current study investigates the effect of a block-copolymer on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of a cycloaliphatic amine cured epoxy resin. It was found that a small amount of MAM triblock-copolymer significantly increases the resistance to fatigue crack propagation of epoxy. Crack growth rate and the Paris law exponent for fatigue-crack growth were considerably reduced from m=15.5 of the neat epoxy to m=8.1 of the nanocomposite. To identify the related reinforcing and fracture mechanisms structural analyses of the fractured surfaces were performed by scanning electron microscope. Characteristic features were identified to be deformation, debonding and fracture of the nano-phases as well as crack pinning. However, the highest resistance against fatigue crack propagation was achieved in a bi-continuous microstructure that consisted of an epoxy-rich phase with embedded submicron sized MAM inclusions, and which was surrounded by a block-copolymer-rich phase that showed rupture and plastic deformation.

  6. Predicting fatigue crack initiation through image-based micromechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, K.-S.; Smillie, Matthew J.; Knowles, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of individual grain orientation on early fatigue crack initiation in a four-point bend fatigue test was investigated numerically and experimentally. The 99.99% aluminium test sample was subjected to high cycle fatigue (HCF) and the top surface microstructure within the inner span of the sample was characterized using electron-beam backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Applying a finite-element submodelling approach, the microstructure was digitally reconstructed and refined studies carried out in regions where fatigue damage was observed. The constitutive behaviour of aluminium was described by a crystal plasticity model which considers the evolution of dislocations and accumulation of edge dislocation dipoles. Using an energy-based approach to quantify fatigue damage, the model correctly predicts regions in grains where early fatigue crack initiation was observed. The tendency for fatigue cracks to initiate in these grains appears to be strongly linked to the orientations of the grains relative to the direction of loading - grains less favourably aligned with respect to the loading direction appear more susceptible to fatigue crack initiation. The limitations of this modelling approach are also highlighted and discussed, as some grains predicted to initiate cracks did not show any visible signs of fatigue cracking in the same locations during testing

  7. BEHAVIOR OF CRACKED EGGS AT NON – DESTRUCTIVE IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Strnková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cracks on the dynamical frequency response of eggshells was studied. The non-destructive impact tests of the intact and cracked eggs were performed. Record of impact force time history was enabled by experimental device. Response of eggshell to the impact was described by the surface displacement of the eggshell. This response was measured by the laser interferometry. The force and response were also expressed in the frequency domain using of the fast Fourier transform. Both time and frequency response were affected by the presence of cracks. It was shown that the influence of cracks on the eggshell response was more effectively described in the frequency domain. The frequency response was relatively very sensitive to the position and orientation of cracks. The frequency response function was characterized by many peaks. Five excitation resonant frequency characteristic of signals were extracted based on the difference of frequency domain response signals. Distinction between intact and cracked eggs was enabled by these parameters. Even if some main problems were solved some of them remained unsolved. One of them was the effect of the impacting body r shape. This problem could be effectively solved namely using of numerical methods. In order to describe the response of eggshell response to the non-destructive impact using of the numerical simulation exact description of eggshell shape was performed. This numerical simulation will be subject of forthcoming paper.

  8. Break the Pattern!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine; Trentemøller, Stine

    Break the Pattern! A critical enquiry into three scientific workplace cultures: Hercules, Caretakers and Worker Bees is the third publication of the international three year long project "Understanding Puzzles in the Gendered European Map" (UPGEM). By contrasting empirical findings from academic...... workplaces in the five UPGEM-countries (Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Italy and Poland) we identify three clusters of cultural patterns in physics as culture. We call these Hercules, Caretakers and Worker Bees. We also consider the influence of national cultural historical processes on the scientific culture...... (physics in culture) and discuss how physics as and in culture influence the perception of science, of work and family life, of the interplay between religion and science as well as how physics as culture can either hinder or promote the career of female scientists....

  9. Investigation of problems of closing of geophysical cracks in thermoelastic media in the case of flow of fluids with impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, A. N.; Davtyan, A. V.; Dinunts, A. S.; Martirosyan, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate a problem of closing cracks by building up a layer of sediments on surfaces of a crack in an infinite thermoelastic medium in the presence of a flow of fluids with impurities. The statement of the problem of closing geophysical cracks in the presence of a fluid flow is presented with regard to the thermoelastic stress and the influence of the impurity deposition in the liquid on the crack surfaces due to thermal diffusion at the fracture closure. The Wiener–Hopf method yields an analytical solution in the special case without friction. Numerical calculations are performed in this case and the dependence of the crack closure time on the coordinate is plotted. A similar spatial problem is also solved. These results generalize the results of previous studies of geophysical cracks and debris in rocks, where the closure of a crack due to temperature effects is studied without taking the elastic stresses into account.

  10. Dynamical evolution of supernova remnants breaking through molecular clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code (Harten et al. 1983). We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the ou...

  11. Influence of Shrinkage-Reducing Admixtures on the Development of Plastic Shrinkage Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Pease, Bradley Justin; Mazzotta, Guy

    2007-01-01

    The term plastic shrinkage cracking is generally used to describe cracks that form between the time when concrete is placed and the time when concrete sets. This paper discusses how the evaporation of water causes concave menisci to form on the surface of fresh concrete. These menisci cause both...... settlement of the concrete and tensile stress development in the surface of the concrete, which increase the potential for development of plastic shrinkage cracks. Specifically, this paper studies the development of plastic shrinkage cracks in mortars containing a commercially available shrinkage......-reducing admixture (SRA). Mortars containing SRA show fewer and narrower plastic shrinkage cracks than plain mortars when exposed to the same environmental conditions. It is proposed that the lower surface tension of the pore fluid in the mortars containing SRA results in less evaporation, reduced settlement...

  12. The crack growth mechanism in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.M.J.; Hopman, P.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The crack growth mechanism in asphalt concrete (Ac) mixes is studied. In cyclic tests on several asphaltic mixes crack growth is measured, both with crack foils and with cOD-gauges. It is found that crack growth in asphaltic mixes is described by three processes which are parallel in time: cohesive

  13. Crackscope : automatic pavement cracking inspection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The CrackScope system is an automated pavement crack rating system consisting of a : digital line scan camera, laser-line illuminator, and proprietary crack detection and classification : software. CrackScope is able to perform real-time pavement ins...

  14. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by...

  15. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  16. Shapes formed by interacting cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Brittle failure through multiple cracks occurs in a wide variety of contexts, from microscopic failures in dental enamel and cleaved silicon to geological faults and planetary ice crusts. In each of these situations, with complicated stress geometries and different microscopic mechanisms, pairwise interactions between approaching cracks nonetheless produce characteristically curved fracture paths. We investigate the origins of this widely observed ``en passant'' crack pattern by fracturing a rectangular slab which is notched on each long side and subjected to quasi-static uniaxial strain from the short side. The two cracks propagate along approximately straight paths until they pass each other, after which they curve and release a lens-shaped fragment. We find that, for materials with diverse mechanical properties, each curve has an approximately square-root shape, and that the length of each fragment is twice its width. We are able to explain the origins of this universal shape with a simple geometrical model.

  17. Premature asphalt concrete pavement cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Recently, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) has identified hot mix asphalt concrete : (HMAC) pavements that have displayed top-down cracking within three years of construction. The objective of : the study was to evaluate the top-down cr...

  18. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari (Boeing)

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  19. Cracks in Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  20. The cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christoper D; McConnell, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of the cracked tooth syndrome (CTS). The condition refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth that occasionally extends into the pulp. A lack of awareness of the condition coupled with its varied clinical features can make diagnosis of CTS difficult. Common symptoms include an uncomfortable sensation or pain from a tooth that occurs while chewing hard foods and which ceases when the pressure is withdrawn. The patient is often unable to identify the offending tooth or quadrant involved, and may report a history of numerous dental procedures with unsatisfactory results. Successful diagnosis and management requires an awareness of the existence of CTS and the appropriate diagnostic tests. Management options depend on the nature of the symptoms and extent of the lesion. These options include routine monitoring, occlusal adjustments, placement of a cast restoration and endodontic treatment. A decision flowchart indicating the treatment options available to the dental practitioner is presented.

  1. Machine Vision based Micro-crack Inspection in Thin-film Solar Cell Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yinong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thin film solar cell consists of various layers so the surface of solar cell shows heterogeneous textures. Because of this property the visual inspection of micro-crack is very difficult. In this paper, we propose the machine vision-based micro-crack detection scheme for thin film solar cell panel. In the proposed method, the crack edge detection is based on the application of diagonal-kernel and cross-kernel in parallel. Experimental results show that the proposed method has better performance of micro-crack detection than conventional anisotropic model based methods on a cross- kernel.

  2. Internal oxidation and probabilistic fracture model of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinović, M. J.

    2017-11-01

    A probabilistic fracture model is applied to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking effect, assuming that the oxidized part of stainless steel sample plays an essential role in the crack initiation, propagation and the sample failure. The Weibull statistical distribution of time-to-failures, estimated through the correlation with the statistical distribution of oxide strengths, including both the surface oxide layer and oxidized grain boundaries, fully describe the experimental scatter obtained in the constant load time-to-failure tests. Large failure uncertainties in these type of tests originate from an intrinsic stochastic behavior of the oxide cracking due to subcritical crack propagation process.

  3. Detection of crack location and size in structures using improved damaged finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanad, Aysha; Rao, B. N.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper two-dimensional finite element with an embedded edge crack proposed by Potirniche et al [1] is improved further for crack depth ratios ranging up to 0.9 h (h is the element depth) and for predicting natural frequency of a cracked beam more accurately. The element is implemented in the commercial finite element code ABAQUS as user element (UEL) subroutine. The accuracy of the UEL is verified by comparing the first natural frequency for the bending mode for several beam cases with different damage locations with available experimental data. Subsequently a methodology to detect crack location and size in conjunction the proposed improved cracked element with is presented for singularity problems like a cracked beam. The frequency response functions, function of crack location and size, are approximated by means of surface-fitting techniques. Measured natural frequencies are used in a crack detection process and the crack location and size can be identified by finding the point of intersection of three frequency contour lines. The experimental data from beams studied by other researchers is employed to verify the accuracy of the proposed methodology in the diagnosis of structural crack faults.

  4. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Mai, Y.W. (Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, long'' (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, small'' (1 to 100 [mu]m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  5. Mechanics and mechanisms of cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mai, Y.W. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1992-05-01

    Damage and cyclic fatigue failure under alternating loading in transformation-toughened zirconia ceramics is reviewed and compared to corresponding behavior under quasi-static loading (static fatigue). Current understanding of the role of transformation toughening in influencing cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior is examined based on studies which altered the extent of the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation in MG-PSZ through subeutectoid aging. These studies suggest that near-tip computations of the crack-driving force (in terms of the local stress intensity) can be used to predict crack-growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable-amplitude (spectrum) loading, using spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy to measure the extent of the transformation zones. In addition, results are reviewed which rationalize distinctions between the crack-growth behavior of preexisting, ``long`` (> 2 mm), through-thickness cracks and naturally-occurring, ``small`` (1 to 100 {mu}m), surface cracks in terms of variations in crack-tip shielding with crack size. In the present study, the effect of grain size variations on crack-growth behavior under both monotonic (R-curve) and cyclic fatigue loading are examined. Such observations are used to speculate on the mechanisms associated with cyclic crack advance, involving such processes as alternating shear via transformation-band formation, cyclic modification of the degree of transformation toughening, and uncracked-ligament (or grain) bridging.

  6. On the controlling parameters for fatigue-crack threshold at low homologous temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, W.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation phenomena near the threshold stress intensity level ΔK /SUB TH/ , has been a vigorously studied topic in recent years. Near threshold the crack propagates rather slowly, thus giving enough time for various physical and chemical reactions to take place. Room air, which is the most commonly encountered environment, can still supply various ingredients such as oxygen, water vapor (and thus hydrogen) to support these reactions. Much effort had been directed toward the environmental aspects of near threshold fatigue crack growth. By conducting tests under vacuum, Suresh and coworkers found that the crack propagation rate in a 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo steel was higher in vacuum than in air. An oxide induced closure, which served to reduce the effective stress intensity at the crack tip, seems to furnish a good explanation. Neumann and coworkers proposed that during the fatigue process, extrusion-intrusion pairs can develop as a consequence of reversed slip around the crack tip when the crack was propagated near threshold stress intensity. Beevers demonstrated that fatigue fracture surfaces contact each other during unloading even under tension-tension cycling. Kanninen and Atkinson also reached the conclusion that the compressive stress acting at the crack tip due to residual plasticity can induce closure. Microstructural effects have also been cited as important factors in near threshold crack growth. It is generally accepted that coarser grains have a beneficial effect on the resistance to the near threshold crack propagation

  7. Mussel adhesive protein coating: A potential therapeutic method for self-healing of cracked teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bo-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, cracked tooth syndrome is the third main cause of tooth extraction, following caries and periodontal diseases, done in almost all the dental clinics. Nevertheless, the diagnosis and treatment of this condition remain controversial. All candidate therapeutics, such as occlusal adjustment, preventive filling, root canal therapy (RCT, and crown restoration, provide unpredictable outcomes. As such, methods to prevent further crack development and to induce crack self-healing must be developed. The Hypothesis: Mussels secreting adhesive foot protein (Mafp can attach to various surfaces under aqueous conditions. In nature, mussels adhere to stones and deposit layer by layer through mineralization, thereby forming mussel-stone composites with excellent mechanical property. Given the natural process of mussel-stone complex formation, we hypothesize that application of Mafp coating at the crack interface may mineralize the cracks by capturing calcium and phosphate ions from the saliva. This process consequently leads to crack self-healing and complete restoration of the tooth structure. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: To test our hypothesis, we need to develop a model in vivo. Cracked teeth disks are adhered together using Mafp solution. Then, the tooth disks are sutured on the interior side of the cheeks. After regular intervals, the disks are removed and characterized. Scanning electron microscopy is performed to evaluate the morphology of the crack interface. Microhardness and shear bond strength are used to evaluate the mechanical property of the healing cracked zone. Transmission electron microscopy is also conducted to evaluate the crystallinity of the crack interface.

  8. Position control of desiccation cracks by memory effect and Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yousuke; Takeshi, Ooshida; Nakahara, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation of desiccation cracks on a layer of a calcium carbonate paste is studied experimentally. This paste is known to exhibit a memory effect, which means that a short-time application of horizontal vibration to the fresh paste predetermines the direction of the cracks that are formed after the paste is dried. While the position of the cracks (as opposed to their direction) is still stochastic in the case of horizontal vibration, the present work reports that their positioning is also controllable, at least to some extent, by applying vertical vibration to the paste and imprinting the pattern of Faraday waves, thus breaking the translational symmetry of the system. The experiments show that the cracks tend to appear in the node zones of the Faraday waves: in the case of stripe-patterned Faraday waves, the cracks are formed twice more frequently in the node zones than in the anti-node zones, presumably due to the localized horizontal motion. As a result of this preference of the cracks to the node zones, the memory of the square lattice pattern of Faraday waves makes the cracks run in the oblique direction differing by 45 degrees from the intuitive lattice direction of the Faraday waves.

  9. Breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 87; Issue 5. Breaking soliton ... We use the simplified Hirota's method to obtain multiple soliton solutions for each developed breaking soliton equation. We also develop ... WAZWAZ1. Department of Mathematics, Saint Xavier University, Chicago, IL 60655, USA ...

  10. Breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton equations of typical and higher orders. The recursion operator of the KdV equation is used to derive these models.We establish the distinctdispersion relation for each equation. We use the simplified Hirota's method to obtain multiple soliton ...

  11. Break location effects on PWR small break LOCA phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro

    1989-01-01

    The report presents experimental results of a small lower plenum break test of SB-PV-01 conducted at the large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) of the Rig-of-Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV program. This test simulates a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) caused by instrument tubes break (break area corresponds to 0.5% of the cold leg flow area) in a Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor (PWR) assuming both manual actuation for all of the high pressure injection (HPI) systems and failure of the auxiliary feedwater systems. The report clarifies long-term system responses, especially the core cooling conditions related to the primary mass inventory. Also it clarifies break location effects on small break LOCA phenomena by comparing other five similar LOCA tests with break locations at cold leg, hot leg, upper head, pressurizer top (TMI-type) and SG U-tubes. It is coucluded that the lower plenum break is the severest on core heatup due to the highest break flow rate and the least primary mass recovery after the ECCS among the six tests. (author)

  12. Breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-06

    Oct 6, 2016 ... Abstract. We develop breaking soliton equations and negative-order breaking soliton equations of typical and higher orders. The recursion operator of the KdV equation is used to derive these models. We establish the distinct dispersion relation for each equation. We use the simplified Hirota's method to ...

  13. A cracked sheet stiffened by several partially debonded intact or broken stringers. [reinforcement (structures) and structural stability of metal sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of several stringers on the stress intensity factors at the tips of a crack is considered. The stringers which were continuously attached to the plate and placed perpendicular to the crack may be partially debonded due to high stress concentrations. Since the stringers may even break under excessive loading conditions, both intact and broken stringers are considered to investigate the effect of rupture. The continuity of displacements along the bond lines leads to an integral equation which is solved to give the shear stress distribution in the adhesive and the stress intensity factors at the crack tips.

  14. Probabilistic Analysis of Crack Width

    OpenAIRE

    J. Marková; M. Holický

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic analysis of crack width of a reinforced concrete element is based on the formulas accepted in Eurocode 2 and European Model Code 90. Obtained values of reliability index b seem to be satisfactory for the reinforced concrete slab that fulfils requirements for the crack width specified in Eurocode 2. However, the reliability of the slab seems to be insufficient when the European Model Code 90 is considered; reliability index is less than recommended value 1.5 for serviceabi...

  15. Permeability and mechanical properties of cracked glass under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ougier-Simonin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Crack initiation and growth in brittle solids under tension have been extensively studied by various experimental, theoretical and numerical approaches. If has been established that dynamic brittle fracture is related to fundamental physical parameters and processes, such as crack speed, crack branching, surface roughening, and dynamic instabilities. On the other hand, less studies have been done in the area of compressive fracture despite its vital importance in geology, material science and engineering applications (such as the improvement and the insurance of the nuclear wastes storage). The present work aims to investigate thermo-mechanical cracking effects on elastic wave velocities, mechanical strength and permeability und r pressure to evaluate damage evolution, brittle failure and transport properties on a synthetic glass (SON 68), and to highlight the very different behavior of the glass amorphous structure compared to any rock structure. The original glass, produced in ideal conditions of slow cooling that prevent from any crack formation, exhibits a linear and reversible mechanical behavior and isotropic elastic velocities, as expected. It also presents a high strength as it fails at about 700 MPa of deviatoric stress for a confining pressure of 15 MPa. We choose to apply to some original glass samples a reproducible method (thermal treatment with a thermal shock of T=100,200 and 300 C) which creates cracks with a homogeneous distribution. The impact of the thermal treatment is clearly visible through the elastic wave velocity measurements as we observe crack closure under hydrostatic conditions (at about 30 MPa). For T ≥ 200 C, the glass mechanical behavior becomes non linear and records an irreversible damage. The total damage observed with the acoustic emissions in these samples underlines the combination of the thermal and the mechanical cracks which drive to the sample failure. The results obtained with pore fluid pressure show a very small

  16. Sheared semi-infinite crack originating at the boundary of a circular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The configuration studied is that of a non-homogeneous infinite solid containing a central hole and a semi-infinite crack, originating from one side of the hole. Longitudinal shear loads of magnitude Tj, j = 1, 2 are applied on parts of the crack surface. It is found that the dominant fracture characteristic is that of a hole or semi ...

  17. An energy analysis of crack-initiation and arrest in epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kim, A.; Bosnyak, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study fracture processes such as crack initiation and arrest in epoxy. A compact tension specimen with displacement-controlled loading is employed to observe multiple crack initiations and arrests. The energy release rate at crack initiation is significantly higher than that at crack arrest, as has been observed elsewhere. In this study, the difference between these energy release rates is found to depend on specimen size (scale effect), and is quantitatively related to the fracture surface morphology. The scale effect, similar to that in strength theory, is conventionally attributed to the statistics of defects which control the fracture process. Triangular shaped ripples, deltoids, are formed on the fracture surface of the epoxy during the slow sub-critical crack growth, prior to the smooth mirrorlike surface characteristic of fast cracks. The deltoids are complimentary on the two crack faces which excludes any inelastic deformation from consideration. The deltoids are analogous to the ripples created on a river surface downstream from a small obstacle. However, in spite of the expectation based on this analogy and the observed scale effect, there are no 'defects' at the apex of the deltoids detectable down to the 0.1 micron level. This suggests that the formation of deltoids during the slow process of subcritical crack growth is an intrinsic feature of the fracture process itself, triggered by inhomogeneity of material on a submicron scale. This inhomogeneity may be related to a fluctuation in the cross-link density of the epoxy.

  18. The effect of couple-stresses on the stress concentration around a moving crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Itou

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a uniformly propagating finite crack in an infinite medium is solved within the linearized couple-stress theory. The self-equilibrated system of pressure is applied to the crack surfaces. The problem is reduced to dual integral equations and solved by a series-expansion method. The dynamic stress-intensity factor is computed numerically.

  19. On the decay of strength in Guilin red clay with cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of cracks in red clay on shear strength through dry-wet cycle test, the experimenters used imaging software and a mathematical model to determine fractal dimension and crack ratio of surface cracks in red clay in Guilin, China. After each dry-wet cycle, direct shear tests were carried out on the sample, and such variables as matrix suction on the crack propagation process of red clay were analyzed. The mechanics model was established and obtained the critical condition of soil cracks. The results show that with the increase in the number of dry-wet cycles the shear strength of the samples would decrease. But the rule of shear strength of sample 3 is slightly different from samples 1 and 2. The shear strength of red clay has a good correlation with fractal dimension and crack ratio, which could be an identification index of the strength of red clay

  20. Advances in fatigue crack closure measurement and analysis: Second volume. ASTM special technical publication 1343

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClung, R.C.; Newman, J.C. Jr. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    The discovery of the phenomenon of plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure by Elber was truly a landmark event in the study of fatigue crack growth (FCG) and the development of practical engineering methods for fatigue life management. Subsequent research identified other contributing mechanisms for crack closure, including crack surface roughness and oxide debris. Fatigue crack closure is now understood to be an intrinsic feature of crack growth behavior that must be considered to understand or treat many FCG problems, although closure may not be an issue in all problems and does not always provide a complete explanation of crack growth behavior. As the thirtieth anniversary of the Elber discovery approached, the strong, continuing international interest in crack closure prompted the organization of another ASTM symposium. An international audience numbering over sixty-five persons heard thirty papers contributed by authors from twelve different countries, with more than half of the papers originating from outside the United States. This STP volume contains peer-reviewed manuscripts for twenty-seven of those presentations, plus one peer-reviewed paper that could not be presented at the symposium. Topics covered are: Fundamental Studies; Experimental Characterization of Closure; Load History Effects; Surface Roughness Effects; and Closure Effects on Crack Behavior. Separate abstracts were prepared for all 28 papers.