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Sample records for surface azido groups

  1. Electronic Structure of the Azide Group in 3¢-Azido-3¢-deoxythymidine (AZT Compared to Small Azide Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations for some structural and electronic properties of the azide moiety in the nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitor 3¢-azido-3¢-deoxythymidine (AZT are reported. These properties, which include geometrical properties in three dimensional space, Hirshfeld charges, electrostatic potential (MEP, vibrational frequencies, and core and valence ionization spectra, are employed to study how the azide group is affected by the presence of a larger fragment. For this purpose, two small but important organic azides, hydrazoic acid and methyl azide, are also considered. The general features of trans Cs configuration for RNNN fragments[1] is distorted in the large AZT bio-molecule. Hirshfeld charge analysis shows charges are reallocated more evenly on azide when the donor group R is not a single atom. Infrared and photoelectron spectra reveal different aspects of the compounds. In conclusion, the electronic structural properties of the compounds depend on the specific property, the local structure and chemical environment of a species.

  2. Study on structure, vibrational analysis and molecular characteristics of some halogen substituted azido-phenylethanones using FTIR spectra and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, J.; Reddy, Byru Venkatram

    2018-03-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of organic compounds 4-fluoro-2-azido-1-phenylethanone (FAP), 4-chloro-2-azido-1-phenylethanone (CAP) and 4-bromo-2-azido-1-phenylethanone (BAP) have been recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1. The optimized molecular structure for global minimum energy of the titled molecules is determined by evaluating torsional potentials as a function of rotation angle about free rotation bonds among the substituent groups subjecting them to DFT employing B3LYP functional with 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. The vibrational frequencies along with infrared intensities are computed by SQM procedure. The rms error between observed and calculated frequencies is found to be 9.27, 8.17 and 7.95 cm-1 for FAP, CAP and BAP, respectively which shows good agreement between experimental and scaled values of calculated frequencies obtained by DFT. The vibrational assignments of all the fundamental bands of each molecule are made unambiguously using PED and eigen vectors obtained in the computations. The computed values of dipole moment, polarizability and hyperpolarizability indicate that the titled molecules exhibit NLO behaviour and hence may be considered for potential applicants for the development of NLO materials. HOMO and LUMO energies evaluated in the study demonstrate chemical stability of the molecules. NBO analysis is made to study the stability of the molecules arising from hyper conjugative interactions and charge delocalization. The molecular electrostatic surface potential (MESP) and thermodynamic parameters are also evaluated.

  3. Graphs, groups and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    1985-01-01

    The field of topological graph theory has expanded greatly in the ten years since the first edition of this book appeared. The original nine chapters of this classic work have therefore been revised and updated. Six new chapters have been added, dealing with: voltage graphs, non-orientable imbeddings, block designs associated with graph imbeddings, hypergraph imbeddings, map automorphism groups and change ringing.Thirty-two new problems have been added to this new edition, so that there are now 181 in all; 22 of these have been designated as ``difficult'''' and 9 as ``unsolved''''. Three of the four unsolved problems from the first edition have been solved in the ten years between editions; they are now marked as ``difficult''''.

  4. Beauville Surfaces and Groups 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, Shelly; Vdovina, Alina

    2015-01-01

    This collection of surveys and research articles explores a fascinating class of varieties: Beauville surfaces. It is the first time that these objects are discussed from the points of view of algebraic geometry as well as group theory. The book also includes various open problems and conjectures related to these surfaces. Beauville surfaces are a class of rigid regular surfaces of general type, which can be described in a purely algebraic combinatoric way. They play an important role in different fields of mathematics like algebraic geometry, group theory and number theory. The notion of Beauville surface was introduced by Fabrizio Catanese in 2000 and, after the first systematic study of these surfaces by Ingrid Bauer, Fabrizio Catanese and Fritz Grunewald, there has been an increasing interest in the subject. These proceedings reflect the topics of the lectures presented during the workshop ‘Beauville Surfaces and Groups 2012’, held at Newcastle University, UK in June 2012. This conference brought toge...

  5. Synthesis of azido derivatives of mucobromic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mbebe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mucobromic acid is a highly reactive multicentered molecule. It was converted to its corresponding but unstable diazido derivative by reaction with two equivalents of sodium azide. The resultant 3,4-diazido-5-hydroxyfuran-2(5H-one was obtained in moderate yield (42% but decomposed readily even at low temperatures. Its more stable analogue 3,4-diazido-5-methoxyfuran-2(5H-one was obtained in excellent yield after reacting 5-methoxy-3,4-dibromofuranone with two equivalents of sodium azide. The 4,5-dibromopyridazinones which are in effect masked mucobromic acid derivatives, underwent nucleophilic substitution reactions with various nucleophiles, including azides and afforded corresponding azidopyridazinones in good yields. The synthesized azido-furanone and pyridazinone derivatives are earmarked for click reactions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v27i1.17

  6. Synthesis and Consecutive Reactions of α-Azido Ketones: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Faiz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review paper covers the major synthetic approaches attempted towards the synthesis of α-azido ketones, as well as the synthetic applications/consecutive reactions of α-azido ketones.

  7. Studies on the inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase by stabilized reaction intermediates and stereodefined azido phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luís; Bujons, Jordi; Casas, Josefina; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-11-10

    Two kinds of inhibitors of the PLP-dependent enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase have been designed and tested on the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Amino phosphates 1, 12, and 32, mimicking the intermediate aldimines of the catalytic process, were weak inhibitors on both enzyme sources. On the other hand, a series of stereodefined azido phosphates, resulting from the replacement of the amino group of the natural substrates with an azido group, afforded competitive inhibitors in the low micromolar range on both enzyme sources. This similar behavior represents an experimental evidence of the reported structural similarities for both enzymes at their active site level. Interestingly, the anti-isomers of the non-natural enantiomeric series where the most potent inhibitors on hS1PL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct Lactamization of Azido Amides via Staudinger-Type Reductive Cyclization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, In Jung; Lee, Su Jeong; Cho, Chang Woo

    2012-01-01

    The direct lactamization of 1,3- and 1,4-azido amides has been achieved using triphenylphosphine and water, affording various γ- and δ-lactams in good to excellent yields. The direct lactamization of the azido amides was performed via the Staudinger-type reductive cyclization in which the amide group acts as the electrophile for lactam synthesis. This lactamization provides a mild, functional group tolerant and efficient route for the synthesis of various γ- and δ-lactams found in natural products and pharmaceuticals. Further studies will be conducted to develop new synthetic routes for the synthesis of various lactams. The lactam ring system is one of the most ubiquitous structural motifs found in natural products and pharmaceuticals. Owing to the prevalence of lactams, their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. Lactams are usually prepared by the coupling of activated carboxylic acid derivatives with amines. Alternative routes include the Beckmann rearrangement of oximes, the Schmidt reaction of cyclic ketones and hydrazoic acid, the Kinugasa reaction of nitrones and terminal acetylenes, the Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and chlorosulfonyl isocyanate, transition metal catalyzed lactamization of amino alcohols, and iodolactamization of amides and alkenes. In particular, the intramolecular Staudinger ligation of azides and activated carboxy acids, including esters, is well known as an environmentally friendly and mild protocol for lactam synthesis

  9. Embeddings of graph braid and surface groups in right-angled Artin groups and braid groups

    OpenAIRE

    Crisp, John; Wiest, Bert

    2003-01-01

    We prove by explicit construction that graph braid groups and most surface groups can be embedded in a natural way in right-angled Artin groups, and we point out some consequences of these embedding results. We also show that every right-angled Artin group can be embedded in a pure surface braid group. On the other hand, by generalising to right-angled Artin groups a result of Lyndon for free groups, we show that the Euler characteristic -1 surface group (given by the relation x^2y^2=z^2) nev...

  10. Grouping pursuit through a regularization solution surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaotong; Huang, Hsin-Cheng

    2010-06-01

    Extracting grouping structure or identifying homogenous subgroups of predictors in regression is crucial for high-dimensional data analysis. A low-dimensional structure in particular-grouping, when captured in a regression model, enables to enhance predictive performance and to facilitate a model's interpretability Grouping pursuit extracts homogenous subgroups of predictors most responsible for outcomes of a response. This is the case in gene network analysis, where grouping reveals gene functionalities with regard to progression of a disease. To address challenges in grouping pursuit, we introduce a novel homotopy method for computing an entire solution surface through regularization involving a piecewise linear penalty. This nonconvex and overcomplete penalty permits adaptive grouping and nearly unbiased estimation, which is treated with a novel concept of grouped subdifferentials and difference convex programming for efficient computation. Finally, the proposed method not only achieves high performance as suggested by numerical analysis, but also has the desired optimality with regard to grouping pursuit and prediction as showed by our theoretical results.

  11. Photoaffinity labeling of the dopamine reuptake carrier protein with 3-azido 3H GBR-12935

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.P.; Martenson, R.E.; Laing, P.; Thurkauf, A.; Decosta, B.; Rice, K.C.; Paul, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    A high affinity tritiated azido-diphenylpiperazine derivative, 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935, was synthesized as a potential photoaffinity probe of the dopamine transporter. Initially, the reversible binding of 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 to crude synaptosomal membranes from the rat striatum was characterized. Specific binding was sodium dependent and inhibited by a variety of drugs that are known to potently inhibit dopamine uptake. Other neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors, as well as cis-flupenthixol, a potent inhibitor of 3 H GBR-12935 binding to piperazine binding sites, failed to inhibit specific binding at concentrations of less than or equal to 10 microM. A good correlation was observed between the relative potencies of these drugs in inhibiting dopamine uptake into synaptosomes and in inhibiting specific 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 binding to rat striatal membranes. These data suggest that 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935, like other diphenylpiperazines such as 3 H GBR-12935 and 3 H GBR-12909, binds primarily to the dopamine transporter under defined assay conditions. After UV photolysis of crude synaptosomal membranes preincubated with 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 (1-2 nM), a single radiolabeled polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Photoincorporation of 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 into this polypeptide was inhibited selectively by compounds that inhibit the uptake of dopamine and was completely dependent on the presence of Na+. No photolabeled proteins were observed when cerebellar membranes were substituted for striatal membranes. Essentially complete adsorption of the radiolabeled 80-kDa polypeptide to wheat germ agglutinin and elution with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine strongly suggest that the dopamine transporter polypeptide photolabeled by 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 is glycosylated

  12. The azido oxide N{sub 3}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petris, Giulia de [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Universita ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Troiani, Anna, E-mail: anna.troiani@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Universita ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Rosi, Marzio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ambientale, Universita di Perugia and ISTM-CNR, Perugia (Italy); Sgamellotti, Antonio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia and ISTM-CNR, Perugia (Italy); Cipollini, Romano [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Universita ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: N{sub 3}O{sup +} ions prepared in the source of a mass spectrometer under low-pressure conditions are submitted to neutralization by collisional electron transfer, leading to the observation of the novel N{sub 3}O oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study reports the positive detection in the gas phase of the novel azido oxide N{sub 3}O. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It has been prepared by collisional electron transfer to the N{sub 3}O{sup +} ion and observed on a microsecond time scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxide has been assigned a minimum lifetime of 0.7 {mu}s and an open-chain structure of NNNO connectivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study examines the role of excited species in the formation of covalently bound ions suitable to neutralization. - Abstract: The new nitrogen-rich oxide N{sub 3}O has been detected in the gas phase by mass spectrometric experiments. The radical has been assigned a minimum lifetime of 0.7 {mu}s and an open-chain NNNO structure in the quartet state. Structures and energies of the N{sub 3}O{sup +} precursor ion and the N{sub 3}O radical have been investigated by ab initio calculations.

  13. 6-Azido hyacinthacine A2 gives a straightforward access to the first multivalent pyrrolizidine architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Adamio, Giampiero; Parmeggiani, Camilla; Goti, Andrea; Moreno-Vargas, Antonio J; Moreno-Clavijo, Elena; Robina, Inmaculada; Cardona, Francesca

    2014-08-28

    The synthesis of the first multivalent pyrrolizidine iminosugars is reported. The key azido intermediates 4 and 31 were prepared after suitable synthetic elaboration of the cycloadduct obtained from 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of D-arabinose derived nitrone to dimethylacrylamide. The key step of the strategy was the stereoselective installation of an azido moiety at C-6 of the pyrrolizidine skeleton. The click reaction with different monovalent and dendrimeric alkyne scaffolds allowed the preparation of a library of new mono- and multivalent pyrrolizidine compounds that were preliminarily assayed as glycosidase inhibitors towards a panel of commercially available glycosyl hydrolases.

  14. Diastereoselective Synthesis of 2-Phenylselenenyl-1,3-anti-Diols and 2-Phenylselenenyl-1,3-anti-Azido-Alcohols via Hydroxyand Azido-Selenenylation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Noto

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A method to synthesize 2-phenylselenenyl-1,3-anti-diols and 2-phenyl- selenenyl-1,3-anti-azidoalcohols via hydroxy- or azido-selenenylation of trans-allylic alcohols is reported. Moreover, the first example of hydroxyl-selenenylation of an allylic azide is presented. Yields ranging from moderate to good and diastereomeric ratios up to 95:5 are achieved.

  15. Azido--meconine-high ortho'Novolak resin-based negative ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A new photoactive compound (PAC), azido--meconine absorbing in the deep UV region has been blended with `alternating' and `semi-alternating' and `high ortho' alternating novolak resins, based on /-cresol. The new photoresists have been evaluated as a negative tone deep UV photoresist for mircolithography.

  16. Two and 8-azido photoaffinity probes. 1. Enzymatic synthesis, characterization, and biological properties of 2- and 8-azido photoprobes of 2-5A and photolabeling of 2-5A binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhadolnik, R.J.; Kariko, K.; Sobol, R.W. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Reichenbach, N.L.; Haley, B.E.

    1988-11-29

    The 2- and 8-azido trimer 5'-triphosphate photoprobes of 2-5A have been enzymatically synthesized from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)2-azidoATP and (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8-azidoAPT by 2-5A synthetase from rabbit reticulocyte lysates. Identification and structural determination of the 2- and 8-azido adenylate trimer 5'-triphosphates were accomplished by enzymatic hydrolyses with T2 RNase, snake venom phosphodiesterase, and bacterial alkaline phosphatase. Hydrolysis products were identified by HPLC and PEI-cellulose TLC analyses. The 8-azido photoprobe of 2-5A displaces p/sub 3/A/sub 4/(/sup 32/P)pCp from RNase L with affinity equivalent to p/sub 3/A/sub 3/. The 8-azido photoprobe also activates RNase L to hydrolyze poly(U)(/sup 32/P)pCp 50% at 7 /times/ 10/sup /minus/9/ M in core-cellulose assays. The 2- and 8-azido photoprobes and authentic p/sub 3/A/sub 3/ activate RNase L to cleave 28S and 18S rRNA to specific cleavage products at 10/sup /minus/9/ M in rRNA cleavage assays. The nucleotide binding site(s) of RNase L and/or other 2-5A binding proteins in extracts of interferon-treated L929 cells were investigated by photoaffinity labeling. Dramatically different photolabeling patterns were observed with the 2- and 8-azido photoprobes. The (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)2-azido adenylate trimer 5'-triphosphate photolabels only one polypeptide with a molecular weight of 185,000 as determined by SDS gel electrophoresis, whereas the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8-azido adenylate trimer 5'-triphosphate covalently photolabels six polypeptides with molecular weights of 46,000, 63,000, 80,000, 89,000, 109,000, and 158,000. Evidence that the photolabeling by 2- and 8-azido 2-5A photoprobes was highly specific for the p/sub 3/A/sub 3/ allosteric binding site was obtained.

  17. Intersections of adelic groups on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budylin, R Ya; Gorchinskiy, S O

    2013-01-01

    We solve a technical problem related to adeles on an algebraic surface. Given a finite set of natural numbers, one can associate with it an adelic group. We show that this operation commutes with taking intersections if the surface is defined over an uncountable field, and we provide a counterexample otherwise. Bibliography: 12 titles

  18. Surface field theories of point group symmetry protected topological phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Jie; Hermele, Michael

    2018-02-01

    We identify field theories that describe the surfaces of three-dimensional bosonic point group symmetry protected topological (pgSPT) phases. The anomalous nature of the surface field theories is revealed via a dimensional reduction argument. Specifically, we study three different surface field theories. The first field theory is quantum electrodynamics in three space-time dimensions (QED3) with four flavors of fermions. We show this theory can describe the surfaces of a majority of bosonic pgSPT phases protected by a single mirror reflection, or by Cn v point group symmetry for n =2 ,3 ,4 ,6 . The second field theory is a variant of QED3 with charge-1 and charge-3 Dirac fermions. This field theory can describe the surface of a reflection symmetric pgSPT phase built by placing an E8 state on the mirror plane. The third field theory is an O (4 ) nonlinear sigma model with a topological theta term at θ =π , or, equivalently, a noncompact CP1 model. Using a coupled wire construction, we show this is a surface theory for bosonic pgSPT phases with U (1 ) ×Z2P symmetry. For the latter two field theories, we discuss the connection to gapped surfaces with topological order. Moreover, we conjecture that the latter two field theories can describe surfaces of more general bosonic pgSPT phases with Cn v point group symmetry.

  19. Improved and reliable synthesis of 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxyguanosine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshchuk, Victor A; Hogrefe, Richard I; Vaghefi, Morteza M

    2004-01-01

    An improved synthesis of N2-protected-3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 20 and 23 is described. Deoxygenation of 2'-O-alkyl (and/or aryl) sulfonyl-5'-dimethoxytritylguanosine coupled with [1,2]-hydride shift rearrangement gave protected 9-(2-deoxythreo-pentofuranosyl)guanines (10, 12 and 16). This rearrangement was accomplished in high yield with a high degree of stereoselectivity using lithium triisobutylborohydride (L-Selectride). Compounds 10, 12 and 16 were transformed into 3'-O-mesylates (18 and 21), which can be used for 3'-substitution. The 3'-azido nucleosides were obtained by treatment of 18 and 21 with lithium azide. This procedure is reproducible with a good overall yield.

  20. A Tractable and Efficient One-Pot Synthesis of 5'-Azido-5'-deoxyribonucleosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore V. Peterson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic routes to 5'-azidoribonucleosides are reported for adenosine, cytidine, guanosine, and uridine, resulting in a widely applicable one-pot methodology for the synthesis of these and related compounds. The target compounds are appropriate as precursors in a variety of purposive syntheses, as the synthetic and therapeutic relevance of azido- and amino-modified nucleosides is expansive. Furthermore, in the conversion of alcohols to azides, these methods offer a tractable alternative to the Mitsunobu and other more difficult reactions.

  1. Synthesis and antiproliferative evaluation of novel azido nucleosides and their phosphoramidate derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xavier, N.M.; Goncalves-Pereira, R.; Jorda, Radek; Řezníčková, Eva; Kryštof, Vladimír; Oliveira, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 9 (2017), s. 1267-1281 ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : anticancer activity * azido nucleosides * bioactive molecules * ics-28 * N-glycosylation * nucleoside phosphoramidates * nucleoside/nucleotide analogs * Staudinger-phosphite reaction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 2.626, year: 2016

  2. Riemann surfaces, Clifford algebras and infinite dimensional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, A.L.; Eastwood, M.G.; Hannabuss, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    We introduce of class of Riemann surfaces which possess a fixed point free involution and line bundles over these surfaces with which we can associate an infinite dimensional Clifford algebra. Acting by automorphisms of this algebra is a 'gauge' group of meromorphic functions on the Riemann surface. There is a natural Fock representation of the Clifford algebra and an associated projective representation of this group of meromorphic functions in close analogy with the construction of the basic representation of Kac-Moody algebras via a Fock representation of the Fermion algebra. In the genus one case we find a form of vertex operator construction which allows us to prove a version of the Boson-Fermion correspondence. These results are motivated by the analysis of soliton solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation and are rather distinct from recent developments in quantum field theory on Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  3. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new 1,2,3-triazolo-2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro- 4'-azido nucleoside derivatives as potent anti-HBV agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Peng, Youmei; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Jingwen; Ma, Haoran; Song, Chuanjun; Liu, Bingjie; Qiao, Yan; Yu, Wenquan; Wu, Jie; Chang, Junbiao

    2018-01-01

    Novel drugs are urgently needed to combat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection due to drug-resistant virus. In this paper, a series of novel 4-monosubstituted 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azido-β-d-arabinofuranosyl 1,2,3-triazole nucleoside analogues (1a-g) were designed, synthesized and screened for in vitro anti-HBV activity. At 5.0 μM in the cellular model, all the synthetic compounds display activities comparable to that of the positive control, lamivudine at 20 μM. Of the compounds tested, the amide-substituted analogue (1a) shows the most promising anti-HBV activity and low cytotoxicity in the cell model. In particular, it retains excellent activity against lamivudine-resistant HBV mutants. In duck HBV (DHBV)-infected duck models, both the serum and liver DHBV DNA levels (67.4% and 53.3%, respectively) were reduced markedly by the treatment with 1a. Analysis of the structure of HBV polymer/1a-triphosphate (1a-TP) complex shows that 1a-TP is stabilized by specific van der Waals interactions with the enzyme residues arising from 4-amino-1,2,3-triazole and the 4'-azido group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct quantification of negatively charged functional groups on membrane surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Surface charge plays an important role in membrane-based separations of particulates, macromolecules, and dissolved ionic species. In this study, we present two experimental methods to determine the concentration of negatively charged functional groups at the surface of dense polymeric membranes. Both techniques consist of associating the membrane surface moieties with chemical probes, followed by quantification of the bound probes. Uranyl acetate and toluidine blue O dye, which interact with the membrane functional groups via complexation and electrostatic interaction, respectively, were used as probes. The amount of associated probes was quantified using liquid scintillation counting for uranium atoms and visible light spectroscopy for the toluidine blue dye. The techniques were validated using self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols with known amounts of charged moieties. The surface density of negatively charged functional groups of hand-cast thin-film composite polyamide membranes, as well as commercial cellulose triacetate and polyamide membranes, was quantified under various conditions. Using both techniques, we measured a negatively charged functional group density of 20-30nm -2 for the hand-cast thin-film composite membranes. The ionization behavior of the membrane functional groups, determined from measurements with toluidine blue at varying pH, was consistent with published data for thin-film composite polyamide membranes. Similarly, the measured charge densities on commercial membranes were in general agreement with previous investigations. The relative simplicity of the two methods makes them a useful tool for quantifying the surface charge concentration of a variety of surfaces, including separation membranes. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Surface functional groups in capacitive deionization with porous carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmatifar, Ali; Oyarzun, Diego I.; Palko, James W.; Hawks, Steven A.; Stadermann, Michael; Santiago, Juan G.; Stanford Microfluidics Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Team

    2017-11-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a promising technology for removal of toxic ions and salt from water. In CDI, an applied potential of about 1 V to pairs of porous electrodes (e.g. activated carbon) induces ion electromigration and electrostatic adsorption at electrode surfaces. Immobile surface functional groups play a critical role in the type and capacity of ion adsorption, and this can dramatically change desalination performance. We here use models and experiments to study weak electrolyte surface groups which protonate and/or depropotante based on their acid/base dissociation constants and local pore pH. Net chemical surface charge and differential capacitance can thus vary during CDI operation. In this work, we present a CDI model based on weak electrolyte acid/base equilibria theory. Our model incorporates preferential cation (anion) adsorption for activated carbon with acidic (basic) surface groups. We validated our model with experiments on custom built CDI cells with a variety of functionalizations. To this end, we varied electrolyte pH and measured adsorption of individual anionic and cationic ions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC) techniques. Our model shows good agreement with experiments and provides a framework useful in the design of CDI control schemes.

  6. Sunspot Groups as Tracers of Sub-Surface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Data on sunspot groups have been quite useful for obtaining clues to several processes on global and local scales within the sun which lead to emergence of toroidal magnetic flux above the sun's surface. I present here a report on such studies carried out at Indian Institute of Astrophysics during the last ...

  7. Sunspot Groups as Tracers of Sub Surface Processes .

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Data on sunspot groups have been quite useful for obtaining clues to several processes on global and local scales within the sun which lead to emergence of toroidal magnetic flux above the sun's surface. I present here a report on such studies carried out at Indian Institute of. Astrophysics during the last decade or ...

  8. The Measurement and Interpretation of Surface Wave Group Arrival Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, G.; Kane, D.; Morrow, J.; Zhou, Y.; Tromp, J.

    2005-12-01

    We have recently developed an efficient technique for measuring the relative group arrival times of surface waves by using cross-correlation and cluster analysis of waveform envelope functions. Applying the analysis to minor arc Love and Rayleigh waves in the frequency band 7 to 35 mHz for all events over magnitude 5.5 results in a dataset of over 200,000 measurements at each frequency for long period Rayleigh waves (frequency less than 25 mHz) and about 100,000 measurements at the shorter periods. Analysis of transverse components results in about half as many Love wave measurements. Simple ray theory inversions of the relative arrival times for apparent group velocity produce maps which are accurate representations of the data (often over 90% variance reduction of the relative arrival times) and which show features strongly correlated with tectonics and crustal thickness. The apparent group velocity variations can be extremely large: 30% velocity variations for 20 mHz Rayleigh waves and 40% variations for 30 mHz Rayleigh waves and can have abrupt lateral changes. This raises the concern that non-ray theory effects could be important. Indeed, a recent analysis by Dahlen and Zhou (personal communication) suggests that the group arrival times should be a functions of both the group velocity AND the phase velocity. The simplest way to test the interpretation of the measurements is to perform the analysis on synthetic seismograms computed for a realistic model of the Earth. Here, we use the SEM with a model which incorporates realistic crust and mantle structure. We are currently computing synthetics for a suite of roughly 1000 events recorded globally that extend to a period of 18 seconds. We shall present the results of applying both ray-based and finite frequency inversions to the synthetic data as well as evaluating the effects of off path propagation at short periods using surface wave ray tracing.

  9. Integrable systems twistors, loop groups, and Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hitchin, NJ; Ward, RS

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is designed to give graduate students an understanding of integrable systems via the study of Riemann surfaces, loop groups, and twistors. The book has its origins in a series of lecture courses given by the authors, all of whom are internationally known mathematicians and renowned expositors. It is written in an accessible and informal style, and fills a gap in the existing literature. The introduction by Nigel Hitchin addresses the meaning of integrability: how do werecognize an integrable system? His own contribution then develops connections with algebraic geometry, and inclu

  10. Specific photoaffinity labeling of two plasma membrane polypeptides with an azido auxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, G.R.; Rayle, D.L.; Jones, A.M.; Lomax, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) hypocotyl tissue by aqueous phase partitioning and assessed for homogeneity by the use of membrane-specific enzyme assays. The highly pure plasma membrane vesicles maintained a pH differential across the membrane and accumulated a tritiated azido analogue of 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA), 5-azido-[7- 3 H]IAA([ 3 H]N 3 IAA), in a manner similar to the accumulation of [ 3 H]IAA. The association of the [ 3 H]N 3 IAA with membrane vesicles was saturable and subject to competition by IAA and auxin analogues. Auxin-binding proteins were photoaffinity labeled by addition of [ 3 H]N 3 IAA to plasma membrane vesicles prior to exposure to UV light and detected by subsequent NaDodSO 4 /PAGE and fluorography. When the reaction temperature was lowered to -196 degree C, high-specific-activity labeling of a 40-kDa and a 42-kDa polypeptide was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that the radiolabeled polypeptides are auxin receptors. The covalent nature of the label should facilitate purification and further characterization of the receptors

  11. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  12. Dimerization of propargyl and homopropargyl 6-azido-6-deoxy-glycosides upon 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Copper-catalyzed, thermal or microwave promoted 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (Click Reaction of 2-propynyl and 3-butynyl 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-6-azido-6-deoxy-glycopyranosides in the D-gluco, D-galacto and D-manno series afford the corresponding dimeric cycloaddition products.

  13. Specific photoaffinity labeling of two plasma membrane polypeptides with an azido auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rayle, D. L.; Jones, A. M.; Lomax, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) hypocotyl tissue by aqueous phase partitioning and assessed for homogeneity by the use of membrane-specific enzyme assays. The highly pure (ca. 95%) plasma membrane vesicles maintained a pH differential across the membrane and accumulated a tritiated azido analogue of 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA), 5-azido-[7-3H]IAA ([3H]N3IAA), in a manner similar to the accumulation of [3H]IAA. The association of the [3H]N3IAA with membrane vesicles was saturable and subject to competition by IAA and auxin analogues. Auxin-binding proteins were photoaffinity labeled by addition of [3H]N3IAA to plasma membrane vesicles prior to exposure to UV light (15 sec; 300 nm) and detected by subsequent NaDodSO4/PAGE and fluorography. When the reaction temperature was lowered to -196 degrees C, high-specific-activity labeling of a 40-kDa and a 42-kDa polypeptide was observed. Triton X-100 (0.1%) increased the specific activity of labeling and reduced the background, which suggests that the labeled polypeptides are intrinsic membrane proteins. The labeled polypeptides are of low abundance, as expected for auxin receptors. Further, the addition of IAA and auxin analogues to the photoaffinity reaction mixture resulted in reduced labeling that was qualitatively similar to their effects on the accumulation of radiolabeled IAA in membrane vesicles. Collectively, these results suggest that the radiolabeled polypeptides are auxin receptors. The covalent nature of the label should facilitate purification and further characterization of the receptors.

  14. Surface group amalgams that (don't) act on 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Hruska, G. Christopher; Stark, Emily; Tran, Hung Cong

    2017-01-01

    We determine which amalgamated products of surface groups identified over multiples of simple closed curves are not fundamental groups of 3-manifolds. We prove each surface amalgam considered is virtually the fundamental group of a 3-manifold. We prove that each such surface group amalgam is abstractly commensurable to a right-angled Coxeter group from a related family. In an appendix, we determine the quasi-isometry classes among these surface amalgams and their related right-angled Coxeter ...

  15. Reactivity of group IV (100) semiconductor surfaces towards organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George T.

    The reactions of simple and multifunctional organic compounds with the clean silicon, germanium, and diamond (100)-2 x 1 semiconductor surfaces have been investigated using a combination of multiple internal reflection infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry density functional theory calculations. From these studies, an improved understanding of the atomic level reactivity of these semiconductor surfaces has been obtained, along with insights into how to achieve their selective coupling with organics of desired and varied functionality. In addition to the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces, our results show that cycloaddition chemistry can also be extended to the diamond (100) surface. At room temperature, 1,3-butadiene was found to form a Diels-Alder product with the diamond (100) surface, as evidenced by isotopic substitution experiments and comparison of the surface adduct with its direct molecular analogue, cyclohexene. The reactions of other classes of molecules in addition to alkenes on the Si(100) and Ge(100) surfaces, including a series of five-membered cyclic amines, were also examined. For tertiary aliphatic amines on Si(100) and both secondary and tertiary aliphatic amines on Ge(100), a majority of the molecules were observed to become stably trapped in dative-bonded precursor states rather than form energetically favorable dissociation products. For pyrrole, aromaticity was found to play a defining role in its reactivity, and a comparison of its molecular and surface reactivity reveals interesting similarities. To probe the factors controlling the selectivity of organic reactions on clean semiconductor surfaces, the adsorption of acetone and a series of unsaturated ketones was also investigated. The reaction of acetone on Ge(100) was found to be under thermodynamic control at room temperature, resulting in the formation of an "ene" product rather than the kinetically favored [2+2] C=O cycloaddition product previously observed on the Si(100) surface. In

  16. Combinations of isoprinosine and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine in lymphocytes infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Schinazi, R F; Cannon, D L; Arnold, B H; Martino-Saltzman, D

    1988-01-01

    Since clinical trials are being planned with the immunomodulating drug isoprinosine combined with the antiviral drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex, it is important to determine the type of antiviral interaction produced by these drugs in vitro. Such a combined modality may not only produce enhanced antiviral effects but also may have a valuable immunorestorative action. The interaction of several ratios of ...

  17. Novel heterometallic metal–azido complex synthesized by “one-step” reaction: synthetic strategy and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Yong-Kun; Li, Xiu-Ping; Zhao, Cui; Wang, Hai-Chao; Xue, Min; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A novel heterometallic complex, [Ni 2 Mn(N 3 ) 2 (nic) 4 ·(H 2 O) 2 ] n (1) (nic=nicotinate), was obtained by assembling MnCl 2 ·4H 2 O, Ni(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O, NaN 3 and nicotinic acid with a “one step” synthetic strategy—hydrothermal reaction. The 3D structure of the complex can be described as end-on (EO) azido and syn,syn carboxylates mixed bridged by alternate Ni–Mn–Ni trimers linked by the nicotinate. Dominant ferromagnetic interactions were observed between the Ni II and Mn II ions in the trimer. - Graphical abstract: A novel heterometallic 3D complex [Ni 2 Mn(N 3 ) 2 (nic) 4 ·(H 2 O) 2 ] n (1) (nic=nicotinate) was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction. This complex exhibits interesting structural and magnetic properties. - Highlights: • It is difficult to construct simple coordination complexes with azide as “ligands” to obtain heterometallic metal–azido compounds. • A “one-step” method—hydrothermal reaction— was introduced to avoid the disadvantages of azide mentioned above. • The magnetic property is different with the isostructural homometal–azido complex due to the changed metal center

  18. E-Polytopes in Picard Groups of Smooth Rational Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyouk Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we introduce special divisors (root, line, ruling, exceptional system and rational quartic in smooth rational surfaces and study their correspondences to subpolytopes in Gosset polytopes k 21 . We also show that the sets of rulings and exceptional systems correspond equivariantly to the vertices of 2 k 1 and 1 k 2 via E-type Weyl action.

  19. 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) induces apoptosis and alters metabolic enzyme activity in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Abby C.; Helliwell, Rachel J.A.; Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Paxton, James W.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Tingle, Malcolm D.

    2003-01-01

    The anti-HIV drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the drug of choice for preventing maternal-fetal HIV transmission during pregnancy. Our aim was to assess the cytotoxic effects of AZT on human placenta in vitro. The mechanisms of AZT-induced effects were investigated using JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells and primary explant cultures from term and first-trimester human placentas. Cytotoxicity measures included trypan blue exclusion, MTT, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Apoptosis was measured with an antibody specific to cleaved caspase-3 and by rescue of cells by the general caspase inhibitor Boc-D-FMK. The effect of AZT on the activities of glutathione-S-transferase, β-glucuronidase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A, and CYP reductase (CYPR) in the placenta was assessed using biochemical assays and immunoblotting. AZT increased ROS levels, decreased cellular proliferation rates, was toxic to mitochondria, and initiated cell death by a caspase-dependent mechanism in the human placenta in vitro. In the absence of serum, the effects of AZT were amplified in all the models used. AZT also increased the amounts of activity of GST, β-glucuronidase, and CYP1A, whereas UGT and CYPR were decreased. We conclude that AZT causes apoptosis in the placenta and alters metabolizing enzymes in human placental cells. These findings have implications for the safe administration of AZT in pregnancy with respect to the maintenance of integrity of the maternal-fetal barrier

  20. Graphs of groups on surfaces interactions and models

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    2001-01-01

    The book, suitable as both an introductory reference and as a text book in the rapidly growing field of topological graph theory, models both maps (as in map-coloring problems) and groups by means of graph imbeddings on sufaces. Automorphism groups of both graphs and maps are studied. In addition connections are made to other areas of mathematics, such as hypergraphs, block designs, finite geometries, and finite fields. There are chapters on the emerging subfields of enumerative topological graph theory and random topological graph theory, as well as a chapter on the composition of English

  1. The Development of Nonlinear Surface and Internal Wave Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    porn (1971a3 observed groups of large amplitude waves propagating in Massachusetts Bay that seemed to rom tidal interaction with a submarine sill...provides a plan view of the tank and a platform for pictures or movies (Fig. 2.2). For these experiments the measurements from 18 wave height sensors

  2. Sunspot Groups as Tracers of Sub Surface Processes .

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    work which is incomplete. 2. Solar magnetic cycle as global MHD oscillations. Using lifespan of a sunspot group as a measure of toroidal magnetic flux emerging during its life, and attaching to it the sign of polarity of bipolar magnetic regions in the respective wing of the butterfly diagram, Gokhale et al. (1992) determined.

  3. Homologie cyclique du produit croise algebrique et groupes de surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bella Baci, A.

    1997-01-01

    Let a group G act on an associative algebra A One can form the algebraic crossed product A G cf which plays the role of a noncommutative quotient in Conness theory The cyclic homology of this algebra was studied extensively in a series of papers It is well known that this homology admits a

  4. Group IV nanocrystals with ion-exchangeable surface ligands and methods of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2018-01-09

    Methods are described that include reacting a starting nanocrystal that includes a starting nanocrystal core and a covalently bound surface species to create an ion-exchangeable (IE) nanocrystal that includes a surface charge and a first ion-exchangeable (IE) surface ligand ionically bound to the surface charge, where the starting nanocrystal core includes a group IV element.

  5. A cell surface clicked navigation system to direct specific bone targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young; Zhang, Zhe; Shim, Jae-Hyuck; Lee, Tae Sup; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2018-02-01

    Cell therapies are promising up-and-coming therapeutic strategies for many diseases. For maximal therapeutic benefits, injected cells have to navigate their way to a designated area, including organ and tissue; unfortunately, the majority of therapeutic cells are currently administered without a guide or homing device. To improve this serious shortcoming, a functionalization method was developed to equip cells with a homing signal. Its application was demonstrated by applying an Azadibenzocyclooctyne-bisphosphonate (ADIBO-BP) and azide paired bioorthogonal chemistry on cells for bone specific homing. Jurkat T cells and bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured with tetraacetylated N-azidoacetyl-d-mannosamine (Ac 4 ManNAz) to place unnatural azido groups onto the cell's surface; these azido groups were then reacted with ADIBO-BP. The tethered bisphosphonates were able to bring Jurkat cells to hydroxyapatite, the major component of bone, and mineralized SAOS-2 cells. The incorporated BP groups also enhanced the specific affinity of BMSCs to mouse femur bone fragments in vitro. The introduced navigation strategy is expected to have a broad application in cell therapy, because through the biocompatible ADIBO and azide reactive pair, various homing signals could be efficiently anchored onto therapeutic cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal structure of ammonium 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine-5′-aminocarbonylphosphonate hemihydrate: an anti-HIV agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim V. Jasko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, NH4+·C11H14N6O7P−·0.5H2O, contains one 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine-5′aminocarbonylphosphonate (ACP–AZT anion, half of an NH4+ cation lying on a twofold rotation axis and in another position, occupied with equal probabilities of 0.5, an NH4+ cation and a water molecule. The amide group of the ACP–AZT anion is disordered (occupancy ratio 0.5:0.5, with one part forming an N—H...O (involving C=O...H4N+ hydrogen bond and the other an O—H...N (involving C—NH2...OH2 hydrogen bond with the components of the split NH4+/H2O position. The pseudorotation parameters of ACP–AZT set it apart from previously studied AZT and thymidine. In the crystal, the various components are linked by N—H...O, O—H...O, N—H...N, C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework.

  7. Evaluation of 4-[18F]fluoro-1-butyne as a radiolabeled synthon for click chemistry with azido compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Click chemistry is a useful approach for the preparation of novel radiopharmaceuticals. In this study, we evaluated 4-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-butyne as a radiolabeled synthon for click chemistry with azido compounds. Our results showed that nucleophilic substitution of 4-tosyloxy-1-butyne with K[ 18 F]F produces vinyl acetylene as well as 4-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-butyne, while the same reaction using 5-tosyloxy-1-pentyne gives exclusively 5-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-pentyne. Thus, ω-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-alkynes with chain lengths longer than four carbons may be better radiolabeled synthons for use in click chemistry.

  8. New one-dimensional azido-bridged manganese(II) coordination polymers exhibiting alternating ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic interactions: structural and magnetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, En-Qing; Bai, Shi-Qiang; Yue, Yan-Feng; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2003-06-02

    Five Mn(II)[bond]azido coordination polymers of formula [Mn(L)(N(3))(2)](n) have been synthesized and crystallographically characterized, and their magnetic properties studied, where L's are the bidentate Schiff bases obtained from the condensation of pyridine-2-carbaldehyde with aniline (1) and its derivatives p-toluidine (2), m-toluidine (3), p-chloroaniline (4), and m-chloroaniline (5). All the complexes consist of the zigzag Mn(II)[bond]azido chains in which the Mn(II) ions are alternately bridged by two end-to-end (EE) and two end-on (EO) azido ligands, the cis-octahedral coordination being completed by the two nitrogen atoms of the Schiff base ligands. Compound 2 is unique in that the Mn[bond](EE-N(3))(2)[bond]Mn ring adopts an unusual twist conformation with the two linear azido bridges crossing each other. By contrast, the rings in the other compounds take the usual chair conformation with the two azido bridges parallel. The double EO bridging fragments in the complexes are similar with the bridging angles (Mn[bond]N[bond]Mn) ranging from 99.6 degrees to 104.0 degrees. Magnetic analyses reveal that alternating ferro- and antiferromagnetic interactions are mediated through the alternating EO and EE azido bridges with the J(F) and J(AF) parameters in the ranges of 4.1-8.0 and -11.8 to -15.4 cm(-1), respectively. Finally, the magnetostructural correlations are investigated. The present complexes follow the general trend that the ferromagnetic interaction through the double EO bridge increases with the Mn[bond]N[bond]Mn bridging angle, while the antiferromagnetic interaction through the double EE bridge is dependent on the distortion of the Mn[bond](N(3))(2)[bond]Mn ring from planarity toward the chair conformation and the Mn[bond]N[bond]N angle.

  9. Grafting of phosphorylcholine functional groups on polycarbonate urethane surface for resisting platelet adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Feng, Yakai, E-mail: yakaifeng@hotmail.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Miao; Shi, Changcan; Khan, Musammir [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jintang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China)

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the resistance of platelet adhesion on material surface, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) was grafted onto polycarbonate urethane (PCU) surface via Michael reaction to create biomimetic structure. After introducing primary amine groups via coupling tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TAEA) onto the polymer surface, the double bond of MPC reacted with the amino group to obtain MPC modified PCU. The modified surface was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results verified that MPC was grafted onto PCU surface by Michael reaction method. The MPC grafted PCU surface had a low water contact angle and a high water uptake. This means that the hydrophilic PC functional groups improved the surface hydrophilicity significantly. In addition, surface morphology of MPC grafted PCU film was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the grafted surface was rougher than the blank PCU surface. In addition, platelet adhesion study was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The PCU films after treated with platelet-rich plasma demonstrated that much fewer platelets adhered to the MPC-grafted PCU surface than to the blank PCU surface. The antithrombogenicity of the MPC-grafted PCU surface was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The result suggested that the MPC modified PCU may have potential application as biomaterials in blood-contacting and some subcutaneously implanted devices. - Highlights: • MPC was successfully grafted onto polycarbonate urethane surface via Michael reaction. • High concentration of PC functional groups on the surface via TAEA molecule • Biomimetic surface modification • The modified surface showed high hydrophilicity and anti-platelet adhesion.

  10. An investigation of the functional groups on the surface of activated carbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARYTE DERVINYTE

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons were produced in the laboratory from wood using a 20-run Plackett–Burman experimental design for 19 factors. The obtained batches of activated carbon were analysed by potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy to determine the surface functional groups. The results obtained by potentiometric titration displayed the distribution of individual acidity constants of those groups in the pK range. Considering this parameter, the surface functional groups were divided into carboxyl, lactone and phenol. The linear regression equations reflecting the influence of each operation used for the synthesis on the amount of these functional groups in the obtained activated carbons were generated. The FTIR spectra were used in parallel for the evaluation of the amount and the type of the surface functional groups. Relationships between the two data sets obtained by potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy were evaluated by correlation analysis. It was established that the amount of surface functional groups determined by potentiometric titration positively correlates with the intensity of the peaks of hydrophilic functional groups in the FTIR spectra. At the same time, the negative correlation between potentiometrically determined amount of surface functional groups and the intensity of peaks of hydrophobic functional groups was observed. Most probably, these non-polar formations can take part in the interaction of carbon surface with H+/OH- ions and diminish the strength of existent functional groups.

  11. Surface functional group characterization using chemical derivatization X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagst, Eda

    2011-03-18

    Chemical derivatization - X-ray photolectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS) was applied successfully in order to determine different functional groups on thin film surfaces. Different amino group carrying surfaces, prepared by spin coating, self-assembly and plasma polymerization, were successfully investigated by (XPS) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Amino groups were derivatized with the widely used primary amino group tags, pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFB) and 4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzaldehyde (TFBA), prior to analysis. Primary amino group quantification was then carried out according to the spectroscopical data. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of different terminal groups were prepared and investigated with XPS and spectra were compared with reference surfaces. An angle resolved NEXAFS measurement was applied to determine the orientation of SAMs. Plasma polymerized allylamine samples with different duty cycle, power and pressure values were prepared in order to study the effects of external plasma parameters on the primary amino group retention. CD-XPS was used to quantify the amino groups and experiments show, that the milder plasma conditions promote the retention of amino groups originating from the allylamine monomer. An interlaboratory comparison of OH group determination on plasma surfaces of polypropylene treated with oxygen plasma, was studied. The surfaces were investigated with XPS and the [OH] amount on the surfaces was calculated. (orig.)

  12. Tunable Oxygen Functional Groups as Electrocatalysts on Graphite Felt Surfaces for All-Vanadium Flow Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez, Luis [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Reed, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Nie, Zimin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Schwarz, Ashleigh M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Kizewski, James P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Wang, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Thomsen, Edwin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Sprenkle, Vincent [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Li, Bin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-05-17

    We decorated the surfaces of graphite felts with some oxygen-containing functional groups, such as C-OH, O=C and HO-C=O. And the mole ratios and amounts of these functional groups were effectively adjusted on the graphite surface by a particular method. The catalytic effects of amounts and mole ratio of different kinds of functional groups on VRB electrode performances were investigated in detail.

  13. Síntese e atividade citotóxica de alguns azido-ciclopaladados estabilizados com ligantes bifosfínicos Synthesis and cytotoxicity of some cyclometallated palladium (II complexes containing coordinated azide and diphosphines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Fávero Caires

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Some cyclopalladated compounds containing the azido group ligand and the (C-N ring of N,N-dimethylbenzylamine have been prepared by bridge opening reactions of dimmer azide complex precursor with some diphosphines in different stoichiometric quantities. The neutral or ionic, mono or binuclear complexes synthesized were characterized by elemental analyses, I. R. spectroscopy and NMR techniques. The series of complexes was screened for cytotoxicity against a panel three human tumour cells lines(C6,Hep-2,HeLa. All complexes were found to be cytotoxic (IC50 at µM concentrations while one complex having the coordination bond N-Pd ruptured also displayed some differential cytotoxicity.

  14. Impact of Micro Silica Surface Hydroxyl Groups on the Properties of Calcium Silicate Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Sonja; Jørgensen, Bianca; Yu, Donghong

    2017-01-01

    to be the limiting step, and therefore large SiO2 surface area is desired. However, other SiO2 surface structure, such as surface impurities (metal ions) and hydroxyl groups might also influence the reaction. In this work, we investigate the influence of micro silica surface hydroxyl groups in the synthesis...... of calcium silicate. We increase the hydroxyl groups by dispersing the micro silica in 10wt% H2O2 (CS10%), and we remove the hydroxyl groups by drying the micro silica at 650°C and then disperse it in water (CS650). A reference sample is also prepared from as-received micro silica dispersed in water (CSref...... by the increase in tobermorite crystal structure. H2O2 increase the micro silica surface area, and the number of hydroxyl groups on the micro silica surface. By removing hydroxyl groups from the silica surface, we tremendously decrease the surface area and the reactivity of micro silica. The results show...

  15. The multilevel analysis of surface acting and mental health: A moderation of positive group affective tone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng-Shiu; Huang, Jui-Chan; Wu, Tzu-Jung

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship among surface acting, mental health, and positive group affective tone. According to the prior theory, this study attempts to establish a comprehensive research framework among these variables, and furthermore tests the moderating effect of positive group affective tone. Data were collected from 435 employees in 52 service industrial companies by questionnaire, and this study conducted multilevel analysis. The results showed that surface acting will negatively affect the mental health. In addition, the positive group affective tone have significant moderating effect on the relationship among surface acting and mental health. Finally, this study discusses managerial implications and highlights future research suggestions.

  16. Overview on the Surface Functionalization Mechanism and Determination of Surface Functional Groups of Plasma Treated Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Cafer

    2018-01-02

    The use of carbon materials for many applications is due to the unique diversity of structures and properties ranging from chemical bonds between the carbon atoms of the materials to nanostructures, crystallite alignment, and microstructures. Carbon nanotubes and other nanoscale carbonaceous materials draw much attention due to their physical and chemical properties, such as high strength, high resistance to corrosion, electrical and thermal conductivity, stability and a qualified adsorbent. Carbon-based nanomaterials, which have a relatively large specific area and layered structure, can be used as an adsorbent for efficient removal of organic and inorganic contaminants. However, one of the biggest obstacles to the development of carbon-based nanomaterials adsorbents is insolubility and the lack of functional groups on the surface. There are several approaches to introduce functional groups on carbon nanotubes. One of these approaches, plasma applications, now has an important place in the creation of surface functional groups as a flexible, fast, and environmentally friendly method. This review focuses on recent information concerning the surface functionalization and modification of plasma treated carbon nanotube. This review considers the surface properties, advantages, and disadvantages of plasma-applied carbon nanotubes. It also examines the reaction mechanisms involved in the functional groups on the surface.

  17. Determination of surface functional groups on mechanochemically activated carbon cloth by Boehm method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Anđelka B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve sorption properties of activated carbon cloth that can be used for wastewater purification, mechanochemical activation was performed in both inert and air atmosphere. Boehm method was used to follow the changes in the number and types of surface groups induced by mechanical milling. The number of the base groups of 0,2493 mmol/g is significantly smaller than the total amount of acidic functional groups, 2,5093 mmol/g. Among the acidic groups present on the surface, the most represented are phenolic groups (2.3846 mmol/g , ie . > 95 % , the carboxylic groups are present far less (0.1173 mmol /g, ie. 4.5 %, while the presence of the lactone group on the surface of ACC is negligible (0.0074 mmol/g ie. under 0.3 %. Mechanochemical activation lead to an increase in the number of acidic and basic groups on the surface of the ACC. The milling in inert atmosphere has dominant effect with respect to the changes in the total number of basic functional groups (compared to milling in an air atmosphere: the number of basic groups of the ACC was 0.8153 mmol/g milled under argon, 0.7933 mmol/g in the air; the number of acidic groups is 2.9807 mmol/g for a sample milled under argon and 3.5313 mmol/g for one milled in the air.

  18. Traceless Azido Linker for the Solid-Phase Synthesis of NH-1,2,3-Triazoles via Cu-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohrt, Anders Emil; Jensen, Jakob Feldthusen; Nielsen, Thomas Eiland

    2010-01-01

    A broadly useful acid-labile traceless azido linker for the solid-phase synthesis of NH-1,2,3-triazoles is presented. A variety of alkynes were efficiently immobilized on a range of polymeric supports by Cu(I)-mediated azide-alkyne cycloadditions. Supported triazoles showed excellent compatibility...

  19. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.mierczynska-vasilev@awri.com.au; Smith, Paul A., E-mail: paul.smith@awri.com.au

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Chemical surface composition affects behaviour of wine adsorption. • SO{sub 3}H and COOH groups adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds. • NH{sub 2} and NR{sub 3} groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. • Red wine constituents after filtration adsorbed more on NR{sub 3} and CHO surfaces. - Abstract: The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with −SO{sub 3}H and –COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas −NH{sub 2} and −NR{sub 3} groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on −NR{sub 3} and –CHO surfaces. The –OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  20. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical surface composition affects behaviour of wine adsorption. • SO 3 H and COOH groups adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds. • NH 2 and NR 3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. • Red wine constituents after filtration adsorbed more on NR 3 and CHO surfaces. - Abstract: The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with −SO 3 H and –COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas −NH 2 and −NR 3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on −NR 3 and –CHO surfaces. The –OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  1. Constant Gaussian curvature surfaces in the 3-sphere via loop groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Inoguchi, Jun-Ichi; Kobayashi, Shimpei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study constant positive Gauss curvature K surfaces in the 3-sphere S3 with 0KK... by the second fundamental form if and only if K is constant. We give a uniform loop group formulation for all such surfaces with K≠0, and use the generalized d’Alembert method to construct examples. This representation gives a natural correspondence between such surfaces with KK

  2. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with -SO3H and -COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas -NH2 and -NR3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on -NR3 and -CHO surfaces. The -OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  3. Surface grafting of carboxylic groups onto thermoplastic polyurethanes to reduce cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, P., E-mail: palves@eq.uc.pt [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Química, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferreira, P. [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Química, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal); Kaiser, Jean-Pierre [EMPA, St. Gallen, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Salk, Natalie [Mikrofertigung – Micro Engineering, Fraunhofer IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, D-288359 Bremen (Germany); Bruinink, Arie [EMPA, St. Gallen, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Sousa, Hermínio C. de; Gil, M.H. [CIEPQPF, Departamento de Engenharia Química, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-790 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of polymers with other materials is an important issue, being their surface properties clearly crucial. For some important polymer applications, their surfaces have to be modified. Surface modification aims to tailor the surface characteristics of a material for a specific application without affecting its bulk properties. Materials can be surface modified by using biological, chemical or physical methods. The aim of this work was to improve the reactivity of the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan{sup ®}) surface and to make its surface cell repellent by grafting carboxylic groups onto its surface. Two TPU materials were studied: a polyether-based TPU and a polyester-based TPU. The grafting efficiency was evaluated by contact angle measurements and by analytical determination of the COOH groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the membranes surface was performed as well as cell adhesion tests. It was proved that the surfaces of the TPUs membranes were successfully modified and that cell adhesion was remarkably reduced.

  4. The Picard group of the moduli space of r-Spin Riemann surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    An r-Spin Riemann surface is a Riemann surface equipped with a choice of rth root of the (co)tangent bundle. We give a careful construction of the moduli space (orbifold) of r-Spin Riemann surfaces, and explain how to establish a Madsen–Weiss theorem for it. This allows us to prove the “Mumford...... conjecture” for these moduli spaces, but more interestingly allows us to compute their algebraic Picard groups (for g≥10, or g≥9 in the 2-Spin case). We give a complete description of these Picard groups, in terms of explicitly constructed line bundles....

  5. Arsonic acid as a robust anchor group for the surface modification of Fe3O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jihoon; Moon, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2013-12-03

    In order to use iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) in various applications, a surface modification that provides colloidal stability and additional functionality to the nanoparticles is necessary. For the modification of the nanoparticle surface with ligand molecules, the ligand molecule should contain an anchor group that has a strong affinity for the surface. However, currently used anchor groups have shown some problems such as low affinity and stability as well as reactivity with the surface. In this study, arsonic acid (RAsO(OH)2) was investigated as a novel anchor group. It was possible to introduce azide groups on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles using 4-azidophenylarsonic acid, and the desired functional molecules could be chemically attached to the surface via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry). By quantifying and comparing the amount of attached anchors on the surface, it was found that arsonic acid displays better affinity than other currently used anchors (catechol, carboxylic acid). Furthermore, we examined the binding reversibility, long-term anchoring stability, and anchoring stability at various pH values. It was revealed that arsonic acid is a stable anchor in various conditions.

  6. XPS study of PBO fiber surface modified by incorporation of hydroxyl polar groups in main chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Tao; Hu Dayong; Jin Junhong; Yang Shenglin [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Li Guang, E-mail: lig@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Jiang Jianming [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Dihydroxy poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (DHPBO), a modified poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole) (PBO) polymer containing double hydroxyl groups in polymer chains, was synthesized by copolymerization of 4,6-diamino resorcinol dihydrochloride (DAR), purified terephthalic acid (TA) and 2,5-dihydroxyterephthalic acid (DHTA). DHPBO fibers were prepared by dry-jet wet-spinning method. The effects of hydroxyl polar groups on the surface elemental compositions of PBO fiber were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the ratio of oxygen/carbon on the surface of DHPBO fibers is higher than that on the surface of PBO fibers, which indicates the content of polar groups on the surface of DHPBO fiber increase compared with PBO fiber.

  7. Surface-binding through polyfunction groups of Rhodamine B on composite surface and its high performance photodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yiqun; Wang, Xiaofen; Gu, Yun; Guo, Lan; Xu, Zhaodi

    2016-03-01

    A kind of novel composite ZnS/In(OH)3/In2S3 is synthesized using zinc oxide nanoplates as zinc raw material during hydrothermal process. Although the obtained samples are composited of ZnS and In(OH)3 and In2S3 phase, the samples possess different structure, morphology and optical absorption property depending on molar ratio of raw materials. Zeta potential analysis indicates different surface electrical property since various content and particle size of the phases. The equilibrium adsorption study confirms the composite ZnS/In(OH)3/In2S3 with surface negative charge is good adsorbent for Rhodamine B (Rh B) dye. In addition, the degradation of Rh B over the samples with surface negative charge under visible light (λ ≥ 420 nm) is more effective than the samples with surface positive charge. The samples before and after adsorbing Rh B molecule are examined by FTIR spectra and Zetasizer. It is found that the three function groups of Rh B molecule, especially carboxyl group anchors to surface of the sample through electrostatic adsorption, coordination and hydrogen-bond. It contributes to rapid transformation of photogenerated electron to conduction band of In(OH)3 and suppresses the recombination of photogenerated carrier. The possible adsorption modes of Rh B are discussed on the basis of the experiment results.

  8. Coupling of carboxylic groups onto the surface of polystyrene parts during fused filament fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Philipp; Schubert, Oliver; Simon, Frank; Schlenstedt, Kornelia

    2017-11-01

    A method for the fabrication of polystyrene parts, modified with carboxylic groups during Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), is being introduced. This method is based on the application of a thin layer of a reactive polymer carrying carboxylic groups on a substrate surface. A polystyrene film is printed on top of this layer. During contact between the hot melt and the reactive layer, a Friedel-Crafts type acylation using a green catalyst takes place, which attaches the reactive polymer to the polystyrene surface. The modified surface is homogeneous, hydrophilic and able to bind copper ions. The method could be used to fabricate unique parts of polystyrene with tailored surface functionalisation. It could be applied for laboratory use, e.g. for the manufacture of lab-on-a-chip devices.

  9. Surface ferro (or antiferro) magnetism in bulk antiferro (or ferro) magnets: renormalization group analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmento, E.F.; Tsallis, C.

    1985-01-01

    The renormalization group techniques are applied, for the first time, to surface magnetism in bulk magnets, for all signs of surface and bulk coupling constants. The g-state Potts model is specifically focused, and a interesting q-evolution of the phase diagram is exhibited. In particular the Ising model (q=2) presents a remarkable feature: surface ferro (or antiferro) magnetism can disappear while heating an antiferro (or ferro) magnet, and reappear again for higher temperatures, before entering in the paramagnetic phase. (Author) [pt

  10. Extrapolated renormalization group calculation of the surface tension in square-lattice Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curado, E.M.F.; Tsallis, C.; Levy, S.V.F.; Oliveira, M.J. de

    1980-06-01

    By using self-dual clusters (whose sizes are characterized by the numbers b=2, 3, 4, 5) within a real space renormalization group framework, the longitudinal surface tension of the square-lattice first-neighbour 1/2-spin ferromagnetic Ising model is calculated. The exact critical temperature T sub(c) is recovered for any value of b; the exact assymptotic behaviour of the surface tension in the limit of low temperatures is analytically recovered; the approximate correlation length critical exponents monotonically tend towards the exact value ν=1 (which, at two dimensions, coincides with the surface tension critical exponent μ) for increasingly large cells; the same behaviour is remarked in what concerns the approximate values for the surface tension amplitude in the limit T→T sub(c). Four different numerical procedures are developed for extrapolating to b→infinite the renormalization group results for the surface tension, and quite satisfactory agreement is obtained with Onsager's exact expression (error varying from zero to a few percent on the whole temperature domain). Furthermore the set of RG surface tensions is compared with a set of biased surface tensions (associated to appropriate misfit seams), and find only fortuitous coincidence among them. (Author) [pt

  11. The synthesis of androstane brassinosteroid analogues with alpha-azido acid ester groups in position 17beta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hniličková, Jaroslava; Kohout, Ladislav; Capdevila, E.; Esteve, A.; Vilaplana, M.; Molist, M.; Brosa, C.; Swaczynová, Jana; Slavíková, Barbora

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 12 (2010), s. 1005-1010 ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS510680561; GA MŠk 1M06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : brassinosteroids * androstane analogues * plant growth regulators Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.106, year: 2010

  12. Enrichment of Nanodiamond Surfaces with Carboxyl Groups for Doxorubicin Loading and Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Y.; Saputra, F. D.; Wuning, S.; Arnelli; Bhaduri, G.

    2017-02-01

    In their pristine state, nanodiamond crystals produced via detonation techniques containing several functional groups present on the surface including amine, amide, alcohol, carbonyl, and carboxyl. These functional groups facilitate nanodiamond to interact drugs so as to nanodiamond is potential for medical application such as drug delivery. Even though research on t he use of nanodiamond for this application has been conducted widely, research on the effect of enrichment of nanodiamond surface with carboxyl functional groups for drug loading and release has not been explored extensively. Therefore, in this paper, the effect of carboxyl-terminated nanodiamond (ND-COOH) on drug loading and release will be presented. The enrichment of nanodiamond with carboxyl groups was undertaken by treating nanodiamond with sulphuric acid and nitric acid. The results show that the doxorubicin (DOX) loading and release efficiencies of ND pristine are higher than that of ND-COOH.

  13. Effects of chemical functional groups on elemental mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jing, E-mail: liujing27@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheney, Marcos A. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Wu Fan; Li Meng [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-02-15

    A systematic theoretical study using density functional theory is performed to provide molecular-level understanding of the effects of chemical functional groups on mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces. The zigzag and armchair edges were used in modeling the carbonaceous surfaces to simulate different adsorption sites. The edge atoms on the upper side of the models are unsaturated to simulate active sites. All calculations (optimizations, energies, and frequencies) were made at B3PW91 density functional theory level, using RCEP60VDZ basis set for mercury and 6-31G(d) pople basis set for other atoms. The results indicate that the embedding of halogen atom can increase the activity of its neighboring site which in turn increases the adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous surface for Hg{sup 0}. The adsorption belongs to chemisorptions, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. For the effects of oxygen functional groups, lactone, carbonyl and semiquinone favor Hg{sup 0} adsorption because they increase the neighboring site's activity for mercury adsorption. On the contrary, phenol and carboxyl functional groups show a physisorption of Hg{sup 0}, and reduce Hg capture. This result can explain the seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature concerning the influence of oxygen functional groups on mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surface.

  14. Surface-binding through polyfunction groups of Rhodamine B on composite surface and its high performance photodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yiqun [College of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center of Analysis and Testing, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Wang, Xiaofen [College of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Gu, Yun; Guo, Lan [College of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center of Analysis and Testing, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Xu, Zhaodi, E-mail: xuzhaodi@ncu.edu.cn [Center of Analysis and Testing, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: The proper adsorption sites of Rh B depending on the phases of composites significantly enhance photodegradation activity under visible light. - Highlights: • The composites ZnS/In(OH){sub 3}/In{sub 2}S{sub 3} were hydrothermally prepared. • Rhodamine B dye was effectively degraded by the composite under the visible light irradiation. • The three function groups of Rhodamine B bind on the composites ZnS/In(OH){sub 3}/In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. • The proper adsorption mode and site of Rhodamine B effectively suppress the combination of carrier. • A new degradation path of Rhodamine B on ZnS/In(OH){sub 3}/In{sub 2}S{sub 3} is found. - Abstract: A kind of novel composite ZnS/In(OH){sub 3}/In{sub 2}S{sub 3} is synthesized using zinc oxide nanoplates as zinc raw material during hydrothermal process. Although the obtained samples are composited of ZnS and In(OH){sub 3} and In{sub 2}S{sub 3} phase, the samples possess different structure, morphology and optical absorption property depending on molar ratio of raw materials. Zeta potential analysis indicates different surface electrical property since various content and particle size of the phases. The equilibrium adsorption study confirms the composite ZnS/In(OH){sub 3}/In{sub 2}S{sub 3} with surface negative charge is good adsorbent for Rhodamine B (Rh B) dye. In addition, the degradation of Rh B over the samples with surface negative charge under visible light (λ ≥ 420 nm) is more effective than the samples with surface positive charge. The samples before and after adsorbing Rh B molecule are examined by FTIR spectra and Zetasizer. It is found that the three function groups of Rh B molecule, especially carboxyl group anchors to surface of the sample through electrostatic adsorption, coordination and hydrogen-bond. It contributes to rapid transformation of photogenerated electron to conduction band of In(OH){sub 3} and suppresses the recombination of photogenerated carrier. The possible

  15. A Chord Diagrammatic Presentation of the Mapping Class Group of a Once Bordered Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bene, Alex

    The Ptolemy groupoid is a combinatorial groupoid generated by elementary moves on marked trivalent fatgraphs with three types of relations. Through the fatgraph decomposition of Teichm\\"uller space, the Ptolemy groupoid is a mapping class group equivariant subgroupoid of the fundamental path...... groupoid of Teichm\\"uller space with a discrete set objects. In particular, it leads to an infinite, but combinatorially simple, presentation of the mapping class group of an orientable surface. In this note, we give a presentation of a full mapping class group equivariant subgroupoid of the Ptolemy...

  16. Preparation and Crystal Structure of 5-Azido-3-nitro-1H-1,2,4-triazole, Its Methyl Derivative and Potassium Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Klapötke

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 5-Azido-3-nitro-1H-1,2,4-triazole, its methyl derivative and potassium salt were synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The crystal structures were determined by low temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interactions between the molecules or ions were analyzed and discussed. Furthermore, all compounds were tested according to BAM (Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung methods.

  17. Influence of surface functional groups on lithium ion intercalation of carbon cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventosa, Edgar; Xia, Wei; Klink, Stefan; La Mantia, Fabio; Muhler, Martin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Commercial carbon cloth made of PAN-based carbon fibres was used as free-standing anode for lithium intercalation. The role of surface functional groups on the specific irreversible charge loss and reversible charge during the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions into carbon cloth has been investigated. Oxygen groups have been introduced by nitric acid vapour treatment and subsequently gradually removed by thermal treatment at different temperatures in He or H 2 atmosphere as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A clear correlation between the amount of surface-bound oxygen groups and the irreversible specific charge was observed. Three irreversible processes were distinguished during the first cathodic scan: (i) reduction of oxygen groups, (ii) formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) and (iii) presumably exfoliation. The latter one was only observed for samples with low surface oxygen concentration, and its contribution to the irreversible capacity was small due to the low graphitization degree of the samples. An increased specific reversible charge upon increasing the amount of oxygen-containing groups was observed with the main improvement above 1.5 V.

  18. Enhanced Group Delay of the Pulse Reflection with Graphene Surface Plasmon via Modified Otto Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the group delay of the transverse magnetic (TM polarized wave reflected from a modified Otto configuration with graphene surface plasmon is investigated theoretically. The findings show that the optical group delay in this structure can be enhanced negatively and can be switched from negative to positive due to the excitation of surface plasmon by graphene. It is clear that the negative group delay can be actively tuned through the Fermi energy of the graphene. Furthermore, the delay properties can also be manipulated by changing either the relaxation time of graphene or the distance between the coupling prism and the graphene. These tunable delay characteristics are promising for fabricating grapheme-based optical delay devices and other applications in the terahertz regime.

  19. The n-propyl 3-azido-2,3-dideoxy-β-D-arabino-hexopyranoside: Syntheses, crystal structure, physical properties and stability constants of their complexes with Cu(II), Ni(II) and VO(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabaś, Anna; Madura, Izabela D.; Marek, Paulina H.; Dąbrowska, Aleksandra M.

    2017-11-01

    The structure, conformation and configuration of the n-propyl 3-azido-2,3-dideoxy-β-D-arabino-hexopyranoside (BAra-nPr) were determined by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy, as well as by optical rotation. The crystal structure was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in P21 space group symmetry of the monoclinic system. The molecule has a 4C1 chair conformation with azide group in the equatorial position both in a solution as well as in the crystal. The spatial arrangement of azide group is compared to other previously determined azidosugars. The hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl group of sugar molecules lead to a ribbon structure observed also for the ethyl homolog. The packing of ribbons is dependent on the alkyl substituent length and with the elongation changes from pseudohexagonal to lamellar. Acidity constants for the n-propyl 3-azido-2,3-dideoxy-β-D-arabino-hexopyranoside (BAra-nPr) in an aqueous solution were evaluated by the spectrophotometric and potentiometric titrations methods. Title compound exhibit blue absorption with the maximum wavelengths in the range of 266 nm and 306 nm. Based on these measurements we showed equilibria existing in a particular solution and a distribution of species which have formed during the titration. We also investigated interactions between Cu(II), Ni(II) and VO(II) and title compound (as ligand L) during complexometric titration. On these bases we identified that in [CuII-BAra-nPr]2+ the ratio of the ligand L to metal ion M(II) was 3:1, while in [NiII-BAra-nPr]2+ and [VOII-BAra-nPr]2+ complexes 2:1 ratios were found. The cumulative stability constants (as log β) occurring in an aqueous solution for the complexes of BAra-nPr with Cu(II), Ni(II) and VO(IV) were 14.57; 11.71 and 4.20, respectively.

  20. Effect of the surface oxygen groups on methane adsorption on coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Shixiong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Wen Jie [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Yu Xiaopeng [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Chu Wei, E-mail: chuwei1965_scu@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified one coal with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} and HNO{sub 3} respectively, to prepare coal samples with different surface properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen groups on coal surface were characterized by XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The textures of the coal samples were investigated by N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption behaviors were measured by volumetric method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There was a negative correlation between methane saturated adsorption capacity and the O{sub total}/C{sub total}. - Abstract: To investigate the influence of surface oxygen groups on methane adsorption on coals, one bituminous coal was modified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} and HNO{sub 3} respectively, to prepare coal samples with different surface properties. The oxygen groups on coal surface were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The textures of the coal samples were investigated by N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Their surface morphologies were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The methane adsorption behaviors of these coal samples were measured at 303 K in pressure range of 0-5.3 MPa by volumetric method. The adsorption data of methane were fitted to the Langmuir model and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) model. The fitting results showed that the D-A model fitted the isotherm data better than the Langmuir model. It was observed that there was, in general, a positive correlation between the methane saturated adsorption capacity and the micropore volume of coals while a negative correlation between methane saturated adsorption capacity and the O{sub total}/C{sub total}. The methane adsorption capacity was determined by the coal surface chemistry when the microporosity parameters of two samples were similar. Coal with a higher amount of oxygen surface groups, and consequently with a less

  1. The XPS study of physical and chemical forms of neptunium group on the surface of minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption behavior and the physical and chemical forms of neptunium on the surface of minerals of the two chlorate samples, biotite and kaolin, with different contents of Fe(II was studied. The liquid-liquid extraction and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to identify the valence forms of neptunium. On the basis of the obtained data the quantitative elemental composition of the surface of the studied minerals, as well as the ionic composition of the formed neptunium complexes was determined. It was shown that the Np(IV and Np(VI containing compounds did not form, while the complexes Np(VO+ -hydroxyl did form on the surface. The oxygen ions bonded with iron and oxygen belonging to water and/or of carboxyl were suggested to be present in the equatorial plane of the neptunyl group NpO+.

  2. Microstructuring of thermo-mechanically highly stressed surfaces final report of the DFG research group 576

    CERN Document Server

    Rienäcker, Adrian; Knoll, Gunter; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans; Reithmeier, Eduard; Dinkelacker, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume presents the final research results of the DFG Research Group 576, which is a joint initiative of five different institutes of the Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universität Kassel, Germany. The research of the DFG Research Group 576 focuses on improving the tribological behavior of thermomechanically highly stressed surfaces, particularly on cylinder liner for combustion engines. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students who want to specialize in the field.

  3. Combinatorial Methods for Detecting Surface Subgroups in Right-Angled Artin Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    We give a short proof of the following theorem of Sang-hyun Kim: if $A(\\Gamma)$ is a right-angled Artin group with defining graph $\\Gamma$, then $A(\\Gamma)$ contains a hyperbolic surface subgroup if $\\Gamma$ contains an induced subgraph $\\bar{C}_n$ for some $n \\geq 5$, where $\\bar{C}_n$ denotes the complement graph of an $n$-cycle. Furthermore, we give a new proof of Kim's co-contraction theorem.

  4. A rare mu-hydroxo-bridged species. synthesis, structure, and properties of mu-hydroxo(tetraphenylporphyrinatomanganese(III))(phthalocyaninato(azido)chromium(III)), [(TPP)Mn-O(H)-CrPc(N3)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzello, Maria Pia; Bartolino, Laura; Ercolani, Claudio; Rizzoli, Corrado

    2006-08-21

    A novel ditetrapyrrolic, heteroleptic, and heterometallic (Mn-Cr) mu-hydroxo-bridged complex has been prepared, and its structural and general properties have been studied. The species mu-hydroxo(tetraphenylporphyrinatomanganese(III))(phthalocyaninato(azido)chromium(III)), [(TPP)Mn-O(H)-CrPc(N3)], isolated as a chloronaphthalene (ClNP) solvate, has been structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray work. The two (TPP)Mn and CrPc(N3) fragments are held together by the bridging mu-hydroxo ion with long Mn-O [1.993(5) A] and Cr-O [1.976(5) A] bond distances and a Mn-O(H)-Cr angle of 163.7(3) degrees . The five-coordinate Mn center in the (TPP)Mn fragment is displaced from the TPP rigorously planar central N4 core by 0.128 A, and the environment is typical of a Mn(III) high-spin site. The six-coordinate Cr(III) in the CrPc(N3) moiety lies practically in the plane of the phthalocyanine macrocycle (displacement toward the azido group: 0.054 A). The average Mn-N(pyr) and Cr-N(pyr) bond distances are 2.011(6) and 1.982(6) A, respectively, and the Mn-Cr bond distance is 3.929(2) A. The porphyrin and phthalocyanine rings are in an almost eclipsed position [5.16(2) degrees ], and the mean planes of the two macrocycles form a dihedral angle of 5.79(4) degrees. Crystal data for [(TPP)Mn-O(H)-CrPc(N3)].2ClNP, C76H45CrMnN15O.2C10H7Cl: a = 16.645(3) A, b = 17.692(4) A, c = 25.828(5) A, alpha = 90 degrees , beta = 98.79(3) degrees , gamma = 90 degrees , space group P2(1)/c (No. 14), V = 7517(3) A(3), Z = 4, R1 = 0.086, and wR2 = 0.267. IR and UV-vis-near-IR spectral and room temperature magnetic susceptibility data of the [Mn-Cr] species are also presented.

  5. Interaction of biodegradative threonine dehydratase (TD) of Escherichia coli with 8-azido-AMP, a photoaffinity analog of AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, R.V.; Datta, P.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulation of TD activity by AMP (Ka = 40 μM) is known to accompany the conversion of monomeric form of the enzyme to its tetramer and a decrease in the Km for threonine. In comparison, 8-azido-AMP (N 3 AMP) simulated TD activity only partially, lowered the Km for threonine and stabilized a dimeric form of the protein. Competition experiments revealed that N 3 AMP exerted an apparent dominant effect in counteracting the AMP-mediated enzyme activation, indicating complex mutual interactions between these ligands. UV irradiation of TD with increasing concentrations of 3 H-N 3 AMP (up to 150 μM) resulted in gradual loss of enzyme activity and concomitant incorporation of N 3 AMP into protein; upon complete inactivation, 0.75 mol of N 3 AMP was bound per mol tetramer. The presence of AMP during photolysis reduced the extent of enzyme inactivation as well as the incorporation of N 3 AMP into protein. Photolabeling of TD with 20 μM 3 H-N 3 AMP revealed one labeled tryptic peptide; at higher N 3 AMP concentrations (>300 μM), two labeled peptides were found, one of which was identical to that found with low N 3 AMP concentration. The cumulative results suggest that N 3 AMP can act as an allosteric modifier and that the peptide labeled at low N 3 AMP may represent the AMP binding site on the protein molecule

  6. Different chemical groups modification on the surface of chitosan nonwoven dressing and the hemostatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Hu, Shihao; Zhou, Zhongzheng; Zeenat, Shah; Cheng, Feng; Li, Yang; Feng, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojie; Chen, Xiguang

    2018-02-01

    The hemostatic properties of surface modified chitosan nonwoven had been investigated. The succinyl groups, carboxymethyl groups and quaternary ammonium groups were introduced into the surface of chitosan nonwoven (obtained NSCS, CMCS and TMCS nonwoven, respectively). For blood clotting, absorbance value (0.105±0.03) of NSCS1 nonwoven was the smallest (CS 0.307±0.002, NSCS2 0.148±0.002, CMCS1 0.195±0.02, CMCS2 0.233±0.001, TMCS1 0.191±0.002, TMCS2 0.345±0.002), which indicated the stronger hemostatic potential. For platelet aggregation, adenosine diphosphate agonist was added to induce the nonwoven to adhered platelets. The aggregation of platelet with TMCS2 nonwoven was highest (10.97±0.16%). Further research of blood coagulation mechanism was discussed, which indicated NSCS and CMCS nonwoven could activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation to accelerate blood coagulation. NSCS1 nonwoven showed the shortest hemostatic time (147±3.7s) and the lowest blood loss (0.23±0.05g) in a rabbit ear artery injury model. These results demonstrated that these surface modified chitosan nonwoven dressings could use as a promising hemostatic intervention, especially NSCS nonwoven dressing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Roles of acidic functional groups of carbon fiber surfaces in enhancing interfacial adhesion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2005-01-01

    The gas phase ozone treatment was used as a method to bind acidic oxygen functional groups on carbon fiber surfaces. The ozone treatment on carbon fibers was varied with the ozone concentration and treatment time. Surface analyses of the carbon fibers before and after treatments were performed by FT-IR, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), and dynamic contact angle measurements. Mechanical interfacial properties of the fibers/polymer composites were investigated by using critical stress intensity factor (K IC ) and critical energy release rate (G IC ) measurements. From the results of FT-IR and XPS, it was observed that the oxygen functional groups, such as -OH, O-C=O, C=O, and C-O, were attached on the carbon fiber surfaces after the ozone treatment. The mechanical interfacial properties of the composites also showed higher values than those of untreated composites. Ozone treatment is attributed to the increase of both the acidic functional groups and the degree of adhesion at interfaces between the fibers and polymeric resin in composites

  8. Photoelectron binding energy shifts observed during oxidation of group IIA, IIIA and IVA elemental surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, P.A.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    An extensive re-evaluation of XPS binding energies (BE's) and binding energy shifts (ΔBE's) from metals, oxides and the carbonates of the group II, III and IVA elements (exceptions are Be, Mg and Hf) has been carried out using a substrate specific BE referencing approach. From this, O-1s BE's are found to fall into surface oxide, bulk oxide and carbonate groupings, with bulk oxides showing the lowest BE's followed by surface oxides (+∼1.5 eV) and then carbonates (+∼3.0 eV). The O-1s BE's from the bulk oxides also appear to scale with 1/d, where d is inter-atomic distance. The same is noted in the ΔBE's observed from the metallic counterparts during oxidation of the elemental surfaces. This, and the decreasing BE exhibited by Ca, Sr and Ba on oxidation is explained within the charge potential model as resulting from competing inter- and intra-atomic effects, and is shown to be consistent with partial covalency arguments utilizing Madulung potentials. The ΔBE's also fall into groups according to the elements location in the periodic table, i.e. s, p or d block. These trends open up the possibility of approximating ΔBE's arising from initial and final state effects, and bond distances

  9. Chemical reactions on platinum-group metal surfaces studied by synchrotron-radiation-based spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Hiroshi; Nakai, Ikuyo; Nagasaka, Masanari; Amemiya, Kenta; Ohta, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    A new version of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray spectroscopy, wave-length-dispersive near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (dispersive-NEXAFS), and fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been applied to mechanistic studies on several surface catalytic reactions on platinum-group-metal surfaces. In this review, our approach using above techniques to understand the reaction mechanism and actual application studies on three well-known catalytic surface reactions, CO oxidation on Pt(111) and Pd(111), NO reduction on Rh(111), and H 2 O formation on Pt(111), are introduced. Spectroscopic monitoring of the progress of the surface reactions enabled us to detect reaction intermediates and analyze the reaction kinetics quantitatively which provides information on reaction order, rate constant, pre-exponential factor, activation energy and etc. Such quantitative analyses combined with scanning tunneling microscopy and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant contribution of the adsorbate configurations and their dynamic changes to the reaction mechanisms of the above fundamental catalytic surface reactions. (author)

  10. Proton migration along the membrane surface in the absence of charged or titratable groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as energy transduction. For example, proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is considered to be the dominant mechanism of proton exchange between membrane sites of high and low proton concentrations. For the investigation of this mechanism, kinetic experiments on proton diffusion are evaluated to determine the ability of lipid membranes to retain protons on their surfaces. Experiments on different lipid bilayer membranes (DPhPC, DPhPE and GMO) are performed under the influence of two types of mobile buffer molecules (Capso, NH4CL). During these experiments the surface diffusion of photolytically released protons is visualized in terms of fluorescence changes of a lipid bound pH-sensitive dye (DHPE +fluorescein). The protons under investigation are released by flash photolysis of a hydrophobic caged compound (DMCM, caged diethyl phosphate). The experimental data confirm the existence of an energy barrier, which prevents the protons from escaping into the bulk. So far this effect was attributed to the proton binding to titrateable groups (e.g. ethanolamine) or electrostatic forces created by charged moieties (e.g. phosphate groups) on the membrane/water interface. However, upon removal of the titrateable groups and charged moieties from the membrane surface, a significant energy barrier remained as indicated by the experiments with glycerol monooleate (GMO) bilayers. To estimate the size of the barrier a semi-analytical model is presented that describes the two and three dimensional proton diffusion and the related physical and chemical processes. Common models describe surface proton diffusion as a series of subsequent hopping processes between membrane-anchored buffer molecules. Our experiments provide evidence for an alternative model. We released membrane-bound caged protons by UV flashes and monitored their arrival at distant sites s by fluorescence

  11. Documentation for The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) data archived at NCEI (NCEI Accession 0123222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international open group for SST data producers, users, and scientists. It brings together...

  12. Iron carbide on titania surface modified with group VA oxides as Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, I.E.; Fiato, R.A.; Chersich, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst is described comprising iron carbide supported on a surface modified titania wherein the support comprises an oxide of a metal selected form the group consisting of niobium, vanadium, tantalum or mixture thereof supported on the titania wherein at least a portion of the supported oxide of niobium, vanandium, tantalum or mixture is in a non-crystalline form. The amount of the supported oxide ranges from about 0.5 to 25 weight percent metal oxide on the titania support based on the total support composition and the catalyst contains at least about 2 milligrams of iron, calculated as Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, per square meter of support surface

  13. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  14. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  15. Interplay of nonlocal response, damping, and low group velocity in surface-plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of metal structures down to the nanoscale has been accompanied with several recent studies demonstrating plasmonic effects not explainable by classical electromagnetic theory. Describing the optical properties of materials solely through the bulk dielectric function has been...... augmented with quantum mechanical corrections, such as the electron spill-out effect and nonlocal response. Here, we discuss the latter and its implications on the waveguiding characteristics, such as dispersion and group velocity, of the surface-plasmon polariton mode supported at a metal-air interface....

  16. Interplay of nonlocal response, damping, and low group velocity in surface-plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization of metal structures down to the nanoscale has been accompanied with several recent studies demonstrating plasmonic effects not explainable by classical electromagnetic theory. Describing the optical properties of materials solely through the bulk dielectric function has been augmented with quantum mechanical corrections, such as the electron spill-out effect and nonlocal response. Here, we discuss the latter and its implications on the waveguiding characteristics, such as dispersion and group velocity, of the surface-plasmon polariton mode supported at a metal-air interface.

  17. Enhancing the efficiency of lithium intercalation in carbon nanotube bundles using surface functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shiyan; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Chen, Liping; Liang, Haojun

    2014-08-14

    The effect of surface functionalization on the ability and kinetics of lithium intercalation in carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles has been studied by comparing the dynamical behaviors of lithium (Li) ions in pristine and -NH2 functionalized CNTs via ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It was observed that lithium intercalation has been achieved quickly for both the pristine and surface functionalized CNT bundle. Our calculations demonstrated for the first time that CNT functionalization improved the efficiency of lithium intercalation significantly at both low and high Li ion density. Moreover, we found that keeping the nanotubes apart with an appropriate distance and charging the battery at a rational rate were beneficial to achieve a high rate of lithium intercalation. Besides, the calculated adsorption energy curves indicated that the potential wells in the system of -NH2 functionalized CNT were deeper than that of the pristine CNT bundle by 0.74 eV, and a third energy minimum with a value of 2.64 eV existed at the midpoint of the central axis of the nanotube. Thus, it would be more difficult to remove Li ions from the nanotube interior after surface functionalization. The barrier for lithium diffusion in the interior of the nanotube is greatly decreased because of the surface functional groups. Based on these results, we would suggest to "damage" the nanotube by introducing defects at its sidewall in order to improve not only the capacity of surface functionalized CNTs but also the efficiency of lithium intercalation and deintercalation processes. Our results presented here are helpful in understanding the mechanism of lithium intercalation into nanotube bundles, which may potentially be applied in the development of CNT based electrodes.

  18. Holomorphic representation of constant mean curvature surfaces in Minkowski space: Consequences of non-compactness in loop group methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Rossman, Wayne; Schmitt, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    We give an infinite dimensional generalized Weierstrass representation for spacelike constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in Minkowski 3-space $\\R^{2,1}$. The formulation is analogous to that given by Dorfmeister, Pedit and Wu for CMC surfaces in Euclidean space, replacing the group $SU_2...... symmetry, as well as studying another class of surfaces for which the metric is rotationally invariant....

  19. Influence of deuterium on kinetics of methane isotope exchange with surface deuteroxy groups of Pt/SiO2 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musoyan, L.M.; Aliev, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction of isotope methane exchange with surface deuteroxy groups of 2 % Pt/SiO 2 catalyst was studied. It is shown that preliminarily chemisorbed deuterium does not decelerate the exchange reaction, but changes its mechanism. Activation energy of exchange on clean surface is equal to 25 kJ/mol; it grows in the presence of deuterium on the surface

  20. Modified PAMAM dendrimer with 4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone surface groups reveals negligible toxicity against three rodent cell-lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janaszewska, Anna; Ciolkowski, Michal; Wróbel, Dominika

    2013-01-01

    Modification of the surface groups of dendrimers is one of the methods to improve their biocompatibility. This article presents results of experiments related to the toxicity of a modified polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of the fourth generation with 4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone surface groups (PAM...

  1. Catalyst-Free Conjugation and In Situ Quantification of Nanoparticle Ligand Surface Density Using Fluorogenic Cu-Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Sun, Honghao; Berg, Rolf Henrik

    2011-01-01

    A highly efficient method for functionalizing nanoparticles and directly quantifying conjugation efficiency and ligand surface density has been developed. Attachment of 3-azido-modifed RGD-peptides to PEGylated liposomes was achieved by using Cu-free click conditions. Upon coupling a fluorophore ...

  2. Tunable Oxygen Functional Groups as Electrocatalysts on Graphite Felt Surfaces for All-Vanadium Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Luis; Reed, David; Nie, Zimin; Schwarz, Ashleigh M; Nandasiri, Manjula I; Kizewski, James P; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Sprenkle, Vincent; Li, Bin

    2016-06-22

    A dual oxidative approach using O2 plasma followed by treatment with H2 O2 to impart oxygen functional groups onto the surface of a graphite felt electrode. When used as electrodes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) system, the energy efficiency of the cell is enhanced by 8.2 % at a current density of 150 mA cm(-2) compared with one oxidized by thermal treatment in air. More importantly, by varying the oxidative techniques, the amount and type of oxygen groups was tailored and their effects were elucidated. It was found that O-C=O groups improve the cells performance whereas the C-O and C=O groups degrade it. The reason for the increased performance was found to be a reduction in the cell overpotential after functionalization of the graphite felt electrode. This work reveals a route for functionalizing carbon electrodes to improve the performance of VRB cells. This approach can lower the cost of VRB cells and pave the way for more commercially viable stationary energy storage systems that can be used for intermittent renewable energy storage. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Alternative splicing of a group II intron in a surface layer protein gene in Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Bonnie A; Simon, Dawn M; Zimmerly, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Group II introns are ribozymes and retroelements found in bacteria, and are thought to have been the ancestors of nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Whereas nuclear introns undergo prolific alternative splicing in some species, group II introns are not known to carry out equivalent reactions. Here we report a group II intron in the human pathogen Clostridium tetani, which undergoes four alternative splicing reactions in vivo. Together with unspliced transcript, five mRNAs are produced, each encoding a distinct surface layer protein isoform. Correct fusion of exon reading frames requires a shifted 5' splice site located 8 nt upstream of the canonical boundary motif. The shifted junction is accomplished by an altered IBS1-EBS1 pairing between the intron and 5' exon. Growth of C. tetani under a variety of conditions did not result in large changes in alternative splicing levels, raising the possibility that alternative splicing is constitutive. This work demonstrates a novel type of gene organization and regulation in bacteria, and provides an additional parallel between group II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns.

  4. Hyphal responses of Neurospora crassa to micron-sized beads with functional chemical surface groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Marie; Edwards, Clive; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2011-02-01

    Filamentous fungi include serious plant and animal pathogens that explore their environment efficiently in order to penetrate the host. This environment is physically and chemically heterogeneous and the fungi rely on specific physical and chemical signals to find the optimal point/s of attack. This study presents a methodology to introduce distinct structures with dimensions similar to the hyphal diameter and specific chemical surface groups into a controllable environment in order to study the fungal response. We introduced 3.3 μm polystyrene beads covered with Epoxy surface groups into microfluidic channels made from PDMS by rapid replica molding. The experimental setup resulted in different areas with low and high densities of beads as well as densely packed patches. The observations of the fungus exploring the areas long-term showed that the growth parameters were altered significantly, compared with the values measured on agar. The fungus responded to both, the physical and chemical parameters of the beads, including temporary directional changes, increased branching angles, decreased branching distances, decreased apical extension velocities and occasional cell wall lysis. The wealth and magnitude of the observed responses indicates that the microfluidic structures provide a powerful platform for the investigation of micron-sized features on filamentous fungi.

  5. Gold nanoparticles as markers for fluorinated surfaces containing embedded amide groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarin, Barbara; Barreca, Davide; Bertola, Maurizio; Cristina Cassani, Maria; Carraro, Giorgio; Maccato, Chiara; Mignani, Adriana; Nanni, Daniele; Parise, Chiara; Ranieri, Silvia

    2018-05-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates were functionalized with fluoroalkylsilanes (FAS) having formula RFC(O)N(R)(CH2)3Si(OMe)3 (1, R = H, RF = C5F11; 2, R = CH3, RF = C5F11;3, R = H, RF = C3F7) and containing embedded amide moieties between the perfluoroalkyl chain and the syloxanic moiety. Subsequently, Au nanoparticle deposition (AuNP) onto the ITO-FAS functionalized surfaces was carried out by immersion into a solution of citrate-stabilized AuNP. The ITO-FAS and AuNP/ITO-FAS modified systems were characterized by various complementary techniques and compared with AuNP/ITO modified with RF(CH2)2Si(OEt)3 (4, RF = C6F13), free from functional groups between the fluorinated tail and the syloxanic moiety. The results showed that only ITO glasses modified with 1, 2 and 3 displayed an oleophobic, as well as hydrophobic, behaviour and that the AuNP Surface Coverage (SC %) directly depended on the fluoroalkylsilane nature with the following trend: 60% ITO-2 > 16% ITO-3 > 9% ITO-1 > 3% ITO-4. The obtained results revealed that, in organosilane 2, the presence of a methyl group on the amide nitrogen increases the steric hindrance in the rotation around the Nsbnd CO bond, resulting in the co-presence of two stable conformers in comparable amounts. Their co-presence in solution, combined with the lack of intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯OCsbnd N hydrogen bonds among the anchored molecules, has dramatic influences on the functionalized ITO, yielding a disorderedly packed coating able to accommodate a large quantity of AuNP. These results indicate that AuNP can act as excellent probes to evaluate the coating layer quality but, at the same time, it is possible to tune the gold loading on electroactive surfaces depending on the chemical structure of the used fluorinated silane.

  6. Counting surface-kernel epimorphisms from a co-compact Fuchsian group to a cyclic group with motivations from string theory and QFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakhast Bibak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphs embedded into surfaces have many important applications, in particular, in combinatorics, geometry, and physics. For example, ribbon graphs and their counting is of great interest in string theory and quantum field theory (QFT. Recently, Koch et al. (2013 [12] gave a refined formula for counting ribbon graphs and discussed its applications to several physics problems. An important factor in this formula is the number of surface-kernel epimorphisms from a co-compact Fuchsian group to a cyclic group. The aim of this paper is to give an explicit and practical formula for the number of such epimorphisms. As a consequence, we obtain an ‘equivalent’ form of Harvey's famous theorem on the cyclic groups of automorphisms of compact Riemann surfaces. Our main tool is an explicit formula for the number of solutions of restricted linear congruence recently proved by Bibak et al. using properties of Ramanujan sums and of the finite Fourier transform of arithmetic functions.

  7. Surface reactivity measurements as required for grouping and read-across: An advanced FRAS protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandon, Arnaud; Werle, Kai; Neubauer, Nicole; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2017-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a widely accepted paradigm associated with different adverse outcomes of particulate matter, including nanomaterials. It has frequently been identified in in vitro and in vivo studies and different assays have been developed for this purpose. Here we describe a newly developed multi-dose protocol of the FRAS assay (Ferric Reduction Ability of Serum). The purpose of this SOP is the measurement of the surface reactivity of nanomaterials under physiological conditions. Antioxidative components as present in human blood serum (HBS) serve as reporter molecules. The assay separates the oxidative damage from the read-out of the reporter molecules. The results show significantly enhanced repeatability with better sensitivity towards low reactivity, enabling application of FRAS both to a rough grouping by reactive vs. passive nanomaterials and further to substantiation of read-across by enhanced resolution of the similarity between different nanoforms of the same substance.

  8. Surface reactivity measurements as required for grouping and read-across: An advanced FRAS protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandon, Arnaud; Werle, Kai; Neubauer, Nicole; Wohlleben, Wendel

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a widely accepted paradigm associated with different adverse outcomes of particulate matter, including nanomaterials. It has frequently been identified in in vitro and in vivo studies and different assays have been developed for this purpose. Here we describe a newly developed multi-dose protocol of the FRAS assay (Ferric Reduction Ability of Serum). The purpose of this SOP is the measurement of the surface reactivity of nanomaterials under physiological conditions. Antioxidative components as present in human blood serum (HBS) serve as reporter molecules. The assay separates the oxidative damage from the read-out of the reporter molecules. The results show significantly enhanced repeatability with better sensitivity towards low reactivity, enabling application of FRAS both to a rough grouping by reactive vs. passive nanomaterials and further to substantiation of read-across by enhanced resolution of the similarity between different nanoforms of the same substance. (paper)

  9. Improvement of surface wetting properties of poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole) by incorporation of ionic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Kaiqing [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Jin Junhong [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Yang Shenglin [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); Li Guang [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)]. E-mail: lig@dhu.edu.cn; Jiang Jianming [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2006-07-25

    Modified poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole), SPBO, containing ionic sulfonate groups was synthesized by polycondensation of the corresponding monomers in polyphosphoric acid. SPBO fiber was spun via a dry-jet wet-spinning technique. The wetting property of poly(p-phenylene benzoxazole) (PBO) fiber and SPBO fiber were measured by contact angle analysis, and the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) between fibers and epoxy was determined by microbond pull-out testing. The contact angles of water and ethanol on SPBO fiber surface get smaller, and the wetting process becomes faster. The surface free energy of SPBO fiber increases to 38.9 mJ m{sup -2}, which is 9.6% higher than that of PBO fiber. Furthermore the ionic introducing leads to a 23% increase in IFSS from 8.2 MPa for PBO/epoxy to 10.1 MPa for SPBO/epoxy. It could be expected that the failure mode may change from fiber/matrix interface adhesive failure to partly cohesive failure mode.

  10. Micrometer-sized TPM emulsion droplets with surface-mobile binding groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; van de Stolpe, Guido L.; Verweij, Ruben W.; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2018-03-01

    Colloids coated with lipid membranes have been widely employed for fundamental studies of lipid membrane processes, biotechnological applications such as drug delivery and biosensing, and more recently, for self-assembly. The latter has been made possible by inserting DNA oligomers with covalently linked hydrophobic anchors into the membrane. The lateral mobility of the DNA linkers on micrometer-sized droplets and solid particles has opened the door to creating structures with unprecedented structural flexibility. Here, we investigate micro-emulsions of TPM (3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate) as a platform for lipid monolayers and further functionalization with proteins and DNA oligonucleotides. TPM droplets can be produced with a narrow size distribution and are polymerizable, thus providing supports for model lipid membranes with controlled size and curvature. With fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we observed that droplet-attached lipids, NeutrAvidin proteins, as well as DNA oligonucleotides all show mobility on the surface. We explored the assembly of micron-sized particles on TPM-droplets by exploiting either avidin-biotin interactions or double-stranded DNA with complementary single-stranded end groups. While the single molecules are mobile, the particles that are attached to them are not. We propose that this is caused by the heterogeneous nature of emulsified TPM, which forms an oligomer network that limits the collective motion of linkers, but allows the surface mobility of individual molecules.

  11. An in vivo strategy to counteract post-administration anticoagulant activity of azido-Warfarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursuegui, Sylvain; Recher, Marion; Krężel, Wojciech; Wagner, Alain

    2017-05-01

    Drugs, usually long acting and metabolically stable molecules, might be the source of adverse effects triggered by complex drug interactions, anaphylaxis and drug-induced coagulopathy. To circumvent this growing drug safety issue, we herein investigate the opportunity offered by bio-orthogonal chemistry for in vivo drug neutralization. We design a small-molecule anticoagulant drug (Warfarin) containing an azide group that acts as a safety pin. It allows drug deactivation and restoration of physiological coagulation via in vivo click reaction with a suitable cyclooctyne-based neutralizing agent. In this strategy, the new molecule formed by reaction of the drug and the antidote is deprived of biological activity and prone to fast renal clearance. This `Click & Clear' approach lays ground for new strategies in designing drugs with switchable biophysical properties.

  12. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling study on the interaction of ctDNA with 3′-deoxy-3′-azido doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Shaoguang; Cui, Yanrui; Liu, Qingfeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Cui, Fengling, E-mail: fenglingcui@hotmail.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Zhang, Guisheng; Chi, Yanwei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Media and Reactions, Ministry of Education, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Peng, Hao [School of Environment, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2013-09-15

    The method of synthesizing 3′-deoxy-3′-azido doxorubicin (ADOX) directly from doxorubicin has been developed. This study presents the interaction between ADOX and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) by using spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling techniques. Iodide quenching, fluorescence polarization, viscosity and molecular modeling studies of ADOX–ctDNA interactions indicated that ADOX was an intercalator of ctDNA and preferentially bound to C–G rich regions of ctDNA. Simultaneously, spectroscopic results indicated that the quenching mechanism of ADOX–ctDNA was a static quenching. According to thermodynamic parameters, electrostatic force played roles in the interaction of ADOX with ctDNA. -- Highlights: ●An approach to 3′-deoxy-3′-azido doxorubicin (ADOX) from doxorubicin was developed. ●The quenching mechanism of ADOX with ctDNA was a static quenching type. ●The binding mode between ADOX and ctDNA was intercalative binding. ●The results of molecular docking corroborated results of spectra investigations.

  13. OPA quantification of amino groups at the surface of lipidic nanocapsules (LNCs) for ligand coupling improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Thomas; Fouchet, Florian; Bastiat, Guillaume; Saulnier, Patrick; Benoît, Jean-Pierre

    2011-10-31

    Lipidic NanoCapsules (LNCs) were prepared via an emulsion phase inversion method. Nanoparticles with hydrodynamic diameter of 25, 50 and 100 nm were easily obtained. Their surfaces are covered with short PEG chains (PEG 660) which are not bearing any chemical reactivities. Thus, in order to overcome this handicap towards post-functionalization possibilities, post-insertion of DSPE-PEG2000 amino (DSPA) can be employed. In order to characterize the insertion step, we have developed a chemical assay for the quantification of amino group inside the PEG shell of LNCs. Subsequently, the post-insertion yield was found to be comprised between 60 and 90% whatever the hydrodynamic diameter of the LNCs is. By means of simple calculations, the density of amino group is estimated to be closed to 0.2 and 1.2 molecules/nm(2). The formulation of LNCs and their controlled functionalization represent an interesting system for the development of bionanoconjugates in a short and effective process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Introduction of sulfate groups on poly(ethylene) surfaces by argon plasma immobilization of sodium alkyl sulfates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, J.P.; Lens, J.P.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Feijen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Sulfate groups were introduced at the surface of poly(ethylene) (PE) samples. This was accomplished by immobilizing a precoated layer of either sodium 10-undecene sulfate (S11(:)) or sodium dodecane sulfate (SDS) on the polymeric surface by means of an argon plasma treatment. For this purpose,

  15. Soil surface protection by Biocrusts: effects of functional groups on textural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concostrina-Zubiri, Laura; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Martínez, Isabel; Flores Flores, José Luis; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-04-01

    In drylands, where vegetation cover is commonly scarce, soil surface is prone to wind and water soil erosion, with the subsequent loss of topsoil structure and chemical properties. These processes are even more pronounced in ecosystems subjected to extra erosive forces, such as grasslands and rangelands that support livestock production. However, some of the physiological and functional traits of biocrusts (i.e., complex association of cyanobacteria, lichens, mosses, fungi and soil particles) make them ideal to resist in disturbed environments and at the same time to protect soil surface from mechanical perturbations. In particular, the filaments and exudates of soil cyanobacteria and the rhizines of lichen can bind together soil particles, forming soil aggregates at the soil surface and thus enhancing soil stability. Also, they act as "biological covers" that preserve the most vulnerable soil layer from wind and runoff erosion and raindrop impact, maintaining soil structure and composition. In this work, we evaluated soil textural properties and organic matter content under different functional groups of biocrusts (i.e., cyanobacteria crust, 3 lichen species, 1 moss species) and in bare soil. In order to assess the impact of livestock trampling on soil properties and on Biocrust function, we sampled three sites conforming a disturbance gradient (low, medium and high impact sites) and a long-term livestock exclusion as control site. We found that the presence of biocrusts had little effects on soil textural properties and organic matter content in the control site, while noticeable differences were found between bare soil and soil under biocrusts (e.g., up to 16-37% higher clay content, compared to bare soil and up to 10% higher organic matter content). In addition, we found that depending on morphological traits and grazing regime, the effects of biocrusts changed along the gradient. For example, soil under the lichen Diploschistes diacapsis, with thick thallus

  16. Surface engineering of Ti-O films by photochemical immobilization of gelatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Y.J.; Ren, J.R.; Huang, N.; Wang, J.; Chen, J.Y.; Leng, Y.X.; Liu, H.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Crystalline Ti-O films were prepared by unbalanced magnetron sputtering and the structure was confirmed by XRD. An organic layer of 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid (APP) was first introduced on the Ti-O films by self-assembling. The stability of the APP on Ti-O films was confirmed by XPS and FTIR analysis. Simultaneously, azido group was introduced in gelatin molecule to act as photoreactive point. The derivated gelatin was spin-coated onto the self-assembled layer and immobilized by UV irradiating. Chemical patterned surface was obtained by using a photomask when irradiating and confirmed by sirius red staining and surface profile analysis. Measured by surface profilometer, the thickness of the immobilized gelatin was about 5-20 nm. The adhering of human endothelial EVC304 cells on APP modified surface was enhanced in the cell culture test. Moreover, the adherence and growth of cells were prior on gelatin-immobilized region visually seen on the patterned surface. This result indicated gelatin-immobilized Ti-O surface can serve as a biocompatible biomaterial for endothelialization

  17. AIMS simulation study of ultrafast electronically nonadiabatic chemistry of methyl azide and UV-VIS spectroscopic study of azido-based energetic plasticizer bis(1,3-diazido prop-2-yl)malonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Jayanta; Banerjee, Shaibal; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2017-09-01

    To gain insight into the ultrafast electronically nonadiabatic chemistry of azido-based energetic plasticizer, we have explored the nonadiabatic chemical dynamics of an azido-based model analog molecule, methyl azide (MAz), using ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulation and electronic structure theory calculations. Molecular nitrogen (N2) is predicted to be the initial product of MAz following its electronic excitation to the S1 electronically excited state. AIMS-based simulation reveals that electronically excited azido-based molecules undergo extremely fast (approximately in 40 femtoseconds) relaxation to the ground state via the (S1/S0)CI conical intersection. Furthermore, this relaxation process involves the Nsbnd N bond elongation along with the bending of N3 moiety. This is the first report on the electronically non-adiabatic chemical dynamics (in ultrafast time domain) of methyl azide. Finally, using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy, we comment on the electronically nonadiabatic chemistry of azido-based energetic plasticizer, bis(1,3-diazido prop-2-yl)malonate.

  18. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig; Casey, Kenneth; Minnett, Peter; Corlett, Gary

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, satellite Agencies, science, operational user/producer and Sea Surface Temperature practitioner communities have come together within the Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) to create a new framework for generation, delivery and application of improved common format high-resolution (~1-10 km) satellite SST datasets for the benefit of society. The GHRSST data system is a mature, robust, and highly reliable near real time and delayed mode data system known as the GHRSST Regional/Global Task Sharing framework (R/GTS) and has operated in NRT since 2006. It consists of distributed Regional Data Assembly Centers (RDACs) around the world that submit their data to a Global Data Assembly Center (GDAC) maintained at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC), where all the data are available for 30 days. After that they are transferred to the GHRSST Long Term Stewardship and Reanalysis Facility (LTSRF) at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) for long-term preservation and distribution. The extensive user base includes many operational meteorological services, the scientific community, industry and Government. Since the R/GTS has operated, statistics show over 72,000 users have accessed the R/GTS in NRT, accessing over 100 million files amounting to more than 232 Tb of information. GHRSST has an organisation structure that has both fixed and flexible components allowing it to respond effectively and efficiently to new and emerging challenges. GHRSST has often been cited as a model for other Virtual Communities/Constellations. GHRSST is underpinned by an international Science Team and International Project Office together. Long-standing GHRSST Technical Advisory Groups (TAG) and ad hoc Working Groups (WG) are typically at the "cutting edge" of international SST activities delivering real coordination in space-based Earth observations for societal benefit through the prioritized

  19. On the organization and thermal behavior of functional groups on Ti3C2 MXene surfaces in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingemar; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Halim, Joseph; Barsoum, Michel W.; Darakchieva, Vanya; Palisaitis, Justinas; Rosen, Johanna; Persson, Per O. Å.

    2018-03-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) MXene Ti3C2T x is functionalized by surface groups (T x ) that determine its surface properties for, e.g. electrochemical applications. The coordination and thermal properties of these surface groups has, to date, not been investigated at the atomic level, despite strong variations in the MXene properties that are predicted from different coordinations and from the identity of the functional groups. To alleviate this deficiency, and to characterize the functionalized surfaces of single MXene sheets, the present investigation combines atomically resolved in situ heating in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and STEM simulations with temperature-programmed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TP-XPS) in the room temperature to 750 °C range. Using these techniques, we follow the surface group coordination at the atomic level. It is concluded that the F and O atoms compete for the DFT-predicted thermodynamically preferred site and that at room temperature that site is mostly occupied by F. At higher temperatures, F desorbs and is replaced by O. Depending on the O/F ratio, the surface bare MXene is exposed as F desorbs, which enables a route for tailored surface functionalization.

  20. Acid-base properties and the chemical imaging of surface-bound functional groups studied with scanning force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegte, E.W.; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a scanning force microscopy (SFM) study on electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between chemically modified SFM probes and surface functional groups. pH-dependent adhesion force measurements in aqueous media between various ionizable functional groups showed a

  1. First principles investigations on the electronic structure of anchor groups on ZnO nanowires and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, A.; Lorke, M.; Rosa, A. L.; Frauenheim, Th.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Dalpian, G. M.; Rocha, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We report on density functional theory investigations of the electronic properties of monofunctional ligands adsorbed on ZnO-(1010) surfaces and ZnO nanowires using semi-local and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We consider three anchor groups, namely thiol, amino, and carboxyl groups. Our results indicate that neither the carboxyl nor the amino group modify the transport and conductivity properties of ZnO. In contrast, the modification of the ZnO surface and nanostructure with thiol leads to insertion of molecular states in the band gap, thus suggesting that functionalization with this moiety may customize the optical properties of ZnO nanomaterials.

  2. A dinuclear end-on azide-bridged copper(II) compound with weak antiferromagnetic interaction - Synthesis, characterization, magnetism and X-ray structure of bis[(μ-azido-κN1)-(azido-κN1)(1,3-bis(benzimidazol-2-yl)-2-methylpropane)copper(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Albada, Gerard A.; Mutikainen, Ilpo; Roubeau, Olivier; Reedijk, Jan

    2013-03-01

    The centrosymmetric dinuclear compound of formula [Cu(μ-N3-κN1)(N3-κN1)(bbmp)]2 is reported. Synthesis, characterization, physical properties are determined in detail, together with its 3D structure. The dinuclear end-on azide-bridged copper(II) compound displays a weak antiferromagnetic interaction, despite the fact that the magnetic orbitals overlap. The Cu-Cu contact distance is 3.1867(8) Å, while the Cu-Nazide-Cu angle is 103.41(14)°. The IR spectra of the azido ligands are as expected for such coordinated azides.

  3. Adhesion of coagulase-negative staphylococci grouped according to physico-chemical surface properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, HC; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Reid, G; Bialkowska-Hobrzanska, H; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    Physico-chemical cell surface properties of 23 coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains, including contact angles, zeta potentials and elemental cell surface composition were measured, together with the adhesion of all strains to hexadecane, The data were employed in a hierarchical cluster

  4. Reversal of brain metabolic abnormalities following treatment of AIDS dementia complex with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine): a PET-FDG study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetti, A.; Berg, G.; Di Chiro, G.

    1989-01-01

    Brain glucose metabolism was evaluated in four patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex using [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans at the beginning of therapy with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine), and later in the course of therapy. In two patients, baseline, large focal cortical abnormalities of glucose utilization were reversed during the course of therapy. In the other two patients, the initial PET study did not reveal pronounced focal alterations, while the post-treatment scans showed markedly increased cortical glucose metabolism. The improved cortical glucose utilization was accompanied in all patients by immunologic and neurologic improvement. PET-FDG studies can detect cortical metabolic abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia complex, and may be used to monitor the metabolic improvement in response to AZT treatment

  5. Synthesis of 3'-azido and 3'-aminoarabinonucleoside 5'-triphosphates and study of their substrate properties in systems with polynucleotide-synthesizing enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papchikhin, A.V.; Purygin, P.P.; Azhaev, A.V.; Kraevskii, A.A.; Kutateladze, T.V.; Chidzhavadze, Z.G.; Bibilashvili, R.Sh.

    1986-01-01

    5'-Triphosphates of 3'-azido- and 3'-amino-3'-deoxyarabinonucleosides containing adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine residues have been synthesized. Their substrate properties in cell-free systems with E. coli DNA polymerase I, calf thymus DNA polymerase α, phage T4 DNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase coded by the avian myeloblastosis virus, and also calf thymus terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase have been studied. It has been shown that aNTP(3'NH 2 ) and aNTP(3'-N 3 ), act as DNA-chain-terminating substrates for DNA polymerase α, phage T4 DNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, and terminal transferase. On the other hand, DNA polymerase I makes practically no use of these compounds as substrates

  6. Annotated bibliography for liquid metal surface tensions of groups III-A, IV-A, and V-A metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1976-04-01

    An annotated bibliography has been prepared which includes summaries of 82 publications dating from 1920 and dealing with the measurement of the surface tensions of Groups III-A, IV-A, and V-A metals in the liquid state. The bibliography is organized by key element investigated, and contains a tabulation of correlations for surface tension as a function of temperature. A brief discussion dealing with variables and methods has been included

  7. Rational design of novel anti-microtubule agent (9-azido-noscapine) from quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) evaluation of noscapinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoshi, Seneha; Naik, Pradeep K; Joshi, Harish C

    2011-10-01

    An anticough medicine, noscapine [(S)-3-((R)4-methoxy-6-methyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-[1,3]dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquinolin-5-yl)-6,7-dimethoxyiso-benzofuran-1(3H)-one], was discovered in the authors' laboratory as a novel type of tubulin-binding agent that mitigates polymerization dynamics of microtubule polymers without changing overall subunit-polymer equilibrium. To obtain systematic insight into the relationship between the structural framework of noscapine scaffold and its antitumor activity, the authors synthesized strategic derivatives (including two new ones in this article). The IC(50) values of these analogs vary from 1.2 to 56.0 µM in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells (CEM). Geometrical optimization was performed using semiempirical quantum chemical calculations at the 3-21G* level. Structures were in agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of molecular flexibility in solution and crystal structures. A genetic function approximation algorithm of variable selection was used to generate the quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model. The robustness of the QSAR model (R(2) = 0.942) was analyzed by values of the internal cross-validated regression coefficient (R(2) (LOO) = 0.815) for the training set and determination coefficient (R(2) (test) = 0.817) for the test set. Validation was achieved by rational design of further novel and potent antitumor noscapinoid, 9-azido-noscapine, and reduced 9-azido-noscapine. The experimentally determined value of pIC(50) for both the compounds (5.585 M) turned out to be very close to predicted pIC(50) (5.731 and 5.710 M).

  8. Photoluminescence effects of graphitic core size and surface functional groups in carbon dots: COO− induced red-shift emission

    KAUST Repository

    Hola, Katerina

    2014-04-01

    We present a simple molecular approach to control the lipophilic/ hydrophilic nature of photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) based on pyrolysis of alkyl gallate precursors. Depending on the gallic acid derivative used, CDs with different alkyl groups (methyl, propyl, lauryl) on the surface can be obtained by isothermal heating at 270 C. This precursor-derived approach allows not only the control of lipophilicity but also the length of the particular alkyl chain enables the control over both the size and photoluminescence (PL) of the prepared CDs. Moreover, the alkyl chains on the CDs surface can be readily converted to carboxylate groups via a mild base hydrolysis to obtain water dispersible CDs with a record biocompatibility. The observed differences in PL properties of CDs and time-resolved PL data, including contributions from carbogenic cores and surface functional group, are rationalized and discussed in detail using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimum design of amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic groups for both cell surface ligand presentation and intercellular cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Masafumi; Li, Cuicui; Matsuda, Masayoshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Hatanaka, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic alkyl groups are expected to be applicable for both ligand presentation on the cell surface and intercellular crosslinking. To explore the optimum design for each application, we synthesized eight different acyl-modified dextrans with varying molecular weight, alkyl length, and alkyl modification degree. We found that the behenate-modified polymers retained on the cell surface longer than the palmitate-modified ones. Since the polymers were also modified with biotin, streptavidin can be presented on the cell surface through biotin-streptavidin recognition. The duration of streptavidin on the cell surface is longer in the behenate-modified polymer than the palmitate-modified one. As for the intercellular crosslinking, the palmitate-modified polymers were more efficient than the behenate-modified polymers. The findings in this research will be helpful to design the acyl-modified polymers for the cell surface engineering.

  10. Dissociation and recombination rate constants for CN on Cu and Ni group transition metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Harrell

    2000-07-01

    We report dissociation and recombination reaction rate constants for CN on the fcc(111) surfaces of Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag and Au from molecular dynamics simulations employing our normalized bond index-reactive potential functions (NBI-RPF). The Arrhenius pre-exponentials for recombination of CN on these surfaces are about three orders of magnitude greater than the dissociation pre-exponentials. On the series of metals considered herein, the reaction energetics favor dissociation on the more active metals and favor recombination on the least active metals. However, the differences in the pre-exponentials of nearly a factor of 10 3 express the tendency of the reaction entropy to favor the recombination on the surfaces investigated. We also discuss the implications of these results in terms of the thermodynamics of the surface reactions.

  11. Influence of the pre-adsorption of group III metals on the growth of Ge nanostructures on vicinal Si surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speckmann, Moritz; Schmidt, Thomas; Flege, Jan Ingo; Heidmann, Inga; Hoecker, Jan; Wilkens, Torsten; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The employment of metals as surfactants (surface active agents) is a promising approach to influence the growth of Ge nanostructures on Si surfaces. Especially for group III and group V elements an enhanced or suppressed Stranski-Krastanov growth behaviour is found, respectively. For all group III metal on silicon systems presented in this study we observe a drastic change of the surface morphology after adsorption of a few monolayers. For the investigations we used a variety of surface sensitive techniques, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), spot profile analysing low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM), and X-ray standing waves (XSW). On the one hand, the adsorption of Ga and In leads to a smoothening of the intrinsically unstable Si(112) surface and the development of 1D metal chains. But on the other hand, the stable Si(113) is decomposed into a regular array of nanofacets after adsorption of Ga. For all cases shown here the possibility of growing highly anisotropic Ge Islands is demonstrated (Ga/Si(113),Ga/Si(112),In/Si(112)).

  12. Interaction between two solid surfaces across PDMS : influence of chain length and end group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, G.X.; Stark, R.; Kappl, M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Butt, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Forces between solid surfaces across polymer melts are poorly understood despite their importance for adhesion and composite materials. Using an atomic force microscope (AFM) this force was measured for poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) on silicon oxide. The influence of molecular weight (4.0-40 kDa)

  13. Solubility studies of inorganic–organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.

  14. Enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles by surface-capping DBS groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baiqi; Jing Liqiang; Qu Yichun; Li Shudan; Jiang Baojiang; Yang Libin; Xin Baifu; Fu Honggang

    2006-01-01

    TiO 2 nanoparticles capped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) are synthesized by a sol-hydrothermal process using tetrabutyl titanate and DBS as raw materials. The effects of surface-capping DBS on the surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS), photoluminescence (PL) and photocatalytic performance of TiO 2 nanoparticles are principally investigated together with their relationships. The results show that the surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles can be well capped by DBS groups while the pH value and added DBS amount are controlled at 5.0 and 2% of TiO 2 mass weight, respectively, and the linkage between DBS groups and TiO 2 surfaces is mainly by means of quasi-sulphonate bond. The intensities of SPS and PL spectra of TiO 2 obviously decrease after DBS-capping, while the activity can greatly increase during the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) solution, which are mainly attributed to the electron-withdrawing character of the DBS groups. Moreover, the enhancement of photocatalytic activity of DBS-capped TiO 2 is also related to the increase in the capability for adsorbing RhB

  15. Comment on Group Velocity Measurement of Surfac Waves by Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Okamoto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Yamada and Yomogida (1997 applied the discrete wavelet transform (DWT to group velocity measurements for the first time. Although their study is one of the pioneering works in application of DWT to seismological analysis, their method gives an inaccurate value as a group velocity in some cases and requires modification. In this report, we point out the problem and propose a modified DWT method for overcoming the problem. In our method, DWT is carried out not for an analysed signal itself but for its complex envelope (Farnbach 1975. A computation algorithm for DWT coefficients for our method is given and shown to be almost the same as that by Yamada and Ohkitani (1991. The influence of the difference between the conventional method and our method on identification of group arrival times of a wave is also shown by a numerical experiment. If analysts want to identify group arrival times using DWT, our method must be adopted instead of the conventional method.

  16. A chord diagrammatic presentation of the mapping class group of a once bordered surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bene, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The Ptolemy groupoid is a combinatorial groupoid generated by elementary moves on marked trivalent fatgraphs with three types of relations. Through the fatgraph decomposition of Teichmüller space, the Ptolemy groupoid is a mapping class group equivariant subgroupoid of the fundamental path groupo...

  17. The Exponential Map of the Group of Area-Preserving Diffeomorphisms of a Surface with Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, James; Misiołek, Gerard; Preston, Stephen C.

    2018-03-01

    We prove that the Riemannian exponential map of the right-invariant L 2 metric on the group of volume-preserving diffeomorphisms of a two-dimensional manifold with a nonempty boundary is a nonlinear Fredholm map of index zero.

  18. On the lipid head group hydration of floating surface monolayers bound to self-assembled molecular protein layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Erdelen, C.; Rump, E.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of monomolecular layers of the protein streptavidin, specifically bound to biotin-functionalized lipid monolayers at aqueous surfaces, has been characterized. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity measurements allowed an assessment of the organization of these self-assembled systems...... with molecular resolution. Emphasis here is placed on the hydration of the lipid head groups in the bound state. For three functionalized lipids with spacers of different lengths between the biotin and their chains it was observed that the head groups were dehydrated in monolayers of the pure lipids, which were...... kept at low surface pressure before protein adsorption. The introduction of dipole moments at the interface by the admixture of phospholipids or the application of lateral pressure on the lipid monolayer before protein adsorption were found to impose an extension of the spacer moieties. The biotin...

  19. Progress in the synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles with amino groups on the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdureanu-Angheluta, A.; Dascalu, A.; Fifere, A.; Coroaba, A.; Pricop, L.; Chiriac, H.; Tura, V.; Pinteala, M.; Simionescu, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript deals with the synthesis of new hydrophilic magnetite particles by employing a two-step method: in the first step magnetite particles with hydrophobic shell formed in presence of oleic acid–oleylamine complex through a synthesis in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle were obtained; while in the second step the hydrophobic shell was interchanged with an aminosilane monomer. The influence of the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ molar ratio on the dimension of the particles of high importance for their potential applications was carefully investigated. This paper, also presents an alternative method of synthesis of new core-shell magnetite particles and the complete study of their structure and morphology by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, ESEM and TEM techniques. The rheological properties and magnetization analysis of high importance for magnetic particles were also investigated. - Highlights: ► Magnetite particles are superparamagnetic materials. ► Magnetite has significant role in nanotechnology due to surface properties and applicability in physical and chemical processes. ► We used an ecological method of synthesis, a reaction in mass, without solvent, in a mortar with pestle. ► We prepared hydrophilic magnetite particles, precursors for biomedical applications.

  20. Silicon surface biofunctionalization with dopaminergic tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena-Serrano, A.; Lucena-Serrano, C.; Contreras-Cáceres, R.; Díaz, A.; Valpuesta, M. [Dep. Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Cai, C. [Dep. Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); López-Romero, J.M., E-mail: jmromero@uma.es [Dep. Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two dopaminergic tetrahydroisoquinolines (THI) were synthesized. • Vinyl-terminated THI incorporated onto the H−Si(1 1 1) substrates via a hydrosilylation. • The highest yield in coverage was obtained in DMSO, at 4 h of irradiation and 0.1 mbar of vacuum. • Alkynyl-terminated Si surface was produced for incorporation of azide-THI by click reaction. • Best yields on grafted molecule were obtained by click reaction in absence of ascorbic acid. - Abstract: In this work we grafted vinyl- and azido-terminated tetrahydroisoquinolines (compounds 1 and 2, respectively) onto H−Si(1 1 1) silicon wafers obtaining highly stable modified surfaces. A double bond was incorporated into the tetrahydroisoquinoline structure of 1 to be immobilized by a light induced hydrosilylation reaction on hydrogen-terminated Si(1 1 1). The best results were obtained employing a polar solvent (DMSO), rather than a non-polar solvent (toluene). The azide derivative 2 was grafted onto alkenyl-terminated silicon substrates with copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). Atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) were used to demonstrate the incorporation of 1 and 2 into the surfaces, study the morphology of the modified surfaces and to calculate the yield of grafting and surface coverage. CA measurements showed the increase in the surface hydrophobicity when 1 or 2 were incorporated into the surface. Moreover, compounds 1 and 2 were prepared starting from 1-(p-nitrophenyl)tetrahydroisoquinoline 3 under smooth conditions and in good yields. The structures of 1 and 2 were designed with a reduced A-ring, two substituents at positions C-6 and C-7, an N-methyl group and a phenyl moiety at C-1 in order to provide a high affinity against dopaminergic receptors. Moreover, O-demethylation of 1 was carried out once it was adsorbed onto the surface by treatment with BBr{sub 3}. The method

  1. Fischer carbene mediated covalent grafting of a peptide nucleic acid on gold surfaces and IR optical detection of DNA hybridization with a transition metalcarbonyl label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pratima; Ghasemi, Mahsa; Ray, Namrata; Sarkar, Amitabha; Kocabova, Jana; Lachmanova, Stepanka; Hromadova, Magdalena; Boujday, Souhir; Cauteruccio, Silvia; Thakare, Pramod; Licandro, Emanuela; Fosse, Céline; Salmain, Michèle

    2016-11-01

    Amine-reactive surfaces comprising N-hydroxysuccinimide ester groups as well as much more unusual Fischer alkoxymetallocarbene groups were generated on gold-coated surfaces via self-assembled monolayers of carboxy- and azido-terminated thiolates, respectively. These functions were further used to immobilize homothymine peptide nucleic acid (PNA) decamer in a covalent fashion involving the primary amine located at its N-terminus. These stepwise processes were monitored by polarization modulation reflection - absorption infrared spectroscopy (PM-RAIRS) that gave useful information on the molecular composition of the organic layers. PNA grafting and hybridization with complementary DNA strand were successfully transduced by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. Unfortunately, attempts to transduce the hybridization optically by IR in a label-free fashion were inconclusive. Therefore we undertook to introduce an IR reporter group, namely a transition metalcarbonyl (TMC) entity at the 5‧ terminus of complementary DNA. Evidence for the formation of PNA-DNA heteroduplex was brought by the presence of ν(Ctbnd O) bands in the 2000 cm-1 region of the IR spectrum of the gold surface owing to the metalcarbonyl label.

  2. Tuning the apparent formal potential of covalently attached ferrocene using SAM bearing ionizable -COOH groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Covalent attachment of ethynylferrocene on the mixed SAM using “click” chemistry. • Control of redox potential at the plane of electron transfer by double layer effect. • Effect of pH of the medium on the redox potential of covalently attached ferrocene. • Change of redox potential of ethynylferrocene with variation of chain length of the diluent and the surface coverage. -- Abstract: A method of tuning the apparent formal potential at the interface between the electrode surface covered with carboxylate thiol self assembled monolayer (SAM) and the solution containing electrolytes is reported. Redox active ferrocene moiety has been covalently attached to the terminal azido groups in the SAM using “click” chemistry. Cyclic voltammetry experiments show that the reduction potential of this ferrocene moiety can be tuned easily from 0.345 V to 0.200 V, i.e. by 145 mV by varying the chain length of the thiol carboxylic acid diluents, changing the pH of the electrolytic solution and by changing the coverage of the surface. Using the (applying the theory of interfacial potential distribution by Smith and White and including the Stern layer effect on the potential of the redox species at the interface proposed by Fawcett) modified Nernst equation the shift of apparent formal potential of redox species at the interface has been analyzed when the chain length of the diluents, pH of the solution and coverage of the surface are changed. The data indicate that the phenomenon is governed by the ionizable polar head groups SAM, i.e. -COOH which changes the interfacial microenvironment around the redox active ferrocene centre

  3. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5

  4. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5.

  5. Skidding accidents : considerations on road surface and vehicle characteristics : summary of the present situation. Provisional recommendation concerning skidding resistance of road surfaces investigation programme. Interim report of the SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents"

    1970-01-01

    This is the first report of SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents". Skidding is considered to be an important contributory factor in traffic accidents. Skidding can in principle be prevented in two ways, viz: (1) reduction of the minimum necessary friction, and (2)

  6. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-01-01

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition

  7. Group method analysis of mixed convection stagnation-point flow of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a vertical stretching surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabwey, Hossam A.; Boumazgour, Mohamed; Rashad, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    The group method analysis is applied to study the steady mixed convection stagnation-point flow of a non-Newtonian nanofluid towards a vertical stretching surface. The model utilized for the nanofluid incorporates the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Applying the one-parameter transformation group which reduces the number of independent variables by one and thus, the system of governing partial differential equations has been converted to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and these equations are then computed numerically using the implicit finite-difference scheme. Comparison with previously published studies is executed and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. Results for the velocity, temperature, and the nanoparticle volume fraction profiles as well as the local skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are presented in graphical and tabular forms, and discussed for different values of the governing parameters to show interesting features of the solutions.

  8. Examining Patients' and Other Group Members' Agreement about Their Alliance to the Group as a Whole and Changes in Patient Symptoms Using Response Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Coco, Gianluca; Gullo, Salvatore; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of research examining patients' and other group members' agreement about their therapeutic alliance. In the present study, the person-group (P-G) fit model was adopted to predict that the group member symptom reduction will be greater when the group member's and the other group members' perceptions of their alliance to the…

  9. Specific effects of surface carboxyl groups on anionic polystyrene particles in their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiue; Musyanovych, Anna; Röcker, Carlheinz; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Nanoparticle uptake by living cells is governed by chemical interactions between functional groups on the nanoparticle as well as the receptors on cell surfaces. Here we have investigated the uptake of anionic polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles of ~100 nm diameter by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using spinning-disk confocal optical microscopy combined with a quantitative analysis of the fluorescence images. Two types of anionic PS nanoparticles with essentially identical sizes and ζ-potentials were employed in this study, carboxyl-functionalized nanoparticles (CPS) and plain PS nanoparticles, both coated with anionic detergent for stabilization. CPS nanoparticles were observed to internalize more rapidly and accumulate to a much higher level than plain PS nanoparticles. The relative importance of different uptake mechanisms for the two types of nanoparticles was investigated by using specific inhibitors. CPS nanoparticles were internalized mainly via the clathrin-mediated mechanism, whereas plain PS nanoparticles mainly utilized the macropinocytosis pathway. The pronounced difference in the internalization behavior of CPS and plain PS nanoparticles points to a specific interaction of the carboxyl group with receptors on the cell surface.

  10. Synthesis of {Alpha}-azido-oximes from chiral cyclo-hexanones. Conformation monitoring by NMR; Sintese de {alpha}-azido-oximas a partir de cicloexanonas quirais: acompanhamento conformacional por ressonancia magnetica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, R.J.; Fontes Prado, M.A.; Oliveira, A.B. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia; Souza Filho, J.D. de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; GArcia, J.I.; Olesker, A.; Lukacs, G. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Chimie des Substances Naturelles

    1993-12-31

    Carbon hydrates are the greatest source of chirality due to a large number of functional groups. Such compounds present preferential conformations, which result in reactions which high level of stereo-selectivity. This work is concerned to the preparation of intermediates to several other synthesis of biological interest and how the above mentioned properties influence these synthesis 6 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Skin tumorigenesis and Ki-ras and Ha-ras mutations in tumors from adult mice exposed in utero to 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Diwan, B A; Anderson, L M; Logsdon, D; Olivero, O A; Haines, D C; Rice, J M; Yuspa, S H; Poirier, M C

    1998-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the potential initiating effects of transplacental 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymine (AZT) and the role of ras mutational activation in skin tumors induced in a two-stage mouse skin model. In addition, mouse liver and lung tumors from a transplacental AZT tumorigenicity study reported elsewhere (Olivero et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 89:1602-1608, 1997) were examined for evidence of ras activation. For both tumor studies, pregnant CD-1 mice were given either vehicle or 25 mg of AZT daily on days 12-18 of gestation. In the 1997 study, the offspring were given no further exposure and were killed at 1 yr of age. For the skin tumor study, all mice received twice-weekly topical 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment from weeks 5-35; half of the mice had been exposed to AZT in utero. At weeks 16-18, 30, 31, and 34-41, the skin tumor incidences in mice given AZT and TPA were significantly higher than in mice given TPA alone (P A transition in the second base, and the major mutation in codon 13 (six in seven tumors examined) was a G-->T transversion in the second base. In skin tumors, AZT exposure did not increase the number of Ha-ras codon 61 mutations, and no Ki-ras mutations were observed. Analysis of ras mutations in liver and lung tumors from mice exposed to AZT in utero (Olivero et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 89:16021608, 1997) with no TPA promotion showed no significant AZT-related increases.

  12. Non-bridging ligand effects on the kinetics of reduction of chloro- and azido-pentaamminecobalt(III by some polypyridyl complexes of ruthenium(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayinka A. Oyetunji

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Pentaamminecobalt(III complexes, [Co(NH35X]2+ (X = Cl-, N3-, are reduced by [Ru(bipy3]2+ and [Ru(terpy(bipyCl] + in aqueous media at a constant ionic strength of 0.5 M (HCl/LiCl. At 308 K, the second order rate constants (M-1 s-1 are as follows: 17.9 for the reduction of the azidocobalt(III complex by [Ru(bipy3]2+, and 1.41 and 2.63 for the [Ru(terpy(bipyCl]+ reduction of the azido- and chlorocobalt(III complexes, respectively. Activation enthalpies (ΔH‡ and entropies (ΔS‡ were determined from temperature dependence measurements with the following results: ΔH‡= 72.1 kJ mol-1 and ΔS‡ = 13.3 J mol-1 K-1 for the [Ru(bipy3]2+ reduction of the azidocobalt(III complex, while for the reduction of the cobalt(III complexes by [Ru(terpy(bipyCl] +, ΔH‡ (N3- = 20.3 kJ mol-1, ΔH‡ (Cl- = 40.6 kJ mol-1, ΔS‡(N3- = -177 J mol-1 K-1, and ΔS‡ (Cl- = -106 J mol-1 K-1. The relative rates of electron transfer in the different reactions and the influence of π-acceptor ligands on the ruthenium(II reduction of the cobalt(III complexes are discussed.

  13. 2-Azido-( sup 32 P)NAD+, a photoactivatable probe for G-protein structure: Evidence for holotransducin oligomers in which the ADP-ribosylated carboxyl terminus of alpha interacts with both alpha and gamma subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaillancourt, R.R.; Dhanasekaran, N.; Johnson, G.L.; Ruoho, A.E. (Univ. of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A radioactive and photoactivatable derivative of NAD+, 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)NAD+, has been synthesized and used with pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate Cys347 of the alpha subunit (alpha T) of GT, the retinal guanine nucleotide-binding protein. ADP-ribosylation of alpha T followed by light activation of the azide moiety of 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)ADP-ribose produced four crosslinked species involving the alpha and gamma subunits of the GT heterotrimer: an alpha trimer (alpha-alpha-alpha), and alpha-alpha-gamma crosslink, an alpha dimer (alpha-alpha), and an alpha-gamma crosslink. The alpha trimer, alpha-alpha-gamma complex, alpha dimer, and alpha-gamma complexes were immunoreactive with alpha T antibodies. The alpha-alpha-gamma and the alpha-gamma complexes were immunoreactive with antisera recognizing gamma subunits. No evidence was found for crosslinking of alpha T to beta T subunits. Hydrolysis of the thioglycosidic bond between Cys347 and 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)ADP-ribose using mercuric acetate resulted in the transfer of radiolabel from Cys347 of alpha T in the crosslinked oligomers to alpha monomers, indicative of intermolecular photocrosslinking, and to gamma monomers, indicative of either intermolecular crosslinked complexes (between heterotrimers) or intramolecular crosslinked complexes (within the heterotrimer). These results demonstrate that GT exists as an oligomer and that ADP-ribosylated Cys347, which is four residues from the alpha T-carboxyl terminus, is oriented toward and in close proximity to the gamma subunit.

  14. Quantitative chemical derivatization technique in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry for surface amine groups on plasma-polymerized ethylenediamine film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinmo; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Jung, Donggeun; Moon, Dae Won; Han, Sang Yun; Lee, Tae Geol

    2005-07-01

    A chemical derivatization technique in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has been developed to quantify the surface density of amine groups of plasma-polymerized ethylenediamine thin film deposited on a glass surface by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition. Chemical tags of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde or pentafluorobenzaldehyde were hybridized with the surface amine groups and were detected in TOF-SIMS spectra as characteristic molecular secondary ions. The surface amine density was controlled in a reproducible manner as a function of deposition plasma power and was also quantified using UV-visible spectroscopy. A good linear correlation was observed between the results of TOF-SIMS and UV-visible measurements as a function of plasma power. This shows that the chemical derivatization technique in TOF-SIMS analysis would be useful in quantifying the surface density of specific functional groups that exist on the organic surface.

  15. The Optimisation of the Expression of Recombinant Surface Immunogenic Protein of Group B Streptococcus in Escherichia coli by Response Surface Methodology Improves Humoral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Dinamarca, Diego A; Jerias, José I; Soto, Daniel A; Soto, Jorge A; Díaz, Natalia V; Leyton, Yessica Y; Villegas, Rodrigo A; Kalergis, Alexis M; Vásquez, Abel E

    2018-03-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of neonatal meningitis and a common pathogen in livestock and aquaculture industries around the world. Conjugate polysaccharide and protein-based vaccines are under development. The surface immunogenic protein (SIP) is a conserved protein in all GBS serotypes and has been shown to be a good target for vaccine development. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli cells has been shown to be useful in the development of vaccines, and the protein purification is a factor affecting their immunogenicity. The response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design can optimise the performance in the expression of recombinant proteins. However, the biological effect in mice immunised with an immunogenic protein that is optimised by RSM and purified by low-affinity chromatography is unknown. In this study, we used RSM for the optimisation of the expression of the rSIP, and we evaluated the SIP-specific humoral response and the property to decrease the GBS colonisation in the vaginal tract in female mice. It was observed by NI-NTA chromatography that the RSM increases the yield in the expression of rSIP, generating a better purification process. This improvement in rSIP purification suggests a better induction of IgG anti-SIP immune response and a positive effect in the decreased GBS intravaginal colonisation. The RSM applied to optimise the expression of recombinant proteins with immunogenic capacity is an interesting alternative in the evaluation of vaccines in preclinical phase, which could improve their immune response.

  16. Vocalization characteristics of North Atlantic right whale surface active groups in the calving habitat, southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygonis, Vasilis; Gerstein, Edmund; Moir, Jim; McCulloch, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Passive acoustic surveys were conducted to assess the vocal behavior of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the designated critical calving habitat along the shallow coastal waters of southeastern United States. Underwater vocalizations were recorded using autonomous buoys deployed in close proximity to surface active groups (SAGs). Nine main vocalization types were identified with manual inspection of spectrograms, and standard acoustic descriptors were extracted. Classification trees were used to examine the distinguishing characteristics of calls and quantify their variability within the SAG vocal repertoire. The results show that descriptors of frequency, bandwidth, and spectral disorder are the most important parameters for partitioning the SAG repertoire, contrary to duration-related measures. The reported source levels and vocalization statistics provide sound production data vital to inform regional passive acoustic monitoring and conservation for this endangered species.

  17. Chemical Force Microscopy Study on the Interactions of COOH Functional Groups with Kaolinite Surfaces: Implications for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipada Santha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay–oil interactions play a critical role in determining the wettability of sandstone oil reservoirs, which, in turn, governs the effectiveness of enhanced oil recovery methods. In this study, we have measured the adhesion between –COOH functional groups and the siloxane and aluminol faces of kaolinite clay minerals by means of chemical force microscopy as a function of pH, salinity (from 0.001 M to 1 M and cation identity (Na+ vs. Ca2+. Results from measurements on the siloxane face show that Ca2+ displays a reverse low-salinity effect (adhesion decreasing at higher concentrations at pH 5.5, and a low salinity effect at pH 8. At a constant Ca2+ concentration of 0.001 M, however, an increase in pH leads to larger adhesion. In contrast, a variation in the Na+ concentration showed less effect in varying the adhesion of –COOH groups to the siloxane face. Measurements on the aluminol face showed a reverse low-salinity effect at pH 5.5 in the presence of Ca2+, whereas an increase in pH with constant ion concentration resulted in a decrease in adhesion for both Ca2+ and Na+. Results are explained by looking at the kaolinite’s surface complexation and the protonation state of the functional group, and highlight a more important role of the multicomponent ion exchange mechanism in controlling adhesion than the double layer expansion mechanism.

  18. Surface structure determination of group 11 metals adsorbed on a rhenium(10 anti 10) surface by low-energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messahel, Lyria

    2012-11-12

    This thesis deals with the computational surface determination of various long-range ordered phases formed by thin films of copper, silver, and gold adsorbed on the rhenium- (10 anti 10) surface. It is based upon LEED-I,V curves for these phases that were recorded in the course of detailed experimental investigations of the respective films carried out in our group (using techniques such as LEED, MEED, and TPD). In order to solve the intricate puzzle of surface structural analysis, the electron elastic scattering behaviour of the investigated coinage metal phases was calculated using the Erlangen TensErLEED program package. Thereby first a set of theoretical LEED-I,V curves is derived for a guessed reference structure. Subsequently its structural input parameters are varied in a trial-and-error procedure until optimal agreement between experiment and theory is attained. The (1 x 1) phases formed by the deposited metals were tackled first to establish an absolute coverage calibration and to elucidate the respective growth modes on the Re(10 anti 10) surface. In all three cases the (1 x 1) structure is developed best at a coverage {Theta}{sub Cu,Ag,Au}=2 ML=1 BL. Extension of the investigation to experimental I,V curves for higher Cu coverages revealed that this element continues to grow bilayerwise, thereby retaining the Re hcp morphology. Ag, in contrast to Cu and Au, happens not to grow as homogeneously, and the TPD data suggest that Ag films exhibit the so-called simultaneous-multilayer (SM) growth mode. The following analysis of the sub-bilayer coverage range shows that the three systems exhibit considerable differences. While Cu, having a negative lattice misfit compared to Re, shows no long-range ordered superstructures, Ag and Au with a similar positive misfit form a couple of such phases. Ag features both a (1 x 4) phase, stable at ambient temperatures, that upon heating transforms into a c(2 x 2) phase that only exists at elevated temperatures. The

  19. Surface structure determination of group 11 metals adsorbed on a rhenium(10 anti 10) surface by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messahel, Lyria

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with the computational surface determination of various long-range ordered phases formed by thin films of copper, silver, and gold adsorbed on the rhenium- (10 anti 10) surface. It is based upon LEED-I,V curves for these phases that were recorded in the course of detailed experimental investigations of the respective films carried out in our group (using techniques such as LEED, MEED, and TPD). In order to solve the intricate puzzle of surface structural analysis, the electron elastic scattering behaviour of the investigated coinage metal phases was calculated using the Erlangen TensErLEED program package. Thereby first a set of theoretical LEED-I,V curves is derived for a guessed reference structure. Subsequently its structural input parameters are varied in a trial-and-error procedure until optimal agreement between experiment and theory is attained. The (1 x 1) phases formed by the deposited metals were tackled first to establish an absolute coverage calibration and to elucidate the respective growth modes on the Re(10 anti 10) surface. In all three cases the (1 x 1) structure is developed best at a coverage Θ Cu,Ag,Au =2 ML=1 BL. Extension of the investigation to experimental I,V curves for higher Cu coverages revealed that this element continues to grow bilayerwise, thereby retaining the Re hcp morphology. Ag, in contrast to Cu and Au, happens not to grow as homogeneously, and the TPD data suggest that Ag films exhibit the so-called simultaneous-multilayer (SM) growth mode. The following analysis of the sub-bilayer coverage range shows that the three systems exhibit considerable differences. While Cu, having a negative lattice misfit compared to Re, shows no long-range ordered superstructures, Ag and Au with a similar positive misfit form a couple of such phases. Ag features both a (1 x 4) phase, stable at ambient temperatures, that upon heating transforms into a c(2 x 2) phase that only exists at elevated temperatures. The structure

  20. Polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid coatings with controllable concentration of surface carboxyl groups: A novel approach in fabrication of polymeric platforms for potential bio-diagnostic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah [Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Djordjevic, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.djordjevic@um.edu.my [Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Koole, Leo H. [Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Health. Medicine and Life Science, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, NL 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis and processing of PMMA-co-MAA spin-coatings on silicon wafers. • Surface chemistry and morphology as a function of tailored co-polymer structure. • Polymer coatings with controlled number of surface carboxyl groups. - Abstract: The generally accepted strategy in development of bio-diagnostic devices is to immobilize proteins on polymeric surfaces as a part of detection process for diseases and viruses through antibody/antigen coupling. In that perspective, polymer surface properties such as concentration of functional groups must be closely controlled in order to preserve the protein activity. In order to improve the surface characteristics of transparent polymethacrylate plastics that are used for diagnostic devices, we have developed an effective fabrication procedure of polymethylmetacrylate-co-metacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) coatings with controlled number of surface carboxyl groups. The polymers were processed effectively with the spin-coating technique and the detailed control over surface properties is here by demonstrated through the variation of a single synthesis reaction parameter. The chemical structure of synthesized and processed co-polymers has been investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). The surface morphology of polymer coatings have been analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We demonstrate that the surface morphology and the concentration of surface –COOH groups (determined with UV–vis surface titration) on the processed PMMA-co-MAA coatings can be precisely controlled by variation of initial molar ratio of reactants in the free-radical polymerization reaction. The wettability of developed polymer surfaces also varies with macromolecular structure.

  1. o-Fluorination of aromatic azides yields improved azido-based fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide: synthesis, spectra, and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Wang, Runyu; Wei, Lv; Cheng, Longhuai; Li, Zhifei; Xi, Zhen; Yi, Long

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signaling molecule with multiple biological functions. To visualize the endogenous in situ production of H2S in real time, new coumarin- and boron-dipyrromethene-based fluorescent turn-on probes were developed for fast sensing of H2S in aqueous buffer and in living cells. Introduction of a fluoro group in the ortho position of the aromatic azide can lead to a greater than twofold increase in the rate of reaction with H2S. On the basis of o-fluorinated aromatic azides, fluorescent probes with high sensitivity and selectivity toward H2S over other biologically relevant species were designed and synthesized. The probes can be used to in situ to visualize exogenous H2S and D-cysteine-dependent endogenously produced H2S in living cells, which makes them promising tools for potential applications in H2S biology. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesis and biological properties of 5-azido-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate, a photoactive nucleotide suitable for making light-sensitive DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.K.; Haley, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    A photoactive nucleotide analogue of dUTP, 5-azido-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate (5-N 3 dUTP), was synthesized from dUMP in five steps. The key reaction in the synthesis of 5-N 3 dUTP is the nitration of dUMP in 98% yield in 5 min at 25 0 C using an excess of nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate in anhydrous dimethylformamide. Reduction of the resulting 5-nitro compound with zinc and 20 mM HCl gave 5-aminodeoxyuridine monophosphate (5-NH 2 dUMP). Diazotization of 5-NH 2 dUMP with HNO 2 followed by the addition NaN 3 to the acidic diazonium salt solution gave a photoactive nucleotide derivative in 80-90% yield. The monophosphate product was identified as 5-N 3 dUMP by proton NMR, UV, IR, and chromatographic analysis as well as by the mode of synthesis and its photosensitivity. After formation of 5-N 3 dUTP through a chemical coupling of pyrophosphate to 5-N 3 dUMP, the triphosphate form of the nucleotide was found to support DNA synthesis by Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I at a rate indistinguishable from that supported by dTTP. When UMP was used as the starting compound, 5-N 3 UTP was formed in an analogous fashion with similar yields and produced a photoactive nucleotide which is a substrate for E. coli RNA polymerase. To prepare [γ- 32 P]-5-N 3 dUTP for use as an active-site-directed photoaffinity labeling reagent, a simple method of preparing γ- 32 P-labeled pyrimidine nucleotides was developed. [γ- 32 P]-5-N 3 dUTP is an effective photoaffinity labeling reagent for DNA polymerase I and was found to bind to the active site with a 2-fold higher affinity than dTTP. The photoactivity of 5-N 3 dUMP is stable to extremes of pH, and [γ- 32 P]-5-N 3 dUTP was an effective photolabeling reagent even in the presence of 10 mM dithiothreitol

  3. Degradation-by-design: Surface modification with functional substrates that enhance the enzymatic degradation of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshbabu, Adukamparai Rajukrishnan; Kurapati, Rajendra; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bartolini, Isacco; Meneghetti, Moreno; Kostarelos, Kostas; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Biodegradation of carbon-based nanomaterials has been pursued intensively in the last few years, as one of the most crucial issues for the design of safe, clinically relevant conjugates for biomedical applications. In this paper it is demonstrated that specific functional molecules can enhance the catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) for the degradation of carbon nanotubes. Two different azido coumarins and one cathecol derivative are linked to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These molecules are good reducing substrates and strong redox mediators to enhance the catalytic activity of HRP. XO, known to metabolize various molecules mainly in the mammalian liver, including human, was instead used to test the biodegradability of MWCNTs modified with an azido purine. The products of the biodegradation process are characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that coumarin and catechol moieties have enhanced the biodegradation of MWCNTs compared to oxidized nanotubes, likely due to the capacity of these substrates to better interact with and activate HRP. Although azido purine-MWCNTs are degraded less effectively by XO than oxidized nanotubes, the data uncover the importance of XO in the biodegradation of carbon-nanomaterials leading to their better surface engineering for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is distinct from the N-CAM related group of surface antigens BSP-2 and D2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faissner, A; Kruse, J; Goridis, C

    1984-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 and the group of N-CAM related molecules, BSP-2 and D2 antigen, are immunochemically distinct molecular species. The two groups of surface molecules are also functionally distinct entities, since inhibition of Ca2+-independent adhesion among early post-natal m...

  5. Modification of dispersibility of nanodiamond by grafting of polyoxyethylene and by the introduction of ionic groups onto the surface via radical trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, I. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Hashimoto, K. [Department of Material Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-218 (Japan); Fujiki, K. [Department of Environmental Science, Niigata Institute of Technology, 1719, Fujihashi, Kashiwazaki, Niigata 945-1195 (Japan); Yamauchi, T. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Material Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-218 (Japan); Tsubokawa, N., E-mail: ntsuboka@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Material Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050, Ikarashi, 2-no-cho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-218 (Japan)

    2014-02-14

    To improve the dispersibility of polycrystalline nanodiamond (ND) in solvents, the grafting of polymers and introduction of ionic groups onto ND surface via radical trapping by ND surface were investigated. The grafting of polyoxyethylene (POE) onto ND surface by trapping of POE radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of POE macro azo-initiator (Azo-POE) was examined. The polymer radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of Azo-POE were successfully trapped by ND surface to give POE-grafted ND. The effect of temperature on the grafting of POE onto ND was discussed. In addition, the introduction of cationic protonated amidine groups onto ND was achieved by the trapping of radicals bearing protonated amidine groups formed by thermal decomposition of 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine)dihydrochloride (AMPA). The anionic carboxylate groups was introduced onto ND surface by the trapping of the radicals bearing carboxyl groups formed by thermal decomposition of 4,4′-azobis(4-cyonovaleric acid) (ACVA) followed by the treatment with NaOH aqueous solution. The dispersibility of ND in water was remarkably improved by the grafting of POE, based on the steric hindrance of polymer chains and by the introduction of ionic groups, based on the ionic repulsion, onto ND surface. - Highlights: • Grafting of PEG onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Introduction of ionic groups onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by PEG grafting based on steric hindrance of PEG chains. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by introduction of ionic groups based on ionic repulsion.

  6. Modification of dispersibility of nanodiamond by grafting of polyoxyethylene and by the introduction of ionic groups onto the surface via radical trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, I.; Hashimoto, K.; Fujiki, K.; Yamauchi, T.; Tsubokawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the dispersibility of polycrystalline nanodiamond (ND) in solvents, the grafting of polymers and introduction of ionic groups onto ND surface via radical trapping by ND surface were investigated. The grafting of polyoxyethylene (POE) onto ND surface by trapping of POE radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of POE macro azo-initiator (Azo-POE) was examined. The polymer radicals formed by the thermal decomposition of Azo-POE were successfully trapped by ND surface to give POE-grafted ND. The effect of temperature on the grafting of POE onto ND was discussed. In addition, the introduction of cationic protonated amidine groups onto ND was achieved by the trapping of radicals bearing protonated amidine groups formed by thermal decomposition of 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine)dihydrochloride (AMPA). The anionic carboxylate groups was introduced onto ND surface by the trapping of the radicals bearing carboxyl groups formed by thermal decomposition of 4,4′-azobis(4-cyonovaleric acid) (ACVA) followed by the treatment with NaOH aqueous solution. The dispersibility of ND in water was remarkably improved by the grafting of POE, based on the steric hindrance of polymer chains and by the introduction of ionic groups, based on the ionic repulsion, onto ND surface. - Highlights: • Grafting of PEG onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Introduction of ionic groups onto nanodiamond was achieved by radical trapping. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by PEG grafting based on steric hindrance of PEG chains. • Nanodiamond was dispersed by introduction of ionic groups based on ionic repulsion

  7. Azido analogs of neuroactive steroids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vidrna, Lukáš; Černý, Ivan; Pouzar, Vladimír; Borovská, Jiřina; Vyklický, Vojtěch; Vyklický ml., Ladislav; Chodounská, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 76, 10/11 (2011), s. 1043-1050 ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1498; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/07/0271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neuroactive steroids * synthesis * azides * NMDA receptor Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.829, year: 2011

  8. First principles-based adsorption comparison of group IV elements (C, Si, Ge, and Sn) on Au(111)/Ag(111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Sudip; Rajesh, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported a first-principle investigation of the structural properties of monomer and dimer for group IV elements (C, Si, Ge, and Sn) adsorbed on the Au(111) and Ag(111) surfaces. The calculations were performed by means of a plane wave based pseudopotential method under the framework of density functional theory. The results reveal the preference of adatom to be adsorbed on the hexagonal closed packed site of the metal (111) surfaces with strong binding energy. The structures introduce interlayer forces in the adsorbate. The strong bonding with the surface atoms is a result of p–d hybridization. The adsorption energy follows a sequence as one goes down in the group IV elements which imply that the interaction of the group IV elements with Au/Ag is decreasing as the atomic number increases.

  9. Comparisons of anti-human immunodeficiency virus activities, cellular transport, and plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetics of 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X B; Zhu, Q Y; Vidal, P M; Watanabe, K A; Polsky, B; Armstrong, D; Ostrander, M; Lang, S A; Muchmore, E; Chou, T C

    1992-01-01

    3'-Fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (FLT), a candidate anti-AIDS compound in clinical trials, showed anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) potency (50% effective concentration, 0.0052 microM) slightly better than or equal to that of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) in MT4 cells and was threefold more potent in H9 cells. There was no FLT resistance demonstrable in the AZT-resistant HIV-1 strains. Both FLT and AZT showed low cytotoxicity for MT4 cells, with selectivity indices (efficacy/toxicity ratio) of greater than 47,000 and greater than 33,000, respectively. Cellular permeation of FLT and thymidine (dThd) was greater than that of AZT, and FLT and dThd permeated the cell membranes by a carrier-mediated mechanism as well as by simple diffusion, as indicated by the existence of nitrobenzylthioinosine-5'-monophosphate-sensitive and -insensitive components. By contrast, transport of AZT into cells was by simple diffusion. The intracellular level of the triphosphate of FLT (FLTTP) in MT4 cells was two- to threefold higher than that of AZT (AZTTP) after exposure to 1.8 microM each compound for 12 h. The elimination kinetics of FLTTP and AZTTP in HIV-1-infected MT4 cells in fresh medium showed biphasic patterns, with initial half-lives of 1.03 and 1.09 h, respectively. In phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, the FLTTP level was increased 59-fold compared with that in unstimulated cells at 12 h, was four- to sixfold higher than the level of AZTTP in stimulated cells at 12 h, and remained four- to fivefold higher during a 4-h elimination period in fresh medium and twofold higher at the end of a 12-h elimination period. Two- to eightfold more [3H]AZT than [3H]FLT was incorporated into the host cell DNA, and both [3H]AZT and [3H]FLT remained persistently incorporated for over 24 h. The incorporated [3H]AZT and [3H]FLT were alkali labile, whereas incorporated [3H]dThd was alkali stable. Pharmacokinetics of FLT in plasma of monkeys after

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of Mn(III) and Cu(II) tetranuclear azido polyoxometalate complexes: multifrequency high-field EPR spectroscopy of Cu4 clusters with S = 1 and S = 2 ground states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialane, Pierre; Duboc, Carole; Marrot, Jérôme; Rivière, Eric; Dolbecq, Anne; Sécheresse, Francis

    2006-02-20

    Two new azido-bridged polyoxometalate compounds were synthesized in acetonitrile/methanol media and their molecular structures have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The [[(gamma-SiW10O36)Mn2(OH)2(N3)(0.5)(H2O)(0.5)]2(mu-1,3-N3)](10-) (1 a) tetranuclear Mn(III) complex, in which an end-to-end N3- ligand acts as a linker between two [(gamma-SiW10O36)Mn2(OH)2]4- units, represents the first manganese-azido polyoxometalate. The magnetic properties have been studied considering the spin Hamiltonian H = -J1(S1S2+S1*S2*)-J2(S1S1*), showing that antiferromagnetic interactions between the paramagnetic centers (g = 1.98) occur both through the di-(mu-OH) bridge (J1 = -25.5 cm(-1)) and the mu-1,3-azido bridge (J2 = -19.6 cm(-1)). The [(gamma-SiW10O36)2Cu4(mu-1,1,1-N3)2(mu-1,1-N3)2]12- (2 a) tetranuclear Cu(II) complex consists of two [gamma-SiW10O36Cu2(N3)2]6- subunits connected through the two mu-1,1,1-azido ligands, the four paramagnetic centers forming a lozenge. The magnetic susceptibility data have been fitted. This reveals ferromagnetic interactions between the four Cu(II) centers, leading to an S=2 ground state (H = -J1(S1S2+S1*S2*)-J2(S2S2*), J1 = +294.5 cm(-1), J2 = +1.6 cm(-1), g = 2.085). The ferromagnetic coupling between the Cu(II) centers in each subunit is the strongest ever observed either in a polyoxometalate compound or in a diazido-bridged Cu(II) complex. Considering complex 2 a and the previously reported basal-basal di-(mu-1,1-N3)-bridged Cu(II) complexes in which the metallic centers are not connected by other magnetically coupling ligands, the linear correlation J1 = 2639.5-24.95*theta(av) between the theta(av) bridging angle and the J1 coupling parameter has been proposed. The electronic structure of complex 2 a has also been investigated by using multifrequency high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR) spectroscopy between 95 and 285 GHz. The spin Hamiltonian parameters of the S = 2 ground state (D = -0.135(2) cm(-1), E = -0

  11. High-Performance Supercapacitor of Functionalized Carbon Fiber Paper with High Surface Ionic and Bulk Electronic Conductivity: Effect of Organic Functional Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suktha, Phansiri; Chiochan, Poramane; Iamprasertkun, Pawin; Wutthiprom, Juthaporn; Phattharasupakun, Nutthaphon; Suksomboon, Montakan; Kaewsongpol, Tanon; Sirisinudomkit, Pichamon; Pettong, Tanut; Sawangphruk, Montree

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A supercapacitor of organic functionalized carbon fiber paper (f-CFP) exhibits high areal and volumetric capacitances. • The performance of the supercapacitor depends on the organic functional group on the surface of the f-CFP. • Hydroxyl and carboxylic groups modified on the surface of f-CFP have higher pseudocapacitive property than amide and amine functional groups. • The f-CFP exhibits high surface ionic and bulk electrical conductivities. - Abstract: Although carbon fiber paper (CFP) or nonwovens are widely used as a non-corrosive and conductive substrate or current collector in batteries and supercapacitors as well as a gas diffusion layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, the CFP cannot store charges due to its poor ionic conductivity and its hydrophobic surface. In this work, the chemically functionalized CFP (f-CFP) consisting of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups on its surface was produced by an oxidation reaction of CFP in a mixed concentrated acid solution of H 2 SO 4 :HNO 3 (3:1 v/v) at 60 °C for 1 h. Other amide and amine groups modified CFP were also synthesized for comparison using a dehydration reaction of carboxylic modified CFP with ethylenediamine and n-butylamine. Interestingly, it was found that hydroxyl and carboxylic groups modified CFP behave as a pseudocapacitor electrode, which can store charges via the surface redox reaction in addition to electrochemical double layer capacitance. The aqueous-based supercapacitor of f-CFP has high areal, volumetric, and specific energy (49.0 μW.h/cm 2 , 1960 mW.h/L, and 5.2 W.h/Kg) and power (3.0 mW/cm 2 , 120 W/L, and 326.2 W/Kg) based on the total geometrical surface area and volume as well as the total weight of positive and negative electrodes. High charge capacity of the f-CFP stems from high ionic charge and pseudocapacitive behavior due to hydroxyl and carboxylic groups on its surface and high bulk electronic conductivity (2.03 mS/cm) due to 1D carbon fiber paper. The

  12. 5 prime -Azido-(3,6- sup 3 H sub 2 )-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: Identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, R.; Feldwisch, J.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Zuechtungsforschung, Koeln (West Germany)); Boland, W. (Univ. Karlsruhe (West Germany))

    1992-01-15

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, the authors have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5{prime}-azido-(3,6-{sup 3}H{sub 2})NPA (({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA and exposure to UV light, they observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed.

  13. Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquis Childs

    1999-09-01

    Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

  14. Azide photochemistry for facile modification of graphitic surfaces: preparation of DNA-coated carbon nanotubes for biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Minoo J; Yang Wenrong; Bojarski, Barbara; Gengenbach, Thomas R; Gao Mei; Zareie, Hadi; McCall, Maxine J

    2012-01-01

    A facile, two-step method for chemically attaching single-stranded DNA to graphitic surfaces, represented here by carbon nanotubes, is reported. In the first step, an azide-containing compound, N-5-azido-nitrobenzoyloxy succinimide (ANB-NOS), is used to form photo-adducts on the graphitic surfaces in a solid-state photochemical reaction, resulting in active ester groups being oriented for the subsequent reactions. In the second step, pre-synthesized DNA strands bearing a terminal amine group are coupled in an aqueous solution with the active esters on the photo-adducts. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by attaching pre-synthesized DNA to surfaces of carbon nanotubes in two platforms—as vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a solid support and as tangled single-walled carbon nanotubes in mats. The reaction products at various stages were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two different assays were used to check that the DNA strands attached to the carbon nanotubes were able to bind their partner strands with complementary base sequences. The first assay, using partner DNA strands tethered to gold nanoparticles, enabled the sites of DNA attachment to the carbon nanotubes to be identified in TEM images. The second assay, using radioactively labelled partner DNA strands, quantified the density of functional DNA strands attached to the carbon nanotubes. The diversity of potential applications for these DNA-modified carbon-nanotube platforms is exemplified here by the successful use of a DNA-modified single-walled carbon-nanotube mat as an electrode for the specific detection of metal ions. (paper)

  15. Electroless oxidation of diamond surfaces in ceric and ferricyanide solutions: An easy way to produce 'C-O' functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N., E-mail: nathalie.simon@uvsq.f [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, Universite de Versailles-St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78000 Versailles (France); Charrier, G.; Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180, Universite de Versailles-St-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, 78000 Versailles (France)

    2010-08-01

    Despite many works are devoted to oxidation of diamond surfaces, it is still a challenge, to successfully produce well defined 'C-O' functions, particularly for functionalization purposes. In this paper we describe and compare, for the first time, the 'electroless' oxidation of as-deposited polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD) films in ceric and ferricyanide solutions at room temperature. Both reactions efficiently generate oxygen functionalities on BDD surface. While a higher amount of 'C-O' moieties is produced with Ce{sup 4+} as oxidizing agent, the use of ferricyanide specie seems the most interesting to specifically generate hydroxyl groups. Additionally, this easy to perform oxidative method appears not damaging for diamond surfaces and adapted to conductive or non-conductive materials. The resulting surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle and capacitance-voltage analysis.

  16. Influence of Group-III-metal and Ag adsorption on the Ge growth on Si(111) and its vicinal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speckmann, Moritz

    2011-12-15

    In the framework of this thesis the surfactant-mediated heteroepitaxial growth of Ge on different Si surfaces has been investigated by means of low-energy electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, spot-profile analysing low-energy electron diffraction, X-ray standing waves, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, x-ray photoemission electron microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. As surfactants gallium, indium, and silver were used. The adsorption of Ga or In on the intrinsically faceted Si(112) surface leads to a smoothing of the surface and the formation of (N x 1) reconstructions, where a mixture of building blocks of different sizes is always present. For both adsorbates the overall periodicity on the surface is strongly dependent on the deposition temperature and the coverage. For the experimental conditions chosen here, the periodicities are in the range of 5.2{<=}N{<=}6.5 and 3.4{<=}N{<=}3.7 for Ga and In, respectively. The (N x 1) unit cells of Ga/Si(112) and In/Si(112) are found to consist of adsorbate atoms on terrace and step-edge sites, forming two atomic chains along the [110] direction. In the Ga-induced structures two Ga-vacancies per unit cell (one in the terrace and one in the step-edge site) are found and a continuous vacancy line on the surface is formed. In the In/Si(112) structure only one vacancy per unit cell in the step-edge site exists and, thus, a continuous adsorbate chain on the terrace sites is present. The adsorption of Ga or In on Si(112) strongly influences the subsequent Ge growth. Ge deposition on the Ga-terminated Si(112) surface leads to the formation of Ge nanowires, which are elongated along the Ga chains and reach lengths of up to 2000 nm for a growth temperature of 600 C. On In-covered Si(112), both small dash-like Ge islands and triangularly shaped islands are found, where

  17. Click chemistry based biomolecular conjugation monitoring using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palla, Mirko; Kumar, Shiv; Li, Zengmin

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based technique for monitoring the conjugation of small molecules by the well-known click reaction between an alkyne and azido moiety on the partner molecules. The monitoring principle is based on the loss of the characteristic...... such as bioconjugation, material science or drug discovery. Additionally, as an attractive advantage of this technique, no significant background signal is expected during the measurements, since these signals reside in a Raman silent region of 2000–2300 cm−1, where virtually all biological molecules are transparent....

  18. Genetic Variations in the Human G Protein-coupled Receptor Class C, Group 6, Member A (GPRC6A) Control Cell Surface Expression and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Stine; Have, Christian Theil; Underwood, Christina Rye

    2017-01-01

    GPRC6A is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by l-amino acids, which, based on analyses of knock-out mice, has been suggested to have physiological functions in metabolism and testicular function. The human ortholog is, however, mostly retained intracellularly in contrast to the cell surface...... of the human ortholog. Genetic analyses of the 1000 genome database and the Inter99 cohort of 6,000 Danes establish the distribution of genotypes among ethnic groups, showing that the cell surface-expressed and functional variant is much more prevalent in the African population than in European and Asian...

  19. Mechanism of Decomposition of Surface Ethoxy Species to Ethene and Acidic OH Groups on H-ZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Junko N; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Osuga, Ryota; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Tatsumi, Takashi

    2015-06-18

    The reaction mechanism of the decomposition of ethoxy species to ethene and acidic OH groups on H-ZSM-5 was studied by IR spectroscopy using isotope-labeled ethanol. The concerted mechanism occurring on both the ethoxy (acid) site and the counterpart lattice oxygen was suggested by GC-MS analysis of evolved d2-ethene and IR observation of the recovery of OH s groups on acid sites from the decomposition of CH3CD2O- ethoxy species. The concerted mechanism was further confirmed by the estimation of activation energy for decomposition of CH3CH2O-, CH3CD2O-, and CD3CD2O- ethoxy species, 122 ± 3, 125 ± 3, and 140 ± 5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, where the kinetic isotope effect was observed for the cleavage of the CH or CD bond of the methyl group of the ethoxy species.

  20. Effects of Surface Charge and Functional Groups on the Adsorption and Binding Forms of Cu and Cd on Roots of indica and japonica Rice Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Dong Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work was designed to understand the mechanisms of adsorption of copper (Cu and cadmium (Cd on roots of indica and japonica varieties of rice. Six varieties each of indica and japonica rice were grown in hydroponics and the chemical properties of the root surface were analyzed, including surface charges and functional groups (-COO- groups as measured by the streaming potential and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR. Binding forms of heavy metals adsorbed on rice roots were identified using sequential extraction methods. In rice roots exposed to Cu and Cd solutions, Cu existed mainly in both exchangeable and complexed forms, whereas Cd existed mainly in the exchangeable form. The amounts of exchangeable Cu and Cd and total adsorbed metal cations on the roots of indica varieties were significantly greater than those on the roots of japonica varieties, and the higher negative charges and the larger number of functional groups on the roots of indica varieties were responsible for their higher adsorption capacity and greater binding strength for Cu and Cd. Surface charge and functional groups on roots play an important role in the adsorption of Cu and Cd on the rice roots.

  1. Whistle emissions of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) differ with group composition and surface behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Elizabeth R; Gartside, Donald F

    2010-04-01

    The intricate and highly developed acoustic communication system of bottlenose dolphins reflects the complexities of their social organization. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) produce numerous types of acoustic emissions, including a diverse repertoire of whistles used for communicative purposes. The influence of group composition on whistle production and the function of different whistles produced by dolphins in wild contexts are relatively unknown. Recordings of acoustic emissions and behavior of dolphins were made concurrently during vessel-based surveys along the coast of northern New South Wales, Australia. Whistles were divided into five tonal classes (sine, rise, down-sweep, flat, and concave) and categorized into distinct whistle types. It is shown that while whistle repetition rate and whistle diversity was influenced by group composition, it is not influenced by behavior. Noncalf groups produced a significantly higher whistle repetition rate and whistle diversity than calf groups. In contrast, the types of whistles produced were related to the behavior in which the dolphins were engaged in: some tonal classes and distinct whistle types were related to different behavior states. Findings suggested that some whistle types may be used to communicate specific information on the behavioral context of the individuals involved.

  2. Surface wave group velocity in the Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan, estimated using ambient noise cross-correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Sekiguchi, Haruko; Somei, Kazuhiro; Miyakoshi, Ken; Aoi, Shin; Kunugi, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    Inter-station cross-correlation functions estimated using continuous ambient noise or microtremor records were used to extract the seismic wave propagation characteristics of the Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan. Temporary continuous observations were conducted at 15 sites in the Osaka basin between 2011 and 2013. The data were analyzed using seismic interferometry. The target period range was 2-8 s. Cross-correlations between all of the possible station pairs were calculated and stacked to produce a year-long data set, and Rayleigh wave signals in the vertical and radial components and Love wave signals in the transverse component were identified from the results. Simulation of inter-station Green's functions using the finite difference method was conducted to check the performance of the current three-dimensional velocity structure model. The measured time lag between the observed and theoretical Green's functions was less than 2 s for most station pairs, which is less than the wave period of interest in the target frequency range. Group velocity tomography was applied to group delay times estimated by means of multiple filter analysis. The estimated group velocities for longer periods of 5-8 s exhibited spatial variation within the basin, which is consistent with the bedrock depth distribution; however, the group velocities for shorter periods of 2-3 s were almost constant over the studied area. The waveform and group velocity information obtained by seismic interferometry analysis can be useful for future reconstruction of a three-dimensional velocity structure model in the Osaka basin.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Quantification of variable functional-group densities of mixed-silane monolayers on surfaces via a dual-mode fluorescence and XPS label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tobias; Dietrich, Paul M; Streeck, Cornelia; Ray, Santanu; Nutsch, Andreas; Shard, Alex; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Unger, Wolfgang E S; Rurack, Knut

    2015-03-03

    The preparation of aminated monolayers with a controlled density of functional groups on silica surfaces through a simple vapor deposition process employing different ratios of two suitable monoalkoxysilanes, (3-aminopropyl)diisopropylethoxysilane (APDIPES) and (3-cyanopropyl)dimethylmethoxysilane (CPDMMS), and advances in the reliable quantification of such tailored surfaces are presented here. The one-step codeposition process was carried out with binary silane mixtures, rendering possible the control over a wide range of densities in a single step. In particular, APDIPES constitutes the functional silane and CPDMMS the inert component. The procedure requires only small amounts of silanes, several ratios can be produced in a single batch, the deposition can be carried out within a few hours and a dry atmosphere can easily be employed, limiting self-condensation of the silanes. Characterization of the ratio of silanes actually bound to the surface can then be performed in a facile manner through contact angle measurements using the Cassie equation. The reliable estimation of the number of surface functional groups was approached with a dual-mode BODIPY-type fluorescence label, which allows quantification by fluorescence and XPS on one and the same sample. We found that fluorescence and XPS signals correlate over at least 1 order of magnitude, allowing for a direct linking of quantitative fluorescence analysis to XPS quantification. Employment of synchrotron-based methods (XPS; reference-free total reflection X-ray fluorescence, TXRF) made the traceable quantification of surface functional groups possible, providing an absolute reference for quantitative fluorescence measurements through a traceable measurement chain.

  5. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  6. Characterization of the spore surface and exosporium proteins of Clostridium sporogenes; implications for Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janganan, Thamarai K; Mullin, Nic; Tzokov, Svetomir B; Stringer, Sandra; Fagan, Robert P; Hobbs, Jamie K; Moir, Anne; Bullough, Per A

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium sporogenes is a non-pathogenic close relative and surrogate for Group I (proteolytic) neurotoxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strains. The exosporium, the sac-like outermost layer of spores of these species, is likely to contribute to adhesion, dissemination, and virulence. A paracrystalline array, hairy nap, and several appendages were detected in the exosporium of C. sporogenes strain NCIMB 701792 by EM and AFM. The protein composition of purified exosporium was explored by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides from major individual SDS-PAGE-separated protein bands, and from bulk exosporium. Two high molecular weight protein bands both contained the same protein with a collagen-like repeat domain, the probable constituent of the hairy nap, as well as cysteine-rich proteins CsxA and CsxB. A third cysteine-rich protein (CsxC) was also identified. These three proteins are also encoded in C. botulinum Prevot 594, and homologues (75-100% amino acid identity) are encoded in many other Group I strains. This work provides the first insight into the likely composition and organization of the exosporium of Group I C. botulinum spores. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Readiness Review Plan for the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in Waste Area Grouping 11 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Readiness Review Plan was prepared by the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 Site Project Readiness Review Team as an overview of the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in WAG 11 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, including major readiness milestones, criteria development methodology, and a list of events to occur as part of the review process for determining readiness for each project phase

  8. Leucine, starch and bicarbonate utilization by specific bacterial groups in surface shelf waters off Galicia (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teira, E; Hernando-Morales, V; Guerrero-Feijóo, E; Varela, M M

    2017-06-01

    The capability of different bacterial populations to degrade abundant polymers, such as algal-derived polysaccharides, or to utilize preferentially polymers over monomers, remains largely unknown. In this study, microautoradiography was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (MAR-FISH) to evaluate the ability of Bacteroidetes, SAR11, Roseobacter spp., Gammaproteobacteria and SAR86 cells to use bicarbonate, leucine and starch under natural light conditions at two locations in shelf surface waters off NW Spain. The percentage of cells incorporating bicarbonate was relatively high (mean 32% ± 4%) and was positively correlated with the intensity of solar radiation. The proportion of cells using starch (mean 56% ± 4%) or leucine (mean 47% ± 4%) was significantly higher than that using bicarbonate. On average, SAR11, Roseobacter spp. and Gammaproteobacteria showed a similarly high percentage of cells using leucine (47%-65% of hybridized cells) than using starch (51%-64% of hybridized cells), while Bacteroidetes and SAR86 cells preferentially used starch (53% of hybridized cells) over leucine (34%-40% of hybridized cells). We suggest that the great percentage of bacteria using starch is related to a high ambient availability of polymers associated to algal cell lysis, which, in turn, weakens the short-term coupling between phytoplankton release and bacterial production. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Preparation and surface active properties of oxypropylated diol monoesters of fatty acids with an amide oxime terminal group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eissa, A. M.F.

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available Locally produced non-edible oil, namely, rice bran oil (R.B.O. was utilized as starting materials for preparing new nonionic surfactant. Oxypropylated diol monoesters of linoleic and rice bran oil fatty acids were prepared. Also amide oxime derivatives were obtained. Surface active properties of these compounds were measured. Under neutral condition amide eximes served as nonionic surfactants and their properties were similar to other oxypropylated monoesters.

    Se ha utilizado un aceite no comestible de producción local, denominado, aceite de salvado de arroz (R.B.O. como materia prima para la preparación de nuevos tensioactivos no iónicos. Se prepararon diol monoésteres oxipropilados de ácido linoleico y ácidos grasos de aceite de salvado de arroz. También se obtuvieron los derivados de amido oxima. Se midieron las propiedades de tensión superficial de estos compuestos. Bajo condiciones neutras las amido eximas sirvieron como tensioactivos no iónicos y sus propiedades fueron similares a los de otros monoésteres oxipropilados.

  10. Synthesis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D sub 3 3. beta. -3 prime -(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propyl ether, a second-generation photoaffinity analogue of 25-hydroxyvitamin D sub 3 : Photoaffinity labeling of rat serum vitamin D binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.; Holick, M.F. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA)); Bouillon, R.; Van Baelen, H. (Laboratorium voor Experimentele Geneeskunde en Endocrinologie, Gasthuisberg, Leuven (Belgium))

    1991-05-14

    Vulnerability of 25-hydroxy-(26,27-{sup 3}H)vitamin D{sub 3} 3{beta}-N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)glycinate, a photoaffinity analogue of 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (25-OH-D{sub 3}) toward standard conditions of carboxymethylationin promoted the authors to synthesize 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} 3{beta}-3{prime}-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)amino)propyl ether (25-ANE), a hydrolytically stable photoaffinity analogue of 25-OH-D{sub 3}, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} 3{beta}-3{prime}-(N-(4-azido-2-nitro-(3,5-{sup 3}H)phenyl)amino)propyl ether ({sup 3}H-25-ANE), the radiolabeled counterpart of 25-ANE competes for the 25-OH-D{sub 3} binding site in rat serum vitamin D binding protein (rDBP). On the other hand, UV exposure of a sample of purified rat DBP (rDBP), preincubated in the dark with {sup 3}H-25-ANE, covalently labeled the protein. However, very little covalent labeling was observed in the absence of UV light or in the presence of a large excess of 25-OH-D{sub 3}. These results provide strong evidence for the covalent labeling of the 25-OH-D{sub 3} binding site in rDPB by {sup 3}H-25-ANE.

  11. Engineering a Zirconium MOF through Tandem "Click" Reactions: A General Strategy for Quantitative Loading of Bifunctional Groups on the Pore Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingfan; Gui, Bo; Chen, Rufan; Hu, Guiping; Meng, Yi; Yuan, Daqiang; Zeller, Matthias; Wang, Cheng

    2018-02-19

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) assembled from linkers of identical length but with different functional groups have gained increasing interests recently. However, it is very challenging for precise control of the ratios of different functionalities. Herein, we reported a stable azide- and alkyne-appended Zr-MOF that can undergo quantitative tandem click reactions on the different functional sites, thus providing a unique platform for quantitative loading of bifunctional moieties. As an added advantage, the same MOF product can be obtained via two independent routes. The method is versatile and can tolerate a wide variety of functional groups, and furthermore, a heterogeneous acid-base MOF organocatalyst was synthesized by tandemly introducing both acidic and basic groups onto the predesigned pore surface. The presented strategy provides a general way toward the construction of bifunctional MOFs with a precise control of ratio of different functionalities for desirable applications in future.

  12. Effect of growth at low pH on the cell surface properties of a typical strain of Lactobacillus casei group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Nezhad, M; Stenzel, Dj; Britz, Ml

    2010-09-01

    Although members of the Lactobacillus casei group are known to survive under acidic conditions, the underlying mechanisms of growth at acidic condition and the impact of low pH on the relative level of protein expression at the cell surface remain poorly studied. After confirming the taxonomy of L. casei strain GCRL 12 which was originally isolated from cheese and confirmed by 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the impact of acidic pH on growth rate was determined. Late log-phase cells cultured at pH 4.0 showed obvious changes in Gram staining properties while transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed evidence of structural distortions of the cell surface relative to the controls cultured at pH 6.5. When comparing cytosolic or whole cell preparations on SDS-PAGE, few changes in protein profiles were observed under the two growth conditions. However, analysis of surface protein extracted by 5M LiCl demonstrated changes in the proportions of proteins present in the molecular weight range of 10 to 80 kDa, with some proteins more dominant at pH 6.5 and other at pH 4. These data suggest that surface proteins of this strain are associated with growth and survival at low pH. The function of these proteins is subject to further investigation.

  13. The influence of surface oxygen and hydroxyl groups on the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate on pure Pd(1 0 0): A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanping [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Dong, Xiuqin [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Yu, Yingzhe, E-mail: yzhyu@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Minhua, E-mail: mhzhangtj@163.com [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • All dehydrogenation reactions in vinyl acetate synthesis on Pd(1 0 0) were studied. • The energy barriers of the transition state of the three reactions were calculated. • The influence of surface Os and OHs on all dehydrogenation actions was discussed. - Abstract: On the basis of a Langmuir–Hinshelwood-type mechanism, the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate (VAH) on pure Pd(1 0 0) with surface oxygen atoms (Os) and hydroxyl groups (OHs) was studied with density functional theory (DFT) method. Our calculation results show that both Os and OHs can consistently reduce the activation energies of dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and VAH to some degree with only one exception that OHs somehow increase the activation energy of VAH. Based on Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism, the three dehydrogenation reactions in presence of surface Os and OHs are almost consistently favored, compared with the corresponding processes on clean Pd(1 0 0) surfaces, and thus a Langmuir–Hinshelwood-type mechanism may not be excluded beforehand when investigating the microscopic performance of the oxygen-assisted vinyl acetate synthesis on Pd(1 0 0) catalysts.

  14. Traffic accidents and road surface skidding resistance : an investigation into the statistical relationship between the skidding resistance of the road surface and relative road risk. Summary of the research report of Sub-committee V of the Working Group on Tyres, Road Surfaces and Skidding Accidents of the Institute for Road Safety Research, SWOV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, L.H.M

    1975-01-01

    This study forms part of an extended research programme of the Working Group on Tyres, Road-surfaces and Skidding accidents. According to the terms of reference a statistical relationship had to be established between the skidding resistance of a road-surface and the number of accidents per million

  15. Stabilization of organometal halide perovskite films by SnO2 coating with inactive surface hydroxyl groups on ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Jinjin; Liu, Jinxi; Wei, Liyu; Liu, Zhenghao; Guan, Lihao; Cao, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have advanced rapid in the last few years, however the thermal instability of perovskite film on ZnO nanorods (NRs) remains a big challenge limiting its commercialization. The present work demonstrated effective suppression of the decomposition of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite through inserting a thin tin oxide (SnO2) passivation layer between ZnO NRs and perovskite films. Although X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed no distinct difference in the amount of hydroxyl groups and oxygen vacancies on the surface of ZnO NRs and ZnO@SnO2 NRs, Raman spectra suggested the hydroxyl groups might be trapped in oxygen vacancies on SnO2 surface, preventing the decomposition of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite through reacting with the hydroxyl groups. The power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells was significantly increased from 6.92% to 12.17% and became hysteresis-free by applying SnO2 passivating layer between perovskite and ZnO layers.

  16. Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5.

  17. Self-assembly of linear [Mn II 2 Mn III ] units with end-on azido bridges: the construction of a ferromagnetic chain using S T = 7 high-spin trimers

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. The controlled organization of high-spin complexes into 1D coordination polymers is a challenge in molecular magnetism. In this work, we report a ferromagnetic Mn trimer Mn3(HL)2(CH3OH)6(Br)4·Br·(CH3OH)21 (H2L = 2-[(9H-fluoren-9-yl)amino]propane-1,3-diol) with the ground spin state of ST = 7 that can be assembled into a one-dimensional coordination chain [Mn3(HL)2(CH3OH)2(Br)4(N3)(H2O)·CH3OH]∞2 using azido bridging ligands. Interestingly, the ferromagnetic nature of 1 is well retained in 2. However, due to the negligible magnetic anisotropy in 1, both 1 and 2 do not show slow-relaxation of magnetization, which indicates that during the process of molecular assembly not only the intratrimer magnetic interaction but also the magnetic anisotropy of the trimer can be reserved.

  18. Self-assembly of linear [Mn(II)2Mn(III)] units with end-on azido bridges: the construction of a ferromagnetic chain using ST = 7 high-spin trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan; Qin, Lei; Li, Guanghua; Abbas, Ghulam; Cao, Yaqun; Wu, Gang; Han, Tian; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Qiu, Shilun

    2015-03-21

    The controlled organization of high-spin complexes into 1D coordination polymers is a challenge in molecular magnetism. In this work, we report a ferromagnetic Mn trimer Mn3(HL)2(CH3OH)6(Br)4·Br·(CH3OH)2 1 (H2L = 2-[(9H-fluoren-9-yl)amino]propane-1,3-diol) with the ground spin state of ST = 7 that can be assembled into a one-dimensional coordination chain [Mn3(HL)2(CH3OH)2(Br)4(N3)(H2O)·CH3OH]∞ 2 using azido bridging ligands. Interestingly, the ferromagnetic nature of 1 is well retained in 2. However, due to the negligible magnetic anisotropy in 1, both 1 and 2 do not show slow-relaxation of magnetization, which indicates that during the process of molecular assembly not only the intratrimer magnetic interaction but also the magnetic anisotropy of the trimer can be reserved.

  19. Fully relativistic study of intermetallic dimers of group-1 elements K through element 119 and prediction of their adsorption on noble metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Anton, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The 4c-DFT calculations were performed for M 2 and MAu (M = K though element 119). Trends in atomic and molecular properties are shown to be reversed in group 1 beyond Cs due to relativity. The 8s(119) AO relativistic stabilization and contraction is the reason for the weakest M–Au bond and smallest adsorption enthalpy of element 119 on noble metals in group 1. Highlights: ► Fully relativistic 4c-DFT calculations were performed for M 2 and MAu (M = K though element 119). ► Trends in atomic and molecular properties are reversed in group 1 from Cs on due to relativity. ► The 8s(119) AO stabilization and contraction result in the weakest M–Au bond in group 1. ► The weakest adsorption of element 119 on noble metals is expected among all group-1 elements. - Abstract: Spectroscopic properties of group-1 M 2 and MAu (M = K, Rb, Cs, Fr, and element 119) were calculated using the 4c-DFT method. The results show that the relativistic contraction and stabilization of the ns(M) AO result in the inversion of trends both in atomic and molecular properties in group 1 beyond Cs. Electronegativity χ of the elements proves to decrease from Cs, the most electropositive element of all elements, to element 119, with its χ value approaching that of Na. Due to the largest relativistic effects on the 8s(119) AO in group 1, bonding in (119) 2 appears to be stronger than that of K 2 , while bonding in 119Au should be the weakest out of all group-1 MAu. Using calculated dissociation energies of M 2 , sublimation enthalpies, ΔH sub , of Fr of 77 kJ/mol and element 119 of 94 kJ/mol were estimated using a linear correlation between these quantities in the chemical group. Using the M–Au binding energies, the adsorption enthalpies, −ΔH ads , of 106 kJ/mol on gold, 76 kJ/mol on platinum, and 63 kJ/mol on silver were estimated for element 119 via a correlation with known ΔH ads in the chemical group. These moderate ΔH ads values are indicative of a

  20. Effect of the functional groups of carbon on the surface and catalytic properties of Ru/C catalysts for hydrogenolysis of glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos-Suarez, E.; Pérez-Cadenas, M.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.; Arcoya, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ruthenium catalysts supported on activated carbons, original (AC) and treated with nitric acid (AC-Ox) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation from either chloride (Cl) or nitroxyl nitrate (n) precursors. These catalysts were characterized by TG, XPS, TEM, TPD-MS and CO adsorption microcalorimetry and evaluated in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol in the liquid phase, at 453 K and 8 MPa. Studies by TEM show that ruthenium particles supported on AC-Ox are larger than on AC, without any effect of the nature of the metal precursor. However, adsorption of CO on the ex-chloride catalysts is inhibited in comparison with that of the ex-nitroxyl nitrate catalysts. Catalysts characterization by TG, TPD-MS and XPS reveals that the nitric acid treatment and the nitroxyl nitrate precursor generate oxygenated groups on the carbon surface, which provide acid properties to the catalysts, although they are partly destroyed during the reduction treatment applied to the catalysts. The sequence of the overall TOF, Ru(Cl)/AC < Ru(n)/AC < Ru(Cl)/AC-Ox ≈ Ru(n)/AC-Ox, reasonably parallels the population increase of surface acid groups. Participation of the -COOH groups in the transformation of glycerol into 1,2-propanediol is verified by using the admixture Ru(Cl)/AC+AC-Ox as catalyst. In this case, since AC-Ox was not thermally treated and no loss of oxygenated groups occurred, TOF and selectivity toward 1,2-propanediol improve in comparison with those of the more active catalysts.

  1. Effect of the functional groups of carbon on the surface and catalytic properties of Ru/C catalysts for hydrogenolysis of glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos-Suarez, E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Técnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey n° 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, Marie Curie n° 2, L-10, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pérez-Cadenas, M. [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, Marie Curie n° 2, L-10, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, Marie Curie n° 2, L-10, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED ICP-CSIC, Group Design and Applied Heterogeneous Catalysis (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Técnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey n° 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED ICP-CSIC, Group Design and Applied Heterogeneous Catalysis (Spain); Arcoya, A., E-mail: aarcoya@icp.csic.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Técnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey n° 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED ICP-CSIC, Group Design and Applied Heterogeneous Catalysis (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Ruthenium catalysts supported on activated carbons, original (AC) and treated with nitric acid (AC-Ox) were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation from either chloride (Cl) or nitroxyl nitrate (n) precursors. These catalysts were characterized by TG, XPS, TEM, TPD-MS and CO adsorption microcalorimetry and evaluated in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol in the liquid phase, at 453 K and 8 MPa. Studies by TEM show that ruthenium particles supported on AC-Ox are larger than on AC, without any effect of the nature of the metal precursor. However, adsorption of CO on the ex-chloride catalysts is inhibited in comparison with that of the ex-nitroxyl nitrate catalysts. Catalysts characterization by TG, TPD-MS and XPS reveals that the nitric acid treatment and the nitroxyl nitrate precursor generate oxygenated groups on the carbon surface, which provide acid properties to the catalysts, although they are partly destroyed during the reduction treatment applied to the catalysts. The sequence of the overall TOF, Ru(Cl)/AC < Ru(n)/AC < Ru(Cl)/AC-Ox ≈ Ru(n)/AC-Ox, reasonably parallels the population increase of surface acid groups. Participation of the -COOH groups in the transformation of glycerol into 1,2-propanediol is verified by using the admixture Ru(Cl)/AC+AC-Ox as catalyst. In this case, since AC-Ox was not thermally treated and no loss of oxygenated groups occurred, TOF and selectivity toward 1,2-propanediol improve in comparison with those of the more active catalysts.

  2. Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

  3. Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants

  4. Reduction of calcium flux from the extracellular region and endoplasmic reticulum by amorphous nano-silica particles owing to carboxy group addition on their surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Onodera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that amorphous nano-silica particles (nano-SPs modulate calcium flux, although the mechanism remains incompletely understood. We thus analyzed the relationship between calcium flux and particle surface properties and determined the calcium flux route. Treatment of Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts with nano-SPs with a diameter of 70 nm (nSP70 increased cytosolic calcium concentration, but that with SPs with a diameter of 300 or 1000 nm did not. Surface modification of nSP70 with a carboxy group also did not modulate calcium flux. Pretreatment with a general calcium entry blocker almost completely suppressed calcium flux by nSP70. Preconditioning by emptying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER calcium stores slightly suppressed calcium flux by nSP70. These results indicate that nSP70 mainly modulates calcium flux across plasma membrane calcium channels, with subsequent activation of the ER calcium pump, and that the potential of calcium flux by nano-SPs is determined by the particle surface charge.

  5. Mapping the surface (hydr)oxo-groups of titanium oxide and its interface with an aqueous solution: the state of the art and a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, George D; Petsi, Theano; Bourikas, Kyriakos; Garoufalis, Christos S; Tsevis, Athanassios; Spanos, Nikos; Kordulis, Christos; Lycourghiotis, Alexis

    2008-10-01

    In this article the "titanium oxide/electrolyte solution" interface is studied by taking in advantage the recent developments in the field of Surface and Interface Chemistry relevant to this oxide. Ab-initio calculations were performed in the frame of the DFT theory for estimating the charge of the titanium and oxygen atoms exposed on the anatase (1 0 1), (1 0 0), (0 0 1), (1 0 3)(f) and rutile (1 1 0) crystal faces. These orientations have smaller surface energy with respect to other ones and thus it is more probable to be the real terminations of the anatase and rutile nanocrystallites in the titania polycrystalline powders. Potentiometric titrations for obtaining "fine structured" titration curves as well as microelectrophoresis and streaming potential measurements have been performed. On the basis of ab-initio calculations, and taking into account the relative contribution of each crystal face to the whole surface of the nanocrystals involved in the titania aggregates of a suspension, the three most probable surface ionization models have been derived. These models and the Music model are then tested in conjunction with the "Stern-Gouy-Chapman" and "Basic Stern" electrostatic models. The finally selected surface ionization model (model A) in combination with each one of the two electrostatic models describes very well the protonation/deprotonation behavior of titania. The description is also very good if this model is combined with the Three Plane (TP) model. The application of the "A/(TP)" model allowed mapping the surface (hydr)oxo-groups [TiO(H) and Ti(2)O(H)] of titania exposed in aqueous solutions. At pH>pzc almost all terminal oxygens [TiO] are non-protonated whereas even at low pH values the non-protonated terminal oxygens predominate. The acid-base behavior of the bridging oxygens [Ti(2)O] is different. Thus, even at pH=10 the greater portion of them is protonated. The application of the "A/TP" model in conjunction with potentiometric titrations

  6. Identification of the psaA Gene, Coding for Pneumococcal Surface Adhesin A, in Viridans Group Streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jado, Isabel; Fenoll, Asunción; Casal, Julio; Pérez, Amalia

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding the pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA) protein has been identified in three different viridans group streptococcal species. Comparative studies of the psaA gene identified in different pneumococcal isolates by sequencing PCR products showed a high degree of conservation among these strains. PsaA is encoded by an open reading frame of 930 bp. The analysis of this fragment in Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus anginosus strains revealed a sequence identity of 95, 94, and 90%, respectively, to the corresponding open reading frame of the previously reported Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B strain. Our results confirm that psaA is present and detectable in heterologous bacterial species. The possible implications of these results for the suitability and potential use of PsaA in the identification and diagnosis of pneumococcal diseases are discussed. PMID:11527799

  7. Towards a highly-efficient fuel-cell catalyst: optimization of Pt particle size, supports and surface-oxygen group concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Navaneethan; de la Fuente, Jose Luis Gomez; Ochal, Piotr; Giri, Rajiv; Raaen, Steinar; Sunde, Svein; Rønning, Magnus; Chen, De

    2013-03-21

    In the present work, methanol oxidation reaction was investigated on Pt particles of various diameters on carbon-nanofibers and carbon-black supports with different surface-oxygen concentrations, aiming for a better understanding of the relationship between the catalyst properties and the electrochemical performance. The pre-synthesized Pt nanoparticles in ethylene glycol, prepared by the polyol method without using any capping agents, were deposited on different carbon supports. Removal of oxygen-groups from the carbon supports had profound positive effects on not only the Pt dispersion but also the specific activity. The edge structures on the stacked graphene sheets in the platelet carbon-nanofibers provided a strong interaction with the Pt particles, significantly reconstructing them in the process. Such reconstruction resulted in the formation of more plated Pt particles on the CNF than on the carbon-black and exposure of more Pt atoms with relatively high co-ordination numbers, and thereby higher specific activity. Owing to the combined advantages of optimum Pt particle diameter, an oxygen-free surface and the unique properties of CNFs, Pt supported on heat-treated CNFs exhibited a higher mass activity twice of that of its commercial counterpart.

  8. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal and Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myneni, Satish C.

    2008-01-01

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  9. The Surface faulting produced by the 30 October 2016 Mw 6.5 Central Italy earthquake: the Open EMERGEO Working Group experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantosti, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    The October 30, 2016 (06:40 UTC) Mw 6.5 earthquake occurred about 28 km NW of Amatrice village as the result of upper crust normal faulting on a nearly 30 km-long, NW-SE oriented, SW dipping fault system in the Central Apennines. This earthquake is the strongest Italian seismic event since the 1980 Mw 6.9 Irpinia earthquake. The Mw 6.5 event was the largest shock of a seismic sequence, which began on August 24 with a Mw 6.0 earthquake and also included a Mw 5.9 earthquake on October 26, about 9 and 35 km NW of Amatrice village, respectively. Field surveys of coseismic geological effects at the surface started within hours of the mainshock and were carried out by several national and international teams of earth scientists (about 120 people) from different research institutions and universities coordinated by the EMERGEO Working Group of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. This collaborative effort was focused on the detailed recognition and mapping of: 1) the total extent of the October 30 coseismic surface ruptures, 2) their geometric and kinematic characteristics, 3) the coseismic displacement distribution along the activated fault system, including subsidiary and antithetic ruptures. The huge amount of collected data (more than 8000 observation points of several types of coseismic effects at the surface) were stored, managed and shared using a specifically designed spreadsheet to populate a georeferenced database. More comprehensive mapping of the details and extent of surface rupture was facilitated by Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry surveys by means of several helicopter flights. An almost continuous alignment of ruptures about 30 km long, N150/160 striking, mainly SW side down was observed along the already known active Mt. Vettore - Mt. Bove fault system. The mapped ruptures occasionally overlapped those of the August 24 Mw 6.0 and October 26 Mw 5.9 shocks. The coincidence between the observed surface ruptures and the trace of active

  10. 20 January 2014 - Members of the Regional Assemblies and Parliaments United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group P. Cruikshank.

    CERN Document Server

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    20 January 2014 - Members of the Regional Assemblies and Parliaments United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group P. Cruikshank.

  11. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Ok; Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil

    2013-01-01

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer–Emmett–Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO 2 supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H 2 adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was conducted to maximize its BET surface area

  12. Incremental Contributions of FbaA and Other Impetigo-Associated Surface Proteins to Fitness and Virulence of a Classical Group A Streptococcal Skin Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchon, Candace N; Ly, Anhphan T; Noto, John P; Luo, Feng; Lizano, Sergio; Bessen, Debra E

    2017-11-01

    Group A streptococci (GAS) are highly prevalent human pathogens whose primary ecological niche is the superficial epithelial layers of the throat and/or skin. Many GAS strains with a strong tendency to cause pharyngitis are distinct from strains that tend to cause impetigo; thus, genetic differences between them may confer host tissue-specific virulence. In this study, the FbaA surface protein gene was found to be present in most skin specialist strains but largely absent from a genetically related subset of pharyngitis isolates. In an Δ fbaA mutant constructed in the impetigo strain Alab49, loss of FbaA resulted in a slight but significant decrease in GAS fitness in a humanized mouse model of impetigo; the Δ fbaA mutant also exhibited decreased survival in whole human blood due to phagocytosis. In assays with highly sensitive outcome measures, Alab49ΔfbaA was compared to other isogenic mutants lacking virulence genes known to be disproportionately associated with classical skin strains. FbaA and PAM (i.e., the M53 protein) had additive effects in promoting GAS survival in whole blood. The pilus adhesin tip protein Cpa promoted Alab49 survival in whole blood and appears to fully account for the antiphagocytic effect attributable to pili. The finding that numerous skin strain-associated virulence factors make slight but significant contributions to virulence underscores the incremental contributions to fitness of individual surface protein genes and the multifactorial nature of GAS-host interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Surface-bound capsular polysaccharide of type Ia group B Streptococcus mediates C1 binding and activation of the classic complement pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, N.J.; Kasper, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of surface-bound type Ia group B Streptococcus (GBS) capsular polysaccharide in anti-body-independent binding of C1 and activation of the classic component pathway was investigated. In a radiolabeled bacterial-polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) association assay, a measure of bacterial opsonization, preincubation of 3 H-type Ia GBS with purified F(ab') 2 to the organism blocked the association of the bacteria with PMN', and the inhibitory effect was dose dependent. The specificity of F(ab') 2 blocking was shown after adsorption of F(ab') 2 with type Ia polysaccharide-sensitized erythrocytes. Polysaccharide-adsorbed F(ab') 2 had a 70% decrease in ability to block the association of bacteria with PMN. Neuraminidase digestion removed 80% of the terminal sialic acid residues from the native polysaccharide. These neuraminidase-digested organisms had a 72% decrease in binding and transfer of purified C1 compared with non-enzyme-treated organisms. Type Ia capsular polysaccharide bound to sheep erythrocytes promoted classic complement pathway-mediated hemolysis of the cells. The role of C1 inhibitor (INH) in modulation of C1 activation by the organisms was investigated. The possibility existed that the C1 INH could be bound by the bacteria, allowing C1 activation to occur in the fluid phase. The inhibitor was purified from human serum, and its activity was measured before and after incubation with type Ia GBS. The organisms had no effect on C1 INH activity. Thus surface-bound capsular polysacchardie of type Ia GBS mediates C1 binding and classic pathway activation, and this does not involve the C1 INH

  14. Anomalous carrier life-time relaxation mediated by head group interaction in surface anchored MnSe quantum dots conjugated with albumin proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, Runjun; Mohanta, Dambarudhar, E-mail: best@tezu.ernet.in

    2017-02-01

    We report on the radiative emission decay dynamics of a less known, γ-phase manganese selenide quantum dot system (MnSe QDs) subjected to bio-functionalization. A short-ligand thioglycolic acid (TGA), and a long-chain sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants were used as surface anchors prior bioconjugation with albumin proteins (BSA). Time resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectra of the QDs have revealed bi-exponential decay trends with the fast (τ{sub 1}) and slow (τ{sub 2}) decay parameters assigned to the core state recombination and surface trapped excitons; respectively. The average lifetime (τ{sub avg}) was found to get shortened from a value of ∼0.87 ns–0.72 ns in unconjugated and BSA conjugated MnSe-TGA QDs; respectively. Conversely, MnSe-SDS QDs with BSA conjugation exhibited nearly four-fold enhancement of τ{sub avg} with respect to its unconjugated counterpart. Moreover, a considerable amount of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was found to occur from the TGA coated MnSe QDs to BSA and with an ensuing efficiency of ∼61%. The origin of anomalous carrier life-time relaxation features has also been encountered through a simplified model as regards head group interaction experienced by the MnSe QDs with different surfactant types. Exploiting luminescence decay characteristics of a magneto-fluorescent candidate could find immense scope in diverse biological applications including assays, labeling and imaging. - Highlights: • Surface anchored manganese selenide quantum dots (MnSe QDs) have been synthesized via a physico-chemical reduction route. • Time resolved luminescence spectra of the QDs have displayed bi-exponential decay trend. • Thioglycolic acid (TGA) coated QDs exhibited shorter lifetime as compared to sodium dodecyl sulfo-succinate (SDS) coated ones. • Upon BSA conjugation, the average life time is four-fold enhanced in MnSe-SDS QDs. • An efficient FRET process has been revealed in BSA conjugated TGA coated MnSe QDs.

  15. One-pot preparation of conducting composite containing abundant amino groups on electrode surface for electrochemical detection of von willebrand factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Ma, Chao; Li, Yi; Liu, Baihui; Tan, Liang

    2018-03-01

    A one-pot protocol based on cyclic voltammetric scan was employed to prepare new conducting composite that was abundant in amino groups. The scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectrum characterization demonstrate that poly(azure A), gold nanoparticles, chitosan and cysteine were immobilized simultaneously on glassy carbon electrode surface. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) antibody (Ab) was subsequently assembled by using glutaraldehyde to construct the Ab/composite-modified electrode. The capture of vWF could inhibit the charge transfer between the ferri-/ferrocyanide probe and the electrode and exert the negative effect on the electrochemical response of the dye polymer in the conducting composite due to the strong steric hindrance effect. The DPV peak current change before and after the immunoreaction was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the vWF concentration from 0.001 to 100 μg mL-1 with a detection limit of 0.4 ng mL-1. The proposed label-free electrochemical method was employed in the investigation on the release of vWF by oxidation-injured vascular endothelial cells. The experimental results exhibit that the vWF content in growth medium was increased when the oxidation injury of the cells was intensified in the presence of H2O2.

  16. Azido-iodo-N-benzyl derivatives of threo-methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta): Rational design, synthesis, pharmacological evaluation, and dopamine transporter photoaffinity labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinsky, David J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Liu, Yi; Huang, Yurong; Surratt, Christopher K; Lever, John R; Foster, James D; Acharya, Rejwi; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Deutsch, Howard M

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to tropane-based compounds such as benztropine and cocaine, non-tropane-based photoaffinity ligands for the dopamine transporter (DAT) are relatively unexplored. Towards addressing this knowledge gap, ligands were synthesized in which the piperidine nitrogen of 3- and 4-iodomethylphenidate was substituted with a benzyl group bearing a photoreactive azide. Analog (±)-3a demonstrated modest DAT affinity and a radioiodinated version was shown to bind covalently to rat striatal DAT and hDAT expressed in cultured cells. Co-incubation of (±)-3a with nonradioactive d-(+)-methylphenidate or (-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (β-CFT, WIN-35,428, a cocaine analog) blocked DAT labeling. Compound (±)-3a represents the first successful example of a DAT photoaffinity ligand based on the methylphenidate scaffold. Such ligands are expected to assist in mapping non-tropane ligand-binding pockets within plasma membrane monoamine transporters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nature of DNA lesions induced in human hepatoma cells, human colonic cells and human embryonic lung fibroblasts by the antiretroviral drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slamenova, Darina [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis, Vlarska 7, 83391 Bratislava (Slovakia)]. E-mail: darina.slamenova@savba.sk; Horvathova, Eva [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis, Vlarska 7, 83391 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bartkova, Miriam [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis, Vlarska 7, 83391 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2006-01-29

    This study tried to clarify the question if nuclear genotoxicity played a role in 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) toxicity. We investigated cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of AZT on human hepatoma HepG2 and human colonic CaCo-2 cells as well as on human diploid lung fibroblasts HEL. The amount of induced DNA damage was measured by standard alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The nature of induced DNA lesions was evaluated (1) by modified SCGE, which includes treatment of lysed cells with DNA repair enzymes Endo III and Fpg and enables to recognize oxidized bases of DNA, and (2) by SCGE processed in parallel at pH 13.0 (standard technique) and pH 12.1, which enables to recognize alkali labile DNA lesions and direct DNA strand breaks. Cytotoxicity of AZT was evaluated by the trypan blue exclusion technique. Our findings showed that 3-h treatment of cells with AZT decreased the viability of all cell lines studied. SCGE performed in the presence of DNA repair enzymes proved that AZT induced oxidative lesions to DNA in all cell types. In hepatoma HepG2 cells and embryonic lung fibroblasts HEL the majority of AZT-induced DNA strand breaks were pH-independent, i.e. they were identified at both pH values (12.1 and 13.0). These DNA lesions represented direct DNA breaks. In colonic Caco-2 cells DNA lesions were converted to DNA strand breaks particularly under strong alkaline conditions (pH > 13.0), which is characteristic for alkali-labile sites of DNA. DNA strand break rejoining was investigated by the standard comet assay technique during 48 h of post-AZT-treatment in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells. The kinetics of DNA rejoining, considered an indicator of DNA repair, revealed that AZT-induced DNA breaks were repaired in both cell types slowly, though HepG2 cells seemed to be more repair proficient with respect to AZT-induced DNA lesions.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows an IgG-isotype-specific defect in ABO blood group antibody formation in patients with common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bernhard Fischer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is the most common clinically severe primary immunodeficiency and comprises a heterogeneous group of patients with recurrent severe bacterial infections due to the failure to produce IgG antibodies after exposure to infectious agents and immunization. Diagnostic recommendations for antibody failure include assessment of isoagglutinins. We have readdressed this four decades old but still accepted recommendation with up to date methodology.Methods: Anti-A/B IgM- and IgG-antibodies were measured by Diamed-ID Micro Typing, surface plasmon resonance (SPR using the Biacore® device and flow cytometry.Results: When Diamed-ID Micro Typing was used, CVID patients (n=34 showed IgG- and IgM-isoagglutinins that were comparable to healthy volunteers (n=28, while all XLA patients (n=8 had none. Anti-A/B IgM-antibodies were present in more than 2/3 of the CVID patients and showed binding kinetics comparable to anti-A/B IgM-antibodies from healthy individuals. A correlation could be found in CVID patients between levels of anti-A/B IgM-antibodies and levels of serum IgM and PnP-IgM-antibodies. In contrast in CVID patients as a group ABO antibodies were significantly decreased when assessed by SPR, which correlated with levels of switched memory, non-switched memory and naïve B cells, but all CVID patients had low/undetectable anti-A/B IgG-antibodies.Conclusion: These results indicate that conventional isoagglutinin assessment and assessment of anti-A/B IgM antibodies are not suited for the diagnosis of impaired antibody production in CVID. Examination of anti-A/B IgG antibodies by SPR provides a useful method for the diagnosis of IgG antibody failure in all CVID patients studied, thus indicating an important additional rationale to start immunoglobulin replacement therapy early in these patients, before post-infectious sequelae develop.

  19. Differences in the Activities of Eight Enzymes from Ten Soil Fungi and Their Possible Influences on the Surface Structure, Functional Groups, and Element Composition of Soil Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3–4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11–60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9–22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11–49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance. PMID:25398013

  20. Structure-function relationships in human testis-determining factor SRY: an aromatic buttress underlies the specific DNA-bending surface of a high mobility group (HMG) box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Joseph D; Chen, Yen-Shan; Maloy, James D; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2014-11-21

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY, a Y-encoded architectural transcription factor. Mutations in SRY cause 46 XY gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype (Swyer syndrome) and confer a high risk of malignancy (gonadoblastoma). Such mutations cluster in the SRY high mobility group (HMG) box, a conserved motif of specific DNA binding and bending. To explore structure-function relationships, we constructed all possible substitutions at a site of clinical mutation (W70L). Our studies thus focused on a core aromatic residue (position 15 of the consensus HMG box) that is invariant among SRY-related HMG box transcription factors (the SOX family) and conserved as aromatic (Phe or Tyr) among other sequence-specific boxes. In a yeast one-hybrid system sensitive to specific SRY-DNA binding, the variant domains exhibited reduced (Phe and Tyr) or absent activity (the remaining 17 substitutions). Representative nonpolar variants with partial or absent activity (Tyr, Phe, Leu, and Ala in order of decreasing side-chain volume) were chosen for study in vitro and in mammalian cell culture. The clinical mutation (Leu) was found to markedly impair multiple biochemical and cellular activities as respectively probed through the following: (i) in vitro assays of specific DNA binding and protein stability, and (ii) cell culture-based assays of proteosomal degradation, nuclear import, enhancer DNA occupancy, and SRY-dependent transcriptional activation. Surprisingly, however, DNA bending is robust to this or the related Ala substitution that profoundly impairs box stability. Together, our findings demonstrate that the folding, trafficking, and gene-regulatory function of SRY requires an invariant aromatic "buttress" beneath its specific DNA-bending surface. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Theoretical evaluation of flotation performance of carboxyl hydroxamic acids with different number of polar groups on the surfaces of diaspore (010) and kaolinite (001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-ping; Zhan, Guo-ping; Jiang, Yu-ren; Guo, Jing-nan; Yin, Zhi-gang; Feng, Rui

    2013-08-01

    The adsorption behaviors of three carboxyl hydroxamic acids on diaspore (010) and kaolinite (001) have been studied by density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) method. The results indicated that carboxyl hydroxamic acids could adsorb on diaspore surface by ionic bonds and hydrogen bonds, and adsorb on kaolinite surface by hydrogen bonds. The models of carboxyl hydroxamic acids adsorbed on diaspore and kaolinite surfaces are proposed.

  2. The location of redox-sensitive groups in the carrier protein of proline at the outer and inner surface of the membrane in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.; Robillard, George T.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence is presented in this report for the presence of two sets of dithiols associated with proline transport activity in Escherichia coli. One set is located at the outer surface, the other at the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. Treatment of right-side-out membrane vesicles from E.

  3. Orientation control of photo-immobilized antibodies on the surface of azobenzene-containing polymers by the introduction of functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Makoto; Ikawa, Taiji; Narita, Mamiko; Hoshino, Fumihiko; Watanabe, Osamu

    2010-06-11

    In our photo-induced immobilization technique for an antibody (IgG) using azopolymers, the introduction of COOH and NMe(2) into the azopolymers, which can introduce surface charges, strongly affected the immobilization properties such as the efficiency of immobilization and the activity of the immobilized IgG (i.e., the orientation of the immobilized IgG). The introduction of COOH promoted a more active orientation of the immobilized IgG. The orientation was determined during the adsorption process onto the azopolymer surface in solution before photo-immobilization, and was maintained during the photo-immobilization. The surface charge of the azopolymer appears to be an important factor for IgG orientation, which involves electrostatic interactions between its Fab and the azopolymer surface.

  4. SHORT COMMUNICATION SYNTHESIS OF AZIDO DERIVATIVES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    substitution reactions with various nucleophiles, including azides and afforded corresponding azidopyridazinones in good .... Lammens, T.M.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M. Green Chem. 2010, 12,. 1430. 2. Busch, R.; Hirth, T.; Liese, A.; Nordhoff, S.; Puls, J.; Puls, O.; Sell, D.; Syldatk, C.; Ulber,. R. Chem.

  5. Acyl and silyl group effects in reactivity-based one-pot glycosylation: synthesis of embryonic stem cell surface carbohydrates Lc4 and IV(2)Fuc-Lc4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yun; Lu, Xin-An; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Lin, Kuo-I; Hung, Shang-Cheng; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2012-03-14

    Relative reactivity evaluations showed the graded arming of toluenyl thioglucosides by variously positioned silyl groups but not by their acyl counterparts. These findings were applied in reactivity-based one-pot assembly of linker-attached Lc(4) and IV(2)Fuc-Lc(4), which are components of human embryonic stem cell surface. The sugar-galectin-1 binding was also examined.

  6. Combinatorial materials research applied to the development of new surface coatings XIII: an investigation of polysiloxane antimicrobial coatings containing tethered quaternary ammonium salt groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Partha; Lee, Elizabeth; Gubbins, Nathan; Christianson, David A; Stafslien, Shane J; Daniels, Justin; Vanderwal, Lyndsi; Bahr, James; Chisholm, Bret J

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput biological assays were used to develop structure - antimicrobial relationships for polysiloxane coatings containing chemically bound (tethered) quaternary ammonium salt (QAS) moieties. The QAS-functional polysiloxanes were derived from solution blends of a silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane, a trimethoxysilane-functional QAS (QAS-TMS), and methylacetoxysilane. Since the QAS moieties provide antimicrobial activity through interaction with the microorganism cell wall, most of the compositional variables that were investigated were associated with the chemical structure of the QAS-TMS. Twenty different QAS-TMS were synthesized for the study and the antimicrobial activity of sixty unique polysiloxane coatings derived from these QAS-TMS determined toward Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , and Candida albicans . The results of the study showed that essentially all of the compositional variables significantly influenced antimicrobial activity. Surface characterization of these moisture-cured coatings using atomic force microscopy as well as water contact angle and water contact angle hysteresis measurements indicated that the compositional variables significantly affected coating surface morphology and surface chemistry. Overall, compositional variables that produced heterogeneous surface morphologies provided the highest antimicrobial activity suggesting that the antimicrobial activity was primarily derived from the relationship between coating chemical composition and self-assembly of QAS moieties at the coating/air interface. Using data modeling software, a narrow region of the compositional space was identified that provided broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity.

  7. Group contribution and parachor analysis of experimental data on densities and surface tension for six ionic liquids with the [PF6] anion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klomfar, Jaroslav; Součková, Monika; Pátek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 385, January (2015), s. 62-71 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00145S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ionic liquid * density * surface tension * odd-even effect Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2015

  8. Spherical Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David

    2016-01-01

    We study surfaces of constant positive Gauss curvature in Euclidean 3-space via the harmonicity of the Gauss map. Using the loop group representation, we solve the regular and the singular geometric Cauchy problems for these surfaces, and use these solutions to compute several new examples. We give...

  9. Long-range interfacial electron transfer and electrocatalysis of molecular scale Prussian Blue nanoparticles linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces by different chemical contacting groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan; Ulstrup, Jens; Chi, Qijin

    2017-01-01

    forming linker molecules. The interfacial ET rate constants were found to depend exponentially on the ET distance for distances longer than a few methylene groups in the chain, with decay factors (β) of 0.9, 1.1, and 1.3 per CH2, for SAMs terminated by −NH3+,–COO–, and–CH3, respectively. This feature...

  10. Atomic geometry and STM simulations of a TiO.sub.2./sub.(110) surface upon formation of an oxygen vacancy and hydroxyl group

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mutombo, Pingo; Kiss, A.M.; Berkó, A.; Cháb, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2008), 025007/1-025007/9 ISSN 0965-0393 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010413 Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) 9/2004 KONTAKT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : vacance * Oxygen * OH group * STM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.388, year: 2008

  11. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Iliaš, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl 4 , MOCl 2 , MCl 6 − , and MOCl 4 2 with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl 4 , the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔH sub , of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr < Hf. On the basis of a correlation between these quantities, ΔH sub (RfCl 4 ) was predicted as 104.2 kJ/mol. The energy of physisorption of MOCl 2 on quartz should increase in the group, Zr < Hf < Rf, as defined by increasing dipole moments of these molecules along the series. In the case of adsorption of MCl 4 on quartz by chemical forces, formation of the MOCl 2 or MOCl 4 2− complexes on the surface can take place, so that the sequence in the adsorption energy should be Zr > Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl 4 on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl 6 2− surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf < Rf. All the predicted sequences, showing a smooth change of the adsorption energy in the group, are in disagreement with the reversed trend Zr ≈ Rf < Hf, observed in the “one-atom-at-a-time” gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations

  12. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Iliaš, M; Türler, A

    2014-08-14

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl4, MOCl2, MCl6(-), and MOCl4(2) with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl4, the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔH(sub), of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr Hf. On the basis of a correlation between these quantities, ΔH(sub)(RfCl4) was predicted as 104.2 kJ/mol. The energy of physisorption of MOCl2 on quartz should increase in the group, Zr Hf Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl4 on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl6(2-) surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf Hf, observed in the "one-atom-at-a-time" gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations.

  13. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Iliaš, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-08-01

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl4, MOCl2, MCl6-, and MOCl42 with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl4, the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔHsub, of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl4 on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl62- surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf < Rf. All the predicted sequences, showing a smooth change of the adsorption energy in the group, are in disagreement with the reversed trend Zr ≈ Rf < Hf, observed in the "one-atom-at-a-time" gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations.

  14. Aquiflexum balticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel marine bacterium of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group isolated from surface water of the central Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2004-11-01

    A bacterial isolate from the Baltic Sea, BA160(T), was characterized for its physiological and biochemical features, fatty acid profile, G+C content and phylogenetic position based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. The strain was isolated from the surface water of the central Baltic Sea during the decay of a plankton bloom. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed a clear affiliation with the family 'Flexibacteraceae', and showed the closest phylogenetic relationship with the species Belliella baltica and Cyclobacterium marinum. The G+C content of the DNA was 38.4 mol%. The strain was red-coloured due to carotenoids, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth was observed at salinities from 0 to 6 %, with an optimum around 1.5 %. Temperature for growth ranged from 4 to 40 degrees C, with an optimum around 30 degrees C. The fatty acids were dominated by branched-chain fatty acids (>87 %), with a high abundance of iso-C(15 : 0) (23 %) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) (19 %). According to its morphology, physiology, fatty acid composition, G+C content and 16S rRNA gene sequence, strain BA160(T) is considered to represent a new genus of the family 'Flexibacteraceae'. Due to its aquatic origin, the name Aquiflexum balticum gen. nov, sp. nov. is suggested for the type species (type strain, BA160(T)=DSM 16537(T)=LMG 22565(T)=CIP 108445(T)) of the new genus.

  15. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  16. Boehm Titration Revisited (Part II: A Comparison of Boehm Titration with Other Analytical Techniques on the Quantification of Oxygen-Containing Surface Groups for a Variety of Carbon Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Schönherr

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of the Boehm titration (BT method as an analytical tool for the quantification of oxygen-containing surface groups is systematically investigated for oxidized carbon black, carbon nanotubes and two active carbons with specific surface areas between 60 and 1750 m2 g−1. The accuracy of the BT method is quantitatively compared with results from elemental analysis (EA, temperature programmed desorption (TPD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Overall, the results from TPD are in line with the values obtained by BT. Both show the equal ratio of the oxygen groups to each other. Within the series of carbon samples, all methods provide similar trends for the total oxygen content yet the absolute numbers are deviating significantly. Reasons for these discrepancies are discussed and linked to the specific characteristics of the different methods. As the BT method is a solution based method, it only probes the surface fraction of the carbon that is accessible to the base solution. That means, it probes the relevant fraction for applications where carbon is in contact to aqueous solutions. Overall, the BT method can be conveniently applied to a broad range of carbon materials as long as the samples are sufficiently hydrophilic and of the enough sample amount is provided.

  17. Tentacle-type zwitterionic stationary phase prepared by surface-initiated graft polymerization of 3-[N,N-dimethyl-N-(methacryloyloxyethyl)-ammonium] propanesulfonate through peroxide groups tethered on porous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Irgum, Knut

    2002-09-15

    A novel stationary phase with tentacle-type zwitterionic interaction layer was synthesized by free radical graft polymerization of 3-[N,N-dimethyl-N-(methacryloyloxyethyl)ammonium]propanesulfonate (SPE) from the surface of Kromasil porous silica particles. The polymerization was initiated by thermal cleavage of tert-butylperoxy groups covalently attached to the particle surface, and the material therefore carries a tentacle-type polymeric interaction layer with 3-sulfopropylbetaine functional moieties. The composition of the surface graft was determined by elemental analysis, and the surface charge was measured using photon correlation spectroscopy. The measured zeta-potentials were close to 0 and nearly independent of pH, and the tentacle character of the interactive layers were evident from the lack of colloidal stability in the absence of salt (antipolyelectrolytic behavior) and a marked increase in column back-pressure when the concentration of perchloric acid or perchlorate salt was increased. The chromatographic properties were evaluated on columns packed with the functionalized material, and it was shown that this zwitterionic stationary phase could simultaneously and independently separate inorganic anions and cations using aqueous solutions of perchloric acid or perchlorate salts as eluents. The material was also capable of separating two acidic and three basic proteins in a single run, using gradient salt elution at constant pH.

  18. Simultaneous detection of forbidden chemical residues in milk using dual-label time-resolved reverse competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay based on amine group functionalized surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, a sensitive dual-label time-resolved reverse competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay was developed for simultaneous detection of chloramphenicol (CAP and clenbuterol (CLE in milk. The strategy was performed based on the distinction of the kinetic characteristics of horseradish peroxidase (HRP and alkaline phosphatase (ALP in chemiluminesecence (CL systems and different orders of magnitude in HRP CL value for CAP and ALP CL value for CLE in the chemiluminescent immunoassay. Capture antibodies were covalently bound to the amine group functionalized chemiluminescent microtiter plate (MTP for efficient binding of detection antibodies for the enzymes labeled CAP (HRP-CAP and CLE (ALP-CLE. The CL signals were recorded at different time points by the automatic luminometers with significant distinction in the dynamic curves. When we considered the ALP CL value (about 10(5 of CLE as background for HRP CL signal value (about 10(7 of CAP, there was no interaction from ALP CL background of CLE and the differentiation of CAP and CLE can be easily achieved. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC50 values of CAP and CLE in milk samples were 0.00501 µg L(-1 and 0.0128 µg L(-1, with the ranges from 0.0003 µg L(-1 to 0.0912 µg L(-1 and from 0.00385 µg L(-1 to 0.125 µg L(-1, respectively. The developed method is more sensitive and of less duration than the commercial ELISA kits, suitable for simultaneous screening of CAP and CLE.

  19. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    compound formed from μ1,1-azido clipping of two methoxido bridged [Cu2] complexes showing asymmetric coordination from benzophenone oxygen atoms and terminal azido groups. Keywords. Tetranuclear copper(II); azido; methoxido; phenoxido; X-ray structure; rhombiodal. 1. Introduction. In recent years, the utilization ...

  20. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  1. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  2. Isopermutation group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muktibodh, A. S. [Department of Mathematics, Mohota College of Science, NAGPUR-440009 India E-mail: amukti2000@yahoo.com (India)

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  3. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  4. Adsorption orientation effects of porphyrin dyes on the performance of DSSC: Comparison of benzoic acid and tropolone anchoring groups binding onto the TiO2 anatase (101) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Han-Cheng; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Ying-Lin

    2018-03-01

    A new porphyrin dye with tropolone anchoring group showing superior stability but lower efficiency versus the promising dye YD2-o-C8 with benzoic acid anchoring group was theoretically investigated for the first time. A series of important parameters related to the efficiency of DSSC were calculated to explore the nature of the experimentally observed lower efficiency and superior stability of tropolone-based solar cells. We found these two dyes with different anchoring groups show comparable electron injection and dye regeneration process. Interestingly, the red-shifted absorption spectrum, relatively weaker ability of releasing protons, and the larger conduction band energy shift of tropolone-based dyes all demonstrated it should show better performance than the benzoic acid dyes, which contradicts with the experimental results. However, through investigating the interaction between the porphyrin dye and the semiconductor by analyzing the electron localization function of the porphyrin dye and preforming energy decomposition analysis, we found that the direction of lone-pair electrons of carbonyl oxygen in the tropolone-based dye makes the dye prefer to adsorb on the surface in an inclined way, in contrary to the benzoic acid-based dye that favored a vertical adsorption. The inclined adsorption could significantly accelerate the charge recombination process between the injected electrons and the oxidized dye, leading to a decreased efficiency of DSSC.

  5. Tyres and road surfaces : experimental multifactor investigation of the factors affecting the brake and side way forces between car tyres and wet road surfaces : summary, conclusions and recommendations from the study by Sub-Committee I of the Working Group on "Tyres, Road Surfaces and Skidding Accidents".

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1976-01-01

    The study concerning the contact between a tyre and the road surface was conducted in three phases. In the first phase the first and second-order factors were separated. The factors: type of road surface, tyre type, tread depth, water depth, tyre pressure and tyre load were included in an

  6. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  7. Group Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this…

  8. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure determination of Mn (II) ion based 1D polymer constructed from 2, 2′ bipyridyl and azide group, its thermal stability, magnetic properties and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudsainiyan, R.K.; Jassal, Amanpreet Kaur; Chawla, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    The 1-D polymeric complex (I) is having formula [Mn(2,2′-BP).(N 3 ) 2 ] n , which has been crystallized in distilled water and characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectrum, powder X-ray diffraction analyses and single-crystal diffraction analysis. This polymer possesses 1D helical chains or coils where Mn–azide–Mn forms the base of the coil which is alternatively garlanded by rigid bi-pyridine rings, where coordinates are in anti-fashion. The Mn (II) ions in the repeating units are linked by two end-on azide groups which extend through the two end-to-end azide ligands to the next unit forming a 1-D polymeric chain. The present study suggests that the use of this rigid and neutral building block leads to give better arrangement of the polymeric motif with [010] chains in 2-c uninodal net. During investigation of strong or weak intermolecular interactions, X-ray diffraction analysis and Hirshfeld surface analysis give rise to comparable results but in Hirshfeld surface analysis, two-third times more results of close contacts are obtained. The fingerprint plots demonstrate that these weak non-bonding interactions are important for stabilizing the crystal packing. Magnetic properties of the complex (I) were analyzed on the basis of an alternating ferro- and antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain of Mn (II) ions. The J-exchange parameters found are J 1 =64.3 K (45.3 cm −1 ), and J 2 =−75.7 K (−53.3 cm −1 ). Magnetic properties are discussed in comparison with those of other similar molecular magnets of [Mn(L–L)(N 3 ) 2 ] n type. - - Highlights: • Synthesized 1-D polymeric complex of Mn (II) ions with 2, 2′ bipyridyl and azide group. • X-ray data of complex (I) is in a good agreement with TGA and other spectroscopic techniques. • DFT calculations were done and compared with the parameter of experimental and theoretical data. • Intermolecular interactions calculated by Hirshfeld surface analysis compared with X-ray data

  9. Combinatorial Group Theory -42-----------------------------~-----------R ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE. Combinatorial Group Theory. Group Theory via Generators and Relations. B Sury is with the School of Mathematics, TIFR,. Mumbai. The concept of groups surfaced with the fundamental works of the great mathematicians. Evariste Galois and Niels Henrik. Abel. The advent of group theory.

  10. Use of synthetic peptides to represent surface-exposed epitopes defined by neutralizing dengue complex- and flavivirus group-reactive monoclonal antibodies on the native dengue type-2 virus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K I

    2008-07-01

    The reactions of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that defined dengue virus (DENV) complex, flavivirus subgroup or group neutralizing epitopes were tested against synthetic peptide sequences from domains I, II and III of the envelope (E) glycoproteins of different DENV-2 genotypes/strains. The DENV complex-reactive mAb identified the surface-exposed 304-GKFKV/IVKEIA-313 peptides and the DENV complex-conserved 393-KKGSSIGQ/KM-401 peptides in domain III, which were located adjacently in the native glycoprotein. Both flavivirus group-reactive mAbs reacted most strongly with fusion sequence peptides from domain II when they contained a cysteine (C) by glycine (G) substitution (underlined) (101-WGNGGGLFG-109) to represent the native rotated C side chain. The 393-401 sequence represents a newly identified epitope, present as a highly flexible coil located between the 385 and 393 cell-binding sequence and the 401 and 413 sequence involved in the E glycoprotein homo-trimer formation. The 101-109 sequence containing 105-C by G substitution and the 393-401 sequence are good candidates for diagnostic assays and cross-protection experiments.

  11. Immobilization of poly(acrylamide) brushes onto poly(caprolactone) surface by combining ATRP and “click” chemistry: Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of protein adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yuhao; Bian, Xinxiu; He, Liu; Cai, Mengtan; Xie, Xiaoxiong [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Luo, Xianglin, E-mail: luoxl@scu.edu.cn [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Material and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Poly(caprolacone) (PCL) film surface was chemically modified by a novel method through combining ATRP and “click” chemistry. • Poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) of tailored chain length were synthesized and “clicked” onto PCL surface. • The modified PCL surface showed reduced BSA and Fg adsorption, and the protein resist ability in terms of chain length through its impact on grafting reaction and modified surface was investigated. - Abstract: Developments of poly(caprolactone) in blood-contacting applications are often restricted due to its intrinsic hydrophobicity. One common way to improve its hemocompatibility is to attach hydrophilic polymers. Here we developed a non-destructive method to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) onto poly(caprolactone) (PCL) surface. In this strategy, azido-ended PCL with low molecular weights was synthesized and blended with PCL to create a surface with “clickable” property. Alkyne-ended poly(acrylamide)s with controlled chain lengths were then synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and finally were immobilized onto PCL surface by “click” reaction. The occurrence of immobilization was verified qualitatively by water contact angle measurement and quantitatively by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The PAAm grafted surface exhibited fouling resistant properties, as demonstrated by reduced bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) adhesion.

  12. Dynamical Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldus, Josef

    The well known symmetry (invariance, degeneracy) dynamical groups or algebras of quantum mechanical Hamiltonians provide quantum numbers (conservation laws, integrals of motion) for state labeling and the associated selection rules. In addition, it is often advantageous to employ much larger groups, referred to as the dynamical groups (noninvariance groups, dynamical algebras, spectrum generating algebras), which may or may not be the invariance groups of the studied system [4.1,2,3,4,5,6,7]. In all known cases, they are Lie groups (LGs), or rather corresponding Lie algebras (LAs), and one usually requires that all states of interest of a system be contained in a single irreducible representation (irrep). Likewise, one may require that the Hamiltonian be expressible in terms of the Casimir operators of the corresponding universal enveloping algebra [4.8,9]. In a weaker sense, one regards any group (or corresponding algebra) as a dynamical group if the Hamiltonian can be expressed in terms of its generators [4.10,11,12]. In nuclear physics, one sometimes distinguishes exact (baryon number preserving), almost exact (e.g., total isospin), approximate (e.g., SU(3) of the "eightfold way") and model (e.g., nuclear shell model) dynamical symmetries [4.13]. The dynamical groups of interest in atomic and molecular physics can be conveniently classified by their topological characteristic of compactness. Noncompact LGs (LAs) generally arise in simple problems involving an infinite number of bound states, while those involving a finite number of bound states (e.g., molecular vibrations or ab initio models of electronic structure) exploit compact LG's.

  13. Unprecedented conformational variability in main group inorganic chemistry: the tetraazidoarsenite and -antimonite salts A+ [M(N3)4]- (A = NMe4, PPh4, (Ph3P)2N; M = As, Sb), five similar salts, five different anion structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiges, Ralf; Rahm, Martin; Christe, Karl O

    2013-01-07

    A unique example for conformational variability in inorganic main group chemistry has been discovered. The arrangement of the azido ligands in the pseudotrigonal bipyramidal [As(N(3))(4)](-) and [Sb(N(3))(4)](-) anions theoretically can give rise to seven different conformers which have identical MN(4) skeletons but different azido ligand arrangements and very similar energies. We have now synthesized and structurally characterized five of these conformers by subtle variations in the nature of the counterion. Whereas conformational variability is common in organic chemistry, it is rare in inorganic main group chemistry and is usually limited to two. To our best knowledge, the experimental observation of five distinct single conformers for the same type of anion is unprecedented. Theoretical calculations at the M06-2X/cc-pwCVTZ-PP level for all seven possible basic conformers show that (1) the energy differences between the five experimentally observed conformers are about 1 kcal/mol or less, and (2) the free monomeric anions are the energetically favored species in the gas phase and also for [As(N(3))(4)](-) in the solid state, whereas for [Sb(N(3))(4)](-) associated anions are energetically favored in the solid state and possibly in solutions. Raman spectroscopy shows that in the azide antisymmetric stretching region, the solid-state spectra are distinct for the different conformers, and permits their identification. The spectra of solutions are solvent dependent and differ from those of the solids indicating the presence of rapidly exchanging equilibria of different conformers. The only compound for which a solid with a single well-ordered conformer could not be isolated was [N(CH(3))(4)][As(N(3))(4)] which formed a viscous, room-temperature ionic liquid. Its Raman spectrum was identical to that of its CH(3)CN solution indicating the presence of an equilibrium of multiple conformers.

  14. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  15. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  16. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  17. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . These fields are interrelated and each of these fields contributes to the other. 2. Examples and classification. We first give some examples of Lie groups. The most frequently occurring ones are the linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), ...

  18. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S RAGHUNATHAN and T N VENKATARAMANA. ∗. School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental ... linear classical groups GLn(R), GLn(C), SOn(R),. SOn(C), Spn(R) and Spn(C). Let us call a con- nected Lie ..... split groups due respectively to C C Moore and. V Deodhar. B Sury solved the congruence subgroup ...

  19. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  20. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... with which they coexist. To achieve this, the research adopted phenomenology as a method and ethnography as strategy, using participant observation, in-depth interviews, and interviews-to-the-double. The results show that the collective management practice is a crossroad of other practices......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  1. (1R,2R,3R,4R,5S-2,3-Bis[(2S′-2-acetoxy-2-phenylacetoxy]-4-azido-1-[(2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazonomethyl]bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert McDonald

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C38H29N7O12, the five-membered ring adopts an envelope conformation in which the `flap' is cis to the cyclopropane group. This conformation is similar to those of other bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane analogues for which crystal structures have been reported. The absolute configuration of the stereogenic centers on the cyclopentane ring, as determined by comparison with the known configurations of the stereogenic centers in the (2S-2-acetoxy-2-phenylacetoxy groups, is 1(R, 2(R, 3(R, 4(R and 5(S. An intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bond is present.

  2. Age evaluation and causation of rock-slope failures along the western margin of the Antrim Lava Group (ALG), Northern Ireland, based on cosmogenic isotope (36Cl) surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, David W.; Wilson, Peter; Dunlop, Paul; Schnabel, Christoph; Rodés, Ángel; Gulliver, Pauline; Xu, Sheng

    2017-05-01

    The temporal pattern of postglacial rock-slope failure in a glaciated upland area of Ireland (the western margin of the Antrim Lava Group) was evaluated using both 36Cl exposure dating of surface boulders on run-out debris and 14C dating of basal organic soils from depressions on the debris. The majority of the 36Cl ages ( 21-15 ka) indicate that major failures occurred during or immediately following local deglaciation ( 18-17 ka). Other ages ( 14-9 ka) suggest some later, smaller-scale failures during the Lateglacial and/or early Holocene. The 14C ages (2.36-0.15 cal ka BP) indicate the very late onset of organic accumulation and do not provide close limiting age constraints. Rock-slope failure during or immediately following local deglaciation was probably in response to some combination of glacial debuttressing, slope steepening and paraglacial stress release. Later failures may have been triggered by seismic activity associated with glacio-isostatic crustal uplift and/or permafrost degradation consequent upon climate change. The 36Cl ages support the findings of previous studies that show the deglacial - Lateglacial period in northwest Ireland and Scotland to have been one of enhanced rock-slope failure. Table S2 Concentrations of main elements (as oxides) etc.

  3. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  6. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  7. The Transport Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    James, D

    2002-01-01

    The Transport Working Group was formed on The 10th November 1999 to study all means of transport required for the installation of the LHC machine in the existing tunnel infrastructure of the LEP. The Groups' main aim is to assess the feasibility of transport propositions offered for the handling to be carried out in the new LHC environment. The working group is composed of Mechanical Engineers, Physicists and Transport Engineers, as well as specialists who are invited to the meetings for their advice on certain aspects of the forthcoming installation. In May 2001 the group mandate was revised to include all means of transport, including surface transport as well as that required in the tunnel. The installation phase requires the handling of approximately 100,000 tonnes of delicate experimental equipment with very strict limits in terms of acceleration and shock loading. This must be installed via vertical shafts up to 140 meters deep.

  8. Cardiovascular group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  9. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  10. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  11. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  12. Super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    A mathematically rigorous notion of supermanifold is presented and used to develop the theory of super Riemann surfaces. Super Riemann surfaces describe superconformal equivalence classes of supergravity geometries in two dimensions and therefore provide a powerful formalism for studying fermionic string theory. They also provide a convenient description of spin structures and half-forms on ordinary Riemann surfaces. I prove the uniformization theorem for super Riemann surfaces, determine the dimension and global structure of super Teichmueller space, and show that the super modular group is isomorphic to the ordinary modular (mapping class) group. Quasisuperconformal mappings and the super Beltrami equations are briefly discussed. 32 refs

  13. Influence of particle and surface quality on the vitrinite reflectance of dispersed organic matter: Comparative exercise using data from the qualifying system for reflectance analysis working group of ICCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, A.G.; Araujo, C.V.; Balke, A.; Cardott, B.; Cook, A.C.; David, P.; Flores, D.; Hamor-Vido, M.; Hiltmann, W.; Kalkreuth, W.; Koch, J.; Kommeren, C.J.; Kus, J.; Ligouis, B.; Marques, M.; Mendonca, Filho J.G.; Misz, M.; Oliveira, L.; Pickel, W.; Reimer, K.; Ranasinghe, P.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Vieth, A.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a qualifying system for reflectance analysis has been the scope of a working group within the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) since 1999, when J. Koch presented a system to qualify vitrinite particles according to their size, proximity to bright components and homogeneity of the surface. After some years of work aimed at improving the classification system using photomicrographs, it was decided to run a round robin exercise on microscopy samples. The classification system tested consists of three qualifiers ranging from excellent to low quality vitrinites with an additional option for unsuitable vitrinites. This paper reports on the results obtained by 22 analysts who were asked to measure random reflectance readings on vitrinite particles assigning to each reading a qualifier. Four samples containing different organic matter types and a variety of vitrinite occurrences have been analysed. Results indicated that the reflectance of particles classified as excellent, good or poor compared to the total average reflectance did not show trends to be systematically lower or higher for the four samples analysed. The differences in reflectance between the qualifiers for any given sample were lower than the scatter of vitrinite reflectance among participants. Overall, satisfactory results were obtained in determining the reflectance of vitrinite in the four samples analysed. This was so for samples having abundant and easy to identify vitrinites (higher plant-derived organic matter) as well as for samples with scarce and difficult to identify particles (samples with dominant marine-derived organic matter). The highest discrepancies were found for the organic-rich oil shales where the selection of the vitrinite population to measure proved to be particularly difficult. Special instructions should be provided for the analysis of this sort of samples. The certainty of identification of the vitrinite associated with the vitrinite

  14. Synthesis of azido derivatives of mucobromic acid | D. Jumbam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mucobromic acid is a highly reactive multicentered molecule. It was converted to its corresponding but unstable diazido derivative by reaction with two equivalents of sodium azide. The resultant 3,4-diazido-5-hydroxyfuran-2(5H)-one was obtained in moderate yield (42%) but decomposed readily even at low temperatures.

  15. Surface tension and 0.1 MPa density for members of homologous series of ionic liquids composed of imidazolium-, pyridinium-, and pyrrolidinium-based cations and of cyano-groups containing anions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Součková, Monika; Klomfar, Jaroslav; Pátek, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 406, November (2015), s. 181-193 ISSN 0378-3812 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00145S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ionic liquid * surface tension-temperature relation * density -temperature relation * cyano-funcionalized anion Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2015

  16. Reconstruction of Kinematic Surfaces from Scattered Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randrup, Thomas; Pottmann, Helmut; Lee, I.-K.

    1998-01-01

    Given a surface in 3-space or scattered points from a surface, we present algorithms for fitting the data by a surface which can be generated by a one--parameter subgroup of the group of similarities. These surfaces are general cones and cylinders, surfaces of revolution, helical surfaces and spi...

  17. Expeditionary Strike Group: Command Structure Design Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchins, Susan G; Kemple, William G; Kleinman, David L; Hocevar, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    An Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) is a new capability mix that combines the combat power of three surface combatants and one submarine with an Amphibious Readiness Group/ Marine Expeditionary Unit...

  18. Minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Dierkes, Ulrich; Sauvigny, Friedrich; Jakob, Ruben; Kuster, Albrecht

    2010-01-01

    Minimal Surfaces is the first volume of a three volume treatise on minimal surfaces (Grundlehren Nr. 339-341). Each volume can be read and studied independently of the others. The central theme is boundary value problems for minimal surfaces. The treatise is a substantially revised and extended version of the monograph Minimal Surfaces I, II (Grundlehren Nr. 295 & 296). The first volume begins with an exposition of basic ideas of the theory of surfaces in three-dimensional Euclidean space, followed by an introduction of minimal surfaces as stationary points of area, or equivalently

  19. Atum: Scalable Group Communication Using Volatile Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Pavlovic, Matej; Seredinschi, Dragos-Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Atum, a group communication middleware for a large, dynamic, and hostile environment. At the heart of Atum lies the novel concept of volatile groups: small, dynamic groups of nodes, each executing a state machine replication protocol, organized in a flexible overlay. Using volatile groups, Atum scatters faulty nodes evenly among groups, and then masks each individual fault inside its group. To broadcast messages among volatile groups, Atum runs a gossip protocol across the...

  20. Rumble surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    National Institute for Transport and Road

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumble surfaces are intermittent short lengths of coarse-textured road surfacings on which vehicle tyres produce a rumbling sound. used in conjunction with appropriate roadsigns and markings, they can reduce accidents on rural roads by alerting...

  1. Surface thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moliner, F.

    1975-01-01

    Basic thermodynamics of a system consisting of two bulk phases with an interface. Solid surfaces: general. Discussion of experimental data on surface tension and related concepts. Adsorption thermodynamics in the Gibbsian scheme. Adsorption on inert solid adsorbents. Systems with electrical charges: chemistry and thermodynamics of imperfect crystals. Thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Simple models of charge transfer chemisorption. Adsorption heat and related concepts. Surface phase transitions

  2. Photodissociation of aromatic azides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyka, M. F.

    2008-08-01

    Quantitative data on the photochemical activity of aromatic azides and on the mechanism and kinetics of azido group photodissociation are analysed and described systematically for the first time. The results of quantum chemical calculations of the azide structure in the ground and lower electronically excited states and the potential energy surfaces along the reaction coordinate of the N-N2 bond dissociation are considered.

  3. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...

  4. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  5. Probability groups as orbits of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, H.N.

    2003-11-01

    The set of double cosets of a group with respect to a subgroup and the set of orbits of a group with respect to a group of automorphisms have structures which can be studied as multigroups, hypergroups or Pasch geometries. When the subgroup or the group of automorphisms are finite, the multivalued products can be provided with some weightages forming so-called Probability Groups. It is shown in this paper that some abstract probability groups can be realized as orbit spaces of groups. (author)

  6. Multifunctional thin film surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  7. Surface properties of beached plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2015-07-01

    Studying plastic characteristics in the marine environment is important to better understand interaction between plastics and the environment. In the present study, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephalate (PET), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) samples were collected from the coastal environment in order to study their surface properties. Surface properties such as surface functional groups, surface topography, point of zero charge, and color change are important factors that change during degradation. Eroded HDPE demonstrated an altered surface topography and color and new functional groups. Eroded PET surface was uneven, yellow, and occasionally, colonized by microbes. A decrease in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) peaks was observed for eroded PET suggesting that degradation had occurred. For eroded PVC, its surface became more lamellar and a new FTIR peak was observed. These surface properties were obtained due to degradation and could be used to explain the interaction between plastics, microbes, and pollutants.

  8. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  10. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  11. New insight into electrochemical-induced synthesis of NiAl2O4/Al2O3: Synergistic effect of surface hydroxyl groups and magnetism for enhanced adsorptivity of Pd(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salleh, N.F.M.; Jalil, A.A.; Triwahyono, S.; Efendi, J.; Mukti, R.R.; Hameed, B.H.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The introduction of Ni to γ-Al 2 O 3 by electrolysis formed NiAl 2 O 4 spinels and NiO. • Physical mixed of NiO with γ-Al 2 O 3 only produced agglomerated NiO-Ni 0 . • Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E has remarkably higher degree of magnetism than Ni/Al 2 O 3 -PM. • Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E adsorbed Pd 2+ ions more effectively (q m = 40.3 mg/g) than Ni/Al 2 O 3 -PM. • Pd 2+ ions were adsorbed to both samples via magnetic attraction and ion exchange. - Abstract: A new promising adsorbent, Ni supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 was prepared in a simple electrolysis system (Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E) in minutes and was compared with the sample prepared by a physical mixing method (Ni/Al 2 O 3 -PM). The adsorbents were characterized by XRD, TEM, FTIR, 27 Al MAS NMR, XPS, and VSM. The results showed that besides NiO nanoparticles, a NiAl 2 O 4 spinel was also formed in Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E during the electrolysis via the dealumination and isomorphous substitution of Ni 2+ ions. In contrast, only agglomerated NiO was found in the Ni/Al 2 O 3 -PM. Adsorption test on removal of Pd 2+ ions from aqueous solution showed that the Pd 2+ ions were exchanged with the hydrogen atoms of the surface–OH groups of both adsorbents. Significantly, the Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E demonstrated a higher adsorption towards Pd 2+ ions than Ni/Al 2 O 3 -PM due to its remarkably higher degree of magnetism, which came from the NiAl 2 O 4 . The use of 0.1 g L −1 Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E gave the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity (q m ) of 40.3 mg g −1 at 303 K and pH 5. The Ni/Al 2 O 3 -E showed high potential for simultaneous removal of various noble and transition metal ions and could be also used repetitively without affecting the high adsorptivity for Pd 2+ ions. This work may provide promising adsorbents for recovery of various metals as well as other materials for such related applications

  12. New insight into electrochemical-induced synthesis of NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Synergistic effect of surface hydroxyl groups and magnetism for enhanced adsorptivity of Pd(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salleh, N.F.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Jalil, A.A., E-mail: aishah@cheme.utm.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Centre of Hydrogen Energy, Institute of Future Energy, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Triwahyono, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Efendi, J. [Department of Chemistry, Universitas Negeri Padang, Jl. Prof. Hamka, Air Tawar, Padang, West Sumatera (Indonesia); Mukti, R.R. [Division of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl Ganesha No 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Hameed, B.H. [School of Chemical Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The introduction of Ni to γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} by electrolysis formed NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels and NiO. • Physical mixed of NiO with γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} only produced agglomerated NiO-Ni{sup 0}. • Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E has remarkably higher degree of magnetism than Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PM. • Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E adsorbed Pd{sup 2+} ions more effectively (q{sub m} = 40.3 mg/g) than Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PM. • Pd{sup 2+} ions were adsorbed to both samples via magnetic attraction and ion exchange. - Abstract: A new promising adsorbent, Ni supported on γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was prepared in a simple electrolysis system (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E) in minutes and was compared with the sample prepared by a physical mixing method (Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PM). The adsorbents were characterized by XRD, TEM, FTIR, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR, XPS, and VSM. The results showed that besides NiO nanoparticles, a NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel was also formed in Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E during the electrolysis via the dealumination and isomorphous substitution of Ni{sup 2+} ions. In contrast, only agglomerated NiO was found in the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PM. Adsorption test on removal of Pd{sup 2+} ions from aqueous solution showed that the Pd{sup 2+} ions were exchanged with the hydrogen atoms of the surface–OH groups of both adsorbents. Significantly, the Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E demonstrated a higher adsorption towards Pd{sup 2+} ions than Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PM due to its remarkably higher degree of magnetism, which came from the NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The use of 0.1 g L{sup −1} Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E gave the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity (q{sub m}) of 40.3 mg g{sup −1} at 303 K and pH 5. The Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-E showed high potential for simultaneous removal of various noble and transition metal ions and could be also used repetitively without affecting the high adsorptivity for Pd{sup 2+} ions. This work may provide promising

  13. Surface boxplots

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-22

    In this paper, we introduce a surface boxplot as a tool for visualization and exploratory analysis of samples of images. First, we use the notion of volume depth to order the images viewed as surfaces. In particular, we define the median image. We use an exact and fast algorithm for the ranking of the images. This allows us to detect potential outlying images that often contain interesting features not present in most of the images. Second, we build a graphical tool to visualize the surface boxplot and its various characteristics. A graph and histogram of the volume depth values allow us to identify images of interest. The code is available in the supporting information of this paper. We apply our surface boxplot to a sample of brain images and to a sample of climate model outputs.

  14. Convex surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    This exploration of convex surfaces focuses on extrinsic geometry and applications of the Brunn-Minkowski theory. It also examines intrinsic geometry and the realization of intrinsic metrics. 1958 edition.

  15. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  16. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Surface phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Wette, Frederik

    1991-01-01

    In recent years substantial progress has been made in the detection of surface phonons owing to considerable improvements in inelastic rare gas scattering tech­ niques and electron energy loss spectroscopy. With these methods it has become possible to measure surface vibrations in a wide energy range for all wave vectors in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone and thus to deduce the complete surface phonon dispersion curves. Inelastic atomic beam scattering and electron energy loss spectroscopy have started to play a role in the study of surface phonons similar to the one played by inelastic neutron scattering in the investigation of bulk phonons in the last thirty years. Detailed comparison between experimen­ tal results and theoretical studies of inelastic surface scattering and of surface phonons has now become feasible. It is therefore possible to test and to improve the details of interaction models which have been worked out theoretically in the last few decades. At this point we felt that a concise, co...

  18. Experience with Group Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqin

    2006-01-01

    Supervision can take a few different forms. For example, it can be one-to-one supervision and it can also be group supervision. Group supervision is an important process within the scientific community. Many research groups use this form to supervise doctoral- and master students in groups. Some efforts have been made to study this process. For example, Samara (2002) studied the group supervision process in group writing. However, group supervision has not been studied thorough...

  19. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  20. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  1. Ice Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane

    2017-05-01

    Ice is a fundamental solid with important environmental, biological, geological, and extraterrestrial impact. The stable form of ice at atmospheric pressure is hexagonal ice, Ih. Despite its prevalence, Ih remains an enigmatic solid, in part due to challenges in preparing samples for fundamental studies. Surfaces of ice present even greater challenges. Recently developed methods for preparation of large single-crystal samples make it possible to reproducibly prepare any chosen face to address numerous fundamental questions. This review describes preparation methods along with results that firmly establish the connection between the macroscopic structure (observed in snowflakes, microcrystallites, or etch pits) and the molecular-level configuration (detected with X-ray or electron scattering techniques). Selected results of probing interactions at the ice surface, including growth from the melt, surface vibrations, and characterization of the quasi-liquid layer, are discussed.

  2. Stability of surface nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Shantanu; van der Hoef, Martin; Zhang, Xuehua; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the stability and dissolution of surface nanobubbles on the chemical heterogenous surface by performing Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of binary mixture consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles. Recently our group has derived the exact expression for equilibrium contact angle of surface nanobubbles as a function of oversaturation of the gas concentration in bulk liquid and the lateral length of bubble. It has been showed that the contact line pinning and the oversaturation of gas concentration in bulk liquid is crucial in the stability of surface nanobubbles. Our simulations showed that how pinning of the three-phase contact line on the chemical heterogenous surface lead to the stability of the nanobubble. We have calculated the equilibrium contact angle by varying the gas concentration in bulk liquid and the lateral length of the bubble. Our results showed that the equilibrium contact angle follows the expression derived analytically by our group. We have also studied the bubble dissolution dynamics and showed the ''stick-jump'' mechanism which was also observed experimentally in case of dissolution of nanodrops.

  3. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  4. Hepatitis B surface antigenaemia among high risk groups in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although it commoner among children, it is likely acquired horizontally. This finding underscores the need for early childhood vaccination. Advocacy on discouraging prevalent harmful traditional practices such as genital mutilation, circumcision, cupping and tribal mark using unsterilized instruments and paraphernalia is ...

  5. Polymer Nanocomposites with Cellulose Nanocrystals Featuring Adaptive Surface Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterodt, Jens C; Sapkota, Janak; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2017-02-13

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are mechanically rigid, toxicologically benign, fiber-like nanoparticles. They can easily be extracted from renewable biosources and have attracted significant interest as reinforcing fillers in polymers. We here report the modification of CNCs with the 2-ureido-4[1H]pyrimidinone (UPy) motif as an adaptive compatibilizer, which permits the dispersion of UPy-modified CNCs in nonpolar as well as polar media. In toluene, the UPy motifs appear to form intra-CNC dimers, so that the particles are somewhat hydrophobized and well-dispersible in this nonpolar solvent. By contrast, the UPy motifs dissociate in DMF and promote dispersibility through interactions with this polar solvent. We have exploited this adaptiveness and integrated UPy-modified CNCs into nonpolar and polar host polymers, which include different poly(ethylene)s, a polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene elastomer and poly(ethylene oxide-co-epichlorohydrin). All nanocomposites display an increase of stiffness and strength in comparison to the neat polymer, and some compositions retain a high elongation at break, even at a filler content of 15% w/w.

  6. Group purchasing: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetrich, J G

    1987-07-01

    The various types and operational methods of purchasing groups are described, and evaluation of groups is discussed. Since group purchasing is increasing in popularity as a method of controlling drug costs, community and hospital pharmacy managers may need to evaluate various groups to determine the appropriateness of their services. Groups are categorized as independent, system based, or alliance or association based. Instead of "purchasing," some groups develop contracts for hospitals, which then purchase directly from the vendor. Aside from this basic difference between groups that purchase and groups that contract, comparisons among groups are difficult because of the wide variation in sizes and services. Competition developing from diversification among groups has led to "super groups," formed from local and regional groups. In evaluating groups, advantages and disadvantages germane to accomplishing the member's objectives must be considered. To ensure a group's success, members must be committed and support the group's philosophies; hospital pharmacists must help to establish a strong formulary system. To select vendors, groups should develop formal qualification and selection criteria and should not base a decision solely on price. The method of solicitation (bidding or negotiating), as well as the role of the prime vendor, should be studied. Legal implications of group purchasing, especially in the areas of administrative fees and drug diversion, must also be considered. The most advantageous group for each organization will include members with common missions and will be able to implement strategies for future success.

  7. EFFECT OF SURFACE TREATMENT ON ENAMEL SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyda Erşahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the effects of different methods of surface treatment on enamel roughness. Materials and Methods: Ninety human maxillary first premolars were randomly divided into three groups (n=30 according to type of enamel surface treatment: I, acid etching; II, Er:YAG laser; III, Nd:YAG laser. The surface roughness of enamel was measured with a noncontact optical profilometer. For each enamel sample, two readings were taken across the sample—before enamel surface treatment (T1 and after enamel surface treatment (T2. The roughness parameter analyzed was the average roughness (Ra. Statistical analysis was performed using a Paired sample t test and the post-hoc Mann- Whitney U test, with the significance level set at 0.05. Results: The highest Ra (average roughness values were observed for Group II, with a significant difference with Groups I and III (P<0.001. Ra values for the acid etching group (Group I were significantly lower than other groups (P<0.001. Conclusion: Surface treatment of enamel with Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser results in significantly higher Ra than acid-etching. Both Er:YAG laser or Nd:YAG laser can be recommended as viable treatment alternatives to acid etching.

  8. Genera of minimal balance surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Koch, E.

    1989-01-01

    The genus of a three-periodic intersection-free surface in R 3 refers to a primitive unit cell of its symmetry group. Two procedures for the calculation of the genus are described: (1) by means of labyrinth graphs; (2) via the Euler characteristic derived from a tiling on the surface. In both cases new formulae based on crystallographic concepts are given. For all known minimal balance surfaces the genera and the labyrinth graphs are tabulated. (orig.)

  9. Ordered groups and infinite permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    The subjects of ordered groups and of infinite permutation groups have long en­ joyed a symbiotic relationship. Although the two subjects come from very different sources, they have in certain ways come together, and each has derived considerable benefit from the other. My own personal contact with this interaction began in 1961. I had done Ph. D. work on sequence convergence in totally ordered groups under the direction of Paul Conrad. In the process, I had encountered "pseudo-convergent" sequences in an ordered group G, which are like Cauchy sequences, except that the differences be­ tween terms of large index approach not 0 but a convex subgroup G of G. If G is normal, then such sequences are conveniently described as Cauchy sequences in the quotient ordered group GIG. If G is not normal, of course GIG has no group structure, though it is still a totally ordered set. The best that can be said is that the elements of G permute GIG in an order-preserving fashion. In independent investigations around that t...

  10. Surfacing Moves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lutz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    such as schedules, machines, and aging bodies. To this end, the article also experiments with ‘surfacing’ as an ethnographic heuristic for figuring these different ‘spatial-timings’. The article concludes that surfacing matters not only in senior home care but also in the field-desks of ethnographic analysis....

  11. Attack surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruschka, Nils; Jensen, Meiko

    2010-01-01

    The new paradigm of cloud computing poses severe security risks to its adopters. In order to cope with these risks, appropriate taxonomies and classification criteria for attacks on cloud computing are required. In this work-in-progress paper we present one such taxonomy based on the notion...... of attack surfaces of the cloud computing scenario participants....

  12. Marked fatgraph complexes and surface automorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuno, Yusuke; Penner, Robert; Turaev, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Combinatorial aspects of the Torelli-Johnson-Morita theory of surface automorphisms are extended to certain subgroups of the mapping class groups. These subgroups are defined relative to a specified homomorphism from the fundamental group of the surface onto an arbitrary group $K$. For $K$ abelia...

  13. Citizens' action group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  14. When Groups Go Wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopler, Janice H.; Galinsky, Maeda J.

    1981-01-01

    Studied social workers' perceptions of group dimensions that had negative effects on members. Found that group leaders viewed group composition as a major source of harmful interaction while members and observers saw group norms as a more frequent cause of negative effects. (Author/JAC)

  15. Group Psychotherapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rainer; Strauss, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the development of group psychotherapies in Germany originating from a psychodynamic tradition. The German health system provides access to inpatient and outpatient psychotherapy for all of its citizens. Whereas groups are common in inpatient settings, the provision of outpatient group treatment still could be improved, as it is the case for the general training of group psychotherapists. Group research in Germany largely reflects clinical practice, with more studies coming from the inpatient field. It is stated that the general image of group treatment seems to be largely positive, which could provide a basis for political initiatives to improve the dissemination of group therapy in this country.

  16. Handbook of group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, Athanase; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Groups and group actions are probably the most central objects in mathematics. Comprising volumes 31 and 32 of the ALM series (with further volumes forthcoming), the Handbook of Group Actions presents survey articles on the topic of group actions and how they appear in several mathematical contexts. The general subject matter is organized under the following sections: geometry, mapping class groups, knot groups, topology, representation theory, deformation theory, and discrete groups. The various articles deal with both classical material and modern developments. They are written by specialists in their respective subject areas, and addressed to graduate students who want to learn the theory, as well as to specialists as a reference.

  17. Computer aided surface representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1989-02-09

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation and display of surfaces, interpolating to given information, in three or more dimensions. In a typical problem, we wish to create a surface from some discrete information. If this information is itself on another surface, the problem is to determine a surface defined on a surface,'' which is discussed below. Often, properties of an already constructed surface are desired: such geometry processing'' is described below. The Summary of Proposed Research from our original proposal describes the aims of this research project. This Summary and the Table of Contents from the original proposal are enclosed as an Appendix to this Progress Report. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through algorithms and computer graphics displays is utilized in the research. The wide range of activity, directed in both theory and applications, makes this project unique. Last month in the first Ardent Titan delivered in the State of Arizona came to our group, funded by the DOE and Arizona State University. Although the Titan is a commercial product, its newness requires our close collaboration with Ardent to maximize results. During the past year, four faculty members and several graduate research assistants have worked on this DOE project. The gaining of new professionals is an important aspect of this project. A listing of the students and their topics is given in the Appendix. The most significant publication during the past year is the book, Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design, by Dr. Gerald Farin. This 300 page volume helps fill a considerable gap in the subject and includes many new results on Bernstein-Bezier curves and surfaces.

  18. Innovation in business groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sharon Belenzon; Tomer Berkovitz

    2007-01-01

    Using novel data on European firms, this paper investigates the relationship between business groups and innovation. Controlling for various firm characteristics, we find that group affiliates are more innovative than standalones. We examine several hypotheses to explain this finding, focusing on group internal capital markets and knowledge spillovers. We find that group affiliation is particularly important for innovation in industries that rely more on external funding and in groups with mo...

  19. Surface modification of bioceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkawa, Akira

    Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAp] is a major inorganic component of bone and teeth tissues and has the excellent biocompatibility and high osteoconductivity. The interactions between HAp and protein or cell have been studied. The HAp related bioceramics such as bone substitute, coating substance of metal implants, inorganic-polymer composites, and cell culture. We described two methods; (1) surface modification of HAp using organosilane; (2) fabrication of HAp ultra-thin layer on gold surface for protein adsorption analyzed with QCM-D technique. The interfacial interaction between collagen and HAp in a nano-region was controlled by depositing the organosilane of n-octadecyltrimethoxysilane (ODS: -CH3) or aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS: -NH2) with a chemical vapor deposition method. The morphologies of collagen adsorbed on the surfaces of HAp and HAp deposited with APTS were similar, however that of the surface with ODS was apparently different, due to the hydrophobic interaction between the organic head group of -CH3 and residual groups of collagen. We present a method for coating gold quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) sensor with ultra-thin layer of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals evenly covering and tightly bound to the surface. The hydroxyapatite sensor operated in liquid with high stability and sensitivity. The in-situ adsorption mechanism and conformational change of fibrinogen on gold, titanium and hydroxyapatite surfaces were investigated by QCM-D technique and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The study indicates that the hydroxyapatite sensor is applicable for qualitative and conformational analysis of protein adsorption.

  20. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  1. Independent student study groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Graham D; Hyde, Sarah J; Davy, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Teachers and students regulate learning to varying degrees in educational programmes in higher education. We present evidence that students in a student-centred medical programme self- and co-regulate their learning in independently formed study groups. We describe the perceived benefits of study groups and the effect of study group membership on student achievement. Years 1-2 of a 4-year, graduate-entry problem-based medical programme. We surveyed 233 year 2 students about features of their study groups and their study group membership in years 1-2. We compared study group membership with students' scores on a written summative assessment held at the end of their second year. For students who joined 1 study group, the length of time their group stayed together was positively related to achievement in the written summative assessment. There were no differences in summative assessment results between students who had been in a study group and students who had not been in a study group. Effective study groups are supportive, socially cohesive groups who generate mutual trust and loyalty, and self- and co-regulate their learning by giving and receiving explanations and summaries and motivating individual study. Teachers can support the formation of study groups by using small-group teaching/learning activities, providing clear learning outcomes and assessment criteria, minimising competition for grades and allocating room space.

  2. Supermanifolds and super Riemann surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    The theory of super Riemann surfaces is rigorously developed using Rogers' theory of supermanifolds. The global structures of super Teichmueller space and super moduli space are determined. The super modular group is shown to be precisely the ordinary modular group. Super moduli space is shown to be the gauge-fixing slice for the fermionic string path integral

  3. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  4. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  5. UPIN Group File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Group Unique Physician Identifier Number (UPIN) File is the business entity file that contains the group practice UPIN and descriptive information. It does NOT...

  6. Introduction to topological groups

    CERN Document Server

    Husain, Taqdir

    2018-01-01

    Concise treatment covers semitopological groups, locally compact groups, Harr measure, and duality theory and some of its applications. The volume concludes with a chapter that introduces Banach algebras. 1966 edition.

  7. Free paratopological groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sayed Elfard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Let FP(X be the free paratopological group on a topological space X in the sense of Markov. In this paper, we study the group FP(X on a $P_\\alpha$-space $X$ where $\\alpha$ is an infinite cardinal and then we prove that the group FP(X is an Alexandroff space if X is an Alexandroff space. Moreover, we introduce a~neighborhood base at the identity of the group FP(X when the space X is Alexandroff and then we give some properties of this neighborhood base. As applications of these, we prove that the group FP(X is T_0 if X is T_0, we characterize the spaces X for which the group FP(X is a topological group and then we give a class of spaces $X$ for which the group FP(X has the inductive limit property.

  8. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  9. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  10. Informal group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Nienstaedt; Dean W. Einspahr; J. Douglas Brodie

    1973-01-01

    Editor's note: The morning's presentations were discussed during the afternoon by three groups, each group discussing one of the morning's three topics. Summaries of the discussions, prepared by the discussion leaders, follow.

  11. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  12. AREVA group overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  13. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... NONcommutative spaces. 2. Banica and Bichon defined quantum symmetry groups for finite metric spaces, finite graphs, etc. 3. Lots of examples computed leading to discovery of completely new kinds of quantum groups. Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum isometry groups. 07.11.

  14. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, J. I. Burgos; Feliu, Elisenda

    2012-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov co...

  15. Asymmetry within social groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Jessie; Loope, Kevin J.; Reeve, H. Kern

    2016-01-01

    Social animals vary in their ability to compete with group members over shared resources and also vary in their cooperative efforts to produce these resources. Competition among groups can promote within-group cooperation, but many existing models of intergroup cooperation do not explicitly account...

  16. Tectaria group: Arthropteris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, H.P.; Leonardía, A.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    Holttum, R.E., Tectaria group. Flora Malesiana, Ser. II, 2 (1991) 1–132 defined this group without the genus Arthropteris. Later molecular studies indicated that this genus belongs to Tectariaceae, the Tectaria group of Holttum. The genus contains two species in Malesia. Illustration is by one

  17. Change through Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  18. The Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group. Volume 2: Working group reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of the various multispectral imaging science working groups are presented. Current knowledge of the spectral and spatial characteristics of the Earth's surface is outlined and the present and future capabilities of multispectral imaging systems are discussed.

  19. Group Psychotherapy in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lars Bo; Thygesen, Bente; Aagaard, Søren

    2015-10-01

    This is a short article on the history and training standards in the Institute of Group Analysis in Copenhagen (IGA-CPH). We describe theoretical orientations and influences in the long-term training program and new initiatives, like courses in mentalization-based group treatment and a dynamic short-term group therapy course, as well as research in group psychotherapy in Denmark. Some group analytic initiatives in relation to social issues and social welfare are presented, as well as initiatives concerning the school system and unemployment.

  20. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  1. 1-(4-(6-Fluorobenzo [d] isoxazol-3-yl) piperidin-1-yl)-2-(4-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl) ethanone: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, Hirshfeld surface analysis, cytotoxic studies and docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindhan, M.; Viswanathan, V.; Karthikeyan, S.; Subramanian, K.; Velmurugan, D.

    2017-08-01

    Compound 1-(4-(6-fluorobenzo[d] isoxazol-3-yl) piperidin-1-yl)-2-(4-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-1, 2,3-triazol-1-yl) ethanone was synthesized in good yield by using click chemistry approach with 2-azido-1-(4-(6-flurobenzo[d]isooxazol-3-yl)piperidin-1-yl)ethanone as a starting material. The synthesized compound was characterized using IR, NMR and MS studies. Thermal stability of the compound was analyzed by using TGA and DSC technique. The single crystal XRD analysis was taken part, to confirm the structure of the compound. The intercontacts in the crystal structure are analyzed using Hirshfeld surfaces computational method. Cytotoxicity of the synthesized compound was evaluated and the results were reported. The binding analysis carried out between the newly synthesized molecule with human serum albumin using fluorescence spectroscopy technique to understand the pharmacokinetics nature of the compound for further biological application. The molecular docking studies were evaluated for the compound to elucidate insights of new molecules in carrier protein.

  2. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  3. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  4. 1,3-Dipolar Cycloadditions of Diazo Compounds in the Presence of Azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Matthew R; Gold, Brian; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-04-01

    The diazo group has untapped utility in chemical biology. The tolerance of stabilized diazo groups to cellular metabolism is comparable to that of azido groups. However, chemoselectivity has been elusive, as both groups undergo 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions with strained alkynes. Removing strain and tuning dipolarophile electronics yields diazo group selective 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions that can be performed in the presence of an azido group. For example, diazoacetamide but not its azido congener react with dehydroalanine residues, as in the natural product nisin.

  5. Superhydrophobic surfaces engineered using diatomaceous earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2013-05-22

    We present a simple method to prepare superhydrophobic surfaces using siliceous exoskeleton of diatoms, a widespread group of algae. This makes diatomaceous earth an accessible and cheap natural material. A micro/nanoscale hierarchical topography was achieved by coating a glass surface with diatomaceous earth, giving rise to a superhydrophilic surface. Superhydrophobic surfaces were obtained by a further surface chemical modification through fluorosilanization. The wettability of the superhydrophobic surface can be modified by Argon plasma treatment in a controlled way by exposure time variation. The chemical surface modification by fluorosilanization and posterior fluorinated SH surface modification by plasma treatment was analyzed by XPS. Using appropriated hollowed masks only specific areas on the surface were exposed to plasma permitting to pattern hydrophilic features with different geometries on the superhydrophobic surface. We showed that the present strategy can be also applied in other substrates, including thermoplastics, enlarging the potential applicability of the resulting surfaces.

  6. Geometric group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bestvina, Mladen; Vogtmann, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) gro...

  7. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  8. CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMINAL GROUPS

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Romanova

    2013-01-01

    New types of criminal groups are emerging in modern society.  These types have their special criminal subculture. The research objective is to develop new parameters of classification of modern criminal groups, create a new typology of criminal groups and identify some features of their subculture. Research methodology is based on the system approach that includes using the method of analysis of documentary sources (materials of a criminal case), method of conversations with themembers of the...

  9. Presentations of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  10. What's your group worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, M R

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of acquisitions and mergers of healthcare organizations, it has become necessary for medical group practices to know what they are worth. The traditional balance sheet valuation ignores what is perhaps the most important consideration of all: a group's earning potential. Discussed in this article are the many facets of the complex valuation process, including both tangible and intangible assets, and the author provides a method for adequately determining a range of values for a medical group.

  11. The maximal acceleration group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the maximal proper acceleration relative to the vacuum, a line element and differential geometry of eight-dimensional phase space are constructed. The maximal acceleration group is defined as the mathematical transformation group under which the eight dimensional line element is invariant. In the classical limit of vanishing Planck's constant, the maximal acceleration group and geometry reduce to those of general relativity

  12. Influence of the carbon fiber surface microstructure on the surface chemistry generated by a thermo-chemical surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vautard, F.; Ozcan, S.; Paulauskas, F.; Spruiell, J.E.; Meyer, H.; Lance, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Continuous thermo-chemical surface treatment used to functionalize different types of carbon fibers. ► Surface density of functional groups directly correlated to the size of the surface microstructure. ► Preferential creation of hydroxyls and carboxylic acids confirmed regardless of the type of carbon fiber. ► Effective surface treatment regardless of the fiber surface microstructure. ► Potential alternative to electro-chemical surface treatment. - Abstract: Carbon fibers made of textile and aerospace grade polyacrylonitrile precursor fibers were surface treated by a continuous gas phase thermochemical treatment. The surface chemistry generated by the surface treatment was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface and the average entire microstructure of the fibers were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Depending on the grade of the precursor, the final surface concentration of oxygen was comprised between 14% and 24%, whereas the typical commercial electrochemical surface treatments led to concentrations of around 8% with the same fibers. The final concentration of oxygen was directly correlated to the size of the crystallites which was a function of the grade of the polyacrylonitrile precursor and to the corresponding surface microstructure. The thermochemical surface treatment enabled a better control of the nature of the oxygen-containing functionalities as well. Whatever the grade of the precursor, desired hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid functionalities were preferably generated, which is observed to be difficult with electrochemical surface treatments.

  13. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions.......Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  14. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  15. The normal holonomy group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmos, C.

    1990-05-01

    The restricted holonomy group of a Riemannian manifold is a compact Lie group and its representation on the tangent space is a product of irreducible representations and a trivial one. Each one of the non-trivial factors is either an orthogonal representation of a connected compact Lie group which acts transitively on the unit sphere or it is the isotropy representation of a single Riemannian symmetric space of rank ≥ 2. We prove that, all these properties are also true for the representation on the normal space of the restricted normal holonomy group of any submanifold of a space of constant curvature. 4 refs

  16. Lie groups for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry J

    2002-01-01

    According to the author of this concise, high-level study, physicists often shy away from group theory, perhaps because they are unsure which parts of the subject belong to the physicist and which belong to the mathematician. However, it is possible for physicists to understand and use many techniques which have a group theoretical basis without necessarily understanding all of group theory. This book is designed to familiarize physicists with those techniques. Specifically, the author aims to show how the well-known methods of angular momentum algebra can be extended to treat other Lie group

  17. Environmental groups in politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.; Goyder, J.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; (Part I) the environmental movement (environmental groups and the attentive public; the episodic development of the environmental movement; the underlying values of environmentalism; the roots of environmental concern; the social limits to growth; elite manipulation of values); the organisation of environmental groups; environmental groups in national politics; environmental groups in local politics; (Part II) the Henley Society; Friends of the Earth; the National Trust; the Royal Society for Nature Conservation; the European Environmental Bureau. (U.K.)

  18. Three Levels of Diversity: An Examination of the Complex Relationship Between Diversity, Group Cohesiveness, Sexual Harassment, Group Performance, and Time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whaley, Gary

    1998-01-01

    ...: surface, working, and deep level diversity. The author explains the nature of the relationship between the three levels of diversity and posits a general model of organizational behavior including diversity, group cohesiveness, group...

  19. Surfaces of Building Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Surynková, Petra

    2009-01-01

    My diploma thesis Surfaces of Building Practice deals with the basic properties of surfaces, their mathematical description, categorization, and application in technical practice. Each studied surface is defined and its process of construction and parametrical description is listed. The thesis studies selected types of surfaces in details - these surfaces include surfaces of revolution, ruled surfaces, screw surfaces, and translational surfaces. An application of each studied surfaces is show...

  20. Trajectory grouping structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Buchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The collective motion of a set of moving entities like people, birds, or other animals, is characterized by groups arising, merging, splitting, and ending. Given the trajectories of these entities, we define and model a structure that captures all of such changes using the Reeb graph, a concept from topology. The trajectory grouping structure has three natural parameters that allow more global views of the data in group size, group duration, and entity inter-distance. We prove complexity bounds on the maximum number of maximal groups that can be present, and give algorithms to compute the grouping structure efficiently. We also study how the trajectory grouping structure can be made robust, that is, how brief interruptions of groups can be disregarded in the global structure, adding a notion of persistence to the structure. Furthermore, we showcase the results of experiments using data generated by the NetLogo flocking model and from the Starkey project. The Starkey data describe the movement of elk, deer, and cattle. Although there is no ground truth for the grouping structure in this data, the experiments show that the trajectory grouping structure is plausible and has the desired effects when changing the essential parameters. Our research provides the first complete study of trajectory group evolvement, including combinatorial,algorithmic, and experimental results.

  1. Surface amination of poly(acrylonitrile)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartwig, Andreas; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.; Smolders, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The surface amination of poly (acrylonitrile) by ammonia plasma treatment has been studied. Furthermore, two other surface modification techniques have been investigated, the plasma chemical decomposition of an amino group containing chemical (tris-(2-aminoethyl)amine) onto the polymer surface and

  2. Combinatorial Group Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 11. Combinatorial Group Theory Group Theory via Generators and Relations. B Sury. General Article Volume 1 Issue 11 November 1996 pp 42-50. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Beam dynamics group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggs, S.

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved.

  4. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... Lots of examples computed leading to discovery of completely new kinds of quantum groups. Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum ... on a noncommutative Riemannian manifold ( given by a spectral data ). Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum isometry groups.

  5. Democratic Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  6. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  7. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

     An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...

  8. Rough surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudina, M.

    1982-08-01

    For the determination of the thermal-hydraulic performances of rough surfaces, the method of evaluation is particularly important. In order to increase confidence in the results, a new evaluation procedure was introduced. This procedure is based on the transformation of simple channel experimental results to equal boundary conditions, and on the suitable application and confirmation of these transformed values in more complicated flow channel geometries. Existing methods, applied to the results obtained in an annular channel, do not fulfil all the transformation requirements. Thus a new, more complete transformation method, which uses the turbulent eddy diffusivity model, was developed. To check the quality of this transformation, within the scope of the new evaluation procedure, the results of experimental investigation in annular channels and in a bundle of hexagonal geometry were used together with the predictions of benchmark calculations. The success of the new method was confirmed by extensive comparisons, with the results of different presently-acknowledged transformations being considered as well. Based on these comparisons an assessment of the individual transformations is given. (Auth.)

  9. Surface Modification for Microreactor Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw Torbicz

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methods of surface modification of different supports, i.e. glass andpolymeric beads for enzyme immobilisation are described. The developed method ofenzyme immobilisation is based on Schiff’s base formation between the amino groups onthe enzyme surface and the aldehyde groups on the chemically modified surface of thesupports. The surface of silicon modified by APTS and GOPS with immobilised enzymewas characterised by atomic force microscopy (AFM, time-of-flight secondary ion massspectroscopy (ToF-SIMS and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The supports withimmobilised enzyme (urease were also tested in combination with microreactors fabricatedin silicon and Perspex, operating in a flow-through system. For microreactors filled withurease immobilised on glass beads (Sigma and on polymeric beads (PAN, a very high andstable signal (pH change was obtained. The developed method of urease immobilisationcan be stated to be very effective.

  10. Cohesion in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Gary M; McClendon, Debra Theobald; Alonso, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Cohesion is the most popular of several relationship constructs in the clinical and empirical group therapy literature. This article reviews the most frequently cited definitions and studied measures of group cohesion. We briefly introduce a new measure, the Group Questionnaire, which elucidates group relationships by suggesting two latent factors of cohesion-relationship quality (positive bond, positive work, and negative relationship) and structure factors (member-leader and member-member). To further understand the literature, we conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between cohesion and treatment outcome in 40 studies. Results indicate cohesion that the weighted aggregate correlation was statistically significant with outcome r = .25, k (40), N (3,323), z = 6.54 (p cohesion outcome correlation (age, theoretical orientation, length, and size of group, as well as interventions intended to enhance cohesion). Consideration of measures and practices to improve treatment outcome are highlighted. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.; Chapman, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  12. Ordered groups and topology

    CERN Document Server

    Clay, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the connections between topology and ordered groups. It begins with a self-contained introduction to orderable groups and from there explores the interactions between orderability and objects in low-dimensional topology, such as knot theory, braid groups, and 3-manifolds, as well as groups of homeomorphisms and other topological structures. The book also addresses recent applications of orderability in the studies of codimension-one foliations and Heegaard-Floer homology. The use of topological methods in proving algebraic results is another feature of the book. The book was written to serve both as a textbook for graduate students, containing many exercises, and as a reference for researchers in topology, algebra, and dynamical systems. A basic background in group theory and topology is the only prerequisite for the reader.

  13. Modification of polycarbonate surface in oxidizing plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovtsyn, A. A.; Smirnov, S. A.; Shikova, T. G.; Kholodkov, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    The properties of the surface of the film polycarbonate Lexan 8010 were experimentally studied after treatment in a DC discharge plasma in oxygen and air at pressures of 50-300 Pa and a discharge current of 80 mA. The contact angles of wetting and surface energies are measured. The topography of the surface was investigated by atomic force microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface was determined from the FT-IR spectroscopy data in the variant of total internal reflection, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Treatment in the oxidizing plasma leads to a change in morphology (average roughness increases), an increase in the surface energy, and the concentration of oxygen-containing groups (hydroxyl groups, carbonyl groups in ketones or aldehydes and in oxyketones) on the surface of the polymer. Possible reasons for the difference in surface properties of polymer under the action of oxygen and air plasma on it are discussed.

  14. Platinum-group elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.; Parks, Heather L.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    generally considered to be inert. PGEs pose a risk to human health only in cases where individuals are occupationally exposed to synthetic PGE compounds, especially workers in precious-metal refineries. In the natural environment, background PGE concentrations are low in water, sediment, soil, and plants. Anthropogenic sources of PGEs in the environment include catalytic converters used in modern automobiles, platinum-based chemotherapy drugs, and smelter emissions.The abundance of sulfide minerals defines the environmental and geologic characteristics of PGE-enriched magmatic sulfide deposits; those deposits with the highest amount of sulfide minerals could have the highest environmental impact. Acid rock drainage from reef-type and contact-type deposits is unlikely because the ores and their host rocks contain low proportions of sulfide minerals. For some conduit-type orebodies with massive ores, mineral-processing techniques separate and produce concentrates of copper-, iron-, and nickel-bearing sulfide minerals; those with copper and nickel are processed to extract metal, but the iron-sulfide minerals, mainly pyrrhotite, are discarded as waste. This results in waste material with a high acid-generating potential.The most significant primary source of PGEs in the United States is a deposit in the Stillwater Complex, which is a layered igneous intrusion in Montana. Approximately 305 metric tons of platinum and palladium have been mined from the Stillwater Complex deposit since 1986. Exploration and development drilling indicate that another 2,200 metric tons are present. Mining has progressed to depths of 1,800 meters below the surface, but the bottom of the ore deposit has not been reached; geologic estimates suggest that another 1,000 to 6,200 metric tons of PGEs could be present at depth. In the future, PGEs may be mined from deposits found near the base of the Duluth Complex, which is a group of igneous intrusions in Minnesota.

  15. Group prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Sara E; Carter, Ebony B

    2017-06-01

    Patients participating in group prenatal care gather together with women of similar gestational ages and 2 providers who cofacilitate an educational session after a brief medical assessment. The model was first described in the 1990s by a midwife for low-risk patients and is now practiced by midwives and physicians for both low-risk patients and some high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes. The majority of literature on group prenatal care uses CenteringPregnancy, the most popular model. The first randomized controlled trial of CenteringPregnancy showed that it reduced the risk of preterm birth in low-risk women. However, recent meta-analyses have shown similar rates of preterm birth, low birthweight, and neonatal intensive care unit admission between women participating in group prenatal care and individual prenatal care. There may be subgroups, such as African Americans, who benefit from this type of prenatal care with significantly lower rates of preterm birth. Group prenatal care seems to result in increased patient satisfaction and knowledge and use of postpartum family planning as well as improved weight gain parameters. The literature is inconclusive regarding breast-feeding, stress, depression, and positive health behaviors, although it is theorized that group prenatal care positively affects these outcomes. It is unclear whether group prenatal care results in cost savings, although it may in large-volume practices if each group consists of approximately 8-10 women. Group prenatal care requires a significant paradigm shift. It can be difficult to implement and sustain. More randomized trials are needed to ascertain the true benefits of the model, best practices for implementation, and subgroups who may benefit most from this innovative way to provide prenatal care. In short, group prenatal care is an innovative and promising model with comparable pregnancy outcomes to individual prenatal care in the general population and improved outcomes in some

  16. Working Group 1: Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenberth, K.; Angell, J.; Barry, R.; Bradley, R.; Diaz, H.; Elliott, W.; Etkins, R.; Folland, C.; Jenne, R.; Jones, P.; Karl, T.; Levitus, S.; Oort, A.; Parker, D.; Ropelewski, C.; Vinnikov, K.; Wigley, T.

    1990-01-01

    Topics of discussion include the following: the need for observations; issues in establishing global climate trends; climate variables such as surface air temperature over land, marine temperature, precipitation, circulation, upper air measurements, historical observations, subsurface ocean data, sea level, cryosphere, clouds, solar radiation, and aerosols; future considerations and recommendations which focuses on the establishment of a global benchmark climate monitoring network and data management

  17. Working Group 1: Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenberth, K.; Angell, J.; Barry, R.; Bradley, R.; Diaz, H.; Elliott, W.; Etkins, R.; Folland, C.; Jenne, R.; Jones, P.; Karl, T.; Levitus, S.; Oort, A.; Parker, D.; Ropelewski, C.; Vinnikov, K.; Wigley, T.

    1991-01-01

    Topics of discussion include the following: the need for observations; issues in establishing global climate trends; climate variables such as surface air temperature over land, marine temperature, precipitation, circulation, upper air measurements, historical observations, subsurface ocean data, sea level, cryosphere, clouds, solar radiation, and aerosols; future considerations and recommendations which focuses on the establishment of a global benchmark climate monitoring network and data management

  18. 10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

  19. 5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

  20. Groups and Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnani, Ravi; Miodownik, Dan; Riolo, Rick

    Violence can take place along a multitude of cleavages, e.g., (1) between political groups like the Kach Movement, pitting West Bank settlers against Israeli governments supporting the land-for-peace agenda; (2) between religious groups, such as Christians and Muslims in the Nigerian cities of Jos and Kaduna; (3) along class lines, as in India between Dalits and members of the Brahminical upper castes, upwardly mobile intermediate castes, and even other backward castes such as the Thevars; and (4) between ethnic groups such as the Hutu and Tutsi, both within and across state boundaries in Rwanda and neighboring Burundi.

  1. Doing focus group research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    2014-01-01

    Scholars of ethnomethodologically informed discourse studies are often sceptical of the use of interview data such as focus group data. Some scholars quite simply reject interview data with reference to a general preference for so-called naturally occurring data. Other scholars acknowledge......, not as something that pre-exists or goes beyond the situated interaction. This article, however, challenges not only the first, but also the second position and suggests that it is, after all, possible to do committedly ethnomethodological studies of focus group data that demonstrate how members of a focus group...

  2. Products of Finite Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ballester-Bolinches, Adolfo; Asaad, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    The study of finite groups factorised as a product of two or more subgroups has become a subject of great interest during the last years with applications not only in group theory, but also in other areas like cryptography and coding theory. It has experienced a big impulse with the introduction of some permutability conditions. The aim of this book is to gather, order, and examine part of this material, including the latest advances made, give some new approach to some topics, and present some new subjects of research in the theory of finite factorised groups.

  3. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  4. [A kibbutz group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, A

    1976-01-01

    Kibbouts-group: three therapeutic or growth factors together: manual work, community life and group technics (group dynamic, Gestalt, psychodrama, bio-energetic) during two weeks. The work of growing and therapy is becoming more concrete and facilitated by the absence of difference between members and leader who share the work and the community life. Important and rapid changes are frequent: a particular attention is given to the "unmedicalisation" of symptoms (fatigue) and to the "unpsychiatrisation" of conflicts. A sample and authentical life style, together with a high degree of communication, favor the desinhibition of attitudes, the clarification of conflicts and the reenforcement of the personality.

  5. Computational approach to Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This volume offers a well-structured overview of existent computational approaches to Riemann surfaces and those currently in development. The authors of the contributions represent the groups providing publically available numerical codes in this field. Thus this volume illustrates which software tools are available and how they can be used in practice. In addition examples for solutions to partial differential equations and in surface theory are presented. The intended audience of this book is twofold. It can be used as a textbook for a graduate course in numerics of Riemann surfaces, in which case the standard undergraduate background, i.e., calculus and linear algebra, is required. In particular, no knowledge of the theory of Riemann surfaces is expected; the necessary background in this theory is contained in the Introduction chapter. At the same time, this book is also intended for specialists in geometry and mathematical physics applying the theory of Riemann surfaces in their research. It is the first...

  6. The Military Cooperation Group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renzi, Jr, Alfred E

    2006-01-01

    .... This thesis will describe a structure to assist with both those needs. The premise is that an expanded and improved network of US Military Groups is the weapon of choice for the war on terror, and beyond...

  7. Generalized quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leivo, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    The algebraic approach to quantum groups is generalized to include what may be called an anyonic symmetry, reflecting the appearance of phases more general than ±1 under transposition. (author). 6 refs

  8. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  9. System analysis task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    At this meeting, the main tasks of the study group were to discuss their task report with other task groups and to formulate the five-year research program, including next year's plans. A summary of the discussion with other task groups is presented. The general objective of the five-year program is to gather all elements necessary for a decision on the technical feasibility of the subseabed option. In addition, site selection criteria consistent with both radiological assessment and engineering capability will be produced. The task group report discussed radiological assessments, normal or base-case assessments, operational failures, low-probability postdisposal events, engineering studies, radiological criteria, legal aspects, social aspects, institutional aspects, generic comparison with other disposal options, and research priorities. The text of the report is presented along with supporting documents

  10. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  11. Group I intron ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Group I intron ribozymes constitute one of the main classes of ribozymes and have been a particularly important model in the discovery of key concepts in RNA biology as well as in the development of new methods. Compared to other ribozyme classes, group I intron ribozymes display considerable...... variation both in their structure and the reactions they catalyze. The best described pathway is the splicing pathway that results in a spliced out intron and ligated exons. This is paralleled by the circularization pathway that leads to full-length circular intron and un-ligated exons. In addition......, the intronic products of these pathways have the potential to integrate into targets and to form various types of circular RNA molecules. Thus, group I intron ribozymes and associated elements found within group I introns is a rich source of biological phenomena. This chapter provides a strategy and protocols...

  12. The theory of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Marshall

    2018-01-01

    This 1959 text offers an unsurpassed resource for learning and reviewing the basics of a fundamental and ever-expanding area. "This remarkable book undoubtedly will become a standard text on group theory." - American Scientist.

  13. Fuzzy Soft Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazmul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notions of Lowen type fuzzy soft topological space are introduced and some of their properties are established in the present paper. Besides this, a combined structure of a fuzzy soft topological space and a fuzzy soft group, which is termed here as fuzzy soft topological group is introduced. Homomorphic images and preimages are also examined. Finally, some definitions and results on fuzzy soft set are studied.

  14. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  15. Parton Distributions Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, L. de; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data

  16. Parton Distributions Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  17. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  18. A universal protocol for photochemical covalent immobilization of intact carbohydrates for the preparation of carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huibin; Zhang, Yiming; Yuan, Xun; Chen, Yi; Yan, Mingdi

    2011-01-19

    A universal photochemical method has been established for the immobilization of intact carbohydrates and their analogues, and for the fabrication of carbohydrate microarrays. The method features the use of perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-modified substrates and the photochemical reaction of surface azido groups with printed carbohydrates. Various aldoses, ketoses, nonreducing sugars such as alditols, and their derivatives can be directly arrayed on the PFPA-modified chips. The lectin-recognition ability of arrayed mannose, glucose, and their oligo- and polysaccharides were confirmed using surface plasmon resonance imaging and laser-induced fluorescence imaging.

  19. A Universal Protocol for Photochemical Covalent Immobilization of Intact Carbohydrates for the Preparation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huibin; Zhang, Yiming; Yuan, Xun; Chen, Yi; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-01-01

    A universal photochemical method has been established for the immobilization of intact carbohydrates and their analogues, and for the fabrication of carbohydrate microarrays. The method features the use of perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-modified substrates and the photochemical reaction of surface azido groups with printed carbohydrates. Various aldoses, ketoses, non-reducing sugars such as alditols and their derivatives can be directly arrayed on the PFPA-modified chips. The lectin-recognition ability of arrayed mannose, glucose and their oligo- and polysaccharides were confirmed using surface plasmon resonance imaging and laser-induced fluorescence imaging. PMID:21138274

  20. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  1. Coordinating Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup

  2. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    known with a high degree of precision and the major defects and properties are well characterised. A major factor in this is that a termination at the Feoct-O plane can be reproducibly prepared by a variety of methods, as long as the surface is annealed in 10-7-10-5 mbar O2 in the final stage of preparation. Such straightforward preparation of a monophase termination is generally not the case for iron oxide surfaces. All available evidence suggests the oft-studied (√2×√2)R45° reconstruction results from a rearrangement of the cation lattice in the outermost unit cell in which two octahedral cations are replaced by one tetrahedral interstitial, a motif conceptually similar to well-known Koch-Cohen defects in Fe1-xO. The cation deficiency results in Fe11O16 stoichiometry, which is in line with the chemical potential in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), which is close to the border between the Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 phases. The Fe3O4(111) surface is also much studied, but two different surface terminations exist close in energy and can coexist, which makes sample preparation and data interpretation somewhat tricky. Both the Fe3O4(100) and Fe3O4(111) surfaces exhibit Fe-rich terminations as the sample selvedge becomes reduced. The Fe3O4(110) surface forms a one-dimensional (1×3) reconstruction linked to nanofaceting, which exposes the more stable Fe3O4(111) surface. α-Fe2O3(0001) is the most studied haematite surface, but difficulties preparing stoichiometric surfaces under UHV conditions have hampered a definitive determination of the structure. There is evidence for at least three terminations: a bulk-like termination at the oxygen plane, a termination with half of the cation layer, and a termination with ferryl groups. When the surface is reduced the so-called "bi-phase" structure is formed, which eventually transforms to a Fe3O4(111)-like termination. The structure of the bi-phase surface is controversial; a largely accepted model of coexisting Fe1-xO and α-Fe2O3(0001) islands

  3. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2016-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe the basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, maximal tori, homogeneous spaces, and roots. This second edition includes two new chapters that allow for an easier transition to the general theory of Lie groups. From reviews of the First Edition: This book could be used as an excellent textbook for a one semester course at university and it will prepare students for a graduate course on Lie groups, Lie algebras, etc. … The book combines an intuitive style of writing w...

  4. Summary report: injection group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brown, B.

    1984-01-01

    The injector group attempted to define and address several problem areas related to the SSC injector as defined in the Reference Design Study (RDS). It also considered the topic of machine utilization, particularly the question of test beam requirements. Details of the work are given in individually contributed papers, but the general concerns and consensus of the group are presented within this note. The group recognized that the injector as outlined in the RDS was developed primarily for costing estimates. As such, it was not necessarily well optimized from the standpoint of insuring the required beam properties for the SSC. On the other hand, considering the extraordinary short time in which the RDS was prepared, it is an impressive document and a good basis from which to work. Because the documented SSC performance goals are ambitious, the group sought an injector solution which would more likely guarantee that SSC performance not be limited by its injectors. As will be seen, this leads to a somewhat different solution than that described in the RDS. Furthermore, it is the consensus of the group that the new, conservative approach represents only a modest cost increase of the overall project well worth the confidence gained and the risks avoided

  5. Frailty Across Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Zepeda, M U; Ávila-Funes, J A; Gutiérrez-Robledo, L M; García-Peña, C

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of an aging biomarker into clinical practice is under debate. The Frailty Index is a model of deficit accumulation and has shown to accurately capture frailty in older adults, thus bridging biological with clinical practice. To describe the association of socio-demographic characteristics and the Frailty Index in different age groups (from 20 to over one hundred years) in a representative sample of Mexican subjects. Cross-sectional analysis. Nationwide and population-representative survey. Adults 20-years and older interviewed during the last Mexican National Health and Nutrition Survey (2012). A 30-item Frailty Index following standard construction was developed. Multi-level regression models were performed to test the associations of the Frailty Index with multiple socio-demographic characteristics across age groups. A total of 29,504 subjects was analyzed. The 30-item Frailty Index showed the highest scores in the older age groups, especially in women. No sociodemographic variable was associated with the Frailty Index in all the studied age groups. However, employment, economic income, and smoking status were more consistently found across age groups. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the Frailty Index in a representative large sample of a Latin American country. Increasing age and gender were closely associated with a higher score.

  6. Group-13 and group-15 doping of germanane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Cultrara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Germanane, a hydrogen-terminated graphane analogue of germanium has generated interest as a potential 2D electronic material. However, the incorporation and retention of extrinsic dopant atoms in the lattice, to tune the electronic properties, remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that the group-13 element Ga and the group-15 element As, can be successfully doped into a precursor CaGe2 phase, and remain intact in the lattice after the topotactic deintercalation, using HCl, to form GeH. After deintercalation, a maximum of 1.1% As and 2.3% Ga can be substituted into the germanium lattice. Electronic transport properties of single flakes show that incorporation of dopants leads to a reduction of resistance of more than three orders of magnitude in H2O-containing atmosphere after As doping. After doping with Ga, the reduction is more than six orders of magnitude, but with significant hysteretic behavior, indicative of water-activation of dopants on the surface. Only Ga-doped germanane remains activated under vacuum, and also exhibits minimal hysteretic behavior while the sheet resistance is reduced by more than four orders of magnitude. These Ga- and As-doped germanane materials start to oxidize after one to four days in ambient atmosphere. Overall, this work demonstrates that extrinsic doping with Ga is a viable pathway towards accessing stable electronic behavior in graphane analogues of germanium.

  7. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  8. Exotic statistics on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbo, T.D.; March-Russel, J.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate the allowed spectrum of statistics for n identical spinless particles on an arbitrary closed two-manifold M, by using a powerful topological approach to the study of quantum kinematics. On a surface of genus g≥1 statistics other than Bose or Fermi can only be obtained by utilizing multi-component state vectors transforming as an irreducible unitary representation of the fundamental group of the n-particle configuration space. These multi-component (or nonscalar) quantizations allow the possibility of fractional statistics, as well as other exotic, nonfractional statistics some of whose properties we discuss. On an orientable surface of genus g≥0 only anyons with rational statistical parameter θ/π=p/q are allowed, and their number is restricted to be sq-g+1 (selement ofZ). For nonorientable surfaces only θ=0, π are allowed. Finally, we briefly comment on systems of spinning particles and make a comparison with the results for solitons in the O(3)-invariant nonlinear sigma model with space manifold M. (orig.)

  9. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  10. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  11. Mobilizing Group Membership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Druckman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A randomized experiment was conducted to assess the effectiveness of three forms of e-mail appeals to prospective members of a newly formed professional group. The baseline condition consisted of an impersonal appeal; prospective members were sent a mass e-mail encouraging them to join. Participants in the personal condition received an e-mail with the same content, prefaced by a personal note from the group president. Participants in the social pressure condition received a personal note that called attention to the fact that they had previously signed a petition to form the professional group and urged them to make good on their earlier pledge (i.e., signing of the petition. Personalization is found to generate strong and statistically significant treatment effects. Even stronger are the effects of social pressure.

  12. Description of two-process surface topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabon, W; Pawlus, P

    2014-01-01

    After two machining processes, a large number of surface topography measurements were made using Talyscan 150 stylus measuring equipment. The measured samples were divided into two groups. The first group contained two-process surfaces of random nature, while the second group used random-deterministic textures of random plateau parts and portions of deterministic valleys. For comparison, one-process surfaces were also analysed. Correlation and regression analysis was used to study the dependencies among surface texture parameters in 2D and 3D systems. As the result of this study, sets of parameters describing multi-process surface topography were obtained for two-process surfaces of random and of random-deterministic types. (papers)

  13. Nature Inspired Surface Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubner, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Materials Scientists more and more are looking to nature for clues on how to create highly functional surface coatings with exceptional properties. The fog harvesting capabilities of the Namib Desert beetle, the beautiful iridescent colors of the hummingbird, and the super water repellant abilities of the Lotus leaf are but a few examples of the amazing properties developed over many years in the natural world. Nature also makes extensive use of the pH-dependent behavior of weak functional groups such as carboxylic acid and amine functional groups. This presentation will explore synthetic mimics to the nano- and microstructures responsible for these fascinating properties. For example, we have demonstrated a pH-induced porosity transition that can be used to create porous films with pore sizes that are tunable from the nanometer scale to the multiple micron scale. The pores of these films, either nano- or micropores, can be reversibly opened and closed by changes in solution pH. The ability to engineer pH-gated porosity transitions in heterostructured thin films has led to the demonstration of broadband anti-reflection coatings that mimic the anti-reflection properties of the moth eye and pH-tunable Bragg reflectors with a structure and function similar to that found in hummingbird wings and the Longhorn beetle. In addition, the highly textured honeycomb-like surfaces created by the formation of micron-scale pores are ideally suited for the creation of superhydrophobic surfaces that mimic the behavior of the self-cleaning lotus leaf. The development of synthetic "backbacks" on immune system cells that may one day ferry drugs to disease sites will also be discussed.

  14. Group B Strep Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding Lethargy (the baby is tired, hard to wake up, limp, or inactive) Difficulty breathing (with severe breathing problems, the baby’s skin, lips, or nails may turn blue) Diagnosis & Tests How will I know I have group B strep? If you’re ...

  15. Gamma gamma technology group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gamma gamma community are concerned that in the rush to prepare for the e+e− machine, allowance is not being made for a future upgrade of the photon linear collider. References. [1] ECFA/DESY Photon Collider Working Group: B Badelek et al, TESLA Technical. Design Report, Part VI, Chapter 1: Photon collider at ...

  16. Groups and Symmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 10. Groups and Symmetry: A Guide to Discovering Mathematics. Geetha Venkataraman. Book Review Volume 4 Issue 10 October 1999 pp 91-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Categorization by Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Hamilton (Rebecca); S. Puntoni (Stefano); N.T. Tavassoli (Nader)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractCategorization is a core psychological process central to consumer and managerial decision-making. While a substantial amount of research has been conducted to examine individual categorization behaviors, relatively little is known about the group categorization process. In two

  18. Unclonable Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dupont, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    We introduce and motivate the concept of unclonable group identification, that provides maximal protection against sharing of identities while still protecting the anonymity of users. We prove that the notion can be realized from any one-way function and suggest a more efficient implementation...

  19. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  20. Group: radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.V.E.

    1990-01-01

    The main activities of the radiation dosimetry group is described, including the calibration of instruments, sources and radioactive solutions and the determination of neutron flux; development, production and market dosimetric materials; development radiation sensor make the control of radiation dose received by IPEN workers; development new techniques for monitoring, etc. (C.G.C.)

  1. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  2. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Marco A.R.

    1994-01-01

    An elementary introduction to quantum groups is presented. The example of Universal Enveloping Algebra of deformed SU(2) is analysed in detail. It is also discussed systems made up of bosonic q-oscillators at finite temperature within the formalism of Thermo-Field Dynamics. (author). 39 refs

  3. INDEPENDENT AND GROUP LEARNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DICKINSON, MARIE B.

    IN CONTRAST TO THE TRADITIONAL EMPHASES ON ROTE LEARNING AND FACT ACCUMULATION, RECENT TRENDS EMERGING FROM EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH STRESS THE DEVELOPMENT OF THINKING PROCESSES SUCH AS THE ABILITY TO REASON ABSTRACTLY AND TO SYNTHESIZE. CHILDREN WORKING INDEPENDENTLY OR IN GROUPS MOVE THROUGH A DISCOVERY LEARNING CURRICULUM IN WHICH THE TEACHER…

  4. Convolution Operators on Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Derighetti, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    This volume is devoted to a systematic study of the Banach algebra of the convolution operators of a locally compact group. Inspired by classical Fourier analysis we consider operators on Lp spaces, arriving at a description of these operators and Lp versions of the theorems of Wiener and Kaplansky-Helson.

  5. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    is routinely defined as involving an objection component, a power requirement and an acceptance component. The objection and acceptance components refer to reasons or dispositions of the subjects of toleration, e.g. public authorities deciding how to act in relation to groups. The power condition refers...

  6. Anaphylaxis vulnerable groups

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Professor of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Age groups vulnerable to serious attacks of anaphylaxis include infants, teenagers, pregnant women, and the elderly. Concomitant diseases, such as severe or uncontrolled asthma, cardiovascular disease, mastocytosis or clonal mast cell ...

  7. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  8. Media Criticism Group Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To integrate speaking practice with rhetorical theory. Type of speech: Persuasive. Point value: 100 points (i.e., 30 points based on peer evaluations, 30 points based on individual performance, 40 points based on the group presentation), which is 25% of course grade. Requirements: (a) References: 7-10; (b) Length: 20-30 minutes; (c)…

  9. Lectures on Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiang, Wu-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This volume consists of nine lectures on selected topics of Lie group theory. We provide the readers a concise introduction as well as a comprehensive 'tour of revisiting' the remarkable achievements of S Lie, W Killing, É Cartan and H Weyl on structural and classification theory of semi-simple Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations; and also the wonderful duet of Cartans' theory on Lie groups and symmetric spaces.With the benefit of retrospective hindsight, mainly inspired by the outstanding contribution of H Weyl in the special case of compact connected Lie groups, we develop the above theory via a route quite different from the original methods engaged by most other books.We begin our revisiting with the compact theory which is much simpler than that of the general semi-simple Lie theory; mainly due to the well fittings between the Frobenius-Schur character theory and the maximal tori theorem of É Cartan together with Weyl's reduction (cf. Lectures 1-4). It is a wonderful reality of the Lie t...

  10. Group theory in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cornwell, J F

    1989-01-01

    Recent devopments, particularly in high-energy physics, have projected group theory and symmetry consideration into a central position in theoretical physics. These developments have taken physicists increasingly deeper into the fascinating world of pure mathematics. This work presents important mathematical developments of the last fifteen years in a form that is easy to comprehend and appreciate.

  11. Hunting in Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    [17] M Sato, Chasing and escaping by three groups of species, Physical Review E, Vol.85, p.066102, 2012. [18] K Dutta, How birds fly together: The dynamics of flocking, Resonance, Vol.15, pp.1097–1110, 2010. [19] T Vicsek et al, Novel type of phase transition in a system of self-driven particles, Physical Review Letter, ...

  12. Gartner Group reports

    CERN Document Server

    Gartner Group. Stamford, CT

    Gartner Group is the one of the leading independent providers of research and analysis material for IT professionals. Their reports provide in-depth analysis of dominant trends, companies and products. CERN has obtained a licence making these reports available online to anyone within CERN. The database contains not only current reports, updated monthly, but also some going back over a year.

  13. Lattices in group manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisboa, P.; Michael, C.

    1982-01-01

    We address the question of designing optimum discrete sets of points to represent numerically a continuous group manifold. We consider subsets which are extensions of the regular discrete subgroups. Applications to Monte Carlo simulation of SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Public interest group involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelley, P.

    1986-01-01

    Including public interest groups in the siting process for nuclear waste disposal facilities is of great importance. Controversial sitings often result in litigation, but involving public interest groups early in the process will lessen the change of this. They act as surrogates for the general public and should be considered as members of the team. It is important to remember though, that all public interest groups are different. In choosing public panels such as public advisory committees, members should not be chosen on the basis of some quota. Opposition groups should not be excluded. Also, it is important to put the right person in charge of the committee. The goal of public involvement is to identify the conflicts. This must be done during the decision process, because conflicts must be known before they can be eliminated. Regarding litigation, it is important to ease through and around legal battles. If the siting process has integrity and a good faith effort has been shown, the court should uphold the effort. In addition, it is important to be negotiable and to eliminate shortcuts

  15. Wave grouping measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansard, E.; Sand, S.E.; Klinting, P.

    1989-02-01

    There are recent indications that distinct wave groupings can be found even in deep water. The main objective has been to give a statistical description suitable for the design of coastal and offshore structures and it is undertaken to make further investigations in this field by analyzing some prototype records using the concepts of run length of high waves and spectrum of squared elevation, the limitations and performances of which in nonlinear waves will be highlighted in this study. An attempt has been made to relate this wave grouping to the surge motion of a floating structure with a simple mooring arrangement and thereby to propose a motion-based grouping measure. It appears that the observed run length statistics can be suitably described by Kimura's predictions if the records are sufficiently long. Records whose duration are equal to, or less than, 0.6 h reflect a large statistical variability in the various wave grouping measures. The filter cut-off proposed in the concept of SIWEH for the estimation of Groupiness Factor appears to be too high to give meaningful contrasts with respect to prototype values of the peakedness factors. It is therefore proposed to use the Hilbert Transform of the time series and a cut-off which is relevant to the natural period of the test structure. In the absence of information about this natural period a cut-off fc less than or equal to f/sub p//15 may work better. The motion equivalent groupiness factor concept could be used effectively to determine the critical sea state conditions to be used for testing of floating structures. The directional resolution of the sea state and theoretical formulations defining statistical variabilities caused by finite record lengths could be useful in evaluating whether the wave grouping is a linear process. (AB) 49 refs.

  16. [Effect to demineralization and remineralization of enamel surface by fluorine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Zhou, Xuedong; Hao, Yuqing

    2012-10-01

    To analyze the mechanism of fluorine by systemic analysis of fluorination-demineralization-remineralization experiments. The enamel specimens were randomly assigned to untreated group (group A), non-fluoride group (group B), low-fluoride group (group C) and high-fluoride group (group D). The in vitro model of fluoride enamel was established in group C and D. Based on that, the establishment of demineralization model and remineralization experiment by pH-cycling in group B, C and D were followed. All enamel specimens were observed by stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope and compared in surface microhardness value. There was distinct difference in micro-morphologic appearance on fluoride enamel surface. Artificial caries of fluoride enamel showed a relatively complete surface, the surface microhardness after demineralization and remineralization in fluoride group was higher than non-fluoride group (P fluorinated enamel can enhance cariostatic potential and remineralization capacity of dental enamel.

  17. Nanoscale processes on insulating surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gnecco, Enrico; Szymoński, Marek

    2009-01-01

    ... the group of Prof. Ernst Meyer in Basel, where he investigated friction processes on alkali halide surfaces in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The main result was the observation of a logarithmic velocity dependence of atomic friction, which was interpreted within a combination of the classical Tomlinson and Eyring models. After his Ph.D. he joined the ...

  18. Attraction to Group, Group Cohesiveness, and Individual Outcome: A Study of Training Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Thomas L.; Duncan, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationships between attraction to group and individual outcome in groups and between group cohesiveness and individual outcome in groups in four groups of 27 graduate students participating in a group psychotherapy experiential training program. Results revealed that attraction to group and group cohesiveness were both related to…

  19. [Blood groups - minuses and pluses. Do the blood group antigens protect us from infectious diseases?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiński, Marcin

    2015-06-25

    Human blood can be divided into groups, which is a method of blood classification based on the presence or absence of inherited erythrocyte surface antigens that can elicit immune response. According to the International Society of Blood Transfusion, there are 341 blood group antigens collected in 35 blood group systems. These antigens can be proteins, glycoproteins or glycosphingolipids, and function as transmembrane transporters, ion channels, adhesion molecules or receptors for other proteins. The majority of blood group antigens is present also on another types of cells. Due to their localization on the surface of cells, blood group antigens can act as receptors for various pathogens or their toxins, such as protozoa (malaria parasites), bacteria (Helicobacter pylori, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae) and viruses (Noroviruses, Parvoviruses, HIV). If the presence of group antigen (or its variant which arised due to mutation) is beneficial for the host (e.g. because pathogens are not able to bind to the cells), the blood group may become a selection trait, leading to its dissemination in the population exposed to that pathogen. There are thirteen blood group systems that can be related to pathogen resistance, and it seems that the particular influence was elicit by malaria parasites. It is generally thought that the high incidence of blood groups such as O in the Amazon region, Fy(a-b-) in Africa and Ge(-) in Papua-New Guinea is the result of selective pressure from malaria parasite. This review summarizes the data about relationship between blood groups and resistance to pathogens.

  20. The Areva Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-08-01

    This document provides information on the Areva Group, a world nuclear industry leader, offering solutions for nuclear power generation, electricity transmission and distribution and interconnect systems to the telecommunications, computer and automotive markets. It presents successively the front end division including the group business lines involved in producing nuclear fuel for electric power generation (uranium mining, concentration, conversion and enrichment and nuclear fuel fabrication); the reactors and services division which designs and builds PWR, BWR and research reactors; the back end division which encompasses the management of the fuel that has been used in nuclear power plants; the transmission and distribution division which provides products, systems and services to the medium and high voltage energy markets; the connectors division which designs and manufactures electrical, electronic and optical connectors, flexible micro circuitry and interconnection systems. Areva is implemented in Europe, north and south america, africa and asia-pacific. (A.L.B.)

  1. The Ombudperson Initiative Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Laura Stewart

    Following many discussions that took place at some of the ATLAS Women's Network lunch gatherings, a few ATLAS women joined forces with similarly concerned CERN staff women to form a small group last Fall to discuss the need for a CERN-wide Ombudsperson. This has since evolved into the Ombudsperson Initiative Group (OIG) currently composed of the following members: Barbro Asman, Stockholm University; Pierre Charrue, CERN AB; Anna Cook, CERN IT; Catherine Delamare, CERN and IT Ombudsperson; Paula Eerola, Lund University; Pauline Gagnon, Indiana University; Eugenia Hatziangeli, CERN AB; Doreen Klem, CERN IT; Bertrand Nicquevert, CERN TS and Laura Stewart, CERN AT. On June 12, members of the OIG met with representatives of Human Resources (HR) and the Equal Opportunity Advisory Panel (EOAP) to discuss the proposal drafted by the OIG. The meeting was very positive. Everybody agreed that the current procedures at CERN applicable in the event of conflict required a thorough review, and that a professionnally trai...

  2. The OMERACT Ultrasound Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Bruyn, George A W

    2017-01-01

    at least 1 joint abnormality versus 30% in the EA group. In HC, the findings of SH and PD were predominantly grade 1 whereas all grades were seen in the EA cohort, but SE was rare. In JIA, synovitis can be diagnosed based on B-mode findings alone because of the presence of physiological vascularization......OBJECTIVE: To provide an update from the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Working Group on the progress for defining ultrasound (US) minimal disease activity threshold at joint level in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and for standardization of US application in juvenile idiopathic...... arthritis (JIA). METHODS: For minimal disease activity, healthy controls (HC) and patients with early arthritis (EA) who were naive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were recruited from 2 centers. US was performed of the hands and feet, and scored semiquantitatively (0-3) for synovial hypertrophy (SH...

  3. Working group 4: Terrestrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    A working group at a Canada/USA symposium on climate change and the Arctic identified major concerns and issues related to terrestrial resources. The group examined the need for, and the means of, involving resource managers and users at local and territorial levels in the process of identifying and examining the impacts and consequences of climatic change. Climatic change will be important to the Arctic because of the magnitude of the change projected for northern latitudes; the apparent sensitivity of its terrestrial ecosystems, natural resources, and human support systems; and the dependence of the social, cultural, and economic welfare of Arctic communities, businesses, and industries on the health and quality of their environment. Impacts of climatic change on the physical, biological, and associated socio-economic environment are outlined. Gaps in knowledge needed to quantify these impacts are listed along with their relationships with resource management. Finally, potential actions for response and adaptation are presented

  4. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation......In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice...

  5. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Document Server

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that owing the preparations for the Open Days, the FM Group will not able to handle specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, nor removal or PC transport requests between the 31 March and 11 April. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of all types of waste and any urgent transport of office furniture or PCs before 31 March. Waste collection requests must be made by contacting FM Support on 77777 or at the e-mail address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form (select "Removals" or "PC transport" from the drop-down menu). For any question concerning the sorting of waste, please consult the following web site: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/ Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  6. Group and representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2017-01-01

    This volume goes beyond the understanding of symmetries and exploits them in the study of the behavior of both classical and quantum physical systems. Thus it is important to study the symmetries described by continuous (Lie) groups of transformations. We then discuss how we get operators that form a Lie algebra. Of particular interest to physics is the representation of the elements of the algebra and the group in terms of matrices and, in particular, the irreducible representations. These representations can be identified with physical observables. This leads to the study of the classical Lie algebras, associated with unitary, unimodular, orthogonal and symplectic transformations. We also discuss some special algebras in some detail. The discussion proceeds along the lines of the Cartan-Weyl theory via the root vectors and root diagrams and, in particular, the Dynkin representation of the roots. Thus the representations are expressed in terms of weights, which are generated by the application of the elemen...

  7. Group leaders optimization algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskin, Anmer; Kais, Sabre

    2011-03-01

    We present a new global optimization algorithm in which the influence of the leaders in social groups is used as an inspiration for the evolutionary technique which is designed into a group architecture. To demonstrate the efficiency of the method, a standard suite of single and multi-dimensional optimization functions along with the energies and the geometric structures of Lennard-Jones clusters are given as well as the application of the algorithm on quantum circuit design problems. We show that as an improvement over previous methods, the algorithm scales as N 2.5 for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N-particles. In addition, an efficient circuit design is shown for a two-qubit Grover search algorithm which is a quantum algorithm providing quadratic speedup over the classical counterpart.

  8. Metrically universal abelian groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doucha, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 369, č. 8 (2017), s. 5981-5998 ISSN 0002-9947 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Abelian group Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2016 http://www.ams.org/journals/tran/2017-369-08/S0002-9947-2017-07059-8/

  9. Multibunch working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems.

  10. Formal groups and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hazewinkel, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of the theory of formal groups and its numerous applications in several areas of mathematics. The seven chapters of the book present basics and main results of the theory, as well as very important applications in algebraic topology, number theory, and algebraic geometry. Each chapter ends with several pages of historical and bibliographic summary. One prerequisite for reading the book is an introductory graduate algebra course, including certain familiarity with category theory.

  11. Storage ring group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Storage Ring Group set out to identify and pursue salient problems in accelerator physics for heavy ion fusion, divorced from any particular reference design concept. However, it became apparent that some basic parameter framework was required to correlate the different study topics. As the Workshop progressed, ring parameters were modified and updated. Consequently, the accompanying papers on individual topics will be found to refer to slightly varied parameters, according to the stage at which the different problems were tackled

  12. Combinatorial group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lyndon, Roger C

    2001-01-01

    From the reviews: "This book (...) defines the boundaries of the subject now called combinatorial group theory. (...)it is a considerable achievement to have concentrated a survey of the subject into 339 pages. This includes a substantial and useful bibliography; (over 1100 ÄitemsÜ). ...the book is a valuable and welcome addition to the literature, containing many results not previously available in a book. It will undoubtedly become a standard reference." Mathematical Reviews, AMS, 1979.

  13. PCORnet's Collaborative Research Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Mark J; Forrest, Christopher B; Carton, Thomas W

    2018-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) launched a multi-institutional "network of networks" in 2013 - Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet) - that is designed to conduct clinical research that is faster, less expensive, and more responsive to the information needs of patients and clinicians. To enhance cross-network and cross-institutional collaboration and catalyze the use of PCORnet, PCORI has supported formation of 11 Collaborative Research Groups focusing on specific disease types (e.g., cardiovascular health and cancer) or particular patient populations (e.g., pediatrics and health disparities). PCORnet's Collaborative Research Groups are establishing research priorities within these focus areas, establishing relationships with potential funders, and supporting development of specific research projects that will use PCORnet resources. PCORnet remains a complex, multilevel, and heterogeneous network that is still maturing and building a diverse portfolio of observational and interventional people-centered research; engaging with PCORnet can be daunting, particularly for outside investigators. We believe the Collaborative Research Groups are stimulating interest and helping investigators navigate the complexity, but only time will tell if these efforts will bear fruit in terms of funded multicenter PCORnet projects.

  14. The 1996 Mount Everest tragedy: contemplation on group process and group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Lorraine; Nelson, Debra

    2003-07-01

    In May 1996, one of the most tragic Mt. Everest climbing seasons was about to unfold, and five climbers would perish in the "Death Zone" miles above the earth's surface. This article considers the events from a group dynamic and group process perspective in an attempt to understand what might have been happening to the group members. We summarize the events through the writings of two chroniclers. We then discuss creating the group, leadership, diversity and subgrouping, scapegoating, and multiple interpretations through an interpersonalist/psychodynamic framework.

  15. Working group 7: Ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheyen, R.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the environmental impact of nuclear power plants. The effects of ionizing radiations, of the thermal and chemical pollution on aquatic ecosystems as well as on terrestrial ecosystems have been estimated. After a general survey of such effects and their interaction, practical conclusions in regard to determined areas such as Meuse-Escaut marine and the coast have been drawn. The contamination effects of food chains have been evaluted under deliberately pessimistic conditions with regard to the choice of the radionuclide as well as of concentration factors. Following the biodegradation conditions of the surface waters, criteria for the quality of the aquatic ecosystems have been established. Finally, attention has been paid on certain factors affecting the site selection especially within the frame of the nature conservation. The effects of cooling towers have been also considered. (G.C.)

  16. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chao [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cao Ye [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China); Sun Kang, E-mail: ksun@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu Jiaxin; Wang Hong [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO{sub 3}H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group ({sup +}N((CH{sub 3}){sub 2})(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup Circled-Minus }) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  17. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Cao, Ye; Sun, Kang; Liu, Jiaxin; Wang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO3H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group (⊕N((CH3)2)(CH2)3SO3⊖) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO3H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO3H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  18. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chao; Cao Ye; Sun Kang; Liu Jiaxin; Wang Hong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO 3 H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group ( + N((CH 3 ) 2 )(CH 2 ) 3 SO 3 ⊖ ) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO 3 H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO 3 H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  19. Limit groups, positive-genus towers and measure equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Bridson, Martin R; Tweedale, Michael; Wilton, Henry

    2005-01-01

    By definition, an $\\omega$-residually free tower is positive-genus if all surfaces used in its construction are of positive genus. We prove that every limit group is virtually a subgroup of a positive-genus $\\omega$-residually free tower. By combining this with results of Gaboriau, we prove that elementarily free groups are measure equivalent to free groups.

  20. On surface approximation using developable surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. Y.; Lee, I. K.; Leopoldseder, s.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a method for approximating a given surface by a developable surface. It will be either a G(1) surface consisting of pieces of cones or cylinders of revolution or a G(r) NURBS developable surface. Our algorithm will also deal properly with the problems of reverse engineering and produ...... robust approximation of given scattered data. The presented technique can be applied in computer aided manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding. (C) 1999 Academic Press....

  1. On surface approximation using developable surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. Y.; Lee, I. K.; Leopoldseder, S.

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a method for approximating a given surface by a developable surface. It will be either a G_1 surface consisting of pieces of cones or cylinders of revolution or a G_r NURBS developable surface. Our algorithm will also deal properly with the problems of reverse engineering and produce...... robust approximation of given scattered data. The presented technique can be applied in computer aided manufacturing, e.g. in shipbuilding....

  2. Roughness of the globular protein surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, A.A.; Galzitskaya, O.V.; Serdyuk, I.N.

    1998-01-01

    Protein surface analysis using high resolution X ray shows that this surface has a two-level organization, on the micro- and macro-scales. On the micro-scale (2-7 Angstroem), the surface is characterized by the d = 2.1 fractal dimension which is intrinsic to surface with weak deformation and reflects the local atomic group packing. On the macro-scale the large scale surface defects are revealed which are interpreted as the result of secondary structure elements packing

  3. Parametrization of translational surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Diaz, Sonia; Shen, Liyong

    2014-01-01

    The algebraic translational surface is a typical modeling surface in computer aided design and architecture industry. In this paper, we give a necessary and sufficient condition for that algebraic surface having a standard parametric representation and our proof is constructive. If the given algebraic surface is translational, then we can compute a standard parametric representation for the surface.

  4. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  5. Grouping Notes Through Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dove, Graham; Abildgaard, Sille Julie Jøhnk; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    The Post-ItTM note is a frequently used, and yet seldom studied, design material. We investigate the functions Post-ItTM notes serve when providing cognitive support for creative design team practice. Our investigation considers the ways in which Post-ItTM notes function as design externalisations......, both individually and when grouped, and their role in categorisation in semantic long-term memory. To do this, we adopt a multimodal analytical approach focusing on interaction between humans, and between humans and artefacts, alongside language. We discuss in detail examples of four different...

  6. Groups and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, David W

    1995-01-01

    In most mathematics textbooks, the most exciting part of mathematics-the process of invention and discovery-is completely hidden from the reader. The aim of Groups and Symmetry is to change all that. By means of a series of carefully selected tasks, this book leads readers to discover some real mathematics. There are no formulas to memorize; no procedures to follow. The book is a guide: Its job is to start you in the right direction and to bring you back if you stray too far. Discovery is left to you. Suitable for a one-semester course at the beginning undergraduate level, there are no prerequ

  7. Statistical Group Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Tim Futing

    2011-01-01

    An incomparably useful examination of statistical methods for comparisonThe nature of doing science, be it natural or social, inevitably calls for comparison. Statistical methods are at the heart of such comparison, for they not only help us gain understanding of the world around us but often define how our research is to be carried out. The need to compare between groups is best exemplified by experiments, which have clearly defined statistical methods. However, true experiments are not always possible. What complicates the matter more is a great deal of diversity in factors that are not inde

  8. Public Participation Guide: Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    A focus group is a small group discussion with professional leadership. Focus groups are used to find out what issues are of most concern for a community or group when little or no information is available.

  9. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Document Server

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  10. Meningococcal group B vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie

    2013-06-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a devastating and feared infection with a significant morbidity and mortality profile. The successful impact of meningococcal capsular group C glyconconjugate vaccines introduced into the UK infant immunization schedule in 1999, has resulted in >80% of disease now being attributable to meningococcal capsular group B (MenB). MenB glyconconjugate vaccines are not immunogenic and hence, vaccine design has focused on sub-capsular antigens. Recently, a four component vaccine to combat MenB disease (4CMenB) has progressed through clinical development and was approved by the European Medicines Agency at the end of 2012. This vaccine has proven safe and immunogenic and has been predicted to provide protection against ~73% of the MenB disease from England and Wales. Recommendation/implementation of the vaccine into the UK infant schedule is currently being evaluated. 4CMenB has the potential to provide protection against a significant proportion of MenB disease in the UK which is currently unpreventable.

  11. Social group and mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltezarević Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our reality, having been subject to the numerous social crises during the last decades of the 20th century, is characterized by frequent incidences of powerlessness and alienation. The man is more frequently a subject to loneliness and overcomes the feeling of worthlessness, no matter whether he considers himself an individual or a part of a whole larger social. Such an environment leads to development of aggression in all fields of ones life. This paper has as an objective the pointing out of the mental harassment that is manifested in the working environment. There is a prevalence of mobbing cases, as a mode of pathological communication. The result of this is that a person, subjected to this kind of abuse, is soon faced with social isolation. This research also aspires to initiate the need for social groups self-organization of which victims are part of. The reaction modality of a social group directly conditions the outcome of the deliberate social drama, one is subjected to it as a result of mobbing.

  12. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  13. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  14. Business working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.

    2000-01-01

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The third group was on Business. The discussion concerned the following points: There are concerns about retaining experienced/trained personnel, and maintaining a good working relationship among them, as well as about the closure of research facilities, the reduction in staff numbers under increasing economic pressure and the lack of new nuclear power plant constructions. The marginal cost of producing electricity is lower for most existing nuclear power plants than for almost all other energy sources. Refurbishment costs are usually relatively small compared with new investments. The ongoing regulatory reform of the electricity market will bring increasing competition. Although PLIM has been carried out in many countries with favourable results, there are still uncertainties which affect business decisions regarding financial and market risks in PLIM activities. Recommendations were made. (author)

  15. Viscoelasticity of multicellular surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana; Milivojevic, Milan

    2017-07-26

    Various modeling approaches have been applied to describe viscoelasticity of multicellular surfaces. The viscoelasticity is considered within three time regimes: (1) short time regime for milliseconds to seconds time scale which corresponds to sub-cellular level; (2) middle time regime for several tens of seconds to several minutes time scale which corresponds to cellular level; and (3) long time regime for several tens of minutes to several hours time scale which corresponds to supra-cellular level. Short and middle time regimes have been successfully elaborated in the literature, whereas long time viscoelasticity remains unclear. Long time regime accounts for collective cell migration. Collective cell migration could induce uncorrelated motility which has an impact to energy storage and dissipation during cell surface rearrangement. Uncorrelated motility influences: (1) volume fraction of migrating cells, (2) distribution of migrating cells, (3) shapes of migrating cell groups. These parameters influence mechanical coupling between migrating and resting subpopulations and consequently the constitutive model for long time regime. This modeling consideration indicates that additional experimental work is needed to confirm the feasibility of constitutive models which have been applied in literature for long time regime as: (1) relaxation of stress and strain, (2) storage and loss moduli as the function of time, (3) distribution of migrating cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  17. Group theory in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of these two volumes (Vol. 1 includes chapters 1-9, Vol. 2 chapters 10-19) has been to provide a comprehensive and self-contained account of those parts of group theory that have been found to be most useful and of their main applications to physical problems. Starting with basic concepts they also include some of the more recent developments (to 1984). The areas of physics that are covered include atomic physics (chapters 1-6, 10-12), electronic energy bands in solids (chapters 1-6, 8 and 9), molecular vibrations (chapters 1, 2, 4-7), lattice vibrations in solids (chapters 1, 2, 4-9) and elementary particles (chapters 10-19). (U.K.)

  18. Optimised Renormalisation Group Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    Exact renormalisation group (ERG) flows interpolate between a microscopic or classical theory and the corresponding macroscopic or quantum effective theory. For most problems of physical interest, the efficiency of the ERG is constrained due to unavoidable approximations. Approximate solutions of ERG flows depend spuriously on the regularisation scheme which is determined by a regulator function. This is similar to the spurious dependence on the ultraviolet regularisation known from perturbative QCD. Providing a good control over approximated ERG flows is at the root for reliable physical predictions. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimised by appropriate choices of the regulator. We study specific optimised regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimised ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and non-vanishing temperature. An optimised flow for a ``proper-time ren...

  19. Group life insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration wishes to inform staff members and fellows having taken out optional life insurance under the group contract signed by CERN that the following changes to the rules and regulations entered into force on 1 January 2013:   The maximum age for an active member has been extended from 65 to 67 years. The beneficiary clause now allows insured persons to designate one or more persons of their choice to be their beneficiary(-ies), either at the time of taking out the insurance or at a later date, in which case the membership/modification form must be updated accordingly. Beneficiaries must be clearly identified (name, first name, date of birth, address).   The membership/modification form is available on the FP website: http://fp.web.cern.ch/helvetia-life-insurance For further information, please contact: Valentina Clavel (Tel. 73904) Peggy Pithioud (Tel. 72736)

  20. Quantum Secure Group Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M Suhail; Al-Amri, M

    2018-03-01

    We propose a quantum secure group communication protocol for the purpose of sharing the same message among multiple authorized users. Our protocol can remove the need for key management that is needed for the quantum network built on quantum key distribution. Comparing with the secure quantum network based on BB84, we show our protocol is more efficient and securer. Particularly, in the security analysis, we introduce a new way of attack, i.e., the counterfactual quantum attack, which can steal information by "invisible" photons. This invisible photon can reveal a single-photon detector in the photon path without triggering the detector. Moreover, the photon can identify phase operations applied to itself, thereby stealing information. To defeat this counterfactual quantum attack, we propose a quantum multi-user authorization system. It allows us to precisely control the communication time so that the attack can not be completed in time.

  1. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  2. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria, E-mail: d.brody@imperial.ac.u [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-25

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  3. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Selective surfaces have wavelength dependent emissivity/absorption. These surfaces can be designed to reflect solar radiation, while maximizing infrared emittance,...

  4. Characterization of solid surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kane, Philip F; Larrabee, Graydon B

    1974-01-01

    .... A comprehensive review of surface analysis, this important volume surveys both principles and techniques of surface characterization, describes instrumentation, and suggests the course of future research...

  5. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    subscales: Cohesion (pgroup milieu were seen. The systemic group turned out to be evaluated as the most structured therapy and also...... in a randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...

  6. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    subscales: Cohesion (psystemic group turned out to be evaluated as the most structured therapy and also...... in a randomized study of systemic versus psychodynamic group therapy, that the short-term outcome for patients who received systemic group psychotherapy was significantly better than the outcome for patients who received psychodynamic group psychotherapy. The current study assessed the group milieu in both groups....... Methods: This randomized prospective study included 106 women: 52 assigned to psychodynamic group psychotherapy and 54 assigned to systemic group psychotherapy. The Group Environment Scale (GES) was filled in the mid phase of therapy and analysed in three dimensions and 10 subscales. Results: The systemic...

  7. Emotional collectives : How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, G.A.; Fischer, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Group settings are epicentres of emotional activity. Yet, the role of emotions in groups is poorly understood. How do group-level phenomena shape group members’ emotional experience and expression? How are emotional expressions recognised, interpreted and shared in group settings? And how do such

  8. Timelike Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces with Singularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Svensson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We use integrable systems techniques to study the singularities of timelike non-minimal constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in the Lorentz–Minkowski 3-space. The singularities arise at the boundary of the Birkhoff big cell of the loop group involved. We examine the behavior of the surfaces...

  9. DETERMINATION OF SURFACE CHARGE DENSITY OF α ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    dissociation of these groups, result into a pH dependent surface charge whose density can be measured by acid-base titration. The surface charge density determined by such method is essentially measured relative to the unknown condition of the oxide/liquid interface prior to reagent addition (i.e. at the point of zero ...

  10. The Stellar Observations Network Group - first results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoci, Victoria; Grundahl, Frank; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen

    SONG - the Stellar Observations Network Group is a Danish-led project set to design and build a global network of 1-m telescopes to carry out detailed studies of solar-like stars using asteroseismology and to discover and characterise exo-planets and their star system. Here we present more than 100...... of individual modes over many orders in the frequency spectrum, leading to studies of rotation, convection, near-surface effects, core structure using mixed modes and stellar activity....

  11. On the monodromy group for the super Schwarzian differential equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Shozo; Yasui, Yukinori.

    1991-03-01

    We calculate the first variation of the monodromy group associated with a super Schwarzian differential equation. The relation between the monodromy period and the Fenchel-Nielsen deformation of a super Riemann surface is presented. (author)

  12. Chemical modification of epitaxial graphene: spontaneous grafting of aryl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, Elena; Itkis, Mikhail E; Ramesh, Palanisamy; Berger, Claire; Sprinkle, Michael; de Heer, Walt A; Haddon, Robert C

    2009-02-04

    The addition of nitrophenyl groups to the surface of few-layer epitaxial graphene (EG) by the formation of covalent carbon-carbon bonds changed the electronic structure and transport properties of the EG from near-metallic to semiconducting.

  13. Open algebraic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miyanishi, Masayoshi

    2000-01-01

    Open algebraic surfaces are a synonym for algebraic surfaces that are not necessarily complete. An open algebraic surface is understood as a Zariski open set of a projective algebraic surface. There is a long history of research on projective algebraic surfaces, and there exists a beautiful Enriques-Kodaira classification of such surfaces. The research accumulated by Ramanujan, Abhyankar, Moh, and Nagata and others has established a classification theory of open algebraic surfaces comparable to the Enriques-Kodaira theory. This research provides powerful methods to study the geometry and topology of open algebraic surfaces. The theory of open algebraic surfaces is applicable not only to algebraic geometry, but also to other fields, such as commutative algebra, invariant theory, and singularities. This book contains a comprehensive account of the theory of open algebraic surfaces, as well as several applications, in particular to the study of affine surfaces. Prerequisite to understanding the text is a basic b...

  14. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable success—several features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  15. The benefit of group sparsity

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Junzhou; Zhang, Tong

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a theory for group Lasso using a concept called strong group sparsity. Our result shows that group Lasso is superior to standard Lasso for strongly group-sparse signals. This provides a convincing theoretical justification for using group sparse regularization when the underlying group structure is consistent with the data. Moreover, the theory predicts some limitations of the group Lasso formulation that are confirmed by simulation studies.

  16. Becoming a group: value convergence and emergent work group identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeussen, Loes; Delvaux, Ellen; Phalet, Karen

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the process of group identity formation through social interaction in real-life work groups, with a focus on achievement values as content of work group identities. Extending research on social identity formation, we examined the process of value convergence as group members negotiate common group goals. Specifically, we predicted that work group members would influence each other's achievement values and that value convergence over time would underlie emergent work group identities and work group performance. Using a fully cross-lagged multilevel design with four repeated measures in 68 work groups, we find that group members' achievement values converge through mutual social influence. Moreover, multilevel polynomial regression analysis reveals that value convergence - rather than group members' initial value fit - longitudinally predicts work group identification and performance. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  17. The Liabilities Management Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, A.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Liabilities Management Group (LMG) was initiated by DTI. It is a cooperative forum which was set up in 1995. The current participants are DTI, UKAEA, NLM (for BNFL), MOD and Magnox Electric. The LMG was initiated to produce closer cooperation between public sector liability management organizations, achieve more cost-effective management of UK nuclear liabilities and enhance development of the UK nuclear decommissioning and waste management strategy. The objectives are to compare practices between liabilities management organizations discuss the scope for collaboration identify priority areas for possible collaboration agree action plans for exploring and undertaking such collaboration.Four task forces have been formed to look at specific areas (R and D, safety, contracts, and project management) and each reports separately to the LMG. The LMG has achieved its original aim of bringing together those with public sector liability management responsibilities. All participants feel that the LMG has been useful and that it should continue. Looking to the future, there is a continuing need for the LMG to facilitate removal of barriers to the achievement of best value for money. The LMG might also consider addressing the 'business process' elements that a liability management organization must be good at in order to define best practice in these. (author)

  18. Oklo working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Maravic, H.

    1993-01-01

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  19. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Saving Face and Group Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm....