WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface bls sensors

  1. (BLS) Department of Library Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gbaje E.S

    Abstract. Documentary source was used to provide analysis of the BLS projects submitted to Department of Library and. Information Science, university of Maiduguri between 2000 and 2006. It was discovered that there was no single BLS project for the year 2001. A total of 355 BLS projects were submitted for the 6 years.

  2. (BLS) Department of Library Science, (University of Maiduguri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Documentary source was used to provide analysis of the BLS projects submitted to Department of Library and Information Science, university of Maiduguri between 2000 and 2006. It was discovered that there was no single BLS project for the year 2001. A total of 355 BLS projects were submitted for the 6 years. In terms of ...

  3. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  4. Comparison of basic life support (BLS video self-instructional system and traditional BLS training in first year nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nikandish

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: For several years, educators have criticized the lecture-based  approach  to teaching and learning. Experts have rightly stressed on acquisition  of a number of critical  skills rather than focusing on lectures. Purpose. To compare students'  pe1jormance after self-education  with VCD and manikin,  with thei performance after standard BLS training.Methods: In this randomized controlled study, twenty first-year nursing students were divided into two groups randomly, and were provided with basic life support (BLS instruction either in the traditional format of lecturing or with VCD and manikin without tutor. The students’ Performance was evaluated on a manikin with a checklist including all steps in BLS.Results: With traditional  instruction,  students'  mean score was 42.2±3.91, while it was 46.3±3.86 with self-education,  showing no significant  difference.Conclusion: In nursing students with no previous BLS training, access to VCD and manikin facilitates immediate achievement of educational objectives similar to those  of a standard  BLS course.  Self­ learning BLS with VCD should be enhanced with a short period of hands-on practice.Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, nursing students, cpr skills, education

  5. A student's perspective: are medical students adequately trained in BLS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewole T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobi Oyewole,1 Folashade Oyewole2 1University of Liverpool – The School of Medicine, Liverpool, 2Imperial College London, London, UK We read with great interest the article by Lami et al regarding improving basic life support (BLS training for medical students.1 We agree that BLS skills are vital for junior doctors. The days of trial by fire have long gone away, and junior doctors and medical students need to feel that they are adequately trained to handle emergency situations they may face in hospital.  Read the original article

  6. Nanomechanical membrane-type surface stress sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Genki; Akiyama, Terunobu; Gautsch, Sebastian; Vettiger, Peter; Rohrer, Heinrich

    2011-03-09

    Nanomechanical cantilever sensors have been emerging as a key device for real-time and label-free detection of various analytes ranging from gaseous to biological molecules. The major sensing principle is based on the analyte-induced surface stress, which makes a cantilever bend. In this letter, we present a membrane-type surface stress sensor (MSS), which is based on the piezoresistive read-out integrated in the sensor chip. The MSS is not a simple "cantilever," rather it consists of an "adsorbate membrane" suspended by four piezoresistive "sensing beams," composing a full Wheatstone bridge. The whole analyte-induced isotropic surface stress on the membrane is efficiently transduced to the piezoresistive beams as an amplified uniaxial stress. Evaluation of a prototype MSS used in the present experiments demonstrates a high sensitivity which is comparable with that of optical methods and a factor of more than 20 higher than that obtained with a standard piezoresistive cantilever. The finite element analyses indicate that changing dimensions of the membrane and beams can substantially increase the sensitivity further. Given the various conveniences and advantages of the integrated piezoresistive read-out, this platform is expected to open a new era of surface stress-based sensing.

  7. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  8. Intelligent Machine Parts with Surface Embedded Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Østbø, Niels Peter

    2009-01-01

    A surface embedded temperature sensor has successfully been fabricated on a customized industrial bolt. The aluminum substrate of the bolt was electrically isolated by plasma electrolytic oxidation followed by the fabrication of a type T thermocouple and finally covered by a wear resistant DLC coating. This bolt is part of our work to develop smart machine parts that are capable of reporting their current physical status under real working conditions enabling both new tools for condition base...

  9. Surface effects in segmented silicon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsalis, Ioannis

    2017-05-01

    Silicon detectors in Photon Science and Particle Physics require silicon sensors with very demanding specifications. New accelerators like the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EuXFEL) and the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), pose new challenges for silicon sensors, especially with respect to radiation hardness. High radiation doses and fluences damage the silicon crystal and the SiO 2 layers at the surface, thus changing the sensor properties and limiting their life time. Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) of incident particles causes silicon crystal damage. Ionizing Energy Loss (IEL) of incident particles increases the densities of oxide charge and interface traps in the SiO 2 and at the Si-SiO 2 interface. In this thesis the surface radiation damage of the Si-SiO 2 system on high-ohmic Si has been investigated using circular MOSFETs biased in accumulation and inversion at an electric field in the SiO 2 of about 500 kV/cm. The MOSFETs have been irradiated by X-rays from an X-ray tube to a dose of about 17 kGy(SiO 2 ) in different irradiation steps. Before and after each irradiation step, the gate voltage has been cycled from inversion to accumulation conditions and back. From the dependence of the drain-source current on gate voltage the threshold voltage of the MOSFET and the hole and electron mobility at the Si-SiO 2 interface were determined. In addition, from the measured drain-source current the change of the oxide charge density during irradiation has been determined. The interface trap density and the oxide charge has been determined separately using the subthreshold current technique based on the Brews charge sheet model which has been applied for first time on MOSFETs built on high-ohmic Si. The results show a significant field-direction dependence of the surface radiation parameters. The extracted parameters and the acquired knowledge can be used to improve simulations of the surface radiation damage of silicon sensors.

  10. Surface effects in segmented silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopsalis, Ioannis

    2017-05-15

    Silicon detectors in Photon Science and Particle Physics require silicon sensors with very demanding specifications. New accelerators like the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (EuXFEL) and the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), pose new challenges for silicon sensors, especially with respect to radiation hardness. High radiation doses and fluences damage the silicon crystal and the SiO{sub 2} layers at the surface, thus changing the sensor properties and limiting their life time. Non-Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) of incident particles causes silicon crystal damage. Ionizing Energy Loss (IEL) of incident particles increases the densities of oxide charge and interface traps in the SiO{sub 2} and at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface. In this thesis the surface radiation damage of the Si-SiO{sub 2} system on high-ohmic Si has been investigated using circular MOSFETs biased in accumulation and inversion at an electric field in the SiO{sub 2} of about 500 kV/cm. The MOSFETs have been irradiated by X-rays from an X-ray tube to a dose of about 17 kGy(SiO{sub 2}) in different irradiation steps. Before and after each irradiation step, the gate voltage has been cycled from inversion to accumulation conditions and back. From the dependence of the drain-source current on gate voltage the threshold voltage of the MOSFET and the hole and electron mobility at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface were determined. In addition, from the measured drain-source current the change of the oxide charge density during irradiation has been determined. The interface trap density and the oxide charge has been determined separately using the subthreshold current technique based on the Brews charge sheet model which has been applied for first time on MOSFETs built on high-ohmic Si. The results show a significant field-direction dependence of the surface radiation parameters. The extracted parameters and the acquired knowledge can be used to improve simulations of the surface

  11. Optimal BLS: Optimizing transit-signal detection for Keplerian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. We optimize the search for transit signals for both detection and computational efficiencies by assuming that the searched systems can be described by Keplerian, and propagating the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Importnantly, we mainly consider the information content of the transit signal and not any specific algorithm - and use BLS (Kovács, Zucker, & Mazeh 2002) just as a specific example.We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually.By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the transit signal parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available.

  12. Searching for circumbinary planets with CB-BLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets (CBP) produce transit signals that are neither periodic not constant in duration or depth. These complications contribute to the low number of detected transiting CBP (nine in total so far), and limited detection to systems that exhibit transits that are relatively deep, i.e. individually-significant transit events. Planets around single stars taught us that small planets far outnumber larger ones, consequently the ability to detect small CBP is of the essence in order to correctly describe CBP demographics. Unfortunately, all currently known transiting CBP were detected either by eye or by some ad-hoc technique that has nothing to do with the 3-body dynamics of CBP (e.g. QATS, Carter & Agol 2013) -- limiting their detection power. CB-BLS (Ofir 2008) is an algorithm for the detection of transiting CBP that was proposed well before the first transiting CBP was detected (Doyle et al 2011). CB-BLS is tailored for CBP dynamics and is optimally sensitive and general. Here we present further evolution and the Matlab source code of CB-BLS that allows it to detect all currently known transiting CBP, including in eccentric and/or inclined orbits. We then describe our preliminary results on searching for transiting CBP in a small subset of the Kepler eclipsing binaries.

  13. Multi-Sensor Improved Sea Surface Temperature (MISST) for GODAE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gentemann, Chelle L; Wick, Gary A; Cummings, James; Bayler, Eric

    2004-01-01

    ...) sensors and to then demonstrate the impact of these improved sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on operational ocean models, numerical weather prediction, and tropical cyclone intensity forecasting...

  14. Surface Embedded Metal Oxide Sensors (SEMOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Talat Ali, Syed; Pleth Nielsen, Lars

    is the second and main part of the project. The main challenges in developing metal oxide sensors are proper choice of the material, sensor location and fabrication technique due to lifetime and cross sensitivity issues in harsh environment where the problems like de-bonding or some kind of diffusion......SEMOS is a joint project between Aalborg University, Danish Technological Institute and Danish Technical University in which micro temperature sensors and metal oxide-based gas sensors are developed and tested in a simulated fuel cell environment as well as in actual working fuel cells. Initially...... complex and sensors are not easily implemented in the construction. Hence sensor interface and sensor position must therefore be chosen carefully in order to make the sensors as non-intrusive as possible. Metal Oxide Sensors (MOX) for measuring H2, O2 and CO concentration in a fuel cell environment...

  15. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  16. Circuit Design of Surface Acoustic Wave Based Micro Force Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanyuan Li; Wenke Lu; Changchun Zhu; Qinghong Liu; Haoxin Zhang; Chenchao Tang

    2014-01-01

    Pressure sensors are commonly used in industrial production and mechanical system. However, resistance strain, piezoresistive sensor, and ceramic capacitive pressure sensors possess limitations, especially in micro force measurement. A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based micro force sensor is designed in this paper, which is based on the theories of wavelet transform, SAW detection, and pierce oscillator circuits. Using lithium niobate as the basal material, a mathematical model is established ...

  17. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  18. Chemical sensors based on surface charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasebi, Amirmasoud; Kruse, Peter

    2018-02-01

    The focus of this review is an introduction to chemiresistive chemical sensors. The general concept of chemical sensors is briefly introduced, followed by different architectures of chemiresistive sensors and relevant materials. For several of the most common systems, the fabrication of the active materials used in such sensors and their properties are discussed. Furthermore, the sensing mechanism, advantages, and limitations of each group of chemiresistive sensors are briefly elaborated. Compared to electrochemical sensors, chemiresistive sensors have the key advantage of a simpler geometry, eliminating the need for a reference electrode. The performance of bulk chemiresistors can be improved upon by using freestanding ultra-thin films (nanomaterials) or field effect geometries. Both of those concepts have also been combined in a gateless geometry, where charge transport though a percolation network of nanomaterials is modulated via adsorbate doping.

  19. Circuit Design of Surface Acoustic Wave Based Micro Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensors are commonly used in industrial production and mechanical system. However, resistance strain, piezoresistive sensor, and ceramic capacitive pressure sensors possess limitations, especially in micro force measurement. A surface acoustic wave (SAW based micro force sensor is designed in this paper, which is based on the theories of wavelet transform, SAW detection, and pierce oscillator circuits. Using lithium niobate as the basal material, a mathematical model is established to analyze the frequency, and a peripheral circuit is designed to measure the micro force. The SAW based micro force sensor is tested to show the reasonable design of detection circuit and the stability of frequency and amplitude.

  20. Cantilever surface stress sensors with single-crystalline silicon piezoresistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Andreas; Hansen, Ole; Boisen, Anja

    2005-01-01

    on cantilever sensors with integrated piezoresistive readout, that one finds between typical atomic force microscopy measurements and the surface stress sensors used in, e.g., biochemical measurements. We have simulated the response from piezoresistive cantilevers as a function of resistor type and placement...

  1. Optimizing surface acoustic wave sensors for trace chemical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, G.C.; Kottenstette, R.J.; Heller, E.J. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes several recent advances for fabricating coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for applications requiring trace chemical detection. Specifically, we have demonstrated that high surface area microporous oxides can provide 100-fold improvements in SAW sensor responses compared with more typical polymeric coatings. In addition, we fabricated GaAs SAW devices with frequencies up to 500 MHz to provide greater sensitivity and an ideal substrate for integration with high-frequency electronics.

  2. Microcontact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor for myoglobin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, Bilgen [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Uzun, Lokman [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Beşirli, Necati [Uludag University, Department of Chemistry, Bursa (Turkey); Denizli, Adil, E-mail: denizli@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we prepared surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using the molecular imprinting technique for myoglobin detection in human serum. For this purpose, we synthesized myoglobin imprinted poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-L-tryptophan methyl ester) [poly(HEMA-MATrp)] nanofilm on the surface of SPR sensor. We also synthesized non-imprinted poly(HEMA-MATrp) nanofilm without myoglobin for the control experiments. The SPR sensor was characterized with contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. We investigated the effectiveness of the sensor using the SPR system. We evaluated the ability of SPR sensor to sense myoglobin with myoglobin solutions (pH 7.4, phosphate buffer) in different concentration range and in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction. We found that the Langmuir adsorption model was the most suitable for the sensor system. The detection limit was 87.6 ng/mL. In order to show the selectivity of the SPR sensor, we investigated the competitive detection of myoglobin, lysozyme, cytochrome c and bovine serum albumin. The results showed that the SPR sensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for myoglobin. - Highlights: • Micro-contact imprinted surface plasmon resonance sensor. • Real-time myoglobin detection in the serum taken from a patient with acute myocardial infarction • Reproducible results for consecutive myoglobin solution supplement • LOD and LOQ values of the SPR sensor were determined to be 26.3 and 87.6 ng/mL. • The SPR sensor has potential for myoglobin sensing during acute MI cases.

  3. Acoustic Sensors for Air and Surface Navigation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Kapoor

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the state-of-the-art and reviews the state-of-research of acoustic sensors used for a variety of navigation and guidance applications on air and surface vehicles. In particular, this paper focuses on echolocation, which is widely utilized in nature by certain mammals (e.g., cetaceans and bats. Although acoustic sensors have been extensively adopted in various engineering applications, their use in navigation and guidance systems is yet to be fully exploited. This technology has clear potential for applications in air and surface navigation/guidance for intelligent transport systems (ITS, especially considering air and surface operations indoors and in other environments where satellite positioning is not available. Propagation of sound in the atmosphere is discussed in detail, with all potential attenuation sources taken into account. The errors introduced in echolocation measurements due to Doppler, multipath and atmospheric effects are discussed, and an uncertainty analysis method is presented for ranging error budget prediction in acoustic navigation applications. Considering the design challenges associated with monostatic and multi-static sensor implementations and looking at the performance predictions for different possible configurations, acoustic sensors show clear promises in navigation, proximity sensing, as well as obstacle detection and tracking. The integration of acoustic sensors in multi-sensor navigation systems is also considered towards the end of the paper and a low Size, Weight and Power, and Cost (SWaP-C sensor integration architecture is presented for possible introduction in air and surface navigation systems.

  4. Acoustic Sensors for Air and Surface Navigation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Rohan; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Gardi, Alessandro; Schyndel, Ron Van; Sabatini, Roberto

    2018-02-07

    This paper presents the state-of-the-art and reviews the state-of-research of acoustic sensors used for a variety of navigation and guidance applications on air and surface vehicles. In particular, this paper focuses on echolocation, which is widely utilized in nature by certain mammals (e.g., cetaceans and bats). Although acoustic sensors have been extensively adopted in various engineering applications, their use in navigation and guidance systems is yet to be fully exploited. This technology has clear potential for applications in air and surface navigation/guidance for Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS), especially considering air and surface operations indoors and in other environments where satellite positioning is not available. Propagation of sound in the atmosphere is discussed in detail, with all potential attenuation sources taken into account. The errors introduced in echolocation measurements due to Doppler, multipath and atmospheric effects are discussed, and an uncertainty analysis method is presented for ranging error budget prediction in acoustic navigation applications. Considering the design challenges associated with monostatic and multi-static sensor implementations and looking at the performance predictions for different possible configurations, acoustic sensors show clear promises in navigation, proximity sensing, as well as obstacle detection and tracking. The integration of acoustic sensors in multi-sensor navigation systems is also considered towards the end of the paper and a low Size, Weight and Power, and Cost (SWaP-C) sensor integration architecture is presented for possible introduction in air and surface navigation systems.

  5. Effective Surface Area of Electrochemical Sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, J.; Sajdlová, Z.; Neděla, Vilém; Flodrová, Eva; Šejnohová, R.; Vránová, H.; Plička, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 161, č. 6 (2014), B147-B150 ISSN 0013-4651 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/118 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * glassy- carbon electrode * gold electrodes * biosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.266, year: 2014

  6. Triboelectric Hydrogen Gas Sensor with Pd Functionalized Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ho Shin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Palladium (Pd-based hydrogen (H2 gas sensors have been widely investigated thanks to its fast reaction and high sensitivity to hydrogen. Various sensing mechanisms have been adopted for H2 gas sensors; however, all the sensors must be powered through an external battery. We report here an H2 gas sensor that can detect H2 by measuring the output voltages generated during contact electrification between two friction surfaces. When the H2 sensor, composed of Pd-coated ITO (indium tin oxide and PET (polyethylene Terephthalate film, is exposed to H2, its output voltage is varied in proportion to H2 concentration because the work function (WF of Pd-coated surface changes, altering triboelectric charging behavior. Specifically, the output voltage of the sensor is gradually increased as exposing H2 concentration increases. Reproducible and sensitive sensor response was observed up 1% H2 exposure. The approach introduced here can easily be adopted to development of triboelectric gas sensors detecting other gas species.

  7. Reference compensation for localized surface-plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehru, Neha

    Noble metal nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) have been extensively investigated for label free detection of various biological and chemical interactions. When compared to other optical sensing techniques, LSPR sensors offer label-free detection of biomolecular interactions in localized sensing volume solutions. However, these sensors also suffer from a major disadvantage---LSPR sensors remain highly susceptible to interference because they respond to both solution refractive index change and non-specific binding as well as specific binding of the target analyte. These interactions can severely compromise the measurement of the target analyte in a complex unknown media and hence limit the applicability and impact of the sensor. In spite of the extensive amount of work done in this field, there has been a clear absence of efforts to make LSPR sensors immune to interfering effects. The work presented in this document investigates, both experimentally and numerically, dual- and tri-mode LSPR sensors that utilize the multiple surface plasmon modes of gold nanostructures to distinguish target analyte from interfering bulk and non-specific binding effects. Finally, a series of biosensing experiments are performed to examine various regeneration assays for LSPR sensors built on indium tin oxide coated glass substrate.

  8. Novel spectral fiber optic sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, Radan; Homola, Jiří; Čtyroký, Jiří; Brynda, Eduard

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 106-111 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/M057; GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA ČR GA102/00/1536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : fibre optic sensors * surface plasmons Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  9. Compact Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor for Underwater Chemical Sensing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Minagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the development of compact surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors for mobile robot olfaction. Underwater robots benefit from olfactory sensing capabilities in various tasks including the search for unexploded ordnance and undersea wreckage. Although the SPR-based chemical sensor is a promising sensing platform, the cumbersome optical setup has been limiting its use on mobile robots. The proposed sensor employs a periodic metal structure formed on a self-assembled layer of polystyrene particles of 200 nm in diameter. With the grating of this size, SPR can be excited even with a simple LED light source. The change in the absorbance is simply measured using a photodiode. Demonstration of the proposed SPR sensor is provided by mounting the sensors on an underwater crayfish robot that autonomously searches for a chemical source. The fabricated sensor shows linear response to ascorbic acid for a concentration range from 20 to 80 mM. Responses of the bare and thiol-coated gold nanostructure to different chemical substances are presented to show the change in the selectivity of the sensor by the coating. Discussions are made on the importance of sample collection for the sensor to attain sensitive chemical detection on a mobile robot.

  10. Poor Demonstration and Knowledge of AED Electrode Placement by Certified and Experienced BLS/AED Instructors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Mathilde; Vammen, Lauge; Hansen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    to demonstrate correct use of an AED remains to be investigated.Aim: To determine BLS instructors’ competence in using an AED.Methods: Certified BLS instructors were asked to operate a training AED (Lifepak ® CR-T Plus, PhysioControl, default audiotape duration of 67 sec from start to time of shock......Introduction: Use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) improves survival. Incorrect AED electrode placement may affect defibrillation success and survival. During courses in basic life support (BLS), instructors teach laypeople how to use an AED. However, BLS instructors’ ability......) on a resuscitation manikin with arms (AMBU ® Man, AMBU) as they would do in a teaching situation but without any explanations. The demonstration by the instructor was video recorded. After shock delivery the AED electrode position was assessed i.e. the distance from the center of the electrode to the recommended...

  11. Design of Surface Modifications for Nanoscale Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Reimhult

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale biosensors provide the possibility to miniaturize optic, acoustic and electric sensors to the dimensions of biomolecules. This enables approaching single-molecule detection and new sensing modalities that probe molecular conformation. Nanoscale sensors are predominantly surface-based and label-free to exploit inherent advantages of physical phenomena allowing high sensitivity without distortive labeling. There are three main criteria to be optimized in the design of surface-based and label-free biosensors: (i the biomolecules of interest must bind with high affinity and selectively to the sensitive area; (ii the biomolecules must be efficiently transported from the bulk solution to the sensor; and (iii the transducer concept must be sufficiently sensitive to detect low coverage of captured biomolecules within reasonable time scales. The majority of literature on nanoscale biosensors deals with the third criterion while implicitly assuming that solutions developed for macroscale biosensors to the first two, equally important, criteria are applicable also to nanoscale sensors. We focus on providing an introduction to and perspectives on the advanced concepts for surface functionalization of biosensors with nanosized sensor elements that have been developed over the past decades (criterion (iii. We review in detail how patterning of molecular films designed to control interactions of biomolecules with nanoscale biosensor surfaces creates new possibilities as well as new challenges.

  12. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman fiberoptic sensors for remote monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, D.L.; Alarie, J.P.; Vo-Dinh, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

    1995-09-01

    A new sensor design for remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements has been developed for environmental applications. The design features the modification of an optical fiber using layers of alumina microparticles and silver coatings for inducing the SERS effect at the sensing probe. A single fiber carries both the laser excitation and the SERS signal radiation, keeping optical parameters at the remote tip simple and consistent. The small tip size achievable with this configuration also demonstrates potential of this new design as a microsensor for in-situ measurement in microenvironments. Details of sensor tip fabrication and optical system design are described. SERS spectra of aqueous environmental samples acquired in-situ using the SERS sensor are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the SERS sensor.

  14. Is current training in basic and advanced cardiac life support (BLS & ACLS) effective? A study of BLS & ACLS knowledge amongst healthcare professionals of North-Kerala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Madavan; Nedungalaparambil, Nisanth Menon; Aslesh, Ottapura Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are expected to have knowledge of current basic and advanced cardiac life support (BLS/ACLS) guidelines to revive unresponsive patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the current practices and knowledge of BLS/ACLS principles among healthcare professionals of North-Kerala using pretested self-administered structured questionnaire. Answers were validated in accordance with American Heart Association's BLS/ACLS teaching manual and the results were analysed. Among 461 healthcare professionals, 141 (30.6%) were practicing physicians, 268 (58.1%) were nurses and 52 (11.3%) supporting staff. The maximum achievable score was 20 (BLS 15/ACLS 5). The mean score amongst all healthcare professionals was 8.9±4.7. The mean score among physicians, nurses and support staff were 8.6±3.4, 9±3.6 and 9±3.3 respectively. The majority of healthcare professionals scored ≤50% (237, 51.4%); 204 (44.3%) scored 51%-80% and 20 (4.34%) scored >80%. Mean scores decreased with age, male sex and across occupation. Nurses who underwent BLS/ACLS training previously had significantly higher mean scores (10.2±3.4) than untrained (8.2±3.6, P =0.001). Physicians with <5 years experience ( P =0.002) and nurses in the private sector ( P =0.003) had significantly higher scores. One hundred and sixty three (35.3%) healthcare professionals knew the correct airway opening manoeuvres like head tilt, chin lift and jaw thrust. Only 54 (11.7%) respondents were aware that atropine is not used in ACLS for cardiac arrest resuscitation and 79 (17.1%) correctly opted ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia as shockable rhythms. The majority of healthcare professionals (356, 77.2%) suggested that BLS/ACLS be included in academic curriculum. Inadequate knowledge of BLS/ACLS principles amongst healthcare professionals, especially physicians, illuminate lacunae in existing training systems and merit urgent redressal.

  15. Sub-micron surface plasmon resonance sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, James A. (Inventor); Amarie, Dragos (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Wearable or implantable devices combining microfluidic control of sample and reagent flow and micro-cavity surface plasmon resonance sensors functionalized with surface treatments or coatings capable of specifically binding to target analytes, ligands, or molecules in a bodily fluid are provided. The devices can be used to determine the presence and concentration of target analytes in the bodily fluids and thereby help diagnose, monitor or detect changes in disease conditions.

  16. Surface noise analysis using a single-ion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, N.; Gerber, S.; Bolloten, G.; Ramm, M.; Ransford, A.; Ulin-Avila, E.; Talukdar, I.; Häffner, H.

    2014-06-01

    We use a single-ion electric-field noise sensor in combination with in situ surface treatment and analysis tools, to investigate the relationship between electric-field noise from metal surfaces in vacuum and the composition of the surface. These experiments are performed in a setup that integrates ion trapping capabilities with surface analysis tools. We find that treatment of an aluminum-copper surface with energetic argon ions significantly reduces the level of room-temperature electric-field noise, but the surface does not need to be atomically clean to show noise levels comparable to those of the best cryogenic traps. The noise levels after treatment are low enough to allow fault-tolerant trapped-ion quantum information processing on a microfabricated surface trap at room temperature.

  17. A Microring Temperature Sensor Based on the Surface Plasmon Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of microring sensor suitable for temperature measurement based on the surface plasmon wave is put forward in this paper. The sensor uses surface plasmon multilayer waveguiding structure in the vertical direction and U-shaped microring structure in the horizontal direction and utilizes SOI as the thermal material. The transfer function derivation of the structure of surface plasmon microring sensor is according to the transfer matrix method. While the change of refractive index of Si is caused by the change of ambient temperature, the effective refractive index of the multilayer waveguiding structure is changed, resulting in the drifting of the sensor output spectrum. This paper focuses on the transmission characteristics of multilayer waveguide structure and the impact on the output spectrum caused by refractive index changes in temperature parts. According to the calculation and simulation, the transmission performance of the structure is stable and the sensitivity is good. The resonance wavelength shift can reach 0.007 μm when the temperature is increased by 100 k and FSR can reach about 60 nm. This structure achieves a high sensitivity in the temperature sense taking into account a wide range of filter frequency selections, providing a theoretical basis for the preparation of microoptics.

  18. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  19. Silicon nanohybrid-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors are highly promising analytical tools, capable of ultrasensitive, multiplex, and nondestructive detection of chemical and biological species. Extensive efforts have been made to design various silicon nanohybrid-based SERS substrates such as gold/silver nanoparticle (NP)-decorated silicon nanowires, Au/Ag NP-decorated silicon wafers (AuNP@Si), and so forth. In comparison to free AuNP- and AgNP-based SERS sensors, the silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors feature higher enhancement factors (EFs) and excellent reproducibility, since SERS hot spots are efficiently coupled and stabilized through interconnection to the semiconducting silicon substrates. Consequently, in the past decade, giant advancements in the development of silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors have been witnessed for myriad sensing applications. In this review, the representative achievements related to the design of high-performance silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors and their use for chemical and biological analysis are reviewed in a detailed way. Furthermore, the major opportunities and challenges in this field are discussed from a broad perspective and possible future directions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. A surface acoustic wave ICP sensor with good temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Hu, Hong; Ye, Aipeng; Zhang, Peng

    2017-07-20

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is very important for assessing and monitoring hydrocephalus, head trauma and hypertension patients, which could lead to elevated ICP or even devastating neurological damage. The mortality rate due to these diseases could be reduced through ICP monitoring, because precautions can be taken against the brain damage. This paper presents a surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor to realize ICP monitoring, which is capable of wireless and passive transmission with antenna attached. In order to improve the temperature stability of the sensor, two methods were adopted. First, the ST cut quartz was chosen as the sensor substrate due to its good temperature stability. Then, a differential temperature compensation method was proposed to reduce the effects of temperature. Two resonators were designed based on coupling of mode (COM) theory and the prototype was fabricated and verified using a system established for testing pressure and temperature. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a linearity of 2.63% and hysteresis of 1.77%. The temperature stability of the sensor has been greatly improved by using the differential compensation method, which validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Long-range surface plasmons for high-resolution surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nenninger, G. G.; Tobiška, Petr; Homola, Jiří; Yee, S. S.

    B74, 1/3 (2001), s. 145-151 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /5./. Lyon-Villeurbanne, 16.04.2000-19.04.2000] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/0549; GA ČR GA102/00/1536 Grant - others:Department of Defense(US) DAAD13-99-C-0032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : sensors * surface plasmons * biosensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 1.440, year: 2001

  2. Highly sensitive BTX detection using surface functionalized QCM sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Asuman Aşıkoğlu; Özdemir, Okan; Altındal, Ahmet, E-mail: altindal@yildiz.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Yildiz Technical University, Davutpasa, 34210 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    A novel organic compound was designed and successfully synthesized for the fabrication of QCM based sensors to detect the low concentrations of BTX gases in indoor air. The effect of the long-range electron orbital delocalization on the BTX vapour sensing properties of azo-bridged Pcs based chemiresistor-type sensors have also been investigated in this work. The sensing behaviour of the film for the online detection of volatile organic solvent vapors was investigated by utilizing an AT-cut quartz crystal resonator. It was observed that the adsorption of the target molecules on the coating surface cause a reversible negative frequency shift of the resonator. Thus, a variety of solvent vapors can be detected by using the phthalocyanine film as sensitive coating, with sensitivity in the ppm range and response times in the order of several seconds depending on the molecular structure of the organic solvent.

  3. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  4. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  5. Surface temperature retrieval in a temperate grassland with multiresolution sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, S. J.; Halthore, R. N.; Hall, F. G.; Markham, B. L.

    1995-12-01

    Radiometric surface temperatures retrieved at various spatial resolutions from aircraft and satellite measurements at the FIFE site in eastern Kansas were compared with near-surface temperature measurements to determine the accuracy of the retrieval techniques and consistency between the various sensors. Atmospheric characterizations based on local radiosonde profiles of temperature, pressure, and water vapor were used with the LOWTRAN-7 and MODTRAN atmospheric radiance models to correct measured thermal radiances of water and grassland targets for atmospheric attenuation. Comparison of retrieved surface temperatures from a helicopter-mounted modular multispectral radiometer (MMR) (˜5-m "pixel"), C-130 mounted thematic mapper simulator (TMS) (NS001, ˜20-m pixel), and the Landsat 5 thematic mapper (TM) (120-m pixel) was done. Differences between atmospherically corrected radiative temperatures and near-surface measurements ranged from less than 1°C to more than 8°C. Corrected temperatures from helicopter-MMR and NS001-TMS were in general agreement with near-surface infrared radiative thermometer (IRT) measurements collected from automated meteorological stations, with mean differences of 3.2°C and 1.7°C for grassland targets. Much better agreement (within 1°C) was found between the retrieved aircraft surface temperatures and near-surface measurements acquired with a hand-held mast equipped with a MMR and IRT. The NS001-TMS was also in good agreement with near-surface temperatures acquired over water targets. In contrast, the Landsat 5 TM systematically overestimated surface temperature in all cases. This result has been noted previously but not consistently. On the basis of the results reported here, surface measurements were used to provide a calibration of the TM thermal channel. Further evaluation of the in-flight radiometric calibration of the TM thermal channel is recommended.

  6. Application of Ultrasonic Sensors in Road Surface Condition Distinction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Nakashima

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The number of accidents involving elderly individuals has been increasing with the increase of the aging population, posing increasingly serious challenges. Most accidents are caused by reduced judgment and physical abilities, which lead to severe consequences. Therefore, studies on support systems for elderly and visually impaired people to improve the safety and quality of daily life are attracting considerable attention. In this study, a road surface condition distinction method using reflection intensities obtained by an ultrasonic sensor was proposed. The proposed method was applied to movement support systems for elderly and visually impaired individuals to detect dangerous road surfaces and give an alarm. The method did not perform well in previous studies of puddle detection, because the alert provided by the method did not enable users to avoid puddles. This study extended the method proposed by previous studies with respect to puddle detection ability. The findings indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method by considering four road surface conditions. The proposed method could detect puddle conditions. The effectiveness of the proposed method was verified in all four conditions, since users could differentiate between road surface conditions and classify the conditions as either safe or dangerous.

  7. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  8. Permanent Education in BLS and ACLS: impact on the knowledge of nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sandro Gonçalves de; Macedo, Larissa Araripe de; Vidal, Marcela de Lima; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical knowledge and practical skills of the Basic Life Support (BLS) and the Advanced Life Support (ALS) are among the most important determining factors of the cardiopulmonary reanimation success rates. Assess the impact of a permanent training program in BLS and ALS on the knowledge of nursing professionals. Cross-sectional study. Population was made of nursing professionals of a tertiary level hospital. Assessments were carried out before and after training. The critical points of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) analysis were addressed. 213 professionals were assessed (76 nurses, 35.7%; 38 assistants, 17.8%; and 99 technicians, 46.7%). Pre-course assessment average grades were statistically different (pnurses (4.69). Single professional without kids showed performance significantly superior to married professional with kids (p=0.02 and 0.004 respectively). Pre-training level of knowledge was inversely proportional to the time elapsed since the completion of undergraduate course or technical course. Main deficiencies were related to the initial approach of airways, to post-resuscitation cares and to the external cardiac massage technique. The post-course general average grade was 7.26. Assistants achieved a performance of 131.2%, technicians, of 78.9% and the nurses, of 85%, with no significant statistic difference (p=0.43). The permanent training program in BLS and ALS resulted in important increment in the level of knowledge of nursing professionals.

  9. Automated external defibrillation as part BLS: implications for education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Pam; Albarran, John W

    2002-09-01

    The latest Adult Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines support the inclusion of the use of the automated external defibrillator (AED), as part of basic life support (BLS). Emphasis on the provision of early defibrillation as part of BLS acknowledges the importance of this manoeuvre in the successful termination of ventricular fibrillation. The ramifications of such changes for both first responders and organisations implementing the guidelines should not be underestimated. Issues relating to resourcing, content and duration of training and retraining, auditing and evaluation require further exploration. To consider these issues now seems particularly pertinent, given the recent launch of the UK Government's paper on public health, 'Saving Lives-Our Healthier Nation' which seeks to deploy AEDs in busy public places for use by trained members of the lay public. Additionally, defibrillation has been identified as one of the key competencies that all trained nurses and other health care providers should be able to undertake. This paper will consider the background to the current guideline changes, analyse the wider implications of translating the recommendations into practice, and offer possible solutions to address the issues raised. Whilst the analysis is particularly pertinent to the United Kingdom, many of the issues raised have international importance.

  10. Comparing three CPR feedback devices and standard BLS in a single rescuer scenario: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapletal, Bernhard; Greif, Robert; Stumpf, Dominik; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Frantal, Sophie; Haugk, Moritz; Ruetzler, Kurt; Schlimp, Christoph; Fischer, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    Efficiently performed basic life support (BLS) after cardiac arrest is proven to be effective. However, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is strenuous and rescuers' performance declines rapidly over time. Audio-visual feedback devices reporting CPR quality may prevent this decline. We aimed to investigate the effect of various CPR feedback devices on CPR quality. In this open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial we compared three CPR feedback devices (PocketCPR, CPRmeter, iPhone app PocketCPR) with standard BLS without feedback in a simulated scenario. 240 trained medical students performed single rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8min. Effective compression (compressions with correct depth, pressure point and sufficient decompression) as well as compression rate, flow time fraction and ventilation parameters were compared between the four groups. Study participants using the PocketCPR performed 17±19% effective compressions compared to 32±28% with CPRmeter, 25±27% with the iPhone app PocketCPR, and 35±30% applying standard BLS (PocketCPR vs. CPRmeter p=0.007, PocketCPR vs. standard BLS p=0.001, others: ns). PocketCPR and CPRmeter prevented a decline in effective compression over time, but overall performance in the PocketCPR group was considerably inferior to standard BLS. Compression depth and rate were within the range recommended in the guidelines in all groups. While we found differences between the investigated CPR feedback devices, overall BLS quality was suboptimal in all groups. Surprisingly, effective compression was not improved by any CPR feedback device compared to standard BLS. All feedback devices caused substantial delay in starting CPR, which may worsen outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reciprocal learning with task cards for teaching Basic Life Support (BLS): investigating effectiveness and the effect of instructor expertise on learning outcomes. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Mols, Liesbet; Charlier, Nathalie; De Meester, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Basic Life Support (BLS) education in secondary schools and universities is often neglected or outsourced because teachers indicate not feeling competent to teach this content. Investigate reciprocal learning with task cards as instructional model for teaching BLS and the effect of instructor expertise in BLS on learning outcomes. There were 175 students (mean age = 18.9 years) randomized across a reciprocal/BLS instructor (RBI) group, a reciprocal/non-BLS instructor (RNI) group, and a traditional/BLS instructor group (TBI). In the RBI and RNI group, students were taught BLS through reciprocal learning with task cards. The instructor in the RBI group was certified in BLS by the European Resuscitation Council. In the TBI, students were taught BLS by a certified instructor according to the Belgian Red Cross instructional model. Student performance was assessed 1 day (intervention) and 3 weeks after intervention (retention). At retention, significantly higher BLS performances were found in the RBI group (M = 78%), p = 0.007, ES = 0.25, and the RNI group (M = 80%), p < 0.001, Effect Size (ES) = .36, compared to the TBI (M = 73%). Significantly more students remembered and performed all BLS skills in the experimental groups at intervention and retention. No differences in BLS performance were found between the reciprocal groups. Ventilation volumes and flow rates were significantly better in the TBI at intervention and retention. Reciprocal learning with task cards is a valuable model for teaching BLS when instructors are not experienced or skilled in BLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating road surface conditions using dynamic tire pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yubo; Wu, H. Felix; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2014-03-01

    In order to best prioritize road maintenance, the level of deterioration must be known for all roads in a city's network. Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and International Roughness Index (IRI) are two standard methods for obtaining this information. However, IRI is substantially easier to measure. Significant time and money could be saved if a method were developed to estimate PCI from IRI. This research introduces a new method to estimate IRI and correlate IRI with PCI. A vehicle-mounted dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS) system is used. The DTPS measures the signals generated from the tire/road interaction while driving. The tire/road interaction excites surface waves that travel through the road. DTPS, which is mounted on the tire's valve stem, measures tire/road interaction by analyzing the pressure change inside the tire due to the road vibration, road geometry and tire wall vibration. The road conditions are sensible to sensors in a similar way to human beings in a car. When driving on a smooth road, tire pressure stays almost constant and there are minimal changes in the DTPS data. When driving on a rough road, DTPS data changes drastically. IRI is estimated from the reconstructed road profile using DTPS data. In order to correlate IRI with PCI, field tests were conducted on roads with known PCI values in the city of Brockton, MA. Results show a high correlation between the estimated IRI values and the known PCI values, which suggests that DTPS-based IRI can provide accurate predictions of PCI.

  13. Miniaturized thermal flow sensor with planar-integrated sensor structures on semicircular surface channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel; de Boer, Meint J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    A calorimetric miniaturized flow sensor was realized with a linear sensor response measured for water flow up to flow rates in the order of 300 nl min-1. A versatile technological concept is used to realize a sensor with a thermally isolated freely suspended silicon-rich silicon-nitride microchannel

  14. Improving the Performance of Semiconductor Sensor Devices Using Surface Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel W.

    As production and understanding of III-nitride growth has progressed, this class of material has been used for its semiconducting properties in the fields of computer processing, microelectronics, and LEDs. As understanding of materials properties has advanced, devices were fabricated to be sensitive to environmental surroundings such as pH, gas, or ionic concentration. Simultaneously the world of pharmaceuticals and environmental science has come to the age where the use of wearable devices and active environmental sensing can not only help us learn more about our surroundings, but help save lives. At the crossroads of these two fields work has been done in marrying the high stability and electrical properties of the III-nitrides with the needs of a growing sensor field for various environments and stimuli. Device architecture can only get one so far, and thus the need for well understood surface functionalization techniques has arisen in the field of III-nitride environmental sensing. Many existing schemes for functionalization involve chemistries that may be unfriendly to a biological environment, unstable in solution, or expensive to produce. One possible solution to these issues is the work presented here, which highlights a surface modification scheme utilizing phosphonic acid based chemistry and biomolecular attachment. This dissertation presents a set of studies and experiments quantifying and analyzing the response behaviors of AlGaN/GaN field effect transistor (FET) devices via their interfacial electronic properties. Additional investigation was done on the modification of these surfaces, effects of stressful environmental conditions, and the utility of the phosphonic acid surface treatments. Signals of AlGaN/GaN FETs were measured as IDrain values and in the earliest study an average signal increase of 96.43% was observed when surfaces were incubated in a solution of a known recognition peptide sequence (SVSVGMKPSPRP). This work showed that even without

  15. Overview of the Characteristics of Micro- and Nano-Structured Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoungho Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of bio-chemical sensing devices has been greatly improved by the development of surface plasmon resonance (SPR based sensors. Advancements in micro- and nano-fabrication technologies have led to a variety of structures in SPR sensing systems being proposed. In this review, SPR sensors (from typical Kretschmann prism configurations to fiber sensor schemes with micro- or nano-structures for local light field enhancement, extraordinary optical transmission, interference of surface plasmon waves, plasmonic cavities, etc. are discussed. We summarize and compare their performances and present guidelines for the design of SPR sensors.

  16. Experimental Validation of a Sensor Monitoring Ice Formation over a Road Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Troiano, Amedeo; Pasero, Eros Gian Alessandro; Mesin, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The reliable detection of ice over road surfaces is an important issue for reducing maintenance costs and improving traffic safety. An innovative capacitive sensor was developed to detect the presence of ice on its surface, and its repeatability, stability and reliability were assessed in simulations and experiments described in previous papers. The indications of the sensor are compared in this paper with the objective identification of ice formation or melting over a road surface in laborat...

  17. Bioreactor studies on the production of bacitracin by mutant strain of bacillus licheniformis BLS-NTTG 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabeen, M.; Arif, R.; Saleem, M.; Ghouri, S.M.; Baig, S.; Syed, Q.

    2005-01-01

    The present study deals with the production of antibiotic bacitracin by Bacillus licheniformis using submerged fermentation technique in stirred fermenter. Altogether 15 samples were isolated from local habitat such as Government College Lahore. Of all the culture tested BLS 13 gave maximum titer (81 plus minus li. Micro /ml) in the fermentation broth. To develop the process for the production of antibiotic bacitracin agro industrial wastes used as a sole source of carbon in different fermentation medias (M1-M10). The culture of Bacillus licheniformis BLS 13 was improved by UV irradiation by exposing the cells of BLS-UV 16 mutated for 60 minutes gave the maximum production i.e. 129.1 plus minus 0.7 i. Micro/ml. The parental strain (i.e. BLS 13 was also improved by using chemical mutagen NTTG which enhance the antibiotic activity, and the mutated strain number i.e. BLS-NTTG 4 gave the maximum production 143.0 plus minus 1.0 i. Micro/ml. In stirred fermenter chemically mutated strain was used to check the productivity of bacitracin in stirred fermenter was increased up to 156 plus minus 1 i. micro /ml. (author)

  18. A multiple linear regression analysis of factors affecting the simulated Basic Life Support (BLS) performance with Automated External Defibrillator (AED) in Flemish lifeguards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserbyt, Peter; Schouppe, Gilles; Charlier, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    Research investigating lifeguards' performance of Basic Life Support (BLS) with Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is limited. Assessing simulated BLS/AED performance in Flemish lifeguards and identifying factors affecting this performance. Six hundred and sixteen (217 female and 399 male) certified Flemish lifeguards (aged 16-71 years) performed BLS with an AED on a Laerdal ResusciAnne manikin simulating an adult victim of drowning. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was conducted with BLS/AED performance as outcome variable and demographic data as explanatory variables. Mean BLS/AED performance for all lifeguards was 66.5%. Compression rate and depth adhered closely to ERC 2010 guidelines. Ventilation volume and flow rate exceeded the guidelines. A significant regression model, F(6, 415)=25.61, p<.001, ES=.38, explained 27% of the variance in BLS performance (R2=.27). Significant predictors were age (beta=-.31, p<.001), years of certification (beta=-.41, p<.001), time on duty per year (beta=-.25, p<.001), practising BLS skills (beta=.11, p=.011), and being a professional lifeguard (beta=-.13, p=.029). 71% of lifeguards reported not practising BLS/AED. Being young, recently certified, few days of employment per year, practising BLS skills and not being a professional lifeguard are factors associated with higher BLS/AED performance. Measures should be taken to prevent BLS/AED performances from decaying with age and longer certification. Refresher courses could include a formal skills test and lifeguards should be encouraged to practise their BLS/AED skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurement system for special surface mapping using miniature displacement sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zowade Martyna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to design a special system for measurements of elements with repetitive geometry or assemblies with repeating components, set in a linear patterns. The main focus was based on developing a computer program for signal analysis from variable number of miniature displacement sensors. It was set that the response for displacement of measuring tip from each sensor was a 0-5 V voltage signal with possibility of using different type of sensors. Requirements were determined based on projected measurement method. A special design of sensor was made for testing the computer program. If the characteristics of the sensor is known, it is possible to compute the type A evaluation of uncertainty. The results are presented in XY chart on computer screen. The program allows the user to choose any number of the sensors and determine the distance between them. Also, the possibility of calibration of sensors’ set was provided. The test were conducted on a prototype handle for sensors, made on a 3D printer.

  20. Bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) production in Aeromonas hydrophila water isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messi, Patrizia; Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno

    2003-03-14

    30 Aeromonas hydrophila water isolates were tested for bacteriocin-like substance (BLS) production using a target panel of closely related microorganisms and other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including food-borne pathogens. A. hydrophila showed antibacterial activity against one or more indicator microorganisms, but the activity emerged only with non-phylogenetically related genera or species. In particular all A. hydrophila showed antibacterial activity against one or more of the tested Staphylococcus strains, five against Listeria spp. (Listeria seeligeri, Listeria welshimeri and Listeria ivanovii), and eight presented a weak antagonistic activity towards Streptococcus agalactiae and Lactobacillus spp. Inhibitory activity was not observed against the other Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria innocua and Enterococcus spp.) and Gram-negative tested strains, including Aeromonas sobria, Aeromonas caviae and the same A. hydrophila, when used as indicator. Anti-staphylococcal activity was observed with a gradual increase of the inhibition zone during incubation and seemed to be influenced by A. hydrophila hemolytic expression. Extrachromosomal analysis showed the presence, in 70% of the strains, of one to five plasmids with molecular masses ranging from 2.1 to 41.5 MDa, but it was not possible to relate this result with BLS production.

  1. Detection of low-molecular-weight domoic acid using surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, Q.; Chen, S.; Taylor, A. D.; Homola, Jiří; Hock, B.; Jiang, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2005), s. 193-201 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /7./. Madrid, 04.04.2004-07.04.2004] Grant - others:US FDA (US) FD-U-002250; National Science Foundation(US) CTS-0092699 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2005

  2. A Finger-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Fabric Surfaces Evaluation by 2-Dimensional Active Sliding Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM. The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures.

  3. A selectively coated photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X; Zhang, Y.; Pan, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel design for a photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmonic resonance sensor. The sensor consists of selectively metal-coated air holes containing analyte channels, which enhance the phase matching between the plasmonic mode and the core-guided mode. Good refractive index sensi...

  4. Application for vibration monitoring of aspheric surface machining based on wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chun Guang; Guo, Yin Biao; Jiang, Chen

    2010-05-01

    Any kinds of tiny vibration of machine tool parts will have a great influence on surface quality of the workpiece at ultra-precise machining process of aspheric surface. At present the major way for decreasing influence of vibration is machining compensation technology. Therefore it is important for machining compensation control to acquire and transmit these vibration signals effectively. This paper presents a vibration monitoring system of aspheric surface machining machine tool based on wireless sensor networks (WSN). Some key issues of wireless sensor networks for vibration monitoring system of aspheric surface machining are discussed. The reliability of data transmission, network communication protocol and synchronization mechanism of wireless sensor networks are studied for the vibration monitoring system. The proposed system achieves multi-sensors vibration monitoring involving the grinding wheel, the workpiece and the workbench spindle. The wireless transmission of vibration signals is achieved by the combination with vibration sensor nodes and wireless network. In this paper, these vibration sensor nodes are developed. An experimental platform is structured which employs wireless sensor networks to the vibration monitoring system in order to test acquisition and wireless transmission of vibration signal. The test results show that the proposed system can achieve vibration data transmission effectively and reliability and meet the monitoring requirements of aspheric surface machining machine tool.

  5. High Sensitivity Semiconductor Sensor Skins for Multi-Axis Surface Pressure Characterization, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase II SBIR program would fabricate high sensitivity semiconductor nanomembrane 'sensor skins' capable of multi-axis surface pressure characterization on...

  6. High Sensitivity Semiconductor Sensor Skins for Multi-Axis Surface Pressure Characterization, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Phase I SBIR program would fabricate high sensitivity semiconductor nanomembrane 'sensor skins' capable of multi-axis surface pressure characterization on...

  7. Searching for transiting circumbinary planets in CoRoT and ground-based data using CB-BLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, A.; Deeg, H. J.; Lacy, C. H. S.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: Already from the initial discoveries of extrasolar planets it was apparent that their population and environments are far more diverse than initially postulated. Discovering circumbinary (CB) planets will have many implications, and in this context it will again substantially diversify the environments that produce and sustain planets. We search for transiting CB planets around eclipsing binaries (EBs). Methods: CB-BLS is a recently-introduced algorithm for the detection of transiting CB planets around EBs. We describe progress in search sensitivity, generality and capability of CB-BLS, and detection tests of CB-BLS on simulated data. We also describe an analytical approach for the determination of CB-BLS detection limits, and a method for the correct detrending of intrinsically-variable stars. Results: We present some blind-tests with simulated planets injected to real CoRoT data. The presented upgrades to CB-BLS allowed it to detect all the blind tests successfully, and these detections were in line with the detection limits analysis. We also correctly detrend bright eclipsing binaries from observations by the TrES planet search, and present some of the first results of applying CB-BLS to multiple real light curves from a wide-field survey. Conclusions: CB-BLS is now mature enough for its application to real data, and the presented processing scheme will serve as the template for our future applications of CB-BLS to data from wide-field surveys such as CoRoT. Being able to put constraints even on non-detection will help to determine the correct frequency of CB planets, contributing to the understanding of planet formation in general. Still, searching for transiting CB planets is still a learning experience, similarly to the state of transiting planets around single stars only a few years ago. The recent rapid progress in this front, coupled with the exquisite quality of space-based photometry, allows to realistically expect that if transiting CB planets

  8. Development of a fieldable rugged TATP surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Clauson, Susan L.; Sylvia, James M.

    2011-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has repeatedly been shown to be capable of single molecule detection in laboratory controlled environments. However, superior detection of desired compounds in complex situations requires optimization of factors in addition to sensitivity. For example, SERS sensors are metals with surface roughness in the nm scale. This metallic roughness scale may not adsorb the analyte of interest but instead cause a catalytic reaction unless stabilization is designed into the sensor interface. In addition, the SERS sensor needs to be engineered sensitive only to the desired analyte(s) or a small subset of analytes; detection of every analyte would saturate the sensor and make data interpretation untenable. Finally, the SERS sensor has to be a preferable adsorption site in passive sampling applications, whether vapor or liquid. In this paper, EIC Laboratories will discuss modifications to SERS sensors that increase the likelihood of detection of the analyte of interest. We will then demonstrate data collected for TATP, a compound that rapidly decomposes and is undetected on standard silver SERS sensors. With the modified SERS sensor, ROC curves for room temperature TATP vapor detection, detection of TATP in a non equilibrium vapor environment in 30 s, detection of TATP on a sensor exposed to a ventilation duct, and detection of TATP in the presence of fuel components were all created and will be presented herein.

  9. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Tiwari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = ∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  10. An Electronic-Nose Sensor Node Based on a Polymer-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Array for Wireless Sensor Network Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kea-Tiong Tang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K2 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18 μm process. The ASIC output was connected to a wireless module to transmit sensor data to a base station for data storage and analysis. This sensor node is applicable for wireless sensor network (WSN applications.

  11. In the Field Application of a New Sensor for Monitoring Road and Runway Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo TROIANO

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Water and ice detection over road and runway surfaces is important to improve traffic safety and to reduce maintenance costs. An innovative low cost capacitive sensor was developed to estimate the dry, wet, or icy state of surfaces. The reliability and repeatability of the indications of the sensor were investigated in a previous work based on simulations and experiments in laboratory, together with a preliminary short test in the field. This work is devoted to the study of the indications of 4 sensors (standard or bituminized during continuous data acquisition in the field (at the Turin Airport lasted 8 months. The indications of different sensors were highly correlated. As one important problem when measuring in the field is due to dirt and salt spread over the road, a preliminary study on the effect of different salt concentrations in the water covering the surface of the sensor was performed. Both simulations and laboratory tests showed that the sensor is not affected by the presence of salt in the water. Considering data measured in the field, the estimated condition of the road provided by the sensors was found to be consistent with the METAR (METeorological Aerodrome Report message of the Turin Airport, for the whole period of investigation. Correlation was found between data from the sensors and rain, fog, and snowfall. The beginning formation of ice identified by the sensor was found to be in some agreement with the indication of a mathematical model of ice prediction from meteorological data. The possibility of using the indications of the sensor together with weather data to train an algorithm providing a more precise prediction of ice formation is discussed.

  12. Collective Bargaining and District Costs for Teacher Health Insurance: An Examination of the Data from the BLS and Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costrell, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    District costs for teachers' health insurance are, on average, higher then employer costs for private-sector professionals. How much of this is attributable to collective bargaining? This article examines the question using data from the National Compensation Survey (NCS) of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) and the state of Wisconsin. In…

  13. Short structured feedback training is equivalent to a mechanical feedback device in two-rescuer BLS: a randomised simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavo, Noemi; Goliasch, Georg; Nierscher, Franz Josef; Stumpf, Dominik; Haugk, Moritz; Breckwoldt, Jan; Ruetzler, Kurt; Greif, Robert; Fischer, Henrik

    2016-05-13

    Resuscitation guidelines encourage the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) feedback devices implying better outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. Whether effective continuous feedback could also be given verbally by a second rescuer ("human feedback") has not been investigated yet. We, therefore, compared the effect of human feedback to a CPR feedback device. In an open, prospective, randomised, controlled trial, we compared CPR performance of three groups of medical students in a two-rescuer scenario. Group "sCPR" was taught standard BLS without continuous feedback, serving as control. Group "mfCPR" was taught BLS with mechanical audio-visual feedback (HeartStart MRx with Q-CPR-Technology™). Group "hfCPR" was taught standard BLS with human feedback. Afterwards, 326 medical students performed two-rescuer BLS on a manikin for 8 min. CPR quality parameters, such as "effective compression ratio" (ECR: compressions with correct hand position, depth and complete decompression multiplied by flow-time fraction), and other compression, ventilation and time-related parameters were assessed for all groups. ECR was comparable between the hfCPR and the mfCPR group (0.33 vs. 0.35, p = 0.435). The hfCPR group needed less time until starting chest compressions (2 vs. 8 s, p feedback or by using a mechanical audio-visual feedback device was similar. Further studies should investigate whether extended human feedback training could further increase CPR quality at comparable costs for training.

  14. Standoff ultracompact micro-Raman sensor for planetary surface explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M Nurul; Bradley, Arthur T; Misra, Anupam K; Bai, Yingxin; Hines, Glenn D; Sharma, Shiv K

    2018-01-01

    We report the development of an innovative standoff ultracompact micro-Raman instrument that would solve some of the limitations of traditional micro-Raman systems to provide a superior instrument for future NASA missions. This active remote sensor system, based on a 532 nm laser and a miniature spectrometer, is capable of inspection and identification of minerals, organics, and biogenic materials within several centimeters (2-20 cm) at a high 10 μm resolution. The sensor system is based on inelastic (Raman) light scattering and laser-induced fluorescence. We report on micro-Raman spectroscopy development and demonstration of the standoff Raman measurements by acquiring Raman spectra in daylight at a 10 cm target distance with a small line-shaped laser spot size of 17.3 μm (width) by 5 mm (height).

  15. FUNCTIONAL SURFACE MICROGEOMETRY PROVIDING THE DESIRED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRCRAFT VIBRATION SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy S. Andreev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper deals with the methods of efficiency improving for piezoelectric vibration sensors used in aircraft industry to control the level of vibration of gas turbine engines. The study looks into the matter of surface microgeometry effect of the vibro sensor part on its transverse sensitivity ratio. Measures are proposed to improve the sensor performance without cost supplement by optimization of the functional surface microgeometry. Method. A method for determination of the best possible surface microgeometry within the specific production conditions is shown. Also, a method for microgeometry estimation of the functional surfaces using graphical criteria is used. Taguchi method is used for design of experiment for functional surfaces machining. The use of this method reduces significantly the number of experiments without validity loss. Main Results. The relationship between technological factors of manufacturing the vibration sensor parts and its sensitivity has been found out. The optimal surface machining methods and process conditions for parts ensuring the best possible sensitivity have been determined. Practical Relevance. Research results can be used by instrument-making companies to improve the process of piezoelectric vibration sensor design and manufacturing.

  16. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikestikova, M.; Allport, P. P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Wilson, J. A.; Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Ullan, M.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Tackmann, K.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Clark, A.; Ferrere, D.; Sevilla, S. Gonzalez; Ashby, J.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Doherty, F.; McMullen, T.; McEwan, F.; O'Shea, V.; Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Chilingarov, A.; Fox, H.; Affolder, A. A.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Greenall, A.; Wonsak, S.; Wormald, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Palni, P.; Seidel, S.; Taylor, A.; Toms, K.; Wang, R.; Hessey, N. P.; Valencic, N.; Hanagaki, K.; Dolezal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Bohm, J.; Stastny, J.; Bevan, A.; Beck, G.; Milke, C.; Domingo, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Hibbard-Lubow, D.; Liang, Z.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; To, K.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Parker, K.; Jinnouchi, O.; Hara, K.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, M.; Iwabuchi, S.; Bernabeu, J.; Civera, J. V.; Garcia, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz, C.; Soldevila, U.

    2016-09-01

    A radiation hard n+-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the "ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration" and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in "punch-through protection" (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×1016 neq/cm2, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×1015 neq/cm2 and by gamma rays from 60Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07.

  17. Effects of two retraining strategies on nursing students' acquisition and retention of BLS/AED skills: A cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Padilla, José Manuel; Suthers, Fiona; Granero-Molina, José; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano

    2015-08-01

    To determine and compare the effects of two different retraining strategies on nursing students' acquisition and retention of BLS/AED skills. Nursing students (N = 177) from two European universities were randomly assigned to either an instructor-directed (IDG) or a student-directed (SDG) 4-h retraining session in BLS/AED. A multiple-choice questionnaire, the Cardiff Test, Laerdal SkillReporter(®) software and a self-efficacy scale were used to assess students' overall competency (knowledge, psychomotor skills and self-efficacy) in BLS/AED at pre-test, post-test and 3-month retention-test. GEE, chi-squared and McNemar tests were performed to examine statistical differences amongst groups across time. There was a significant increase in the proportion of students who achieved competency for all variables measuring knowledge, psychomotor skills and self-efficacy between pre-test and post-test in both groups (all p-valuesretention at 3 months, success rates of students within the IDG deteriorated significantly for all variables except ≥ 70% of chest compressions with correct hand position (p-value = 0.12). Conversely, the proportion of students who achieved competency within the SDG only decreased significantly in 'mean no flow-time ≤ 5s' (p-value = 0.02). Furthermore, differences between groups' success rates at retention-test also proved to be significantly different for all variables measured (all p-values < 0.05). This study demonstrated that using a student-directed strategy to retrain BLS/AED skills has resulted in a higher proportion of nursing students achieving and retaining competency in BLS/AED at three months when compared to an instructor-directed strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oriented coupling of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to sensor surfaces using light assisted immobilisation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snabe, Torben; Røder, Gustav Andreas; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2005-01-01

    histocompatibility complex (MHC class I) to a sensor surface is presented. The coupling was performed using light assisted immobilisation--a novel immobilisation technology which allows specific opening of particular disulphide bridges in proteins which then is used for covalent bonding to thiol-derivatised surfaces...... via a new disulphide bond. Light assisted immobilisation specifically targets the disulphide bridge in the MHC-I molecule alpha(3)-domain which ensures oriented linking of the complex with the peptide binding site exposed away from the sensor surface. Structural analysis reveals that a similar...

  19. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  20. Sunlight Intensity Based Global Positioning System for Near-Surface Underwater Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Fernández

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Water monitoring is important in domains including documenting climate change, weather prediction and fishing. This paper presents a simple and energy efficient localization strategy for near surface buoy based sensors. Sensors can be dropped randomly in the ocean and thus self-calibrate in terms of geographic location such that geo-tagged observations of water quality can be made without the need for costly and energy consuming GPS-hardware. The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. Unlike previous localization techniques for underwater sensors, the current approach does not rely on stationary or mobile reference points.

  1. Sunlight intensity based global positioning system for near-surface underwater sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Javier V; Sandnes, Frode E; Fernández, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Water monitoring is important in domains including documenting climate change, weather prediction and fishing. This paper presents a simple and energy efficient localization strategy for near surface buoy based sensors. Sensors can be dropped randomly in the ocean and thus self-calibrate in terms of geographic location such that geo-tagged observations of water quality can be made without the need for costly and energy consuming GPS-hardware. The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. Unlike previous localization techniques for underwater sensors, the current approach does not rely on stationary or mobile reference points.

  2. Intelligent detection of cracks in metallic surfaces using a waveguide sensor loaded with metamaterial elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdulbaset; Hu, Bing; Ramahi, Omar

    2015-05-15

    This work presents a real life experiment of implementing an artificial intelligence model for detecting sub-millimeter cracks in metallic surfaces on a dataset obtained from a waveguide sensor loaded with metamaterial elements. Crack detection using microwave sensors is typically based on human observation of change in the sensor's signal (pattern) depicted on a high-resolution screen of the test equipment. However, as demonstrated in this work, implementing artificial intelligence to classify cracked from non-cracked surfaces has appreciable impact in terms of sensing sensitivity, cost, and automation. Furthermore, applying artificial intelligence for post-processing data collected from microwave sensors is a cornerstone for handheld test equipment that can outperform rack equipment with large screens and sophisticated plotting features. The proposed method was tested on a metallic plate with different cracks and the obtained experimental results showed good crack classification accuracy rates.

  3. Signals from fluorescent materials on the surface of silicon micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    For the High-Luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new, all-silicon tracker. In order to minimise the amount of material in the detector, circuit boards with readout electronics will be glued on to the active area of the sensor. Several adhesives investigated to be used for the construction of detector modules were found to become fluorescent when exposed to UV light. These adhesives could become a light source in the high-radiation environment of the ATLAS detector. The effect of fluorescent material covering the sensor surface in a high- radiation environment has been studied for a silicon micro-strip sensor using a micro-focused X-ray beam. By pointing the beam both inside the sensor and parallel to the sensor surface, the sensor responses from direct hits and fluorescence can be compared with high precision. This contribution presents a setup to study the susceptibility of silicon strip sensors to light contamination from fluorescent mate...

  4. Signals from fluorescent materials on the surface of silicon micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    For the High-Luminosity Upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced with a new, all-silicon tracker (ITk). In order to minimise the amount of material in the ITk, circuit boards with readout electronics will be glued onto the active area of the sensor. Several adhesives, investigated to be used for the construction of detector modules, were found to become fluorescent when exposed to UV light. These adhesives could become a light source in the high-radiation environment of the ATLAS detector. The effect of fluorescent material covering the sensor surface in a high-radiation environment has been studied for a silicon micro-strip sensor using a micro-focused X-ray beam. By positioning the beam parallel to the sensor surfave and pointing it both inside the sensor and above the sensor surface inside the deposited glue, the sensor responses from direct hits and fluorescence can be compared with high precision. This contribution presents a setup to study the susceptibilit...

  5. Surface acoustic wave sensors with Graphene/PANI nanocomposites for nitric oxide detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beibei; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Lingling

    2017-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave sensors with grapheme/PANI nanocomposite sensitive films for detecting nitric oxide (NO) were fabricated and experimentally studied. Morphological characterization and functionalization of the sensing material were explored using SEM and FTIR, respectively. The study of sensor response compared film sensitivity, response time, reversibility, and limit of detection for nanocomposite films, pure grapheme and pure PANI to the detection of NO. The response and recovery times were 40s and 20s when detecting 4ppm NO, respectively. The frequency response was discovered to be linear in the NO concentration range 1-50 ppm. The nanocomposite sensors had improved sensitivities compared to the polymer devices, and better response times.

  6. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikestikova, M., E-mail: mikestik@fzu.cz [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Allport, P.P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Wilson, J.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department and Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Hommels, L.B.A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ullan, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Campus UAB-Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Bloch, I.; Gregor, I.M.; Tackmann, K. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-21

    A radiation hard n{sup +}-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the “ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration” and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in “punch-through protection” (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} and by gamma rays from {sup 60}Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07. - Highlights:

  7. A Novel Particulate Matter 2.5 Sensor Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuling Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Design, fabrication and experiments of a miniature particulate matter (PM 2.5 sensor based on the surface acoustic wave (SAW technology were proposed. The sensor contains a virtual impactor (VI for particle separation, a thermophoretic precipitator (TP for PM2.5 capture and a SAW sensor chip for PM2.5 mass detection. The separation performance of the VI was evaluated by using the finite element method (FEM model and the PM2.5 deposition characteristic in the TP was obtained by analyzing the thermophoretic theory. Employing the coupling-of-modes (COM model, a low loss and high-quality SAW resonator was designed. By virtue of the micro electro mechanical system (MEMS technology and semiconductor technology, the SAW based PM2.5 sensor detecting probe was fabricated. Then, combining a dual-port SAW oscillator and an air sampler, the experimental platform was set up. Exposing the PM2.5 sensor to the polystyrene latex (PSL particles in a chamber, the sensor performance was evaluated. The results show that by detecting the PSL particles with a certain diameter of 2 μm, the response of the SAW based PM2.5 sensor is linear, and in accordance with the response of the light scattering based PM2.5 monitor. The developed SAW based PM2.5 sensor has great potential for the application of airborne particle detection.

  8. Hybrid surface platform for the simultaneous detection of proteins and DNA using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homola, Jiří; Piliarik, Marek; Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Shaoyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 11 (2008), s. 4231-4236 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance imaging * DNA -directed immobilization * protein array Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 5.712, year: 2008

  9. The effect of scattered light sensor orientation on roughness measurement of curved polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    with crossed surface lay to document the robustness of the method. The instrument area-integrating measuring principle (figure 1) is based on a non-coherent light beam of ∅ 0.9 mm and 670 nm wavelength illuminating the measured surface, reflection of the incident light from the surface slopes in spatial......The effect of angular orientation of a scattered light sensor with respect to main curvature and surface lay on roughness measurements is evaluated. A commercial scattered light sensor OS 500-32 from Optosurf GmbH was used. The investigation was performed on polished cylindrical surfaces...... directions, and its acquisition within ± 16º angular range with a linear detector array. From the distribution of the acquired scattered light intensity, a number of statistical parameters describing the surface texture are calculated, where the Aq parameter (variance of the scattered light distribution...

  10. The effect of scattered light sensor orientation on roughness measurement of curved polished surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering is a method for surface roughness measurements well suitable for use in a production environment thanks to its fast measurement rate, insensitivity to vibrations and to small misalignments. The method is however affected by several other factors. In this paper, the effect of angu...... of angular orientation of a commercial scattered light sensor on roughness measurements of polished cylindrical surfaces with crossed surface lay is investigated to document the robustness of the method....

  11. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  12. A Steel Ball Surface Quality Inspection Method Based on a Circumferential Eddy Current Array Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huayu; Xie, Fengqin; Cao, Maoyong; Zhong, Mingming

    2017-07-01

    To efficiently inspect surface defects on steel ball bearings, a new method based on a circumferential eddy current array (CECA) sensor was proposed here. The best probe configuration, in terms of the coil quality factor (Q-factor), magnetic field intensity, and induced eddy current density on the surface of a sample steel ball, was determined using 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-coil probes, for analysis and comparison. The optimal lift-off from the measured steel ball, the number of probe coils, and the frequency of excitation current suitable for steel ball inspection were obtained. Using the resulting CECA sensor to inspect 46,126 steel balls showed a miss rate of ~0.02%. The sensor was inspected for surface defects as small as 0.05 mm in width and 0.1 mm in depth.

  13. A Steel Ball Surface Quality Inspection Method Based on a Circumferential Eddy Current Array Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayu Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently inspect surface defects on steel ball bearings, a new method based on a circumferential eddy current array (CECA sensor was proposed here. The best probe configuration, in terms of the coil quality factor (Q-factor, magnetic field intensity, and induced eddy current density on the surface of a sample steel ball, was determined using 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-coil probes, for analysis and comparison. The optimal lift-off from the measured steel ball, the number of probe coils, and the frequency of excitation current suitable for steel ball inspection were obtained. Using the resulting CECA sensor to inspect 46,126 steel balls showed a miss rate of ~0.02%. The sensor was inspected for surface defects as small as 0.05 mm in width and 0.1 mm in depth.

  14. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walied A. Moussa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  15. Specific capture of target bacteria onto sensor surfaces for infectious disease diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Inoue, Shinnosuke; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Lee, Kyong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    A long-sought goal for infectious disease care is a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool that is compatible with the needs of low-resource settings. To identify target biomarkers of infectious diseases, immunoassays utilizing the binding affinity between antigen and antibody have been widely used. In immunoassays, the interaction between antigen and antibody on sensor surfaces should be precisely controlled for specific identification of targets. This paper studies the specific capturing mechanisms of target bacteria onto sensor surfaces through investigation of combined effects of capillary action and binding affinity. As a model system, cells of both Escherichia coli and the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin strain of Mycobacterium bovis were used to study specific and nonspecific capturing mechanisms onto a microtip sensor. The capillary action was observed to arrange the concentrated cells onto the two-dimensional sensor surface. Due to the capillary-induced organization of target cells on the antibody-functionalized sensor surface, the number of the captured target cells was three times greater than that of the non-targeted cells. The capturing and detection capabilities varied with the width of a microtip. The specific capturing mechanism can be used to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of an immunoassay. (paper)

  16. Discovery and characterization of BlsE, a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase involved in the blasticidin S biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    Full Text Available BlsE, a predicted radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM protein, was anaerobically purified and reconstituted in vitro to study its function in the blasticidin S biosynthetic pathway. The putative role of BlsE was elucidated based on bioinformatics analysis, genetic inactivation and biochemical characterization. Biochemical results showed that BlsE is a SAM-dependent radical enzyme that utilizes cytosylglucuronic acid, the accumulated intermediate metabolite in blsE mutant, as substrate and catalyzes decarboxylation at the C5 position of the glucoside residue to yield cytosylarabinopyranose. Additionally, we report the purification and reconstitution of BlsE, characterization of its [4Fe-4S] cluster using UV-vis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopic analysis, and investigation of the ability of flavodoxin (Fld, flavodoxin reductase (Fpr and NADPH to reduce the [4Fe-4S](2+ cluster. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that Cys31, Cys35, Cys38 in the C×××C×MC motif and Gly73, Gly74, Glu75, Pro76 in the GGEP motif were crucial amino acids for BlsE activity while mutation of Met37 had little effect on its function. Our results indicate that BlsE represents a typical [4Fe-4S]-containing radical SAM enzyme and it catalyzes decarboxylation in blasticidin S biosynthesis.

  17. Solvent effect on polystyrene surface roughness on top of QCM sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakti, Setyawan P.; Rahmawati, Eka; Robiandi, Fadli

    2016-01-01

    Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) has been used as a basis for many chemical sensors and biosensor. Its sensitivity to mass change which can detect a mass change on its surface down to sub ng/cm2 is one of its interesting aspects. Another interesting feature is its ability to work in liquid environment. However, there are many aspects which influence QCM sensor properties in contact with liquid. One of the aspects is surface roughness of the matrix layer where on top of it a biological sensitive layer will be immobilized. One of matrix layers in the immobilizing biological sensitive layer was polystyrene. Polystyrene was coated on the QCM sensor by using the spin coating method. During the coating process, polystyrene was solved using non-polar solvent. It is known that the physical and chemical properties of the solvent affect a transition process from soluble polymer becoming rigid polymer layer. In this work, we show that polystyrene solved in chloroform has a higher surface roughness compare to one solved in toluene, xylene, or tetrahydrofuran. Surface roughness of the polystyrene coating were measured using a non-contact profilometer. However, we also found that there is no difference on the electrical impedance of the QCM sensor coated with polystyrene resulted from differing solvent when the sensor was in contact with air and water. Thus, all of the mentioned solvent can be used to solve the polystyrene as a coating material for QCM sensor without affecting the electrical performance of the sensor, but the choice of the solution can be used as a simple method to control the difference roughness of the polystyrene coating.

  18. Solvent effect on polystyrene surface roughness on top of QCM sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakti, Setyawan P., E-mail: sakti@ub.ac.id; Rahmawati, Eka; Robiandi, Fadli [Advanced System and Material Technology, Laboratory of Instrumentation and Measurement Department of Physics, Brawijaya University (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) has been used as a basis for many chemical sensors and biosensor. Its sensitivity to mass change which can detect a mass change on its surface down to sub ng/cm2 is one of its interesting aspects. Another interesting feature is its ability to work in liquid environment. However, there are many aspects which influence QCM sensor properties in contact with liquid. One of the aspects is surface roughness of the matrix layer where on top of it a biological sensitive layer will be immobilized. One of matrix layers in the immobilizing biological sensitive layer was polystyrene. Polystyrene was coated on the QCM sensor by using the spin coating method. During the coating process, polystyrene was solved using non-polar solvent. It is known that the physical and chemical properties of the solvent affect a transition process from soluble polymer becoming rigid polymer layer. In this work, we show that polystyrene solved in chloroform has a higher surface roughness compare to one solved in toluene, xylene, or tetrahydrofuran. Surface roughness of the polystyrene coating were measured using a non-contact profilometer. However, we also found that there is no difference on the electrical impedance of the QCM sensor coated with polystyrene resulted from differing solvent when the sensor was in contact with air and water. Thus, all of the mentioned solvent can be used to solve the polystyrene as a coating material for QCM sensor without affecting the electrical performance of the sensor, but the choice of the solution can be used as a simple method to control the difference roughness of the polystyrene coating.

  19. Photometric stereo sensor for robot-assisted industrial quality inspection of coated composite material surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Eva; Zambal, Sebastian; Stöger, Matthias; Eitzinger, Christian

    2015-04-01

    While composite materials are increasingly used in modern industry, the quality control in terms of vision-based surface inspection remains a challenging task. Due to the often complex and three-dimensional structures, a manual inspection of these components is nearly impossible. We present a photometric stereo sensor system including an industrial robotic arm for positioning the sensor relative to the inspected part. Two approaches are discussed: stop-and-go positioning and continuous positioning. Results are presented on typical defects that appear on various composite material surfaces in the production process.

  20. Quantitative measurement of in-plane acoustic field components using surface-mounted fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Richard O.; Dhawan, Rajat R.; Gunther, Michael F.; Murphy, Kent A.

    1993-01-01

    Extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors have been used to obtain calibrated, quantitative measurements of the in-plane displacement components associated with the propagation of ultrasonic elastic stress waves on the surfaces of solids. The frequency response of the sensor is determined by the internal spacing between the two reflecting fiber endface surfaces which form the Fabry-Perot cavity, a distance which is easily controlled during fabrication. With knowledge of the material properties of the solid, the out-of-plane displacement component of the wave may also be determined, giving full field data.

  1. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  2. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  3. Development of a Magnetostrictive FeNi Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Current Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A magnetostrictive FeNi-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW-based current sensor was proposed in this work. The weak remanence and hysteresis effect of the FeNi itself contributes to suppress the asymmetry in sensor response at increasing and decreasing current. The sensor response was simulated by solving the coupled electromechanical field equation in layered structure considering the magnetostrictive effect and an approach of effective dielectric constant. The effects from the aspect ratio and thickness of the FeNi film on sensor response were analyzed to determine the optimal design parameters. Differential oscillation structure was used to form the sensor, in which, the FeNi thin film was deposited along the SAW propagation of the sensor chip by using RF magnetron sputtering. The magnetostrictive effect of the FeNi coating induced by the magnetic loading generates the perturbation in SAW velocity, and corresponding oscillation frequency. High sensitivity of 10.7 KHz/A, good linearity and repeatability, lower hysteresis error of 0.97% were obtained from the developed prototype 150 MHz SAW FeNi coated current sensor.

  4. Screening model for nanowire surface-charge sensors in liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martin Hedegård; Mortensen, Asger; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    The conductance change of nanowire field-effect transistors is considered a highly sensitive probe for surface charge. However, Debye screening of relevant physiological liquid environments challenge device performance due to competing screening from the ionic liquid and nanowire charge carriers....

  5. Experimental Validation of a Sensor Monitoring Ice Formation over a Road Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo TROIANO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The reliable detection of ice over road surfaces is an important issue for reducing maintenance costs and improving traffic safety. An innovative capacitive sensor was developed to detect the presence of ice on its surface, and its repeatability, stability and reliability were assessed in simulations and experiments described in previous papers. The indications of the sensor are compared in this paper with the objective identification of ice formation or melting over a road surface in laboratory, under dynamic or stationary conditions, using tap water or a solution with 5 % of salt concentration. The sensor provides indications which are in line with the condition of the road surface, with a mean error in the identification of the time instants of ice-wet and wet-ice transitions lower than about 10 and 40 minutes in the case of tap water and salt water, respectively, both under different temperature gradients or in stationary conditions. Moreover, the indication provided by the sensor always anticipates the formation of ice over the road surface.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance based optical fiber riboflavin sensor by using molecularly imprinted gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2013-05-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based optical fiber riboflavin/vitamin B2 sensor using combination of colloidal crystal templating and molecularly imprinted gel. The sensor works on spectral interrogation method. The operating range of the sensor lies from 0 μg/ml to 320 μg/ml, the suitable amount of intakes of riboflavin recommended for different age group. The SPR spectra show blue shift with increasing concentration of riboflavin, which is due to the interaction of riboflavin molecule over specific binding sites caused by molecular imprinting. The present sensor has many advantageous features such as fast response, small probe size, low cost and can be used for remote/online monitoring.

  7. Fiber Bragg grating assisted surface plasmon resonance sensor with graphene oxide sensing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasu, P. T.; Noor, A. S. M.; Shabaneh, A. A.; Yaacob, M. H.; Lim, H. N.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    A single mode fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used to generate Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The uniform gratings of the FBG are used to scatter light from the fiber optic core into the cladding thus enabling the interaction between the light and a thin gold film in order to generate SPR. Applying this technique, the cladding around the FBG is left intact, making this sensor very robust and easy to handle. A thin film of graphene oxide (GO) is deposited over a 45 nm gold film to enhance the sensitivity of the SPR sensor. The gold coated sensor demonstrated high sensitivity of approximately 200 nm/RIU when tested with different concentrations of ethanol in an aqueous medium. A 2.5 times improvement in sensitivity is observed with the GO enhancement compared to the gold coated sensor.

  8. A selectively coated photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Pan, Shanshan; Shum, Ping; Yan, Min; Leviatan, Yehuda; Li, Changming

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel design for a photonic crystal fiber based surface plasmonic resonance sensor. The sensor consists of selectively metal-coated air holes containing analyte channels, which enhance the phase matching between the plasmonic mode and the core-guided mode. Good refractive index sensitivity as high as 5500 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) can be achieved in the proposed structure. Compared with the entirely coated structure, the selectively coated sensor design demonstrates narrower resonance spectral width. Moreover, the greater resonance depth can improve the sensing performance in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The improvements in spectral width and SNR can both contribute to a better detection limit for this refractive index sensor

  9. A Flexible Arrayed Eddy Current Sensor for Inspection of Hollow Axle Inner Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguo Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A reliable and accurate inspection of the hollow axle inner surface is important for the safe operation of high-speed trains. In order to improve the reliability of the inspection, a flexible arrayed eddy current sensor for non-destructive testing of the hollow axle inner surface was designed, fabricated and characterized. The sensor, consisting of two excitation traces and 28 sensing traces, was developed by using the flexible printed circuit board (FPCB technique to conform the geometric features of the inner surfaces of the hollow axles. The main innovative aspect of the sensor was the new arrangement of excitation/sensing traces to achieve a differential configuration. Finite element model was established to analyze sensor responses and to determine the optimal excitation frequency. Experimental validations were conducted on a specimen with several artificial defects. Results from experiments and simulations were consistent with each other, with the maximum relative error less than 4%. Both results proved that the sensor was capable of detecting longitudinal and transverse defects with the depth of 0.5 mm under the optimal excitation frequency of 0.9 MHz.

  10. A Liquid-Surface-Based Three-Axis Inclination Sensor for Measurement of Stage Tilt Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuki; Kataoka, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Chen, Yuan-Liu; Chen, Xiuguo; Matsukuma, Hiraku; Gao, Wei

    2018-01-30

    In this paper a new concept of a liquid-surface-based three-axis inclination sensor for evaluation of angular error motion of a precision linear slide, which is often used in the field of precision engineering such as ultra-precision machine tools, coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) and so on, is proposed. In the liquid-surface-based three-axis inclination sensor, a reference float mounting a line scale grating having periodic line grating structures is made to float over a liquid surface, while its three-axis angular motion is measured by using an optical sensor head based on the three-axis laser autocollimation capable of measuring three-axis angular motion of the scale grating. As the first step of research, in this paper, theoretical analysis on the angular motion of the reference float about each axis has been carried out based on simplified kinematic models to evaluate the possibility of realizing the proposed concept of a three-axis inclination sensor. In addition, based on the theoretical analyses results, a prototype three-axis inclination sensor has been designed and developed. Through some basic experiments with the prototype, the possibility of simultaneous three-axis inclination measurement by the proposed concept has been verified.

  11. First Results for a Superconducting Imaging-Surface Sensor Array for Magnetocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlachov, A.; Overton, W.; Wood, C.C.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-08-28

    The authors have completed fabrication and preliminary testing of a 12-channel SQUID array using the superconducting image-surface gradiometer concept. Sensor response to point dipole magnetic sources, and uniform fields used to simulate ambient magnetic fields followed predicted values to high precision. Edge effects were not observed for sources, within 5cm of the center of the imaging surface independent of whether the source is close or far from the surface. The superconducting imaging-surface also reduced uniform ambient fields at the SQUID sensors by approximately a factor of ten. Finally, a high degree of symmetry was observed between sides of the imaging surface for uniform fields. This symmetry, together with the very small sensitivity of sensors on the back side of the imaging surface to sources close to the front side provides an excellent circumstance for implementing either digital or analog background rejection. Their goal is to implement a higher density array with the superconducting imaging surface, together with background rejection, and utilize this system for MCG and other biomagnetic studies.

  12. Experiment of Laser Pointing Stability on Different Surfaces to validate Micrometric Positioning Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)721924; Mainaud Durand, Helene; Piedigrossi, Didier; Sandomierski, Jacek; Sosin, Mateusz; Geiger, Alain; Guillaume, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    CLIC requires 10 μm precision and accuracy over 200m for the pre-alignment of beam related components. A solution based on laser beam as straight line reference is being studied at CERN. It involves camera/shutter assemblies as micrometric positioning sensors. To validate the sensors, it is necessary to determine an appropriate material for the shutter in terms of laser pointing stability. Experiments are carried out with paper, metal and ceramic surfaces. This paper presents the standard deviations of the laser spot coordinates obtained on the different surfaces, as well as the measurement error. Our experiments validate the choice of paper and ceramic for the shutter of the micrometric positioning sensor. It also provides an estimate of the achievable precision and accuracy of the determination of the laser spot centre with respect to the shutter coordinate system defined by reference targets.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance sensors based on uniform-waist tapered fibers in a reflective configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Óscar; Díaz-Herrera, Natalia; Navarrete, María-Cruz; González-Cano, Agustín

    2006-10-01

    We present a configuration for surface plasmon resonance sensors based on uniform-waist tapered optical fibers and reflective elements. Once the fiber is tapered fulfilling the adiabatic criterion, a multilayer including a metallic medium is asymmetrically deposited on the uniform waist of the fiber. This feature provides the resonant excitation of multiple surface plasma waves. In addition, a mirror is produced at the fiber tip by a chemical Tollens reaction. In this way, the sensor operates in a reflective mode, more convenient for dip probes. When these sensors are spectrally interrogated, a high sensitivity of 10-4 refractive index units per nanometer is attained. These devices can be advantageously used for any kind of chemical sensing and biosensing.

  14. Synthesis methods of gold nanoparticles for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsuri Nurul Diyanah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (GNPs have been known as an excellent characteristic for Local Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR sensors due to their sensitive spectral response to the local environment of the nanoparticle surface and ease of monitoring the light signal due to their strong scattering or absorption. Prior the technologies, GNPs based LSPR has been commercialized and have become a central tool for characterizing and quantifying in various field. In this review, we presented a brief introduction on the history of surface plasmon, the theory behind the surface plasmon resonance (SPR and the principles of LSPR. We also reported on the synthetization as well of the properties of the GNPs and the applications in current LSPR sensors.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance sensor for detection of bisphenol A in drinking water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hegnerová, Kateřina; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 151, č. 1 (2010), s. 177-179 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance biosensor * bisphenol A * drinking water Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2010

  16. Optimization of capacitive membrane sensors for surface-stress-based measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sajadi, B.; Goosen, J.F.L.; van Keulen, A.

    2017-01-01

    Surface stress-based measurement is a relatively new mechanism in biological and chemical sensing. The viability of this mechanism depends on the maximum sensitivity, accuracy, and precision that can be achieved with these sensors. In this paper, an analytical approximate solution and a

  17. Reflection-based fibre-optic refractive index sensor using surface plasmon resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlubina, P.; Kadulová, M.; Ciprian, D.; Sobota, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, August 19 (2014), 14033:1-5 ISSN 1990-2573 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * fibre -optic sensor * spectral interrogation technique * aqueous solutions of ethanol * refractive index Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  18. Apparatus and process for an off-surface cone penetrometer sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smail, Timothy R.; French, Phillip J.; Huffman, Russell K.

    2003-04-29

    A cone penetrometer is provided having a pivoting arm which deploys a variable distance from the surface of the cone penetrometer. Sensors placed on the end of the deployable arm provide for data collection outside a compression zone created by the insertion of the cone penetrometer.

  19. Modelling and characterisation of surface plasmon based sensors for the detection of E. coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rajarajan, M.; Dar, T.; Themistos, Ch.; Rahman, A.; Grattan, K.; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2009), s. 564-571 ISSN 0950-0340 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : SPR sensor * long-range surface plasmon * bacterium Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.942, year: 2009

  20. Ultrahigh resolution long range surface plasmon-based sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, Radan; Homola, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 1 (2007), s. 10-12 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/04/P141; GA ČR GA203/02/1326; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/03/0249 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) QLK4-CT-2002-02323; US FDA (US) FD-U-002250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * refractive index Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.934, year: 2007

  1. First bulk and surface results for the ATLAS ITk stereo annulus sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Abidi, Syed Haider; The ATLAS collaboration; Bohm, Jan; Botte, James Michael; Ciungu, Bianca; Dette, Karola; Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fernandez-Tejero, Xavi; Garcia-Argos, Carlos; Gillberg, Dag; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hunter, Robert Francis Holub

    2018-01-01

    A novel microstrip sensor geometry, the “stereo annulus”, has been developed for use in the end-cap of the ATLAS experiment’s strip tracker upgrade at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL- LHC). The radiation-hard, single-sided, ac-coupled, n + -in-p microstrip sensors are designed by the ITk Strip Sensor Collaboration and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. The stereo annulus design has the potential to revolutionize the layout of end-cap microstrip trackers promising better tracking performance and more complete coverage than the contemporary configurations. These advantages are achieved by the union of equal length, radially oriented strips with a small stereo angle implemented directly into the sensor surface. The first-ever results for the stereo annulus geometry have been collected across several sites world- wide and are presented here. A number of full-size, unirradiated sensors were evaluated for their mechanical, bulk, and surface properties. The new device, the ATLAS12EC, is compared ag...

  2. First Results for a Novel Superconducting Imaging-Surface Sensor Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.R.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlashov, A.; Overton, W.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-09-13

    A superconducting imaging-surface system was constructed using 12 coplanar thin-film SQUID magnetometers located parallel to and spaced 2 cm from a 25 cm diameter lead imaging-plane. Some measurements included two additional sensors on the ''back'' side of the superconducting imaging-plane to study the field symmetry for our system. Performance was measured in a shielded can and in the open laboratory environment. Data from this system has been used to: (a) understand the noise characteristics of the dewar-SQUID imaging plate arrangement, (b) to verify the imaging principle, (c) measure the background rejection factor of the imaging plane, and (d) compare superconducting materials for the imaging plane. A phantom source field was measured at the sensors as a function of phantom distance from the sensor array to verify the imaging theory. Both the shape and absolute value of the measured and predicted curves agree very well indicating the system is behaving as a gradiometer in accordance with theory. The output from SQUIDs located behind the imaging surface that sense background fields can be used for software or analog background cancellation. Fields arising from sources close to the imaging plane were shielded form the background sensors by more than a factor of 1000. Measurement of the symmetry of sensor sensitivity to uniform fields exactly followed theoretical predictions.

  3. First results for a novel superconducting imaging-surface sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.R.; Espy, M.A.; Matlashov, A.; Overton, W.; Peters, M.V.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-12-31

    A superconducting imaging-surface system was constructed using 12 coplanar thin-film SQUID magnetometers located parallel to and spaced 2 cm from a 25 cm diameter lead imaging-plane. Some measurements included two additional sensors on the back side of the superconducting imaging-plane to study the field symmetry for the system. Performance was measured in a shielded can and in the open laboratory environment. Data from this system has been used to: (1) understand the noise characteristics of the dewar-SQUID imaging plate arrangement, (2) to verify the imaging principle, (c) measure the background rejection factor of the imaging plane, and (4) compare superconducting materials for the imaging plane. A phantom source field was measured at the sensors as a function of phantom distance from the sensor array to verify the imaging theory. Both the shape and absolute values of the measured and predicted curves agree very well indicating the system is behaving as a gradiometer in accordance with theory. The output from SQUIDs located behind the imaging surface that sense background fields can be used for software or analog background cancellation. Fields arising from sources close to the imaging plane were shielded from the background sensors by more than a factor of 1000. Measurement of the symmetry of sensor sensitivity to uniform fields exactly followed theoretical predictions.

  4. Graphene Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Charge and Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Satoshi; Ono, Takao; Kanai, Yasushi; Ikuta, Takashi; Shimatani, Masaaki; Ogawa, Shinpei; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2018-01-26

    We have combined a graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor on a LiTaO 3 substrate to create a graphene surface acoustic wave (GSAW) sensor. When a SAW propagates in graphene, an acoustoelectric current (I A ) flows between two attached electrodes. This current has unique electrical characteristics, having both positive and negative peak values with respect to the electrolyte-gate voltage (V Eg ) in solution. We found that I A is controlled by V Eg and the amplitude of the SAW. It was also confirmed that the GSAW sensor detects changes of electrical charge in solution like conventional GFET sensors. Furthermore, the detection of amino-group-modified microbeads was performed by employing a GSAW sensor in a phthalate buffer solution at pH 4.1. The hole current peak shifted to the lower left in the I A -V Eg characteristics. The left shift was caused by charge detection by the GFET and can be explained by an increase of amino groups that have positive charges at pH 4.1. In contrast, the downward shift is thought to be due to a reduction in the amplitude of the propagating SAW because of an increase in the mass loading of microbeads. This mass loading was detected by the SAW sensor. Thus, we have demonstrated that the GSAW sensor is a transducer capable of the simultaneous detection of charge and mass, which indicates that it is an attractive platform for highly sensitive and multifunctional solution sensing.

  5. Fabrication of bimetallic microfluidic surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors on paper by screen printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lu-Lu; Song, Qi-Xia; Li, Yuan-Ting; Peng, Mao-Pan; Li, Da-Wei; Chen, Li-Xia; Fossey, John S; Long, Yi-Tao

    2013-08-20

    Au-Ag bimetallic microfluidic, dumbbell-shaped, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors were fabricated on cellulose paper by screen printing. These printed sensors rely on a sample droplet injection zone, and a SERS detection zone at either end of the dumbbell motif, fabricated by printing silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) successively with microscale precision. The microfluidic channel was patterned using an insulating ink to connect these two zones and form a hydrophobic circuit. Owing to capillary action of paper in the millimeter-sized channels, the sensor could enable self-filtering of fluids to remove suspended particles within wastewater without pumping. This sensor also allows sensitive SERS detection, due to advantageous combination of the strong surface enhancement of Ag NPs and excellent chemical stability of Au NPs. The SERS performance of the sensors was investigated by employing the probe rhodamine 6G, a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.1×10(-13)M and an enhancement factor of 8.6×10(6) could be achieved. Moreover, the dumbbell-shaped bimetallic sensors exhibited good stability with SERS performance being maintained over 14 weeks in air, and high reproducibility with less than 15% variation in spot-to-spot SERS intensity. Using these dumbbell-shaped bimetallic sensors, substituted aromatic pollutants in wastewater samples could be quantitatively analyzed, which demonstrated their excellent capability for rapid trace pollutant detection in wastewater samples in the field without pre-separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor chip of gold nanoparticles and detection lipase–osmolytes interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hoornam, S. [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Science, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vesaghi, M.A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranjbar, B.; Azizi, A. [Department of Biophysics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mobasheri, H. [Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, PO Box 13145-1384, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Research Institute (BRC), University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We synthesized localized surface plasmon resonance sensor of gold nanoparticles by RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • LSPR sensor was characterized by TEM, XPS, AFM. • LSPR sensor was utilized to detect interaction between sorbitol and trehalose, with Pesudomonace Cepacia Lipase (PCL). • Unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. • Refractive index of PCL was obtained by Mie theory modeling. - Abstract: Co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD from acetylene gas and Au target were used to prepare sensor chip of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Deposition conditions were optimized to reach a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Au NPs with particle size less than 10 nm. The RF power was set at 180 W and the initial gas pressure was set at 0.035 mbar. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data were used to investigate particles size and surface morphology of LSPR sensor chip. The Au and C content of the LSPR sensor chip of Au NPs was obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin film was used as intermediate material to immobilize Au NPs on the SiO{sub 2} substrate. The interaction between two types of osmolytes, i.e. sorbitol and trehalose, with Pseudomonas cepacia lipase (PCL) were detected by the prepared LSPR biosensor chip. The detection mechanism is based on LSPR spectroscopy in which the wavelength of absorption peak is sensitive to the refractive index of the environment of the Au NPs. This mechanism eliminates the use of a probe or immobilization of PCL on the Au NPs of LSPR sensor chip. The interaction between PCL and osmolytes can change refractive index of the mixture or solution. We found that unlike to trehalose, sorbitol interacts with the PCL. This interaction increases refractive index of the PCL and sorbitol mixture. Refractive index of PCL in the presence of different concentration of sorbitol was

  7. Surface Acoustic WaveAmmonia Sensors Based on ST-cut Quartz under Periodic Al Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yau Su

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW devices are key components for sensing applications. SAW propagation under a periodic grating was investigated in this work. The theoretical method used here is the space harmonic method. We also applied the results of SAW propagation studied in this work to design a two-port resonator with an Al grating on ST-cut quartz. The measured frequency responses of the resonator were similar to the simulation ones. Then, the chemical interface of polyaniline/WO3 composites was coated on the SAW sensor for ammonia detection. The SAW sensor responded to ammonia gas and could be regenerated using dry nitrogen.

  8. Electrochemical surface plasmon resonance sensor based on two-electrode configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bing; Dong, Wei; Wen, Yizhang; Pang, Kai; Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Yazhuo; Zhan, Shuyue

    2016-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about electrochemistry reactions, a two-electrode electrochemical surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) sensor has been proposed. We describe the theory of potential modulation for this novel sensor and determine the factors that can change the SPR resonance angle. The reference electrode in three-electrode configuration was eliminated, and comparing with several other electrode materials, activated carbon (AC) is employed as the suitable counter electrode for its potential stability. Just like three-electrode configuration, the simpler AC two-electrode system can also obtain detailed information about the electrochemical reactions. (paper)

  9. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser vapor sensor using swelling polymer reflection modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgård; Dohn, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Vapor detection using a low-refractive index polymer for reflection modulation of the top mirror in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated. The VCSEL sensor concept presents a simple method to detect the response of a sensor polymer in the presence of volatile organic co...... compounds. We model the physics as a change in the top mirror loss caused by swelling of the polymer upon absorbing the target volatile organic compound. Further we show how acetone vapors at 82 000 ppm concentration can change the polymer coated VCSEL output power by 20 mu W....

  10. Rational Design of Peptide-Functionalized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor for Specific Detection of TNT Explosive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a rationally-designed 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT binding peptide derived from an amino acid sequence of the complementarity-determining region (CDR of an anti-TNT monoclonal antibody was used for TNT detection based on a maleimide-functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor. By antigen-docking simulation and screening, the TNT binding candidate peptides were obtained as TNTHCDR1 derived from the heavy chain of CDR1, TNTHCDR2 derived from CDR2, and TNTHCDR3 from CDR3 of an anti-TNT antibody. The binding events between candidate peptides and TNT were evaluated using the SPR sensor by direct determination based on the 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES surface. The TNT binding peptide was directly immobilized on the maleimide-functionalized sensor chip surface from N-γ-maleimidobutyryl-oxysuccinimide ester (GMBS. The results demonstrated that peptide TNTHCDR3 was identified and selected as a TNT binding peptide among the other two candidate peptides. Five kinds of TNT analogues were also investigated to testify the selectivity of TNT binding peptide TNTHCDR3. Furthermore, the results indicated that the APTES-GMBS-based SPR sensor chip procedure featured a great potential application for the direct detection of TNT.

  11. Semiconductor Sensors Application for Definition of Factor of Ozone Heterogeneous Destruction on Teflon Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya V. Finogenova

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available In our paper we present the results of our research, which was carried out by means of semiconductor sensor techniques (SCS, which allowed evaluating heterogeneous death-rate of ozone (γ Teflon surface. When ozone concentration is near to Ambient Air Standard value, γ is assessed to be equal to 6,57*10-7. High technique response provide possibility to determine ozone contents in the air media and the percentage of ozone, decomposed on the communication surfaces and on the surfaces of installation in the low concentration range (1–100 ppb.

  12. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  13. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Polymer Photonic Crystal Fibers with Metal Nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Quan Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A large-mode-area polymer photonic crystal fiber made of polymethyl methacrylate with the cladding having only one layer of air holes near the edge of the fiber is designed and proposed to be used in surface plasmon resonance sensors. In such sensor, a nanoscale metal film and analyte can be deposited on the outer side of the fiber instead of coating or filling in the holes of the conventional PCF, which make the real time detection with high sensitivity easily to realize. Moreover, it is relatively stable to changes of the amount and the diameter of air holes, which is very beneficial for sensor fabrication and sensing applications. Numerical simulation results show that under the conditions of the similar spectral and intensity sensitivity of 8.3 × 10−5–9.4 × 10−5 RIU, the confinement loss can be increased dramatically.

  15. Evaluation of Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage of Silicon Sensors for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Mikeštíková, Marcela; Št'astný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of different types of end-cap miniature n + -in- p strip sensors, ATLAS12A, were evaluated in Institute of Physics in Prague before and after proton and gamma irradiation. We report here on the bulk damage aspects, including the increase of leakage current and evaluation of the full depletion voltage and the surface damage, including the decrease of inter-strip resistance, changes in inter-strip capacitance and the effectiveness of punch-through protection structure. It was verified that different geometries of end-cap sensors do not influence their stability; the sensors should provide acceptable strip isolation and n ew gate PTP structure functions well even at the highest tested proton fluence 2× 10 15 n eq / cm 2

  16. Smell identification of spices using nanomechanical membrane-type surface stress sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Gaku; Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-11-01

    Artificial olfaction, that is, a chemical sensor system that identifies samples by smell, has not been fully achieved because of the complex perceptional mechanism of olfaction. To realize an artificial olfactory system, not only an array of chemical sensors but also a valid feature extraction method is required. In this study, we achieved the identification of spices by smell using nanomechanical membrane-type surface stress sensors (MSS). Features were extracted from the sensing signals obtained from four MSS coated with different types of polymers, focusing on the chemical interactions between polymers and odor molecules. The principal component analysis (PCA) of the dataset consisting of the extracted parameters demonstrated the separation of each spice on the scatter plot. We discuss the strategy for improving odor identification based on the relationship between the results of PCA and the chemical species in the odors.

  17. Integration of thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-03-09

    Passive and remote sensing technology has many potential applications in implantable devices, automation, or structural monitoring. In this paper, a tri-layer thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor with the maximum sensitivity of 16%/Oe and GMI ratio of 44% was combined with a two-port surface acoustic wave(SAW) transponder on a common substrate using standard microfabrication technology resulting in a fully integrated sensor for passive and remote operation. The implementation of the two devices has been optimized by on-chip matching circuits. The measurement results clearly show a magnetic field response at the input port of the SAW transponder that reflects the impedance change of the GMI sensor.

  18. Automatic monitoring of ecosystem structure and functions using integrated low-cost near surface sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Ryu, Y.; Jiang, C.; Hwang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Near surface sensors are able to acquire more reliable and detailed information with higher temporal resolution than satellite observations. Conventional near surface sensors usually work individually, and thus they require considerable manpower from data collection through information extraction and sharing. Recent advances of Internet of Things (IoT) provides unprecedented opportunities to integrate various low-cost sensors as an intelligent near surface observation system for monitoring ecosystem structure and functions. In this study, we developed a Smart Surface Sensing System (4S), which can automatically collect, transfer, process and analyze data, and then publish time series results on public-available website. The system is composed of micro-computer Raspberry pi, micro-controller Arduino, multi-spectral spectrometers made from Light Emitting Diode (LED), visible and near infrared cameras, and Internet module. All components are connected with each other and Raspberry pi intelligently controls the automatic data production chain. We did intensive tests and calibrations in-lab. Then, we conducted in-situ observations at a rice paddy field and a deciduous broadleaf forest. During the whole growth season, 4S obtained landscape images, spectral reflectance in red, green, blue, and near infrared, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR), and leaf area index (LAI) continuously. Also We compared 4S data with other independent measurements. NDVI obtained from 4S agreed well with Jaz hyperspectrometer at both diurnal and seasonal scales (R2 = 0.92, RMSE = 0.059), and 4S derived fPAR and LAI were comparable to LAI-2200 and destructive measurements in both magnitude and seasonal trajectory. We believe that the integrated low-cost near surface sensor could help research community monitoring ecosystem structure and functions closer and easier through a network system.

  19. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  20. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and temperature by the ball surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kazushi; Akao, Shingo; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Tsukahara, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture sensor with an amorphous silica sensitive film and realized wide-range measurement from 0.017 ppmv [a frost point (FP) of -99 °C] to 6.0 × 103 ppmv (0 °C FP). However, since the sensitivity of the sensor depends on the temperature, measurement results are disturbed when the temperature largely changes. To overcome this problem, we developed a method to simultaneously measure temperature and gas concentration using a ball SAW sensor. Temperature and concentration is derived by solving equations for the delay time change at two frequencies. When the temperature had a large jump, the delay time change was significantly disturbed, but the water concentration was almost correctly measured, by compensating the sensitivity change using measured temperature. The temperature measured by a ball SAW sensor will also be used to control the ball temperature. This method will make a ball SAW sensor reliable in environments of varying temperatures.

  2. Surface-type humidity sensor based on cellulose-PEPC for telemetry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, Kh. S.; Saleem, M.; Qasuria, T. A.; Farooq, M.

    2011-01-01

    Au/cellulose-PEPC/Au surface-type humidity sensors were fabricated by drop-casting cellulose and poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC) blend thin films. A blend of 2wt% of each cellulose and PEPC in benzol was used for the deposition of humidity sensing films. Blend films were deposited on glass substrates with preliminary deposited surface-type gold electrodes. Films of different thicknesses of cellulose and PEPC composite were deposited by drop-casting technique. A change in electrical resistance and capacitance of the fabricated devices was observed by increasing the relative humidity in the range of 0-95% RH. It was observed that the capacitances of the sensors increase, while their resistances decrease with increasing the relative humidity. The sensors were connected to op-amp square wave oscillators. It was observed that with increasing the relative humidity, the oscillator's frequencies were also increased in the range of 4.2-12.0 kHz for 65 μm thick film sample, 4.1-9.0 kHz for 88 μm thick film sample, and 4.2-9.0 kHz for 210 μm sample. Effects of film thickness on the oscillator's frequency with respect to humidity were also investigated. This polymer humidity sensor controlled oscillator can be used for short-range and long-range remote systems at environmental monitoring and assessment of the humidity level. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  4. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund, James B., E-mail: jim@jamessund.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Causey, Corey P. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Wolter, Scott D. [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Parker, Charles B., E-mail: charles.parker@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Toone, Eric J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance sensors a materials guide to design and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Leiva Casemiro; Thirstrup, Carsten; Neff, Helmut Franz

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the important physical phenomenon of Surface Plasmon Resonance or Surface Plasmon Polaritons in thin metal films, a phenomenon which is exploited in the design of a large variety of physico-chemical optical sensors. In this treatment, crucial materials aspects for design and optimization of SPR sensors are investigated and outlined in detail. The text covers the selection of nanometer thin metal films, ranging from free-electron to the platinum type conductors, along with their combination with a large variety of dielectric substrate materials, and associated individual layer and opto-geometric arrangements. Furthermore, as-yet hardly explored SPR features of selected metal–metal and metal–dielectric super lattices are included in this report. An in-depth multilayer Fresnel evaluation provides the mathematical tool for this optical analysis, which otherwise relies solely on experimentally determined electro-optical materials parameters.

  6. Fully-drawn carbon-based chemical sensors on organic and inorganic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kelvin M; Mirica, Katherine A; Walish, Joseph J; Swager, Timothy M

    2014-10-21

    Mechanical abrasion is an extremely simple, rapid, and low-cost method for deposition of carbon-based materials onto a substrate. However, the method is limited in throughput, precision, and surface compatibility for drawing conductive pathways. Selective patterning of surfaces using laser-etching can facilitate substantial improvements to address these current limitations for the abrasive deposition of carbon-based materials. This study demonstrates the successful on-demand fabrication of fully-drawn chemical sensors on a wide variety of substrates (e.g., weighing paper, polymethyl methacrylate, silicon, and adhesive tape) using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as sensing materials and graphite as electrodes. Mechanical mixing of SWCNTs with solid or liquid selectors yields sensors that can detect and discriminate parts-per-million (ppm) quantities of various nitrogen-containing vapors (pyridine, aniline, triethylamine).

  7. A variable pressure method for characterizing nanoparticle surface charge using pore sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Robert; Anderson, Will; Eldridge, James; Glossop, Ben; Willmott, Geoff

    2012-04-03

    A novel method using resistive pulse sensors for electrokinetic surface charge measurements of nanoparticles is presented. This method involves recording the particle blockade rate while the pressure applied across a pore sensor is varied. This applied pressure acts in a direction which opposes transport due to the combination of electro-osmosis, electrophoresis, and inherent pressure. The blockade rate reaches a minimum when the velocity of nanoparticles in the vicinity of the pore approaches zero, and the forces on typical nanoparticles are in equilibrium. The pressure applied at this minimum rate can be used to calculate the zeta potential of the nanoparticles. The efficacy of this variable pressure method was demonstrated for a range of carboxylated 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles with different surface charge densities. Results were of the same order as phase analysis light scattering (PALS) measurements. Unlike PALS results, the sequence of increasing zeta potential for different particle types agreed with conductometric titration.

  8. Detection of botulinum neurotoxins in buffer and hney using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ladd, J.; Taylor, A.; Homola, Jiří; Jiang, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 1 (2008), s. 129-134 ISSN 0925-4005 Grant - others:US FDA (US) FD-U-002250; National Science Foundation(US) CBET-0528605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje ; N - neverejné zdroje Keywords : surface plasmons * biosensors * toxicology Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2008

  9. Using Metal-Multilayer-Dielectric Structure to Increase Sensitivity of Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchenko, Svitlana G.; Lymarenko, Ruslan A.; Taranenko, Victor B.

    2017-04-01

    We propose using a specially designed metal-multilayer-dielectric structure deposited on glass substrate to enhance the evanescent field and improve the sensitivity of the surface plasmon resonance sensor. The proposed structure supports both hybrid plasmonic transverse magnetic modes and conventional waveguide transverse electric modes. We show numerically the significant enhancement of the evanescent field and improvement of the sensitivity for the waveguide transverse electric mode.

  10. Capability assessment and challenges for quantum technology gravity sensors for near surface terrestrial geophysical surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Daniel; Metje, Nicole; Tuckwell, George

    2017-11-01

    Geophysical surveying is widely used for the location of subsurface features. Current technology is limited in terms of its resolution (thus size of features it can detect) and penetration depth and a suitable technique is needed to bridge the gap between shallow near surface investigation using techniques such as EM conductivity mapping and GPR commonly used to map the upper 5 m below ground surface, and large features at greater depths detectable using conventional microgravity (> 5 m below ground surface). This will minimise the risks from unknown features buried in and conditions of the ground during civil engineering work. Quantum technology (QT) gravity sensors potentially offer a step-change in technology for locating features which lie outside of the currently detectable range in terms of size and depth, but that potential is currently unknown as field instruments have not been developed. To overcome this, a novel computer simulation was developed for a large range of different targets of interest. The simulation included realistic noise modelling of instrumental, environmental and location sources of noise which limit the accuracy of current microgravity measurements, in order to assess the potential capability of the new QT instruments in realistic situations and determine some of the likely limitations on their implementation. The results of the simulations for near surface features showed that the new technology is best employed in a gradiometer configuration as opposed to the traditional single sensor gravimeter used by current instruments due to the ability to suppress vibrational environmental noise effects due to common mode rejection between the sensors. A significant improvement in detection capability of 1.5-2 times was observed, putting targets such as mineshafts into the detectability zone which would be a major advantage for subsurface surveying. Thus this research, for the first time, has demonstrated clearly the benefits of QT gravity

  11. Numerical investigation into a surface plasmon resonance sensor based on optical fiber microring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunliu; Wang, Yanru; Wang, Dongning; Ding, Zhewen

    2017-06-01

    A reflective surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on optical fiber microring is proposed. In such a sensor, plasmons on the outer surface of the metallized channels containing analyte can be excited by a fundamental mode of a thin-core fiber (TCF). The refractive index (RI) sensing can be achieved as the surface plasmons are sensitive to changes in the refrective index of the analyte. Numerical simulation results show that the resonance spectrum shifts toward the shorter wavelength gradually when the analyte refractive index increases from 1.0 to 1.33, whereas it shifts toward the longer wavelength gradually when the analyte refractive index increases from 1.33 to 1.43, and there is a turning point at the refractive index value of 1.33. The highest sensitivity achieved is up to 2.30×103 nm/RIU near the refractive index value of 1.0. Such a compact sensor has potential in gaseous substance monitoring.

  12. Bidirectional fiber-wireless and fiber-VLLC transmission system based on an OEO-based BLS and a RSOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Han; Li, Chung-Yi; Lu, Ting-Chien; Wu, Chang-Jen; Chu, Chien-An; Shiva, Ajay; Mochii, Takao

    2016-02-01

    A bidirectional fiber-wireless and fiber-visible-laser-light-communication (VLLC) transmission system based on an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO)-based broadband light source (BLS) and a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Through an in-depth observation of such bidirectional fiber-wireless and fiber-VLLC transmission systems, good bit error rate performances are obtained over a 40 km single-mode fiber and a 10 m RF/optical wireless transport. Such a bidirectional fiber-wireless and fiber-VLLC transmission system is an attractive option for providing broadband integrated services.

  13. Comparison of E-coli O157 : H7 preparation methods used for detection with surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, A. D.; Yu, Q.; Chen, S.; Homola, Jiří; Jiang, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2005), s. 202-208 ISSN 0925-4005. [European Conference on Optical Chemical Sensors and Biosensors EUROPT(R)ODE /7./. Madrid, 04.04.2004-07.04.2004] Grant - others:US FDA(US) FD-U-002250 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : biosensors * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.646, year: 2005

  14. Shock tunnel measurements of surface pressures in shock induced separated flow field using MEMS sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, R; Jagadeesh, G; Ram, S N; Hegde, G M; Nayak, M M

    2015-01-01

    Characterized not just by high Mach numbers, but also high flow total enthalpies—often accompanied by dissociation and ionization of flowing gas itself—the experimental simulation of hypersonic flows requires impulse facilities like shock tunnels. However, shock tunnel simulation imposes challenges and restrictions on the flow diagnostics, not just because of the possible extreme flow conditions, but also the short run times—typically around 1 ms. The development, calibration and application of fast response MEMS sensors for surface pressure measurements in IISc hypersonic shock tunnel HST-2, with a typical test time of 600 μs, for the complex flow field of strong (impinging) shock boundary layer interaction with separation close to the leading edge, is delineated in this paper. For Mach numbers 5.96 (total enthalpy 1.3 MJ kg −1 ) and 8.67 (total enthalpy 1.6 MJ kg −1 ), surface pressures ranging from around 200 Pa to 50 000 Pa, in various regions of the flow field, are measured using the MEMS sensors. The measurements are found to compare well with the measurements using commercial sensors. It was possible to resolve important regions of the flow field involving significant spatial gradients of pressure, with a resolution of 5 data points within 12 mm in each MEMS array, which cannot be achieved with the other commercial sensors. In particular, MEMS sensors enabled the measurement of separation pressure (at Mach 8.67) near the leading edge and the sharply varying pressure in the reattachment zone. (paper)

  15. A Gaussian Process Data Modelling and Maximum Likelihood Data Fusion Method for Multi-Sensor CMM Measurement of Freeform Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of freeform surfaces in various functional applications has become more widespread. Multi-sensor coordinate measuring machines (CMMs are becoming popular and are produced by many CMM manufacturers since their measurement ability can be significantly improved with the help of different kinds of sensors. Moreover, the measurement accuracy after data fusion for multiple sensors can be improved. However, the improvement is affected by many issues in practice, especially when the measurement results have bias and there exists uncertainty regarding the data modelling method. This paper proposes a generic data modelling and data fusion method for the measurement of freeform surfaces using multi-sensor CMMs and attempts to study the factors which affect the fusion result. Based on the data modelling method for the original measurement datasets and the statistical Bayesian inference data fusion method, this paper presents a Gaussian process data modelling and maximum likelihood data fusion method for supporting multi-sensor CMM measurement of freeform surfaces. The datasets from different sensors are firstly modelled with the Gaussian process to obtain the mean surfaces and covariance surfaces, which represent the underlying surfaces and associated measurement uncertainties. Hence, the mean surfaces and the covariance surfaces are fused together with the maximum likelihood principle so as to obtain the statistically best estimated underlying surface and associated measurement uncertainty. With this fusion method, the overall measurement uncertainty after fusion is smaller than each of the single-sensor measurements. The capability of the proposed method is demonstrated through a series of simulations and real measurements of freeform surfaces on a multi-sensor CMM. The accuracy of the Gaussian process data modelling and the influence of the form error and measurement noise are also discussed and demonstrated in a series of experiments

  16. Application of a Saddle-Type Eddy Current Sensor in Steel Ball Surface-Defect Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huayu; Zhong, Mingming; Xie, Fengqin; Cao, Maoyong

    2017-12-05

    Steel ball surface-defect inspection was performed by using a new saddle-type eddy current sensor (SECS), which included a saddle coil and a signal conditioning circuit. The saddle coil was directly wound on the steel ball's outer bracket in a semi-circumferential direction. Driven by a friction wheel, the test steel ball rotated in a one-dimensional direction, such that the steel ball surface was fully scanned by the SECS. There were two purposes for using the SECS in the steel ball inspection system: one was to reduce the complexity of the unfolding wheel of the surface deployment mechanism, and the other was to reduce the difficulty of sensor processing and installation. Experiments were carried out on bearing steel balls in diameter of 8 mm with three types of representative and typical defects by using the SECS, and the results showed that the inspection system can detect surface defects as small as 0.05 mm in width and 0.1 mm in depth with high-repetition detection accuracy, and the detection efficiency of 5 pcs/s, which meet the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 10 bearing steel balls. The feasibility of detecting steel ball surface defects by SECS was verified.

  17. Fabrication of surface plasmon resonance sensor surface with control of the nonspecific adsorption and affinity for the detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene using an antifouling copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eYatabe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor using a hydrophilic polymer for the highly sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. The hydrophilic polymer was made from mono-2-(methacryloyloxyethylsuccinate (MES and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP. The detection of TNT was carried out by displacement assay with the SPR measurement. In displacement assay, the affinity between anti-TNT antibody and the sensor surface, affects to the sensitivity. In the SPR measurement, nonspecific adsorption should be controlled because SPR sensor cannot discriminate between specific and nonspecific adsorption. Therefore, the affinity and nonspecific adsorption were controlled by changing the ratio of HEMA to MES. A detection limit of 0.4 ng/ml (ppb for TNT was achieved using a sensor surface with the lowest affinity without nonspecific adsorption.

  18. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry - Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, James B.; Causey, Corey P.; Wolter, Scott D.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Toone, Eric J.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-05-01

    The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen-oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Surface biofunctionalization and production of miniaturized sensor structures using aerosol printing technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, Ingo; Groth, Esther; Wirth, Ingo; Schumacher, Julian; Maiwald, Marcus; Zoellmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this paper demonstrates that very small protein and DNA structures can be applied to various substrates without denaturation using aerosol printing technology. This technology allows high-resolution deposition of various nanoscaled metal and biological suspensions. Before printing, metal and biological suspensions were formulated and then nebulized to form an aerosol which is aerodynamically focused on the printing module of the system in order to achieve precise structuring of the nanoscale material on a substrate. In this way, it is possible to focus the aerosol stream at a distance of about 5 mm from the printhead to the surface. This technology is useful for printing fluorescence-marked proteins and printing enzymes without affecting their biological activity. Furthermore, higher molecular weight DNA can be printed without shearing. The advantages, such as printing on complex, non-planar 3D structured surfaces, and disadvantages of the aerosol printing technology are also discussed and are compared with other printing technologies. In addition, miniaturized sensor structures with line thicknesses in the range of a few micrometers are fabricated by applying a silver sensor structure to glass. After sintering using an integrated laser or in an oven process, electrical conductivity is achieved within the sensor structure. Finally, we printed BSA in small micrometre-sized areas within the sensor structure using the same deposition system. The aerosol printing technology combined with material development offers great advantages for future-oriented applications involving biological surface functionalization on small areas. This is important for innovative biomedical micro-device development and for production solutions which bridge the disciplines of biology and electronics.

  20. Rough-Surface-Enabled Capacitive Pressure Sensors with 3D Touch Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kilsoo; Lee, Jaehong; Kim, Gwangmook; Kim, Youngjae; Kang, Subin; Cho, Sungjun; Kim, SeulGee; Kim, Jae-Kang; Lee, Wooyoung; Kim, Dae-Eun; Kang, Shinill; Kim, DaeEun; Lee, Taeyoon; Shim, Wooyoung

    2017-11-01

    Fabrication strategies that pursue "simplicity" for the production process and "functionality" for a device, in general, are mutually exclusive. Therefore, strategies that are less expensive, less equipment-intensive, and consequently, more accessible to researchers for the realization of omnipresent electronics are required. Here, this study presents a conceptually different approach that utilizes the inartificial design of the surface roughness of paper to realize a capacitive pressure sensor with high performance compared with sensors produced using costly microfabrication processes. This study utilizes a writing activity with a pencil and paper, which enables the construction of a fundamental capacitor that can be used as a flexible capacitive pressure sensor with high pressure sensitivity and short response time and that it can be inexpensively fabricated over large areas. Furthermore, the paper-based pressure sensors are integrated into a fully functional 3D touch-pad device, which is a step toward the realization of omnipresent electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High-precision micro-displacement optical-fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zongda; Liu, Lu; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yaxun

    2017-05-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel optical-fiber micro-displacement sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) by fabricating a Kretschmann configuration on graded-index multimode fiber (GIMMF). We employ a single-mode fiber to change the radial position of the incident beam as the displacement. In the GIMMF, the angle between the light beam and fiber axis, which is closely related to the resonance angle, is changed by the displacement; thus, the resonance wavelength of the fiber SPR shifts. This micro-displacement fiber sensor has a wide detection range of 0-25 μm, a high sensitivity with maximum up to 10.32 nm/μm, and a nanometer resolution with minimum to 2 nm, which transcends almost all of other optical-fiber micro-displacement sensors. In addition, we also research that increasing the fiber polishing angle or medium refractive index can improve the sensitivity. This micro-displacement sensor will have a great significance in many industrial applications and provide a neoteric, rapid, and accurate optical measurement method in micro-displacement.

  2. An Exposed-Core Grapefruit Fibers Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianchao Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of air hole coating and analyte filling in microstructured optical fiber-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors, we designed an exposed-core grapefruit fiber (EC-GFs-based SPR sensor. The exposed section of the EC-GF is coated with a SPR, supporting thin silver film, which can sense the analyte in the external environment. The asymmetrically coated fiber can support two separate resonance peaks (x- and y-polarized peaks with orthogonal polarizations and x-polarized peak, providing a much higher peak loss than y-polarized, also the x-polarized peak has higher wavelength and amplitude sensitivities. A large analyte refractive index (RI range from 1.33 to 1.42 is calculated to investigate the sensing performance of the sensor, and an extremely high wavelength sensitivity of 13,500 nm/refractive index unit (RIU is obtained. The silver layer thickness, which may affect the sensing performance, is also discussed. This work can provide a reference for developing a high sensitivity, real-time, fast-response, and distributed SPR RI sensor.

  3. Square array photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Yang, Xu; Zhao, Bingyue; Hou, Jingyun; Shum, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), a novel refractive index (RI) sensor comprising a square photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is proposed to realize the detection of the annular analyte. Instead of hexagon structure, four large air-holes in a square array are introduced to enhance the sensitivity by allowing two polarization directions of the core mode to be more sensitive. The gold is used as the only plasmonic material. The design purpose is to reduce the difficulty in gold deposition and enhance the RI sensitivity. The guiding properties and the effects of the parameters on the performance of the sensor are numerically investigated by the Finite Element Method (FEM). By optimizing the structure, the sensor can exhibit remarkable sensitivity up to 7250 nm/RIU and resolution of 1.0638 × 10‑5 RIU with only one plasmonic material, which is very competitive compared with the other reported externally coated and single-layer coated PCF-based SPR (PCF-SPR) sensors, to our best knowledge.

  4. Detection of biomolecules in complex media using surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Michael R.; Masson, Jean-Francois; Barhnart, Margaret; Beaudoin, Stephen; Booksh, Karl S.

    2005-11-01

    Detection of multiple biologically relevant molecules was accomplished at sub-ng/mL levels in highly fouling media using fiber- optic based surface plasmon resonance sensors. Myocardial infarction markers, myoglobin and cTnI, were quantified in full serum with limits of detection below 1 ng/mL. Biologically relevant levels are between 15-30 ng/mL and 1-5 ng/mL for myoglobin and cTnI respectively. Cytokines involved in chronic wound healing, Interleukin 1, Interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor α, were detected at around 1 ng/mL in cell culture media. Preliminary results in monitoring these cytokines in cell cultures expressing the cytokines were obtained. The protein diagnostic of spinal muscular atrophy, survival motor neuron protein, was quantified from cell lysate. To obtain such results in complex media, the sensor's stability to non-specific protein adsorption had to be optimized. A layer of the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid is attached to the sensor. This layer optimizes the antibody attachment to the sensor while minimizing the non-specific signal from serum proteins.

  5. Surface Crack Detection in Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipes Using BOTDA Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural deterioration after a period of service can induce the failure of prestressed concrete cylinder pipes (PCCPs, with microcracks in the coating leading to the corrosion of the prestressed wires. In this paper, we propose the use of Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA strain sensors for detecting the onset of microcracking in PCCP coating: the BOTDA strain sensors are mounted on the surface of the PCCP, and distributed strain measurements are employed to assess the cracks in the mortar coating and the structural state of the pipe. To validate the feasibility of the proposed approach, experimental investigations were conducted on a prototype PCCP segment, wherein the inner pressure was gradually increased to 1.6 MPa. Two types of BOTDA strain sensors—the steel wire packaged fiber optic sensor and the polyelastic packaged fiber optic sensor—were employed in the experiments. The experimental distributed measurements agreed well with the finite element computations, evidencing that the investigated strain sensors are sensitive to localized deterioration behaviors such as PCCP microcracking.

  6. Semi-continuous, real-time monitoring of protein biomarker using a recyclable surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyung; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Paek, Sung-Ho; Cho, Hyun-Mo; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2017-02-15

    Although label-free immunosensors based on, for example, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) provide advantages of real-time monitoring of the analyte concentration, its application to routine clinical analysis in a semi-continuous manner is problematic because of the high cost of the sensor chip. The sensor chip is in most cases regenerated by employing an acidic pH. However, this causes gradual deterioration of the activity of the capture antibody immobilized on the sensor surface. To use sensor chips repeatedly, we investigated a novel surface modification method that enables regeneration of the sensor surface under mild conditions. We introduced a monoclonal antibody (anti-CBP Ab) that detects the conformational change in calcium binding protein (CBP) upon Ca 2+ binding (>1mM). To construct a regenerable SPR-based immunosensor, anti-CBP Ab was first immobilized on the sensor surface, and CBP conjugated to the capture antibody (specific for creatine kinase-MB isoform (CK-MB); CBP-CAb) then bound in the presence of Ca 2+ . A serum sample was mixed with the detection antibody to CK-MB, which generated an SPR signal proportional to the analyte concentration. After each analysis, the sensor surface was regenerated using medium (pH 7) without Ca 2+ , and then adding fresh CBP-CAb in the presence of Ca 2+ for the subsequent analysis. Analysis of multiple samples using the same sensor was reproducible at a rate >98.7%. The dose-response curve was linear for 1.75-500.75ng/mL CK-MB, with an acceptable coefficient of variation of 96%), and exhibited analytical stability for 1 month. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a renewal of a sensor surface with fresh antibody after each analysis, providing high consistency in the assay during a long-term use (e.g., a month at least). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Automatic centroid detection and surface measurement with a digital Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Zhao, Liping; Li, Xiang; Fang, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    With the breakthrough of manufacturing technologies, the measurement of surface profiles is becoming a big issue. A Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) provides a promising technology for non-contact surface measurement with a number of advantages over interferometry. The SHWS splits the incident wavefront into many subsections and transfers the distorted wavefront detection into the centroid measurement. So the accuracy of the centroid measurement determines the accuracy of the SHWS. In this paper, we have presented a new centroid measurement algorithm based on an adaptive thresholding and dynamic windowing method by utilizing image-processing techniques. Based on this centroid detection method, we have developed a digital SHWS system which can automatically detect centroids of focal spots, reconstruct the wavefront and measure the 3D profile of the surface. The system has been tested with various simulated and real surfaces such as flat surfaces, spherical and aspherical surfaces as well as deformable surfaces. The experimental results demonstrate that the system has good accuracy, repeatability and immunity to optical misalignment. The system is also suitable for on-line applications of surface measurement

  8. Biomolecular Nano-Flow-Sensor to Measure Near-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noji Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that the measurement of the near-surface flow at the interface between a liquid and solid using a 10 nm-sized biomolecular motor of F1-ATPase as a nano-flow-sensor. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic test-bed chip to precisely control the liquid flow acting on the F1-ATPase. In order to visualize the rotation of F1-ATPase, several hundreds nanometer-sized particle was immobilized at the rotational axis of F1-ATPase to enhance the rotation to be detected by optical microscopy. The rotational motion of F1-ATPase, which was immobilized on an inner surface of the test-bed chip, was measured to obtain the correlation between the near-surface flow and the rotation speed of F1-ATPase. As a result, we obtained the relationship that the rotation speed of F1-ATPase was linearly decelerated with increasing flow velocity. The mechanism of the correlation between the rotation speed and the near-surface flow remains unclear, however the concept to use biomolecule as a nano-flow-sensor was proofed successfully. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9479-3 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  9. Sensitivity enhancement of a surface plasmon resonance sensor using porous metamaterial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherifi, Abdellatif; Bouhafs, Benamar

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device with two porous left handed metamaterial (LHM) layers separated by an insulator gap, is investigated. The effect of the insulator gap thickness and its refractive index (RI) on the angular response of the device is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the SPR sensor is enhanced compared to the standard SPR sensors. Here, the multilayer structure is probed with 738 nm-wavelength, and electromagnetic properties of active porous LHM layers are described from the effective medium theory (EMT). Furthermore, in the increase of the porosity from 0 to 0.6, the designed nanocavity exhibits a fundamental SPR mode long-range (LR) type and it can be of interest in high-performance SPR sensing.

  10. Discriminating crop, weeds and soil surface with a terrestrial LIDAR sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Moreno, Hugo; Rosell-Polo, Joan Ramón; Escolá, Alexandre; Valero, Constantino; Gerhards, Roland; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José; Griepentrog, Hans-Werner

    2013-10-29

    In this study, the evaluation of the accuracy and performance of a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor for vegetation using distance and reflection measurements aiming to detect and discriminate maize plants and weeds from soil surface was done. The study continues a previous work carried out in a maize field in Spain with a LIDAR sensor using exclusively one index, the height profile. The current system uses a combination of the two mentioned indexes. The experiment was carried out in a maize field at growth stage 12-14, at 16 different locations selected to represent the widest possible density of three weeds: Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) P.Beauv., Lamium purpureum L., Galium aparine L.and Veronica persica Poir.. A terrestrial LIDAR sensor was mounted on a tripod pointing to the inter-row area, with its horizontal axis and the field of view pointing vertically downwards to the ground, scanning a vertical plane with the potential presence of vegetation. Immediately after the LIDAR data acquisition (distances and reflection measurements), actual heights of plants were estimated using an appropriate methodology. For that purpose, digital images were taken of each sampled area. Data showed a high correlation between LIDAR measured height and actual plant heights (R2 = 0.75). Binary logistic regression between weed presence/absence and the sensor readings (LIDAR height and reflection values) was used to validate the accuracy of the sensor. This permitted the discrimination of vegetation from the ground with an accuracy of up to 95%. In addition, a Canonical Discrimination Analysis (CDA) was able to discriminate mostly between soil and vegetation and, to a far lesser extent, between crop and weeds. The studied methodology arises as a good system for weed detection, which in combination with other principles, such as vision-based technologies, could improve the efficiency and accuracy of herbicide spraying.

  11. Implementation of a multi-modal mobile sensor system for surface and subsurface assessment of roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Birken, Ralf; Shahini Shamsabadi, Salar

    2015-03-01

    There are more than 4 million miles of roads and 600,000 bridges in the United States alone. On-going investments are required to maintain the physical and operational quality of these assets to ensure public's safety and prosperity of the economy. Planning efficient maintenance and repair (M&R) operations must be armed with a meticulous pavement inspection method that is non-disruptive, is affordable and requires minimum manual effort. The Versatile Onboard Traffic Embedded Roaming Sensors (VOTERS) project developed a technology able to cost- effectively monitor the condition of roadway systems to plan for the right repairs, in the right place, at the right time. VOTERS technology consists of an affordable, lightweight package of multi-modal sensor systems including acoustic, optical, electromagnetic, and GPS sensors. Vehicles outfitted with this technology would be capable of collecting information on a variety of pavement-related characteristics at both surface and subsurface levels as they are driven. By correlating the sensors' outputs with the positioning data collected in tight time synchronization, a GIS-based control center attaches a spatial component to all the sensors' measurements and delivers multiple ratings of the pavement every meter. These spatially indexed ratings are then leveraged by VOTERS decision making modules to plan the optimum M&R operations and predict the future budget needs. In 2014, VOTERS inspection results were validated by comparing them to the outputs of recent professionally done condition surveys of a local engineering firm for 300 miles of Massachusetts roads. Success of the VOTERS project portrays rapid, intelligent, and comprehensive evaluation of tomorrow's transportation infrastructure to increase public's safety, vitalize the economy, and deter catastrophic failures.

  12. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas

  13. Tunnel junction sensors for HCI-surface measurements at low kinetic energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, J. M.; Lake, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, we have developed and deployed the capability to make and use tunnel junctions sensors (TJS) as extremely sensitive tools for the measurement of surface nanofeatures created by particle-surface interactions. The focus of our interest has been highly charged ion (HCI) produced nanofeatures, which we are able to produce in situ due to a direct vacuum connection to the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Using these sensors, we make systematic studies of the role of the charge state on the size of features created by HCIs and connect those measurements to the stopping power. Recently we have begun to study reduced velocities at a fixed charge state for which little previous theoretical or experimental work has been done. Due to many technical improvements that have been made to our methods, we offer a contemporary summary of the TJS fabrication and HCI irradiation method. Further, we present early experimental results showing increased surface damage when Xe41+ is extracted at ≈4.6 kV in comparison with ≈8.1 kV.

  14. Tunnel junction sensors for HCI-surface measurements at low kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, J.M., E-mail: joshua.pomeroy@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Lake, R.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In recent years, we have developed and deployed the capability to make and use tunnel junctions sensors (TJS) as extremely sensitive tools for the measurement of surface nanofeatures created by particle-surface interactions. The focus of our interest has been highly charged ion (HCI) produced nanofeatures, which we are able to produce in situ due to a direct vacuum connection to the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Using these sensors, we make systematic studies of the role of the charge state on the size of features created by HCIs and connect those measurements to the stopping power. Recently we have begun to study reduced velocities at a fixed charge state for which little previous theoretical or experimental work has been done. Due to many technical improvements that have been made to our methods, we offer a contemporary summary of the TJS fabrication and HCI irradiation method. Further, we present early experimental results showing increased surface damage when Xe{sup 41+} is extracted at ≈4.6 kV in comparison with ≈8.1 kV.

  15. Tunnel junction sensors for HCI-surface measurements at low kinetic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomeroy, J.M.; Lake, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed and deployed the capability to make and use tunnel junctions sensors (TJS) as extremely sensitive tools for the measurement of surface nanofeatures created by particle-surface interactions. The focus of our interest has been highly charged ion (HCI) produced nanofeatures, which we are able to produce in situ due to a direct vacuum connection to the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Using these sensors, we make systematic studies of the role of the charge state on the size of features created by HCIs and connect those measurements to the stopping power. Recently we have begun to study reduced velocities at a fixed charge state for which little previous theoretical or experimental work has been done. Due to many technical improvements that have been made to our methods, we offer a contemporary summary of the TJS fabrication and HCI irradiation method. Further, we present early experimental results showing increased surface damage when Xe 41+ is extracted at ≈4.6 kV in comparison with ≈8.1 kV

  16. Compliment Graphene Oxide Coating on Silk Fiber Surface via Electrostatic Force for Capacitive Humidity Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kook In; Kim, Seungdu; Lee, In Gyu; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Jung-Ha; Hong, Suck Won; Cho, Byung Jin; Hwang, Wan Sik

    2017-02-19

    Cylindrical silk fiber (SF) was coated with Graphene oxide (GO) for capacitive humidity sensor applications. Negatively charged GO in the solution was attracted to the positively charged SF surface via electrostatic force without any help from adhesive intermediates. The magnitude of the positively charged SF surface was controlled through the static electricity charges created on the SF surface. The GO coating ability on the SF improved as the SF's positive charge increased. The GO-coated SFs at various conditions were characterized using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Raman spectroscopy, and LCR meter. Unlike the intact SF, the GO-coated SF showed clear response-recovery behavior and well-behaved repeatability when it was exposed to 20% relative humidity (RH) and 90% RH alternatively in a capacitive mode. This approach allows humidity sensors to take advantage of GO's excellent sensing properties and SF's flexibility, expediting the production of flexible, low power consumption devices at relatively low costs.

  17. Compliment Graphene Oxide Coating on Silk Fiber Surface via Electrostatic Force for Capacitive Humidity Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kook In Han

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical silk fiber (SF was coated with Graphene oxide (GO for capacitive humidity sensor applications. Negatively charged GO in the solution was attracted to the positively charged SF surface via electrostatic force without any help from adhesive intermediates. The magnitude of the positively charged SF surface was controlled through the static electricity charges created on the SF surface. The GO coating ability on the SF improved as the SF’s positive charge increased. The GO-coated SFs at various conditions were characterized using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, Raman spectroscopy, and LCR meter. Unlike the intact SF, the GO-coated SF showed clear response-recovery behavior and well-behaved repeatability when it was exposed to 20% relative humidity (RH and 90% RH alternatively in a capacitive mode. This approach allows humidity sensors to take advantage of GO’s excellent sensing properties and SF’s flexibility, expediting the production of flexible, low power consumption devices at relatively low costs.

  18. Modelling of the surface plasmon resonance waveguide sensor with Bragg grating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čtyroký, Jiří; Abdelmalek, F.; Ecke, W.; Usbeck, K.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 31, 9/10 (1999), s. 927-941 ISSN 0306-8919. [Optical waveguide theory and numerical modelling. Hagen, 18.09.1998-19.09.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/96/1561 Grant - others:EU COST(XE) OC 240.10; EU COST(XE) OC 268.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : Bragg gratings * optical waveguide theory * surface plasmon resonance * optical sensors * optical waveguides Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.876, year: 1999

  19. Smart Sensor Based Obstacle Detection for High-Speed Unmanned Surface Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Dan; Galeazzi, Roberto; Andersen, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an obstacle detection system for a high-speed and agile unmanned surface vehicle (USV), running at speeds up to 30 m/s. The aim is a real-time and high performance obstacle detection system using both radar and vision technologies to detect obstacles within a range of 175 m....... A computer vision horizon detector enables a highly accurate attitude estimation despite large and sudden vehicle accelerations. This further facilitates the reduction of sea clutter by utilising a attitude based statistical measure. Full scale sea trials show a significant increase in obstacle tracking...... performance using sensor fusion of radar and computer vision....

  20. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  1. Flexible surface acoustic wave respiration sensor for monitoring obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao; Tao, Xiang; Dong, Shurong; Qin, Yiheng; Yu, Liyang; Luo, Jikui; Deen, M. Jamal

    2017-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has received much attention in recent years due to its significant harm to human health and high morbidity rate. A respiration monitoring system is needed to detect OSAS, so that the patient can receive treatment in a timely manner. Wired and wireless OSAS monitoring systems have been developed, but they require a wire connection and batteries to operate, and they are bulky, heavy and not user-friendly. In this paper, we propose the use of a flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW) microsensor to detect and monitor OSAS by measuring the humidity change associated with the respiration of a person. SAW sensors on rigid 128° YX LiNbO3 substrate are also characterized for this application. Results show both types of SAW sensors are suitable for OSAS monitoring with good sensitivity, repeatability and reliability, and the response time and recovery time for the flexible SAW sensors are 1.125 and 0.75 s, respectively. Our work demonstrates the potential for an innovative flexible microsensor for the detection and monitoring of OSAS.

  2. Re-thinking surface enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors with a systems perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ian M.

    2017-02-01

    While surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) may not compete with the standard central lab approaches for chemical and biological sensing, SERS may have the potential to provide unique capabilities for analytics away from the central lab. Raman spectrometers have evolved from benchtop systems to high-performing handheld instruments that are compatible with analysis of samples in the field. However, for SERS to truly succeed as a "point-of-sample" analytical technique, the SERS sensor must fit the needs of analysis in the field, including little or no sample preparation, minimal peripheral equipment, and ease of use. Traditional plasmonically-active rigid devices do not meet these requirements. Even microfluidic SERS devices generally are not compatible with point-of-sample analysis, as the "world-to-chip" interface presents challenges, and peripheral equipment is generally required. In this review we will discuss the advances in plasmonic substrates fabricated on porous membranes, leading to SERS sensors that can collect samples via swabbing or dipping, clean up samples through separation, concentrate analytes by lateral flow focusing, and avoid the need for peripheral equipment. In particular, we will focus on inkjet-fabricated devices, which may present the best opportunity for scale-up via roll-to-roll manufacturing. We will also discuss the directions that flexible SERS sensors are moving the field, such as simple fabrication techniques, new support materials, SERS swabs, and SERS-active tapes and films.

  3. The sensitivity of surface polaritons in LHM-antiferromagnetic waveguide sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khozondar, Hala J., E-mail: hkhozondar@iugaza.edu [Electrical Engineering Department, Islamic University, P.O.Box 108, Gaza, Palestine (Country Unknown); Al-Sahhar, Zeyad I., E-mail: z_alsahhar@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Al-Aqsa University, Gaza, Palestine (Country Unknown); Shabat, Mohamad M., E-mail: shabat@iugaza.edu.ps [Physics Department, Islamic University, Gaza, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2014-11-15

    A three-layer waveguide structure sensor consisting of LHMs film surrounded by dielectric cladding and antiferromagnetic substrate is proposed. Left-handed materials (LHMs) known as Metamaterials (MTMs) have simultaneous negative permeability and permittivity. The dispersion relation for the structure is derived for TE modes only. The sensitivity is calculated for surface waves at the interface between LHM film and dielectric layer. Two ranges of frequencies are chosen such that the Voigt permeability, μ{sub v}, is either negative or positive. The sensitivity is proven to be affected by different parameters including the film thickness, LHM parameters, and Voigt permittivity. The results show that the proposed structure is sensitive to small changes in the cladding indicating that the structure is working as a sensor with high sensitivity. The parameters at which maximum sensitivity occur are obtained. - Highlights: • The homogenous sensitivity is used to measure the sensitivity of the structure. • Sensitivity changes as the value of Voigt permittivity, μ{sub v}, changes sign. • The sensitivity is affected by the film thickness and the LHM parameters. • The three-layered sensor has high sensitivity and compact structure. • The parameters at which we achieved maximum sensitivity are obtained.

  4. Optical monitoring of surface anchoring changes for nematic liquid crystal based chemical and biological sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yang

    In this dissertation, optically monitoring the surface anchoring changes of liquid crystal (LC) due to the chemical or biological bindings is presented. The deformation of LC director with different anchoring energies is simulated using Finite Element Method and continuum theory of nematic LC. The optical properties of the LC film are simulated using the Finite Difference Time Domain method. First, the interference color method was used to monitor the anchoring change. The calculated and experimental interference colors of liquid crystal films due to the optical retardation of two orthogonal electromagnetic components at different surface anchoring conditions and applied voltages are studied. The calculated colors were converted into sRGB parameters so that the corresponding colors can be displayed on a color computer monitor and printed out on a color printer. A gold micro-structure was fabricated and used to control the optical retardation. Polarizing micrographs were collected and compared with the calculated colors. Second, the influence of a bias voltage on the surface-driven orientational transition of liquid crystals resulted from the weakening anchoring and anchoring transition is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The same interdigitated Au micro-structure was used in the nematic LC based chemical and biological sensors. With a suitable bias electric field, the process of the weakening anchoring energy and the uniform surface-driven orientational transition due to targeted molecules binding to a functionalized surface were observed optically. Finally, measurement of optical transmission was used to monitor the anchoring change. Polarizing micrographs were collected and compared with simulated textures. Experimental and simulation results both demonstrate the optical method can effectively monitor the surface anchoring change due to the presence of targeted analytes. These results show that these optical techniques are suitable for LC based sensing

  5. Single-molecule characterization and engineering of the surfaces of nucleic acid sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Eric Alan

    The advent of personalized medicine will require biosensors capable of reliably detecting small levels of disease biomarkers. In microarrays and sensors for nucleic acids, hybridization events between surface-tethered DNA probes and the nucleic acids of interest (targets) are transduced into a detectable signal. However, target-binding ultimately occurs as a result of molecular motions and interactions between the probe and target at the nanometer scale, and common characterization methods either lack the resolution to characterize the sensors at this scale or provide only limited information about their interactions with their nanoscale chemical environment. In this dissertation I argue that an impediment to the development of more reliable and practical biosensors is the lack of knowledge and control of the nanometer length-scale structure of biosensor surfaces, which has a profound impact on molecular recognition and reactions for detection. After reviewing the fundamental surface chemistry and structural motifs of biosensors in Chapter 1, in Chapter 2 I use electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) to characterize in situ a common class of model nucleic acid sensors---thiolated DNA attached to a gold electrode which has been passivated by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer---with single-molecule resolution. This level of detail allows me to observe both the conformations of individual probes and their spatial distribution at the nanoscale, then determine how these are affected by assembly conditions, probe structure, and interactions with co-adsorbates. I also determine how these nanoscale details affect the dynamic response of probes to electric fields, which have been commonly used in sensing schemes, and ultimately the ability of the surface-tethered probes to bind with target nucleic acids. In Chapter 3, I demonstrate and optimize the nanoscale patterning of individual DNA molecules into isolated, chemically well-defined niches on the surface

  6. A low-cost, orientation-insensitive microwave water-cut sensor printed on a pipe surface

    KAUST Repository

    Karimi, Muhammad Akram

    2017-10-24

    This paper presents a novel and contactless water fraction (also known as water cut) measurement technique, which is independent of geometric distribution of oil and water inside the pipe. The sensor is based upon a modified dual helical stub resonators implemented directly on the pipe\\'s outer surface and whose resonance frequency decreases by increasing the water content in oil. The E-fields have been made to rotate and distribute well inside the pipe, despite having narrow and curved ground plane. It makes the sensor\\'s reading dependent only on the water fraction and not on the mixture distribution inside the pipe. That is why, the presented design does not require any flow conditioner to homogenize the oil/water mixture unlike many commercial WC sensors. The presented sensor has been realized by using extremely low cost methods of screen-printing and reusable 3D printed mask. Complete characterization of the proposed WC sensor, both in horizontal and vertical orientations, has been carried out in an industrial flow loop. Excellent repeatability of the sensor\\'s response has been observed under different flow conditions. The measured performance results of the sensor show full range accuracy of ±2-3% while tested under random orientations and wide range of flow rates.

  7. Optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for rapid detection of avian influenza virus subtype H6: Initial studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xihong; Tsao, Yu-Chia; Lee, Fu-Jung; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Wang, Ching-Ho; Chuang, Tsung-Liang; Wu, Mu-Shiang; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2016-07-01

    A side-polished fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was fabricated to expose the core surface and then deposited with a 40 nm thin gold film for the near surface sensing of effective refractive index changes with surface concentration or thickness of captured avian influenza virus subtype H6. The detection surface of the SPR optical fiber sensor was prepared through the plasma modification method for binding a self-assembled monolayer of isopropanol chemically on the gold surface of the optical fiber. Subsequently, N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide was activated to enable EB2-B3 monoclonal antibodies to capture A/chicken/Taiwan/2838V/00 (H6N1) through a flow injection system. The detection limit of the fabricated optical fiber sensor for A/chicken/Taiwan/2838V/00 was 5.14 × 10(5) EID50/0.1 mL, and the response time was 10 min on average. Moreover, the fiber optic sensor has the advantages of a compact size and low cost, thus rendering it suitable for online and remote sensing. The results indicated that the optical fiber sensor can be used for epidemiological surveillance and diagnosing of avian influenza subtype H6 rapidly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface Electromyographic Sensor for Human Motion Estimation Based on Arm Wrestling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen GAO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the surface electromyographic (EMG sensor is developed to acquire the EMG signals from the upper limb when the participants compete with the arm wrestling robot (AWR which is fabricated to play arm wrestling game with human on a table with pegs for entertainment and human motion modeling of upper limbs muscle. As the EMG signal is a measurement of the anatomical and physiological characteristic of the specific muscle, the macroscopical movement patterns of the human body can be classified and recognized. The high-frequency noises are eliminated effectively and the characteristics of EMG signals can be extracted through wavelet packet transformation. Auto-regressive model of EMG is conducted to effectively simulate the stochastic time sequences with a series of auto-regressive coefficients. The win/lose pattern is recognized by neural network based on extracted characteristics of surface EMG signal.

  9. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW device is investigated through finite element method (FEM simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  10. A high-performance lab-on-a-chip liquid sensor employing surface acoustic wave resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustanovich, K.; Yantchev, V.; Kirejev, V.; Jeffries, G. D. M.; Lobovkina, T.; Jesorka, A.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate herein a new concept for lab-on-a-chip in-liquid sensing, through integration of surface acoustic wave resonance (SAR) in a one-port configuration with a soft polymer microfluidic delivery system. In this concept, the reflective gratings of a one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator are employed as mass loading-sensing elements, while the SAW transducer is protected from the measurement environment. We describe the design, fabrication, implementation, and characterization using liquid medium. The sensor operates at a frequency of 185 MHz and has demonstrated a comparable sensitivity to other SAW in-liquid sensors, while offering quality factor (Q) value in water of about 250, low impedance and fairly low susceptibility to viscous damping. For proof of principle, sensing performance was evaluated by means of binding 40 nm neutravidin-coated SiO2 nanoparticles to a biotin-labeled lipid bilayer deposited over the reflectors. Frequency shifts were determined for every step of the affinity assay. Demonstration of this integrated technology highlights the potential of SAR technology for in-liquid sensing.

  11. A surface acoustic wave humidity sensor with high sensitivity based on electrospun MWCNT/Nafion nanofiber films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Sheng; Chen Dajing; Chen Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    Humidity detection has been widely used in a variety of fields. A humidity sensor with high sensitivity is reported in this paper. A surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR) with high resonance frequency was fabricated as a basic sensitive component. Various nanotechnologies were used to improve the sensor's performance. A multi-walled carbon nanotube/Nafion (MWCNT/Nafion) composite material was prepared as humidity-sensitive films, deposited on the surface of an SAWR by the electrospinning method. The electrospun MWCNT/Nafion nanofiber films showed a three-dimensional (3D) porous structure, which was profitable for improving the sensor's performance. The new nano-water-channel model of Nafion was also applied in the humidity sensing process. Compared to other research, the present sensor showed excellent sensitivity (above 400 kHz/% relative humidity (RH) in the range from 10% RH to 80% RH), good linearity (R 2 > 0.98) and a short response time (∼3 s-63%).

  12. Measurement of temperature and pressure on the surface of a blunt cone using FBG sensor in hypersonic wind tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guru Prasad, A S; Sharath, U; Asokan, S; Nagarjun, V; Hegde, G M

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of temperature and pressure exerted on the leeward surface of a blunt cone specimen has been demonstrated in the present work in a hypersonic wind tunnel using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The experiments were conducted on a 30° apex-angle blunt cone with 51 mm base diameter at wind flow speeds of Mach 6.5 and 8.35 in a 300 mm hypersonic wind tunnel of Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. A special pressure insensitive temperature sensor probe along with the conventional bare FBG sensors was used for explicit temperature and aerodynamic pressure measurement respectively on the leeward surface of the specimen. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow field around the blunt cone specimen has also been carried out to obtain the temperature and pressure at conditions analogous to experiments. The results obtained from FBG sensors and the CFD simulations are found to be in good agreement with each other. (paper)

  13. Modeling of magnetic fields on a cylindrical surface and associated parameter estimation for development of a size sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops analytical sensing principles for estimation of circumferential size of a cylindrical surface using magnetic sensors. An electromagnet and magnetic sensors are used on a wearable band for measurement of leg size. In order to enable robust size estimation during rough real-world use of the wearable band, three estimation algorithms are developed based on models of the magnetic field variation over a cylindrical surface. The magnetic field models developed include those for a dipole and for a uniformly magnetized cylinder. The estimation algorithms used include a linear regression equation, an extended Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. Experimental laboratory tests show that the size sensor in general performs accurately, yielding sub-millimeter estimation errors. The unscented Kalman filter yields the best performance that is robust to bias and misalignment errors. The size sensor developed herein can be used for monitoring swelling due to fluid accumulation in the lower leg and a number of other biomedical applications. (paper)

  14. Global Sea Surface Temperature: A Harmonized Multi-sensor Time-series from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the methods used to obtain a new global sea surface temperature (SST) dataset spanning the early 1980s to the present, intended for use as a climate data record (CDR). The dataset provides skin SST (the fundamental measurement) and an estimate of the daily mean SST at depths compatible with drifting buoys (adjusting for skin and diurnal variability). The depth SST provided enables the CDR to be used with in situ records and centennial-scale SST reconstructions. The new SST timeseries is as independent as possible from in situ observations, and from 1995 onwards is harmonized to an independent satellite reference (namely, SSTs from the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (Advanced ATSR)). This maximizes the utility of our new estimates of variability and long-term trends in interrogating previous datasets tied to in situ observations. The new SSTs include full resolution (swath, level 2) data, single-sensor gridded data (level 3, 0.05 degree latitude-longitude grid) and a multi-sensor optimal analysis (level 4, same grid). All product levels are consistent. All SSTs have validated uncertainty estimates attached. The sensors used include all Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers from NOAA-6 onwards and the ATSR series. AVHRR brightness temperatures (BTs) are calculated from counts using a new in-flight re-calibration for each sensor, ultimately linked through to the AATSR BT calibration by a new harmonization technique. Artefacts in AVHRR BTs linked to varying instrument temperature, orbital regime and solar contamination are significantly reduced. These improvements in the AVHRR BTs (level 1) translate into improved cloud detection and SST (level 2). For cloud detection, we use a Bayesian approach for all sensors. For the ATSRs, SSTs are derived with sufficient accuracy and sensitivity using dual-view coefficients. This is not the case for single-view AVHRR observations, for which a physically based retrieval is employed, using a hybrid

  15. District Costs for Teacher Health Insurance: An Examination of the Data from the BLS and Wisconsin. The Productivity for Results Series No. 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costrell, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Rising health insurance costs have been a source of fiscal distress for school districts. In this paper, I closely examine data from the National Compensation Survey (NCS) of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to address a few basic questions: (1) Are district costs for teachers' health insurance higher, on average, than employer costs for…

  16. Comparison of a newly established emotional stimulus approach to a classical assessment-driven approach in BLS training: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckuck, Karl; Schröder, Hanna; Rossaint, Rolf; Stieger, Lina; Beckers, Stefan K; Sopka, Sasa

    2018-02-22

    The study objective was to implement two strategies (short emotional stimulus vs announced practical assessment) in the teaching of resuscitation skills in order to evaluate whether one led to superior outcomes. This study is an educational intervention provided in one German academic university hospital. First-yearmedical students (n=271) during the first3 weeks of their studies. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups following a sequence of random numbers: the emotional stimulus group (EG) and the assessment group (AG). In the EG, the intervention included watching an emotionally stimulating video prior to the Basic Life Support (BLS) course. In the AG, a practical assessment of the BLS algorithm was announced and tested within a 2 min simulated cardiac arrest scenario. After the baseline testing, a standardised BLS course was provided. Evaluation points were defined 1 week and 6 months after. Compression depth (CD) and compression rate (CR) were recorded as the primary endpoints for BLS quality. Within the study, 137 participants were allocated to the EG and 134 to the AG. 104 participants from EG and 120 from AG were analysed1 week after the intervention, where they reached comparable chest-compression performance without significant differences (CR P=0.49; CD P=0.28). The chest-compression performance improved significantly for the EG (Ptraining. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Highly sensitive and ultrafast response surface acoustic wave humidity sensor based on electrospun polyaniline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qianqian; Li Yang; Yang Mujie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polyanline/poly(vinyl butyral) nanofibers are prepared by electrospinning. ► Nanofiber-based SAW humidity sensor show high sensitivity and ultrafast response. ► The SAW sensor can detect very low humidity. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANi) composite nanofibers were deposited on surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a central frequency of 433 MHz to construct humidity sensors. Electrospun nanofibers of poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), poly(ethylene oxide), poly(vinylidene fluoride), poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and humidity response of corresponding SAW humidity sensors were investigated. The results indicated that PVB was suitable as a matrix to form nanofibers with PANi by electrospinning (ES). Electrospun PANi/PVB nanofibers exhibited a core–sheath structure as revealed by transmittance electron microscopy. Effects of ES collection time on humidity response of SAW sensor based on PANi/PVB nanofibers were examined at room temperature. The composite nanofiber sensor exhibited very high sensitivity of ∼75 kHz/%RH from 20 to 90%RH, ultrafast response (1 s and 2 s for humidification and desiccation, respectively) and good sensing linearity. Furthermore, the sensor could detect humidity as low as 0.5%RH, suggesting its potentials for low humidity detection. Attempts were done to explain the attractive humidity sensing performance of the sensor by considering conductivity, hydrophilicity, viscoelasticity and morphology of the polymer composite nanofibers.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance image sensor module of spin-coated silver film with polymer layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Prism modules of 20 nm-, 40 nm-, and 60 nm-thick spin-coated silver films both without and with an upper 100 nm-thick spin-coated polymer layer were fabricated for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image sensor applications. The prism modules were applied to an SPR image sensor system. The coefficients of determination (R2s) for the 20 nm-, 40 nm- and 60 nm-thick silver films without the polymer layer were 0.9231, 0.9901, and 0.9889, respectively, and with the polymer layer 0.9228, 0.9951, and 0.9880, respectively when standard ethanol solutions with 0.1% intervals in the range of 20.0% to 20.5% were applied. The upper polymer layer has no effect on the R2. The prism modules of the 40-nm-thick spin-coated silver films had the highest R2 value of approximately 0.99. The durability of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the 100 nm-thick polymer layer is much better than that without the upper low-loss polymer layer. The developed SPR image sensor module of the 40 nm-thick spin-coated silver film with the upper 100 nm-thick low-loss polymer film is expected to be a very cost-effective and robust solution because the films are formed at low temperatures in a short period of time without requiring a vacuum system and are very durable.

  19. Evaluation of surface smoothness by a laser displacement sensor II: comparison of lateral effect photodiode and multielement array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandak, J.; Tanaka, C.; Ohtani, T.

    2004-01-01

    Development of accurate surface assessment technology is of vital interest to modern wood industries. In this experiment we investigated new and fast noncontacting sensors to determine their usefulness for wood surface evaluation and to verify their accuracy. Two types of laser displacement sensors [equipped with a position sensitive detector (PSD) and a charge coupled device (CCD) detector] are compared with a conventional stylus and with theoretical profiles. Hornbeam workpieces with triangular profiles of differing slope and height were used for the evaluation. The results show that resolution of both sensors decreases as the height of the profile decreases. The error ratio of the laser-scanned profiles changes as a function of profile height, in the range 5%–33%. The CCD method is superior for accurate surface roughness evaluation, although the PSD approach can still be used for monitoring the error of form in most applications

  20. Bacteriophage T4 Nanoparticles as Materials in Sensor Applications: Variables That Influence Their Organization and Assembly on Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinny L. Liu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage T4 nanoparticles possess characteristics that make them ideal candidates as materials for sensors, particularly as sensor probes. Their surface can be modified, either through genetic engineering or direct chemical conjugation to display functional moieties such as antibodies or other proteins to recognize a specific target. However, in order for T4 nanoparticles to be utilized as a sensor probe, it is necessary to understand and control the variables that determine their assembly and organization on a surface. The aim of this work is to discuss some of variables that we have identified as influencing the behavior of T4 nanoparticles on surfaces. The effect of pH, ionic strength, substrate characteristics, nanoparticle concentration and charge was addressed qualitatively using atomic force microscopy (AFM.

  1. Integration of surface electromyographic sensors with the transfemoral amputee socket: a comparison of four differing configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefferman, Gerald M; Zhang, Fan; Nunnery, Michael J; Huang, He

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in recording high-quality electromyographic signals from within the sockets of lower-limb amputees. However, successful recording presents major challenges to both researchers and clinicians. This article details and compares four prototypical integrated socket-sensor designs used to record electromyographic signals from within the sockets of transfemoral amputees. Four prototypical socket-sensor configurations were constructed and tested on a single transfemoral amputee asked to perform sitting/standing, stair ascent/descent, and level ground walking. The number of large-amplitude motion artifacts generated using each prototype was quantified, the amount of skin irritation documented, and the comfort level of each assembly subjectively assessed by the amputee subject. Of the four configurations tested, the combination of a suction socket with integrated wireless surface electrodes generated the lowest number of large-amplitude motion artifacts, the least visible skin irritation, and was judged to be most comfortable by the amputee subject. The collection of high-quality electromyographic signals from an amputee's residual limb while maximizing patient comfort holds substantial potential to enhance neuromuscular clinical assessment and as a method of intuitive control of powered lower-limb prostheses. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  2. Two Dimensional Array of Piezoresistive Nanomechanical Membrane-Type Surface Stress Sensor (MSS with Improved Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico F. de Rooij

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new generation of piezoresistive nanomechanical Membrane-type Surface stress Sensor (MSS chips, which consist of a two dimensional array of MSS on a single chip. The implementation of several optimization techniques in the design and microfabrication improved the piezoresistive sensitivity by 3~4 times compared to the first generation MSS chip, resulting in a sensitivity about ~100 times better than a standard cantilever-type sensor and a few times better than optical read-out methods in terms of experimental signal-to-noise ratio. Since the integrated piezoresistive read-out of the MSS can meet practical requirements, such as compactness and not requiring bulky and expensive peripheral devices, the MSS is a promising transducer for nanomechanical sensing in the rapidly growing application fields in medicine, biology, security, and the environment. Specifically, its system compactness due to the integrated piezoresistive sensing makes the MSS concept attractive for the instruments used in mobile applications. In addition, the MSS can operate in opaque liquids, such as blood, where optical read-out techniques cannot be applied.

  3. Método para Medir Indirectamente la Velocidad de Fase en Sensores Surface Acoustic Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Andrés Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available El sensor de temperatura Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW ofrece amplias posibilidades para ser utilizado en ambientes hostiles. En teoría, las mediciones del SAW se pueden leer inalámbricamente sin integrar circuitos electrónicos en su estructura, permitiendo funcionalidades en mediciones a muy altas temperaturas. La literatura reporta que las variaciones de temperatura del SAW ocasionan corrimientos en su frecuencia de sincronismo, efecto que se atribuye a la sensibilidad térmica de la velocidad de fase del substrato piezoeléctrico. Caracterizar  apropiadamente el SAW requiere una buena medición de la velocidad de fase. No obstante, medir esta velocidad con respecto a la temperatura no es posible con la instrumentación actual. Este artículo reporta un método indirecto para medir estas variaciones de velocidad a través de  simulaciones basadas en el Modelo de Mason y mediciones de la respuesta en frecuencia de un prototipo SAW. Identificar la velocidad de fase del SAW conlleva a graficar, con aceptable precisión, la curva de funcionamiento del sensor, la cual puede utilizarse posteriormente como curva de calibración.

  4. The detection of small organic molecules based on novel functionalized surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rui; Cameron, Brent D.

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop rapid, inexpensive, and easily applied in vivo phenotyping strategies for characterizing drug-metabolizing phenotypes with reference to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in biological fluids. Therefore, the accurate detection of low concentration of theophylline, which can be used as a probe for cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes (e.g. CYP1A2) activity, could benefit drug-metabolizing studies. In this study, a portable, specific, and sensitive functionalized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using polyacrylamide molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as the highly specific selector is developed for the detection of low concentration theophylline in the presence of other confounding components, such as, caffeine which has a very similar chemical structure.

  5. Multi sensor validation and error characteristics of Arctic satellite sea surface temperature observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna; Tonbo, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    in the satellite products related to observation techniques, data processing and cloud masking. Temporal and spatial error scales are derived for all satellite products using the satellite versus in situ match-up dataset. Temporal error scales are typically between 1 and 2 days and the characteristic spatial error......Six of the operational global satellite sea surface temperature products from infrared and microwave sensors are validated in a consistent way in waters north of 60° N. The 15-month validation with drifting buoy in situ observations shows that data from the Advanced Along-Tracking Scanning...... Radiometer (AATSR) on-board the ENVISAT satellite and NAVOCEANO data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on-board the NOAA 18 satellite are superior in terms of bias and standard deviation. The observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) on-board the Aqua...

  6. Impact of MODIS Sensor Calibration Updates on Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Reflectance and Albedo Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly A.; Polashenski, Chris M.; Chen, Justin; Tedesco, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface reflectance and albedo trends using the newly released Collection 6 (C6) MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products over the period 2001-2016. We find that the correction of MODIS sensor degradation provided in the new C6 data products reduces the magnitude of the surface reflectance and albedo decline trends obtained from previous MODIS data (i.e., Collection 5, C5). Collection 5 and 6 data product analysis over GrIS is characterized by surface (i.e., wet vs. dry) and elevation (i.e., 500-2000 m, 2000 m and greater) conditions over the summer season from 1 June to 31 August. Notably, the visible-wavelength declining reflectance trends identified in several bands of MODIS C5 data from previous studies are only slightly detected at reduced magnitude in the C6 versions over the dry snow area. Declining albedo in the wet snow and ice area remains over the MODIS record in the C6 product, albeit at a lower magnitude than obtained using C5 data. Further analyses of C6 spectral reflectance trends show both reflectance increases and decreases in select bands and regions, suggesting that several competing processes are contributing to Greenland Ice Sheet albedo change. Investigators using MODIS data for other ocean, atmosphere and/or land analyses are urged to consider similar re-examinations of trends previously established using C5 data.

  7. Impact of MODIS sensor calibration updates on Greenland Ice Sheet surface reflectance and albedo trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly A.; Polashenski, Chris M.; Chen, Justin; Tedesco, Marco

    2017-08-01

    We evaluate Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface reflectance and albedo trends using the newly released Collection 6 (C6) MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products over the period 2001-2016. We find that the correction of MODIS sensor degradation provided in the new C6 data products reduces the magnitude of the surface reflectance and albedo decline trends obtained from previous MODIS data (i.e., Collection 5, C5). Collection 5 and 6 data product analysis over GrIS is characterized by surface (i.e., wet vs. dry) and elevation (i.e., 500-2000 m, 2000 m and greater) conditions over the summer season from 1 June to 31 August. Notably, the visible-wavelength declining reflectance trends identified in several bands of MODIS C5 data from previous studies are only slightly detected at reduced magnitude in the C6 versions over the dry snow area. Declining albedo in the wet snow and ice area remains over the MODIS record in the C6 product, albeit at a lower magnitude than obtained using C5 data. Further analyses of C6 spectral reflectance trends show both reflectance increases and decreases in select bands and regions, suggesting that several competing processes are contributing to Greenland Ice Sheet albedo change. Investigators using MODIS data for other ocean, atmosphere and/or land analyses are urged to consider similar re-examinations of trends previously established using C5 data.

  8. Impact of MODIS sensor calibration updates on Greenland Ice Sheet surface reflectance and albedo trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Casey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS surface reflectance and albedo trends using the newly released Collection 6 (C6 MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer products over the period 2001–2016. We find that the correction of MODIS sensor degradation provided in the new C6 data products reduces the magnitude of the surface reflectance and albedo decline trends obtained from previous MODIS data (i.e., Collection 5, C5. Collection 5 and 6 data product analysis over GrIS is characterized by surface (i.e., wet vs. dry and elevation (i.e., 500–2000 m, 2000 m and greater conditions over the summer season from 1 June to 31 August. Notably, the visible-wavelength declining reflectance trends identified in several bands of MODIS C5 data from previous studies are only slightly detected at reduced magnitude in the C6 versions over the dry snow area. Declining albedo in the wet snow and ice area remains over the MODIS record in the C6 product, albeit at a lower magnitude than obtained using C5 data. Further analyses of C6 spectral reflectance trends show both reflectance increases and decreases in select bands and regions, suggesting that several competing processes are contributing to Greenland Ice Sheet albedo change. Investigators using MODIS data for other ocean, atmosphere and/or land analyses are urged to consider similar re-examinations of trends previously established using C5 data.

  9. On-chip surface modified nanostructured ZnO as functional pH sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Liu, Wenpeng; Sun, Chongling; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are promising candidates as electronic components for biological and chemical applications. In this study, ZnO ultra-fine nanowire (NW) and nanoflake (NF) hybrid structures have been prepared by Au-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under ambient pressure. Their surface morphology, lattice structures, and crystal orientation were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two types of ZnO nanostructures were successfully integrated as gate electrodes in extended-gate field-effect transistors (EGFETs). Due to the amphoteric properties of ZnO, such devices function as pH sensors. We found that the ultra-fine NWs, which were more than 50 μm in length and less than 100 nm in diameter, performed better in the pH sensing process than NW-NF hybrid structures because of their higher surface-to-volume ratio, considering the Nernst equation and the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model. Furthermore, the surface coating of (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) protects ZnO nanostructures in both acidic and alkaline environments, thus enhancing the device stability and extending its pH sensing dynamic range.

  10. Rough surface Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles to fabricating high sensitivity SERS immunochromatographic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Liu, Hongwu Liu; Wu, Ze; Liu, An; Yao, Cuize; Li, Xiuqing; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Shiting; Luo, Zhi; Tang, Yong

    2015-11-14

    Immunochromatographic sensors (ICSs) are inexpensive, simple, portable, and robust, thus making ICSs commonplace in clinical diagnoses, food testing, and environmental monitoring. However, commonly used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) ICSs have low sensitivity. Therefore, we developed highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) ICSs. To enhance the sensitivity of SERS ICSs, rough surface core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles (RSAu@AgNPs) were prepared by coating silver on the surface of gold nanoflowers (AuNFs). Then these nanoparticles were used as SERS substrate in the SERS ICSs, after which the SERS ICSs were implemented to detect haemoglobin and heavy metal cadmium ion (Cd(2+)). The limit of detection (LOD) of the SERS ICSs for detecting haemoglobin was 8 ng/mL, and the linear range of the SERS ICSs was from 31.3 to 2000 ng/mL. The LOD of the SERS ICSs for detecting Cd(2+) was 0.05 ng/mL and the linear analysis range was from 0.05 to 25 ng/mL. The cross reactivity of the SERS ICSs was studied and results showed that the SERS ICSs exhibited highly specific for detection of haemoglobin and Cd(2+), respectively. The SERS ICSs were then used to detect haemoglobin (spiked in serum and in stool) and Cd(2+) (spiked in tap water, river water, and soil leaching water), and the results showed high recovery. These characteristics indicated that SERS ICSs were ideal tools for clinical diagnosis and environmental pollution monitoring.

  11. Experimental investigations of sensor-based surface following tasks by a mobile manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.; Baker, J.E.; Pin, F.G.

    1993-10-01

    This paper discusses experimental investigations of the feasibility and requirements of simultaneous external-sensor-based-control of the wheeled platform and the manipulator of a mobile robot. The experiments involve 3-D arbitrary surface following by the manipulator while the platform moves along a predefined trajectory. A variety of concave and convex surfaces were used in the experiments, during which target and measured values of the platform and arm positions and orientations, together with the surface absolute location and normal estimates, were logged at 10 Hz. For all experiments, the data logs showed significant noise, at high frequency, in the calculated surface normal values despite smooth tracking of their target values by the arm and the platform, with typical closed loop delays between target and achieved values of the order of 100 msec. This high-frequency noise in the calculated values is conjectured to result mainly from the arm`s transmission cables compliance and backlash in the spherical wrist gears. On the other hand, the end-effector distance to the surface showed some low frequency errors of the order of {plus_minus}20%The two major sources of these low frequency errors appeared to reside respectively in the low values of the velocity bound and gain parameters utilized to filter the high frequency noise in the calculated normal values prior to using them as input to the arm control, and in the rolling contact of the platform`s rubber-coated wheels on the ground where significant errors in the platform`s positions and orientations can accumulate.

  12. Estrous detection by monitoring ventral tail base surface temperature using a wearable wireless sensor in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryotaro; Yoshioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Toru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Okada, Hironao; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the ventral tail base surface temperature (ST) was monitored using a wearable wireless sensor for estrus detection in cattle. Relationships among ST, behavioral estrus expression, ovulation, and changes in hormone profiles during the estrous cycle were examined. Holstein Friesian or Japanese Black female cattle were used in summer (August-September), autumn (October-November) and winter (January-February; three animals per season). On Day 11 of the estrous cycle (Day 0=the day of ovulation), the sensor was attached to the surface of the ventral tail base and ST was measured every 2min until Day 11 of the next estrous cycle. Hourly maximum ST values were used for analysis. To exclude circadian rhythm and seasonal effects, ST changes were expressed as residual temperatures (RT=actual ST - mean ST for the same hour on the previous 3days). Obvious circadian rhythms of the ST were observed and daily changes in the ST significantly differed among seasons. There was no significant seasonal difference, however, in the RT. The mean RT increased significantly ∼24 compared with ∼48h before ovulation. The mean maximum RT was 1.27±0.30°C, which was observed 5.6±2.4h after the onset of estrus, 2.4±1.3h before LH peak, and 26.9±1.2h before ovulation. The ST of the ventral tail base could be monitored throughout the estrous cycle and could detect a substantial change around the time of expression of behavioral estrus. Calculation and analysis of the RT could be useful for automatic estrous detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Transparent and Flexible Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Sensors Based on Gold Nanostar Arrays Embedded in Silicon Rubber Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungyoung; Lee, Jiwon; Ko, Hyunhyub

    2017-12-20

    Integration of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors onto transparent and flexible substrates enables lightweight and deformable SERS sensors which can be wrapped or swabbed on various nonplanar surfaces for the efficient collection and detection of analytes on various surfaces. However, the development of transparent and flexible SERS substrates with high sensitivity is still challenging. Here, we demonstrate a transparent and flexible SERS substrate with high sensitivity based on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film embedded with gold nanostar (GNS) assemblies. The flexible SERS substrates enable conformal coverage on arbitrary surfaces, and the optical transparency allows light interaction with the underlying contact surface, thereby providing highly sensitive detection of analytes adsorbed on arbitrary metallic and dielectric surfaces which otherwise do not provide any noticeable Raman signals of analytes. In particular, when the flexible SERS substrates are covered onto metallic surfaces, the SERS enhancement is greatly improved because of the additional plasmon couplings between GNS and metal film. We achieve the detection capability of a trace amount of benzenethiol (10 -8 M) and enormous SERS enhancement factor (∼1.9 × 10 8 ) for flexible SERS substrates on Ag film. In addition, because of the embedded structure of GNS monolayers within the PDMS film, SERS sensors maintain the high sensitivity even after mechanical deformations of stretching, bending, and torsion for 100 cycles. The transparent and flexible SERS substrates introduced in this study are applicable to various SERS sensing applications on nonplanar surfaces, which are not achievable for hard SERS substrates.

  14. Control of the positional relationship between a sample collection instrument and a surface to be analyzed during a sampling procedure using a laser sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [Clinton, TN; Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-21

    A system and method utilizes distance-measuring equipment including a laser sensor for controlling the collection instrument-to-surface distance during a sample collection process for use, for example, with mass spectrometric detection. The laser sensor is arranged in a fixed positional relationship with the collection instrument, and a signal is generated by way of the laser sensor which corresponds to the actual distance between the laser sensor and the surface. The actual distance between the laser sensor and the surface is compared to a target distance between the laser sensor and the surface when the collection instrument is arranged at a desired distance from the surface for sample collecting purposes, and adjustments are made, if necessary, so that the actual distance approaches the target distance.

  15. A simple small size and low cost sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for selective detection of Fe(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Alberti, Giancarla; Pesavento, Maria; D'Agostino, Girolamo; Quattrini, Federico; Biesuz, Raffaela; Zeni, Luigi

    2014-03-07

    A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF), has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III). DFO-SAM sensors based on appropriate electrochemical techniques can be frequently found in the scientific literature. In this work, we present the first example of a DFO-SAM sensor based on SPR in an optical fiber. The SPR sensing platform was realized by removing the cladding of a plastic optical fiber along half the circumference, spin coating a buffer of Microposit S1813 photoresist on the exposed core, and finally sputtering a thin gold film. The hydroxamate siderophore deferoxamine (DFO), having high binding affinity for Fe(III), is then used in its immobilized form, as self-assembled monolayer on the gold layer surface of the POF sensor. The results showed that the DFO-SAM-POF-sensor was able to sense the formation of the Fe(III)/DFO complex in the range of concentrations between 1 μm and 50 μm with a linearity range from 0 to 30 μm of Fe(III). The selectivity of the sensor was also proved by interference tests.

  16. Phase modulation and structural effects in a D-shaped all-solid photonic crystal fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhixin; Hao, Xin; Shao, Yonghong; Chen, Yuzhi; Li, Xuejin; Fan, Ping

    2014-06-16

    We numerically investigate a D-shaped fiber surface plasmon resonance sensor based on all-solid photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with finite element method. In the side-polished PCF sensor, field leakage is guided to penetrate through the gap between the rods, causing a pronounced phase modulation in the deep polishing case. Taking advantage of these amplified phase shifts, a high-performance fiber sensor design is proposed. The significant enhancements arising from this new sensor design should lift the performance of the fiber SPR sensor into the range capable of detecting a wide range of biochemical interactions, which makes it especially attractive for many in vivo and in situ bioanalysis applications. Several parameters which influence the field leakage, such as the polishing position, the pitch of the PCF, and the rod diameter, are inspected to evaluate their impacts. Furthermore, we develop a mathematical model to describe the effects of varying the structural parameters of a D-shaped PCF sensor on the evanescent field and the sensor performance.

  17. Influence of different land surfaces on atmospheric conditions measured by a wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengfeld, Katharina; Ament, Felix

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric conditions close to the surface, like temperature, wind speed and humidity, vary on small scales because of surface heterogeneities. Therefore, the traditional measuring approach of using a single, highly accurate station is of limited representativeness for a larger domain, because it is not able to determine these small scale variabilities. However, both the variability and the domain averages are important information for the development and validation of atmospheric models and soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) schemes. Due to progress in microelectronics it is possible to construct networks of comparably cheap meteorological stations with moderate accuracy. Such a network provides data in high spatial and temporal resolution. The EPFL Lausanne developed such a network called SensorScope, consisting of low cost autonomous stations. Each station observes air and surface temperature, humidity, wind direction and speed, incoming solar radiation, precipitations, soil moisture and soil temperature and sends the data via radio communication to a base station. This base station forwards the collected data via GSM/GPRS to a central server. Within the FLUXPAT project in August 2009 we deployed 15 stations as a twin transect near Jülich, Germany. One aim of this first experiment was to test the quality of the low cost sensors by comparing them to more accurate reference measurements. It turned out, that although the network is not highly accurate, the measurements are consistent. Consequently an analysis of the pattern of atmospheric conditions is feasible. For example, we detect a variability of ± 0.5K in the mean temperature at a distance of only 2.3 km. The transect covers different types of vegetation and a small river. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of different land surfaces and the distance to the river on meteorological conditions. On the one hand, some results meet our expectations, e.g. the relative humidity decreases with increasing

  18. CPR in medical schools: learning by teaching BLS to sudden cardiac death survivors – a promising strategy for medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herkner Harald

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR training is gaining more importance for medical students. There were many attempts to improve the basic life support (BLS skills in medical students, some being rather successful, some less. We developed a new problem based learning curriculum, where students had to teach CPR to cardiac arrest survivors in order to improve the knowledge about life support skills of trainers and trainees. Methods Medical students who enrolled in our curriculum had to pass a 2 semester problem based learning session about the principles of cardiac arrest, CPR, BLS and defibrillation (CPR-D. Then the students taught cardiac arrest survivors who were randomly chosen out of a cardiac arrest database of our emergency department. Both, the student and the Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD survivor were asked about their skills and knowledge via questionnaires immediately after the course. The questionnaires were then used to evaluate if this new teaching strategy is useful for learning CPR via a problem-based-learning course. The survey was grouped into three categories, namely "Use of AED", "CPR-D" and "Training". In addition, there was space for free answers where the participants could state their opinion in their own words, which provided some useful hints for upcoming programs. Results This new learning-by-teaching strategy was highly accepted by all participants, the students and the SCD survivors. Most SCD survivors would use their skills in case one of their relatives goes into cardiac arrest (96%. Furthermore, 86% of the trainees were able to deal with failures and/or disturbances by themselves. On the trainer's side, 96% of the students felt to be well prepared for the course and were considered to be competent by 96% of their trainees. Conclusion We could prove that learning by teaching CPR is possible and is highly accepted by the students. By offering a compelling appreciation of what CPR can achieve in using

  19. Influence of surface position along the working range of conoscopic holography sensors on dimensional verification of AISI 316 wire EDM machined surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Pedro; Blanco, David; Rico, Carlos; Valiño, Gonzalo; Mateos, Sabino

    2014-03-06

    Conoscopic holography (CH) is a non-contact interferometric technique used for surface digitization which presents several advantages over other optical techniques such as laser triangulation. Among others, the ability for the reconstruction of high-sloped surfaces stands out, and so does its lower dependence on surface optical properties. Nevertheless, similarly to other optical systems, adjustment of CH sensors requires an adequate selection of configuration parameters for ensuring a high quality surface digitizing. This should be done on a surface located as close as possible to the stand-off distance by tuning frequency (F) and power (P) until the quality indicators Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and signal envelope (Total) meet proper values. However, not all the points of an actual surface are located at the stand-off distance, but they could be located throughout the whole working range (WR). Thus, the quality of a digitized surface may not be uniform. The present work analyses how the quality of a reconstructed surface is affected by its relative position within the WR under different combinations of the parameters F and P. Experiments have been conducted on AISI 316 wire EDM machined flat surfaces. The number of high-quality points digitized as well as distance measurements between different surfaces throughout the WR allowed for comparing the metrological behaviour of the CH sensor with respect to a touch probe (TP) on a CMM.

  20. Influence of Surface Position along the Working Range of Conoscopic Holography Sensors on Dimensional Verification of AISI 316 Wire EDM Machined Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernández

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conoscopic holography (CH is a non-contact interferometric technique used for surface digitization which presents several advantages over other optical techniques such as laser triangulation. Among others, the ability for the reconstruction of high-sloped surfaces stands out, and so does its lower dependence on surface optical properties. Nevertheless, similarly to other optical systems, adjustment of CH sensors requires an adequate selection of configuration parameters for ensuring a high quality surface digitizing. This should be done on a surface located as close as possible to the stand-off distance by tuning frequency (F and power (P until the quality indicators Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR and signal envelope (Total meet proper values. However, not all the points of an actual surface are located at the stand-off distance, but they could be located throughout the whole working range (WR. Thus, the quality of a digitized surface may not be uniform. The present work analyses how the quality of a reconstructed surface is affected by its relative position within the WR under different combinations of the parameters F and P. Experiments have been conducted on AISI 316 wire EDM machined flat surfaces. The number of high-quality points digitized as well as distance measurements between different surfaces throughout the WR allowed for comparing the metrological behaviour of the CH sensor with respect to a touch probe (TP on a CMM.

  1. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Konrad; Helwig, Andreas; Müller, Gerhard; Hille, Pascal; Eickhoff, Martin

    2015-09-23

    In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO₂ and NH₃, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  2. Design and Analysis of a Micromechanical Three-Component Force Sensor for Characterizing and Quantifying Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Q.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Roughness, which can represent the trade-off between manufacturing cost and performance of mechanical components, is a critical predictor of cracks, corrosion and fatigue damage. In order to measure polished or super-finished surfaces, a novel touch probe based on three-component force sensor for characterizing and quantifying surface roughness is proposed by using silicon micromachining technology. The sensor design is based on a cross-beam structure, which ensures that the system possesses high sensitivity and low coupling. The results show that the proposed sensor possesses high sensitivity, low coupling error, and temperature compensation function. The proposed system can be used to investigate micromechanical structures with nanometer accuracy.

  3. Photonic crystal fiber-based surface plasmon resonance sensor with selective analyte channels and graphene-silver deposited core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifat, Ahmmed A; Mahdiraji, G Amouzad; Chow, Desmond M; Shee, Yu Gang; Ahmed, Rajib; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2015-05-19

    We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs). Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber's properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM). The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU-1) with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10(-5) RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI) sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46-1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor's footprint.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance sensor with dispersionless microfluidics for direct detection of nucleic acids at the low femtomole level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špringer, Tomáš; Piliarik, Marek; Homola, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 145, č. 1 (2010), s. 588-591 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : microfluidics * surface plasmon resonance * DNA detection Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2010

  5. The structure of sensor organic polymeric solids deposited on surfaces of interest for sensing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemon, Paul

    2001-01-01

    For many years, electrochemically deposited polypyrrole has found application in a host of technologically significant areas. Popular applications include use in rechargeable batteries, electrochromic displays and artificial muscles. However, perhaps the most significant application of polypyrrole is as a gas sensing material. The relatively low selectivity of polypyrrole has led to it seldom being used as a 'stand alone' sensor; the ease by which the properties of polypyrrole may be subtly modified during electrochemical deposition (resulting in subtly different sensor responses) makes it ideally suited for incorporation into sensing 'arrays'. The level of understanding concerning the growth dynamics and structural characteristics of electrochemically deposited polypyrrole was poor prior to the commencement of the work presented; this thesis describes research undertaken in order to elucidate the properties of this material. As variation of the dopant group used during electrochemical deposition has been shown to result in significant structural and operational variations, the work presented focuses on polypyrrole doped with sodium benzene sulfonate (benzene sulfonic acid, sodium salt). The effects of deposition parameter variation have been studied (such as deposition potential and dopant concentration); repeatable relationships were found between deposition parameters and [a] sensor electrical conductivity, and [b] the surface morphology of the films formed. The influence of sensor substrate design is also considered; dissimilarities were found between the consistency and resistance temporal stability of elements deposited on simple 'boot' electrodes and interdigital microelectrodes. A significant proportion of the work presented concerns the study of the macrostructure of electrochemically deposited polypyrrole films. Several novel structural features have been presented, all of which have been documented in the scientific press. These include: 1) The formation

  6. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  7. An Algorithm for Retrieving Land Surface Temperatures Using VIIRS Data in Combination with Multi-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lang; Mao, Kebiao; Ma, Ying; Zhao, Fen; Jiang, Lipeng; Shen, Xinyi; Qin, Zhihao

    2014-01-01

    A practical algorithm was proposed to retrieve land surface temperature (LST) from Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data in mid-latitude regions. The key parameter transmittance is generally computed from water vapor content, while water vapor channel is absent in VIIRS data. In order to overcome this shortcoming, the water vapor content was obtained from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data in this study. The analyses on the estimation errors of vapor content and emissivity indicate that when the water vapor errors are within the range of ±0.5 g/cm2, the mean retrieval error of the present algorithm is 0.634 K; while the land surface emissivity errors range from −0.005 to +0.005, the mean retrieval error is less than 1.0 K. Validation with the standard atmospheric simulation shows the average LST retrieval error for the twenty-three land types is 0.734 K, with a standard deviation value of 0.575 K. The comparison between the ground station LST data indicates the retrieval mean accuracy is −0.395 K, and the standard deviation value is 1.490 K in the regions with vegetation and water cover. Besides, the retrieval results of the test data have also been compared with the results measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) VIIRS LST products, and the results indicate that 82.63% of the difference values are within the range of −1 to 1 K, and 17.37% of the difference values are within the range of ±2 to ±1 K. In a conclusion, with the advantages of multi-sensors taken fully exploited, more accurate results can be achieved in the retrieval of land surface temperature. PMID:25397919

  8. Iridium Oxide pH Sensor Based on Stainless Steel Wire for pH Mapping on Metal Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrestani, S.; Ismail, M. C.; Kakooei, S.; Beheshti, M.; Zabihiazadboni, M.; Zavareh, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    A simple technique to fabricate the iridium oxide pH sensor is useful in several applications such as medical, food processing and engineering material where it is able to detect the changes of pH. Generally, the fabrication technique can be classified into three types: electro-deposition iridium oxide film (EIrOF), activated iridium oxide film (AIROF) and sputtering iridium oxide film (SIROF). This study focuses on fabricating electrode, calibration and test. Electro-deposition iridium oxide film is a simple and effective method of fabricating this kind of sensor via cyclic voltammetry process. The iridium oxide thick film was successfully electrodeposited on the surface of stainless steel wire with 500 cycles of sweep potential. A further analysis under FESEM shows detailed image of iridium oxide film which has cauliflower-liked microstructure. EDX analysis shows the highest element present are iridium and oxygen which concluded that the process is successful. The iridium oxide based pH sensor has shown a good performance in comparison to conventional glass pH sensor when it is being calibrated in buffer solutions with 2, 4, 7 and 9 pH values. The iridium oxide pH sensor is specifically designed to measure the pH on the surface of metal plate.

  9. Detection of flaws on surface of civil infrastructures and their profiling using imaging system with laser displacement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Paritosh; Kharkovsky, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Civil infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, roads and pipelines are the integral part of people's lives and their failure can have large public safety and economic consequences. Early detection of flaws in civil infrastructures and their appropriate retrofitting will aid in preventing this failure. Flaws such as cracks and impact damages initially occur on the surface and propagate inside the materials causing further degradation. There is a need to develop systems that can detect these surface flaws. Developing a system with one sensing technique which can detect the flaws is a challenging task since infrastructures are made up of diverse materials such as concrete, metal, plastics, composite and timber that have different electrical and mechanical properties. It is also desired that non-plain surfaces with complex profiles can be interrogated and surface flaws can be detected. We have proposed an imaging system capable of interrogating structures with complex surface profiles for the purpose of detection and evaluation of surface flaws such as cracks and impact damages using laser displacement sensor (LDS). The developed system consists of LDS mounted on the scanner which is able to perform raster scan over the specimen under test. The reading of displacement from the sensor head to the laser spot on the surface of the test material is then used to generate images which can be used to detect the surface flaws. The proof of concept is given by testing specimens made of metal, concrete and plastics with complex surface profiles.

  10. Occupational amputations in Illinois 2000-2007: BLS vs. data linkage of trauma registry, hospital discharge, workers compensation databases and OSHA citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lee; Krupczak, Colin; Brandt-Rauf, Sherry; Forst, Linda

    2013-05-01

    Workplace amputation is a widespread, disabling, costly, and preventable public health problem. Thousands of occupational amputations occur each year, clustering in particular economic sectors, workplaces, and demographic groups such as young workers, Hispanics, and immigrants. To identify and describe work related amputations amongst Illinois residents that occur within Illinois as reported in three legally mandated State databases; to compare these cases with those identified through the BLS-Survey of Occupational Illnesses and Injuries (SOII); and to determine the extent of direct intervention by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for these injuries in the State. We linked cases across three databases in Illinois - trauma registry, hospital discharge, and workers compensation claims. We describe amputation injuries in Illinois between 2000 and 2007, compare them to the BLS-SOII, and determine OSHA investigations of the companies where amputations occurred. There were 3984 amputations identified, 80% fingertips, in the Illinois databases compared to an estimated 3637, 94% fingertips, from BLS-SOII. Though the overall agreement is close, there were wide fluctuations (over- and under-estimations) in individual years between counts in the linked dataset and federal survey estimates. No OSHA inspections occurred for these injuries. Increased detection of workplace amputations is essential to targeting interventions and to evaluating program effectiveness. There should be mandatory reporting of all amputation injuries by employers and insurance companies within 24h of the event, and every injury should be investigated by OSHA. Health care providers should recognise amputation as a public health emergency and should be compelled to report. There should be a more comprehensive occupational injury surveillance system in the US that enhances the BLS-SOII through linkage with state databases. Addition of industry, occupation, and work

  11. Noninvasive, three-dimensional full-field body sensor for surface deformation monitoring of human body in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenning; Shao, Xinxing; He, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Jialin; Xu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jinlin

    2017-09-01

    Noninvasive, three-dimensional (3-D), full-field surface deformation measurements of the human body are important for biomedical investigations. We proposed a 3-D noninvasive, full-field body sensor based on stereo digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) for surface deformation monitoring of the human body in vivo. First, by applying an improved water-transfer printing (WTP) technique to transfer optimized speckle patterns onto the skin, the body sensor was conveniently and harmlessly fabricated directly onto the human body. Then, stereo-DIC was used to achieve 3-D noncontact and noninvasive surface deformation measurements. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed body sensor were verified and discussed by considering different complexions. Moreover, the fabrication of speckle patterns on human skin, which has always been considered a challenging problem, was shown to be feasible, effective, and harmless as a result of the improved WTP technique. An application of the proposed stereo-DIC-based body sensor was demonstrated by measuring the pulse wave velocity of human carotid artery. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  12. Lab-on-a-Chip Magneto-Immunoassays: How to Ensure Contact between Superparamagnetic Beads and the Sensor Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hütten

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lab-on-a-chip immuno assays utilizing superparamagnetic beads as labels suffer from the fact that the majority of beads pass the sensing area without contacting the sensor surface. Different solutions, employing magnetic forces, ultrasonic standing waves, or hydrodynamic effects have been found over the past decades. The first category uses magnetic forces, created by on-chip conducting lines to attract beads towards the sensor surface. Modifications of the magnetic landscape allow for additional transport and separation of different bead species. The hydrodynamic approach uses changes in the channel geometry to enhance the capture volume. In acoustofluidics, ultrasonic standing waves force µm-sized particles onto a surface through radiation forces. As these approaches have their disadvantages, a new sensor concept that circumvents these problems is suggested. This concept is based on the granular giant magnetoresistance (GMR effect that can be found in gels containing magnetic nanoparticles. The proposed design could be realized in the shape of paper-based test strips printed with gel-based GMR sensors.

  13. Noninvasive, three-dimensional full-field body sensor for surface deformation monitoring of human body in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenning; Shao, Xinxing; He, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Jialin; Xu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jinlin

    2017-09-01

    Noninvasive, three-dimensional (3-D), full-field surface deformation measurements of the human body are important for biomedical investigations. We proposed a 3-D noninvasive, full-field body sensor based on stereo digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) for surface deformation monitoring of the human body in vivo. First, by applying an improved water-transfer printing (WTP) technique to transfer optimized speckle patterns onto the skin, the body sensor was conveniently and harmlessly fabricated directly onto the human body. Then, stereo-DIC was used to achieve 3-D noncontact and noninvasive surface deformation measurements. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed body sensor were verified and discussed by considering different complexions. Moreover, the fabrication of speckle patterns on human skin, which has always been considered a challenging problem, was shown to be feasible, effective, and harmless as a result of the improved WTP technique. An application of the proposed stereo-DIC-based body sensor was demonstrated by measuring the pulse wave velocity of human carotid artery.

  14. M13 Bacteriophage/Silver Nanowire Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensor for Sensitive and Selective Pesticide Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun Hye; Mun, ChaeWon; Kim, ChunTae; Park, Sung-Gyu; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Sun Ho; Dang, Jaejeung; Choo, Jaebum; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Dong-Ho; Jung, Ho Sang

    2018-03-28

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor comprising silver nanowires (AgNWs) and genetically engineered M13 bacteriophages expressing a tryptophan-histidine-tryptophan (WHW) peptide sequence (BPWHW) was fabricated by simple mixing of BPWHW and AgNW solutions, followed by vacuum filtration onto a glass-fiber filter paper (GFFP) membrane. The AgNWs stacked on the GFFP formed a high density of SERS-active hot spots at the points of nanowire intersections, and the surface-coated BPWHW functioned as a bioreceptor for selective pesticide detection. The BPWHW-functionalized AgNW (BPWHW/AgNW) sensor was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The Raman signal enhancement and the selective pesticide SERS detection properties of the BPWHW/AgNW sensor were investigated in the presence of control substrates such as wild-type M13 bacteriophage-decorated AgNWs (BPWT/AgNW) and undecorated AgNWs (AgNW). The BPWHW/AgNW sensor exhibited a significantly higher capture capability for pesticides, especially paraquat (PQ), than the control SERS substrates, and it also showed a relatively higher selectivity for PQ than for other bipyridylium pesticides such as diquat and difenzoquat. Furthermore, as a field application test, PQ was detected on the surface of PQ-pretreated apple peels, and the results demonstrated the feasibility of using a paper-based SERS substrate for on-site residual pesticide detection. The developed M13 bacteriophage-functionalized AgNW SERS sensor might be applicable for the detection of various pesticides and chemicals through modification of the M13 bacteriophage surface peptide sequence.

  15. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchang Hao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of an R-SAW resonator by a P-matrix cascading technique. Cascading the P-matrixes of unloaded areas with mass loaded areas, the sensitivity for different sensitive areas was obtained by analyzing the frequency shift. The performance of the sensitivity analysis was confirmed by the measured responses from the silicon dioxide (SiO2 deposited on different sensitive areas of R-SAW resonators. It is shown that the mass sensitivity varies strongly for different sensitive areas, and the optimal sensitive area lies towards the center of the device.

  16. Evaluation of electrode surface modification techniques for the development of chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiatsatos, C.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis covers several aspects of electrode surface modification techniques. The successful application of gamma-radiation to create polymer-coated electrodes, where the polymers can be ion exchangers and consequently of great analytical interest by themselves (such as the polymer poly(diallyl) dimethyl ammonium chloride) or where some other neutral polymers can function as convenient matrices for the introduction of biomolecules and/or other electrochemically interesting species is reported. This is demonstrated by using the neutral polymer poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAL) as a matrix for immobilization of the enzyme glucose oxidase and the mediator methyl viologen. The effect of γ-radiation on PVAL is discussed, as well as swelling properties of the irradiated polymers and specific characteristics of the created chemical sensors. Results of an experiment where the various kinds of interactions between the ion-exchange polymer Nafion and some positively charged species are explored are reported, and a model system for competition (methyl viologen vs. ruthenium hexaamine) which increases significantly our understanding of the interaction is mentioned. The effect of γ-radiation on Nafion and its ion-exchange compabilities is discussed also. A system of conduction polymers primarily polypyrrole, used as a detector of electroinactive anions due to their doping-undergoing in the film is discussed. Preliminary results on a new method that involves chemical cross-linking of a triisocyane molecule with -OH containing polymers in the presence of enzymes are reported

  17. A Synthetic Phased Array Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for Quantifying Bolt Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasim Guldiken

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report our findings on implementing a synthetic phased array surface acoustic wave sensor to quantify bolt tension. Maintaining proper bolt tension is important in many fields such as for ensuring safe operation of civil infrastructures. Significant advantages of this relatively simple methodology is its capability to assess bolt tension without any contact with the bolt, thus enabling measurement at inaccessible locations, multiple bolt measurement capability at a time, not requiring data collection during the installation and no calibration requirements. We performed detailed experiments on a custom-built flexible bench-top experimental setup consisting of 1018 steel plate of 12.7 mm (½ in thickness, a 6.4 mm (¼ in grade 8 bolt and a stainless steel washer with 19 mm (¾ in of external diameter. Our results indicate that this method is not only capable of clearly distinguishing properly bolted joints from loosened joints but also capable of quantifying how loose the bolt actually is. We also conducted detailed signal-to-noise (SNR analysis and showed that the SNR value for the entire bolt tension range was sufficient for image reconstruction.

  18. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, M.; Barman, P. B.; Som, T.; Hazra, S. K.

    2015-10-01

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C-150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C-150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  19. Tetrodotoxin Detection by a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor in Pufferfish Matrices and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX poisoning is most commonly associated with consumption of pufferfish. TTX is a low molecular weight (~319 Da neurotoxin that selectively blocks voltage-sensitive Na+-gated ion channels. The standard method accepted worldwide for monitoring TTX toxicity in food matrices is the mouse bioassay. Ethical concerns from live animal testing, low sample throughput, and analytical inaccuracies have led to the need for an alternative method. We have previously established that surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors can quantify TTX in aqueous buffer samples by an antibody-based inhibition assay. In this paper, we report the extension of the assay for the detection of TTX in both clinical- and food-relevant matrices. The assay was optimized for application to three relevant complex matrices: pufferfish liver extract, pufferfish muscle extract, and human urine. Matrix effects are discussed and calibration curves are presented. Naturally contaminated pufferfish liver and muscle extracts were analyzed by the SPR method, and the data is compared to liquid-chromatography electrospray-ionization multiple reactions monitoring mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MRM/MS data. Ten samples, including three from a poisoning incident, two control monkfish samples, and five toxic pufferfish samples, were analyzed using this method, and the data is compared to LC/ESI/MRM/MS analysis of the samples.

  20. A surface acoustic wave response detection method for passive wireless torque sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanping; Kong, Ping; Qi, Hongli; Liu, Hongye; Ji, Xiaojun

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an effective surface acoustic wave (SAW) response detection method for the passive wireless SAW torque sensor to improve the measurement accuracy. An analysis was conducted on the relationship between the response energy-entropy and the bandwidth of SAW resonator (SAWR). A self-correlation method was modified to suppress the blurred white noise and highlight the attenuation characteristic of wireless SAW response. The SAW response was detected according to both the variation and the duration of energy-entropy ascension of an acquired RF signal. Numerical simulation results showed that the SAW response can be detected even when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 6dB. The proposed SAW response detection method was evaluated with several experiments at different conditions. The SAW response can be well distinguished from the sinusoidal signal and the noise. The performance of the SAW torque measurement system incorporating the detection method was tested. The obtained repeatability error was 0.23% and the linearity was 0.9934, indicating the validity of the detection method.

  1. An S-FSCW Based Multi-Channel Reader System for Beamforming Applications using Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pfeffer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Interrogating multiple surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors located within the same radar beam require techniques to separate the multiple superposing SAW sensor responses. The presented multi-channel reader features four parallel transceiver channels, which are based on the switched frequency-stepped continuous-wave principle and high-speed parallelized baseband electronics. Thus classical beamforming applications including angle of arrival measurement of single SAW tags and the angular separation of multiple SAW sensors are presented and compared to a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO approach. Due to the larger virtual array in the MIMO approach a larger aperture can be synthesized, which leads to significantly better angular separation results. The level analysis for the given system is verified by baseband-power measurements at different readout distances, considering the hardware parameters as well as the free-space propagation aspects. Finally measurements assess the maximum interrogation distance for the system.

  2. Optical Fiber Sensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Silver Nanoparticles Photodeposited on the Optical Fiber End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gabriel Ortega-Mendoza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the implementation of an optical fiber sensor to measure the refractive index in aqueous media based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. We have used a novel technique known as photodeposition to immobilize silver nanoparticles on the optical fiber end. This technique has a simple instrumentation, involves laser light via an optical fiber and silver nanoparticles suspended in an aqueous medium. The optical sensor was assembled using a tungsten lamp as white light, a spectrometer, and an optical fiber with silver nanoparticles. The response of this sensor is such that the LSPR peak wavelength is linearly shifted to longer wavelengths as the refractive index is increased, showing a sensitivity of 67.6 nm/RIU. Experimental results are presented.

  3. Advanced LWIR hyperspectral sensor for on-the-move proximal detection of liquid/solid contaminants on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Jay P.; Dixon, John; Dupuis, Julia R.; Cosofret, Bogdan R.; Marinelli, William J.

    2017-05-01

    Sensor technologies capable of detecting low vapor pressure liquid surface contaminants, as well as solids, in a noncontact fashion while on-the-move continues to be an important need for the U.S. Army. In this paper, we discuss the development of a long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-10.5 μm) spatial heterodyne spectrometer coupled with an LWIR illuminator and an automated detection algorithm for detection of surface contaminants from a moving vehicle. The system is designed to detect surface contaminants by repetitively collecting LWIR reflectance spectra of the ground. Detection and identification of surface contaminants is based on spectral correlation of the measured LWIR ground reflectance spectra with high fidelity library spectra and the system's cumulative binary detection response from the sampled ground. We present the concepts of the detection algorithm through a discussion of the system signal model. In addition, we present reflectance spectra of surfaces contaminated with a liquid CWA simulant, triethyl phosphate (TEP), and a solid simulant, acetaminophen acquired while the sensor was stationary and on-the-move. Surfaces included CARC painted steel, asphalt, concrete, and sand. The data collected was analyzed to determine the probability of detecting 800 μm diameter contaminant particles at a 0.5 g/m2 areal density with the SHSCAD traversing a surface.

  4. Photonic Crystal Fiber-Based Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Selective Analyte Channels and Graphene-Silver Deposited Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmmed A. Rifat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor based on photonic crystal fiber (PCF with selectively filled analyte channels. Silver is used as the plasmonic material to accurately detect the analytes and is coated with a thin graphene layer to prevent oxidation. The liquid-filled cores are placed near to the metallic channel for easy excitation of free electrons to produce surface plasmon waves (SPWs. Surface plasmons along the metal surface are excited with a leaky Gaussian-like core guided mode. Numerical investigations of the fiber’s properties and sensing performance are performed using the finite element method (FEM. The proposed sensor shows maximum amplitude sensitivity of 418 Refractive Index Units (RIU−1 with resolution as high as 2.4 × 10−5 RIU. Using the wavelength interrogation method, a maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity of 3000 nm/RIU in the sensing range of 1.46–1.49 is achieved. The proposed sensor is suitable for detecting various high RI chemicals, biochemical and organic chemical analytes. Additionally, the effects of fiber structural parameters on the properties of plasmonic excitation are investigated and optimized for sensing performance as well as reducing the sensor’s footprint.

  5. Development of a Non-Contact, Inductive Depth Sensor for Free-Surface, Liquid-Metal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhaug, Gerrit; Kolemen, Egemen; Fischer, Adam; Hvasta, Mike

    2017-10-01

    This paper details a non-contact based, inductive depth measurement system that can sit behind a layer of steel and measure the depth of the liquid metal flowing over the steel. Free-surface liquid metal depth measurement is usually done with invasive sensors that impact the flow of the liquid metal, or complex external sensors that require lasers and precise alignment. Neither of these methods is suitable for the extreme environment encountered in the diverter region of a nuclear fusion reactor, where liquid metal open channel flows are being investigated for future use. A sensor was developed that used the inductive coupling of a coil to liquid metal to measure the height of the liquid metal present. The sensor was built and tested experimentally, and modeled with finite element modeling software to further understand the physics involved. Future work will attempt to integrate the sensor into the Liquid Metal eXperiment (LMX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for more refined testing. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. First bulk and surface results for the ATLAS ITk Strip stereo annulus sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Robert Francis Holub; The ATLAS collaboration; Affolder, Tony; Bohm, Jan; Botte, James Michael; Ciungu, Bianca; Dette, Karola; Dolezal, Zdenek; Escobar, Carlos; Fadeyev, Vitaliy

    2018-01-01

    A novel microstrip sensor geometry, the stereo annulus, has been developed for use in the end-cap of the ATLAS experiment's strip tracker upgrade at the HL-LHC. Its first implementation is in the ATLAS12EC sensors a large-area, radiation-hard, single-sided, ac-coupled, \

  7. Inhibition of charge recombination for enhanced dye-sensitized solar cells and self-powered UV sensors by surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Liang, E-mail: chuliang@njupt.edu.cn [Advanced Energy Technology Center, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (NUPT), Nanjing 210046 (China); Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO)-School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China); Qin, Zhengfei; Liu, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering (SMSE), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications (NUPT), Nanjing 210046 (China); Ma, Xin’guo, E-mail: maxg2013@sohu.com [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for High-efficiency Utilization of Solar Energy, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Inhibition of charge recombination was utilized to prolong electrode lifetime in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and self-powered UV sensors based on TiO{sub 2}-modified SnO{sub 2} photoelectrodes. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open-circuit voltage decay measurements indicated that the electron lifetime was significantly prolonged in DSSCs after TiO{sub 2} modification. And in self-powered UV sensors, the sensitivity and response time were enhanced. - Highlights: • The surface modification to inhibit charge recombination was utilized in photovoltaic devices. • Inhibition of charge recombination can prolong electrode lifetime in photovoltaic devices. • Enhanced DSSCs and self-powered UV sensors based on SnO{sub 2} photoelectrodes were obtained by TiO{sub 2} modification. - Abstract: The surface modification to inhibit charge recombination was utilized in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and self-powered ultraviolet (UV) sensors based on SnO{sub 2} hierarchical microspheres by TiO{sub 2} modification. For DSSCs with SnO{sub 2} photoelectrodes modified by TiO{sub 2}, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was improved from 1.40% to 4.15% under standard AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW/cm{sup 2}). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open-circuit voltage decay measurements indicated that the charge recombination was effectively inhibited, resulting in long electron lifetime. For UV sensors with SnO{sub 2} photoelectrodes modified by TiO{sub 2} layer, the self-powered property was more obvious, and the sensitivity and response time were enhanced from 91 to 6229 and 0.15 s to 0.055 s, respectively. The surface modification can engineer the interface energy to inhibit charge recombination, which is a desirable approach to improve the performance of photoelectric nanodevice.

  8. Performance evaluation of a conformal thermal monitoring sheet sensor array for measurement of surface temperature distributions during superficial hyperthermia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P; Juang, T; Gaeta, C; Stauffer, P R

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a novel conformal thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) sensor array with differential thermal sensitivity for measuring temperature distributions over large surface areas. Performance of the sensor array is evaluated in terms of thermal accuracy, mechanical stability and conformity to contoured surfaces, probe self-heating under irradiation from microwave and ultrasound hyperthermia sources, and electromagnetic field perturbation. A prototype with 4 x 4 array of fiber-optic sensors embedded between two flexible and thermally conducting polyimide films was developed as an alternative to the standard 1-2 mm diameter plastic catheter-based probes used in clinical hyperthermia. Computed tomography images and bending tests were performed to evaluate the conformability and mechanical stability respectively. Irradiation and thermal barrier tests were conducted and thermal response of the prototype was compared with round cross-sectional clinical probes. Bending and conformity tests demonstrated higher flexibility, dimensional stability and close conformity to human torso. Minimal perturbation of microwave fields and low probe self-heating was observed when irradiated with 915 MHz microwave and 3.4 MHz ultrasound sources. The transient and steady state thermal responses of the TMS array were superior compared to the clinical probes. A conformal TMS sensor array with improved thermal sensitivity and dimensional stability was investigated for real-time skin temperature monitoring. This fixed-geometry, body-conforming array of thermal sensors allows fast and accurate characterization of two-dimensional temperature distributions over large surface areas. The prototype TMS demonstrates significant advantages over clinical probes for characterizing skin temperature distributions during hyperthermia treatments of superficial tissue disease.

  9. A New Sensor for Surface Process Quantification in the Geosciences - Image-Assisted Tacheometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicovac, Tanja; Reiterer, Alexander; Rieke-Zapp, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    The quantification of earth surface processes in the geosciences requires precise measurement tools. Typical applications for precise measurement systems involve deformation monitoring for geo-risk management, detection of erosion rates, etc. Often employed for such applications are laser scanners, photogrammetric sensors and image-assisted tacheometers. Image-assisted tacheometers offer the user (metrology expert) an image capturing system (CCD/CMOS camera) in addition to 3D point measurements. The images of the telescope's visual field are projected onto the camera's chip. The camera is capable of capturing panoramic image mosaics through camera rotation if the axes of the measurement system are driven by computer controlled motors. With appropriate calibration, these images are accurately geo-referenced and oriented since the horizontal and vertical angles of rotation are continuously measured and fed into the computer. The oriented images can then directly be used for direction measurements with no need for control points in object space or further photogrammetric orientation processes. In such a system, viewing angles must be addressed to chip pixels inside the optical field of view. Hence dedicated calibration methods have to be applied, an autofocus unit has to be added to the optical path, and special digital image processing procedures have to be used to detect the points of interest on the objects to be measured. We present such a new optical measurement system for measuring and describing 3D surfaces for geosciences. Besides the technique and methods some practical examples will be shown. The system was developed at the Vienna University of Technology (Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics) - two interdisciplinary research project, i-MeaS and SedyMONT, have been launched with the purpose of measuring and interpreting 3D surfaces and surface processes. For the in situ measurement of bed rock erosion the level of surveying accuracy required for recurring sub

  10. Study of n-on-p sensors breakdown in presence of dielectrics placed on top surface

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Cole Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS Upgrade strip module design has readout flex circuits glued directly on top of the sensors’ active area to facilitate the assembly process and minimize the radiation length. The process requires radiation-hard adhesives compatible with the sensor technology. We report on the studies of the breakdown behavior with miniature versions of the prototype sensors, where candidate adhesives were placed in several locations on top of the sensor, including the strip area, guard ring region, and sensor edge. Thermal cycling tends to attenuate the observed cases of breakdown with glue on top of the guard ring. Glue reaching the sensor edge results in low breakdown voltage if it also covers AC- or DC- pads or bias ring openings. Glue placement on top of guard ring region was performed on a large-format sensor, with generally similar results to the miniature sensor tests, except for a large glue deposition, which resulted in a permanent reduction of the breakdown voltage. Post-irradiation measurements were perf...

  11. Effective Low-Power Wearable Wireless Surface EMG Sensor Design Based on Analog-Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Balouchestani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface Electromyography (sEMG is a non-invasive measurement process that does not involve tools and instruments to break the skin or physically enter the body to investigate and evaluate the muscular activities produced by skeletal muscles. The main drawbacks of existing sEMG systems are: (1 they are not able to provide real-time monitoring; (2 they suffer from long processing time and low speed; (3 they are not effective for wireless healthcare systems because they consume huge power. In this work, we present an analog-based Compressed Sensing (CS architecture, which consists of three novel algorithms for design and implementation of wearable wireless sEMG bio-sensor. At the transmitter side, two new algorithms are presented in order to apply the analog-CS theory before Analog to Digital Converter (ADC. At the receiver side, a robust reconstruction algorithm based on a combination of ℓ1-ℓ1-optimization and Block Sparse Bayesian Learning (BSBL framework is presented to reconstruct the original bio-signals from the compressed bio-signals. The proposed architecture allows reducing the sampling rate to 25% of Nyquist Rate (NR. In addition, the proposed architecture reduces the power consumption to 40%, Percentage Residual Difference (PRD to 24%, Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE to 2%, and the computation time from 22 s to 9.01 s, which provide good background for establishing wearable wireless healthcare systems. The proposed architecture achieves robust performance in low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR for the reconstruction process.

  12. Molecularly imprinted surface acoustic wave sensors: The synergy of electrochemical and gravimetric transductions in chemical recognition processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattach, Youssef; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Fougnion, Jean-Marie; Garnier, Francis; Pernelle, Christine; Remita, Samy

    2012-01-01

    Chemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted conducting polymers (MICP) is described. Polythiophenes – acetic acid thiophene MICP films with different thicknesses have been electrosynthesized over the sensing area of an original electrochemical surface acoustic wave sensor (ESAW). To investigate the sensing properties of the developed sensor, electrochemical and gravimetric combined transductions have been applied to atrazine (ATZ) detection. Films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) noted PEDOT as well as non imprinted conducting polymers (NICP), were also prepared, in order to lead a comparative study. The structure of all films was investigated by IR spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Films growth and their doping/undoping processes were investigated by simultaneous gravimetric/electrochemical transduction. Real time measurements highlighted difference between the two polymers electrosynthesis kinetics. MICP and NICP films grow linearly with time, whereas PEDOT film thickness presents a limit value of 1 μm in the implied conditions. Considering ESAW sensor response towards charge “transfer”, a linear relationship between sensor phase variations and charges density have been found for PEDOT film, with a sensitivity of about 470 ° C −1 cm 2 . The same sensitivity can also be considered for MICP and NICP films up to 200 mC cm −2 . Beyond this value, saturation has been observed. This divergence have been attributed to difference in films thicknesses, which led to values of weight ratio MICP (NICP)/PEDOT included between 3 and 4.6 for electropolymerization duration going from 10 s to 30 s. Combined use of electrochemical and gravimetric transductions, using MICP as sensitive layer, have also been considered to highlight the ability of the developed ESAW sensor to detect the specific recognition of polymer functional cavities towards ATZ molecules.

  13. Inverse least-squares modeling of vapor descriptors using polymer-coated surface acoustic wave sensor array responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, J W; Patrash, S J; Kaganovet, S N; Abraham, M H; Wise, B M; Gallagher, N B

    2001-11-01

    In previous work, it was shown that, in principle, vapor descriptors could be derived from the responses of an array of polymer-coated acoustic wave devices. This new chemometric classification approach was based on polymer/vapor interactions following the well-established linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs) and the surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducers being mass sensitive. Mathematical derivations were included and were supported by simulations. In this work, an experimental data set of polymer-coated SAW vapor sensors is investigated. The data set includes 20 diverse polymers tested against 18 diverse organic vapors. It is shown that interfacial adsorption can influence the response behavior of sensors with nonpolar polymers in response to hydrogen-bonding vapors; however, in general, most sensor responses are related to vapor interactions with the polymers. It is also shown that polymer-coated SAW sensor responses can be empirically modeled with LSERs, deriving an LSER for each individual sensor based on its responses to the 18 vapors. Inverse least-squares methods are used to develop models that correlate and predict vapor descriptors from sensor array responses. Successful correlations can be developed by multiple linear regression (MLR), principal components regression (PCR), and partial least-squares (PLS) regression. MLR yields the best fits to the training data, however cross-validation shows that prediction of vapor descriptors for vapors not in the training set is significantly more successful using PCR or PLS. In addition, the optimal dimension of the PCR and PLS models supports the dimensionality of the LSER formulation and SAW response models.

  14. A 30-Year Multi-Sensor Vegetation Index and Land Surface Phenology Data Record: Methods Challenges and Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didan, K.; Barreto-munoz, A.; Miura, T.; Tsend-Ayush, J.

    2013-12-01

    During the last five years the Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab. (vip.arizona.edu) embarked on an effort to process a global multi-sensor Earth Science Data Record of NDVI, EVI2, and land surface Phenology. Data from AVHRR, MODIS, and SPOT-VGT, covering the period 1981 to present, were processed into a seamless and sensor independent record using a suite of community algorithms for data filtering, across-sensor continuity, Vegetation Index (NDVI and EVI2), land surface Phenology, and spatial and temporal gap filling. Currently at Version 3.0 these ESDRs are suitable for the study of land surface vegetation dynamics, long term change and trends, anomalies, and can support various ecosystem and climate modeling efforts by providing key parameters. While adapting the various algorithms to processing this new data record many challenges emerged, ranging from excessive missing and poor quality data to complex and temporally dependent divergence across the various sensors making continuity quite difficult. The first step to addressing these challenges was the adoption of very strict and low tolerance to noise data filters, where the intrinsic input data quality is used along with the long term expected dynamic range to screen for outliers and poor quality. A sophisticated and explicit per-pixel and seasonally dependent across-sensor translation algorithm was developed to address the continuity more properly. To generate the land surface phenology we adapted various community algorithms to work with and take advantage of this new record. Both the standard MODIS Vegetation dynamic algorithm and an in-house homogeneous cluster algorithm were applied to the data. We've also completed a spatially and temporally explicit error and uncertainty characterization of this record. Results indicate a VI error in the range of 5-10% VI units and a 5-40 days error in the date dependent phenology parameters, with an average error of 15 days. This VIP record accounts now for more than

  15. A regenerative label-free fiber optic sensor using surface plasmon resonance for clinical diagnosis of fibrinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen TT

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tan Tai Nguyen,1 Sun Oh Bea,1 Dong Min Kim,2 Won Jung Yoon,3 Jin-Won Park,4 Seong Soo A An,1 Heongkyu Ju1,5,6 1Department of Bionano Technology, College of Bionano Technology, Gachon University, Seongnam, 2Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, Sejong City, 3Department of Chemical and Bio Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam, 4Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, College of Energy and Biotechnology, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, 5Department of Nanophysics, College of Bionano Technology, Gachon University, Seongnam, 6Neuroscience Institute, Gil Hospital, Incheon, South Korea Purpose: We present the regenerative label-free fiber optical biosensor that exploits surface plasmon resonance for quantitative detection of fibrinogen (Fbg extracted from human blood plasma.Materials and methods: The sensor head was made up of a multimode optical fiber with its polymer cladding replaced by metal composite of nanometer thickness made of silver, aluminum, and nickel. The Ni layer coated allowed a direct immobilization of histidine-tagged peptide (HP on its metal surface without an additional cross-linker in between. On the coated HP layer, immunoglobulin G was then immobilized for specific capturing of Fbg.Results: We demonstrated a real-time quantitative detection of Fbg concentrations with limit of detection of ~10 ng/mL. The fact that the HP layer could be removed by imidazole with acid also permitted us to demonstrate the regeneration of the outermost metal surface of the sensor head for the sensor reusability.Conclusion: The sensor detection limit was estimated to be ~10 pM, which was believed to be sensitive enough for detecting Fbg during the clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases, myocardial infarction, strokes, and Alzheimer’s diseases. Keywords: SPR, real-time assay, histidine-tagged peptide, protein sensing

  16. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  17. Sensitive detection of capsaicinoids using a surface plasmon resonance sensor with anti-homovanillic Acid polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-13

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  18. Near-surface Salinity and Temperature structure Observed with Dual-Sensor Drifters in the Subtropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Volkov, D.; Goni, G. J.; Lumpkin, R.; Foltz, G. R.

    2017-12-01

    Three surface drifters equipped with temperature and salinity sensors at 0.2 m and 5 m depths were deployed in April/May 2015 in the subtropical South Pacific with the objective of measuring near-surface salinity differences seen by satellite and in situ sensors and examining the causes of these differences. Measurements from these drifters indicate that water at a depth of 0.2 m is about 0.013 psu fresher than at 5 m and about 0.024°C warmer. Events with large temperature and salinity differences between the two depths are caused by anomalies in surface freshwater and heat fluxes, modulated by wind. While surface freshening and cooling occurs during rainfall events, surface salinification is generally observed under weak wind conditions (≤4 m/s). Further examination of the drifter measurements demonstrates that (i) the amount of surface freshening and strength of the vertical salinity gradient heavily depend on wind speed during rain events, (ii) salinity differences between 0.2 m and 5 m are positively correlated with the corresponding temperature differences for cases with surface salinification, and (iii) temperature exhibits a diurnal cycle at both depths, whereas the diurnal cycle of salinity is observed only at 0.2 m when the wind speed is less than 6 m/s. The amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of temperature at both depths decrease with increasing wind speed. The mean diurnal cycle of surface salinity is dominated by events with winds less than 2 m/s.

  19. Chemodynamics of Soft Nanoparticulate Metal Complexes: From the Local Particle/Medium Interface to a Macroscopic Sensor Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Raewyn M; Pinheiro, José Paulo; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2017-01-17

    The lability of a complex species between a metal ion M and a binding site S, MS, is conventionally defined with respect to an ongoing process at a reactive interface, for example, the conversion or accumulation of the free metal ion M by a sensor. In the case of soft charged multisite nanoparticulate complexes, the chemodynamic features that are operative within the micro environment of the particle body generally differ substantially from those for dissolved similar single-site complexes in the same medium. Here we develop a conceptual framework for the chemodynamics and the ensuing lability of soft (3D) nanoparticulate metal complexes. The approach considers the dynamic features of MS at the intraparticulate level and their impact on the overall reactivity of free metal ions at the surface of a macroscopic sensing interface. Chemodynamics at the intraparticulate level is shown to involve a local reaction layer at the particle/medium interface, while at the macroscopic sensor level an operational reaction layer is invoked. Under a certain window of conditions, volume exclusion of the nanoparticle body near the medium/sensor interface is substantial and affects the properties of the reaction layer and the overall lability of the nanoparticulate MS complex toward the reactive surface.

  20. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Maier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  1. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Konrad; Helwig, Andreas; Müller, Gerhard; Hille, Pascal; Eickhoff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high. PMID:28793583

  2. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the "gradient effect". This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the "substrate effect". This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG sensor

  3. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the “gradient effect”. This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the “substrate effect”. This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an

  4. Graphene oxide and dextran capped gold nanoparticles based surface plasmon resonance sensor for sensitive detection of concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Fang; Yao, Gui-Hong; Liang, Ru-Ping; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2013-12-15

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions mediate the important physiological and pathophysiological processes in living organism. Their study has attracted great attention due to its importance in understanding these biological processes and in fabricating biosensors for diagnostics and drug development. Here, by using concanavalin A (ConA) as a model protein, a novel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor was developed for sensitive detection ConA. In this sensing platform, dextran (Dex) capped gold nanoparticles (Dex-Au NPs) were initially synthesized in one-pot and utilized as amplification reagent. After deposition of graphene oxide (GO) on the SPR gold film, phenoxy-derivatized dextran (DexP) was assembled onto the GO-modified gold chip surface through π-π interaction. The resultant GO/DexP sensing interface could specifically capture ConA which could further react with Dex-Au NPs through the specific interaction between ConA and Dex, forming a sandwich configuration. The morphologies and the electrochemistry of the formed sensing surface were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammogram. Owing to the high surface area of GO and the excellent amplification of Dex-Au NPs, the developed sandwich SPR sensor successfully fulfilled the sensitive detection of ConA in the range of 1.0-20.0 μg mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.39 μg mL(-1). Compared to the direct assay format, the prepared sandwich SPR sensor led to an improvement of 28.7-fold in the sensitivity. The results demonstrated that the proposed method might provide a new direction in designing high-performance SPR biosensors for sensitive and selective detection of a wide spectrum of biomolecules. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence of a rearrangement of the surface structure in titanium phthalocyanine sensors induced by the interaction with nitrogen oxides molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generosi, A.; Paci, B.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Perfetti, P.; Paoletti, A.M.; Pennesi, G.; Rossi, G.; Caminiti, R.

    2005-01-01

    Thin-film samples of titanium phthalocyanine, a sensor of environmental pollutants, were studied by time resolved energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity (EDXR). This original method demonstrated to be an ideal tool to follow the evolution of the films morphology upon gas exposure, in situ, also allowing an unexpected response of the sensors to be detected. Indeed, while the increase in thickness showed the characteristic feature of a 'breathing-like' expansion, already observed in other metal-Pc, the curve of roughness versus exposure time exhibited a peak. This effect, in some cases evident by observation with the naked eye the EDXR data, was attributed to a surface structure rearrangement process

  6. Titanium Dioxide-Based 64∘ YX LiNbO3 Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Sadek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2 and gold (Au doped TiO2-based surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors have been investigated as hydrogen gas detectors. The nanocrystal-doped TiO2 films were synthesized through a sol-gel route, mixing a Ti-butoxide-based solution with diluted colloidal gold nanoparticles. The films were deposited via spin coating onto 64∘ YX LiNbO3 SAW transducers in a helium atmosphere. The SAW gas sensors were operated at various temperatures between 150 and 310∘C. It was found that gold doping on TiO2 increased the device sensitivity and reduced the optimum operating temperature.

  7. Monoclonal antibody-based Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for pathogen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2007-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device, which incorporates a biological sensing element integrated within a physicochemical transducer. The aim of a biosensor is to produce an electronic signal, which is proportional to the interaction of analytes with the sensing element. This means that the sensor......, that can detect and quantify specific plant pathogens and map these to defined positions within the field, would enable the farm manager to perform a precise and targeted application of pesticides and thereby reduce and optimise the use of agrochemicals. The ideal scenario for precision agriculture...... is to have real-time, robust and low-cost sensors, for both soil and air, which can be operated by personnel with limited or no training in plant pathology. In the present thesis focus is put on the development of immunological sensors for detection of two model plant pathogens, Puccinia striiformis f...

  8. Optical monitoring of thin film electro-polymerization on surface of ITO-coated lossy-mode resonance sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaszek, Michał; Dominik, Magdalena; Burnat, Dariusz; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Stranak, Viteszlav; Sezemsky, Petr; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2017-04-01

    This work presents an optical fiber sensors based on lossy-mode resonance (LMR) phenomenon supported by indium tin oxide (ITO) thin overlay for investigation of electro-polymerization effect on ITO's surface. The ITO overlays were deposited on core of polymer-clad silica (PCS) fibers using reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS) method. Since ITO is electrically conductive and electrochemically active it can be used as a working electrode in 3-electrode cyclic voltammetry setup. For fixed potential applied to the electrode current flow decrease with time what corresponds to polymer layer formation on the ITO surface. Since LMR phenomenon depends on optical properties in proximity of the ITO surface, polymer layer formation can be monitored optically in real time. The electrodeposition process has been performed with Isatin which is a strong endogenous neurochemical regulator in humans as it is a metabolic derivative of adrenaline. It was found that optical detection of Isatin is possible in the proposed configuration.

  9. A finite state machine read-out chip for integrated surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Sambarta; Iliadis, Agis A.

    2015-01-01

    A finite state machine based integrated sensor circuit suitable for the read-out module of a monolithically integrated SAW sensor on Si is reported. The primary sensor closed loop consists of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), a peak detecting comparator, a finite state machine (FSM), and a monolithically integrated SAW sensor device. The output of the system oscillates within a narrow voltage range that correlates with the SAW pass-band response. The period of oscillation is of the order of the SAW phase delay. We use timing information from the FSM to convert SAW phase delay to an on-chip 10 bit digital output operating on the principle of time to digital conversion (TDC). The control inputs of this digital conversion block are generated by a second finite state machine operating under a divided system clock. The average output varies with changes in SAW center frequency, thus tracking mass sensing events in real time. Based on measured VCO gain of 16 MHz/V our system will convert a 10 kHz SAW frequency shift to a corresponding mean voltage shift of 0.7 mV. A corresponding shift in phase delay is converted to a one or two bit shift in the TDC output code. The system can handle alternate SAW center frequencies and group delays simply by adjusting the VCO control and TDC delay control inputs. Because of frequency to voltage and phase to digital conversion, this topology does not require external frequency counter setups and is uniquely suitable for full monolithic integration of autonomous sensor systems and tags.

  10. Sub-surface Elasticity Imaging Sensor based on Bio-Optics with Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ha LEE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel tactile sensor capable of measuring material constants of the sensed object has been fabricated and demonstrated in the current study. Although many tactile sensors have been previously developed, the resolution of these measurements is still fairly low compared to the sensation of human touch. The tactile sensor we propose is comprised of an elastic optical waveguide unit, a high resolution CCD camera unit, and an LED light source. The sensing element is formed on Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and is illuminated along its four edges by LED light sources. The sensor operates on the principle of total internal reflection within an optical waveguide. Since the waveguide is surrounded by air, having a lower refractive index than the waveguide, the incident light directed into the waveguide remains contained within it. When an object compresses the waveguide, the contact area of the waveguide deforms and causes the light to scatter. Since the scattered light is directly captured by a CCD camera, the tactile resolution of the proposed sensor is based on the resolution of the camera. The normal force is detected from the integrated gray scale values of bright pixels emitted from the deformed area of the optical waveguide. Non-rigid point matching algorithm with Laplacian smoothing spline is used to estimate the displacement of control points between 3D rendered tactile images captured under different compression ratios. The strain experienced through the sensed object is derived from a function of the associated displacement. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the ability of the proposed sensing strategy in measuring Young’s modulus of polymer samples within 4.23 % error.

  11. Experimental investigations of sensor-based surface following performed by a mobile manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.; Baker, J.E.; Pin, F.G.

    1994-10-01

    We discuss a series of surface following experiments using a range finder mounted on the end of an arm that is mounted on a vehicle. The goal is to keep the range finder at a fixed distance from an unknown surface and to keep the orientation of the range finder perpendicular to the surface. During the experiments, the vehicle moves along a predefined trajectory while planning software determines the position and orientation of the arm. To keep the range finder perpendicular to the surface, the planning software calculates the surface normal for the unknown surface. We assume that the unknown surface is a cylinder (the surface depends on x and y but does not depend on z). To calculate the surface normal, the planning software must calculate the locations (x,y) of points on the surface in world coordinates. The calculation requires data on the position and orientation of the vehicle, the position and orientation of the arm, and the distance from the range finder to the surface. We discuss four series of experiments. During the first series of experiments, the calculated surface normal values had large high frequency random variations. A filter was used to produce an average value for the surface normal and we limited the rate of change in the yaw angle target for the arm. We performed the experiment for a variety of concave and convex surfaces. While the experiments were qualitative successes, the measured distance to the surface was significantly different than the target. The distance errors were systematic, low frequency, and had magnitudes up to 25 mm. During the second series of experiments, we reduced the variations in the calculated surface normal values. While reviewing the data collected while following the surface of a barrel, we found that the radius of the calculated surface was significantly different than the measured radius of the barrel.

  12. Very thin spin-coated silver films via transparent silver ink for surface plasmon resonance sensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jung-Han; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2012-07-01

    We fabricated very thin silver films with thicknesses of 20 nm, 40 nm, and 60 nm on a prism using a spin coating method for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image sensor module applications. An aqueous silver ionic complex solution was spin-coated and then thermally cured for 10 minutes at 150 degrees C in an oven. The spin-coated solid silver films possessed silver crystallinity. The prism modules with the 20-nm-, 40-nm- and 60-nm-thick thin silver films were applied to an SPR image sensor system. The coefficients of determination for the 20-nm-, 40-nm- and 60-nm-thick silver films were 0.923, 0.990 and 0.989, respectively when standard ethanol solutions with 0.1% intervals in the range of 20.0% to 20.5% were applied. The correlation is high-performed and the coefficients of determination are as close as 1. The spin coating method of very thin silver films for SPR image sensor modules is expected to be a very cost-effective solution because the films can be formed at a low temperature in a short period of time without requiring a vacuum system.

  13. Structure Crack Identification Based on Surface-mounted Active Sensor Network with Time-Domain Feature Extraction and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunling DU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the condition of metallic structures are classified based on the acquired sensor data from a surface-mounted piezoelectric sensor/actuator network. The structures are aluminum plates with riveted holes and possible crack damage at these holes. A 400 kHz sine wave burst is used as diagnostic signals. The combination of time-domain S0 waves from received sensor signals is directly used as features and preprocessing is not needed for the dam age detection. Since the time sequence of the extracted S0 has a high dimension, principal component estimation is applied to reduce its dimension before entering NN (neural network training for classification. An LVQ (learning vector quantization NN is used to classify the conditions as healthy or damaged. A number of FEM (finite element modeling results are taken as inputs to the NN for training, since the simulated S0 waves agree well with the experimental results on real plates. The performance of the classification is then validated by using these testing results.

  14. A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor based on a three-dimensional sensing layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To fabricate a new surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor, the design and preparation of SERS-active sensing layer is one of important topics. In this study, we fabricated a highly sensitive three-dimensional (3D SERS-active sensing layer on the optical fiber terminal via in situ polymerizing a porous polymer material on a flat optical fiber terminal through thermal-induced process, following with the photochemical silver nanoparticles growth. The polymerized polymer formed a 3D porous structure with the pore size of 0.29–0.81 μm, which were afterward decorated with abundant silver nanoparticles with the size of about 100 nm, allowing for higher SERS enhancement. This SERS-active optical fiber sensor was applied for the determination of 4-mercaptopyridine, crystal violet and maleic acid The enhancement factor of this SERS sensing layer can be reached as about 108. The optical fiber sensor with high sensitive SERS-active porous polymer is expected for online analysis and environment detection.

  15. A Wearable System for Recognizing American Sign Language in Real-Time Using IMU and Surface EMG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Sun, Lu; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2016-09-01

    A sign language recognition system translates signs performed by deaf individuals into text/speech in real time. Inertial measurement unit and surface electromyography (sEMG) are both useful modalities to detect hand/arm gestures. They are able to capture signs and the fusion of these two complementary sensor modalities will enhance system performance. In this paper, a wearable system for recognizing American Sign Language (ASL) in real time is proposed, fusing information from an inertial sensor and sEMG sensors. An information gain-based feature selection scheme is used to select the best subset of features from a broad range of well-established features. Four popular classification algorithms are evaluated for 80 commonly used ASL signs on four subjects. The experimental results show 96.16% and 85.24% average accuracies for intra-subject and intra-subject cross session evaluation, respectively, with the selected feature subset and a support vector machine classifier. The significance of adding sEMG for ASL recognition is explored and the best channel of sEMG is highlighted.

  16. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  17. Comparison of Surface and Column Variations of CO2 Over Urban Areas for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan; Browell, Edward

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaign, to investigate the ability of space-based observations to accurately assess near surface conditions related to air quality. This campaign includes, Washington DC/Baltimore, MD (July 2011), San Joaquin Valley, CA (January - February 2013), Houston, TX (September 2013), and Denver, CO (July-August 2014). Each of these campaigns consisted of missed approaches and approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 km). In this study, surface (0 - 1 km) and column-averaged (0 - 3.5 km) CO2 mixing ratio values from the vertical soundings in the four geographically different urban areas are used to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of CO2 within the different urban atmospheric emission environments. Tracers such as CO, CH2O, NOx, and NMHCs are used to identify the source of CO2 variations in the urban sites. Additionally, we apply nominal CO2 column weighting functions for potential future active remote CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57-microns and 2.05-microns measurement regions to convert the in situ CO2 vertical mixing ratio profiles to variations in CO2 column optical depths, which is what the active remote sensors actually measure. Using statistics calculated from the optical depths at each urban site measured during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and for each nominal weighting function, we investigate the natural variability of CO2 columns in the lower troposphere; relate the CO2 column variability to the urban surface emissions; and show the measurement requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) in the continental U.S. urban areas.

  18. NEWTON - NEW portable multi-sensor scienTific instrument for non-invasive ON-site characterization of rock from planetary surface and sub-surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Michelena, M.; de Frutos, J.; Ordóñez, A. A.; Rivero, M. A.; Mesa, J. L.; González, L.; Lavín, C.; Aroca, C.; Sanz, M.; Maicas, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Cobos, P.; Pérez, M.; Kilian, R.; Baeza, O.; Langlais, B.; Thébault, E.; Grösser, J.; Pappusch, M.

    2017-09-01

    In space instrumentation, there is currently no instrument dedicated to susceptibly or complete magnetization measurements of rocks. Magnetic field instrument suites are generally vector (or scalar) magnetometers, which locally measure the magnetic field. When mounted on board rovers, the electromagnetic perturbations associated with motors and other elements make it difficult to reap the benefits from the inclusion of such instruments. However, magnetic characterization is essential to understand key aspects of the present and past history of planetary objects. The work presented here overcomes the limitations currently existing in space instrumentation by developing a new portable and compact multi-sensor instrument for ground breaking high-resolution magnetic characterization of planetary surfaces and sub-surfaces. This new technology introduces for the first time magnetic susceptometry (real and imaginary parts) as a complement to existing compact vector magnetometers for planetary exploration. This work aims to solve the limitations currently existing in space instrumentation by means of providing a new portable and compact multi-sensor instrument for use in space, science and planetary exploration to solve some of the open questions on the crustal and more generally planetary evolution within the Solar System.

  19. LIBS Sensor for Sub-surface CO2 Leak Detection in Carbon Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinesh JAIN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring carbon sequestration poses numerous challenges to the sensor community. For example, the subsurface environment is notoriously harsh, with large potential mechanical, thermal, and chemical stresses, making long-term stability and survival a challenge to any potential in situ monitoring method. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been demonstrated as a promising technology for chemical monitoring of harsh environments and hard to reach places. LIBS has a real- time monitoring capability and can be used for the elemental and isotopic analysis of solid, liquid, and gas samples. The flexibility of the probe design and the use of fiber- optics has made LIBS particularly suited for remote measurements. The paper focuses on developing a LIBS instrument for downhole high-pressure, high-temperature brine experiments, where CO2 leakage could result in changes in the trace mineral composition of an aquifer. The progress in fabricating a compact, robust, and simple LIBS sensor for widespread subsurface leak detection is presented.

  20. Monoclonal antibody-based Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for pathogen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2007-01-01

    essentially transforms molecular interactions into a digital signal, thereby making detection of analytes label-free. Biosensors are used for detection of analytes ranging from small drug molecules to food- and waterborne microorganisms as well as biowarfare pathogens. In future farming, plant production......, that can detect and quantify specific plant pathogens and map these to defined positions within the field, would enable the farm manager to perform a precise and targeted application of pesticides and thereby reduce and optimise the use of agrochemicals. The ideal scenario for precision agriculture...... is to have real-time, robust and low-cost sensors, for both soil and air, which can be operated by personnel with limited or no training in plant pathology. In the present thesis focus is put on the development of immunological sensors for detection of two model plant pathogens, Puccinia striiformis f...

  1. The structure of sensor organic polymeric solids deposited on surfaces of interest for sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lemon, P

    2001-01-01

    For many years, electrochemically deposited polypyrrole has found application in a host of technologically significant areas. Popular applications include use in rechargeable batteries, electrochromic displays and artificial muscles. However, perhaps the most significant application of polypyrrole is as a gas sensing material. The relatively low selectivity of polypyrrole has led to it seldom being used as a 'stand alone' sensor; the ease by which the properties of polypyrrole may be subtly modified during electrochemical deposition (resulting in subtly different sensor responses) makes it ideally suited for incorporation into sensing 'arrays'. The level of understanding concerning the growth dynamics and structural characteristics of electrochemically deposited polypyrrole was poor prior to the commencement of the work presented; this thesis describes research undertaken in order to elucidate the properties of this material. As variation of the dopant group used during electrochemical deposition has been sho...

  2. Análise comparativa de sensores de velocidade de deslocamento em função da superfície Analysis of speed sensors performance on different surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José P. Molin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Um dos fatores que influencia diretamente no desempenho de sistemas mecanizados é a velocidade de deslocamento pela sua importância no planejamento e na execução das operações agrícolas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a acurácia de quatro sensores de velocidade, em condições de superfície asfáltica, solo com cobertura vegetal, aclives e declives, acelerações e desacelerações, submetidos a velocidades representativas para aplicações agrícolas. Foram ensaiados dois modelos comerciais de sensores de radar, um sensor de GPS e um sensor óptico. Foram identificadas diferenças significativas para as situações de solo com cobertura vegetal, acelerações e desacelerações. Para a superfície asfáltica, em situação de velocidade constante, os sensores avaliados não apresentaram desempenho com diferença significativa. Os sensores tipo radar demonstraram ser influenciados pela superfície com cobertura vegetal. Na superfície asfáltica, sob condições de aceleração e desaceleração, o sensor de GPS apresentou retardo nos valores de velocidade quando comparado com os demais.One of the factors that influence directly the performance of mechanized systems is the forward speed that is important on planning and managing agricultural operations. The objective of this work was to evaluate the accuracy of four speed sensors, on paved road, vegetated surface, hills, increasing and reducing representative speeds for agricultural applications. Two commercial radars, a GPS sensor and an optical sensor were tested. For the paved road surface, under constant speed, no significant differences were observed on the performance. Radars were influenced by the vegetated surface. On paved road and under acceleration and deceleration the GPS sensor presented delay on its speed values when compared with the other sensors.

  3. Safety and security monitoring of dams using nano-micromachined-based surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wayne, Jr.; Saafi, Mohamed; Romine, Peter; Xiao, Zhigang; Pett, Dave

    2006-03-01

    Concerns about the safety of concrete dams have increased during recent years, partly because the population at risk in locations downstream of major dams continues to expand and also because these old dams are experiencing long-term damage and the seismic design concepts used to build them were inadequate. Reliable techniques for continuous monitoring of certain key parameters affecting the dams' integrity are currently nonexistent and this is because of the lack of sensing technology capable to function in a hostile environment such as low temperatures and high moisture level. This paper presents new low cost, passive and wireless micro-machined SAW-based sensors to monitor the safety and security of dams. These SAW sensors are composed of MEMS transducers, Nano-polymer actuators and an antenna, and are deposited on a thin film substrate. The sensors are passive, do not require power on-board and can be interrogated wireless using a radar. When embedded into concrete dams, the devices will be able to detect and locate internal cracks and measure certain key parameters affecting the durability of dams such as temperature, moisture, pH, chloride and carbon dioxide.

  4. Study of n-on-p sensors breakdown in presence of dielectrics placed on top surface

    CERN Document Server

    Affolder, Tony; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment at LHC will have several upgrade projects for High Luminosity LHC operations. Its tracking system will be replaced to cope with the higher interaction rate and radiation levels. The Strip portion of the tracker will be significantly expanded in radius and instrumented area to control the occupancy and momentum resolution. The strip modules are based on large-area n-on-p sensors with short strips, designed to work with the larger particle fluxes and radiation hardness requirements. The strip module design has readout flex circuit glued directly on top of the sensors’ active area to facilitate the assembly process and minimize the radiation length. Adhesive spread outward to the guard ring (GR) region is typically avoided to control the sensor breakdown. However, due to the large number of modules to be constructed, on the order of 20000, such occasions may in principle happen, depending on the process precision control. Therefore, the adhesive influence on the sensor breakdown and the br...

  5. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashan, M A M; Kalavally, V; Ramakrishnan, N; Lee, H W

    2016-01-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface. (paper)

  6. A comparative study on surface morphological investigations of ferric oxide for LPG and opto-electronic humidity sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satyendra; Verma, Nidhi [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Yadav, B.C., E-mail: balchandra_yadav@rediffmail.com [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Department of Applied Physics, School for Physical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow 226025, U.P. (India); Prakash, Rajiv [School of Materials Science and Technology, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2012-09-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flower-like, elliptical and spherical shaped surface morphologies of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and surface morphological investigations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the surface morphology and sensing property. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advancement in sensitivity of LPG sensor in comparison to prior work. - Abstract: In the present work nanostructured ferric oxides were synthesized via hydroxide precipitation method without using any surfactant and size selection medium. The surface morphologies and structure of samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structural analysis confirmed the formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with {alpha}-phase and rhombohedral structure. Optical and thermal properties were investigated by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Pelletizations of materials were done using hydraulic press and these pellets were investigated with the exposition of liquefied petroleum gas. Variations in resistance of the pellet with time for different concentrations of LPG were recorded at room temperature (27 Degree-Sign C). The maximum value of average sensitivity was found {approx}5 for 5 vol.% of LPG. Our results show that the LPG sensing behavior was inspired by the different kinds of surface morphologies of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and inferred that the spherical porous nanoparticles synthesized via hydroxide precipitation process (S-3) had best response to LPG.

  7. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashan, M. A. M.; Kalavally, V.; Lee, H. W.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface.

  8. Angular scanning and variable wavelength surface plasmon resonance allowing free sensor surface selection for optimum material- and bio-sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakayan, Dina; Tuppurainen, Jussipekka; Albers, Martin; van Lint, Matthijs J.; van Iperen, Dick J.; Weda, Jelmer J.A.; Kuncova-Kallio, Johana; Somsen, Govert W.; Kool, Jeroen

    2018-01-01

    A variable-wavelength Kretschmann configuration surface plasmon resonance (SPR) apparatus with angle scanning is presented. The setup provides the possibility of selecting the optimum wavelength with respect to the properties of the metal layer of the sensorchip, sample matrix, and biomolecular

  9. On-Site Detection of Aflatoxin B1 in Grains by a Palm-Sized Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Moon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins (AFs are highly toxic compounds that can cause both acute and chronic toxicity in humans. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is considered the most toxic of AFs. Therefore, the rapid and on-site detection of AFB1 is critical for food safety management. Here, we report the on-site detection of AFB1 in grains by a portable surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor. For the detection of AFB1, the surface of an SPR Au chip was sequentially modified by cysteine-protein G, AFB1 antibody, and bovine serum albumin (BSA. Then, the sample solution and AFB1-BSA conjugate were flowed onto the Au chip in serial order. In the absence of AFB1, the SPR response greatly increased due to the binding of AFB1-BSA on the Au chip. In the presence of AFB1, the SPR response showed little change because the small AFB1 molecule binds on the Au chip instead of the large AFB1-BSA molecule. By using this portable SPR-based competitive immunoassay, the sensor showed low limits of detection (2.51 ppb and quantification (16.32 ppb. Furthermore, we successfully detected AFB1 in rice, peanut, and almond samples, which suggests that the proposed sensing method can potentially be applied to the on-site monitoring of mycotoxins in food.

  10. Classification of reflected signals from cavitated tooth surfaces using an artificial intelligence technique incorporating a fiber optic displacement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Arof, Hamzah; Irawati, Ninik; Musirin, Ismail; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Ahmad, Harith

    2014-05-01

    An enhanced dental cavity diameter measurement mechanism using an intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensor (FODS) scanning and imaging system, fuzzy logic as well as a single-layer perceptron (SLP) neural network, is presented. The SLP network was employed for the classification of the reflected signals, which were obtained from the surfaces of teeth samples and captured using FODS. Two features were used for the classification of the reflected signals with one of them being the output of a fuzzy logic. The test results showed that the combined fuzzy logic and SLP network methodology contributed to a 100% classification accuracy of the network. The high-classification accuracy significantly demonstrates the suitability of the proposed features and classification using SLP networks for classifying the reflected signals from teeth surfaces, enabling the sensor to accurately measure small diameters of tooth cavity of up to 0.6 mm. The method remains simple enough to allow its easy integration in existing dental restoration support systems.

  11. A versatile optical profilometer based on conoscopic holography sensors for acquisition of specular and diffusive surfaces in artworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaburro, Nicola; Marchioro, Giacomo; Daffara, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Surface metrology of artworks requires the design of suitable devices for in-situ non-destructive measurement together with reliable procedures for an effective analysis of such non-engineered variegate objects. To advance the state-of-the-art it has been implemented a versatile optical micro-profilometry taking advantage of the adapt- ability of conoscopic holography sensors, able to operate with irregular shapes and composite materials (diffusive, specular, and polychrome) of artworks. The scanning technique is used to obtain wide field and high spatially resolved areal profilometry. The prototype has a modular scheme based on a set of conoscopic sensors, extending the typical design based on a scanning stage and a single probe with a limited bandwidth, thus allowing the collection of heights data from surface with different scales and materials with variegate optical response. The system was optimized by characterizing the quality of the measurement with the probes triggered in continuous scanning modality. The results obtained on examples of cultural heritage objects (2D paintings, 3D height-relief) and materials (pictorial, metallic) demonstrate the versatility of the implemented device.

  12. Nanocrystalline BaSnO3 as an Alternative Gas Sensor Material: Surface Reactivity and High Sensitivity to SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marikutsa, Artem; Rumyantseva, Marina; Baranchikov, Alexander; Gaskov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline perovskite-type BaSnO3 was obtained via microwave-assisted hydrothermal route followed by annealing at variable temperature. The samples composition and microstructure were characterized. Particle size of 18–23 nm was unaffected by heat treatment at 275–700 °C. Materials DC-conduction was measured at variable temperature and oxygen concentration. Barium stannate exhibited n-type semiconductor behavior at 150–450 °C with activation energy being dependent on the materials annealing temperature. Predominant ionosorbed oxygen species types were estimated. They were shown to change from molecular to atomic species on increasing temperature. Comparative test of sensor response to various inorganic target gases was performed using nanocrystalline SnO2-based sensors as reference ones. Despite one order of magnitude smaller surface area, BaSnO3 displayed higher sensitivity to SO2 in comparison with SnO2. DRIFT spectroscopy revealed distinct interaction routes of the oxides surfaces with SO2. Barium-promoted sulfate formation favoring target molecules oxidation was found responsible for the increased BaSnO3 sensitivity to ppm-range concentrations of SO2 in air. PMID:28793573

  13. Nanocrystalline BaSnO3 as an Alternative Gas Sensor Material: Surface Reactivity and High Sensitivity to SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Marikutsa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline perovskite-type BaSnO3 was obtained via microwave-assisted hydrothermal route followed by annealing at variable temperature. The samples composition and microstructure were characterized. Particle size of 18–23 nm was unaffected by heat treatment at 275–700 °C. Materials DC-conduction was measured at variable temperature and oxygen concentration. Barium stannate exhibited n-type semiconductor behavior at 150–450 °C with activation energy being dependent on the materials annealing temperature. Predominant ionosorbed oxygen species types were estimated. They were shown to change from molecular to atomic species on increasing temperature. Comparative test of sensor response to various inorganic target gases was performed using nanocrystalline SnO2-based sensors as reference ones. Despite one order of magnitude smaller surface area, BaSnO3 displayed higher sensitivity to SO2 in comparison with SnO2. DRIFT spectroscopy revealed distinct interaction routes of the oxides surfaces with SO2. Barium-promoted sulfate formation favoring target molecules oxidation was found responsible for the increased BaSnO3 sensitivity to ppm-range concentrations of SO2 in air.

  14. A simple and sensitive surface molecularly imprinted polymers based fluorescence sensor for detection of λ-Cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunbo; Song, Zhilong; Pan, Jianming; Yan, Yongsheng; Cao, Zhijing; Wei, Xiao; Gao, Lin; Wang, Juan; Dai, Jiangdong; Meng, Minjia; Yu, Ping

    2014-07-01

    In this study, surface molecularly imprinted YVO4:Eu(3+) nanoparticles with molecular recognitive optosensing activity were successfully prepared by precipitation polymerization using λ-Cyhalothrin (LC) as template molecules, methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the polymerization precursors which could complex with template molecules, and the material has been characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and so on. Meanwhile, the as-prepared core-shell structured nanocomposite (YVO4:Eu(3+)@MIPs), which was composed of lanthanide doped YVO4:Eu(3+) as fluorescent signal and surface molecular imprinted polymers as molecular selective recognition sites, could selectively and sensitively optosense the template molecules. After the experimental conditions were optimized, two linear relationship were obtained covering the concentration range of 2.0-10.0 μM and 10.0-90.0 μM, and the limit of detection (LOD) for LC was found to be 1.76 μM. Furthermore, a possible mechanism was put forward to explain the fluorescence quenching of YVO4:Eu(3+)@MIPs. More importantly, the obtained sensor was proven to be suitable for the detection of residues of LC in real examples. And the excellent performance of this sensor will facilitate future development of rapid and high-efficiency detection of LC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanocrystalline BaSnO₃ as an Alternative Gas Sensor Material: Surface Reactivity and High Sensitivity to SO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marikutsa, Artem; Rumyantseva, Marina; Baranchikov, Alexander; Gaskov, Alexander

    2015-09-18

    Nanocrystalline perovskite-type BaSnO₃ was obtained via microwave-assisted hydrothermal route followed by annealing at variable temperature. The samples composition and microstructure were characterized. Particle size of 18-23 nm was unaffected by heat treatment at 275-700 °C. Materials DC-conduction was measured at variable temperature and oxygen concentration. Barium stannate exhibited n -type semiconductor behavior at 150-450 °C with activation energy being dependent on the materials annealing temperature. Predominant ionosorbed oxygen species types were estimated. They were shown to change from molecular to atomic species on increasing temperature. Comparative test of sensor response to various inorganic target gases was performed using nanocrystalline SnO₂-based sensors as reference ones. Despite one order of magnitude smaller surface area, BaSnO₃ displayed higher sensitivity to SO₂ in comparison with SnO₂. DRIFT spectroscopy revealed distinct interaction routes of the oxides surfaces with SO₂. Barium-promoted sulfate formation favoring target molecules oxidation was found responsible for the increased BaSnO₃ sensitivity to ppm-range concentrations of SO₂ in air.

  16. The use of reverse iontophoresis based surface plasmon resonance for the development of a noninvasive real time transdermal biomarker sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Niraj K.; Hwang, Yongsoon; Cameron, Brent D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in the identification of biomarkers offer a potential means to facilitate early disease detection, gauge treatment in drug therapy clinical trials, and to assess the impact of fatigue and/or stress as related to human physical and cognitive performance. For practical implementation, however, real-time sensing and quantification of such physiological biomarkers is preferred. Some key aspects in this process are continuous sample collection and real time detection. Traditionally, blood is considered the gold standard for samples but frequent phlebotomy is painful and inconvenient. Other sources like saliva and passive sweat cannot be precisely controlled and are affected by other limitations. Some of these can be addressed by reverse iontophoresis which is a noninvasive technique capable of facilitating controlled transport of biomolecules up to 20kDa in size across the skin barrier by passing a low level current between two dermal electrodes. The samples collected at the electrode site can then be monitored at site or transported via a microfluidic channel towards a sensor. In the case reported here, the sensor is based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which is a label free, real time, and highly sensitive optical sensing technique. The real time SPR detection of targeted biomarkers is then achieved through the use of aptamer surface modification. In this experiment, extraction and detection of orexin A, a stress related biomarker, is used for demonstration purposes.

  17. Surface stress sensor based on MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometer with high wavelength selectivity for label-free biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Hizawa, Takeshi; Misawa, Nobuo; Taki, Miki; Sawada, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a surface stress sensor based on a microelectromechanical Fabry-Perot interferometer with high wavelength selectivity by using Au half-mirrors, for highly sensitive label-free biosensing. When the target molecule is adsorbed by the antigen-antibody reaction onto a movable membrane with a thin Au film, which acts as an upper mirror of the optical interferometer, the amount of deflection of the movable membrane deflected by the change in surface stress can be detected with high sensitivity. To improve the signal at the small membrane deflection region of this biosensor resulting in detection of low concentration molecules, by integrating 50 nm-thick Au half-mirrors, the wavelength selectivity of the optical interferometer has been successfully improved 6.6 times. Furthermore, the peak shift in the reflection spectrum due to the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) antigen with a concentration of 10 ng ml-l by the antigen-antibody reaction was spectroscopically measured on the fabricated optical interferometer, and the deflection amount of the movable membrane after 10 min treatment was 2.4 times larger than that of nonspecific adsorption with the avidin molecules. This result indicated that the proposed sensor can be used for selective detection of low-concentration target antigen molecules.

  18. Sensitive and rapid detection of anti-PEG in blood using surface plasmon resonance sensor (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fang; Jiang, Shaoyi; Yu, Qiuming

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is widely used to modify many therapeutic proteins and nanoparticles to reduce their immunogenicity and to improve their pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties. It is generally accepted that PEG is non-immunogenic and non-antigenic. However, an emerging of literature and studies shows that the immune system can generate specific antibodies binding PEG. These anti-PEG antibodies not only correlate with adverse reactions appeared after patient infusions, but are also found to be the reason for therapeutic efficacy loss during chronical administrations. In addition, because of constant exposure to PEG in daily consumer products including detergents, processed food and cosmetics, a substantial proportion of the population has likely developed anti-PEG immunity. Thus a method to quickly and accurately measure the anti-PEG antibody level is desired. Nevertheless, the gold standard to detect anti-PEG antibodies is ELISA, which is costly and time-consuming especially for quantification. Herein, we demonstrated the anti-PEG measurement in blood serum using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Several PEG-based surface functionalization on SPR sensor chip were studied in terms of protein resistance and the limit of detection (LOD) of anti-PEG. The quantitative detection can be achieved in less than 30 min with LOD comparable to ELISA. Furthermore, the IgG and IgM of anti-PEG can be differentiated by following the secondary antibody.

  19. MAARGHA: A Prototype System for Road Condition and Surface Type Estimation by Fusing Multi-Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Rajamohan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Road infrastructure in countries like India is expanding at a rapid pace and is becoming increasingly difficult for authorities to identify and fix the bad roads in time. Current Geographical Information Systems (GIS lack information about on-road features like road surface type, speed breakers and dynamic attribute data like the road quality. Hence there is a need to build road monitoring systems capable of collecting such information periodically. Limitations of satellite imagery with respect to the resolution and availability, makes road monitoring primarily an on-field activity. Monitoring is currently performed using special vehicles that are fitted with expensive laser scanners and need skilled resource besides providing only very low coverage. Hence such systems are not suitable for continuous road monitoring. Cheaper alternative systems using sensors like accelerometer and GPS (Global Positioning System exists but they are not equipped to achieve higher information levels. This paper presents a prototype system MAARGHA (MAARGHA in Sanskrit language means an eternal path to solution, which demonstrates that it can overcome the disadvantages of the existing systems by fusing multi-sensory data like camera image, accelerometer data and GPS trajectory at an information level, apart from providing additional road information like road surface type. MAARGHA has been tested across different road conditions and sensor data characteristics to assess its potential applications in real world scenarios. The developed system achieves higher information levels when compared to state of the art road condition estimation systems like Roadroid. The system performance in road surface type classification is dependent on the local environmental conditions at the time of imaging. In our study, the road surface type classification accuracy reached 100% for datasets with near ideal environmental conditions and dropped down to 60% for datasets with shadows and

  20. Capturing 2D transient surface data of granular flows against obstacles with an RGB-D sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Voullieme, Daniel; Juez, Carmelo; Murillo, Javier; Garcia-Navarro, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    Landslides are an ubiquitous natural hazard, and therefore human infrastructure and settlements are often at risk in mountainous regions. In order to better understand and predict landslides, systematic studies of the phenomena need to be undertaken. In particular, computational tools which allow for analysis of field problems require to be thoroughly tested, calibrated and validated under controlled conditions. And to do so, it is necessary for such controlled experiments to be fully characterized in the same terms as the numerical model requires. This work presents an experimental study of dry granular flow over a rough bed with topography which resembles a mountain valley. It has an upper region with a very high slope. The geometry of the bed describes a fourth order polynomial curve, with a low point with zero slope, and afterwards a short region with adverse slope. Obstacles are present in the lower regions which are used as model geometries of human structures. The experiments consisted of a sudden release a mass of sand on the upper region, and allowing it to flow downslope. Furthermore, it has been frequent in previous studies to measure final states of the granular mass at rest, but seldom has transient data being provided, and never for the entire field. In this work we present transient measurements of the moving granular surfaces, obtained with a consumer-grade RGB-D sensor. The sensor, developed for the videogame industry, allows to measure the moving surface of the sand, thus obtaining elevation fields. The experimental results are very consistent and repeatable. The measured surfaces clearly show the distinctive features of the granular flow around the obstacles and allow to qualitatively describe the different flow patterns. More importantly, the quantitative description of the granular surface allows for benchmarking and calibration of predictive numerical models, key in scaling the small-scale experimental knowledge into the field.

  1. The Inflatable Mini Anne® Manikin May be Used as an Inexpensive Alternative to a Standard Life-size Resuscitation Manikin During Instructor-led BLS/AED Training - A Randomized Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Camilla; Cordsen, Anna-Sophie N; Hoe, Masja B

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The inflatable and inexpensive Mini Anne® resuscitation manikin is widely used with a self-instruction video and allows dissemination of BLS/AED skills to large groups. The learning outcome following instructor-led BLS/AED training using a Mini Anne® compared to a standard life...... using the Mini Anne® manikin was not significantly different compared with training on a standard life-size manikin. The Mini Anne® manikin may be used as an inexpensive alternative to a standard life-size resuscitation manikin.Author Disclosures: C. Bang: None. A.N. Cordsen: None. M.B. Hoe: None. S...

  2. Terrain following of arbitrary surfaces using a high intensity LED proximity sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Many robotic operations, e.g., mapping, scanning, feature following, etc., require accurate surface following of arbitrary targets. This paper presents a versatile surface following and mapping system designed to promote hardware, software and application independence, modular development, and upward expandability. These goals are met by: a full, a priori specification of the hardware and software interfaces; a modular system architecture; and a hierarchical surface-data analysis method, permitting application specific tuning at each conceptual level of topological abstraction. This surface following system was fully designed and independently of any specific robotic host, then successfully integrated with and demonstrated on a completely a priori unknown, real-time robotic system. 7 refs.

  3. Near Surface Investigation of Agricultural Soils using a Multi-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatcharam, K.; Unc, A.; Krishnapillai, M.; Cheema, M.; Galagedara, L.

    2017-12-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors have been used as precision agricultural tools over decades. They are being used to measure spatiotemporal variability of soil properties and soil stratification in the sense of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). We mapped the ECa variability by horizontal coplanar (HCP) and by vertical coplanar (VCP) orientation of a multi-frequency EMI sensor and identified its interrelation with physical properties of soil. A broadband, multi-frequency handheld EMI sensor (GEM-2) was used on a loamy sand soil cultivated with silage-corn in western Newfoundland, Canada. Log and line spaced, three frequency ranges (weak, low, and high), based on the factory calibration were tested using HCP and VCP orientation to produce spatiotemporal data of ECa. In parallel, we acquired data on soil moisture content, texture and bulk density. We then assessed the statistical significance of the relationship between ECa and soil physical properties. The test site had three areas of distinct soil properties corresponding to the elevation, in particular. The same spatial variability was also identified by ECa mapping at different frequencies and the two modes of coil orientations. Data analysis suggested that the high range frequency (38 kHz (log-spaced) and 49 kHz (line-spaced)) for both HCP and VCP orientations produced accurate ECa maps, better than the weak and low range frequencies tested. Furthermore, results revealed that the combined effects of soil texture, moisture content and bulk density affect ECameasurements as obtained by both frequencies and two coil orientations. Keywords: Apparent electrical conductivity, Electromagnetic induction, Horizontal coplanar, Soil properties, Vertical coplanar

  4. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Thomas B

    Recent advances in microbiology, computational capabilities, and microelectromechanical-system fabrication techniques permit modeling, design, and fabrication of low-cost, miniature, sensitive and selective liquid-phase sensors and lab-on-a-chip systems. Such devices are expected to replace expensive, time-consuming, and bulky laboratory-based testing equipment. Potential applications for devices include: fluid characterization for material science and industry; chemical analysis in medicine and pharmacology; study of biological processes; food analysis; chemical kinetics analysis; and environmental monitoring. When combined with liquid-phase packaging, sensors based on surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) technology are considered strong candidates. For this reason such devices are focused on in this work; emphasis placed on device modeling and packaging for liquid-phase operation. Regarding modeling, topics considered include mode excitation efficiency of transducers; mode sensitivity based on guiding structure materials/geometries; and use of new piezoelectric materials. On packaging, topics considered include package interfacing with SAW devices, and minimization of packaging effects on device performance. In this work novel numerical models are theoretically developed and implemented to study propagation and transduction characteristics of sensor designs using wave/constitutive equations, Green's functions, and boundary/finite element methods. Using developed simulation tools that consider finite-thickness of all device electrodes, transduction efficiency for SAW transducers with neighboring uniform or periodic guiding electrodes is reported for the first time. Results indicate finite electrode thickness strongly affects efficiency. Using dense electrodes, efficiency is shown to approach 92% and 100% for uniform and periodic electrode guiding, respectively; yielding improved sensor detection limits. A numerical sensitivity analysis is presented targeting viscosity

  5. UV Climate at Mars Surface: A Proposed Sensor for Both Orbit and Ground Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillotay, D.; Depiesse, C.; Daerden, F.; This, N.; Muller, C.

    2012-06-01

    The UV conditions on the surface of Mars are of paramount importance for the human exploration of Mars. We propose to measure spectrally the solar direct and diffuse UV and visible radiations from both Mars orbit and surface with light instruments.

  6. Design of a High-Performance Micro Integrated Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Silicon-On-Insulator Rib Waveguide Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengpeng Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI rib waveguide with large cross-section, a micro integrated surface plasmon resonance (SPR biochemical sensor platform is proposed. SPR is excited at the deeply etched facet of the bend waveguide by the guiding mode and a bimetallic configuration is employed. With the advantages of SOI rib waveguide and the silicon microfabrication technology, an array of the SPR sensors can be composed to implement wavelength interrogation of the sensors’ output signal, so the spectrometer or other bulky and expensive equipment are not necessary, which enables the SPR sensor to realize the miniaturization and integration of the entire sensing system. The performances of the SPR sensor element are verified by using the two-dimensional finite-different time-domain method. The parameters of the sensor element and the array are optimized for the achievement of high performance for biochemical sensing application. As a typical example, a single bimetallic SPR sensor with 3 nm Au over 32 nm Al possesses a high sensitivity of 3.968 × 104 nm/RIU, a detection-accuracy of 14.7 μm−1. For a uniparted SPR sensor, it can achieve a detection limit of 5.04 × 10−7 RIU. With the relative power measurement accuracy of 0.01 dB, the refractive index variation of 1.14 × 10−5 RIU can be detected by the SPR sensor array.

  7. Localization of CO2 Leakage from a Circular Hole on a Flat-Surface Structure Using a Circular Acoustic Emission Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwang Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leak localization is essential for the safety and maintenance of storage vessels. This study proposes a novel circular acoustic emission sensor array to realize the continuous CO2 leak localization from a circular hole on the surface of a large storage vessel in a carbon capture and storage system. Advantages of the proposed array are analyzed and compared with the common sparse arrays. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale stainless steel plate and leak signals were obtained from a circular hole in the center of this flat-surface structure. In order to reduce the influence of the ambient noise and dispersion of the acoustic wave on the localization accuracy, ensemble empirical mode decomposition is deployed to extract the useful leak signal. The time differences between the signals from the adjacent sensors in the array are calculated through correlation signal processing before estimating the corresponding distance differences between the sensors. A hyperbolic positioning algorithm is used to identify the location of the circular leak hole. Results show that the circular sensor array has very good directivity toward the circular leak hole. Furthermore, an optimized method is proposed by changing the position of the circular sensor array on the flat-surface structure or adding another circular sensor array to identify the direction of the circular leak hole. Experiential results obtained on a 100 cm × 100 cm stainless steel plate demonstrate that the full-scale error in the leak localization is within 0.6%.

  8. Improved Aerosol Optical Thickness, Columnar Water Vapor, and Surface Reflectance Retrieval from Combined CASI and SASI Airborne Hyperspectral Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An increasingly common requirement in remote sensing is the integration of hyperspectral data collected simultaneously from different sensors (and fore-optics operating across different wavelength ranges. Data from one module are often relied on to correct information in the other, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT and columnar water vapor (CWV. This paper describes problems associated with this process and recommends an improved strategy for processing remote sensing data, collected from both visible to near-infrared and shortwave infrared modules, to retrieve accurate AOT, CWV, and surface reflectance values. This strategy includes a workflow for radiometric and spatial cross-calibration and a method to retrieve atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance based on a radiative transfer function. This method was tested using data collected with the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI and SWIR Airborne Spectrographic Imager (SASI from a site in Huailai County, Hebei Province, China. Various methods for retrieving AOT and CWV specific to this region were assessed. The results showed that retrieving AOT from the remote sensing data required establishing empirical relationships between 465.6 nm/659 nm and 2105 nm, augmented by ground-based reflectance validation data, and minimizing the merit function based on AOT@550 nm optimization. The paper also extends the second-order difference algorithm (SODA method using Powell’s methods to optimize CWV retrieval. The resulting CWV image has fewer residual surface features compared with the standard methods. The derived remote sensing surface reflectance correlated significantly with the ground spectra of comparable vegetation, cement road and soil targets. Therefore, the method proposed in this paper is reliable enough for integrated atmospheric correction and surface reflectance retrieval from hyperspectral remote sensing data. This study provides a good reference for surface

  9. Surface plasmon resonance sensor based on golden nanoparticles and cold vapour generation technique for the detection of mercury in aqueous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jimmy; Chirinos, José; Gutiérrez, Héctor; La Cruz, Marie

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a surface plasmon resonance sensor for determination of Hg based on golden nanoparticles was developed. The sensor follows the change of the signal from solutions in contact with atomic mercury previously generated by the reaction with sodium borohydride. Mie theory predicts that Hg film, as low as 5 nm, induced a significant reduction of the surface plasmon resonance signal of 40 nm golden nanoparticles. This property was used for quantification purposes in the sensor. The device provide limits of detection of 172 ng/L that can compared with the 91 ng/L obtained with atomic fluorescence, a common technique used for Hg quantification in drinking water. This result was relevant, considering that it was not necessary to functionalize the nanoparticles or use nanoparticles deposited in a substrate. Also, thanks that Hg is released from the matrix, the surface plasmon resonance signal was not affected by concomitant elements in the sample.

  10. Development of a laser-based sensor to measure true road surface deflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The high-speed measurement of accurate pavement surface deflections under a moving wheel at a networklevel : still remains a challenge in pavement engineering. This goal cannot be accomplished with stationary deflectionmeasuring : devices. Engineers ...

  11. ANALYSIS OF ROAD SURFACE TEMPERATURE VARIATION ALONG THE ROAD SEGMENTATION USING MOBILE THERMAL SENSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Dukgeun Yun; Jaehong Park

    2016-01-01

    According to the road accidents statistics of Korea, 33% of fatalities occurred in winter. As many factors can be the causes of the accidents in winter season, road freezing is the most important factor among them. Even though the road surface temperature is more important than air temperature, generally the drivers and road manager get the air temperature from the weather forecast. If a road manager has information or can predict the road surface condition or temperature, the accidents relat...

  12. Monoclonal antibody-based Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for pathogen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2007-01-01

    essentially transforms molecular interactions into a digital signal, thereby making detection of analytes label-free. Biosensors are used for detection of analytes ranging from small drug molecules to food- and waterborne microorganisms as well as biowarfare pathogens. In future farming, plant production......A biosensor is an analytical device, which incorporates a biological sensing element integrated within a physicochemical transducer. The aim of a biosensor is to produce an electronic signal, which is proportional to the interaction of analytes with the sensing element. This means that the sensor.......sp. tritici, the cause of wheat yellow rust and Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late blight disease in potato. As no antibody existed against urediniospores from P. striiformis, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced and characterised. IgM-isotype mAbs from nine hybridoma cell lines were...

  13. QuakeSim: a Web Service Environment for Productive Investigations with Earth Surface Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. W.; Donnellan, A.; Granat, R. A.; Lyzenga, G. A.; Glasscoe, M. T.; McLeod, D.; Al-Ghanmi, R.; Pierce, M.; Fox, G.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Rundle, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    The QuakeSim science gateway environment includes a visually rich portal interface, web service access to data and data processing operations, and the QuakeTables ontology-based database of fault models and sensor data. The integrated tools and services are designed to assist investigators by covering the entire earthquake cycle of strain accumulation and release. The Web interface now includes Drupal-based access to diverse and changing content, with new ability to access data and data processing directly from the public page, as well as the traditional project management areas that require password access. The system is designed to make initial browsing of fault models and deformation data particularly engaging for new users. Popular data and data processing include GPS time series with data mining techniques to find anomalies in time and space, experimental forecasting methods based on catalogue seismicity, faulted deformation models (both half-space and finite element), and model-based inversion of sensor data. The fault models include the CGS and UCERF 2.0 faults of California and are easily augmented with self-consistent fault models from other regions. The QuakeTables deformation data include the comprehensive set of UAVSAR interferograms as well as a growing collection of satellite InSAR data.. Fault interaction simulations are also being incorporated in the web environment based on Virtual California. A sample usage scenario is presented which follows an investigation of UAVSAR data from viewing as an overlay in Google Maps, to selection of an area of interest via a polygon tool, to fast extraction of the relevant correlation and phase information from large data files, to a model inversion of fault slip followed by calculation and display of a synthetic model interferogram.

  14. Maritime over the Horizon Sensor Integration: High Frequency Surface-Wave-Radar and Automatic Identification System Data Integration Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Dejan; Stojkovic, Nikola; Lekic, Nikola

    2018-04-09

    To obtain the complete operational picture of the maritime situation in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) which lies over the horizon (OTH) requires the integration of data obtained from various sensors. These sensors include: high frequency surface-wave-radar (HFSWR), satellite automatic identification system (SAIS) and land automatic identification system (LAIS). The algorithm proposed in this paper utilizes radar tracks obtained from the network of HFSWRs, which are already processed by a multi-target tracking algorithm and associates SAIS and LAIS data to the corresponding radar tracks, thus forming an integrated data pair. During the integration process, all HFSWR targets in the vicinity of AIS data are evaluated and the one which has the highest matching factor is used for data association. On the other hand, if there is multiple AIS data in the vicinity of a single HFSWR track, the algorithm still makes only one data pair which consists of AIS and HFSWR data with the highest mutual matching factor. During the design and testing, special attention is given to the latency of AIS data, which could be very high in the EEZs of developing countries. The algorithm is designed, implemented and tested in a real working environment. The testing environment is located in the Gulf of Guinea and includes a network of HFSWRs consisting of two HFSWRs, several coastal sites with LAIS receivers and SAIS data provided by provider of SAIS data.

  15. Label-free aptamer-based sensor for specific detection of malathion residues by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yonghui; Teng, Yuanjie; Li, Pan; Liu, Wenhan; Shi, Qianwei; Zhang, Yuchao

    2018-02-01

    A novel label-free aptamer surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor for trace malathion residue detection was proposed. In this process, the binding of malathion molecule with aptamer is identified directly. The silver nanoparticles modified with positively charged spermine served as enhancing and capture reagents for the negatively charged aptamer. Then, the silver nanoparticles modified by aptamer were used to specifically capture the malathion. The SERS background spectra of spermine, aptamer, and malathion were recorded and distinguished with the spectrum of malathion-aptamer. To enhance the characteristic peak signal of malathion captured by the aptamer, the aggregate reagents (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2) were compared and selected. The selectivity of this method was verified in the mixed-pesticide standard solution, which included malathion, phosmet, chlorpyrifos-methyl, and fethion. Results show that malathion can be specifically identified when the mixed-pesticide interferences existed. The standard curve was established, presenting a good linear range of 5 × 10- 7 to 1 × 10- 5 mol·L- 1. The spiked experiments for tap water show good recoveries from 87.4% to 110.5% with a relative standard deviation of less than 4.22%. Therefore, the proposed label-free aptamer SERS sensor is convenient, specifically detects trace malathion residues, and can be applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of other pesticides.

  16. Chemical etching of Tungsten thin films for high-temperature surface acoustic wave-based sensor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, M., E-mail: m.spindler@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Herold, S.; Acker, J. [BTU Cottbus – Senftenberg, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 101548, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Brachmann, E.; Oswald, S.; Menzel, S.; Rane, G. [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are widely used as wireless sensors in different application fields. Recent developments aimed to utilize those devices as temperature sensors even in the high temperature range (T > 300 °C) and in harsh environmental conditions. Therefore, conventional materials, which are used for the substrate and for the interdigital transducer finger electrodes such as multilayers or alloys based on Al or Cu have to be exchanged by materials, which fulfill some important criteria regarding temperature related effects. Electron beam evaporation as a standard fabrication method is not well applicable for depositing high temperature stable electrode materials because of their very high melting points. Magnetron sputtering is an alternative deposition process but is also not applicable for lift-off structuring without any further improvement of the structuring process. Due to a relatively high Ar gas pressure of about 10{sup −1} Pa, the sidewalls of the photoresist line structures are also covered by the metallization, which subsequently prevents a successful lift-off process. In this study, we investigate the chemical etching of thin tungsten films as an intermediate step between magnetron sputtering deposition of thin tungsten finger electrodes and the lift-off process to remove sidewall covering for a successful patterning process of interdigital transducers. - Highlights: • We fabricated Tungsten SAW Electrodes by magnetron sputtering technology. • An etching process removes sidewall covering of photoresist, which allows lift-off. • Tungsten etching rates based on a hydrogen peroxide solutions were determined.

  17. Surface-Micromachined Neural Sensors with Integrated Double Side Recordings on Dry-Etch Benzocyclobutene(BCB) Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haixin; He, Jiping; Kim, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    a neural sensor with novel structure and capable of double side recordings has been designed and fabricated using surface micromachining technique. Dry-etch Benzocyclobutene (BCB) was selected as the substrate and packaging material for its excellent electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. Positive photoresist (AZ4620) was used as the sacrificial layer during the formation of backside recording sites, and the lift-off process combined with BCB dry etch technique was developed to open the recording sites on the backside. The finished device has intracortical recording sites on both sides, and also epidural recording sites on the front side. The total channel number doubled compared to that of single side electrode structure. Three dry-etch BCB layers were applied to insulate the front side conduction traces from the backside trace layer, and package the entire devices. The developed process shows reliable and high fabrication yield, and results suggest that this newly developed neural sensor could improve the performance and efficiency of neural recording.

  18. Far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool surface salinity variability observed by SMOS and Aquarius sensors over the period 2010-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, Nicolas; Alory, Gael; Maes, Christophe; Illig, Serena; Chapron, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) deduced from SMOS and Aquarius/SAC-D satellite missions are analyzed over the period 2010-2012 in the Far Eastern Pacific Fresh Pool. The lowest values of salinity in surface layers (migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over Central America (Alory et al., 2012). During the boreal winter, as the ITCZ moves southward, the north-easterly Panama gap wind creates a south-westward jet-like current in its path with a dipole of Ekman pumping/eddies on its flanks. As a result, upwelling in the Panama Bight brings cold and salty waters to the surface which erode the fresh pool on its eastern side while surface currents stretch the pool westward. The present study focuses on the fresh pool patterns ranging from the seasonal and interannual variability over the last 3 year period. Each year, satellite SSS products reveal the erosion of the fresh pool by the Panama upwelling. Compared to the SSS climatology from the World Ocean Atlas, satellite SSS data systematically exhibit fresher surface water (by ~0.5 to 1 unit in SSS) just after the occurrence of the maximum SSS reached in the region during the Panama upwelling events (April-May). Using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data, we found that these fresh anomalies coincide with local excess precipitation. Moreover, except during the boreal winter 2011, saltier surface waters than in the climatology were observed during the intensification phase of the Panama upwelling events (Fev-March). Using ASCAT sensor surface winds, TRMM data, surface current deduced from altimeter data combined with the satellite SSS, the study will analyze how these observed SSS anomalies could be related to the interannual variability in the dominant physical mechanisms involved in the freshpool dynamics. A particular focus will be set on the consistency between SMOS and Aquarius observations and on the potential role of the surface freshwater

  19. Investigation on effects of surface morphologies on response of LPG sensor based on nanostructured copper ferrite system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satyendra [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Yadav, B.C., E-mail: balchandra_yadav@rediffmail.com [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Department of Applied Physics, School for Physical Sciences, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Lucknow 226025, U.P. (India); Gupta, V.D. [Nanomaterials and Sensors Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007, U.P. (India); Dwivedi, Prabhat K. [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, U.P. (India)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Figure shows the variations in resistance with time for copper ferrite system synthesized in various molar ratio. A maximum variation in resistance was observed for copper ferrite prepared in 1:1 molar ratio. Highlights: ► Evaluation of structural, optical and surface morphologies. ► Significant variation in LPG sensing properties. ► Surface modification of ferric oxide pellet by copper ferrite. ► CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} pellets for LPG sensing at room temperature. -- Abstract: Synthesis of a copper ferrite system (CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) via chemical co-precipitation method is characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface morphology (scanning electron microscope) and optical absorption spectroscopy. These characteristics show their dependence on the relative compositions of the two subsystems. They are further confirmed by the variation in the band gap. A study of gas sensing properties shows the spinel CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized in 1:1 molar ratio exhibit best response to LPG adsorption/resistance measurement. Thus resistance based LPG sensor is found robust, cheap and may be applied for kitchens and industrial applications.

  20. Processing OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imagery from radiance-at-sensor to surface reflectance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.H.; Ruitenbeek, F.J.A. van; Werff, H.M.A. van der; Zegers, T.E.; Oosthoek, J.H.P.; Marsh, S.H.; Meer, F.D. van der

    2014-01-01

    OMEGA/Mars Express hyperspectral imagery is an excellent source of data for exploring the surface composition of the planet Mars. Compared to terrestrial hyperspectral imagery, the data are challenging to work with; scene-specific transmission models are lacking, spectral features are shallow making

  1. Multi-sensor remote sensing parameterization of heat fluxes over heterogeneous land surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faivre, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    The parameterization of heat transfer by remote sensing, and based on SEBS scheme for turbulent heat fluxes retrieval, already proved to be very convenient for estimating evapotranspiration (ET) over homogeneous land surfaces. However, the use of such a method over heterogeneous landscapes (e.g.

  2. Theoretical analysis of a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance sensor utilizing a Bragg grating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špačková, Barbora; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 25 (2009), s. 23254-23264 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : Surface plasmon resonance * Fiber optic * Bragg grating * Biosensor * Coupled mode theory Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.278, year: 2009

  3. Novel concept of multi-channel fiber optic surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špačková, Barbora; Piliarik, Marek; Kvasnička, Pavel; Rajarajan, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 1 (2009), s. 199-203 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : . Surface plasmon resonance * Fiber optic * Bragg grating * Biosensor Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.083, year: 2009

  4. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...

  5. Accommodation of repetitive sensor faults - applied to surface faults on compact discs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2008-01-01

    Surface defects such as scratches and fingerprints on compact discs (CDs) can cause CD players to lose focus and tracking on the discs. A scheme for handling these defects has previously been proposed. In this brief, adaptive and predictive versions of this scheme are developed. The adaptive sche...

  6. A Method to Simulate the Observed Surface Properties of Proton Irradiated Silicon Strip Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00335524; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichhorn, T.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.

    2015-04-23

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. To upgrade the tracker to required performance level, extensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. A defect model of Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD simulation package for the bulk properties of proton irradiated devices has been producing simulations closely matching with measurements of silicon strip detectors. However, the model does not provide expected behavior due to the fluence increased surface damage. The solution requires an approach that does not affect the accurate bulk properties produced by the proton model, but only adds to it the required radiation induced properties close to the surface. These include the observed position dependency of the strip detector's charge collec...

  7. Toward single-molecule detection with sensors based on propagating surface plasmons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvasnička, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Vala, Milan; Bocková, Markéta; Homola, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2012), s. 163-165 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701; GA MŠk OC09058; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : optical biosenzor * single molecule * surface plasmon microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.385, year: 2012

  8. Gold Nanoplates for a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Boric Acid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlia Morsin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR properties of metallic nanostructures, such as gold, are very sensitive to the dielectric environment of the material, which can simply be adjusted by changing its shape and size through modification of the synthesizing process. Thus, these unique properties are very promising, particularly for the detection of various types of chemicals, for example boric acid which is a non-permitted preservative employed in food preparations. For the sensing material, gold (Au nanoplates with a variety of shapes, i.e., triangular, hexagonal, truncated pentagon and flat rod, were prepared using a seed-mediated growth method. The yield of Au nanoplates was estimated to be ca. 63% over all areas of the sensing material. The nanoplates produced two absorption bands, i.e., the transverse surface plasmon resonance (t-SPR and the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance (l-SPR at 545 nm and 710 nm, respectively. In the sensing study, these two bands were used to examine the response of gold nanoplates to the presence of boric acid in an aqueous environment. In a typical process, when the sample is immersed into an aqueous solution containing boric acid, these two bands may change their intensity and peak centers as a result of the interaction between the boric acid and the gold nanoplates. The changes in the intensities and peak positions of t-SPR and l-SPR linearly correlated with the change in the boric acid concentration in the solution.

  9. Integration of multi-sensor data to measure soil surface changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltner, Anette; Schneider, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation models (DEM) of high resolution and accuracy covering a suitable sized area of interest can be a promising approach to help understanding the processes of soil erosion. Thereby, the plot under investigation should remain undisturbed. The fragile marl landscape in Andalusia (Spain) is especially prone to soil detachment and transport with unique sediment connectivity characteristics due to the soil properties and climatic conditions. A 600 m² field plot is established and monitored during three field campaigns (Sep. 2013, Nov. 2013 and Feb. 2014). Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are suitable tools to generate high resolution topography data that describe soil surface changes at large field plots. Thereby, the advantages of both methods are utilised in a synergetic manner. On the one hand, TLS data is assumed to comprise a higher reliability regarding consistent error behaviour than DEMs derived from overlapping UAV images. Therefore, global errors (e.g. dome effect) and local errors (e.g. DEM blunders due to erroneous image matching) within the UAV data are assessed with the DEMs produced by TLS. Furthermore, TLS point clouds allow for fast and reliable filtering of vegetation spots, which is not as straightforward within the UAV data due to known image matching problems in areas displaying plant cover. On the other hand, systematic DEM errors linked to TLS are detected and possibly corrected utilising the DEMs reconstructed from overlapping UAV images. Furthermore, TLS point clouds are filtered corresponding to the degree of point quality, which is estimated from parameters of the scan geometry (i.e. incidence angle and footprint size). This is especially relevant for this study because the area of interest is located at gentle hillslopes that are prone to soil erosion. Thus, the view of the scanning device onto the surface results in an adverse angle, which is solely slightly improved by the

  10. Thermal Transmission through Existing Building Enclosures: Destructive Monitoring in Intermediate Layers versus Non-Destructive Monitoring with Sensors on Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echarri, Víctor; Espinosa, Almudena; Rizo, Carlos

    2017-12-08

    Opaque enclosures of buildings play an essential role in the level of comfort experienced indoors and annual energy demand. The impact of solar radiation and thermal inertia of the materials that make up the multi-layer enclosures substantially modify thermal transmittance behaviour of the enclosures. This dynamic form of heat transfer, additionally affected by indoor HVAC systems, has a substantial effect on the parameters that define comfort. It also has an impact on energy demand within a daily cycle as well as throughout a one-year use cycle. This study describes the destructive monitoring of an existing block of flats located in Alicante. Once the enclosure was opened, sensors of temperature (PT100), air velocity, and relative humidity were located in the different layers of the enclosure, as well as in the interior and exterior surfaces. A pyranometer was also installed to measure solar radiation levels. A temperature data correction algorithm was drawn up to address irregularities produced in the enclosure. The algorithm was applied using a Raspberry Pi processor in the data collection system. The comparative results of temperature gradients versus non-destructive monitoring systems are presented, providing measures of the transmittance value, surface temperatures and indoor and outdoor air temperatures. This remote sensing system can be used in future studies to quantify and compare the energy savings of different enclosure construction solutions.

  11. Thermal Transmission through Existing Building Enclosures: Destructive Monitoring in Intermediate Layers versus Non-Destructive Monitoring with Sensors on Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echarri, Víctor; Espinosa, Almudena; Rizo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Opaque enclosures of buildings play an essential role in the level of comfort experienced indoors and annual energy demand. The impact of solar radiation and thermal inertia of the materials that make up the multi-layer enclosures substantially modify thermal transmittance behaviour of the enclosures. This dynamic form of heat transfer, additionally affected by indoor HVAC systems, has a substantial effect on the parameters that define comfort. It also has an impact on energy demand within a daily cycle as well as throughout a one-year use cycle. This study describes the destructive monitoring of an existing block of flats located in Alicante. Once the enclosure was opened, sensors of temperature (PT100), air velocity, and relative humidity were located in the different layers of the enclosure, as well as in the interior and exterior surfaces. A pyranometer was also installed to measure solar radiation levels. A temperature data correction algorithm was drawn up to address irregularities produced in the enclosure. The algorithm was applied using a Raspberry Pi processor in the data collection system. The comparative results of temperature gradients versus non-destructive monitoring systems are presented, providing measures of the transmittance value, surface temperatures and indoor and outdoor air temperatures. This remote sensing system can be used in future studies to quantify and compare the energy savings of different enclosure construction solutions. PMID:29292781

  12. The theory of surface-enhanced Raman scattering on semiconductor nanoparticles; toward the optimization of SERS sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, John R

    2017-12-04

    We present an expression for the lowest order nonzero contribution to the surface-enhanced Raman spectrum obtained from a system of a molecule adsorbed on a semiconductor nanoparticle. Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling of the zero-order Born-Oppenheimer states results in an expression which may be regarded as an extension of the Albrecht A-, B-, and C-terms to SERS substrates. We show that the SERS enhancement is caused by combinations of several types of resonances in the combined system, namely, surface, exciton, charge-transfer, and molecular resonances. These resonances are coupled by terms in the numerator, which provide selection rules that enable various tests of the theory and predict the relative intensities of the Raman lines. Furthermore, by considering interactions of the various contributions to the SERS enhancement, we are able to develop ways to optimize the enhancement factor by tailoring the semiconductor nanostructure, thereby adjusting the locations of the various contributing resonances. This provides a procedure by which molecular sensors can be constructed and optimized. We provide several experimental examples on substrates such as monolayer MoS 2 and GaN nanorods.

  13. Thermal Transmission through Existing Building Enclosures: Destructive Monitoring in Intermediate Layers versus Non-Destructive Monitoring with Sensors on Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Echarri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Opaque enclosures of buildings play an essential role in the level of comfort experienced indoors and annual energy demand. The impact of solar radiation and thermal inertia of the materials that make up the multi-layer enclosures substantially modify thermal transmittance behaviour of the enclosures. This dynamic form of heat transfer, additionally affected by indoor HVAC systems, has a substantial effect on the parameters that define comfort. It also has an impact on energy demand within a daily cycle as well as throughout a one-year use cycle. This study describes the destructive monitoring of an existing block of flats located in Alicante. Once the enclosure was opened, sensors of temperature (PT100, air velocity, and relative humidity were located in the different layers of the enclosure, as well as in the interior and exterior surfaces. A pyranometer was also installed to measure solar radiation levels. A temperature data correction algorithm was drawn up to address irregularities produced in the enclosure. The algorithm was applied using a Raspberry Pi processor in the data collection system. The comparative results of temperature gradients versus non-destructive monitoring systems are presented, providing measures of the transmittance value, surface temperatures and indoor and outdoor air temperatures. This remote sensing system can be used in future studies to quantify and compare the energy savings of different enclosure construction solutions.

  14. Local validation of MODIS sensor sea surface temperature on western Mediterranean shallow waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Durá

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The sea surface temperature (SST estimated from MODIS Aqua products (daytime and nighttime 11 μm and night 4 μm has been correlated with field data taken at three depths (15, 50, 100 cm in a Western Mediterranean coastal area. The comparison has allowed us to analyze the uncertainty in the estimation of this parameter in coastal waters using low spatial resolution satellite images. The results show that the daytime SST_11 μm product obtains fittest statistical values: RMSE (root mean square error and r2 (Pearson’s correlation coefficient of 1°C and 0.96, respectively, for 50 cm depth.

  15. Motor Function Evaluation of Hemiplegic Upper-Extremities Using Data Fusion from Wearable Inertial and Surface EMG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanran Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative evaluation of motor function is of great demand for monitoring clinical outcome of applied interventions and further guiding the establishment of therapeutic protocol. This study proposes a novel framework for evaluating upper limb motor function based on data fusion from inertial measurement units (IMUs and surface electromyography (EMG sensors. With wearable sensors worn on the tested upper limbs, subjects were asked to perform eleven straightforward, specifically designed canonical upper-limb functional tasks. A series of machine learning algorithms were applied to the recorded motion data to produce evaluation indicators, which is able to reflect the level of upper-limb motor function abnormality. Sixteen healthy subjects and eighteen stroke subjects with substantial hemiparesis were recruited in the experiment. The combined IMU and EMG data yielded superior performance over the IMU data alone and the EMG data alone, in terms of decreased normal data variation rate (NDVR and improved determination coefficient (DC from a regression analysis between the derived indicator and routine clinical assessment score. Three common unsupervised learning algorithms achieved comparable performance with NDVR around 10% and strong DC around 0.85. By contrast, the use of a supervised algorithm was able to dramatically decrease the NDVR to 6.55%. With the proposed framework, all the produced indicators demonstrated high agreement with the routine clinical assessment scale, indicating their capability of assessing upper-limb motor functions. This study offers a feasible solution to motor function assessment in an objective and quantitative manner, especially suitable for home and community use.

  16. A Constellation of CubeSat InSAR Sensors for Rapid-Revisit Surface Deformation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wye, L.; Lee, S.; Yun, S. H.; Zebker, H. A.; Stock, J. D.; Wicks, C. W., Jr.; Doe, R.

    2016-12-01

    The 2007 NRC Decadal Survey for Earth Sciences highlights three major Earth surface deformation themes: 1) solid-earth hazards and dynamics; 2) human health and security; and 3) land-use change, ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity. Space-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a key change detection tool for addressing these themes. Here, we describe the mission and radar payload design for a constellation of S-band InSAR sensors specifically designed to provide the global, high temporal resolution, sub-cm level deformation accuracy needed to address some of the major Earth system goals. InSAR observations with high temporal resolution are needed to properly monitor certain nonlinearly time-varying features (e.g., unstable volcanoes, active fault lines, and heavily-used groundwater or hydrocarbon reservoirs). Good temporal coverage is also needed to reduce atmospheric artifacts by allowing multiple acquisitions to be averaged together, since each individual SAR measurement is corrupted by up to several cm of atmospheric noise. A single InSAR platform is limited in how often it can observe a given scene without sacrificing global spatial coverage. Multiple InSAR platforms provide the spatial-temporal flexibility required to maximize the science return. However, building and launching multiple InSAR platforms is cost-prohibitive for traditional satellites. SRI International (SRI) and our collaborators are working to exploit developments in nanosatellite technology, in particular the emergence of the CubeSat standard, to provide high-cadence InSAR capabilities in an affordable package. The CubeSat Imaging Radar for Earth Science (CIRES) subsystem, a prototype SAR elec­tronics package developed by SRI with support from a 2014 NASA ESTO ACT award, is specifically scaled to be a drop-in radar solution for resource-limited delivery systems like CubeSats and small airborne vehicles. Here, we present our mission concept and flow-down requirements for a

  17. MiR-126 regulates proliferation and invasion in the bladder cancer BLS cell line by targeting the PIK3R2-mediated PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jun Xiao,1 Huan-Yi Lin,2 Yuan-Yuan Zhu,3 Yu-Ping Zhu,1 Ling-Wu Chen2 1Department of Urology, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 2Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 3Clinical Laboratory, Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, People’s Republic of China Objective: To assess whether microRNA-126 (miR-126 targets phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulatory subunit beta (PIK3R2 and to determine the potential roles of miR-126 in regulating proliferation and invasion via the PIK3R2-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K-protein kinase B (Akt signaling pathway in the human bladder BLS cell line. Materials and methods: A recombinant lentivirus (Lv vector expressing miR-216 (Lv-miR-126 was successfully constructed, and Lv-miR-126 and Lv vector were transfected into the BLS cell line. A direct regulatory relationship between miR-126 and the PIK3R2 gene was demonstrated by luciferase reporter assays. To determine whether PIK3R2 directly participates in the miR-126-induced effects in BLS cells, anti-miR-126 and a PIK3R2 small interfering RNA (siRNA were transfected into the BLS cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure miR-126 and PIK3R2 expressions. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine and colony formation assays to assess cell proliferation, flow cytometry for cell apoptosis and cell cycle analysis, Transwell assays for cell migration and invasion, and Western blots for PIK3R2, PI3K, phosphorylated PI3K (p-PI3K, Akt, and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt protein expressions were performed. Results: Lv-miR-126 significantly enhanced the relative expression of miR-126 in the BLS cells after infection (P<0.0001. MiR-126 overexpression inhibited the proliferation, cloning, migration, and invasion of BLS cells, promoted cell apoptosis, and induced S phase arrest (all P<0.05. PIK3R2, p-PI3K, and p-Akt protein expressions were significantly

  18. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  19. Surface analysis and electrochemistry of a robust carbon-nanofiber-based electrode platform H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suazo-Dávila, D.; Rivera-Meléndez, J. [NASA-MIRO Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials (CANM), Department of Chemistry, Molecular Sciences Research Center, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR, 00936 (United States); Koehne, J.; Meyyappan, M. [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Cabrera, C.R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@upr.edu [NASA-MIRO Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials (CANM), Department of Chemistry, Molecular Sciences Research Center, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, San Juan, PR, 00936 (United States)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers were intercalated with SiO{sub 2} for mechanical strength and isolation of individual electrodes. • Stable and robust electrochemical hydrogen peroxide sensor is stable and robust. • Five consecutive calibration curves were done with different hydrogen peroxide concentrations over a period of 3 days without any deterioration in the electrochemical response. • The sensor was also used for the measurement of hydrogen peroxide as one of the by-products of the reaction of cholesterol oxidase with cholesterol and the sensor response exhibited linear behavior from 50 μM to 1 mM in cholesterol concentration. • In general, the electrochemical sensor is robust, stable, and reproducible, and the detection limit and sensitivity responses were among the best when compared with the literature. - Abstract: A vertically aligned carbon nanofiber-based (VACNF) electrode platform was developed for an enzymeless hydrogen peroxide sensor. Vertical nanofibers have heights on the order of 2–3 μm, and diameters that vary from 50 to 100 nm as seen by atomic force microscopy. The VACNF was grown as individual, vertically, and freestanding structures using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The electrochemical sensor, for the hydrogen peroxide measurement in solution, showed stability and reproducibility in five consecutive calibration curves with different hydrogen peroxide concentrations over a period of 3 days. The detection limit was 66 μM. The sensitivity for hydrogen peroxide electrochemical detection was 0.0906 mA cm{sup −2} mM{sup −1}, respectively. The sensor was also used for the measurement of hydrogen peroxide as the by-product of the reaction of cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase as a biosensor application. The sensor exhibits linear behavior in the range of 50 μM–1 mM in cholesterol concentrations. The surface analysis and electrochemistry characterization is presented.

  20. Synthesis of surface molecular imprinting polymer on SiO{sub 2}-coated CdTe quantum dots as sensor for selective detection of sulfadimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiping; Ying, Haiqin; Liu, Yanyan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Xu, Wanzhen, E-mail: xwz09@ujs.edu.cn [School of the Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yang, Yanfei; Luan, Yu [Zhenjiang Institute for Drug Control of Jiangsu Province, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Lu, Yi; Liu, Tianshu [Zhenjiang Entry-Exit Inspection Quarantine Bureau, Zhenjiang 212008 (China); Yu, Shui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yang, Wenming, E-mail: ywm@ujs.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Surface molecular imprinting technology and SiO{sub 2}-coated CdTe QDs were combined to prepare a novel fluorescent sensor for selective detection of sulfadimidine. • The relative fluorescent intensity weakened in a linear way with the increasing concentration of sulfadimidine in the range of 10–60 μmol L{sup −1}. • The practical application of the fluorescent MIP sensor was evaluated by means of analyzing sulfadimidine in the real milk samples. The recoveries were at the range of 90.3–99.6% and the relative standard deviation ranged from 1.9 to 3.1%. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates a facile method to synthesize surface molecular imprinting polymer (MIP) on SiO{sub 2}-coated CdTe QDs for selective detection of sulfadimidine (SM{sub 2}). The fluorescent MIP sensor was prepared using cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) as the material of fluorescent signal readout, sulfadimidine as template molecule, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as functional monomer and tetraethyloxysilane (TEOS) as cross-linking agent. The CdTe cores were embed in the silicon shells by a sol-gel reaction and then the molecular imprinting layers were immobilized on the surface of the SiO{sub 2}-coated CdTe QDs. Under the optimized conditions, the relative fluorescent intensity weakened in a linear way with the increasing concentration of sulfadimidine in the range of 10–60 μmol L{sup −1}. The practical application of the fluorescent MIP sensor was evaluated by means of analyzing sulfadimidine in the real milk samples. The recoveries were at the range of 90.3–99.6% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 1.9 to 3.1%, which indicates the successful synthesis of the fluorescent MIP sensor. This sensor provides an alternative solution for selective determination of sulfadimidine from real milk samples.

  1. Applications of passive remote surface acoustic wave sensors in high-voltage systems; Einsatz von passiven funkabfragbaren Oberflaechenwellensensoren in der elektrischen Energietechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teminova, R.

    2007-06-29

    Passive remote Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors have been applied e.g. as temperature, pressure or torque sensors. Their important advantages over standard methods are their passive operating principle, which allows operation without any power supply, as well as the wireless high-frequency signal transmission over distances up to about 10..15 m even through (non metallic) housings. These properties of SAW sensors particularly qualify them for applications in high voltage operational equipment. First experience was gained in a long time field test of surge arrester monitoring based on SAW temperature sensors in a German high-voltage substation. Now, this system has been further developed at Darmstadt University of Technology for other applications, the first of them being an overhead line (OHL) conductor temperature measurement, the second one a temperature monitoring system for of high-voltage disconnectors. After designing and building the sensors, extensive laboratory tests were carried out applying high-voltage, high-current and thermal stress in order to approve the suitability for the intended application. All these tests confirmed the assumption that SAW sensors, due to their passive working principle, are not affected at all by any kind of electrical, magnetic or thermal stress that may occur during service. The complete temperature sensor consists of three parts: a sensor chip, an antenna which receives and transmits the signal from and to the radar unit and a body for installation and for protection against environmental impact. One must find a good compromise between optimizing of thermal, dielectric and high-frequency characteristics and at the same time taking into consideration a simple installation. These requirements on the SAW sensors turned out to be difficult to coordinate. To achieve a high measuring precision is especially difficult. First, a new sensor for OHL application was developed. The OHL conductor temperature sensor had been optimized

  2. Confined surface plasmon sensors based on strongly coupled disk-in-volcano arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bin; Wang, Limin; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yu, Ye; Zhang, Gang

    2015-02-14

    Disk-in-volcano arrays are reported to greatly enhance the sensing performance due to strong coupling in the nanogaps between the nanovolcanos and nanodisks. The designed structure, which is composed of a nanovolcano array film and a disk in each cavity, is fabricated by a simple and efficient colloidal lithography method. By tuning structural parameters, the disk-in-volcano arrays show greatly enhanced resonances in the nanogaps formed by the disks and the inner wall of the volcanos. Therefore they respond to the surrounding environment with a sensitivity as high as 977 nm per RIU and with excellent linear dependence on the refraction index. Moreover, through mastering the fabrication process, biological sensing can be easily confined to the cavities of the nanovolcanos. The local responsivity has the advantages of maximum surface plasmon energy density in the nanogaps, reducing the sensing background and saving expensive reagents. The disk-in-volcano arrays also possess great potential in applications of optical and electrical trapping and single-molecule analysis, because they enable establishment of electric fields across the gaps.

  3. Acceleration of Upper Trunk Coordination in Young Versus old Adults During Walking on the Level and Irregular Floor Surface Using MTx Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Soleimanifar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the reliability of head and trunk acceleration measured by MTx sensors during walking on Level and Irregular surfaces and to compare the differences between healthy young and old adults. Methods: Participants were 20 young female university students and 20 non-faller elderly women in Iran, 2013. Two MTX sensors were used to measure head and trunk accelerations in the vertical (VT, anterior-posterior (AP, and medial-lateral (ML directions while participants walked on a 7-meter walkway.  Results: ICC values in young group were higher as compared to non- faller elderly group; ICC was greater than 0.7 for 89.47%(34.38 of variables in young group and for 60.52%(23.38 in non- faller. Intersession reliability for upper trunk coordination indices in regular surface and in young group showed highest values as compared with other conditions in both groups, whereas the lowest intersession reliability was found in irregular floor surface indices in non-faller elderly group. Discussion: The calculated ICC, SEM, CV%, MDC values suggest that the MTX sensors provide precise recordings and detect small changes in upper  trunk accelerometric parameters. ICC values were influenced by the age and the floor condition. In healthy young, all ICC values in regular surface were higher than 0.7. Floor condition effect was noticeable in elderly especially in ML direction. During walking on irregular surface, ML acceleration, velocity and harmonic  ratio in elderly showed lower repeatability.

  4. Large Scale Automatic Analysis and Classification of Roof Surfaces for the Installation of Solar Panels Using a Multi-Sensor Aerial Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis López-Fernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost multi-sensor aerial platform, aerial trike, equipped with visible and thermographic sensors is used for the acquisition of all the data needed for the automatic analysis and classification of roof surfaces regarding their suitability to harbor solar panels. The geometry of a georeferenced 3D point cloud generated from visible images using photogrammetric and computer vision algorithms, and the temperatures measured on thermographic images are decisive to evaluate the areas, tilts, orientations and the existence of obstacles to locate the optimal zones inside each roof surface for the installation of solar panels. This information is complemented with the estimation of the solar irradiation received by each surface. This way, large areas may be efficiently analyzed obtaining as final result the optimal locations for the placement of solar panels as well as the information necessary (location, orientation, tilt, area and solar irradiation to estimate the productivity of a solar panel from its technical characteristics.

  5. The need for surface-parallel sensor orientation to address energy balance closure on mountain slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Ortiz, Penelope; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Pérez-Priego, Óscar; Carrara, Arnaud; Metzger, Stefan; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of turbulent fluxes in varying environments are one of the tools scientists and decision makers rely on for assessing and forecasting global warming. Thus, in the last two decades eddy-covariance (EC) towers have proliferated around the globe. Yet, ideal sites are rarely found, and there is a great need to extend the EC method and its theoretical underpinning to more complex terrain. In particular, several principal challenges are aggravated by sloping terrain. Nevertheless, various studies have concluded that the EC method is a useful tool to determine ecosystem energy and CO2/H2O fluxes on mountain slopes. Following the first law of thermodynamics, the validity of EC measurements is often evaluated in terms of their ability to close the balance of energy entering [net radiation minus the soil heat flux] and leaving [sum of the latent and sensible heat, measured by EC] an ecosystem. In sloping terrain, this criterion is applied with results comparable to sites located in more ideal terrain. Arguably, fluxes perpendicular to the surface are needed to assess the energy budget. However, even in sloping terrain instrument installations are frequently referenced perpendicular to the geo-potential (e.g. using a bubble level). Here, we demonstrate several advantages of installing the net radiometer and soil heat flux instruments parallel to a 16% slope with a southwest orientation. Our results reveal a diurnal hysteresis in the energy balance closure as large as 30% when net radiometer and soil heat flux instruments are installed perpendicular to the geo-potential. Installing the net radiometer and soil heat flux instruments slope-parallel mitigates this discrepancy.

  6. Marine Acoustic Sensor Assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruffa, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    A marine acoustic sensor assembly includes an acoustic panel having a forward surface and an after surface, a laser scanner oriented so as to project a laser beam onto the acoustic panel after surface...

  7. Particle Fabrication Using Inkjet Printing onto Hydrophobic Surfaces for Optimization and Calibration of Trace Contraband Detection Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Gillen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A method has been developed to fabricate patterned arrays of micrometer-sized monodisperse solid particles of ammonium nitrate on hydrophobic silicon surfaces using inkjet printing. The method relies on dispensing one or more microdrops of a concentrated aqueous ammonium nitrate solution from a drop-on-demand (DOD inkjet printer at specific locations on a silicon substrate rendered hydrophobic by a perfluorodecytrichlorosilane monolayer coating. The deposited liquid droplets form into the shape of a spherical shaped cap; during the evaporation process, a deposited liquid droplet maintains this geometry until it forms a solid micrometer sized particle. Arrays of solid particles are obtained by sequential translation of the printer stage. The use of DOD inkjet printing for fabrication of discrete particle arrays allows for precise control of particle characteristics (mass, diameter and height, as well as the particle number and spatial distribution on the substrate. The final mass of an individual particle is precisely determined by using gravimetric measurement of the average mass of solution ejected per microdrop. The primary application of this method is fabrication of test materials for the evaluation of spatially-resolved optical and mass spectrometry based sensors used for detecting particle residues of contraband materials, such as explosives or narcotics.

  8. Development of neutron detector using sensor type surface barrier with (n,p) and (n,α) converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi Filho, Tufic

    1999-01-01

    A Si semiconductor detector, surface barrier type, with a slim film of a converter material capable to produce charged particles was used as a sensor of neutrons in an environment of a zero power reactor. Two types of converters were used to improve the detection efficiency: (1) the polyethylene, n(CH 2 ), which produces recoil protons from the (n,p) interaction and, (2) the 10 B which generates a particle from the (n,alpha) reaction. The optimal thickness of those converters was determined experimentally and specifically for the polyethylene a mathematical model R(ips) = ε p · N 0 ·(1-e -Σ·Χ ) ·e -μ ·Χ + ε n · N 0 · -Σ · Χ was used to fit to the experimental data. For the polyethylene converter the thickness was of 0.058 cm (62.64 mg.cm -2 ) while for the 10 B it was equal to 6.55 [μm (1.54 mg.cm -2 ). The converter of polyethylene or 10 B improved the detection efficiency to a factor of 4.7 and 3.0 respectively. The comparison of the spectrum of the background radiation with the spectra of the recoil protons and the a radiation from the 10 B it was concluded that the polyethylene presented better performance than the 10 B converter. (author)

  9. Random Forest-Based Recognition of Isolated Sign Language Subwords Using Data from Accelerometers and Surface Electromyographic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ruiliang; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-14

    Sign language recognition (SLR) has been widely used for communication amongst the hearing-impaired and non-verbal community. This paper proposes an accurate and robust SLR framework using an improved decision tree as the base classifier of random forests. This framework was used to recognize Chinese sign language subwords using recordings from a pair of portable devices worn on both arms consisting of accelerometers (ACC) and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors. The experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed random forest-based method for recognition of Chinese sign language (CSL) subwords. With the proposed method, 98.25% average accuracy was obtained for the classification of a list of 121 frequently used CSL subwords. Moreover, the random forests method demonstrated a superior performance in resisting the impact of bad training samples. When the proportion of bad samples in the training set reached 50%, the recognition error rate of the random forest-based method was only 10.67%, while that of a single decision tree adopted in our previous work was almost 27.5%. Our study offers a practical way of realizing a robust and wearable EMG-ACC-based SLR systems.

  10. Rapid determination of floral aroma compounds of lilac blossom by fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Yeon; Shin, Hyun Du; Kim, Sung Jean; Hong, Jongki

    2008-03-07

    A novel analytical method using fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been developed for the detection of volatile aroma compounds emanated from lilac blossom (Syringa species: Syringa vulgaris variginata and Syringa dilatata). GC/SAW could detect and quantify various fragrance emitted from lilac blossom, enabling to provide fragrance pattern analysis results. The fragrance pattern analysis could easily characterize the delicate differences in aromas caused by the substantial difference of chemical composition according to different color and shape of petals. Moreover, the method validation of GC/SAW was performed for the purpose of volatile floral actual aroma analysis, achieving a high reproducibility and excellent sensitivity. From the validation results, GC/SAW could serve as an alternative analytical technique for the analysis of volatile floral actual aroma of lilac. In addition, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) GC-MS was employed to further confirm the identification of fragrances emitted from lilac blossom and compared to GC/SAW.

  11. A Novel Feature Optimization for Wearable Human-Computer Interfaces Using Surface Electromyography Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel human-computer interface (HCI using bioelectrical signals as input is a valuable tool to improve the lives of people with disabilities. In this paper, surface electromyography (sEMG signals induced by four classes of wrist movements were acquired from four sites on the lower arm with our designed system. Forty-two features were extracted from the time, frequency and time-frequency domains. Optimal channels were determined from single-channel classification performance rank. The optimal-feature selection was according to a modified entropy criteria (EC and Fisher discrimination (FD criteria. The feature selection results were evaluated by four different classifiers, and compared with other conventional feature subsets. In online tests, the wearable system acquired real-time sEMG signals. The selected features and trained classifier model were used to control a telecar through four different paradigms in a designed environment with simple obstacles. Performance was evaluated based on travel time (TT and recognition rate (RR. The results of hardware evaluation verified the feasibility of our acquisition systems, and ensured signal quality. Single-channel analysis results indicated that the channel located on the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU performed best with mean classification accuracy of 97.45% for all movement’s pairs. Channels placed on ECU and the extensor carpi radialis (ECR were selected according to the accuracy rank. Experimental results showed that the proposed FD method was better than other feature selection methods and single-type features. The combination of FD and random forest (RF performed best in offline analysis, with 96.77% multi-class RR. Online results illustrated that the state-machine paradigm with a 125 ms window had the highest maneuverability and was closest to real-life control. Subjects could accomplish online sessions by three sEMG-based paradigms, with average times of 46.02, 49.06 and 48.08 s

  12. Improving the robustness of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based sensors by Bayesian Non-negative Matrix Factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrøm, Tommy Sonne; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer; Larsen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    ” where the signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio is greatly amplified. However, at low concentrations hot spots with target molecules bound are rare. Furthermore, traditional detection relies on having uncontaminated sensor readings which is unrealistic in a real world detection setting. In this paper, we propose....... Compared to traditional data processing, the NMF approach enables a more reproducible and sensitive sensor....

  13. IsoNose - Isotopic Tools as Novel Sensors of Earth Surfaces Resources - A new Marie Curie Initial Training Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Bouman, Caludia; Kamber, Balz; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Gorbushina, Anna; James, Rachael; Oelkers, Eric; Tesmer, Maja; Ashton, John

    2015-04-01

    The Marie Curie Initial Training Network »Isotopic Tools as Novel Sensors of Earth Surfaces Resources - IsoNose« is an alliance of eight international partners and five associated partners from science and industry. The project is coordinated at the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and will run until February 2018. In the last 15 years advances in novel mass-spectrometric methods have opened opportunities to identify "isotopic fingerprints" of virtually all metals and to make use of the complete information contained in these fingerprints. The understanding developed with these new tools will ultimately guide the exploitation of Earth surface environments. However, progress in bringing these methods to end-users depends on a multi transfer of knowledge between (1) isotope Geochemistry and Microbiology, Environmental Sciences (2), Economic Geology and (3) instrument developers and users in the development of user-friendly and new mass spectrometric methods. IsoNose will focus on three major Earth surface resources: soil, water and metals. These resources are currently being exploited to an unprecedented extent and their efficient management is essential for future sustainable development. Novel stable isotope techniques will disclose the processes generating (e.g. weathering, mineral ore formation) and destroying (e.g. erosion, pollution) these resources. Within this field the following questions will be addressed and answered: - How do novel stable isotope signatures characterize weathering processes? - How do novel stable isotope signatures trace water transport? - How to use novel stable isotope as environmental tracers? - How to use novel stable isotope for detecting and exploring metal ores? - How to improve analytical capabilities and develop robust routine applications for novel stable isotopes? Starting from the central questions mentioned above the IsoNose activities are organized in five scientific work packages: 1

  14. Detection of heavy metal ions in contaminated water by surface plasmon resonance based optical fibre sensor using conducting polymer and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibre surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions in the drinking water is designed. Silver (Ag) metal and indium tin oxide (ITO) are used for the fabrication of the SPR probe which is further modified with the coating of pyrrole and chitosan composite. The sensor works on the wavelength interrogation technique and is capable of detecting trace amounts of Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+) heavy metal ions in contaminated water. Four types of sensing probes are fabricated and characterised for heavy metal ions out of these pyrrole/chitosan/ITO/Ag coated probe is found to be highly sensitive among all other probes. Further, the cadmium ions bind strongly to the sensing surface than other ions and due to this the sensor is highly sensitive for Cd(2+) ions. The sensor's performance is best for the low concentrations of heavy metal ions and its sensitivity decreases with the increasing concentration of heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. TOPOGRAPHIC LOCAL ROUGHNESS EXTRACTION AND CALIBRATION OVER MARTIAN SURFACE BY VERY HIGH RESOLUTION STEREO ANALYSIS AND MULTI SENSOR DATA FUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Kim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The planetary topography has been the main focus of the in-orbital remote sensing. In spite of the recent development in active and passive sensing technologies to reconstruct three dimensional planetary topography, the resolution limit of range measurement is theoretically and practically obvious. Therefore, the extraction of inner topographical height variation within a measurement spot is very challengeable and beneficial topic for the many application fields such as the identification of landform, Aeolian process analysis and the risk assessment of planetary lander. In this study we tried to extract the topographic height variation over martian surface so called local roughness with different approaches. One method is the employment of laser beam broadening effect and the other is the multi angle optical imaging. Especially, in both cases, the precise pre processing employing high accuracy DTM (Digital Terrain Model were introduced to minimise the possible errors. Since a processing routine to extract very high resolution DTMs up to 0.5–4m grid-spacing from HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment and 20–10m DTM from CTX (Context Camera stereo pair has been developed, it is now possible to calibrate the local roughness compared with the calculated height variation from very high resolution topographic products. Three testing areas were chosen and processed to extract local roughness with the co-registered multi sensor data sets. Even though, the extracted local roughness products are still showing the strong correlation with the topographic slopes, we demonstrated the potentials of the height variations extraction and calibration methods.

  16. Application and exploration of fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor to the analysis of thymus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Yeon; Ko, Jae Won; Jeong, Seo-Young; Hong, Jongki

    2008-09-26

    Fast gas chromatography combined with surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW) has been applied for the detection of volatile aroma compounds emanated from thymus medicinal plants such as T. quinquecostotus (Jeju and Mt. Gaya in South Korea), T. quinquecostotus var. japonica (Ulreung island in South Korea), T. mongolicus (Northeastern Asia), and T. serpyllum (Europe). The GC/SAW involving the fragrance pattern analysis provides a novel analytical method with a very fast separation and characterization of aromas caused by the delicate difference of chemical composition according to botanical and geographical origin. On the comparison of experiments, the characteristic components and analytical tendency for air-dried thymus species detected by GC/SAW appear to be quite similar to those obtained by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-GC-MS, but the abundance ratios between these two methods are different. In addition to that, the discrimination of various thymus species by using VaporPrint image based on GC/SAW provides a quite reliable result. On the basis of principal component analysis (PCA) results, the ability for classification among species of completely different chemotypes by HS-SPME-GC-MS is good enough, but the classification of same chemotypes species which are from different geographical origin in same country, original species and its variety, an air-drying term for 13 days and 16 months appear much lower than GC/SAW. Interestingly, the present experiment reveals that the air-drying term influences the aroma composition: the concentration of the pharmacologically active species, monoterpene phenol (thymol), reaches its highest concentrations after it was dried for 5 days or 13 days, which is much higher than in fresh or over-dried for a long times.

  17. Generation of Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Hybrid Au–Ag Nanoparticle Arrays as a Sensor of Polychlorinated Biphenyls Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the hybrid Au–Ag hexagonal lattice of triangular and square lattice of quadrate periodic nanoparticle arrays (PNAs were designed to investigate their extinction spectra of the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs. First, their simulating extinction spectra were calculated by discrete dipole approximation (DDA numerical method by changing the media refractive index. Simulation results showed that as the media refractive index was changed from 1.0 to 1.2, the maximum peak intensity of LSPRs spectra had no apparent change and the wavelength to reveal the maximum peak intensity of LSPRs spectra was shifted lower value. Polystyrene (PS nanospheres with two differently arranged structures were used as the templates to deposit the hybrid Au–Ag hexagonal lattice of triangular and square lattice of quadrate periodic PNAs by evaporation method. The hybrid Au–Ag hexagonal lattice of triangular and square lattice of quadrate PNAs were grown on single crystal silicon (c-Si substrates, and their measured extinction spectra were compared with the calculated results. Finally, the fabricated hexagonal lattices of triangular PNAs were investigated as a sensor of polychlorinated biphenyl solution (PCB-77 by observing the wavelength to reveal the maximum extinction efficiency (λmax. We show that the adhesion of β-cyclodextrins (SH-β-CD on the hybrid Au–Ag hexagonal lattice of triangular PNAs could be used to increase the variation of λmax. We also demonstrate that the adhesion of SH-β-CD increases the sensitivity and detection effect of PCB-77 in hexagonal lattice of triangular PNAs.

  18. Uncertainties in surface mass and energy flux estimates due to different eddy covariance sensors and technical set-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriga, Nicola; Fratini, Gerardo; Forgione, Antonio; Tomassucci, Michele; Papale, Dario

    2010-05-01

    Eddy covariance is a well established and widely used methodology for the measurement of turbulent fluxes of mass and energy in the atmospheric boundary layer, in particular to estimate CO2/H2O and heat exchange above ecologically relevant surfaces (Aubinet 2000, Baldocchi 2003). Despite its long term application and theoretical studies, many issues are still open about the effect of different experimental set-up on final flux estimates. Open issues are the evaluation of the performances of different kind of sensors (e.g. open path vs closed path infra-red gas analysers, vertical vs horizontal mounting ultrasonic anemometers), the quantification of the impact of corresponding physical corrections to be applied to get robust flux estimates taking in account all processes concurring to the measurement (e.g. the so-called WPL term, signal attenuation due to air sampling system for closed path analyser, relative position of analyser and anemometer) and the differences between several data transmission protocols used (analogue, digital RS-232, SDM). A field experiment was designed to study these issues using several instruments among those most used within the Fluxnet community and to compare their performances under conditions supposed to be critical: rainy and cold weather conditions for open-path analysers (Burba 2008), water transport and absorption at high air relative humidity conditions for closed-path systems (Ibrom, 2007), frequency sampling limits and recorded data robustness due to different transmission protocols (RS232, SDM, USB, Ethernet) and finally the effect of the displacement between anemometer and analyser using at least two identical analysers placed at different horizontal and vertical distances from the anemometer. Aim of this experiment is to quantify the effect of several technical solutions on the final estimates of fluxes measured at a point in the space and if they represent a significant source of uncertainty for mass and energy cycle

  19. Critical stages of a biodetection platform development from sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry and assay development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Yildiz

    2014-06-01

    Once viewed solely as a tool to analyse biomolecular interactions, biosensors are gaining widespread interest for diagnostics, biological defense, environmental and quality assurance in agriculture/food industries. Advanced micro fabrication techniques have facilitated integration of microfluidics with sensing functionalities on the same chip making system automation more convenient1. Biosensor devices relying on lab-on-a-chip technologies and nanotechnology has attracted much of attention in recent years for biological defense research and development. However, compared with the numerous publications and patents available, the commercialization of biosensors technology has significantly lagged behind the research output. This paper reviews the reasons behind the slow commercialisation of biosensors with an insight to the critical stages of a biosensor development from the sensor chip fabrication to surface chemistry applications and nanotechnology applications in sensing with case studies. In addition, the paper includes the description of a new biodetection platform based on Real-time Electrochemical ProfilingTM (REPTM) that comprises novel electrode arrays and nanoparticle based sensing. The performance of the REPTM platform has been tested for the detection of Planktothrix agardhii, one of the toxic bloom-forming cyanobacteria, usually found in shallow fresh water sources that can be used for human consumption. The optimised REPTM assay allowed the detection of P. agardhii DNA down to 6 pM. This study, showed the potential of REPTM as a new biodetection platform for toxic bacteria and hence further studies will involve the development of a portable multi-analyte biosensor based on REPTM technology for on-site testing.

  20. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  1. Laser sensor system documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Phase 1 of TxDOT Project 0-6873, True Road Surface Deflection Measuring Device, developed a : laser sensor system based on several sensors mounted on a rigid beam. : This sensor system remains with CTR currently, as the project is moving into Phase 2...

  2. An in-situ real-time optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for monitoring the growth of TiO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Chia; Tsai, Woo-Hu; Shih, Wen-Ching; Wu, Mu-Shiang

    2013-07-23

    An optical fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is proposed for monitoring the thickness of deposited nano-thin films. A side-polished multimode SPR optical fiber sensor with an 850 nm-LD is used as the transducing element for real-time monitoring of the deposited TiO2 thin films. The SPR optical fiber sensor was installed in the TiO2 sputtering system in order to measure the thickness of the deposited sample during TiO2 deposition. The SPR response declined in real-time in relation to the growth of the thickness of the TiO2 thin film. Our results show the same trend of the SPR response in real-time and in spectra taken before and after deposition. The SPR transmitted intensity changes by approximately 18.76% corresponding to 50 nm of deposited TiO2 thin film. We have shown that optical fiber sensors utilizing SPR have the potential for real-time monitoring of the SPR technology of nanometer film thickness. The compact size of the SPR fiber sensor enables it to be positioned inside the deposition chamber, and it could thus measure the film thickness directly in real-time. This technology also has potential application for monitoring the deposition of other materials. Moreover, in-situ real-time SPR optical fiber sensor technology is in inexpensive, disposable technique that has anti-interference properties, and the potential to enable on-line monitoring and monitoring of organic coatings.

  3. Development and Validation of an On-Line Water Toxicity Sensor with Immobilized Luminescent Bacteria for On-Line Surface Water Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolijn Woutersen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface water used for drinking water production is frequently monitored in The Netherlands using whole organism biomonitors, with for example Daphnia magna or Dreissena mussels, which respond to changes in the water quality. However, not all human-relevant toxic compounds can be detected by these biomonitors. Therefore, a new on-line biosensor has been developed, containing immobilized genetically modified bacteria, which respond to genotoxicity in the water by emitting luminescence. The performance of this sensor was tested under laboratory conditions, as well as under field conditions at a monitoring station along the river Meuse in The Netherlands. The sensor was robust and easy to clean, with inert materials, temperature control and nutrient feed for the reporter organisms. The bacteria were immobilized in sol-gel on either an optical fiber or a glass slide and then continuously exposed to water. Since the glass slide was more sensitive and robust, only this setup was used in the field. The sensor responded to spikes of genotoxic compounds in the water with a minimal detectable concentration of 0.01 mg/L mitomycin C in the laboratory and 0.1 mg/L mitomycin C in the field. With further optimization, which should include a reduction in daily maintenance, the sensor has the potential to become a useful addition to the currently available biomonitors.

  4. Ultrasensitive detection and quantification of E. coli O157:H7 using a giant magneto impedance sensor in an open-surface micro fluidic cavity covered with an antibody-modified gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhen; Liu, Yan; Lei, Chong; Sun, Xue-cheng; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method for ultrasensitive detection and quantification of the pathogen Escherichia coli (E. coli), type O157:H7. It is using a tortuous-shaped giant magneto impedance (GMI) sensor in combination with an open-surface micro fluidic system coated with a gold film for performing the sandwich immuno binding on its surface. Streptavidin-coated super magnetic Dynabeads were loaded with biotinylated polyclonal antibody to capture E. coli O157:H7. The E. coli-loaded Dynabeads are then injected into the microfluidics system where it comes into contact with the surface of gold nanofilm carrying the monoclonal antibody to form the immuno complex. As a result, the GMI ratio is strongly reduced at high frequencies if E. coli O157:H7 is present. The sensor has a linear response in the 50 to 500 cfu·mL −1 concentration range, and the detection limit is 50 cfu·mL −1 at a working frequency of 2.2 MHz. In our perception, this method provides a valuable tool for developing GMI-based micro fluidic sensors systems for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of pathogenic bacteria. The method may also be extended to other sensing applications by employing respective immuno reagents. (author)

  5. Chemical surface treatment with toluene to enhance sensitivity of NO2 gas sensors based on CuPcTs/Alq3 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi H. Suhail

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A nitrogen dioxide (NO2 gas sensor based on the blend of copper phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium/tris-(8-hydroxyquinolinealuminum (CuPcTs/Alq3 thin films was fabricated. The effect of chemical surface treatment with toluene on the structural, surface morphology and device sensitivity has been examined. The X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of as-deposited and toluene-treated films exhibit a broad hump peak at 2θ = 24°. The atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements show that the average particle diameter decreases with immersing time. The needle like shapes can be seen from scanning electron microscopy (SEM images for films treated with toluene for an immersing time of 60 min. Gas sensor characterizations demonstrate that all samples have superior NO2 gas sensitivity at a operating temperature of 373 K. The increase of the sensor sensitivity with increasing chemical treatment time up to 60 min was observed. All films show the stable and repeatable response patterns.

  6. A vapor response mechanism study of surface-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes coated chemiresistors and quartz crystal microbalance sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hung-Ling; Lu, Chia-Jung; Tian, Wei-Cheng; Sheen, Horn-Jiunn

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the selectivity and discusses the response mechanisms of various surface-modified, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-coated sensor arrays for the detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Two types of sensor platforms, chemiresistor and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), were used to probe the resistance changes and absorption masses during vapor sensing. Four sensing materials were used in this comparison study: pristine, acidified, esterified, and surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS)-coated SWCNTs. SWCNT-coated QCMs reached the response equilibrium faster than the chemiresistors did, which revealed a delay diffusion behavior at the inter-tube junction. In addition, the calibration lines for QCMs were all linear, but the chemiresistors showed curvature calibration lines which indicated less effectiveness of swelling at high concentrations. While the sorption of vapor molecules caused an increase in the resistance for most SWCNTs due to the swelling, the acidified SWCNTs showed no responses to nonpolar vapors and a negative response to hydrogen bond acceptors. This discovery provided insight into the inter-tube interlocks and conductivity modulation of acidified SWCNTs via a hydrogen bond. The results in this study provide a stepping-stone for further understanding of the mechanisms behind the vapor selectivity of surface-modified SWCNT sensor arrays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Improved Mono-Window Algorithm for Land Surface Temperature Retrieval from Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The successful launch of the Landsat 8 satellite with two thermal infrared bands on February 11, 2013, for continuous Earth observation provided another opportunity for remote sensing of land surface temperature (LST. However, calibration notices issued by the United States Geological Survey (USGS indicated that data from the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS Band 11 have large uncertainty and suggested using TIRS Band 10 data as a single spectral band for LST estimation. In this study, we presented an improved mono-window (IMW algorithm for LST retrieval from the Landsat 8 TIRS Band 10 data. Three essential parameters (ground emissivity, atmospheric transmittance and effective mean atmospheric temperature were required for the IMW algorithm to retrieve LST. A new method was proposed to estimate the parameter of effective mean atmospheric temperature from local meteorological data. The other two essential parameters could be both estimated through the so-called land cover approach. Sensitivity analysis conducted for the IMW algorithm revealed that the possible error in estimating the required atmospheric water vapor content has the most significant impact on the probable LST estimation error. Under moderate errors in both water vapor content and ground emissivity, the algorithm had an accuracy of ~1.4 K for LST retrieval. Validation of the IMW algorithm using the simulated datasets for various situations indicated that the LST difference between the retrieved and the simulated ones was 0.67 K on average, with an RMSE of 0.43 K. Comparison of our IMW algorithm with the single-channel (SC algorithm for three main atmosphere profiles indicated that the average error and RMSE of the IMW algorithm were −0.05 K and 0.84 K, respectively, which were less than the −2.86 K and 1.05 K of the SC algorithm. Application of the IMW algorithm to Nanjing and its vicinity in east China resulted in a reasonable LST estimation for the region. Spatial

  8. A Novel Phonology- and Radical-Coded Chinese Sign Language Recognition Framework Using Accelerometer and Surface Electromyography Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Juan; Chen, Xun; Liu, Aiping; Peng, Hu

    2015-09-15

    Sign language recognition (SLR) is an important communication tool between the deaf and the external world. It is highly necessary to develop a worldwide continuous and large-vocabulary-scale SLR system for practical usage. In this paper, we propose a novel phonology- and radical-coded Chinese SLR framework to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous SLR using accelerometer (ACC) and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors. The continuous Chinese characters, consisting of coded sign gestures, are first segmented into active segments using EMG signals by means of moving average algorithm. Then, features of each component are extracted from both ACC and sEMG signals of active segments (i.e., palm orientation represented by the mean and variance of ACC signals, hand movement represented by the fixed-point ACC sequence, and hand shape represented by both the mean absolute value (MAV) and autoregressive model coefficients (ARs)). Afterwards, palm orientation is first classified, distinguishing "Palm Downward" sign gestures from "Palm Inward" ones. Only the "Palm Inward" gestures are sent for further hand movement and hand shape recognition by dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm and hidden Markov models (HMM) respectively. Finally, component recognition results are integrated to identify one certain coded gesture. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed SLR framework with a vocabulary scale of 223 characters can achieve an averaged recognition accuracy of 96.01% ± 0.83% for coded gesture recognition tasks and 92.73% ± 1.47% for character recognition tasks. Besides, it demonstrats that sEMG signals are rather consistent for a given hand shape independent of hand movements. Hence, the number of training samples will not be significantly increased when the vocabulary scale increases, since not only the number of the completely new proposed coded gestures is constant and limited, but also the transition movement which connects successive signs needs no

  9. Effects of Nanowire Length and Surface Roughness on the Electrochemical Sensor Properties of Nafion-Free, Vertically Aligned Pt Nanowire Array Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, vertically aligned Pt nanowire arrays (PtNWA with different lengths and surface roughnesses were fabricated and their electrochemical performance toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection was studied. The nanowire arrays were synthesized by electroplating Pt in nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO template. Different parameters, such as current density and deposition time, were precisely controlled to synthesize nanowires with different surface roughnesses and various lengths from 3 μm to 12 μm. The PtNWA electrodes showed better performance than the conventional electrodes modified by Pt nanowires randomly dispersed on the electrode surface. The results indicate that both the length and surface roughness can affect the sensing performance of vertically aligned Pt nanowire array electrodes. Generally, longer nanowires with rougher surfaces showed better electrochemical sensing performance. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA presented the largest sensitivity (654 μA·mM−1·cm−2 among all the nanowires studied, and showed a limit of detection of 2.4 μM. The 12 μm rough surface PtNWA electrode also showed good anti-interference property from chemicals that are typically present in the biological samples such as ascorbic, uric acid, citric acid, and glucose. The sensing performance in real samples (river water was tested and good recovery was observed. These Nafion-free, vertically aligned Pt nanowires with surface roughness control show great promise as versatile electrochemical sensors and biosensors.

  10. Effect of nanoscale surface texture on the contact-pressure-dependent conduction characteristics of a carbon-nanotube thin-film tactile pressure sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chaehyun; Lee, Kunhak; Choi, Eunsuk; Kim, Ahsung; Kim, Jinoh; Lee, Seungbeck [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    We report on a novel tactile pressure sensor structure that transfers the vertical pressure applied to the sample's surface to lateral strain in the carbon-nanotube thin film embedded in an elastomer by using a 'wavy' structured substrate contact surface. When pressure was applied to the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surface, it was transferred to a carbon-nanotube thin film (CNTF) underneath, where it stretched to conform to the wavy substrate surface. This resulted in an elongation, or lateral strain, in the CNTF layer, their reducing its conductance. The measurements showed that with an applied vertical pressure of 30 kPa, a 15% reduction in conductance was achieved with only a 500-nm deflection in the CNTF, and repeatedly applied pressures for 3,600 cycles (12 hours) resulted in only a 2% reduction in sensitivity, demonstrating the their film's high sensitivity and reliability. The mechanical stability and high sensitivity of the CNTF/PDMS hybrid with wavy substrate structures may make possible applications to future tactile pressure sensors.

  11. Analysis of binary mixtures of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons with low-phase-noise shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors using multielectrode transducer designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Florian; Mohler, Rachel E; Ricco, Antonio J; Josse, Fabien

    2014-11-18

    The present work investigates a compact sensor system that provides rapid, real-time, in situ measurements of the identities and concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons at parts-per-billion concentrations in water through the combined use of kinetic and thermodynamic response parameters. The system uses shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensors operating directly in the liquid phase. The 103 MHz SAW sensors are coated with thin sorbent polymer films to provide the appropriate limits of detection as well as partial selectivity for the analytes of interest, the BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), which are common indicators of fuel and oil accidental releases in groundwater. Particular emphasis is placed on benzene, a known carcinogen and the most challenging BTEX analyte with regard to both regulated levels and its solubility properties. To demonstrate the identification and quantification of individual compounds in multicomponent aqueous samples, responses to binary mixtures of benzene with toluene as well as ethylbenzene were characterized at concentrations below 1 ppm (1 mg/L). The use of both thermodynamic and kinetic (i.e., steady-state and transient) responses from a single polymer-coated SH-SAW sensor enabled identification and quantification of the two BTEX compounds in binary mixtures in aqueous solution. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved, resulting in lower limits of detection and improved identification at low concentrations, by designing and implementing a type of multielectrode transducer pattern, not previously reported for chemical sensor applications. The design significantly reduces signal distortion and root-mean-square (RMS) phase noise by minimizing acoustic wave reflections from electrode edges, thus enabling limits of detection for BTEX analytes of 9-83 ppb (calculated from RMS noise); concentrations of benzene in water as low as ~100 ppb were measured directly. Reliable quantification of BTEX

  12. Wireless SAW Interrogator and Sensor System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless, passive, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW), Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) temperature sensors, operating in a multi-sensor environment, developed at the...

  13. Application of a diffractive element-based sensor for detection of latent fingerprints from a curved smooth surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuivalainen, Kalle; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Myller, Kari

    2009-01-01

    An optical measurement device, which is a diffractive element-based sensor, is presented for the detection of latent fingerprints on curved objects such as a ballpoint pen. The device provides image and gloss information on the ridges of a fingerprint. The device is expected to have applications in forensic studies. (technical design note)

  14. Towards the development of cascaded surface plasmon resonance POF sensors exploiting gold films and synthetic recognition elements for detection of contaminants in transformer oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pesavento

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of developing a multichannel optical chemical sensor, based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs and surface plasmon resonance (SPR in a D-shaped multimode plastic optical fiber (POF, is presented by two cascaded SPR-POF-MIP sensors with different thicknesses of the gold layer. The low cost, the high selectivity and sensitivity of the SPR-POF-MIP platforms and the simple and modular scheme of the optical interrogation layout make this system a potentially suitable on-line multi-diagnostic tool. As a proof of principle, the possibility of simultaneous determination of two important analytes, dibenzyl disulfide (DBDS and furfural (2-FAL, in power transformer oil was investigated. Their presence gives useful indication of underway corrosive or ageing processes in power transformers, respectively. Preliminarily, the dependence of the performance of the D-shaped optical platform on the gold film thickness has been studied, comparing two platforms with 30 nm and 60 nm thick gold layers. It has been found that the resonance wavelengths are different on platforms with gold layer of different thickness, furthermore when MIPs are present on the gold as receptors, the performances of the platforms are similar in the two considered sensors.

  15. The design of long wavelength planetary SAR sensor and its applications for monitoring shallow sub-surface of Moon and planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.

    2015-12-01

    SAR observations over planetary surface have been conducted mainly in two ways. The first is the subsurface sounding, for example Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) and Shallow Surface Radar (SHARAD), using ground penetration capability of long wavelength electromagnetic waves. On the other hand, imaging SAR sensors using burst mode design have been employed to acquire surface observations in the presence of opaque atmospheres such as in the case of Venus and Titan. We propose a lightweight SAR imaging system with P/L band wavelength to cover the vertical observation gap of these planetary radar observation schemes. The sensor is for investigating prominent surface and near-subsurface geological structures and physical characteristics. Such measurements will support landers and rover missions as well as future manned missions. We evaluate required power consumption, and estimate mass and horizontal resolution, which can be as good as 3-7 meters. Initial specifications for P/L dual band SARs for the lunar case at 130 km orbital altitude were designed already based on a assumptions that sufficient size antenna (>3m width diameter or width about 3m and >10kg weight) can be equipped. Useful science measurements to be obtained include: (1) derivation of subsurface regolith depth; 2) Surface and shallow subsurface radar imaging, together with radar ranging techniques such as radargrammetry and inteferometry. The concepts in this study can be used as an important technical basis for the future solid plant/satellite missions and already proposed for the 2018 Korean Lunar mission.

  16. High-resolution, high-linearity temperature sensor using surface acoustic wave device based on LiNbO3/SiO2/Si substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Guang Tian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution and high-linearity surface acoustic wave (SAW temperature sensor, consisting of a SAW resonator device fabricated on novel X-cut LiNbO3/SiO2/Si piezoelectric substrate and a resonance frequency readout chip using standard 180 nm CMOS technology, is presented for the first time. High temperature performance substrate LiNbO3/SiO2/Si is prepared mainly by ion implantation and wafer bonding at first. RF SAW device with resonance frequency near 900 MHz is designed and fabricated on the substrate. Traditional probe method using network analyzer and the readout chip method are both implemented to characterize the fabricated SAW device. Further measurement of temperature using resonance frequency shift of SAW device demonstrates the feasibility of the combined system as a portable SAW temperature sensor. The obtained frequency-temperature relation of the fabricated device is almost linear. The frequency resolution of the readout chip is 733 Hz and the corresponding temperature accuracy is 0.016 ° C. Resolution of the sensor in this work is superior to most of the commercial temperature measurement sensors. Theory analysis and finite element simulation are also presented to prove the mechanism and validity of using SAW device for temperature detection applications. We conclude that the high-linearity frequency-temperature relation is achieved by the offset between high-order coefficients of LiNbO3 and SiO2 with opposite signs. This work offers the possibility of temperature measuring in ultra-high precision sensing and control applications.

  17. Microcantilever Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hans Peter; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilevers have been used in atomic force microscopy for the topography imaging of non-conductive surfaces for more than 20 years. Cantilever beams without tips have proved their applicability in recent years as miniaturized, ultrasensitive, and fast-responding sensors for applications in chemistry, physics, biochemistry, and medicine. Microcantilever sensors respond by bending due to the absorption of molecules. A shift in resonance frequency also occurs. They can be operated in different environments such as gaseous environment, liquids, or vacuum. In gas, microcantilever sensors can be operated as an artificial nose, whereby the bending pattern of a microfabricated array of eight polymer-coated silicon cantilevers is characteristic of the different vapors from solvents, flavors, and beverages. When operated in a liquid, microcantilever sensors are able to detect biochemical reactions. Each cantilever is functionalized with a specific biochemical probe receptor, sensitive for detection of the corresponding target molecule. Applications lie in the fields of label- and amplification-free detection of DNA hybridization, the detection of proteins as well as antigen-antibody reactions, and the detection of larger entities, such as bacteria and fungi.

  18. Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

    2008-10-10

    We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

  19. Intra-urban spatial variability of surface ozone in Riverside, CA: viability and validation of low-cost sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighi, Kira; Coffey, Evan; Polidori, Andrea; Feenstra, Brandon; Lv, Qin; Henze, Daven K.; Hannigan, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Sensor networks are being more widely used to characterize and understand compounds in the atmosphere like ozone (O3). This study employs a measurement tool, called the U-Pod, constructed at the University of Colorado Boulder, to investigate spatial and temporal variability of O3 in a 200 km2 area of Riverside County near Los Angeles, California. This tool contains low-cost sensors to collect ambient data at non-permanent locations. The U-Pods were calibrated using a pre-deployment field calibration technique; all the U-Pods were collocated with regulatory monitors. After collocation, the U-Pods were deployed in the area mentioned. A subset of pods was deployed at two local regulatory air quality monitoring stations providing validation for the collocation calibration method. Field validation of sensor O3 measurements to minute-resolution reference observations resulted in R2 and root mean squared errors (RMSEs) of 0.95-0.97 and 4.4-5.9 ppbv, respectively. Using the deployment data, ozone concentrations were observed to vary on this small spatial scale. In the analysis based on hourly binned data, the median R2 values between all possible U-Pod pairs varied from 0.52 to 0.86 for ozone during the deployment. The medians of absolute differences were calculated between all possible pod pairs, 21 pairs total. The median values of those median absolute differences for each hour of the day varied between 2.2 and 9.3 ppbv for the ozone deployment. Since median differences between U-Pod concentrations during deployment are larger than the respective root mean square error values, we can conclude that there is spatial variability in this criteria pollutant across the study area. This is important because it means that citizens may be exposed to more, or less, ozone than they would assume based on current regulatory monitoring.

  20. Non-Invasive monitoring of diaphragmatic timing by means of surface contact sensors: An experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galdiz Batxi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive monitoring of respiratory muscle function is an area of increasing research interest, resulting in the appearance of new monitoring devices, one of these being piezoelectric contact sensors. The present study was designed to test whether the use of piezoelectric contact (non-invasive sensors could be useful in respiratory monitoring, in particular in measuring the timing of diaphragmatic contraction. Methods Experiments were performed in an animal model: three pentobarbital anesthetized mongrel dogs. The motion of the thoracic cage was acquired by means of a piezoelectric contact sensor placed on the costal wall. This signal is compared with direct measurements of the diaphragmatic muscle length, made by sonomicrometry. Furthermore, to assess the diaphragmatic function other respiratory signals were acquired: respiratory airflow and transdiaphragmatic pressure. Diaphragm contraction time was estimated with these four signals. Using diaphragm length signal as reference, contraction times estimated with the other three signals were compared with the contraction time estimated with diaphragm length signal. Results The contraction time estimated with the TM signal tends to give a reading 0.06 seconds lower than the measure made with the DL signal (-0.21 and 0.00 for FL and DP signals, respectively, with a standard deviation of 0.05 seconds (0.08 and 0.06 for FL and DP signals, respectively. Correlation coefficients indicated a close link between time contraction estimated with TM signal and contraction time estimated with DL signal (a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98, a reliability coefficient of 0.95, a slope of 1.01 and a Spearman's rank-order coefficient of 0.98. In general, correlation coefficients and mean and standard deviation of the difference were better in the inspiratory load respiratory test than in spontaneous ventilation tests. Conclusion The technique presented in this work provides a non

  1. Estimating the relationship between urban 3D morphology and land surface temperature using airborne LiDAR and Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Urban forests are known for mitigating the urban heat island effect and heat-related health issues by reducing air and surface temperature. Beyond the amount of the canopy area, however, little is known what kind of spatial patterns and structures of urban forests best contributes to reducing temperatures and mitigating the urban heat effects. Previous studies attempted to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and various indicators of vegetation abundance using remote sensed data but the majority of those studies relied on two dimensional area based metrics, such as tree canopy cover, impervious surface area, and Normalized Differential Vegetation Index, etc. This study investigates the relationship between the three-dimensional spatial structure of urban forests and urban surface temperature focusing on vertical variance. We use a Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor image (acquired on July 24, 2014) to estimate the land surface temperature of the City of Sacramento, CA. We extract the height and volume of urban features (both vegetation and non-vegetation) using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and high spatial resolution aerial imagery. Using regression analysis, we apply empirical approach to find the relationship between the land surface temperature and different sets of variables, which describe spatial patterns and structures of various urban features including trees. Our analysis demonstrates that incorporating vertical variance parameters improve the accuracy of the model. The results of the study suggest urban tree planting is an effective and viable solution to mitigate urban heat by increasing the variance of urban surface as well as evaporative cooling effect.

  2. Real-time detection, classification, and quantification of apneic episodes using miniature surface motion sensors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Dan; Lev-Tov, Lior; Levy, Carmit; Faingersh, Anna; Colman Klotzman, Ifat; Bibi, Haim; Rotschild, Avi; Landesberg, Amir

    2015-07-01

    Real-time detection and classification of apneic episodes remain significant challenges. This study explores the applicability of a novel method of monitoring the respiratory effort and dynamics for rapid detection and classification of apneic episodes. Obstructive apnea (OA) and hypopnea/central apnea (CA) were induced in nine tracheostomized rats, by short-lived airway obstruction and administration of succinylcholine, respectively. Esophageal pressure (EP), EtCO2, arterial O2 saturation (SpO2), heart rate, and blood pressure were monitored. Respiratory dynamics were monitored utilizing three miniature motion sensors placed on the chest and epigastrium. Three indices were derived from these sensors: amplitude of the tidal chest wall displacement (TDi), breath time length (BTL), that included inspiration and rapid expiration phases, and amplitude time integral (ATI), the integral of breath amplitude over time. OA induced a progressive 6.42 ± 3.48-fold increase in EP from baseline, which paralleled a 3.04 ± 1.19-fold increase in TDi (P classification of central and obstructive apneic episodes, which tightly correlates with the EP.

  3. Fabrication of an SPR Sensor Surface with Antifouling Properties for Highly Sensitive Detection of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Using Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we modified a surface plasmon resonance immunosensor chip with a polymer using surface-initiated atom transfer polymerization (SI-ATRP for the highly sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. To immobilize a TNT analogue on the polymer, mono-2-(methacryloyloxyethylsuccinate (MES, which has a carboxyl group, was used in this study. However, the anti-TNT antibody may adsorb non-specifically on the polymer surface by an electrostatic interaction because MES is negatively charged. Therefore, a mixed monomer with MES and diethylaminoethylmethacrylate (DEAEM, which has a tertiary amino group and is positively charged, was prepared to obtain electroneutrality for suppressing the nonspecific adsorption. The detection of TNT was performed by inhibition assay using the polymer surface. To ensure high sensitivity to TNT, the affinity between the surface and the antibody was optimized by controlling the density of the initiator for ATRP by mixing two types of self-assembled monolayer reagents. As a result, a limit of detection of 5.7 pg/mL (ppt for TNT was achieved using the optimized surface.

  4. Au nanoparticle-modified DNA sensor based on simultaneous electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and localized surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin R; Hau, Ben Y H; Endo, Tatsuro; Kerman, Kagan

    2014-03-15

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) were performed on the same Au nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass surfaces. Cyclic voltammetry was applied to electrodeposit AuNPs on ITO surface directly. The surface plasmon band characterization of AuNPs was initially studied by controlling the electrodeposition conditions. It was found that the size of AuNP clusters was significantly affected by the applied potential and KCl concentration in solution. The dual-detection platform was applied to detect DNA hybridization related to a specific point mutation in apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE), which was related to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The preliminary results facilitate the development of a versatile biosensor that can be easily miniaturized and integrated into a high-throughput diagnostic device. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A silica nanoparticle-based sensor for selective fluorescent detection of homocysteine via interaction differences between thiols and particle-surface-bound polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changmin; Zeng, Fang; Luo, Ming; Wu, Shuizhu

    2012-08-01

    Biothiols play crucial roles in maintaining biological systems; among them, homocysteine (Hcy) has received increasing attention since elevated levels of Hcy have been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hence, the selective detection of this specific biothiol, which is a disease-associated biomarker, is very important. In this paper, we demonstrate a new mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based sensor for selective detection of homocysteine from biothiols and other common amino acids. In this fluorescent sensing system, an anthracene nitroolefin compound was placed inside the mesopores of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and used as a probe for thiols. The hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG 5000) molecules were covalently bound to the MSN surface and used as a selective barrier for Hcy detection via different interactions between biothiols and the PEG polymer chains. The sensor can discriminate Hcy from the two low-molecular mass biothiols (GSH and Cys) and other common amino acids in totally aqueous media as well as in serum, with a detection limit of 0.1 μM. This strategy may offer an approach for designing other MSN-based sensing systems by using polymers as diffusion regulators in sensing assays for other analytes.

  6. Graphene Chemical Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The sensor uses graphene based devices to sense the surface potential of a graphene channel exposed to an analyte. When analyte molecules adsorb onto the...

  7. Electroactive Properties of 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium Ionic Liquid Covalently Bonded on Mesoporous Silica Surface: Development of an Electrochemical Sensor Probed for NADH, Dopamine and Uric Acid Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroneze, Camila M.; Rahim, Abdur; Fattori, Natália; Costa, Luiz P. da; Sigoli, Fernando A.; Mazali, Italo O.; Custodio, Rogério; Gushikem, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: A hybrid organic-inorganic porous material was successfully prepared through chemical modification of a non-ordered mesoporous silica, obtained by the sol-gel process, with 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium groups. The porous material was evaluated as a platform for the development of electrochemical sensors, here probed toward the electrooxidation of NADH (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). The presence of cationic imidazolium groups on the surface of the hybrid silica-based material allowed the electrochemical detection of these biomolecules without any other electron mediator or biomolecular recognition component. Such behavior highlights the potentiality of this material to be applied in the development of new electrochemical sensing devices. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory emphasizes that the cationic character of imidazolium group provides better oxidation conditions if the solvent effect is minimized

  8. Effect of Surface Plasmon Coupling to Optical Cavity Modes on the Field Enhancement and Spectral Response of Dimer-Based sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Alrasheed, Salma

    2017-09-05

    We present a theoretical approach to narrow the plasmon linewidth and enhance the near-field intensity at a plasmonic dimer gap (hot spot) through coupling the electric localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance of a silver hemispherical dimer with the resonant modes of a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The strong coupling is demonstrated by the large anticrossing in the reflection spectra and a Rabi splitting of 76 meV. Up to 2-fold enhancement increase can be achieved compared to that without using the cavity. Such high field enhancement has potential applications in optics, including sensors and high resolution imaging devices. In addition, the resonance splitting allows for greater flexibility in using the same array at different wavelengths. We then further propose a practical design to realize such a device and include dimers of different shapes and materials.

  9. Fluxgate vector magnetometers: Compensated multi-sensor devices for ground, UAV and airborne magnetic survey for various application in near surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Bruno; Le Maire, Pauline; Munschy, Marc; Dechamp, Aline

    2017-04-01

    Fluxgate 3-components magnetometer is the kind of magnetometer which offers the lightest weight and lowest power consumption for the measurement of the intensity of the magnetic field. Moreover, vector measurements make it the only kind of magnetometer allowing compensation of magnetic perturbations due to the equipment carried with it. Unfortunately, Fluxgate magnetometers are quite uncommon in near surface geophysics due to the difficulty to calibrate them precisely. The recent advances in calibration of the sensors and magnetic compensation of the devices from a simple process on the field led Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg to develop instruments for georeferenced magnetic measurements at different scales - from submetric measurements on the ground to aircraft-conducted acquisition through the wide range offered by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) - with a precision in the order of 1 nT. Such equipment is used for different kind of application: structural geology, pipes and UXO detection, archaeology.

  10. Machine learning algorithms based on signals from a single wearable inertial sensor can detect surface- and age-related differences in walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B; Dixon, P C; Jacobs, J V; Dennerlein, J T; Schiffman, J M

    2018-04-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a machine learning algorithm utilizing triaxial accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer data from an inertial motion unit (IMU) could detect surface- and age-related differences in walking. Seventeen older (71.5 ± 4.2 years) and eighteen young (27.0 ± 4.7 years) healthy adults walked over flat and uneven brick surfaces wearing an inertial measurement unit (IMU) over the L5 vertebra. IMU data were binned into smaller data segments using 4-s sliding windows with 1-s step lengths. Ninety percent of the data were used as training inputs and the remaining ten percent were saved for testing. A deep learning network with long short-term memory units was used for training (fully supervised), prediction, and implementation. Four models were trained using the following inputs: all nine channels from every sensor in the IMU (fully trained model), accelerometer signals alone, gyroscope signals alone, and magnetometer signals alone. The fully trained models for surface and age outperformed all other models (area under the receiver operator curve, AUC = 0.97 and 0.96, respectively; p ≤ .045). The fully trained models for surface and age had high accuracy (96.3, 94.7%), precision (96.4, 95.2%), recall (96.3, 94.7%), and f1-score (96.3, 94.6%). These results demonstrate that processing the signals of a single IMU device with machine-learning algorithms enables the detection of surface conditions and age-group status from an individual's walking behavior which, with further learning, may be utilized to facilitate identifying and intervening on fall risk. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Micro Coriolis Gas Density Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparreboom, Wouter; Ratering, Gijs; Kruijswijk, Wim; van der Wouden, E.J.; Groenesteijn, Jarno; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report on gas density measurements using a micro Coriolis sensor. The technology to fabricate the sensor is based on surface channel technology. The measurement tube is freely suspended and has a wall thickness of only 1 micron. This renders the sensor extremely sensitive to changes

  12. Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of Mixed-Phase Clouds: an example from M-PACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Boer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice water paths are found to range between 11.0–366.4 (0.5–114.1 gm−2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286–2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm−2.

  13. Complex surface deformation monitoring and mechanism inversion over Qingxu-Jiaocheng, China with multi-sensor SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Chaoying; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Chengsheng

    2018-02-01

    Qingxu-Jiaocheng, China has been suffering severe land subsidence along with the development of ground fissure, which are controlled by local fault and triggered by groundwater withdrawal. With multi-sensor SAR images, we study the spatiotemporal evolution of ground deformation over Qingxu-Jiaocheng with an IPTA InSAR technique and assess the role of groundwater withdrawal to the observed deformation. Discrete GPS measurements are applied to verify the InSAR results. The RMSE of the differences between InSAR and GPS, i.e. ALOS and GPS and Envisat and GPS, are 5.7 mm and 6.3 mm in the LOS direction, respectively. The east-west and vertical components of the observed deformation from 2007 to 2010 are decomposed by using descending-track Envisat and ascending-track ALOS interferograms, indicating that the east-west component cannot be neglected when the deformation is large or the ground fissure is active. Four phases of land subsidence in the study region are successfully retrieved, and its spatiotemporal evolution is quantitatively analyzed. Lastly, a flat lying sill model with distributed contractions is implemented to model the InSAR deformation over Qingxu-Jiaocheng, which manifests that the ground deformation is mainly caused by groundwater withdrawal. This research provides new insights into the land subsidence monitoring and its mechanism inversion over Qingxu-Jiaocheng region.

  14. Surface-Embedded Stretchable Electrodes by Direct Printing and their Uses to Fabricate Ultrathin Vibration Sensors and Circuits for 3D Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Young-Tae; Cho, Sunghwan; Song, Woo-Jin; Moon, Sungmin; Park, Chan-Gyung; Park, Soojin; Myoung, Jae Min; Jeong, Unyong

    2017-11-01

    Printing is one of the easy and quick ways to make a stretchable wearable electronics. Conventional printing methods deposit conductive materials "on" or "inside" a rubber substrate. The conductors made by such printing methods cannot be used as device electrodes because of the large surface topology, poor stretchability, or weak adhesion between the substrate and the conducting material. Here, a method is presented by which conductive materials are printed in the way of being surface-embedded in the rubber substrate; hence, the conductors can be widely used as device electrodes and circuits. The printing process involves a direct printing of a metal precursor solution in a block-copolymer rubber substrate and chemical reduction of the precursor into metal nanoparticles. The electrical conductivity and sensitivity to the mechanical deformation can be controlled by adjusting the number of printing operations. The fabrication of highly sensitive vibration sensors is thus presented, which can detect weak pulses and sound waves. In addition, this work takes advantage of the viscoelasticity of the composite conductor to fabricate highly conductive stretchable circuits for complicated 3D structures. The printed electrodes are also used to fabricate a stretchable electrochemiluminescence display. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance with Five-Branched Gold Nanostars in a Plastic Optical Fiber for Bio-Chemical Sensor Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Zeni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a refractive index sensor based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR in a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF, is presented and experimentally tested. LSPR is achieved exploiting five-branched gold nanostars (GNS obtained using Triton X-100 in a seed-growth synthesis. They have the uncommon feature of three localized surface plasmon resonances. The strongest LSPRs fall in two ranges, one in the 600–900 nm range (LSPR 2 and the other one in the 1,100–1,600 nm range (LSPR 3, both sensible to refractive index changes. Anyway, due to the extremely strong attenuation (>102 dB/m of the employed POF in the 1,100–1,600 nm range, only LSPR 2 will be exploited for refractive index change measurements, useful for bio-chemical sensing applications, as a proof of principle of the possibility of realizing a compact, low cost and easy-to-use GNS based device.

  16. A well-ordered flower-like gold nanostructure for integrated sensors via surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Kang, Taejoon; Kim, Bongsoo; Yoo, Seung Min; Lee, Sang Yup

    2009-01-01

    A controllable flower-like Au nanostructure array for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was fabricated using the combined technique of the top-down approach of conventional photolithography and the bottom-up approach of electrodeposition. Au nanostructures with a mean roughness ranging from 5.1 to 49.6 nm were obtained by adjusting electrodeposition time from 2 to 60 min. The rougher Au nanostructure provides higher SERS enhancement, while the highest SERS intensity obtained with the Au nanostructure is 29 times stronger than the lowest intensity. The SERS spectra of brilliant cresyl blue (BCB), benzenethiol (BT), adenine and DNA were observed from the Au nanostructure.

  17. A comparative study on surface morphological investigations of ferric oxide for LPG and opto-electronic humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satyendra; Verma, Nidhi; Yadav, B. C.; Prakash, Rajiv

    2012-09-01

    In the present work nanostructured ferric oxides were synthesized via hydroxide precipitation method without using any surfactant and size selection medium. The surface morphologies and structure of samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structural analysis confirmed the formation of Fe2O3 with α-phase and rhombohedral structure. Optical and thermal properties were investigated by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Pelletizations of materials were done using hydraulic press and these pellets were investigated with the exposition of liquefied petroleum gas. Variations in resistance of the pellet with time for different concentrations of LPG were recorded at room temperature (27 °C). The maximum value of average sensitivity was found ˜5 for 5 vol.% of LPG. Our results show that the LPG sensing behavior was inspired by the different kinds of surface morphologies of Fe2O3 and inferred that the spherical porous nanoparticles synthesized via hydroxide precipitation process (S-3) had best response to LPG.

  18. Implanted electroenzymatic glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, L C; Duggan, C A

    1982-01-01

    The advent of electrochemical sensors for intermittent sampling of blood gases and hydrogen ions in the clinic, intensive care, and surgical units has revolutionized diagnostic and critical care medical technics. The use of electrochemical sensors for continuous transcutaneous monitoring of blood gases is further enhancing the medical surveillance of patients. The more recent introduction of glucose and other electroenzymatic sensors has stimulated broad research in the development of metabolic monitoring. For the present research, the glucose sensor widely used for the rapid specific micro-analysis of whole blood and plasma is explored for possible use as an in vivo intravascular or tissue-implanted sensor. This sensor is based on the polarographic measurement of hydrogen peroxide generated by glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) held between two membranes. The first membrane allows the diffusion of glucose, ions, and many other small molecules, while the second membrane allows the diffusion of the glucose-generated hydrogen peroxide to the platinum surface, but excludes ascorbic acid, bilirubin, and uric acid. Such sensors respond rapidly and specifically when acutely implanted subcutaneously in cats and dogs. They function well as glucose-sensor-tipped venous catheters. One sensor was repeatedly used for in vitro polarograms, subcutaneous and blood glucose monitoring, over a period of ten months, with storage in the cold between uses, with the complete retention of its response characteristics.

  19. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  20. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic mapping of an object’s local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems.

  1. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2014-12-25

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  2. Comparison of Land Surface Phenology Detections from Geostationary (AHI) and Polar-orbiting (VIIRS) Sensors in Tropical Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Land surface phenology (LSP) is an important indicator of ecosystem response to global change and reflects the exchange of water, energy, and carbon between the land surface and the atmosphere. However, the extraction of LSP in tropical Southeast Asia is very challenging due to weak seasonal variation and frequent cloud commination during the vegetation growing season. The successful launch of Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) onboard Himawari-8 geostationary satellite in October 2014 provides large opportunities to obtain cloud-free observations in daily time series data because it collects data every 10 minutes at a spatial resolution of 500m-2000 m. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard operational Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite provides global moderate-resolution (375-750 m) data once every day. To compare the capability of AHI and VIIRS observations to monitor LSP in frequently-cloud-covered tropical Southeast Asia, this research first extracted LSP metrics based on the time series of daily two-band enhanced vegetation index (EVI2) from AHI and VIIRS using a hybrid piecewise logistic model in 2015 and 2016. The daily AHI EVI2 was calculated from diurnal observations after EVI2 at every 10 minutes was angularly corrected using an empirical kernel-driven model to eliminate the effect caused by the varying sun-satellite geometry. Subsequently, we compared the phenological transition dates of greenup onset and dormancy onset retrieved from AHI and VIIRS data at both pixel level and country level. Finally, we assessed the influences of the quality of daily observation from AHI and VIIRS on the reconstruction of EVI2 time series and the retrievals of phenological dates.

  3. Sensitivity enhancement of surface plasmon resonance sensor based on graphene-MoS{sub 2} hybrid structure with TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} composite layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurya, J.B.; Prajapati, Y.K. [Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology, Electronics and Communication Engineering Department, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, V. [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Physics, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh (India); Saini, J.P. [Bundelkhand Institute of Engineering and Technology, Electronics and Communication Engineering Department, Jhansi, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on graphene-MoS{sub 2} hybrid structure with composite layer of TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} is presented. The angular interrogation method is used for the analysis of reflected light from the sensor. For the calculation of the sensitivity, first of all the thicknesses of TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2} and gold layers are optimized for the monolayer graphene and MoS{sub 2}. Thereafter, at these optimum thicknesses the reflectance curves are plotted for different sensor structure and comparison of change in resonance angle is made among these structures. It is observed that the sensitivity of the graphene-MoS{sub 2}-based sensor is enhanced by 9.24 % with respect conventional SPR sensor. The sensitivity is further enhanced by including TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} composite layer between prism base and metal layer and observed that the enhanced sensitivity for this sensor is 12.82 % with respect to conventional SPR sensor and 3.28 % with respect to graphene-MoS{sub 2}-based SPR sensor. At the end of this paper, the variation of the sensitivity and minimum reflectance is plotted with respect to sensing layer refractive index at the optimum thickness of all the layers and optimum number of MoS{sub 2} and graphene layers. It is also observed that four layers of MoS{sub 2} and monolayer graphene are best selection for the maximum enhancement of the sensitivity. (orig.)

  4. Immobilization of ionophore and surface characterization studies of the titanium(III) ion in a PVC-membrane sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayi, Majid; Heng, Lee Yook; Kassim, Anuar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeid; Abdollahi, Yadollah; Jahangirian, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Novel ionophores comprising various hydroxide and amine structures were immobilized onto poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrices, and these were examined to determine Ti(III) selectivity. To predict the selectivity of Ti(III), a PVC membrane was used to investigate the binding of Ti(III) to c-methylcalix[4]resorcinarene (CMCR). The study showed that the chelating ligand, CMCR, was coordinated selectively to Ti(III) at eight coordination sites involving the oxygen atoms at the interface of the membrane/solution. The membrane was prepared, based on CMCR as an ionophore, sodium tetrakis(4-fluorophenyl) borate (NaTFPB) as a lipophilic ionic additive, and dioctylphthalate (DOP) as a plasticizer. The immobilization of the ionophore and surface characterization studies revealed that the performance of CMCR-immobilized PVC was equivalent to that of mobile ionophores in supported liquid membranes (SLMs). The strengths of the ion-ionophore (CMCR-Ti(OH)(OH(2))(5) (2+)) interactions and the role of ionophores on membranes were studied via UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  5. Characteristics of Polysilicon Wire Glucose Sensors with a Surface Modified by Silica Nanoparticles/γ-APTES Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jheng-Jia Jhuang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This report investigates the sensing characteristics of polysilicon wire (PSW glucose biosensors, including thickness characteristics and line-width effects on detection limits, linear range and interference immunity with membranes coated by micropipette/spin-coating and focus-ion-beam (FIB processed capillary atomic-force-microscopy (C-AFM tip scan/coating methods. The PSW surface was modified with a mixture of 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (γ-APTES and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-treated hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles (NPs. We found that the thickness of the γ-APTES+NPs nonocomposite could be controlled well at about 22 nm with small relative standard deviation (RSD with repeated C-AFM tip scan/coatings. The detection limit increased and linear range decreased with the line width of the PSW through the tip-coating process. Interestingly, the interference immunity ability improves as the line width increases. For a 500 nm-wide PSW, the percentage changes of the channel current density changes (ΔJ caused by acetaminophen (AP can be kept below 3.5% at an ultra-high AP-to-glucose concentration ratio of 600:1. Simulation results showed that the line width dependence of interference immunity was strongly correlated with the channel electrical field of the PSW biosensor.

  6. The transmission interferometric adsorption sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuberger, M; Balmer, T E

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a high-speed adsorption sensor based on thin-film interference at the interfaces. The sensor can be used as a stand-alone instrument or in combination with a direct surface force measurement, which yields a wide range of additional information on molecular interactions on adsorbed films. The achieved mass resolution of the presented method (1-10 ng cm -2 Hz -1/2 ) is comparable to or better than other modern bio-sensors. The dependence of mass resolution on various factors is presented and demonstrated in a number of relevant examples. The described method is suitable for the implementation of a low-cost bio-sensor with a minimal number of optical elements. The measurement spot size is one micrometre or more and sampling rates >10 Hz are readily possible. In contrast to other bio-sensors, the signal baseline has a remarkable long-term stability since the measured signal is virtually independent of refractive index changes in the fluid medium above the sensor surface. In combination with an optical spectral correlation method, the classical computer calculations are substituted by an optical calculator and a label-free real-time imaging adsorption sensor is realized. We demonstrate sensor operation both inside the extended surface forces apparatus as well as in a stand-alone bio-sensor configuration. As a final point, we illustrate the imaging capability of this new sensor technology on a patterned bio-functionalized surface. (review article)

  7. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  8. An Effective Quality Control of Pharmacologically Active Volatiles of Houttuynia cordata Thunb by Fast Gas Chromatography-Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Yeon Oh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast gas chromatography-surface acoustic wave sensor (GC/SAW has been applied for the detection of the pharmacological volatiles emanated from Houttuynia cordata Thunb which is from South Korea. H. cordata Thunb with unpleasant and fishy odors shows a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and insect repellent. The aim of this study is to show a novel quality control by GC/SAW methodology for the discrimination of the three different parts of the plant such as leaves, aerial stems, and underground stems for H. cordata Thunb. Sixteen compounds were identified. β-Myrcene, cis-ocimene and decanal are the dominant volatiles for leaves (71.0% and aerial stems (50.1%. While, monoterpenes (74.6% are the dominant volatiles for underground stems. 2-Undecanone (1.3% and lauraldehyde (3.5% were found to be the characteristic components for leaves. Each part of the plant has its own characteristic fragrance pattern owing to its individual chemical compositions. Moreover, its individual characteristic fragrance patterns are conducive to discrimination of the three different parts of the plant. Consequently, fast GC/SAW can be a useful analytical method for quality control of the different parts of the plant with pharmacological volatiles as it provides second unit analysis, a simple and fragrant pattern recognition.

  9. Precipitable water and surface humidity over global oceans from special sensor microwave imager and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, Wenqing; Wentz, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Global fields of precipitable water W from the special sensor microwave imager were compared with those from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. They agree over most ocean areas; both data sets capture the two annual cycles examined and the interannual anomalies during an ENSO episode. They show significant differences in the dry air masses over the eastern tropical-subtropical oceans, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. In these regions, comparisons with radiosonde data indicate that overestimation by the ECMWF model accounts for a large part of the differences. As a check on the W differences, surface-level specific humidity Q derived from W, using a statistical relation, was compared with Q from the ECMWF model. The differences in Q were found to be consistent with the differences in W, indirectly validating the Q-W relation. In both W and Q, SSMI was able to discern clearly the equatorial extension of the tongues of dry air in the eastern tropical ocean, while both ECMWF and climatological fields have reduced spatial gradients and weaker intensity.

  10. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  11. Qualification of a distributed optical fiber sensor bonded to the surface of a concrete structure: a methodology to obtain quantitative strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon, Astrid; Hénault, Jean-Marie; Quiertant, Marc; Taillade, Frédéric; Khadour, Aghiad; Martin, Renaud-Pierre; Benzarti, Karim

    2015-11-01

    Distributed optical fiber systems (DOFSs) are an emerging and innovative technology that allows long-range and continuous strain/temperature monitoring with a high resolution. Sensing cables are either surface-mounted or embedded into civil engineering structures to ensure long-term structural monitoring and early crack detection. However, strain profiles measured in the optical fiber (OF) may differ from the actual strain in the structure due to the shear transfer through the intermediate material layers between the OF and the host material (i.e., in the protective coating of the sensing cable and in the adhesive). Therefore, OF sensors need to be qualified to provide accurate quantitative strain measurements. This study presents a methodology for the qualification of a DOFS. This qualification is achieved through the calculation of the so-called mechanical transfer function (MTF), which relates the strain profile in the OF to the actual strain profile in the structure. It is proposed to establish a numerical modeling of the system, in which the mechanical parameters are calibrated from experiments. A specific surface-mounted sensing cable connected to an optical frequency domain reflectometry interrogator is considered as a case study. It was found that (i) tensile and pull-out tests can provide detailed information about materials and interfaces of the numerical model; (ii) the calibrated model made it possible to compute strain profiles along the OF and therefore to calculate the MTF of the system; (iii) the results proved to be consistent with experimental data collected on a cracked concrete beam during a four-point bending test. This paper is organized as follows: first, the technical background related to DOFSs and interrogators is briefly recalled, the MTF is defined and the above-mentioned methodology is presented. In the second part, the methodology is applied to a specific cable. Finally, a comparison with experimental evidence validates the proposed

  12. A Whole-Cell Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on a Leucine Auxotroph of Escherichia coli Displaying a Gold-Binding Protein: Usefulness for Diagnosis of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Min-Ah; Park, Jung Hun; Cho, Daeyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2016-03-01

    We developed a whole-cell surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a leucine auxotroph of Escherichia coli displaying a gold-binding protein (GBP) in response to cell growth and applied this sensor to the diagnosis of maple syrup urine disease, which is represented by the elevated leucine level in blood. The leucine auxotroph was genetically engineered to grow displaying GBP in a proportion to the concentration of target amino acid leucine. The GBP expressed on the surface of the auxotrophs directly bound to the golden surface of an SPR chip without the need for any additional treatment or reagents, which consequently produced SPR signals used to determine leucine levels in a test sample. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were further applied to the SPR system, which significantly enhanced the signal intensity up to 10-fold by specifically binding to GBP expressed on the cell surface. Finally, the diagnostic utility of our system was demonstrated by its employment in reliably determining different statuses of maple syrup urine disease based on a known cutoff level of leucine. This new approach based on an amino acid-auxotrophic E. coli strain expressing a GBP that binds to an SPR sensor holds great promise for detection of other metabolic diseases of newborn babies including homocystinuria and phenylketonuria, which are also associated with abnormal levels of amino acids.

  13. Direct fabrication of thin film gold resistance temperature detection sensors on a curved surface using a flexible dry film photoresist and their calibration up to 450 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C. H.; Park, H. W.; Kim, H. H.; Park, S. H.; Son, C.; Kim, M. C.; Lee, J. H.; Go, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    High efficiency heat exchangers, such as intercoolers and recuperators, are composed of complex and compact structures to enhance heat transfer. This limits the installation of conventional temperature sensors to measure the temperature inside the heat exchanger without flow disturbance. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a direct patterning method in which metal is sputtered onto a curved surface using film photoresist and the fabrication of thin film Au resistance temperature detection (RTD) temperature sensors. A photosensitive film resist has been used to overcome the difficulty of 3-dimensional photolithography on a curved surface. The film resist after 2-dimensional photolithography is laminated over an alumina rod which is deposited with Au as an RTD sensing material. The Au metal is etched chemically, and the film resist is removed to form the thin film Au-RTD temperature sensors. They are calibrated by measuring the resistance change against temperature in a thermally controlled furnace. The second order polynomial fit shows good agreement with the measured temperatures with a standard deviation of 0.02 for the temperature range of 20-450 °C. Finally, the performance of the Au-RTD temperature sensors was evaluated.

  14. Direct fabrication of thin film gold resistance temperature detection sensors on a curved surface using a flexible dry film photoresist and their calibration up to 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, C H; Park, H W; Kim, H H; Park, S H; Son, C; Go, J S; Kim, M C; Lee, J H

    2013-01-01

    High efficiency heat exchangers, such as intercoolers and recuperators, are composed of complex and compact structures to enhance heat transfer. This limits the installation of conventional temperature sensors to measure the temperature inside the heat exchanger without flow disturbance. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a direct patterning method in which metal is sputtered onto a curved surface using film photoresist and the fabrication of thin film Au resistance temperature detection (RTD) temperature sensors. A photosensitive film resist has been used to overcome the difficulty of 3-dimensional photolithography on a curved surface. The film resist after 2-dimensional photolithography is laminated over an alumina rod which is deposited with Au as an RTD sensing material. The Au metal is etched chemically, and the film resist is removed to form the thin film Au-RTD temperature sensors. They are calibrated by measuring the resistance change against temperature in a thermally controlled furnace. The second order polynomial fit shows good agreement with the measured temperatures with a standard deviation of 0.02 for the temperature range of 20–450 °C. Finally, the performance of the Au-RTD temperature sensors was evaluated. (paper)

  15. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  16. Core and surface microgel mechanics are differentially sensitive to alternative crosslinking concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Himansu; Kruger, Terra M; Lansakara, Thiranjeewa I; Tivanski, Alexei V; Stevens, Lewis L

    2017-08-30

    Microgel mechanics are central to the swelling of stimuli-responsive materials and furthermore have recently emerged as a novel design space for tuning the uptake of nanotherapeutics. Despite this importance, the techniques available to assess mechanics, at the sub-micron scale, remain limited. In this report, all mechanical moduli for a series of air-dried, polystyrene-co-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pS-co-NIPAM) microgels of varying composition in monomer and crosslinker (N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide (BIS)) mol% have been determined using Brillouin light scattering (BLS) and AFM nanoindentation. These techniques sample the material through distinct means and provide complementary nanomechanical data. An initial demonstration of this combined approach is used to evaluate size-dependent nanomechanics in pS particles of varying diameter. For the pS-co-NIPAM series, our BLS results demonstrate an increase in Young's (E) and shear moduli with increasing NIPAM and/or BIS mol%, while the Poisson's ratio decreased. The same rank order in E was observed from AFM and the two techniques correlate well. However, at low BIS crosslinking, an inverted particle structure persists and small increases in BIS yield a higher increase in E from AFM relative to BLS, consistent with a higher density at the particle surface. At higher BIS incorporation, the microgel reverts to a typical, dense-core structure and further increasing BIS yields changes to core-particle mechanics reflected in BLS. Lastly, at 75 mol% NIPAM, the microgels displayed a broad volume phase transition and increased crosslinking resulted in a minor, yet unexpected, increase in swelling ratio. This complementary approach offers new insight into nanomechanics critical for microgel design and application.

  17. Application of Surface Protective Coating to Enhance Environment-Withstanding Property of the MEMS 2D Wind Direction and Wind Speed Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyu-Sik; Lee, Dae-Sung; Song, Sang-Woo; Jung, Jae Pil

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) two-dimensional (2D) wind direction and wind speed sensor consisting of a square heating source and four thermopiles was manufactured using the heat detection method. The heating source and thermopiles of the manufactured sensor must be exposed to air to detect wind speed and wind direction. Therefore, there are concerns that the sensor could be contaminated by deposition or adhesion of dust, sandy dust, snow, rain, and so forth, in the air, and that the membrane may be damaged by physical shock. Hence, there was a need to protect the heating source, thermopiles, and the membrane from environmental and physical shock. The upper protective coating to protect both the heating source and thermopiles and the lower protective coating to protect the membrane were formed by using high-molecular substances such as SU-8, Teflon and polyimide (PI). The sensor characteristics with the applied protective coatings were evaluated. PMID:28925942

  18. Application of Surface Protective Coating to Enhance Environment-Withstanding Property of the MEMS 2D Wind Direction and Wind Speed Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyu-Sik; Lee, Dae-Sung; Song, Sang-Woo; Jung, Jae Pil

    2017-09-19

    In this study, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) two-dimensional (2D) wind direction and wind speed sensor consisting of a square heating source and four thermopiles was manufactured using the heat detection method. The heating source and thermopiles of the manufactured sensor must be exposed to air to detect wind speed and wind direction. Therefore, there are concerns that the sensor could be contaminated by deposition or adhesion of dust, sandy dust, snow, rain, and so forth, in the air, and that the membrane may be damaged by physical shock. Hence, there was a need to protect the heating source, thermopiles, and the membrane from environmental and physical shock. The upper protective coating to protect both the heating source and thermopiles and the lower protective coating to protect the membrane were formed by using high-molecular substances such as SU-8, Teflon and polyimide (PI). The sensor characteristics with the applied protective coatings were evaluated.

  19. Non-intrusive refractometer sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    present technique. The present technique may be useful for monitoring refractive indices of active chemical solutions which was not possible with intrusive-type FO sensors. 2. Sensor principle. For a circular beam of light with cross-sectional area A, incident at an angle θi on the surface of a second medium, the power ...

  20. Smart sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refer to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor systems covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of "very large scale integration" (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performance. So, sophisticated signal processing operations have been developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays on the same focal plane avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduce inside the sensor some of the basic function of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogenity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the processing techniques for only the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation threshold.

  1. Advanced Magnetoimpedance Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-02-01

    This thesis is concerned with the advanced topics of thin film magnetoimpedance (MI) sensors. The author proposes and develops novel MI sensors that target on the challenges arising from emerging applications such as flexible electronics, passive wireless sensing, etc. In the study of flexible MI sensor, the investigated sensors of NiFe/Cu/NiFe tri-layersare fabricated on three flexible substrates having different surface roughness: Kapton, standard and premiumphotopaper. Sensitivity versus substrate roughness analysis is carried out for the selection of optimal substrate material. The high magnetic sensing performance is achieved by using Kapton substrate. Stress simulation, incorporated with the theory of magnetostriction effect, reveals the material composition of Ni/Fe being as a key factor of the stress dependent MI effect for the flexible MI sensors. In the development of MI-SAW device for passive wireless magnetic field sensing, NiFe/Cu/NiFe tri-layersand interdigital transducers(IDT) are designed and fabricated on a single piece of LiNbO3substrate, providing a high degree of integration and the advantage of standard microfabrication. The double-electrodeIDT has been utilized and proven to have an optimal sensing performance in comparison to the bi-directional IDT design. The optimized high frequency performance of the thin film MI sensor results in a MI-SAW passive wireless magnetic sensor with high magnetic sensitivity comparing to the MI microwire approach. Benefiting from the high degree of integration of the MI thin film element, in the following study, two additional sensing elements are integrated to the SAW device to have a multifunctional passive wireless sensor with extended temperature and humidity sensing capabilities. Analytical models havebeen developed to eliminate the crossovers of different sensing signals through additional reference IDTs, resulting in a multifunctional passive wireless sensor with the capability of detecting all three

  2. Wireless SAW Based Temperature Gradient Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes design and development of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature gradient sensor for instrumentation of thermal protection systems...

  3. Passive Wireless SAW Humidity Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based humidity sensors for NASA application to distributed...

  4. Microfabricated Ice-Detection Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeAnna, Russell

    1997-01-01

    .... The sensor is capable of distinguishing between an ice covered and a clean surface. It employs a bulk micromachined wafer with a 7 micrometers thick, boron doped, silicon diaphragm which serves as one plate of a parallel plate capacitor...

  5. Sensor web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  6. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  7. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate

  8. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  9. Micro-LiDAR velocity, temperature, density, concentration sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M. (Inventor); Dorrington, Adrian A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A light scatter sensor includes a sensor body in which are positioned a plurality of optical fibers. The sensor body includes a surface, in one end of each of the optical fibers terminates at the surface of the sensor body. One of the optical fibers is an illumination fiber for emitting light. A plurality of second optical fibers are collection fibers for collecting scattered light signals. A light sensor processor is connected to the collection fibers to detect the scattered light signals.

  10. NOVEL ZINC OXIDE FUNCTIONALIZED CARBON NANOTUBE CHEMIRESISTOR SENSOR ENHANCED WITH SURFACE O2 PLASMA INDUCED DEFECTS FOR METHANEDETECTION AT SINGLE PPM LEVEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelty/Progress ClaimsThis paper presents a novel functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based chemiresistor sensor which can detect methane at 2 ppm concentration level at room temperature with relative resistance change (RRC) of 2%. This is the highest reported ...

  11. Fabrication of a Microneedle/CNT Hierarchical Micro/Nano Surface Electrochemical Sensor and Its In-Vitro Glucose Sensing Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsam Yoon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report fabrication of a microneedle-based three-electrode integrated electrochemical sensor and in-vitro characterization of this sensor for glucose sensing applications. A piece of silicon was sequentially dry and wet etched to form a 15 × 15 array of tall (approximately 380 µm sharp silicon microneedles. Iron catalyst was deposited through a SU-8 shadow mask to form the working electrode and counter electrode. A multi-walled carbon nanotube forest was grown directly on the silicon microneedle array and platinum nano-particles were electrodeposited. Silver was deposited on the Si microneedle array through another shadow mask and chlorinated to form a Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The 3-electrode electrochemical sensor was tested for various glucose concentrations in the range of 3~20 mM in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS solution. The sensor’s amperometric response to the glucose concentration is linear and its sensitivity was found to be 17.73 ± 3 μA/mM-cm2. This microneedle-based sensor has a potential to be used for painless diabetes testing applications.

  12. Hole doping and surface functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube chemiresistive sensors for ultrasensitive and highly selective organophosphor vapor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Liangming; Dai Zhenqing; Chen Haiyan; Chen Changxin; Wang Jian; Zhang Liying; Xu Dong; Wang Zi; Zhang Yafei; Shi Diwen; Ye Peiyi

    2011-01-01

    We developed a chemiresistive sensor based on doped and functionalized semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) (simulant of nerve agent sarin) vapor. The semiconducting SWNT network was deposited between interdigitated electrodes and modified by solid organic acid tetrafluorohydroquinone (TFQ). The TFQ molecules could not only selectively bind DMMP onto the sidewalls of SWNTs via the strong hydrogen bonding interaction, but also tailor the electronic properties of SWNTs via heavy hole doping. This synergetic effect significantly improved the sensitivity of the devices, and enabled the sensors to easily detect DMMP at 20 parts-per-trillion (ppt) concentration with a response time of less than 2 min, without the need for pre-concentration of the analytes. This sensitivity is about five orders of magnitude higher than that of the unmodified SWNT chemiresistor, and also significantly higher than that of the functionalized SWNT chemiresistors previously reported. Moreover, the SWNT-TFQ sensors could be recovered when DMMP is replaced with referencing gas. The SWNT-TFQ sensors also show excellent selectivity toward DMMP over some interfering organic vapors. The response mechanism, i.e. charge transfer and dedoping was investigated.

  13. Hole doping and surface functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube chemiresistive sensors for ultrasensitive and highly selective organophosphor vapor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Liangming; Dai Zhenqing; Chen Haiyan; Chen Changxin; Wang Jian; Zhang Liying; Xu Dong; Wang Zi; Zhang Yafei [Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shi Diwen; Ye Peiyi, E-mail: lmwei@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: yfzhang@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2011-10-21

    We developed a chemiresistive sensor based on doped and functionalized semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) (simulant of nerve agent sarin) vapor. The semiconducting SWNT network was deposited between interdigitated electrodes and modified by solid organic acid tetrafluorohydroquinone (TFQ). The TFQ molecules could not only selectively bind DMMP onto the sidewalls of SWNTs via the strong hydrogen bonding interaction, but also tailor the electronic properties of SWNTs via heavy hole doping. This synergetic effect significantly improved the sensitivity of the devices, and enabled the sensors to easily detect DMMP at 20 parts-per-trillion (ppt) concentration with a response time of less than 2 min, without the need for pre-concentration of the analytes. This sensitivity is about five orders of magnitude higher than that of the unmodified SWNT chemiresistor, and also significantly higher than that of the functionalized SWNT chemiresistors previously reported. Moreover, the SWNT-TFQ sensors could be recovered when DMMP is replaced with referencing gas. The SWNT-TFQ sensors also show excellent selectivity toward DMMP over some interfering organic vapors. The response mechanism, i.e. charge transfer and dedoping was investigated.

  14. Hole doping and surface functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotube chemiresistive sensors for ultrasensitive and highly selective organophosphor vapor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liangming; Shi, Diwen; Ye, Peiyi; Dai, Zhenqing; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Changxin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Liying; Xu, Dong; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Yafei

    2011-10-01

    We developed a chemiresistive sensor based on doped and functionalized semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) (simulant of nerve agent sarin) vapor. The semiconducting SWNT network was deposited between interdigitated electrodes and modified by solid organic acid tetrafluorohydroquinone (TFQ). The TFQ molecules could not only selectively bind DMMP onto the sidewalls of SWNTs via the strong hydrogen bonding interaction, but also tailor the electronic properties of SWNTs via heavy hole doping. This synergetic effect significantly improved the sensitivity of the devices, and enabled the sensors to easily detect DMMP at 20 parts-per-trillion (ppt) concentration with a response time of less than 2 min, without the need for pre-concentration of the analytes. This sensitivity is about five orders of magnitude higher than that of the unmodified SWNT chemiresistor, and also significantly higher than that of the functionalized SWNT chemiresistors previously reported. Moreover, the SWNT-TFQ sensors could be recovered when DMMP is replaced with referencing gas. The SWNT-TFQ sensors also show excellent selectivity toward DMMP over some interfering organic vapors. The response mechanism, i.e. charge transfer and dedoping was investigated.

  15. Modern BLS, dispatch and AED concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Rudolph W.

    2013-01-01

    Basic Life Support has changed significantly over the last 15 years. Evidence-based changes in recommendations involved compression rate, compression depth and the ratio between compressions and ventilations. There is much evidence that early basic life support increases the probability of survival

  16. System identification of a small low-cost unmanned aerial vehicle using flight data from low-cost sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Nathan Von

    Remote sensing has traditionally been done with satellites and manned aircraft. While. these methods can yield useful scientificc data, satellites and manned aircraft have limitations in data frequency, process time, and real time re-tasking. Small low-cost unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide greater possibilities for personal scientic research than traditional remote sensing platforms. Precision aerial data requires an accurate vehicle dynamics model for controller development, robust flight characteristics, and fault tolerance. One method of developing a model is system identification (system ID). In this thesis system ID of a small low-cost fixed-wing T-tail UAV is conducted. The linerized longitudinal equations of motion are derived from first principles. Foundations of Recursive Least Squares (RLS) are presented along with RLS with an Error Filtering Online Learning scheme (EFOL). Sensors, data collection, data consistency checking, and data processing are described. Batch least squares (BLS) and BLS with EFOL are used to identify aerodynamic coecoefficients of the UAV. Results of these two methods with flight data are discussed.

  17. Flow sensor of the thermal type

    OpenAIRE

    Bos, Jeroen Wouter; Hoitink, Ronald Wilhelmus Johannes; Besseling, Johannes Henricus; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2007-01-01

    A flow sensor of the thermal type having a U-shaped sensor tube with two legs and a connecting limb with two adjoining electrical resistance elements, and with a housing. The sensor tube has an inlet side and an outlet side. The housing has a first and a second housing part of a thermally well-conducting material, each with an inner surface provided with cavities and with an outer surface. The housing parts are placed with their inner surfaces against each other, while the U-shaped sensor tub...

  18. Automotive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Jiri; Illing, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Sensors are an essential component of most electronic systems in the car. They deliver input parameters for comfort features, engine and emission control as well as for the active and passive safety systems. New technologies such as silicon micromachining play an important role for the introduction of these sensors in all vehicle classes. The importance and use of these sensor technologies in today"s automotive applications will be shown in this article. Finally an outlook on important current developments and new functions in the car will be given.

  19. Piezoceramic Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Valeriy

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the latest and complete information about various types of piezosensors. A sensor is a converter of the measured physical size to an electric signal. Piezoelectric transducers and sensors are based on piezoelectric effects. They have proven to be versatile tools for the measurement of various processes. They are used for quality assurance, process control and for research and development in many different industries. In each area of application specific requirements to the parameters of transducers and sensors are developed. This book presents the fundamentals, technical des

  20. Sol-Gel Thin Films for Plasmonic Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic gas sensors are optical sensors that use localized surface plasmons or extended surface plasmons as transducing platform. Surface plasmons are very sensitive to dielectric variations of the environment or to electron exchange, and these effects have been exploited for the realization of sensitive gas sensors. In this paper, we review our research work of the last few years on the synthesis and the gas sensing properties of sol-gel based nanomaterials for plasmonic sensors. PMID:26184216

  1. Radiation sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wykes, J.S.; Adsley, I.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation detectors, suitable for use in industrial environments, eg coal mines are claimed. At least two scintillation crystals are mounted on a resilient support material, preferably silicone rubber. The sensors are both robust and compact. (U.K.)

  2. Subsurface Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeier, J. J.; Davies, J. L.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Conventional thinking holds that underground- and underwater radio communication is not possible, except at very low frequencies employing very long antennas and high transmit power. However, researchers at The University of Iowa have demonstrated that using inexpensive, low-power radios, it is in fact possible to achieve reliable underground radio communication over distances of several meters. This allows for creating underground wireless sensor networks. A proof-of-concept network was established at The University of Iowa, where nodes that measure soil moisture content are buried over a 20×20 m area (up to 1 m deep). The nodes organize themselves into a wireless sensor network, reconfigure routes as radio link quality waxes and wanes, cooperate in routing data packets to a surface base station, and so on. In an agricultural research setting, an advantage of such buried wireless sensor networks is that, if nodes were buried deep enough, they may be left in place during agricultural field work. Power consumption is an important issue in wireless sensor networks. This is especially true in a buried network where battery replacement is a major undertaking. The focus of continuing research is developing methods of inductively recharging buried sensor batteries.

  3. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  4. Development of an unattended ground sensor array using piezoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kelly; Gupta, Neelam; Sartain, Ronald B.

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the development of an Unattended Ground Sensor based on an array of pressure sensors designed to be buried in the ground. This sensor array, along with the required software (still under development), will have the ability to distinguish between humans and animals based on the size and shape of the foot print. The technology may also be applied to determine the weight and type of vehicle traveling on a road. The sensor array consists of pressure sensitive resistors (piezoresistors) on 0.8 inch centers printed on a sheet of polyimide film. Although very large arrays might one day be screen printed, the arrays for this study have been printed using a syringe dispenser and a precision x-y computer controlled table. For the preliminary development, the array has been sized to 8X10 inches. The piezoresistive properties of the sensors are discussed and preliminary test data is presented. It is shown that the piezoresistive gauge factor (ΔR/R/ΔL/L) is roughly 10 times that of conventional metal strain gauges. Because the change in resistance is large compared to metal strain gauges, lower cost electronics can be used. The small net size and low mass enables sensing elements with fast response time. The fact that these piezoresistive elements are directly printed, as opposed to being adhesively attached to a surface, eliminates many of the issues associated with bonded discrete sensors. It is anticipated that the piezoresistive sensor approach presented in this paper will be well suited to extremely rugged environmental conditions compared to the commercially available sensor arrays which rely on surface contact resistance or capacitive sensors which can be easily destroyed by moisture. Environmental testing will be done in a future phase of the project. The final system, which is still under development, will consist of a sensor array, information processing, and RF signal transmission. The system is anticipated to be low cost and environmentally

  5. Integrated Passive And Wireless Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-04-30

    A passive and wireless sensor is provided for sensing at least one of magnetic field, temperature or humidity. The sensor can provide only one of the sensing functions, individually or any combination of them simultaneously. It can be used for various applications where magnetic field changes, temperature and/or humidity need to be measured. In one or more embodiments, a surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor is provided that can measure one or more of a magnetic field (or current that generates the magnetic field), temperature and humidity. In one or more embodiments, a magnetoimpedence (MI) sensor (for example a thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor), a thermally sensitive (for example a Lithium Niobite (LiNbO.sub.3)) substrate, and a humidity sensitive film (for example a hydrogel film) can be used as sensing elements.

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE: The transmission interferometric adsorption sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, M.; Balmer, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a high-speed adsorption sensor based on thin-film interference at the interfaces. The sensor can be used as a stand-alone instrument or in combination with a direct surface force measurement, which yields a wide range of additional information on molecular interactions on adsorbed films. The achieved mass resolution of the presented method (1-10 ng cm-2 Hz-1/2) is comparable to or better than other modern bio-sensors. The dependence of mass resolution on various factors is presented and demonstrated in a number of relevant examples. The described method is suitable for the implementation of a low-cost bio-sensor with a minimal number of optical elements. The measurement spot size is one micrometre or more and sampling rates >10 Hz are readily possible. In contrast to other bio-sensors, the signal baseline has a remarkable long-term stability since the measured signal is virtually independent of refractive index changes in the fluid medium above the sensor surface. In combination with an optical spectral correlation method, the classical computer calculations are substituted by an optical calculator and a label-free real-time imaging adsorption sensor is realized. We demonstrate sensor operation both inside the extended surface forces apparatus as well as in a stand-alone bio-sensor configuration. As a final point, we illustrate the imaging capability of this new sensor technology on a patterned bio-functionalized surface.

  7. Single Nanoparticle Plasmonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sriram

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of plasmonic nanomaterials in optical sensors, coupled with the advances in detection techniques, has opened the way for biosensing with single plasmonic particles. Single nanoparticle sensors offer the potential to analyse biochemical interactions at a single-molecule level, thereby allowing us to capture even more information than ensemble measurements. We introduce the concepts behind single nanoparticle sensing and how the localised surface plasmon resonances of these nanoparticles are dependent upon their materials, shape and size. Then we outline the different synthetic approaches, like citrate reduction, seed-mediated and seedless growth, that enable the synthesis of gold and silver nanospheres, nanorods, nanostars, nanoprisms and other nanostructures with tunable sizes. Further, we go into the aspects related to purification and functionalisation of nanoparticles, prior to the fabrication of sensing surfaces. Finally, the recent developments in single nanoparticle detection, spectroscopy and sensing applications are discussed.

  8. Leica ADS40 Sensor for Coastal Multispectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The Leica ADS40 Sensor as it is used for coastal multispectral imaging is presented. The contents include: 1) Project Area Overview; 2) Leica ADS40 Sensor; 3) Focal Plate Arrangements; 4) Trichroid Filter; 5) Gradient Correction; 6) Image Acquisition; 7) Remote Sensing and ADS40; 8) Band comparisons of Satellite and Airborne Sensors; 9) Impervious Surface Extraction; and 10) Impervious Surface Details.

  9. A Novel Low-cost, Ka-band, High Altitude, Multi-Baseline Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Sensor for Surface Water Ocean Topography, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NRC Decadal Survey recommended the Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission to address terrestrial fresh water hydrology and physical oceanography...

  10. Analysis of rotation sensor data from the SINAPS@ Kefalonia (Greece) post-seismic experiment—link to surface geology and wavefield characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaa, Sarah; Hollender, Fabrice; Perron, Vincent; Imtiaz, Afifa; Bard, Pierre-Yves; Mariscal, Armand; Cochard, Alain; Dujardin, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Although rotational seismology has progressed in recent decades, the links between rotational ground motion and site soil conditions are poorly documented. New experiments were performed on Kefalonia Island (Greece) following two large earthquakes ( M W = 6.0, M W = 5.9) in early 2014 on two well-characterized sites (soft soil, V S30 250 m/s; rock, V S30 830 m/s, V S30 being harmonic average shear-wave velocity between 0 and 30 m depth). These earthquakes led to large six-component (three translations and three rotations) datasets of hundreds of well-recorded events. The relationship between peak translational acceleration versus peak rotational velocity is found sensitive to the site conditions mainly for the rotation around the vertical axis (torsion; dominated by Love waves): the stiffer the soil, the lower the torsion, for a given level of translational acceleration. For rotation around the horizontal axes (rocking; dominated by Rayleigh waves), this acceleration/rotation relationship exhibits much weaker differences between soft and rock sites. Using only the rotation sensor, an estimate of the Love-to-Rayleigh energy ratios could be carried out and provided the same results as previous studies that have analyzed the Love- and Rayleigh-wave energy proportions using data from translational arrays deployed at the same two sites. The coupling of translational and rotational measurements appears to be useful, not only for direct applications of engineering seismology, but also to investigate the composition of the wavefield, while avoiding deployment of dense arrays. The availability of new, low-noise rotation sensors that are easy to deploy in the field is of great interest and should extend the use of rotation sensors and expand their possible applications.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Nanoplasmonic sensors for biointerfacial science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Joshua A; Rahim Ferhan, Abdul; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-06-19

    In recent years, nanoplasmonic sensors have become widely used for the label-free detection of biomolecules across medical, biotechnology, and environmental science applications. To date, many nanoplasmonic sensing strategies have been developed with outstanding measurement capabilities, enabling detection down to the single-molecule level. One of the most promising directions has been surface-based nanoplasmonic sensors, and the potential of such technologies is still emerging. Going beyond detection, surface-based nanoplasmonic sensors open the door to enhanced, quantitative measurement capabilities across the biointerfacial sciences by taking advantage of high surface sensitivity that pairs well with the size of medically important biomacromolecules and biological particulates such as viruses and exosomes. The goal of this review is to introduce the latest advances in nanoplasmonic sensors for the biointerfacial sciences, including ongoing development of nanoparticle and nanohole arrays for exploring different classes of biomacromolecules interacting at solid-liquid interfaces. The measurement principles for nanoplasmonic sensors based on utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) phenomena are first introduced. The following sections are then categorized around different themes within the biointerfacial sciences, specifically protein binding and conformational changes, lipid membrane fabrication, membrane-protein interactions, exosome and virus detection and analysis, and probing nucleic acid conformations and binding interactions. Across these themes, we discuss the growing trend to utilize nanoplasmonic sensors for advanced measurement capabilities, including positional sensing, biomacromolecular conformation analysis, and real-time kinetic monitoring of complex biological interactions. Altogether, these advances highlight the rich potential of nanoplasmonic sensors and the future growth prospects of

  12. Radiation sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.L.; Geronime, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation sensor and thermocouple, respectively, which can be used for reactor in-core instrumentation. The radiation sensor consists of an inconel conductor wire and rhodium emitter wire, the thermocouple of two intertwined alumel or chromel wires. Both are arranged in the center of a metal tube relative to which they are separated by an insulator made of SiO 2 fibers. This insulator is first introduced as a loose fabric between the radiation sensor and the thermocouple, respectively, and the metal tube and then compacted to a density of 35-73% of pure SiO 2 by drawing the tube. There is no need for soldering or welding. The insulation resistivity at room temperature ist between 10 14 and 10 15 ohms. (ORU) [de

  13. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Planar Hall Effect Sensors for Biodetection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni

    the rotation response (Brownian relaxation) of the magnetic beads, which can be measured through magnetic AC susceptometry. The dPHEB sensor is used for surface-based biodetection, where the analytes bind to capture probes immobilised on the sensor surface and allow for ligation of magnetic beads to the sensor...... in a sandwich assay. Biotinylated DNA target binds to surface tethered capture probes and allows for the ligation of 50 nm streptavidin coated magnetic beads to the sensor surface. The sensor can detect DNA to a concentration of 156 pM upon 60 min hybridisation. The setup is capable of measuring DNA......The work presented in this thesis contributes to the development of diagnostic tools also suited for use at the point-of-care. These devices may help to spread part of the biochemical analysis work from centralised laboratories to doctors' offices and in some cases to patients' homes. Point...

  15. Fleet Protection Using a Small UAV Based IR Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buss, James R; Ax, Jr, George R

    2005-01-01

    A study was performed to define candidate electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) sensor configurations and assess their potential utility as small UAV-based sensors surveilling a perimeter around surface fleet assets...

  16. New Wireless Sensors for Diagnostics Under Harsh Environments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is an acute need for robust sensors and sensor systems capable of operation in harsh environments. In particular, high temperature passive wireless surface...

  17. Wireless SAW Sensor Strain Gauge & Integrated Interrogator Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless, passive, Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) temperature sensors, which can operate in a multi-sensor environment, have recently been successfully demonstrated. A...

  18. New Wireless Sensors for Diagnostics Under Harsh Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is an acute need for robust sensors and sensor systems capable of operation in harsh environments. In particular, high temperature passive wireless surface...

  19. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  20. Imaging Sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natural and Manmade Sensors. A less well-known instance of how we have been anticipated by evolution refers to the compound eye of insects like bees, wasps, etc. and of arthropods like the horseshoe crab (Figure 1). The compound eye consists of several thousand ommatidia. Each ommatidium is a separate detector, ...

  1. GMI sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Platil, A.; Malátek, M.; Ripka, P.; Kraus, Luděk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 110, 1-3 (2004), s. 341-342 ISSN 0924-4247 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetic sensors * GMI * magnetometer Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.462, year: 2004

  2. Gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  3. A Novel Low-cost, Ka-band, High Altitude, Multi-Baseline Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Sensor for Surface Water Ocean Topography, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal presents the Ka-band SWOT Phenomenology Airborne Radar (KaSPAR) to support the surface water ocean topography (SWOT) mission for science and algorithm...

  4. The nature of surface behavior of tin oxide doped sensors: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies before and after exposure to liquid petroleum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phani, A. R.; Manorama, S.; Rao, V. J.

    2000-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been carried out to investigate the possible chemical species involved in the gas-solid interaction and enhancing mechanism of the Pd-doped SnO2 sensor element. In the case of SnO2 and SnO2/Al2Si2O7, when the samples are exposed to liquid petroleum gas (LPG), the SnO2 is reduced to metallic Sn indicating adsorption-desorption (chemical mechanism). Whereas in the case of SnO2/Pd and SnO2/Al2Si2O7/Pd systems in addition to chemical mechanism, there is an additional contribution from the Pd, in which PdO2 and PdO are reduced to PdO and Pd, respectively, attributed to electronic mechanism. It has been observed that the electronic mechanism is more predominant than the chemical one.

  5. Optical fibre microwire sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G.; Belal, Mohammad; Jung, Y.; Song, Z.; Xu, F.; Newson, T.P.; Richardson, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews sensing applications of optical fibre microwires and nanowires. In addition to the usual benefits of sensors based on optical fibres, these sensors are extremely compact and have fast response speeds. In this review sensors will be grouped in three categories according to their morphology: linear sensors, resonant sensors and tip sensors. While linear and resonant sensors mainly exploit the fraction of power propagating outside the microwire physical boundary, tip sensors t...

  6. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  7. Contact pin-printing of albumin-fungicide conjugate for silicon nitride-based sensors biofunctionalization: Multi-technique surface analysis for optimum immunoassay performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajos, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.gajos@doctoral.uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza, 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Budkowski, Andrzej [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza, 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Tsialla, Zoi; Petrou, Panagiota [Institute of Nuclear & Radiological Sciences & Technology, Energy & Safety, NCSR Demokritos, P. Grigoriou & Neapoleos St., Aghia Paraksevi 15310, Athens (Greece); Awsiuk, Kamil; Dąbczyński, Paweł [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza, 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Bernasik, Andrzej [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Rysz, Jakub [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza, 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Misiakos, Konstantinos; Raptis, Ioannis [Department of Microelectronics, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR Demokritos, P. Grigoriou & Neapoleos St., Aghia Paraksevi 15310, Athens (Greece); Kakabakos, Sotirios [Institute of Nuclear & Radiological Sciences & Technology, Energy & Safety, NCSR Demokritos, P. Grigoriou & Neapoleos St., Aghia Paraksevi 15310, Athens (Greece)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Contact pin-printing of overlapping probe spots and spotting by hand are compared. • Contact pin-printing favors probe immobilization with two-fold higher surface density. • Incomplete monolayer develops to bilayer as printing solution concentration increases. • Blocking molecules complete probe monolayer but reduce probe bilayer. • Surface immunoreaction increases with probe concentration in printing solution. - Abstract: Mass fabrication of integrated biosensors on silicon chips is facilitated by contact pin-printing, applied for biofunctionalization of individual Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-based transducers at wafer-scale. To optimize the biofunctionalization for immunochemical (competitive) detection of fungicide thiabendazole (TBZ), Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces are modified with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and examined after: immobilization of BSA-TBZ conjugate (probe) from solutions with different concentration, blocking with bovine serum albumin (BSA), and immunoreaction with a mouse monoclonal antibody against TBZ. Nanostructure, surface density, probe composition and coverage uniformity of protein layers are evaluated with Atomic Force Microscopy, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Contact pin-printing of overlapping probe spots is compared with hand spotted areas. Contact pin-printing resulted in two-fold increase of immobilized probe surface density as compared to hand spotting. Regarding BSA-TBZ immobilization, an incomplete monolayer develops into a bilayer as the concentration of BSA-TBZ molecules in the printing solution increases from 25 to 100 μg/mL. Upon blocking, however, a complete protein monolayer is formed for all the BSA-TBZ concentrations used. Free surface sites are filled with BSA for low surface coverage with BSA-TBZ, whereas loosely bound BSA-TBZ molecules are removed from the BSA-TBZ bilayer. As a consequence immunoreaction efficiency

  8. Nanomaterial-Enabled Wearable Sensors for Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Swetha, Puchakayala; Zhu, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Highly sensitive wearable sensors that can be conformably attached to human skin or integrated with textiles to monitor the physiological parameters of human body or the surrounding environment have garnered tremendous interest. Owing to the large surface area and outstanding material properties, nanomaterials are promising building blocks for wearable sensors. Recent advances in the nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors including temperature, electrophysiological, strain, tactile, electrochemical, and environmental sensors are presented in this review. Integration of multiple sensors for multimodal sensing and integration with other components into wearable systems are summarized. Representative applications of nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors for healthcare, including continuous health monitoring, daily and sports activity tracking, and multifunctional electronic skin are highlighted. Finally, challenges, opportunities, and future perspectives in the field of nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Semiconductor sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  10. Vibrissa Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    a seal whisker was joined at its base to a spring gimbal and subjected to flow conditions. Attorney Docket No. 300119 3 of 11 Fluid flow and the...whisker were then observed by a camera . In other research, an artificial whisker fabricated by stereolithography was fastened to a piezoelectric...the art. For example, membrane 38 could be replaced by a gimbal . The gimbal could be made from elastomeric material. Non-magnetic sensors could

  11. Flexible Sensors for Pressure Therapy: Effect of Substrate Curvature and Stiffness on Sensor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodasevych, Iryna; Parmar, Suresh; Troynikov, Olga

    2017-10-20

    Flexible pressure sensors are increasingly being used in medical and non-medical applications, and particularly in innovative health monitoring. Their efficacy in medical applications such as compression therapy depends on the accuracy and repeatability of their output, which in turn depend on factors such as sensor type, shape, pressure range, and conformability of the sensor to the body surface. Numerous researchers have examined the effects of sensor type and shape, but little information is available on the effect of human body parameters such as support surfaces' curvature and the stiffness of soft tissues on pressure sensing performance. We investigated the effects of body parameters on the performance of pressure sensors using a custom-made human-leg-like test setup. Pressure sensing parameters such as accuracy, drift and repeatability were determined in both static (eight hours continuous pressure) and dynamic (10 cycles of pressure application of 30 s duration) testing conditions. The testing was performed with a focus on compression therapy application for venous leg ulcer treatments, and was conducted in a low-pressure range of 20-70 mmHg. Commercially available sensors manufactured by Peratech and Sensitronics were used under various loading conditions to determine the influence of stiffness and curvature. Flat rigid, flat soft silicone and three cylindrical silicone surfaces of radii of curvature of 3.5 cm, 5.5 cm and 6.5 cm were used as substrates under the sensors. The Peratech sensor averaged 94% accuracy for both static and dynamic measurements on all substrates; the Sensitronics sensor averaged 88% accuracy. The Peratech sensor displayed moderate variations and the Sensitronics sensor large variations in output pressure readings depending on the underlying test surface, both of which were reduced markedly by individual pressure calibration for surface type. Sensor choice and need for calibration to surface type are important considerations for

  12. Radio requestable passive SAW water content sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reindl, L.; Ruppel, C.C.W.; Kirmayr, A.; Stockhausen, N.; Hilhorst, M.A.; Balendonk, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new passive sensor for remote measurement of water content in sandy soil was designed, using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line. Information from this sensor can be obtained by an interrogation device via a radio link operating in the European 434-MHz industrial-scientific-medical

  13. Noise cancellation in magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography with isolated reference sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Espy, Michelle A.; Matlachov, Andrei; Volegov, Petr

    2010-06-01

    An apparatus measures electromagnetic signals from a weak signal source. A plurality of primary sensors is placed in functional proximity to the weak signal source with an electromagnetic field isolation surface arranged adjacent the primary sensors and between the weak signal source and sources of ambient noise. A plurality of reference sensors is placed adjacent the electromagnetic field isolation surface and arranged between the electromagnetic isolation surface and sources of ambient noise.

  14. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  15. Testing of surface properties pre-rad and post-rad of n-in-p silicon sensors for very high radiation environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindgren, S.; Affolder, A.A.; Allport, P.P.; Bates, R.; Betancourt, C.; Böhm, Jan; Brown, H.; Buttar, C.; Carter, J. R.; Casse, G.; Mikeštíková, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 636, č. 1 (2011), "S111"-"S117" ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : p-bulk silicon * surface damage * charge collection * punch-through voltage Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nima.2010.04.094

  16. Improving Long-term Global Precipitation Dataset Using Multi-sensor Surface Soil Moisture Retrievals and the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, F.; Crow, W. T.; Holmes, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Using multiple historical satellite surface soil moisture products, the Kalman Filtering-based Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART) is applied to improve the accuracy of a multi-decadal global daily rainfall product that has been bias-corrected to match the monthly totals of available rain gauge observations. In order to adapt to the irregular retrieval frequency of heritage soil moisture products, a new variable correction window method is developed which allows for better efficiency in leveraging temporally sparse satellite soil moisture retrievals. Results confirm the advantage of using this variable window method relative to an existing fixed-window version of SMART over a range of accumulation periods. Using this modified version of SMART, and heritage satellite surface soil moisture products, a 1.0-degree, 1979-1998 global rainfall dataset over land is corrected and validated. Relative to the original precipitation product, the updated correction scheme demonstrates improved root-mean-square-error and correlation accuracy and provides a higher probability of detection and lower false alarm rates for 3-day rainfall accumulation estimates, except for the heaviest (99th percentile) cases. This corrected rainfall dataset is expected to provide improved rainfall forcing data for the land surface modeling community.

  17. Hypergol Sensor Using Passive Wireless SAW Devices, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the preliminary development of surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hypergolic fuel sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless leak...

  18. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  19. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalshoven, James, Jr.; Dabney, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Instrument measures polarization characteristics of Earth at three wavelengths. Airborne Laser Polarization Sensor (ALPS) measures optical polarization characteristics of land surface. Designed to be flown at altitudes of approximately 300 m to minimize any polarizing or depolarizing effects of intervening atmosphere and to look along nadir to minimize any effects depending on look angle. Data from measurements used in conjunction with data from ground surveys and aircraft-mounted video recorders to refine mathematical models used in interpretation of higher-altitude polarimetric measurements of reflected sunlight.

  20. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  1. Intrusion detection sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.D.

    1978-07-01

    Intrusion detection sensors are an integral part of most physical security systems. Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Safeguards and Security, Sandia Laboratories has conducted a survey of available intrusion detection sensors and has tested a number of different sensors. An overview of these sensors is provided. This overview includes (1) the operating principles of each type of sensor, (2) unique sensor characteristics, (3) desired sensor improvements which must be considered in planning an intrusion detection system, and (4) the site characteristics which affect the performance of both exterior and interior sensors. Techniques which have been developed to evaluate various intrusion detection sensors are also discussed

  2. Ingestible Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Ha, Nam; Ou, Jian Zhen; Berean, Kyle J

    2017-04-28

    Ingestible sensing capsules are fast emerging as a critical technology that has the ability to greatly impact health, nutrition, and clinical areas. These ingestible devices are noninvasive and hence are very attractive for customers. With widespread access to smart phones connected to the Internet, the data produced by this technology can be readily seen and reviewed online, and accessed by both users and physicians. The outputs provide invaluable information to reveal the state of gut health and disorders as well as the impact of food, medical supplements, and environmental changes on the gastrointestinal tract. One unique feature of such ingestible sensors is that their passage through the gut lumen gives them access to each individual organ of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, ingestible sensors offer the ability to gather images and monitor luminal fluid and the contents of each gut segment including electrolytes, enzymes, metabolites, hormones, and the microbial communities. As such, an incredible wealth of knowledge regarding the functionality and state of health of individuals through key gut biomarkers can be obtained. This Review presents an overview of the gut structure and discusses current and emerging digestible technologies. The text is an effort to provide a comprehensive overview of ingestible sensing capsules, from both a body physiology point of view as well as a technological view, and to detail the potential information that they can generate.

  3. Multi-Sensor Mud Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2010-01-01

    Robust mud detection is a critical perception requirement for Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) autonomous offroad navigation. A military UGV stuck in a mud body during a mission may have to be sacrificed or rescued, both of which are unattractive options. There are several characteristics of mud that may be detectable with appropriate UGV-mounted sensors. For example, mud only occurs on the ground surface, is cooler than surrounding dry soil during the daytime under nominal weather conditions, is generally darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and is highly polarized. However, none of these cues are definitive on their own. Dry soil also occurs on the ground surface, shadows, snow, ice, and water can also be cooler than surrounding dry soil, shadows are also darker than surrounding dry soil in visible imagery, and cars, water, and some vegetation are also highly polarized. Shadows, snow, ice, water, cars, and vegetation can all be disambiguated from mud by using a suite of sensors that span multiple bands in the electromagnetic spectrum. Because there are military operations when it is imperative for UGV's to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, passive sensors are desirable. JPL has developed a daytime mud detection capability using multiple passive imaging sensors. Cues for mud from multiple passive imaging sensors are fused into a single mud detection image using a rule base, and the resultant mud detection is localized in a terrain map using range data generated from a stereo pair of color cameras.

  4. A flexible infrared sensor for tissue oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Dahl; Thyssen, Anders; Engholm, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    integrated in a flexible array. The flexibility is achieved by combining silicon with Polydimethylsiloxane and polyimide using standard IC manufacturing. This ensures that the electrical interconnects on the sensor can withstand being bent in order for the sensor to confine to the curved surface of the head...... of a neonatal. The sensor platform has been tested and is found to be very durable and capable of being both bent to small radii of curvature and strained in the longitudinal direction. The electrical interconnects on the sensor only experience a relative small increase in resistance when the sensor is bent up...... to 90° and they can withstand a longitudinal strain of up to 5% without being damaged. A durability test has shown no fatigue or change in resistance for the electrical interconnects when the sensor had been bent 10,000 times. Two different sizes of photo detectors have been characterized. The smaller...

  5. Sensor-Based Inspection of the Formation Accuracy in Ultra-Precision Grinding (UPG) of Aspheric Surface Considering the Chatter Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yao; Bai, Yue; Xu, Zhijun

    2018-03-01

    This paper proposes an experimental approach for monitoring and inspection of the formation accuracy in ultra-precision grinding (UPG) with respect to the chatter vibration. Two factors related to the grinding progress, the grinding speed of grinding wheel and spindle, and the oil pressure of the hydrostatic bearing are taken into account to determining the accuracy. In the meantime, a mathematical model of the radius deviation caused by the micro vibration is also established and applied in the experiments. The results show that the accuracy is sensitive to the vibration and the forming accuracy is much improved with proper processing parameters. It is found that the accuracy of aspheric surface can be less than 4 μm when the grinding speed is 1400 r/min and the wheel speed is 100 r/min with the oil pressure being 1.1 MPa.

  6. Surface Air Temperature Fluctuations and Lapse Rates on Olivares Gamma Glacier, Rio Olivares Basin, Central Chile, from a Novel Meteorological Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirically based studies of glacier meteorology, especially for the Southern Hemisphere, are relatively sparse in the literature. Here, we use an innovative network of highly portable, low-cost thermometers to report on high-frequency (1-min time resolution surface air temperature fluctuations and lapse rates (LR in a ~800-m elevational range (from 3,675 to 4,492 m a.s.l. across the glacier Olivares Gamma in the central Andes, Chile. Temperatures were measured during an intense field campaign in late Southern summer, 19–27 March 2015, under varying weather conditions. We found a complex dependence of high-frequency LR on time of day, topography, and wider meteorological conditions, with hourly temperature variations during this week that were probably mainly associated with short- and long-wave radiation changes and not with wind speed/direction changes. Using various pairs of sites within our station network, we also analyze spatial variations in LR. Uniquely in this study, we compare temperatures measured at heights of 1-m and 2-m above the glacier surface for the network of five sites and found that temperatures at these two heights occasionally differed by more than ±4°C during the early afternoons, although the mean temperature difference is much smaller (~0.3°C. An implication of our results is that daily, hourly, or even monthly averaged LR may be insufficient for feeding into accurate melt models of glacier change, with the adoption of subhourly (ideally 1–10-min resolution LR likely to prove fruitful in developing new innovative high-time-resolution melt modelling. Our results are potentially useful as input LR for local glacier melt models and for improving the understanding of lapse rate fluctuations and glacier response to climate change.

  7. Optical find of hypersonic surface acoustic waves in bulk transparent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Riobóo, Rafael J.; Sánchez-Sánchez, Alberto; Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct information from surface acoustic waves (SAWs) of bulk transparent materials can be obtained by using Brillouin light scattering (BLS). The study of surface phonons by means of an optical spectroscopy such as BLS has been historically constrained to nontransparent and highly reflecting bulk and film samples or even to very thin films deposited on reflecting substrates. Probably due to its low signal and to the narrow window in experimental conditions, it was assumed for years that bulk transparent samples were not suited for Brillouin spectroscopy in order to get information on SAWs, negating this optical technique in the search for SAW properties. The reported experiments on transparent glasses and single crystals (cubic MgO and trigonal sapphire) prove that there is no intrinsic physical reason not to collect SAW propagation velocity data from transparent bulk samples and opens a challenge to apply the Brillouin spectroscopy in a wider scenario to obtain direct information, in a nondestructive and contactless way, about SAWs in bulk materials.

  8. Evaluating links between deformation, topography and surface temperature at volcanic domes: Results from a multi-sensor study at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Jacqueline T.; Milillo, Pietro; Varley, Nick; Perissin, Daniele; Pantaleo, Michele; Walter, Thomas R.

    2017-12-01

    Dome building activity is common at many volcanoes and due to the gravitational instability, a dome represents one of the most hazardous volcanic phenomena. Shallow volcanic processes as well as rheological and structural changes of the dome affecting the fluid transport have been linked to transitions in eruptive activity. Also, hydrothermal alteration may affect the structural integrity of the dome, increasing the potential for collapse. However, mapping the deformation and details of fluid escape at the summit of steep sloped volcanoes and integrating these with other types of data is challenging due to difficult access and poor coverage. Here we present for the first time the near-vertical and near-horizontal surface deformation field of a quiescent summit dome and the relationships with degassing and topographic patterns. Our results are derived from high resolution satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) time series based on a year of TerraSAR-X SpotLight acquisitions and Structure from Motion (SfM) processing of overflight infrared data at Volcán de Colima, Mexico. The identified deformation is dominated by localized heterogeneous subsidence of the summit dome exceeding rates of 15 cm/yr, and strongly decreasing over the year 2012, up to the renewal of explosive and extrusive activity in early 2013. We tentatively attribute the deformation to the degassing, cooling and contraction of the dome and shallow conduit material. We also find that the results strongly differ depending on the chosen InSAR time series method, which potentially overprints the true physical complexities of small scale, shallow deformation processes. The combined interpretation of the deformation and infrared data reveals a complex spatial relationship between the degassing pathways and the deformation. While we observe no deformation across the crater rim fumaroles, discontinuities in the deformation field are more commonly observed around the dome rim fumaroles and occasionally on the

  9. Stylus type MEMS texture sensor covered with corrugated diaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takashiro; Asao, Hideaki; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a stylus type MEMS texture sensor covered with a corrugated palylene diaphragm, which prevent debris from jamming into the sensor without significant degradation of sensitivity and bandwidth, was reported. A new fabrication process using a lost-foil method to make the corrugated diaphragm on a 3-axis piezoresistive force sensor at wafer level has been developed. The texture sensor could detect the surface microstructure as small as about 10 \

  10. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  12. A novel non-enzymatic glucose sensor based on the modification of carbon paste electrode with CuO nanoflower: Designing the experiments by response surface methodology (RSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani-Beni, Zahra; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2017-10-15

    A non enzymatic modified electrode was constructed based on the modification of carbon paste electrode with CuO nanoflower (CuO-CPE). The raw and modified samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM-EDX and X-ray mapping techniques. The proposed CuO-CPE showed a well voltammetric peak pair in cyclic voltammetry which of peak currents were decreased in the presence of glucose. Hence, this decrease in peak current was used for voltammetric determination of glucose. To evaluate interactions between the influencing variables, experiments were designed by response surface methodology (RSM) and the results showed CuO%-pH have the most effect on square wave voltammetric response. The best response was obtained in a run including 20% CuO modifier, pH 3.6, amplitude 0.106V, step potential 0.0074V and frequency 17.75Hz. Calibration curve was constructed and a linear response between ΔIp (difference of peak current in the presence and absence of glucose in SqW voltammograms) and glucose concentration was obtained in concentration range from 0.06 to 10mmolL -1 [calibration equation: ΔI (μA)=91.35 C glucose +523.12, R 2 =0.9967] with detection and quantification limits of 7.49×10 -10 and 2.49×10 -9 molL -1 , respectively. The modified electrode can be used satisfactory in determination of glucose in real samples such as human blood serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Field effect sensors for PCR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, Meng-Houit; Sweatman, Denis R.

    2004-03-01

    The use of field effect sensors for biological and chemical sensing is widely employed due to its ability to make detections based on charge and surface potential. Because proteins and DNA almost always carry a charge [1], silicon can be used to micro fabricate such a sensor. The EIS structure (Electrolyte on Insulator on Silicon) provides a novel, label-free and simple to fabricate way to make a field effect DNA detection sensor. The sensor responds to fluctuating capacitance caused by a depletion layer thickness change at the surface of the silicon substrate through DNA adsorption onto the dielectric oxide/PLL (Poly-L-Lysine) surface. As DNA molecules diffuse to the sensor surface, they are bound to their complimentary capture probes deposited on the surface. The negative charge exhibited by the DNA forces negative charge carriers in the substrate to move away from the surface. This causes an n-type depletion layer substrate to thicken and a p-type to thin. The depletion layer thickness can be measured by its capacitance using an LCR meter. This experiment is conducted using the ConVolt (constant voltage) approach. Nucleic acids are amplified by an on chip PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) system and then fed into the sensor. The low ionic solution strength will ensure that counter-ions do not affect the sensor measurements. The sensor surface contains capture probes that bind to the pathogen. The types of pathogens we"ll be detecting include salmonella, campylobacter and E.Coli DNA. They are held onto the sensor surface by the positively charged Poly-L-Lysine layer. The electrolyte is biased through a pseudo-reference electrode. Pseudo reference electrodes are usually made from metals such as Platinum or Silver. The problem associated with "floating" biasing electrodes is they cannot provide stable biasing potentials [2]. They drift due to surface charging effects and trapped charges on the surface. To eliminate this, a differential system consisting of 2 sensors

  14. Investigation of optical/infrared sensor techniques for application satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, I.

    1972-01-01

    A method of scanning an optical sensor array by acoustic surface waves is discussed. Data cover detailed computer based analysis of the operation of a multielement acoustic surface-wave-scanned optical sensor, the development of design and operation techniques that were used to show the feasibility of an integrated array to design several such arrays, and experimental verification of a number of the calculations with discrete sensor devices.

  15. A Simple Test to Evaluate the Calibration Stability and Accuracy of Infrared Thermocouple Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pinnock, Derek R.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Accurately measuring surface temperature is not difficult when the surface, the sensor, and air temperatures are similar, but it is challenging when the surface temperature is significantly different than air and sensor temperatures. We tested three Infrared Thermocouple sensors (IRT’s) that had been used for two years in a greenhouse environment. The importance of the correction for sensor body temperature was also examined.

  16. Research on photoconductor radiological sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, Francois

    1989-01-01

    Because of the evolution of medical imaging techniques to digital systems, it is necessary to replace radiological film which has many drawbacks, by a detector quite as efficient and quickly giving a digitable signal. The purpose of this thesis is to find new X-ray digital imaging processes using photoconductor materials such as amorphous selenium. After reviewing the principle of direct radiology and functions to be served by the X-ray sensor (i e. detection, memory, assignment, visualization), we explain specification. We especially show the constraints due to the object to be radio-graphed (condition of minimal exposure), and to the reading signal (electronic noise detection associated with a reading frequency). As a result of this study, a first photoconductor sensor could be designed. Its principle is based on photo carrier trapping at dielectric-photoconductor structure interface. The reading system needs the scanning of a laser beam upon the sensor surface. The dielectric-photoconductor structure enabled us to estimate the possibilities offered by the sensor and to build a complete x-ray imaging system. The originality of thermos-dielectric sensor, that was next studied, is to allow a thermal assignment reading. The chosen system consists in varying the ferroelectric polymer capacity whose dielectric permittivity is weak at room temperature. The thermo-dielectric material was studied by thermal or Joule effect stimulation. During our experiments, trapping was found in a sensor made of amorphous selenium between two electrodes. This new effect was performed and enabled us to expose a first interpretation. Eventually, the comparison of these new sensor concepts with radiological film shows the advantage of the proposed solution. (author) [fr

  17. Lactate Sensors on Flexible Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactate detection by an in situ sensor is of great need in clinical medicine, food processing, and athletic performance monitoring. In this paper, a flexible, easy to fabricate, and low-cost biosensor base on lactate oxidase is presented. The fabrication processes, including metal deposition, sol-gel IrOx deposition, and drop-dry enzyme loading method, are described in detail. The loaded enzyme was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the sensors. Durability, sensibility, and selectivity of the biosensors were examined. The comparison for different electrode sizes and different sensing film materials was conducted. The sensor could last for four weeks with an average surface area normalized sensitivity of 950 nA/(cm2 mM and 9250 nA/(cm2 mM for Au-based electrodes, and IrOx-modified electrodes respectively, both with an electrode size of 100 × 50 μm. The self-referencing method to record noises simultaneously with the working electrode greatly improved sensor sensitivity and selectivity. The sensor showed little response to interference chemicals, such as glutamate and dopamine.

  18. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  19. Novel Framework for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Flying Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, Prateek; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2014-01-01

    are avoided in this framework. The proposed framework is therefore highly suitable for sensor network deployment in inhabitable harsh terrain. Fuzzy logic based inference of the clusters (referred as cluster-hops) that could be covered by the sensor fly, governed by the input parameters has been presented....... collection entity, as proposed in this framework. Similarly, cluster heads (CHs) are usually expected to transfer the aggregated data to an adjoining CH or to the base station (BS) directly. In the proposed framework the CH transfers data directly to the flying sensor node, averting the need for energy...... intensive multi-hop inter-cluster communication to relay information to the BS. The flying sensor node is referred as sensor fly. The limitations of a conventional sensor network deployed on ground surface, in respect to the near ground path loss, and communication hindrance due to undulating terrain...

  20. Magnetic Tactile Sensor for Braille Reading

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-04-27

    We report a biomimetic magnetic tactile sensor for Braille characters reading. The sensor consists of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia implemented on magnetic micro sensors. The nanocomposite is produced from the highly elastic polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires that exhibit a permanent magnetic behavior. This design enables remote operation and does not require an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires. The highly elastic nanocomposite is easy to pattern, corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces, which allows recognizing small changes in surface texture, as in the case of Braille dots. The 6 dots of a braille cell are read from top to bottom with a tactile sensor array consisting of 4 elements and 1 mm long nanocomposite cilia.