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Sample records for surface atomic layer

  1. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al 2 O 3 due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO 2 . • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt

  2. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  3. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-07

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Atomic and molecular layer activation of dielectric surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, John Joseph

    Strong interaction between the material deposit and substrate is critical to stable deposits and interfaces. The work presented here focuses on the surface activation of dielectric surfaces and oxidized metal surfaces to promote the chemisorption of palladium (II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate (PdII (hfac)2). The goal is to develop reliable, robust metallization protocols, which enable strong interactions between the metal and substrate. SiO2, air exposed Ta, Trikon, and SiLK were activated with sulfur or phosphorus. Two types of activations were developed; one based on self-assembled chemistry, and the other a plasma-assisted process. Activation of the surface using self-assembly techniques was carried out using mercaptan-terminated silane and tetrasulfide silane. The resulting films were characterized by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tetrasulfide silane sources films exhibit self-limiting behavior, even in the presence of water vapor; whereas mercaptan-terminated silane sourced films tend to be thicker. The surface activations using atomic layers of sulfur and phosphorus were carried out in a rf plasma chamber using hydrogen sulfide and phosphine sources, respectively. The activations were studied as functions of rf power, system pressure, and substrate material. Results show that higher rf powers and lower system pressures promote greater surface coverages by sulfur with a reduced oxidation state. The activated dielectrics show evidence of PdII(hfac)2 chemisorption, in contrast to non-activated surfaces. The binding energy shift of the Pd3d 5/2 XPS peak towards elemental Pd provides evidence for the dissociative chemisorption of PdII(hfac)2. The extent of dissociation depends on the substrate temperature and the activation method used. The conclusions of the work presented here have implications for metallization using highly polarizable transition metals. Specifically, it can be applied to

  5. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO 2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  7. Surface passivation of GaAs nanowires by the atomic layer deposition of AlN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtrom, I. V., E-mail: igorstrohm@mail.ru; Bouravleuv, A. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Samsonenko, Yu. B.; Khrebtov, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Soshnikov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Reznik, R. R.; Cirlin, G. E., E-mail: cirlin@beam.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg National Research Academic University—Nanotechnology Research and Education Center (Russian Federation); Dhaka, V.; Perros, A.; Lipsanen, H. [Aalto University (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    It is shown that the atomic layer deposition of thin AlN layers can be used to passivate the surface states of GaAs nanowires synthesized by molecular-beam epitaxy. Studies of the optical properties of samples by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements shows that the photoluminescence-signal intensity can be increased by a factor of up to five by passivating the nanowires with a 25-Å-thick AlN layer.

  8. Improvement and protection of niobium surface superconductivity by atomic layer deposition and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, T.; /IIT, Chicago /Argonne; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Moore, J.; Pellin, M.; Elam, J.; /Argonne; Cooley, L.; /Fermilab; Antoine, C.; /Saclay

    2008-11-01

    A method to treat the surface of Nb is described, which potentially can improve the performance of superconducting rf cavities. We present tunneling and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements at the surface of cavity-grade niobium samples coated with a 3 nm alumina overlayer deposited by atomic layer deposition. The coated samples baked in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperature degraded superconducting surface. However, at temperatures above 450 C, the tunneling conductance curves show significant improvements in the superconducting density of states compared with untreated surfaces.

  9. Self-cleaning and surface chemical reactions during hafnium dioxide atomic layer deposition on indium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Head, Ashley R; Yngman, Sofie; Knutsson, Johan V; Hjort, Martin; McKibbin, Sarah R; Troian, Andrea; Persson, Olof; Urpelainen, Samuli; Knudsen, Jan; Schnadt, Joachim; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2018-04-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) enables the ultrathin high-quality oxide layers that are central to all modern metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits. Crucial to achieving superior device performance are the chemical reactions during the first deposition cycle, which could ultimately result in atomic-scale perfection of the semiconductor-oxide interface. Here, we directly observe the chemical reactions at the surface during the first cycle of hafnium dioxide deposition on indium arsenide under realistic synthesis conditions using photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the widely used ligand exchange model of the ALD process for the removal of native oxide on the semiconductor and the simultaneous formation of the first hafnium dioxide layer must be significantly revised. Our study provides substantial evidence that the efficiency of the self-cleaning process and the quality of the resulting semiconductor-oxide interface can be controlled by the molecular adsorption process of the ALD precursors, rather than the subsequent oxide formation.

  10. Surface passivation investigation on ultra-thin atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide layers for their potential application to form tunnel layer passivated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Nandakumar, Naomi; Kaur, Gurleen; Ke, Cangming; Liao, Baochen; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    The surface passivation performance of atomic layer deposited ultra-thin aluminium oxide layers with different thickness in the tunnel layer regime, i.e., ranging from one atomic cycle (∼0.13 nm) to 11 atomic cycles (∼1.5 nm) on n-type silicon wafers is studied. The effect of thickness and thermal activation on passivation performance is investigated with corona-voltage metrology to measure the interface defect density D it(E) and the total interface charge Q tot. Furthermore, the bonding configuration variation of the AlO x films under various post-deposition thermal activation conditions is analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Additionally, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate) is used as capping layer on ultra-thin AlO x tunneling layers to further reduce the surface recombination current density to values as low as 42 fA/cm2. This work is a useful reference for using ultra-thin ALD AlO x layers as tunnel layers in order to form hole selective passivated contacts for silicon solar cells.

  11. Surface passivation of efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells using thermal atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Che-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Jui; Chang, Che-Wei; Huang, Jhih-Jie; Yang, Ming-Jui; Tjahjono, Budi; Huang, Jian-Jia; Hsu, Wen-Ching; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2013-10-09

    Efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells passivated by an Al2O3 layer are demonstrated. The broadband antireflection of the nanotextured black silicon solar cells was provided by fabricating vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays on the n(+) emitter. A highly conformal Al2O3 layer was deposited upon the SiNW arrays by the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) based on the multiple pulses scheme. The nanotextured black silicon wafer covered with the Al2O3 layer exhibited a low total reflectance of ∼1.5% in a broad spectrum from 400 to 800 nm. The Al2O3 passivation layer also contributes to the suppressed surface recombination, which was explored in terms of the chemical and field-effect passivation effects. An 8% increment of short-circuit current density and 10.3% enhancement of efficiency were achieved due to the ALD Al2O3 surface passivation and forming gas annealing. A high efficiency up to 18.2% was realized in the ALD Al2O3-passivated nanotextured black silicon solar cells.

  12. Atomic Layer-Deposited TiO2 Coatings on NiTi Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokoun, D.; Racek, J.; Kadeřávek, L.; Kei, C. C.; Yu, Y. S.; Klimša, L.; Šittner, P.

    2018-02-01

    NiTi shape-memory alloys may release poisonous Ni ions at the alloys' surface. In an attempt to prepare a well-performing surface layer on an NiTi sample, the thermally grown TiO2 layer, which formed during the heat treatment of NiTi, was removed and replaced with a new TiO2 layer prepared using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, it was found that the ALD layer prepared at as low a temperature as 100 °C contained Ti in oxidation states + 4 and + 3. As for static corrosion properties of the ALD-coated NiTi samples, they further improved compared to those covered by thermally grown oxide. The corrosion rate of samples with thermally grown oxide was 1.05 × 10-5 mm/year, whereas the corrosion rate of the ALD-coated samples turned out to be about five times lower. However, cracking of the ALD coating occurred at about 1.5% strain during the superelastic mechanical loading in tension taking place via the propagation of a localized martensite band.

  13. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  14. Characterization of surface electrochemical reactions used in electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy and digital etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Thomas Allen

    Surface analytical techniques have been used to characterize electrochemical reactions to be used in semiconductor processing technologies. Studies have been performed using UHV-EC methodology to determine conditions for the surface limited dissolution of CdTe(100). Electrochemical conditions were identified which resulted in the reduction of the top layer of tellurium atoms, leaving behind a cadmium enriched surface. Attempts to find an electrochemical potential for the oxidative dissolution of the cadmium surface were complicated by the simultaneous oxidation of the compound CdTe. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy has also been used to characterize the formation of tellurium atomic layers formed on Au(111) and Au(100) by underpotential deposition. On Au(100), the following sequence of surface structures was observed prior to bulk electrodeposition: a p(2x2), a (2x✓10), a (2x4), and a (✓2x✓5). The transitions between these structures was observed by STM and mechanisms for the phase transitions are presented. The results are correlated to UHV-EC studies of tellurium UPD on Au(100). On Au(111), the following sequence of structures was observeḑ: a (✓3 x✓3), a (✓7x✓13), and a (3x3). The (✓3x✓3) was shown to exist with a network of domain walls, forming long range triangular and diamond shaped superstructures. Conversion of the (✓3x✓3) to higher coverage structure resulted in roughening of the underlying Au surface and a mechanism is hypothesized to explain this transition. The STM results are also correlated to low energy electron diffraction (LEED) results obtained by UHV-EC studies. The surface structures formed by reductive UPD of the chalcogenide elements and Se on both Au(100) and Au(111) are compared. Both elements initially resulted in structures consisting of isolated atoms separated by distances close to the reported van der Waals diameter. Higher coverage structures resulted in interatomic chalcogenide bonding and the structures

  15. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Solid State Electronics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H. [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstraße 15, 48149 Münster (Germany); Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine, E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yee, Ye Sheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Clemens, Bruce M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  16. Influence of surface relaxation of strained layers on atomic resolution ADF imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas; Duschek, Lennart; Belz, Jürgen; Oelerich, Jan Oliver; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2017-10-01

    Surface relaxation of thin transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens of strained layers results in a severe bending of lattice planes. This bending significantly displaces atoms from their ideal channeling positions which has a strong impact on the measured annular dark field (ADF) intensity. With the example of GaAs quantum wells (QW) embedded in a GaP barrier, we model the resulting displacements by elastic theory using the finite element (FE) formalism. Relaxed and unrelaxed super cells served as input for state of the art frozen phonon simulation of atomic resolution ADF images. We systematically investigate the dependencies on the sample´s geometric parameters, i.e. QW width and TEM sample thickness, by evaluating the simulated intensities at the atomic column´s positions as well as at the background positions in between. Depending on the geometry the ADF intensity can be affected in a range several nm from the actual interface. Moreover, we investigate the influence of the surface relaxation on the angular distribution of the scattered intensity. At high scattering angles we observe an intensity reduction at the interface as well as in the GaP barrier due to de-channeling. The amount of intensity reduction at an atomic column is directly proportional to its mean square displacement. On the contrary we find a clearly increased intensity at low angles caused by additional diffuse scattering. We discuss the implications for quantitative evaluations as well as strategies to compensate for the reduced intensities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Atomic layer deposition in nanostructured photovoltaics: tuning optical, electronic and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmstrom, Axel F.; Santra, Pralay K.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials offer key advantages for third-generation photovoltaics, such as the ability to achieve high optical absorption together with enhanced charge carrier collection using low cost components. However, the extensive interfacial areas in nanostructured photovoltaic devices can cause high recombination rates and a high density of surface electronic states. In this feature article, we provide a brief review of some nanostructured photovoltaic technologies including dye-sensitized, quantum dot sensitized and colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We then introduce the technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a vapor phase deposition method using a sequence of self-limiting surface reaction steps to grow thin, uniform and conformal films. We discuss how ALD has established itself as a promising tool for addressing different aspects of nanostructured photovoltaics. Examples include the use of ALD to synthesize absorber materials for both quantum dot and plasmonic solar cells, to grow barrier layers for dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, and to infiltrate coatings into colloidal quantum dot solar cell to improve charge carrier mobilities as well as stability. We also provide an example of monolayer surface modification in which adsorbed ligand molecules on quantum dots are used to tune the band structure of colloidal quantum dot solar cells for improved charge collection. Finally, we comment on the present challenges and future outlook of the use of ALD for nanostructured photovoltaics.

  18. Atomic layer deposition in nanostructured photovoltaics: tuning optical, electronic and surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmstrom, Axel F; Santra, Pralay K; Bent, Stacey F

    2015-08-07

    Nanostructured materials offer key advantages for third-generation photovoltaics, such as the ability to achieve high optical absorption together with enhanced charge carrier collection using low cost components. However, the extensive interfacial areas in nanostructured photovoltaic devices can cause high recombination rates and a high density of surface electronic states. In this feature article, we provide a brief review of some nanostructured photovoltaic technologies including dye-sensitized, quantum dot sensitized and colloidal quantum dot solar cells. We then introduce the technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD), which is a vapor phase deposition method using a sequence of self-limiting surface reaction steps to grow thin, uniform and conformal films. We discuss how ALD has established itself as a promising tool for addressing different aspects of nanostructured photovoltaics. Examples include the use of ALD to synthesize absorber materials for both quantum dot and plasmonic solar cells, to grow barrier layers for dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, and to infiltrate coatings into colloidal quantum dot solar cell to improve charge carrier mobilities as well as stability. We also provide an example of monolayer surface modification in which adsorbed ligand molecules on quantum dots are used to tune the band structure of colloidal quantum dot solar cells for improved charge collection. Finally, we comment on the present challenges and future outlook of the use of ALD for nanostructured photovoltaics.

  19. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhaka, Veer, E-mail: veer.dhaka@aalto.fi; Perros, Alexander; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Haggren, Tuomas; Lipsanen, Harri [Department of Micro- and Nanosciences, Micronova, Aalto University, P.O. Box 13500, FI-00076 (Finland); Naureen, Shagufta; Shahid, Naeem [Research School of Physics & Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko [Department of Applied Physics and Nanomicroscopy Center, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 (Finland); Srinivasan, Anand [School of Information and Communication Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, S-164 40 Kista (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature (∼200 °C) grown atomic layer deposition (ALD) films of AlN, TiN, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, GaN, and TiO{sub 2} were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP) nanowires (NWs), and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL) at low temperatures (15K), and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å) film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL) was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars) to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  20. Protective capping and surface passivation of III-V nanowires by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veer Dhaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature (∼200 °C grown atomic layer deposition (ALD films of AlN, TiN, Al2O3, GaN, and TiO2 were tested for protective capping and surface passivation of bottom-up grown III-V (GaAs and InP nanowires (NWs, and top-down fabricated InP nanopillars. For as-grown GaAs NWs, only the AlN material passivated the GaAs surface as measured by photoluminescence (PL at low temperatures (15K, and the best passivation was achieved with a few monolayer thick (2Å film. For InP NWs, the best passivation (∼2x enhancement in room-temperature PL was achieved with a capping of 2nm thick Al2O3. All other ALD capping layers resulted in a de-passivation effect and possible damage to the InP surface. Top-down fabricated InP nanopillars show similar passivation effects as InP NWs. In particular, capping with a 2 nm thick Al2O3 layer increased the carrier decay time from 251 ps (as-etched nanopillars to about 525 ps. Tests after six months ageing reveal that the capped nanostructures retain their optical properties. Overall, capping of GaAs and InP NWs with high-k dielectrics AlN and Al2O3 provides moderate surface passivation as well as long term protection from oxidation and environmental attack.

  1. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K.K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HfO 2 films using thermal ALD are studied for silicon surface passivation. • As-deposited thin film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with surface recombination velocity (SRV) <100 cm/s. • Annealing improves passivation quality with SRV ∼20 cm/s for ∼8 nm film. - Abstract: Hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO 2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (D it ) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  2. Rational Design of Hyperbranched Nanowire Systems for Tunable Superomniphobic Surfaces Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Boban, Mathew; He, Yang; Kazyak, Eric; Lee, Duck H.; Wang, Chongmin; Tuteja, Anish; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2017-01-24

    A method for tunable control of geometry in hyperbranched ZnO nanowire (NW) systems is reported, which enables the rational design and fabrication of superomniphobic surfaces. Branched NWs with tunable density and orientation were grown via a sequential hydrothermal process, in which atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used for NW seeding, disruption of epitaxy, and selective blocking of NW nucleation. This approach allows for the rational design and optimization of three-level hierarchical structures, in which the geometric parameters of each level of hierarchy can be individually controlled. We demonstrate the coupled relationships between geometry and contact angle for a variety of liquids, which is supported by mathematical models of structural superomniphobicity. The highest performing superomniphobic surface was designed with three levels of hierarchy and achieved the following advancing/receding contact angles, water: 172°/170°, hexadecane: 166°/156°, octane: 162°/145°, and heptane: 160°/130°. Low surface tension liquids were shown to bounce off the surface from a height of 7 cm without breaking through and wetting. This approach demonstrates the power of ALD as an enabling technique for hierarchical materials by design, spanning the macro, micro, and nano length scales.

  3. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Chi, Dongzhi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO x ) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO x films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO x films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO x films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO x has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO x in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  4. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Chi, Dongzhi; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiOx) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiOx films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiOx films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiOx films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiOx has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiOx in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  5. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface...

  6. Electrode surface engineering by atomic layer deposition: A promising pathway toward better energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2016-04-29

    Research on electrochemical energy storage devices including Li ion batteries (LIBs), Na ion batteries (NIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs) has accelerated in recent years, in part because developments in nanomaterials are making it possible to achieve high capacities and energy and power densities. These developments can extend battery life in portable devices, and open new markets such as electric vehicles and large-scale grid energy storage. It is well known that surface reactions largely determine the performance and stability of electrochemical energy storage devices. Despite showing impressive capacities and high energy and power densities, many of the new nanostructured electrode materials suffer from limited lifetime due to severe electrode interaction with electrolytes or due to large volume changes. Hence control of the surface of the electrode material is essential for both increasing capacity and improving cyclic stability of the energy storage devices.Atomic layer deposition (ALD) which has become a pervasive synthesis method in the microelectronics industry, has recently emerged as a promising process for electrochemical energy storage. ALD boasts excellent conformality, atomic scale thickness control, and uniformity over large areas. Since ALD is based on self-limiting surface reactions, complex shapes and nanostructures can be coated with excellent uniformity, and most processes can be done below 200. °C. In this article, we review recent studies on the use of ALD coatings to improve the performance of electrochemical energy storage devices, with particular emphasis on the studies that have provided mechanistic insight into the role of ALD in improving device performance. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-07

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  8. Boron Nitride Nanoporous Membranes with High Surface Charge by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matthieu; Koonkaew, Boonprakrong; Balme, Sebastien; Utke, Ivo; Picaud, Fabien; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Coy, Emerson; Miele, Philippe; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-05-17

    In this work, we report the design and the fine-tuning of boron nitride single nanopore and nanoporous membranes by atomic layer deposition (ALD). First, we developed an ALD process based on the use of BBr 3 and NH 3 as precursors in order to synthesize BN thin films. The deposited films were characterized in terms of thickness, composition, and microstructure. Next, we used the newly developed process to grow BN films on anodic aluminum oxide nanoporous templates, demonstrating the conformality benefit of BN prepared by ALD, and its scalability for the manufacturing of membranes. For the first time, the ALD process was then used to tune the diameter of fabricated single transmembrane nanopores by adjusting the BN thickness and to enable studies of the fundamental aspects of ionic transport on a single nanopore. At pH = 7, we estimated a surface charge density of 0.16 C·m -2 without slip and 0.07 C·m -2 considering a reasonable slip length of 3 nm. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with experimental conditions confirmed the conductivities and the sign of surface charges measured. The high ion transport results obtained and the ability to fine-tune nanoporous membranes by such a scalable method pave the way toward applications such as ionic separation, energy harvesting, and ultrafiltration devices.

  9. Electronic passivation of silicon surfaces by thin films of atomic layer deposited gallium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. G.; Cuevas, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the application of gallium oxide (Ga 2 O 3 ) thin films to crystalline silicon solar cells. Effective passivation of n- and p-type crystalline silicon surfaces has been achieved by the application of very thin Ga 2 O 3 films prepared by atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ozone (O 3 ) as the reactants. Surface recombination velocities as low as 6.1 cm/s have been recorded with films less than 4.5 nm thick. A range of deposition parameters has been explored, with growth rates of approximately 0.2 Å/cycle providing optimum passivation. The thermal activation energy for passivation of the Si-Ga 2 O 3 interface has been found to be approximately 0.5 eV. Depassivation of the interface was observed for prolonged annealing at increased temperatures. The activation energy for depassivation was measured to be 1.9 eV.

  10. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and

  11. Stabilizing small molecules on metal oxide surfaces using atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kenneth; Losego, Mark D; Kalanyan, Berç; Parsons, Gregory N; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-10-09

    Device lifetimes and commercial viability of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs) are dependent on the stability of the surface bound molecular chromophores and catalysts. Maintaining the integrity of the solution-metal oxide interface is especially challenging in DSPECs for water oxidation where it is necessary to perform high numbers of turnovers, under irradiation in an aqueous environment. In this study, we describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2 on nanocrystalline TiO2 prefunctionalized with the dye molecule [Ru(bpy)2(4,4'-(PO3H2)bpy)](2+) (RuP) as a strategy to stabilize surface bound molecules. The resulting films are over an order of magnitude more photostable than untreated films and the desorption rate constant exponentially decreases with increased thickness of ALD TiO2 overlayers. However, the injection yield for TiO2-RuP with ALD TiO2 also decreases with increasing overlayer thickness. The combination of decreased injection yield and 95% quenched emission suggests that the ALD TiO2 overlayer acts as a competitive electron acceptor from RuP*, effectively nonproductively quenching the excited state. The ALD TiO2 also increases back electron transfer rates, relative to the untreated film, but is independent of overlayer thickness. The results for TiO2-RuP with an ALD TiO2 overlayer are compared with similar films having ALD Al2O3 overlayers.

  12. Growth mechanisms for Si epitaxy on O atomic layers: Impact of O-content and surface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayachandran, Suseendran, E-mail: suseendran.jayachandran@imec.be [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Castle Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Billen, Arne [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Douhard, Bastien; Conard, Thierry; Meersschaut, Johan; Moussa, Alain; Caymax, Matty; Bender, Hugo [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandervorst, Wilfried [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heyns, Marc [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Castle Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Delabie, Annelies [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • O{sub 3} or O{sub 2} exposures on H-Si(100) result in O ALs with different surface structures. • Si-EPI on O AL using O{sub 3} process is by direct epitaxial growth mechanism. • Si-EPI on O AL using O{sub 2} process is by epitaxial lateral overgrowth mechanism. • Distortions by O AL, SiH{sub 4} flux rate and Si thickness has an impact on Si-EPI quality. - Abstract: The epitaxial growth of Si layers on Si substrates in the presence of O atoms is generally considered a challenge, as O atoms degrade the epitaxial quality by generating defects. Here, we investigate the growth mechanisms for Si epitaxy on O atomic layers (ALs) with different O-contents and structures. O ALs are deposited by ozone (O{sub 3}) or oxygen (O{sub 2}) exposure on H-terminated Si at 50 °C and 300 °C respectively. Epitaxial Si is deposited by chemical vapor deposition using silane (SiH{sub 4}) at 500 °C. After O{sub 3} exposure, the O atoms are uniformly distributed in Si-Si dimer/back bonds. This O layer still allows epitaxial seeding of Si. The epitaxial quality is enhanced by lowering the surface distortions due to O atoms and by decreasing the arrival rate of SiH{sub 4} reactants, allowing more time for surface diffusion. After O{sub 2} exposure, the O atoms are present in the form of SiO{sub x} clusters. Regions of hydrogen-terminated Si remain present between the SiO{sub x} clusters. The epitaxial seeding of Si in these structures is realized on H-Si regions, and an epitaxial layer grows by a lateral overgrowth mechanism. A breakdown in the epitaxial ordering occurs at a critical Si thickness, presumably by accumulation of surface roughness.

  13. Surface Recombination of Crystalline Silicon Substrates Passivated by Atomic-Layer-Deposited AlOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafune, Koji; Miki, Shohei; Matsutani, Ryosuke; Hamano, Junpei; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ogura, Atsuhi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    2012-04-01

    AlOx films as passivation layers for p-type crystalline silicon were prepared by atomic layer deposition with ozone as an oxidant, and the effects of the AlOx film thickness and deposition temperature on the maximum recombination velocity (Smax) were evaluated. Smax is improved by increasing the layer thickness but saturates at a layer thickness of about 30 nm. In the case of samples deposited at room temperature, Smax is improved fivefold when the thickness is increased from 20 to 33 nm. Smax also improved as the deposition temperature was increased to 300 °C then deteriorated when it was further increased to 350 °C. After postdeposition annealing, we obtained an Smax of 8.5 cm/s.

  14. On surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using diazonium chemistry to introduce the initiator layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iruthayaraj, Joseph; Chernyy, Sergey; Lillethorup, Mie

    2011-01-01

    This work features the controllability of surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate, initiated by a multilayered 2-bromoisobutyryl moiety formed via diazonium chemistry. The thickness as a function of polymerization time has been studied by varying...

  15. Relevance of sub-surface chip layers for the lifetime of magnetically trapped atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H. B.; Henkel, C; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    on the thickness of that layer, as long as the layers below have a much smaller conductivity; essentially the same magnetic noise would be obtained with a metallic membrane suspended in vacuum. Based on our theory we give general scaling laws of how to reduce the effect of surface magnetic noise on the trapped...... measurements where the center of a side guide trap is laterally shifted with respect to the current carrying wire using additional bias fields. Comparing the experiment to theory, we find a fair agreement and demonstrate that for a chip whose topmost layer is metallic, the magnetic noise depends essentially...

  16. Atomic layer deposition TiO2 coated porous silicon surface: Structural characterization and morphological features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor; Jancelewicz, Mariusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Kempiński, Mateusz; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Załęski, Karol; Jurga, Stefan; Smyntyna, Valentyn

    2015-01-01

    TiO 2 thin films were grown on highly-doped p-Si (100) macro- and mesoporous structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using TiCl 4 and deionized water as precursors at 300 °C. The crystalline structure, chemical composition, and morphology of the deposited films and initial silicon nanostructures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mean size of TiO 2 crystallites was determined by TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the mean crystallite size and the crystallinity of the TiO 2 are influenced dramatically by the morphology of the porous silicon, with the mesoporous silicon resulting in a much finer grain size and amorphous structure than the macroporous silicon having a partially crystal anatase phase. A simple model of the ALD layer growth inside the pores was presented. - Highlights: • The morphology and chemical composition of TiO 2 and porous Si were established. • The approximate size of TiO 2 nanocrystals was estimated. • The model of the atomic layer deposition coating in the porous Si was presented

  17. Atomic layer deposition of lead sulfide quantum dots on nanowire surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Jung, Hee Joon; Trejo, Orlando; McDowell, Matthew T; Hryciw, Aaron; Brongersma, Mark; Sinclair, Robert; Prinz, Fritz B

    2011-03-09

    Quantum dots provide unique advantages in the design of novel optoelectronic devices owing to the ability to tune their properties as a function of size. Here we demonstrate a new technique for fabrication of quantum dots during the nucleation stage of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of PbS. Islands with sub-10 nm diameters were observed during the initial ALD cycles by transmission electron microscopy, and in situ observations of the coalescence and sublimation behavior of these islands show the possibility of further modifying the size and density of dots by annealing. The ALD process can be used to cover high-aspect-ratio nanostructures, as demonstrated by the uniform coating of a Si nanowire array with a single layer of PbS quantum dots. Photoluminescence measurements on the quantum dot/nanowire composites show a blue shift when the number of ALD cycles is decreased, suggesting a route to fabricate unique three-dimensional nanostructured devices such as solar cells.

  18. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 on crystalline silicon solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Joon; Song, Hee Eun; Chang, Hyo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al 2 O 3 layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al 2 O 3 passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al 2 O 3 growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al 2 O 3 passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al 2 O 3 shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al 2 O 3 surface passivation

  19. An atomic-force-microscopy study of the structure of surface layers of intact fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalisov, M. M.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Penniyaynen, V. A.; Nyapshaev, I. A.; Kipenko, A. V.; Timoshchuk, K. I.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2017-02-01

    Intact embryonic fibroblasts on a collagen-treated substrate have been studied by atomic-force microscopy (AFM) using probes of two types: (i) standard probes with tip curvature radii of 2-10 nm and (ii) special probes with a calibrated 325-nm SiO2 ball radius at the tip apex. It is established that, irrespective of probe type, the average maximum fibroblast height is on a level of 1.7 μm and the average stiffness of the probe-cell contact amounts to 16.5 mN/m. The obtained AFM data reveal a peculiarity of the fibroblast structure, whereby its external layers move as a rigid shell relative to the interior and can be pressed inside to a depth dependent on the load only.

  20. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, Lau (one of the authors pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  1. Three-dimensional hydration layer mapping on the (10.4) surface of calcite using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marutschke, Christoph; Hermes, Ilka; Bechstein, Ralf; Kühnle, Angelika; Walters, Deron; Cleveland, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Calcite, the most stable modification of calcium carbonate, is a major mineral in nature. It is, therefore, highly relevant in a broad range of fields such as biomineralization, sea water desalination and oil production. Knowledge of the surface structure and reactivity of the most stable cleavage plane, calcite (10.4), is pivotal for understanding the role of calcite in these diverse areas. Given the fact that most biological processes and technical applications take place in an aqueous environment, perhaps the most basic—yet decisive—question addresses the interaction of water molecules with the calcite (10.4) surface. In this work, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is used for three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the surface structure and the hydration layers above the surface. An easy-to-use scanning protocol is implemented for collecting reliable 3D data. We carefully discuss a comprehensible criterion for identifying the solid–liquid interface within our data. In our data three hydration layers form a characteristic pattern that is commensurate with the underlying calcite surface. (paper)

  2. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, B.; Stangl, R.; Ma, F.; Mueller, T.; Lin, F.; Aberle, A. G.; Bhatia, C. S.; Hoex, B.

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H2O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s-1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al2O3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100-400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance-voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlOx/c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 1012 to 3.3 × 1012 cm-2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 1011 to 0.8 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1. This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al2O3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing.

  3. Tip-force induced surface deformation in the layered commensurate tellurides NbA xTe 2 (A = Si, Ge) during atomic force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengel, H.; Cantow, H.-J.; Magonov, S. N.; Monconduit, L.; Evain, M.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    1994-12-01

    The Te-atom surfaces of commensurate layered tellurides NbA xTe 2 ( A = Si, x = {1}/{2}; A = Ge, x = {1}/{3}, {2}/{5}, {3}/{7}) were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at different applied forces. Although the bulk crystal structures show a negligible height corrugation in the surface Te-atom sheets, the AFM images exhibit dark linear patterns that become strongly pronounced at high applied forces (several hundreds nN). This feature comes about because the tip-sample force interactions induce a surface corrugation according to the local hardness variation of the surface.

  4. Influence of the Localization of Ge Atoms within the Si(001(4 × 2 Surface Layer on Semicore One-Electron States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha I. Tkachuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption complexes of germanium on the reconstructed Si(001(4 × 2 surface have been simulated by the Si96Ge2Н84 cluster. For Ge atoms located on the surface layer, DFT calculations (B3LYP/6-31G** of their 3d semicore-level energies have shown a clear-cut correlation between the 3d5/2 chemical shifts and mutual arrangement of Ge atoms. Such a shift is positive when only one Ge atom penetrates into the crystalline substrate, while being negative for both penetrating Ge atoms. We interpret these results in terms of the charge distribution in clusters under consideration.

  5. Atomic Layer Epitaxy Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and Their Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    disilane coupled with the use of atomic hydrogen produced via cracking of molecular hydrogen over a hot tungsten filament. Microbeam analysis revealed...and M. Yoshimoto, Extended Abstracts of the 22nid Conference on Solid State Devices and Materials, Sendai, Japan, 1990 p. 933. 4. 0.T. Sorensen, J

  6. Atomic layer deposition precursor step repetition and surface plasma pretreatment influence on semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talkenberg, Florian, E-mail: florian.talkenberg@ipht-jena.de; Illhardt, Stefan; Schmidl, Gabriele; Schleusener, Alexander; Sivakov, Vladimir [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Radnóczi, György Zoltán; Pécz, Béla [Centre for Energy Research, Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly-Thege Miklós u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Dikhanbayev, Kadyrjan; Mussabek, Gauhar [Department of Physics and Engineering, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050040 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Gudovskikh, Alexander [Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre, St. Petersburg Academic University, Russian Academy of Sciences, Hlopina Str. 8/3, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Semiconductor–insulator–semiconductor heterojunction solar cells were prepared using atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The silicon surface was treated with oxygen and hydrogen plasma in different orders before dielectric layer deposition. A plasma-enhanced ALD process was applied to deposit dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the plasma pretreated n-type Si(100) substrate. Aluminum doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO or AZO) was deposited by thermal ALD and serves as transparent conductive oxide. Based on transmission electron microscopy studies the presence of thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) layer was detected at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The SiO{sub x} formation depends on the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and has significant influence on solar cell parameters. The authors demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma pretreatment and a precursor dose step repetition of a single precursor improve the initial growth behavior of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and avoid the SiO{sub x} generation. Furthermore, it improves the solar cell performance, which indicates a change of the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface states.

  7. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  8. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  9. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, B; Stangl, R; Ma, F; Mueller, T; Lin, F; Aberle, A G; Bhatia, C S; Hoex, B

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H 2 O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s −1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al 2 O 3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100–400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance–voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlO x /c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 10 12 to 3.3 × 10 12 cm −2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 10 11 to 0.8 × 10 11 cm −2 eV −1 . This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al 2 O 3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing. (paper)

  10. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  11. Surface passivation and carrier selectivity of the thermal-atomic-layer-deposited TiO2 on crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym M.; Schüler, Nadine; Shkodin, Evgeniy; Ammapet Vijayan, Ramachandran; Masilamani, Sangaravadivel; Varadharajaperumal, Muthubalan; Crovetto, Andrea; Hansen, Ole

    2017-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate the use of an ultrathin TiO2 film as a passivating carrier-selective contact for silicon photovoltaics. The effective lifetime, surface recombination velocity, and diode quality dependence on TiO2 deposition temperature with and without a thin tunneling oxide interlayer (SiO2 or Al2O3) on p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) are reported. 5-, 10-, and 20-nm-thick TiO2 films were deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature range of 80-300 °C using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and water. TiO2 thin-film passivation layers alone result in a lower effective carrier lifetime compared with that with an interlayer. However, SiO2 and Al2O3 interlayers enhance the TiO2 passivation of c-Si surfaces. Further annealing at 200 °C in N2 gas enhances the surface passivation quality of TiO2 tremendously. From these findings, design principles for TiO2-Si heterojunction with optimized photovoltage, interface quality, and electron extraction to maximize the photovoltage of TiO2-Si heterojunction photovoltaic cells are formulated. Diode behaviour was analysed with the help of experimental, analytical, and simulation methods. It is predicted that TiO2 with a high carrier concentration is a preferable candidate for high-performance solar cells. The possible reasons for performance degradation in those devices with and without interlayers are also discussed.

  12. Fabrication and surface passivation of porous 6H-SiC by atomic layer deposited films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    Porous 6H-SiC samples with different thicknesses were fabricated through anodic etching in diluted hydrofluoric acid. Scanning electron microscope images show that the dendritic pore formation in 6HSiC is anisotropic, which has different lateral and vertical formation rates. Strong photoluminesce......Porous 6H-SiC samples with different thicknesses were fabricated through anodic etching in diluted hydrofluoric acid. Scanning electron microscope images show that the dendritic pore formation in 6HSiC is anisotropic, which has different lateral and vertical formation rates. Strong...... above the 6H-SiC crystal band gap, which suggests that the strong photoluminescence is ascribed to surface state produced during the anodic etching....

  13. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  14. Oxidation precursor dependence of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films in a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 surface passivation stacks

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Yuren; Zhou, Chunlan; Jia, Endong; Wang, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain a good passivation of a silicon surface, more and more stack passivation schemes have been used in high-efficiency silicon solar cell fabrication. In this work, we prepared a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks on KOH solution-polished n-type solar grade mono-silicon(100) wafers. For the Al2O3 film deposition, both thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) were used. Interface trap density spectra were obtained for Si passivation with a-S...

  15. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  16. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO2 on AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO 2 on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO 2 and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications

  17. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    OpenAIRE

    P. X. Zhang; H.-U. Habermeier

    2008-01-01

    New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT). Our recent studies ind...

  18. The effect of light soaking on crystalline silicon surface passivation by atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Stangl, Rolf; Mueller, Thomas; Lin, Fen; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Hoex, Bram

    2013-01-01

    The effect of light soaking of crystalline silicon wafer lifetime samples surface passivated by thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 is investigated in this paper. Contrary to other passivation materials used in solar cell applications (i.e., SiO2, SiNx), using thermal ALD Al2O3, an increase in effective carrier lifetime after light soaking under standard testing conditions is observed for both p-type (˜45%) and n-type (˜60%) FZ c-Si lifetime samples. After light soaking and storing the samples in a dark and dry environment, the effective lifetime decreases again and practically returns to the value before light soaking. The rate of lifetime decrease after light soaking is significantly slower than the rate of lifetime increase by light soaking. To investigate the underlying mechanism, corona charge experiments are carried out on p-type c-Si samples before and after light soaking. The results indicate that the negative fixed charge density Qf present in the Al2O3 films increases due to the light soaking, which results in an improved field-effect passivation. Numerical calculations also confirm that the improved field-effect passivation is the main contributor for the increased effective lifetime after light soaking. To further understand the light soaking phenomenon, a kinetic model—a charge trapping/de-trapping model—is proposed to explain the time dependent behavior of the lifetime increase/decrease observed under/after light soaking. The trap model fits the experimental results very well. The observed light enhanced passivation for ALD Al2O3 passivated c-Si is of technological relevance, because solar cell devices operate under illumination, thus an increase in solar cell efficiency due to light soaking can be expected.

  19. Atomic layer deposition TiO{sub 2} coated porous silicon surface: Structural characterization and morphological features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iatsunskyi, Igor, E-mail: igoyat@amu.edu.pl [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Experimental Physics, Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, 42, Pastera str., 65023 Odessa (Ukraine); Jancelewicz, Mariusz; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Kempiński, Mateusz [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poland (Poland); Peplińska, Barbara [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Jarek, Marcin; Załęski, Karol [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Jurga, Stefan [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, 85 Umultowska str., 61-614, Poznan (Poland); Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Smyntyna, Valentyn [Department of Experimental Physics, Odessa National I.I. Mechnikov University, 42, Pastera str., 65023 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2015-08-31

    TiO{sub 2} thin films were grown on highly-doped p-Si (100) macro- and mesoporous structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using TiCl{sub 4} and deionized water as precursors at 300 °C. The crystalline structure, chemical composition, and morphology of the deposited films and initial silicon nanostructures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mean size of TiO{sub 2} crystallites was determined by TEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the mean crystallite size and the crystallinity of the TiO{sub 2} are influenced dramatically by the morphology of the porous silicon, with the mesoporous silicon resulting in a much finer grain size and amorphous structure than the macroporous silicon having a partially crystal anatase phase. A simple model of the ALD layer growth inside the pores was presented. - Highlights: • The morphology and chemical composition of TiO{sub 2} and porous Si were established. • The approximate size of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals was estimated. • The model of the atomic layer deposition coating in the porous Si was presented.

  20. Formation of Micro- and Nanostructures on the Nanotitanium Surface by Chemical Etching and Deposition of Titania Films by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. Nazarov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an integrated approach was used for the preparation of a nanotitanium-based bioactive material. The integrated approach included three methods: severe plastic deformation (SPD, chemical etching and atomic layer deposition (ALD. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the nature of the etching medium (acidic or basic Piranha solutions and the etching time have a significant qualitative impact on the nanotitanium surface structure both at the nano- and microscale. The etched samples were coated with crystalline biocompatible TiO2 films with a thickness of 20 nm by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Comparative study of the adhesive and spreading properties of human osteoblasts MG-63 has demonstrated that presence of nano- and microscale structures and crystalline titanium oxide on the surface of nanotitanium improve bioactive properties of the material.

  1. Nucleation and initial growth of atomic layer deposited titanium oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry and the effect of pretreatment by surface barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, David C., E-mail: dccameron@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Krumpolec, Richard, E-mail: richard.krumpolec@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 4 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ivanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: tatiana.ivanova@lut.fi [ASTRaL team, Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, 50130 Mikkeli (Finland); Homola, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.homola@mail.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Černák, Mirko, E-mail: cernak@physics.muni.cz [R& D Centre for Low-Cost Plasma and Nanotechnology Surface Modification, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 267/2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows initial nucleation and growth process in atomic layer deposited titanium dioxide. • Quantum confinement effects were used to measure evolution of crystallite size. • Crystallite surface density can be extracted from ellipsometric surface roughness data and crystallite size. • Pretreatment of silicon substrates by diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge has only minor effects on titanium dioxide film nucleation and growth. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterise the initial nucleation stage of the atomic layer deposition of the anatase phase of titanium dioxide on silicon substrates. Careful control and analysis of the ellipsometric measurements enables the determination of the evolution of crystallite diameter and surface density in the nucleation stage before a continuous film is formed. This growth behaviour is in line with atomic force microscopy measurements of the crystallite size. The crystallite diameter is a linear function of the number of ALD cycles with a slope of approximately 1.7 Å cycle{sup −1} which is equivalent to a layer growth rate of 0.85 Å cycle{sup −1} consistent with a ripening process which increases the crystallite size while reducing their density. The crystallite density decreases from ∼3 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} in the initial nucleation stages to ∼3 × 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} before the film becomes continuous. The effect of exposing the substrate to a diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge in an air atmosphere before deposition was measured and only small differences were found: the plasma treated samples were slightly rougher in the initial stages and required a greater number of cycles to form a continuous film (∼80) compared to the untreated films (∼50). A thicker layer of native oxide was found after plasma treatment.

  2. Relation of lifetime to surface passivation for atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on crystalline silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Joon [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hee Eun, E-mail: hsong@kier.re.kr [Photovoltaic Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Sik, E-mail: hschang@cnu.ac.kr [Graduate School of Energy Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on Si solar wafer to lifetime. • We deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si solar wafer after several cleaning process. • Potassium can be left on Si surface by incomplete cleaning process and degrade the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation quality. - Abstract: We investigated the relation of potassium contamination on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface after potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching to the lifetime of the c-Si solar cell. Alkaline solution was employed for saw damage removal (SDR), texturing, and planarization of a textured c-Si solar wafer prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. In the solar-cell manufacturing process, ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} passivation is utilized to obtain higher conversion efficiency. ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows excellent surface passivation, though minority carrier lifetime varies with cleaning conditions. In the present study, we investigated the relation of potassium contamination to lifetime in solar-cell processing. The results showed that the potassium-contaminated samples, due to incomplete cleaning of KOH, had a short lifetime, thus establishing that residual potassium can degrade Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation.

  3. Effective optimization of surface passivation on porous silicon carbide using atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2017-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (B–N co-doped SiC) produced by anodic oxidation showed strong photoluminescence (PL) at around 520 nm excited by a 375 nm laser. The porous SiC samples were passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films, resulting in a significant enhancement...... of the PL intensity (up to 689%). The effect of thickness, annealing temperature, annealing duration and precursor purge time on the PL intensity of ALD Al2O3 films was investigated. In order to investigate the penetration depth and passivation effect in porous SiC, the samples were characterized by X...... effective method to enhance the luminescence efficiency of porous SiC....

  4. Observation by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy of strongly inverted surface layers at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, O. A.; Alvarez, J.; Gushina, E. V.; Favre, W.; Gueunier-Farret, M. E.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Kleider, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heterojunctions made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) are examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Conductive channels at both (n )a-Si:H/(p)c-Si and (p)a-Si:H/(n)c-Si interfaces are clearly revealed. These are attributed to two-dimension electron and hole gases due to strong inversion layers at the c-Si surface in agreement with previous planar conductance measurements. The presence of a hole gas in (p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si structures implies a quite large valence band offset (EVc-Si-EVa-Si:H>0.25 eV).

  5. Predicting synergy in atomic layer etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanarik, Keren J. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Tan, Samantha [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Yang, Wenbing [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kim, Taeseung [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Lill, Thorsten [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Kabansky, Alexander [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Hudson, Eric A. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Ohba, Tomihito [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Nojiri, Kazuo [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Yu, Jengyi [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Wise, Rich [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Berry, Ivan L. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Pan, Yang [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Marks, Jeffrey [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States); Gottscho, Richard A. [Lam Research Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a multistep process used today in manufacturing for removing ultrathin layers of material. In this article, the authors report on ALE of Si, Ge, C, W, GaN, and SiO2 using a directional (anisotropic) plasma-enhanced approach. The authors analyze these systems by defining an “ALE synergy” parameter which quantifies the degree to which a process approaches the ideal ALE regime. This parameter is inspired by the ion-neutral synergy concept introduced in the 1979 paper by Coburn and Winters. ALE synergy is related to the energetics of underlying surface interactions and is understood in terms of energy criteria for the energy barriers involved in the reactions. Synergistic behavior is observed for all of the systems studied, with each exhibiting behavior unique to the reactant–material combination. By systematically studying atomic layer etching of a group of materials, the authors show that ALE synergy scales with the surface binding energy of the bulk material. This insight explains why some materials are more or less amenable to the directional ALE approach. Furthermore, they conclude that ALE is both simpler to understand than conventional plasma etch processing and is applicable to metals, semiconductors, and dielectrics.

  6. USE OF ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF FUNCTIONALIZATION OF NANOPOROUS BIOMATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Narayan, R.; Adiga, S.; Pellin, M.; Curtiss, L.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.; Elam, J.

    2010-02-08

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  7. Room-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2 O3 : Impact on Efficiency, Stability and Surface Properties in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Malgorzata; Das, Chittaranjan; Wang, Zhiping; Henkel, Karsten; Rouissi, Zied; Wojciechowski, Konrad; Snaith, Henry J; Schmeisser, Dieter

    2016-12-20

    In this work, solar cells with a freshly made CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 perovskite film showed a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.4 % whereas the one with 50 days aged perovskite film only 6.1 %. However, when the aged perovskite was covered with a layer of Al 2 O 3 deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at room temperature (RT), the PCE value was clearly enhanced. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that the ALD precursors are chemically active only at the perovskite surface and passivate it. Moreover, the RT-ALD-Al 2 O 3 -covered perovskite films showed enhanced ambient air stability. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Oxidation precursor dependence of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films in a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 surface passivation stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yuren; Zhou, Chunlan; Jia, Endong; Wang, Wenjing

    2015-03-01

    In order to obtain a good passivation of a silicon surface, more and more stack passivation schemes have been used in high-efficiency silicon solar cell fabrication. In this work, we prepared a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks on KOH solution-polished n-type solar grade mono-silicon(100) wafers. For the Al2O3 film deposition, both thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD) and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) were used. Interface trap density spectra were obtained for Si passivation with a-Si films and a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks by a non-contact corona C-V technique. After the fabrication of a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stacks, the minimum interface trap density was reduced from original 3 × 1012 to 1 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1, the surface total charge density increased by nearly one order of magnitude for PE-ALD samples and about 0.4 × 1012 cm-2 for a T-ALD sample, and the carrier lifetimes increased by a factor of three (from about 10 μs to about 30 μs). Combining these results with an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, we discussed the influence of an oxidation precursor for ALD Al2O3 deposition on Al2O3 single layers and a-Si:H(i)/Al2O3 stack surface passivation from field-effect passivation and chemical passivation perspectives. In addition, the influence of the stack fabrication process on the a-Si film structure was also discussed in this study.

  9. Properties of the c-Si/Al2O3 interface of ultrathin atomic layer deposited Al2O3 layers capped by SiNx for c-Si surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldis, D.; Richter, A.; Benick, J.; Saint-Cast, P.; Hermle, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a detailed study of c-Si/Al2O3 interfaces of ultrathin Al2O3 layers deposited with atomic layer deposition (ALD), and capped with SiNx layers deposited with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A special focus was the characterization of the fixed charge density of these dielectric stacks and the interface defect density as a function of the Al2O3 layer thickness for different ALD Al2O3 deposition processes (plasma-assisted ALD and thermal ALD) and different thermal post-deposition treatments. Based on theoretical calculations with the extended Shockley-Read-Hall model for surface recombination, these interface properties were found to explain well the experimentally determined surface recombination. Thus, these interface properties provide fundamental insights into to the passivation mechanisms of these Al2O3/SiNx stacks, a stack system highly relevant, particularly for high efficiency silicon solar cells. Based on these findings, it was also possible to improve the surface passivation quality of stacks with thermal ALD Al2O3 by oxidizing the c-Si surface prior to the Al2O3 deposition.

  10. Interface Trap Density Reduction for Al2O3/GaN (0001) Interfaces by Oxidizing Surface Preparation prior to Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernokletov, Dmitry M; Negara, Muhammad A; Long, Rathnait D; Aloni, Shaul; Nordlund, Dennis; McIntyre, Paul C

    2015-06-17

    We correlate interfacial defect state densities with the chemical composition of the Al2O3/GaN interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures using synchrotron photoelectron emission spectroscopy (PES), cathodoluminescence and high-temperature capacitance-voltage measurements. The influence of the wet chemical pretreatments involving (1) HCl+HF etching or (2) NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 were investigated on n-type GaN (0001) substrates. Prior to ALD, PES analysis of the NH4OH(aq) treated surface shows a greater Ga2O3 component compared to either HCl+HF treated or as-received surfaces. The lowest surface concentration of oxygen species is detected on the acid etched surface, whereas the NH4OH treated sample reveals the lowest carbon surface concentration. Both surface pretreatments improve electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors compared to untreated samples by reducing the Al2O3/GaN interface state density. The lowest interfacial trap density at energies in the upper band gap is detected for samples pretreated with NH4OH. These results are consistent with cathodoluminescence data indicating that the NH4OH treated samples show the strongest band edge emission compared to as-received and acid etched samples. PES results indicate that the combination of reduced carbon contamination while maintaining a Ga2O3 interfacial layer by NH4OH(aq) exposure prior to ALD results in fewer interface traps after Al2O3 deposition on the GaN substrate.

  11. SnO2 anode surface passivation by atomic layer deposited HfO2 improves li-ion battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2014-03-14

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that nanoscale HfO2 surface passivation layers formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) significantly improve the performance of Li ion batteries with SnO2-based anodes. Specifically, the measured battery capacity at a current density of 150 mAg -1 after 100 cycles is 548 and 853 mAhg-1 for the uncoated and HfO2-coated anodes, respectively. Material analysis reveals that the HfO2 layers are amorphous in nature and conformably coat the SnO2-based anodes. In addition, the analysis reveals that ALD HfO2 not only protects the SnO2-based anodes from irreversible reactions with the electrolyte and buffers its volume change, but also chemically interacts with the SnO2 anodes to increase battery capacity, despite the fact that HfO2 is itself electrochemically inactive. The amorphous nature of HfO2 is an important factor in explaining its behavior, as it still allows sufficient Li diffusion for an efficient anode lithiation/delithiation process to occur, leading to higher battery capacity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effective Surface Passivation of InP Nanowires by Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2O3with POxInterlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, L E; Cavalli, A; Verheijen, M A; Haverkort, J E M; Bakkers, E P A M; Kessels, W M M

    2017-10-11

    III/V semiconductor nanostructures have significant potential in device applications, but effective surface passivation is critical due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. For InP such passivation has proven particularly difficult, with substantial depassivation generally observed following dielectric deposition on InP surfaces. We present a novel approach based on passivation with a phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide deposited using a low-temperature process, which is critical to avoid P-desorption. For this purpose we have chosen a PO x layer deposited in a plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) system at room temperature. Since PO x is known to be hygroscopic and therefore unstable in atmosphere, we encapsulate this layer with a thin ALD Al 2 O 3 capping layer to form a PO x /Al 2 O 3 stack. This passivation scheme is capable of improving the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of our state-of-the-art wurtzite (WZ) InP nanowires by a factor of ∼20 at low excitation. If we apply the rate equation analysis advocated by some authors, we derive a PL internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of 75% for our passivated wires at high excitation. Our results indicate that it is more reliable to calculate the IQE as the ratio of the integrated PL intensity at room temperature to that at 10 K. By this means we derive an IQE of 27% for the passivated wires at high excitation (>10 kW cm -2 ), which constitutes an unprecedented level of performance for undoped InP nanowires. This conclusion is supported by time-resolved PL decay lifetimes, which are also shown to be significantly higher than previously reported for similar wires. The passivation scheme displays excellent long-term stability (>7 months) and is additionally shown to substantially improve the thermal stability of InP surfaces (>300 °C), significantly expanding the temperature window for device processing. Such effective surface passivation is a key enabling technology for InP nanowire devices such as

  13. Atomic layer deposition of highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles on a high surface area electrode backbone for electrochemical promotion of catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajar, Y.; di Palma, V.; Kyriakou, V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Baranova, E. A.; Vernoux, P.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Creatore, M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Tsampas, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    A novel catalyst design for electrochemical promotion of catalysis (EPOC) is proposed which overcomes the main bottlenecks that limit EPOC commercialization, i.e., the low dispersion and small surface area of metal catalysts. We have increased the surface area by using a porous composite electrode

  14. A study of the effect of surface pretreatment on atomic layer deposited Al2O3 interface with GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianyi; Li, Wenwen; Mandal, Saptarshi; Chowdhury, Srabanti

    2017-08-01

    Al2O3 has been an attractive gate dielectric for GaN power devices owing to its large conduction band offset with GaN ( 2.13eV), relatively high dielectric constant ( 9.0) and high breakdown electric field ( 10 MV/cm). Due to exceptional control over film uniformity and deposition rate, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been widely used for Al2O3 deposition. The major obstacle to ALD Al2O3 on GaN is its high interface-state density (Dit) caused by incomplete chemical bonds, native oxide layer and impurities at the Al2O3/GaN interface. Therefore, an appropriate surface pretreatment prior to deposition is essential for obtaining high-quality interface. In this study, we investigated the effect of TMA, H2O and Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment on Dit and border traps (Nbt). 5 cycles of TMA purge, 5 cycles of H2O purge and Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment were conducted on GaN prior to deposition of ALD Al2O3. Al2O3/GaN metaloxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) were fabricated for the characterization of Dit and Nbt using UV-assisted capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique. The results show that TMA and H2O pretreatment had trivial effects on interface engineering whereas Ar/N2 plasma pretreatment slightly reduced Dit and significantly reduced Nbt.

  15. Atomically flat single terminated oxide substrate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Yang, Chan-Ho; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Jeong, Yoon H.

    2017-05-01

    Scientific interest in atomically controlled layer-by-layer fabrication of transition metal oxide thin films and heterostructures has increased intensely in recent decades for basic physics reasons as well as for technological applications. This trend has to do, in part, with the coming post-Moore era, and functional oxide electronics could be regarded as a viable alternative for the current semiconductor electronics. Furthermore, the interface of transition metal oxides is exposing many new emergent phenomena and is increasingly becoming a playground for testing new ideas in condensed matter physics. To achieve high quality epitaxial thin films and heterostructures of transition metal oxides with atomically controlled interfaces, one critical requirement is the use of atomically flat single terminated oxide substrates since the atomic arrangements and the reaction chemistry of the topmost surface layer of substrates determine the growth and consequent properties of the overlying films. Achieving the atomically flat and chemically single terminated surface state of commercially available substrates, however, requires judicious efforts because the surface of as-received substrates is of chemically mixed nature and also often polar. In this review, we summarize the surface treatment procedures to accomplish atomically flat surfaces with single terminating layer for various metal oxide substrates. We particularly focus on the substrates with lattice constant ranging from 4.00 Å to 3.70 Å, as the lattice constant of most perovskite materials falls into this range. For materials outside the range, one can utilize the substrates to induce compressive or tensile strain on the films and explore new states not available in bulk. The substrates covered in this review, which have been chosen with commercial availability and, most importantly, experimental practicality as a criterion, are KTaO3, REScO3 (RE = Rare-earth elements), SrTiO3, La0.18Sr0.82Al0.59Ta0.41O3 (LSAT), Nd

  16. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, T.; Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M.; Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch.; Saukkonen, T.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2–1 μm) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness (∼ 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu 3 Cp) 2 , Ti(OMe) 4 and O 3 precursors at 250 °C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO 2 /Si ∅200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 °C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {001} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {111} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O 3 ) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: ► Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. ► Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2–1 μm wide. ► Most STO grains were {001} oriented.

  17. The importance of dye chemistry and TiCl4 surface treatment in the behavior of Al2O3 recombination barrier layers deposited by atomic layer deposition in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Thomas P; Bakke, Jonathan R; Ding, I-Kang; Hardin, Brian E; Nguyen, William H; Mondal, Rajib; Bailie, Colin D; Margulis, George Y; Hoke, Eric T; Sellinger, Alan; McGehee, Michael D; Bent, Stacey F

    2012-09-21

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to fabricate Al(2)O(3) recombination barriers in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSSCs) employing an organic hole transport material (HTM) for the first time. Al(2)O(3) recombination barriers of varying thickness were incorporated into efficient ss-DSSCs utilizing the Z907 dye adsorbed onto a 2 μm-thick nanoporous TiO(2) active layer and the HTM spiro-OMeTAD. The impact of Al(2)O(3) barriers was also studied in devices employing different dyes, with increased active layer thicknesses, and with substrates that did not undergo the TiCl(4) surface treatment. In all instances, electron lifetimes (as determined by transient photovoltage measurements) increased and dark current was suppressed after Al(2)O(3) deposition. However, only when the TiCl(4) treatment was eliminated did device efficiency increase; in all other instances efficiency decreased due to a drop in short-circuit current. These results are attributed in the former case to the similar effects of Al(2)O(3) ALD and the TiCl(4) surface treatment whereas the insulating properties of Al(2)O(3) hinder charge injection and lead to current loss in TiCl(4)-treated devices. The impact of Al(2)O(3) barrier layers was unaffected by doubling the active layer thickness or using an alternative ruthenium dye, but a metal-free donor-π-acceptor dye exhibited a much smaller decrease in current due to its higher excited state energy. We develop a model employing prior research on Al(2)O(3) growth and dye kinetics that successfully predicts the reduction in device current as a function of ALD cycles and is extendable to different dye-barrier systems.

  18. The importance of dye chemistry and TiCl4 surface treatment in the behavior of Al2O3 recombination barrier layers deposited by atomic layer deposition in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to fabricate Al 2O 3 recombination barriers in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSSCs) employing an organic hole transport material (HTM) for the first time. Al 2O 3 recombination barriers of varying thickness were incorporated into efficient ss-DSSCs utilizing the Z907 dye adsorbed onto a 2 μm-thick nanoporous TiO 2 active layer and the HTM spiro-OMeTAD. The impact of Al 2O 3 barriers was also studied in devices employing different dyes, with increased active layer thicknesses, and with substrates that did not undergo the TiCl 4 surface treatment. In all instances, electron lifetimes (as determined by transient photovoltage measurements) increased and dark current was suppressed after Al 2O 3 deposition. However, only when the TiCl 4 treatment was eliminated did device efficiency increase; in all other instances efficiency decreased due to a drop in short-circuit current. These results are attributed in the former case to the similar effects of Al 2O 3 ALD and the TiCl 4 surface treatment whereas the insulating properties of Al 2O 3 hinder charge injection and lead to current loss in TiCl 4-treated devices. The impact of Al 2O 3 barrier layers was unaffected by doubling the active layer thickness or using an alternative ruthenium dye, but a metal-free donor-π-acceptor dye exhibited a much smaller decrease in current due to its higher excited state energy. We develop a model employing prior research on Al 2O 3 growth and dye kinetics that successfully predicts the reduction in device current as a function of ALD cycles and is extendable to different dye-barrier systems. © This journal is the Owner Societies 2012.

  19. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...... variations of the current flow direction, resulting from local properties of the wire. These disorder potentials found near lithographically fabricated wires are two orders of magnitude smaller than those measured close to electroplated conductors....

  20. Atomic Layer Thermopile Materials: Physics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. X. Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New types of thermoelectric materials characterized by highly anisotropic Fermi surfaces and thus anisotropic Seebeck coefficients are reviewed. Early studies revealed that there is an induced voltage in high TC oxide superconductors when the surface of the films is exposed to short light pulses. Subsequent investigations proved that the effect is due to anisotropic components of the Seebeck tensor, and the type of materials is referred to atomic layer thermopile (ALT. Our recent studies indicate that multilayer thin films at the nanoscale demonstrate enhanced ALT properties. This is in agreement with the prediction in seeking the larger figure of merit (ZT thermoelectric materials in nanostructures. The study of ALT materials provides both deep insight of anisotropic transport property of these materials and at the same time potential materials for applications, such as light detector and microcooler. By measuring the ALT properties under various perturbations, it is found that the information on anisotropic transport properties can be provided. The information sometimes is not easily obtained by other tools due to the nanoscale phase coexistence in these materials. Also, some remained open questions and future development in this research direction have been well discussed.

  1. Interaction of GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S

    2004-08-15

    GaN surface passivation processes are still under development and among others hydrogen treatments are investigated. In this study, we use non-destructive optical and electrical probes such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and surface potential Kelvin probe microscopy (SP-KPM) in conjunction with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the study of the different reactivity of Ga-polar and N-polar GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen. The GaN epitaxial layers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates, and GaN and AlN buffer layers are used to grow N-polar and Ga-polar films, respectively. The atomic hydrogen is produced by a remote rf (13.56 MHz) H{sub 2} plasma in order to rule out any ion bombardment of the GaN surface and make the interaction chemical. It is found that the interaction of GaN surfaces with atomic hydrogen depends on polarity, with N-polar GaN exhibiting greater reactivity. Furthermore, it is found that atomic hydrogen is effective in the passivation of grain boundaries and surface defects states.

  2. Ultra-Thin Atomic Layer Deposited TiN Films: Non-Linear I–V Behaviour and the Importance of Surface Passivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hao, B.; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the electrical resistivity of atomic layer deposited TiN thin films in the thickness range 2.5-20 nm. The measurements were carried out using the circular transfer length method structures. For the films with thickness in the range of 10-20 nm, the measurements exhibited linear

  3. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  4. Helium atom scattering from surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    High resolution helium atom scattering can be applied to study a number of interesting properties of solid surfaces with great sensitivity and accuracy. This book treats in detail experimental and theoretical aspects ofthis method as well as all current applications in surface science. The individual chapters - all written by experts in the field - are devoted to the investigation of surface structure, defect shapes and concentrations, the interaction potential, collective and localized surface vibrations at low energies, phase transitions and surface diffusion. Over the past decade helium atom scattering has gained widespread recognitionwithin the surface science community. Points in its favour are comprehensiveunderstanding of the scattering theory and the availability of well-tested approximation to the rigorous theory. This book will be invaluable to surface scientists wishing to make an informed judgement on the actual and potential capabilities of this technique and its results.

  5. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, R.J.; Thijsse, B.J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-01-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness:

  6. AlN Surface Passivation of GaN-Based High Electron Mobility Transistors by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, An-Jye; Chu, Kuo-Hsiung; Lin, I.-Feng; Østreng, Erik; Fang, Yung-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Peng; Wu, Bo-Wei; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Ming; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Chang, Chun-Yen; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-04-01

    We report a low current collapse GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with an excellent thermal stability at 150 °C. The AlN was grown by N2-based plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) and shown a refractive index of 1.94 at 633 nm of wavelength. Prior to deposit AlN on III-nitrides, the H2/NH3 plasma pre-treatment led to remove the native gallium oxide. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectroscopy confirmed that the native oxide can be effectively decomposed by hydrogen plasma. Following the in situ ALD-AlN passivation, the surface traps can be eliminated and corresponding to a 22.1% of current collapse with quiescent drain bias ( V DSQ) at 40 V. Furthermore, the high temperature measurement exhibited a shift-free threshold voltage ( V th), corresponding to a 40.2% of current collapse at 150 °C. The thermal stable HEMT enabled a breakdown voltage (BV) to 687 V at high temperature, promising a good thermal reliability under high power operation.

  7. Layered Atom Arrangements in Complex Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.E. Sikafus; R.W.Grimes; S.M.Corish; A.R. Cleave; M.Tang; C.R.Stanek; B.P. Uberuaga; J.A.Valdez

    2005-04-15

    In this report, we develop an atom layer stacking model to describe systematically the crystal structures of complex materials. To illustrate the concepts, we consider a sequence of oxide compounds in which the metal cations progress in oxidation state from monovalent (M{sup 1+}) to tetravalent (M{sup 4+}). We use concepts relating to geometric subdivisions of a triangular atom net to describe the layered atom patterns in these compounds (concepts originally proposed by Shuichi Iida). We demonstrate that as a function of increasing oxidation state (from M{sup 1+} to M{sup 4+}), the layer stacking motifs used to generate each successive structure (specifically, motifs along a 3 symmetry axis), progress through the following sequence: MMO, MO, M{sub r}O, MO{sub r/s}O{sub u/v}, MOO (where M and O represent fully dense triangular atom nets and r/s and u/v are fractions used to describe partially filled triangular atom nets). We also develop complete crystallographic descriptions for the compounds in our oxidation sequence using trigonal space group R{bar 3}.

  8. Nano-soldering to single atomic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girit, Caglar O [Berkeley, CA; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, CA

    2011-10-11

    A simple technique to solder submicron sized, ohmic contacts to nanostructures has been disclosed. The technique has several advantages over standard electron beam lithography methods, which are complex, costly, and can contaminate samples. To demonstrate the soldering technique graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, has been contacted, and low- and high-field electronic transport properties have been measured.

  9. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 3. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide nanolayers and dependence of GPC on surface OH concentration. Anu Philip Subin Thomas K Rajeev Kumar. Research Articles Volume 82 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 563-569 ...

  10. Dynamics of Back Electron Transfer in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Featuring 4-tert-Butyl-Pyridine and Atomic-Layer-Deposited Alumina as Surface Modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael J; Vermeer, Michael J DeVries; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-06-18

    A series of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) was constructed with TiO2 nanoparticles and N719 dye. The standard I3(-)/I(-) redox shuttle and the Co(1,10-phenanthroline)3(3+/2+) shuttle were employed. DSCs were modified with atomic-layered-deposited (ALD) coatings of Al2O3 and/or with the surface-adsorbing additive 4-tert-butyl-pyridine. Current-voltage data were collected to ascertain the influence of each modification upon the back electron transfer (ET) dynamics of the DSCs. The primary effect of the additives alone or in tandem is to increase the open-circuit voltage. A second is to alter the short-circuit current density, JSC. With dependence on the specifics of the system examined, any of a myriad of dynamics-related effects were observed to come into play, in both favorable (efficiency boosting) and unfavorable (efficiency damaging) ways. These effects include modulation of (a) charge-injection yields, (b) rates of interception of injected electrons by redox shuttles, and (c) rates of recombination of injected electrons with holes on surface-bound dyes. In turn, these influence charge-collection lengths, charge-collection yields, and onset potentials for undesired dark current. The microscopic origins of the effects appear to be related mainly to changes in driving force and/or electronic coupling for underlying component redox reactions. Perhaps surprisingly, only a minor role for modifier-induced shifts in conduction-band-edge energy was found. The combination of DSC-efficiency-relevant effects engendered by the modifiers was found to vary substantially as a function of the chemical identity of the redox shuttle employed. While types of modifiers are effective, a challenge going forward will be to construct systems in ways in which the benefits of organic and inorganic modifiers can be exploited in fully additive, or even synergistic, fashion.

  11. Textured strontium titanate layers on platinum by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, T., E-mail: tom.blomberg@asm.com [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Anttila, J.; Haukka, S.; Tuominen, M. [ASM Microchemistry Ltd., Vaeinoe Auerin katu 12 A, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Lukosius, M.; Wenger, Ch. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Saukkonen, T. [Aalto University, Puumiehenkuja 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2012-08-31

    Formation of textured strontium titanate (STO) layers with large lateral grain size (0.2-1 {mu}m) and low X-ray reflectivity roughness ({approx} 1.36 nm) on Pt electrodes by industry proven atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is demonstrated. Sr(t-Bu{sub 3}Cp){sub 2}, Ti(OMe){sub 4} and O{sub 3} precursors at 250 Degree-Sign C were used to deposit Sr rich STO on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si Empty-Set 200 mm substrates. After crystallization post deposition annealing at 600 Degree-Sign C in air, most of the STO grains showed a preferential orientation of the {l_brace}001{r_brace} plane parallel to the substrate surface, although other orientations were also present. Cross sectional and plan view transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analysis revealed more than an order of magnitude larger lateral grain sizes for the STO compared to the underlying multicrystalline {l_brace}111{r_brace} oriented platinum electrode. The combination of platinum bottom electrodes with ALD STO(O{sub 3}) shows a promising path towards the formation of single oriented STO film. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amorphous strontium titanate (STO) on platinum formed a textured film after annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal domains in 60 nm STO film were 0.2-1 {mu}m wide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most STO grains were {l_brace}001{r_brace} oriented.

  12. Effect of surface pretreatment in the thermal atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 for passivation of crystal Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Shin, Hong-Sik; Jeong, Kwang-Seok; Oh, Sung-Kwen; Lee, Horyeong; Han, Kyumin; Lee, Yongwoo; Lee, Song-Jae; Lee, Ga-Won; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2014-08-01

    H2O or NH4OH (5%) precursor pretreatment in the chamber was carried out before the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of an Al2O3 passivation layer on p-type crystal Si. It was found that the density of negative oxide fixed charges significantly increased, the Al-O combination at the interface changed, the Al/O atomic at the interface of Al2O3/Si decreased, and the effective lifetime increased. The pretreated samples with changes in the Al-O structure at the interface, which made the interface more oxygen-rich, were believed to be the reason for the improvement of the field effect passivation in Al2O3 passivated crystal Si solar cell applications.

  13. Applications of atomic layer deposition in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenbin; Li, Xianglin; Krishna Karuturi, Siva; Wenhui Fam, Derrick; Fan, Hongjin; Shrestha, Santosh; Wong, Lydia Helena; Iing Yoong Tok, Alfred

    2015-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a unique tool for the growth of thin films with excellent conformity and thickness control down to atomic levels. The application of ALD in energy research has received increasing attention in recent years. In this review, the versatility of ALD in solar cells will be discussed. This is specifically focused on the fabrication of nanostructured photoelectrodes, surface passivation, surface sensitization, and band-structure engineering of solar cell materials. Challenges and future directions of ALD in the applications of solar cells are also discussed.

  14. Impact of surface morphology of Si substrate on performance of Si/ZnO heterojunction devices grown by atomic layer deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, Purnima; Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Jit, Satyabrata

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors have investigated the structural, optical, and electrical characteristics of silicon nanowire (SiNW)/zinc oxide (ZnO) core–shell nanostructure heterojunctions and compared their characteristics with Si/ZnO planar heterojunctions to investigate the effect of surface morphology of Si substrate in the characteristics of Si/ZnO heterojunction devices. In this work, ZnO thin film was conformally deposited on both p-type 〈100〉 planar Si substrate and substrate with vertically aligned SiNW arrays by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method. The x-ray diffraction spectra show that the crystalline structures of Si/ZnO heterojunctions are having (101) preferred orientation, whereas vertically oriented SiNW/ZnO core–shell heterojunctions are having (002)-oriented wurtzite crystalline structures. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Si/ZnO heterojunctions show a very sharp single peak at 377 nm, corresponding to the bandgap of ZnO material with no other defect peaks in visible region; hence, these devices can have applications only in UV region. On the other hand, SiNW/ZnO heterojunctions are having band-edge peak at 378 nm along with a broad emission band, spreading almost throughout the entire visible region with a peak around 550 nm. Therefore, ALD-grown SiNW/ZnO heterojunctions can emit green and red light simultaneously. Reflectivity measurement of the heterojunctions further confirms the enhancement of visible region peak in the PL spectra of SiNW/ZnO heterojunctions, as the surface of the SiNW/ZnO heterojunctions exhibits extremely low reflectance ( 20%). The current–voltage characteristics of both Si/ZnO and SiNW/ZnO heterojunctions are measured with large area ohmic contacts on top and bottom of the structure to compare the electrical characteristics of the devices. Due to large surface to-volume ratio of SiNW/ZnO core–shell heterojunction devices, the output current rating is about 130 times larger compared to their planar

  15. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Bent, Stacey F.; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.

    2015-01-01

    Partial CuInGaSe 2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnO x buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II–VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide

  16. Atomic Manipulation on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, Markus; Lutz, Christopher P.; Heinrich, Andreas J.

    Half a century ago, Nobel Laureate Richard Feynman asked in a now-famous lecture what would happen if we could precisely position individual atoms at will [R.P. Feynman, Eng. Sci. 23, 22 (1960)]. This dream became a reality some 30 years later when Eigler and Schweizer were the first to position individual Xe atoms at will with the probe tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on a Ni surface [D.M. Eigler, E.K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990)].

  17. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotipalli R.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD aluminum oxide (Al2O3 has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012−1013 cm-2 in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit. This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD. Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2 (20 nm, SiO2 (20 nm deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H (20 nm also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV. The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn, and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  18. Passivation effects of atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotipalli, R.; Delamare, R.; Poncelet, O.; Tang, X.; Francis, L. A.; Flandre, D.

    2013-09-01

    Atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) has recently demonstrated an excellent surface passivation for both n- and p-type c-Si solar cells thanks to the presence of high negative fixed charges (Qf ~ 1012-1013 cm-2) in combination with a low density of interface states (Dit). This paper investigates the passivation quality of thin (15 nm) Al2O3 films deposited by two different techniques: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) and Thermal atomic layer deposition (T-ALD). Other dielectric materials taken into account for comparison include: thermally-grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) (20 nm), SiO2 (20 nm) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) (20 nm) also deposited by PECVD. With the above-mentioned dielectric layers, Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitors were fabricated for Qf and Dit extraction through Capacitance-Voltage-Conductance (C-V-G) measurements. In addition, lifetime measurements were carried out to evaluate the effective surface recombination velocity (SRV). The influence of extracted C-V-G parameters (Qf,Dit) on the injection dependent lifetime measurements τ(Δn), and the dominant passivation mechanism involved have been discussed. Furthermore we have also studied the influence of the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness between the Al2O3 and silicon surface on the field-effect passivation mechanism. It is shown that the field effect passivation in accumulation mode is more predominant when compared to surface defect passivation.

  19. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  20. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L; Hamze, Ali K; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J; Demkov, Alexander A; Ekerdt, John G

    2017-02-07

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO 3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO 3 , SrZrO 3 , SrHfO 3 , and SrHf 0.55 Ti 0.45 O 3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  1. PREFACE: Atom-surface scattering Atom-surface scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2010-08-01

    It has been a privilege and a real pleasure to organize this special issue or festschrift in the general field of atom-surface scattering (and its interaction) in honor of J R Manson. This is a good opportunity and an ideal place to express our deep gratitude to one of the leaders in this field for his fundamental and outstanding scientific contributions. J R Manson, or Dick to his friends and colleagues, is one of the founding fathers, together with N Cabrera and V Celli, of the 'Theory of surface scattering and detection of surface phonons'. This is the title of the very well-known first theoretical paper by Dick published in Physical Review Letters in 1969. My first meeting with Dick was around twenty years ago in Saclay. J Lapujoulade organized a small group seminar about selective adsorption resonances in metal vicinal surfaces. We discussed this important issue in surface physics and many other things as if we had always known each other. This familiarity and warm welcome struck me from the very beginning. During the coming years, I found this to be a very attractive aspect of his personality. During my stays in Göttingen, we had the opportunity to talk widely about science and life at lunch or dinner time, walking or cycling. During these nice meetings, he showed, with humility, an impressive cultural background. It is quite clear that his personal opinions about history, religion, politics, music, etc, come from considering and analyzing them as 'open dynamical systems'. In particular, with good food and better wine in a restaurant or at home, a happy cheerful soirée is guaranteed with him, or even with only a good beer or espresso, and an interesting conversation arises naturally. He likes to listen before speaking. Probably not many people know his interest in tractors. He has an incredible collection of very old tractors at home. In one of my visits to Clemson, he showed me the collection, explaining to me in great detail, their technical properties

  2. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  3. Photoenhanced atomic layer epitaxy. Hikari reiki genshiso epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y. (Toshiba corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    The growth temperature range was greatly expanded of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) expected as the growth process of ultra-thin stacks. Ga layers and As layers were formed one after the other on a GaAs substrate in the atmosphere of trimethylgallium (TMG) or AsH{sub 2} supplied alternately, by KrF excimer laser irradiation normal to the substrate. As a result, the growth temperature range was 460-540{degree}C nearly 10 times that of 500 {plus minus} several degrees centigrade in conventional thermal growth method. Based on the experimental result where light absorption of source molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface was larger than that under gaseous phase condition, new adsorbed layer enhancement model was proposed to explain above irradiation effect verifying it by experiments. As this photoenhancement technique is applied to other materials, possible fabrication of new crystal structures as a super lattice with ultra-thin stacks of single atomic layers is expected because of a larger freedom in material combination for hetero-ALE. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  5. Issues involved in the atomic layer deposition of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Robert Kimes

    Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to study the nucleation and growth of tungsten on aluminum oxide surfaces. Tungsten metal was deposited using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) techniques. ALD uses sequential surface reactions to deposit material with atomic layer control. W ALD is performed using sequential exposures of WF6 and Si2H6. The step-wise nature of W ALD allows nucleation studies to be performed by analyzing the W surface concentration after each ALD reaction. Nucleation and growth regions can be identified by quantifying the AES signal intensities from both the W surface and the Al2O3 substrate. W nucleation occurred in 3 ALD reaction cycles. The AES results yielded a nucleation rate of 1.0 A/ALD cycle and a growth rate of ≈3 A/ALD cycle. AES studies also explored the nucleation and growth of Al2O3 on W. Al2O3 nucleated in 1 ALD cycle giving a nucleation rate of 3.5 A/ALD cycle and a subsequent growth rate of 1.0 A/ALD cycle. Mass spectrometry was then used to study the ALD reaction chemistry of tungsten deposition. Because of the step-wise nature of the W ALD chemistry, each W ALD reaction could be studied independently. The gaseous mass products were identified from both the WF6 and Si2H6 reactions. H2, HF and SiF4 mass products were observed for the WF6 reaction. The Si2H6 reaction displayed a room temperature reaction and a 200°C reaction. Products from the room temperature Si2H6 reaction were H2 and SiF3H. The reaction at 200°C yielded only H2 as a reaction product. H2 desorption from the surface contributes to the 200°C Si2H6 reaction. AES was used to confirm that the gas phase reaction products are correlated with a change in the surface species. Atomic hydrogen reduction of metal halides and oganometallic compounds provides another method for depositing metals with atomic layer control. The quantity of atomic hydrogen necessary to perform this chemistry is critical to the metal ALD process. A thermocouple probe was constructed to

  6. Crystalline thin films: The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) view

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique is selected as one of the methods to prepare thin films for various applications, including electrocatalytic materials and compound....

  7. Double-atomic layer of Tl on Si(111): Atomic arrangement and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalyuk, Alexey N.; Bondarenko, Leonid V.; Tupchaya, Alexandra Y.; Gruznev, Dimitry V.; Chou, Jyh-Pin; Hsing, Cheng-Rong; Wei, Ching-Ming; Zotov, Andrey V.; Saranin, Alexander A.

    2018-02-01

    Metastable double-atomic layer of Tl on Si(111) has recently been found to display interesting electric properties, namely superconductivity below 0.96 K and magnetic-field-induced transition into an insulating phase intermediated by a quantum metal state. In the present work, using a set of experimental techniques, including low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, in a combination with density-functional-theory calculations, we have characterized atomic and electronic properties of the Tl double layer on Si(111). The double Tl layer has been concluded to contain ∼ 2.4 monolayer of Tl. A top Tl layer has a '1 × 1' basic structure and displays 6 × 6 moiré pattern which originates from various residence sites of Tl atoms. Upon cooling below ∼ 140 K, the 6 × 6 moiré pattern changes to that having a 6√{ 3} × 6√{ 3} periodicity. However, the experimentally determined electron band dispersions show a 1 × 1 periodicity. The calculated band structure unfolded into the 1 × 1 surface Brillouin zone reproduces well the main features of the photoelectron spectra.

  8. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlled Synthesis of Pd/Pt Core Shell Nanoparticles Using Area-selective Atomic Layer Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Kun; Zhu, Qianqian; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    We report an atomic scale controllable synthesis of Pd/Pt core shell nanoparticles (NPs) via area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a modified surface. The method involves utilizing octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify the surface. Take the usage of pinholes on SAMs as active sites for the initial core nucleation, and subsequent selective deposition of the second metal as the shell layer. Since new nucleation sites can be effectively blocked by s...

  10. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-01-01

    Progress for the period Sept. 15, 1992 to Sept. 14, 1993 is discussed. Semiclassical methods that will allow much faster and more accurate three-dimensional atom--surface scattering calculations, both elastic and inelastic, are being developed. The scattering of He atoms from buckyballs is being investigated as a test problem. Somewhat more detail is given on studies of He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations of He + and Ar + ion sputtering of Pt surfaces are also being done. He atom scattering from Xe overlayers on metal surfaces and the thermalized dissociation of H 2 on Cu(110) are being studied. (R.W.R.) 64 refs

  11. Highly reflective polymeric substrates functionalized utilizing atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzuarregui, Ana; Coto, Borja; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gregorczyk, Keith E.; Ruiz de Gopegui, Unai; Barriga, Javier; Knez, Mato

    2015-08-01

    Reflective surfaces are one of the key elements of solar plants to concentrate energy in the receivers of solar thermal electricity plants. Polymeric substrates are being considered as an alternative to the widely used glass mirrors due to their intrinsic and processing advantages, but optimizing both the reflectance and the physical stability of polymeric mirrors still poses technological difficulties. In this work, polymeric surfaces have been functionalized with ceramic thin-films by atomic layer deposition. The characterization and optimization of the parameters involved in the process resulted in surfaces with a reflection index of 97%, turning polymers into a real alternative to glass substrates. The solution we present here can be easily applied in further technological areas where seemingly incompatible combinations of polymeric substrates and ceramic coatings occur.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of copper and copper silver films using an electrochemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, J.S.; Liu, Y.S.; Chin, T.S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the formation and properties of Cu and Cu(Ag) films on a Ru/Si substrate using electrochemical atomic layer deposition. The process was performed layer-by-layer using underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox reactions. The first Cu atomic layer was deposited on the Ru/Si substrate via UPD. Using UPD, atomic layered of Pb, which acts as a sacrificial layer, was applied on the Cu layer. Then, a Cu 2+ solution was flushed into the cell at an open-circuit potential, and the Pb layer was exchanged for Cu via redox replacements. The above sequences were repeated 500 times to form a Cu film. The Cu(Ag) alloy films were formed using Cu–UPD and Ag–UPD in predetermined sequences. The lowest electrical resistivity achieved was 3.6 and 2.2 μΩ cm for the Cu film and Cu(Ag) film, respectively, after annealing at 400 °C. Due to the self-limiting reactions, the process has the ability to deposit atomic layers to meet the requirement of Cu interconnects. - Highlights: • Layer-by-layer growth of Cu and Cu(Ag) films are prepared using electrochemical atomic layer deposition. • Cu coverage is from 0.33 to 0.51 ML for each deposition cycle in different NaCl concentrations. • The process can be applied in Cu interconnections

  13. ONE-DIMENSIONAL ORDERING OF IN ATOMS IN A CU(100) SURFACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BREEMAN, M; BARKEMA, GT; BOERMA, DO

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the ordering of In atoms embedded in the top layer of a Cu(100) surface is presented. The interaction energies between the In and Cu atoms were derived from atom-embedding calculations, with Finnis-Sinclair potentials. It was found that the interaction between In atoms in the

  14. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2015-01-01

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe 3 O 4 thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe 3 O 4 thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7 nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210 K. After post-annealing in H 2 /Ar at 400 °C, the as-grown α−Fe 2 O 3 sample is reduced to Fe 3 O 4 phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications

  15. Simulation of atomic layer deposition on nanoparticle agglomerates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, W.; van Ommen, J.R.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Coated nanoparticles have many potential applications; production of large quantities is feasible by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on nanoparticles in a fluidized bed reactor. However, due to the cohesive interparticle forces, nanoparticles form large agglomerates, which influences the coating

  16. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    areas and high adsorptive capacities. We find that a nanoscale coating of Al2O3 formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the surface of nonwoven ...distribution is unlimited. Highly Adsorptive, MOF-Functionalized Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition The... Nonwoven Fiber Mats for Hazardous Gas Capture Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition Report Title While metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show great

  17. Spotting 2D atomic layers on aluminum nitride thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Hareesh; Bharadwaj B, Krishna; Vaidyuala, Kranthi Kumar; Suran, Swathi; Bhat, Navakanta; Varma, Manoj; Srinivasan Raghavan

    2015-10-23

    Substrates for 2D materials are important for tailoring their fundamental properties and realizing device applications. Aluminum nitride (AIN) films on silicon are promising large-area substrates for such devices in view of their high surface phonon energies and reasonably large dielectric constants. In this paper epitaxial layers of AlN on 2″ Si wafers have been investigated as a necessary first step to realize devices from exfoliated or transferred atomic layers. Significant thickness dependent contrast enhancements are both predicted and observed for monolayers of graphene and MoS2 on AlN films as compared to the conventional SiO2 films on silicon, with calculated contrast values approaching 100% for graphene on AlN as compared to 8% for SiO2 at normal incidences. Quantitative estimates of experimentally measured contrast using reflectance spectroscopy show very good agreement with calculated values. Transistors of monolayer graphene on AlN films are demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of complete device fabrication on the identified layers.

  18. Atomic layer epitaxy of compound semiconductors with metalorganic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBaars, S. P.; Dapkus, P. D.

    1989-11-01

    Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) is a relatively new growth technology for depositing compound semiconductors one monolayer at a time. By employing a new regime of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth, in which saturated surface reactions control the growth, it is possible to alternately deposit monolayers of column III and column V elements so that only one monolayer of the III-V compound semiconductor is formed in every cycle of the deposition. The use of metalorganic precursors for ALE is of considerable importance since it allows the hybridization of ALE with the existing MOCVD technique. Several benefits can be realized by integrating the two technologies. Layers of critical thickness and uniformity requirements can be grown by ALE, while thicker epitaxial layers can be grown by MOCVD. Additional advantages are the "digital growth" nature of ALE which affords a high degree of thickness reproducibility, and the selective area growth potential of laser-assisted ALE (LALE). In this paper, ALE and LALE of GaAs is reviewed with an emphasis on the utilization of metalorganic precursors.

  19. XRD and RBS studies of quasi-amorphous zinc oxide layers produced by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guziewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: guzel@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Turos, Andrzej [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 04-500 Otwock (Poland); Stonert, Anna [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Soltana 7, 04-500 Otwock (Poland); Snigurenko, Dmytro; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Diduszko, Ryszard [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501 Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    Although zinc oxide has been widely investigated for many important applications such as laser diodes, photovoltaics, and sensors, some basic properties of this material have not been established up to now. One of these are stopping power values which are crucial for the Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry analysis. For this kind of measurements, amorphous materials should be used. In this paper we show the results of stopping power measurements for ZnO films grown by Atomic Layer Deposition. The films were grown on a silicon (100) substrate and parameters of the growth were chosen in a way that prevents crystallization of ZnO films. A series of ZnO films with thickness between 20 and 160 nm have been investigated. Extended film characterization has proven that the obtained nanopolycrystalline ZnO films can be considered as truly amorphous with respect to ion beam applications. ZnO films have been used for precise stopping power measurement of MeV He-ions in the energy range from 200 to 5000 keV. These results provide indispensable data for ion beam modification and analysis of ZnO. - Highlights: • Thin ZnO films of low crystallographic quality were obtained by Atomic Layer Deposition at 60 °C. • Nanopolycrystalline structure and atomically flat surface has been measured by X-ray diffraction. • Stopping power measurements show a very good agreement with the calculated values.

  20. Atomic layer deposition for nanofabrication and interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Monan; Li, Xianglin; Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a tool for conformal coating on high aspect-ratio nanostructures with excellent uniformity. It has become a technique for both template-directed nanofabrications and engineering of surface properties. This Feature Article highlights the application of ALD in selected fields including photonics, SERS and energy materials. Specifically, the topics include fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures for the SERS applications, fabrication of 3-D nanoarchitectured photoanodes for solar energy conversions (dye-sensitized solar cells and photoelectrochemical cells), and coating of electrodes to enhance the cyclic stability and thus device life span of batteries. Dielectric coating for tailoring optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures is also discussed as exemplified by ZnO nanowires. Future direction of ALD in these applications is discussed at the end.

  1. Scalable synthesis of palladium nanoparticle catalysts by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinhua; Lyon, Lauren B.; Jiang Yingbing; Weimer, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to produce Pd/Al 2 O 3 catalysts using sequential exposures of Pd(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate and formalin at 200 °C in a fluidized bed reactor. The ALD-prepared Pd/alumina catalysts were characterized by various methods including hydrogen chemisorption, XPS, and TEM, and compared with a commercially available 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst, which was also characterized. The content of Pd on alumina support and the size of Pd nanoparticles can be controlled by the number of ALD-coating cycles and the dose time of the Pd precursor. One layer of organic component from the Pd precursor remained on the Pd particle surface. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina had greater active metal surface area and percent metal dispersion than the commercial 1 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst. The ALD and commercial catalysts were subjected to catalytic testing to determine their relative activities for glucose oxidation to gluconic acid in aqueous solution. The ALD 0.9 wt% Pd/alumina catalyst had comparable activity as compared to the commercial 1 wt% Pd catalyst. No noticeable amount of Pd leaching was observed for the ALD-prepared catalysts during the vigorously stirred reaction.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on layer structured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Wang, Y.; Irle, S.; Morokuma, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical sputtering of hydrogen atom on graphite was simulated using molecular dynamics. Especially, the layer structure of the graphite was maintained by interlayer intermolecular interaction. Three kinds of graphite surfaces, flat (0 0 0 1) surface, armchair (1 1 2-bar 0) surface and zigzag (1 0 1-bar 0) surface, are dealt with as targets of hydrogen atom bombardment. In the case of the flat surface, graphene layers were peeled off one by one and yielded molecules had chain structures. On the other hand, C 2 H 2 and H 2 are dominant yielded molecules on the armchair and zigzag surfaces, respectively. In addition, the interaction of a single hydrogen isotope on a single graphene is investigated. Adsorption, reflection and penetration rates are obtained as functions of incident energy and explain hydrogen retention on layered graphite. (author)

  3. Atomic Layer Deposition in Bio-Nanotechnology: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishal, Arghya K; Butt, Arman; Selvaraj, Sathees K; Joshi, Bela; Patel, Sweetu B; Huang, Su; Yang, Bin; Shukohfar, Tolou; Sukotjo, Cortino; Takoudis, Christos G

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique increasingly used in nanotechnology and ultrathin film deposition; it is ideal for films in the nanometer and Angstrom length scales. ALD can effectively be used to modify the surface chemistry and functionalization of engineering-related and biologically important surfaces. It can also be used to alter the mechanical, electrical, chemical, and other properties of materials that are increasingly used in biomedical engineering and biological sciences. ALD is a relatively new technique for optimizing materials for use in bio-nanotechnology. Here, after a brief review of the more widely used modes of ALD and a few of its applications in biotechnology, selected results that show the potential of ALD in bio-nanotechnology are presented. ALD seems to be a promising means for tuning the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity characteristics of biomedical surfaces, forming conformal ultrathin coatings with desirable properties on biomedical substrates with a high aspect ratio, tuning the antibacterial properties of substrate surfaces of interest, and yielding multifunctional biomaterials for medical implants and other devices.

  4. Single-layer model for surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniglia, C K; Jensen, D G

    2002-06-01

    Random roughness of an optical surface reduces its specular reflectance and transmittance by the scattering of light. The reduction in reflectance can be modeled by a homogeneous layer on the surface if the refractive index of the layer is intermediate to the indices of the media on either side of the surface. Such a layer predicts an increase in the transmittance of the surface and therefore does not provide a valid model for the effects of scatter on the transmittance. Adding a small amount of absorption to the layer provides a model that predicts a reduction in both reflectance and transmittance. The absorbing layer model agrees with the predictions of a scalar scattering theory for a layer with a thickness that is twice the rms roughness of the surface. The extinction coefficient k for the layer is proportional to the thickness of the layer.

  5. Robust, functional nanocrystal solids by infilling with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Gibbs, Markelle; Perkins, Craig L; Tolentino, Jason; Zarghami, Mohammad H; Bustamante, Jorge; Law, Matt

    2011-12-14

    Thin films of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are inherently metatstable materials prone to oxidative and photothermal degradation driven by their large surface-to-volume ratios and high surface energies. (1) The fabrication of practical electronic devices based on NC solids hinges on preventing oxidation, surface diffusion, ripening, sintering, and other unwanted physicochemical changes that can plague these materials. Here we use low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) to infill conductive PbSe NC solids with metal oxides to produce inorganic nanocomposites in which the NCs are locked in place and protected against oxidative and photothermal damage. Infilling NC field-effect transistors and solar cells with amorphous alumina yields devices that operate with enhanced and stable performance for at least months in air. Furthermore, ALD infilling with ZnO lowers the height of the inter-NC tunnel barrier for electron transport, yielding PbSe NC films with electron mobilities of 1 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). Our ALD technique is a versatile means to fabricate robust NC solids for optoelectronic devices.

  6. Atomic layer deposition on nanoparticles in a rotary reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jarod Alan

    Challenges are encountered during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on large quantities of nanoparticles. The particles must be agitated or vigorously mixed to perform the ALD surface reactions in reasonable times and to prevent the particles from being agglomerated by the ALD film. The high surface area of nanoparticles also demands efficient reactant usage because large quantities of reactant are required for the surface reactions to reach completion. To address these challenges, a novel rotary reactor was developed to achieve constant particle agitation during static ALD reactant exposures. In the design of this new reactor, a cylindrical drum with porous metal walls was positioned inside a vacuum chamber. The porous cylindrical drum was rotated by a magnetically coupled rotary feedthrough. By rotating the cylindrical drum to obtain a centrifugal force of less than one gravitational force, the particles were agitated by a continuous "avalanche" of particles. The effectiveness of this rotary reactor was demonstrated by Al 2O3 ALD on ZrO2 particles. A number of techniques including transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning Auger spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that the Al2O3 ALD film conformally coats the ZrO 2 particles. Combining static reactant exposures with a very high surface area sample in the rotary reactor also provides unique opportunities for studying the surface chemistry during ALD. Sequential, subsaturating doses can be used to examine the self-limiting behavior of the ALD reactions in the rotary reactor. This dosing method is the first demonstration of self-limiting ALD on bulk quantities of nanoparticles. By combining these sequential, subsaturating doses with quadrupole mass spectrometry, ALD reactions can be analyzed from the gas phase using full mass spectrum analysis. The reaction products are present in a high enough concentration to discern a gas phase mechanism for reactions

  7. Mode-locking of an InAs Quantum Dot Based Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Using Atomic Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-16

    Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers). 2)! Installation of a FTIR based temperature dependent reflectivity setup for characterizing VECSELs...and SESAMs (Semiconductor Saturable Absorber Mirrors). 3)! Demonstration of up to 6 Watts CW with InAs QD (Quantum Dot) VECSELs (1250 nm) and 15...AFRL and at other university collaborators such as the University of Arizona. 2.#Installation#of#a# FTIR #based#temperature#dependent#reflectivity

  8. Atomic structure of the SnO{sub 2} (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, T.J.; LaFemina, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    Using a tight-binding, total-energy model, we examine atomic relaxations of the ideal stoichiometric and reduced tin oxide (11) surfaces. In both cases we find a nearly bond-length conserving rumple of the top layer, and a smaller counter-relaxation of the second layer. These calculations show no evidence of surface states in the band gap for either surface.

  9. Atomic structure of the SnO sub 2 (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, T.J.; LaFemina, J.P.

    1991-12-01

    Using a tight-binding, total-energy model, we examine atomic relaxations of the ideal stoichiometric and reduced tin oxide (11) surfaces. In both cases we find a nearly bond-length conserving rumple of the top layer, and a smaller counter-relaxation of the second layer. These calculations show no evidence of surface states in the band gap for either surface.

  10. Surface passivation and carrier selectivity of the thermal-atomic-layer-deposited TiO2 on crystalline silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Schüler, Nadine; Shkondin, Evgeniy

    2017-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the use of an ultrathin TiO2 film as a passivating carrier-selective contact for silicon photovoltaics. The effective lifetime, surface recombination velocity, and diode quality dependence on TiO2 deposition temperature with and without a thin tunneling oxide interlayer (SiO2...... heterojunction with optimized photovoltage, interface quality, and electron extraction to maximize the photovoltage of TiO2–Si heterojunction photovoltaic cells are formulated. Diode behaviour was analysed with the help of experimental, analytical, and simulation methods. It is predicted that TiO2 with a high...... carrier concentration is a preferable candidate for high-performance solar cells. The possible reasons for performance degradation in those devices with and without interlayers are also discussed....

  11. Atomic clusters and atomic surfaces in icosahedral quasicrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiquandon, Marianne; Portier, Richard; Gratias, Denis

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the basic tools commonly used to describe the atomic structures of quasicrystals with a specific focus on the icosahedral phases. After a brief recall of the main properties of quasiperiodic objects, two simple physical rules are discussed that lead one to eventually obtain a surprisingly small number of atomic structures as ideal quasiperiodic models for real quasicrystals. This is due to the fact that the atomic surfaces (ASs) used to describe all known icosahedral phases are located on high-symmetry special points in six-dimensional space. The first rule is maximizing the density using simple polyhedral ASs that leads to two possible sets of ASs according to the value of the six-dimensional lattice parameter A between 0.63 and 0.79 nm. The second rule is maximizing the number of complete orbits of high symmetry to construct as large as possible atomic clusters similar to those observed in complex intermetallic structures and approximant phases. The practical use of these two rules together is demonstrated on two typical examples of icosahedral phases, i-AlMnSi and i-CdRE (RE = Gd, Ho, Tm).

  12. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition with Thermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates ranging from glass, polymers, aerogels, and metals to high aspect ratio geometries. This talk will focus on the utilization of ALD for engineering applications.

  13. Modifing the Surface Layers of Mechanical Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Slanec

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the creation of thin surface layers prepared by the Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition Method (PACVD. Polished sample surfaces made of tool steel were used. An investigation of the dependence of layer thickness on process duration was carried out. The structure of the original surface and the structure of the coated surface were evaluated and compared. The microhardness of the surface areas was also measured.

  14. ZrO2 and HfO2 dielectrics on (001) n-InAs with atomic-layer-deposited in situ surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babadi, Aein S.; Lind, Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of ZrO2 and HfO2 gate dielectrics on n-InAs were evaluated. Particularly, an in situ surface treatment method including cyclic nitrogen plasma and trimethylaluminum pulses was used to improve the quality of the high-κ oxides. The quality of the InAs-oxide interface was evaluated with a full equivalent circuit model developed for narrow band gap metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements exhibit a total trap density profile with a minimum of 1 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 and 4 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 for ZrO2 and HfO2, respectively, both of which are comparable to the best values reported for high-κ/III-V devices. Our simulations showed that the measured capacitance is to a large extent affected by the border trap response suggesting a very low density of interface traps. Charge trapping in MOS structures was also investigated using the hysteresis in the C-V measurements. The experimental results demonstrated that the magnitude of the hysteresis increases with increase in accumulation voltage, indicating an increase in the charge trapping response.

  15. ZrO{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2} dielectrics on (001) n-InAs with atomic-layer-deposited in situ surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babadi, Aein S., E-mail: Aein.Shiri-Babadi@EIT.LTH.SE; Lind, Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik [Department of Electrical and Information Technology, Lund University, Lund SE-22100 (Sweden)

    2016-03-28

    The electrical properties of ZrO{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics on n-InAs were evaluated. Particularly, an in situ surface treatment method including cyclic nitrogen plasma and trimethylaluminum pulses was used to improve the quality of the high-κ oxides. The quality of the InAs-oxide interface was evaluated with a full equivalent circuit model developed for narrow band gap metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements exhibit a total trap density profile with a minimum of 1 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} and 4 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} for ZrO{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2}, respectively, both of which are comparable to the best values reported for high-κ/III-V devices. Our simulations showed that the measured capacitance is to a large extent affected by the border trap response suggesting a very low density of interface traps. Charge trapping in MOS structures was also investigated using the hysteresis in the C–V measurements. The experimental results demonstrated that the magnitude of the hysteresis increases with increase in accumulation voltage, indicating an increase in the charge trapping response.

  16. Atomic structure of the SbCu surface alloy: A surface X-ray diffraction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, I.; Gay, J.M.; Lapena, L.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution at 400 degrees C of an antimony layer deposited at room temperature on a Cu(111) substrate leads to a surface alloy with a p(root 3x root 3)R 30 degrees x 30 degrees superstructure and a Sb composition of 1/3.We present here a structural study of this Sb-Cu compound by surface X......-ray diffraction (SXRD). The best agreement is obtained for a Cu,Sb surface layer with Sb atoms substituting 1/3 of the Cu atoms, over an essentially unperturbed Cu(111) plane. The largest relaxation is undergone by the Sb atoms which rise by 0.32+0.02 Angstrom over the mean plane of its Cu neighbours....... No substantial in-plane relaxations were observed. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Effect of interface layer on growth behavior of atomic-layer-deposited Ir thin film as novel Cu diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Hong Kee; Kim, Joo Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Growth and nucleation behavior of Ir films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on different interfacial layers such as SiO 2 , surface-treated TaN, and 3-nm-thick TaN were investigated. To grow Ir thin film by ALD, (1,5-cyclooctadiene) (ethylcyclopentadienyl) iridium (Ir(EtCp)(COD)) and oxygen were employed as the metalorganic precursor and reactant, respectively. To obtain optimal deposition conditions, the deposition temperature was varied from 240 to 420 deg. C and the number of deposition cycles was changed from 150 to 300. The Ir film grown on the 3-nm-thick TaN surface showed the smoothest and most uniform layer for all the deposition cycles, whereas poor nucleation and three-dimensional island-type growth of the Ir layer were observed on Si, SiO 2 , and surface-treated TaN after fewer number of deposition cycles. The uniformity of the Ir film layer was maintained for all the different substrates up to 300 deposition cycles. Therefore we suggest that the growth behavior of the Ir layer on different interface layer is related to the chemical bonding pattern of the substrate film or interface layer, resulting in better understand the growth mechanism of Ir layer as a copper diffusion barrier. The ALD-grown Ir films show the preferential direction of (1 1 1) for all the reflections, which indicates the absence of IrO 2 in metallic Ir.

  18. Surface Plasmon Polaritons Probed with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra; Panas, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optical mirror for cold rubidium atoms based on a repulsive dipole potential created by means of a modified recordable digital versatile disc. Using the mirror, we have determined the absolute value of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) intensity, reaching 90 times the intensity...

  19. The Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on Ni foam for the electrooxidation of alcohols

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of Pt and Pd metal by surface limited redox replacement reactions was performed using the electrochemical atomic layer deposition. Carbon paper and Ni foam were used as substrates for metal deposition. Supported Pt and Pd...

  20. Atom diffraction reveals the impact of atomic core electrons on atom-surface potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2010-12-03

    We measured ratios of van der Waals potential coefficients (C3) for different atoms (Li, Na, K, and Rb) interacting with the same surface by studying atom diffraction from a nanograting. These measurements are a sensitive test of atomic structure calculations because C3 ratios are strongly influenced by core electrons and only weakly influenced by the permittivity and geometry of the surface. Our measurement uncertainty of 2% in the ratio C(3)(K)/C(3)(Na) is close to the uncertainty of the best theoretical predictions, and some of these predictions are inconsistent with our measurement.

  1. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    -k) materials as the gate oxide of MOSFET [1–3]. Aluminium oxide prepared by atomic ... adsorbed on to the substrate/previous layer in a saturating fashion. Argon/nitrogen is pulsed into the chamber to purge out any unreacted ...

  2. Inductively coupled plasma nanoetching of atomic layer deposition alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Chang, Bingdong; Todeschini, Matteo

    2018-01-01

    Al2O3 thin-film deposited by atomic layer deposition is an attractive plasma etch mask for Micro and Nano Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS and NEMS). 20-nm-thick Al2O3 mask enables through silicon wafer plasma etching. Al2O3 is also an excellent etch mask for other important MEMS materials...

  3. Atomic layer deposition for nanostructured Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, H. C. M.; Donders, M. E.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Notten, P. H. L.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructuring is targeted as a solution to achieve the improvements required for implementing Li-ion batteries in a wide range of applications. These applications range in size from electrical vehicles down to microsystems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) could be an enabling technology for

  4. Hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition of Tungsten films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to establish a novel technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the future ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) of microelectronics. We developed a hot-wire assisted ALD (HWALD), where a heated tungsten (W) filament is utilized instead of a plasma to generate radicals. HWALD is

  5. Formation of HgSe thin films using electrochemical atomic Layer epitaxy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe, MK

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of HgSe using electrochemical atomic-layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of ALE, where electrochemical surface-limited reactions referred to as underpotential deposits, generally result...

  6. Ultrafast atomic layer deposition of alumina layers for solar cell passivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Lankhorst, A.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Tiba, V.; Spee, K.; Maas, D.; Vermeer, A.

    2010-01-01

    An ultrafast atomic layer deposition technique is presented, based on the spatial separation of the half-reactions, with which alumina layers can be deposited with deposition rates of more than 1 nm/s. The deposition rate is limited by the water half-reaction, for which a kinetic model has been

  7. Mechanisms of subthreshold atomic emission from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiv, A.E.; Elango, M.A.; Britavskaya, E.P.; Zaharchenko, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulation of the dynamics of ions and atoms on the surfaces of solids has been carried out. The Coulomb, Pauli, exchange and Van der Waals potentials have been taken into account. The semi-empirical quantum-chemical method has been used also. In the case of alkali halide surfaces it is shown that if recharge of an anion (X - → X + ) occurs in two surface layers, it may initiate the ejection of positive metal ions (M + ) and, assisted by the capture of an electron by a departing M + , of metal atoms M 0 . Besides the Coulomb repulsion the Pauli shock is shown to play an essential role in the driving of the ejection process. This mechanism of desorption has large efficiency when the excitation of a core electron occurs in case of alkali halide crystals and has a strong dependence on the crystal ionicity. We obtained the energy distribution of ejected particles for different mechanisms of electron-ion emission. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic dichroism in photoemission: a new element-specific magnetometer with atomic-layer resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starke, K.; Arenholz, E.; Kaindl, G.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic coupling in layered metallic structures has become a key issue in thin-film magnetism since the observation of oscillatory exchange coupling across non-ferromagnetic spacer layers. Although this phenomenon was discovered in rare earths (RE) superlattices, mostly transition-metal systems have been studied and are now applied in data-storage industry. An understanding of the coupling mechanisms has been reached after a fabrication of high-quality interfaces became possible. It allowed, in particular, the experimental finding of induced ferromagnetic order in 'nonmagnetic' atomic layers near an interface, using element-specific probes such as magnetic circular dichroism in x-ray absorption. - In layered RE systems, by contrast, the well known intermiscibility has prevented a preparation of atomically sharp interfaces, and all RE superlattices studied so far showed interdiffusion zones of several atomic layers. In the present overview, we report the first fabrication of atomically flat heteromagnetic RE interfaces, their structural characterization and their magnetic analysis using magnetic dichroism in photoemission (MDPE). This new tool gives access to the magnetization of individual atomic layers near interfaces in favourite cases. Merits of MDPE as a magnetometer are demonstrated at the example of Eu/Gd(0001), where chemical shifts of core-level photoemission lines allow to spectroscopically separate up to four different atomic layers. The high surface sensitivity of MDPE, together with the well known dependence of the core-level binding energies on the coordination number of the photo emitting atom, opens the door to future site-specific studies of magnetism in sub-monolayer systems such as 'nanowires'

  9. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; De Brito Mota, F; De Castilho, Caio M C; Mascarenhas, Artur J S

    2010-01-01

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp 2 to sp 3 transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the Γ point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  10. A DFT study of halogen atoms adsorbed on graphene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Paulo V C; Mascarenhas, Artur J S; de Brito Mota, F; de Castilho, Caio M C

    2010-12-03

    In this work, ab initio density functional theory calculations were performed in order to study the structural and electronic properties of halogens (X = fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine) that were deposited on both sides of graphene single layers (X-graphene). The adsorption of these atoms on only one side of the layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed on the other was also considered (H,X-graphene). The results indicate that the F-C bond in the F-graphene system causes an sp(2) to sp(3) transition of the carbon orbitals, and similar effects seem to occur in the H,X-graphene systems. For the other cases, two configurations are found: bonded (B) and non-bonded (NB). For the B configuration, the structural arrangement of the atoms was similar to F-graphene and H-graphene (graphane), although the electronic structures present some differences. In the NB configuration, the interaction between the adsorbed atoms and the graphene layer seems to be essentially of the van der Waals type. In these cases, the original shape of the graphene layer presents only small deviations from the pristine form and the adsorbed atoms reach equilibrium far from the sheet. The F-graphene structure has a direct bandgap of approximately 3.16 eV at the Γ point, which is a value that is close to the value of 3.50 eV that was found for graphane. The Cl-graphene (B configuration), H,F-graphene and H,Cl-graphene systems have smaller bandgap values. All of the other systems present metallic behaviours. Energy calculations indicate the possible stability of these X-graphene layers, although some considerations about the possibility of spontaneous formation have to be taken into account.

  11. Atomic-Layer-Confined Doping for Atomic-Level Insights into Visible-Light Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fengcai; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Yongfu; Liang, Liang; Liu, Katong; Xu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Qun; Pan, Bicai; Luo, Yi; Xie, Yi

    2015-08-03

    A model of doping confined in atomic layers is proposed for atomic-level insights into the effect of doping on photocatalysis. Co doping confined in three atomic layers of In2S3 was implemented with a lamellar hybrid intermediate strategy. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of Co ions brings about several new energy levels and increased density of states at the conduction band minimum, leading to sharply increased visible-light absorption and three times higher carrier concentration. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the electron transfer time of about 1.6 ps from the valence band to newly formed localized states is due to Co doping. The 25-fold increase in average recovery lifetime is believed to be responsible for the increased of electron-hole separation. The synthesized Co-doped In2S3 (three atomic layers) yield a photocurrent of 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.5 V vs. RHE, nearly 10 and 17 times higher than that of the perfect In2S3 (three atomic layers) and the bulk counterpart, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Model castings with composite surface layer - application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in foundingprocess a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase inhardness and aberasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generallyapplied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. In range of studies was made cast steel test castings withcomposite surface layer, which usability for industrial applications was estimated by criterion of hardness and aberasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral and quality of joint cast steel – (Fe-Cr-C. Based on conducted studies a thesis, that composite surface layer arise from liquid state, was formulated. Moreover, possible is control of composite layer thickness and its hardness by suitable selection of parameters i.e. thickness of insert, pouring temperature and solidification modulus of casting. Possibility of technology application of composite surface layer in manufacture of cast steel slide bush for combined cutter loader is presented.

  13. Stop Band Gap in Periodic Layers of Confined Atomic Vapor/Dielectric Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan-Yuan; Li Li; Lu Yi-Xin; Zhang Yan-Peng; Xu Ke-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A stop band gap is predicted in periodic layers of a confined atomic vapor/dielectric medium. Reflection and transmission profile of the layers over the band gap can be dramatically modified by the confined atoms and the number of layer periods. These gap and line features can be ascribed to the enhanced contribution of slow atoms induced by atom-wall collision, transient behavior of atom-light interaction and Fabry—Pérot effects in a thermal confined atomic system

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition for Coating of High Aspect Ratio TiO2 Nanotube Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present an optimized approach for the deposition of Al2O3 (as a model secondary material) coating into high aspect ratio (≈180) anodic TiO2 nanotube layers using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. In order to study the influence of the diffusion of the Al2O3 precursors on the resulting coating thickness, ALD processes with different exposure times (i.e., 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 s) of the trimethylaluminum (TMA) precursor were performed. Uniform coating of the nanotube interiors was achieved with longer exposure times (5 and 10 s), as verified by detailed scanning electron microscopy analysis. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements were used to monitor the deposition process and its particular features due to the tube diameter gradient. Finally, theoretical calculations were performed to calculate the minimum precursor exposure time to attain uniform coating. Theoretical values on the diffusion regime matched with the experimental results and helped to obtain valuable information for further optimization of ALD coating processes. The presented approach provides a straightforward solution toward the development of many novel devices, based on a high surface area interface between TiO2 nanotubes and a secondary material (such as Al2O3). PMID:27643411

  15. Producing of multicomponent and composite surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzchon, T.; Bielinski, P.; Michalski, A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a new method of producing multicomponent and composite layers on steel substrate. The combination of nickel plating with glow-discharge bordering or impulse-plasma deposition method gives an opportunity to obtain good properties of surface layers. The results of examinations of carbon 45 (0.45%C) steel, nickel plated and then borided under glow discharge conditions or covered with TiN layers are presented. The corrosion and friction wear resistance of such layers are markedly higher than for layer produced on non nickel plated substrates. (author). 19 refs, 5 figs

  16. Atom probe tomography characterization of thin copper layers on aluminum deposited by galvanic displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Ai, Jiahe; Hillier, Andrew C; Hebert, Kurt R

    2012-01-24

    ″Ultrathin″ metallization layers on the order of nanometers in thickness are increasingly used in semiconductor interconnects and other nanostructures. Aqueous deposition methods are attractive methods to produce such layers due to their low cost, but formation of ultrathin layers has proven challenging, particularly on oxide-coated substrates. This work focused on the formation of thin copper layers on aluminum, by galvanic displacement from alkaline aqueous solutions. Analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) showed that continuous copper films of approximately 1 nm thickness were formed, apparently the first demonstration of deposition of ultrathin metal layers on oxidized substrates from aqueous solutions. The APT reconstructions indicate that deposited copper replaced a portion of the surface oxide film on aluminum. The results are consistent with mechanisms in which surface hydride species on aluminum mediate deposition, either by directly reducing cupric ions or by inducing electronic conduction in the oxide, thus enabling cupric ion reduction by Al metal.

  17. Oxide-based materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Marek; Pietruszka, Rafał; Kaszewski, Jarosław; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Godlewski, Michał M.; Slonska, Anna; Gajewski, Zdzisław

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of wide band-gap oxides grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) are suitable for a range of applications. Some of these applications will be presented. First of all, ALD-grown high-k HfO2 is used as a gate oxide in the electronic devices. Moreover, ALD-grown oxides can be used in memory devices, in transparent transistors, or as elements of solar cells. Regarding photovoltaics (PV), ALD-grown thin films of Al2O3 are already used as anti-reflection layers. In addition, thin films of ZnO are tested as replacement of ITO in PV devices. New applications in organic photovoltaics, electronics and optoelectronics are also demonstrated Considering new applications, the same layers, as used in electronics, can also find applications in biology, medicine and in a food industry. This is because layers of high-k oxides show antibacterial activity, as discussed in this work.

  18. Surface chemistry of a Cu(I) beta-diketonate precursor and the atomic layer deposition of Cu{sub 2}O on SiO{sub 2} studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Dileep, E-mail: dileep.dhakal@zfm.tu-chemnitz.de [Center for Microtechnologies – ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Waechtler, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas [Center for Microtechnologies – ZfM, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz, Germany and Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems - ENAS, Technologie-Campus 3, D-09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Lang, Heinrich; Mothes, Robert; Tuchscherer, André [Institute of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The surface chemistry of the bis(tri-n-butylphosphane) copper(I) acetylacetonate, [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)] and the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Cu{sub 2}O using this Cu precursor as reactant and wet oxygen as coreactant on SiO{sub 2} substrates are studied by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Cu precursor was evaporated and exposed to the substrates kept at temperatures between 22 °C and 300 °C. The measured phosphorus and carbon concentration on the substrates indicated that most of the [{sup n}Bu{sub 3}P] ligands were released either in the gas phase or during adsorption. No disproportionation was observed for the Cu precursor in the temperature range between 22 °C and 145 °C. However, disproportionation of the Cu precursor was observed at 200 °C, since C/Cu concentration ratio decreased and substantial amounts of metallic Cu were present on the substrate. The amount of metallic Cu increased, when the substrate was kept at 300 °C, indicating stronger disproportionation of the Cu precursor. Hence, the upper limit for the ALD of Cu{sub 2}O from this precursor lies in the temperature range between 145 °C and 200 °C, as the precursor must not alter its chemical and physical state after chemisorption on the substrate. Five hundred ALD cycles with the probed Cu precursor and wet O{sub 2} as coreactant were carried out on SiO{sub 2} at 145 °C. After ALD, in-situ XPS analysis confirmed the presence of Cu{sub 2}O on the substrate. Ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry indicated an average film thickness of 2.5 nm of Cu{sub 2}O deposited with a growth per cycle of 0.05 Å/cycle. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations depicted a homogeneous, fine, and granular morphology of the Cu{sub 2}O ALD film on SiO{sub 2}. AFM investigations suggest that the deposited Cu{sub 2}O film is continuous on the SiO{sub 2} substrate.

  19. Effect of substrate composition on atomic layer deposition using self-assembled monolayers as blocking layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Engstrom, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The authors have examined the effect of two molecules that form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the subsequent growth of TaN x by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on two substrate surfaces, SiO 2 and Cu. The SAMs that the authors have investigated include two vapor phase deposited, fluorinated alkyl silanes: Cl 3 Si(CH 2 ) 2 (CF 2 ) 5 CF 3 (FOTS) and (C 2 H 5 O) 3 Si(CH 2 ) 2 (CF 2 ) 7 CF 3 (HDFTEOS). Both the SAMs themselves and the TaN x thin films, grown using Ta[N(CH 3 ) 2 ] 5 and NH 3 , were analyzed ex situ using contact angle, spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and low energy ion-scattering spectroscopy (LEISS). First, the authors find that both SAMs on SiO 2 are nominally stable at T s  ∼ 300 °C, the substrate temperature used for ALD, while on Cu, the authors find that HDFTEOS thermally desorbs, while FOTS is retained on the surface. The latter result reflects the difference in the head groups of these two molecules. The authors find that both SAMs strongly attenuate the ALD growth of TaN x on SiO 2 , by about a factor of 10, while on Cu, the SAMs have no effect on ALD growth. Results from LEISS and XPS are decisive in determining the nature of the mechanism of growth of TaN x on all surfaces. Growth on SiO 2 is 2D and approximately layer-by-layer, while on the surfaces terminated by the SAMs, it nucleates at defect sites, is islanded, and is 3D. In the latter case, our results support growth of the TaN x thin film over the SAM, with a considerable delay in formation of a continuous thin film. Growth on Cu, with or without the SAMs, is also 3D and islanded, and there is also a delay in the formation of a continuous thin film as compared to growth on SiO 2 . These results highlight the power of coupling measurements from both LEISS and XPS in examinations of ultrathin films formed by ALD

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition Alumina-Passivated Silicon Nanowires: Probing the Transition from Electrochemical Double-Layer Capacitor to Electrolytic Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriau, Dorian; Boniface, Maxime; Valero, Anthony; Aldakov, Dmitry; Brousse, Thierry; Gentile, Pascal; Sadki, Said

    2017-04-19

    Silicon nanowires were coated by a 1-5 nm thin alumina layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in order to replace poorly reproducible and unstable native silicon oxide by a highly conformal passivating alumina layer. The surface coating enabled probing the behavior of symmetric devices using such electrodes in the EMI-TFSI electrolyte, allowing us to attain a large cell voltage up to 6 V in ionic liquid, together with very high cyclability with less than 4% capacitance fade after 10 6 charge/discharge cycles. These results yielded fruitful insights into the transition between an electrochemical double-layer capacitor behavior and an electrolytic capacitor behavior. Ultimately, thin ALD dielectric coatings can be used to obtain hybrid devices exhibiting large cell voltage and excellent cycle life of dielectric capacitors, while retaining energy and power densities close to the ones displayed by supercapacitors.

  1. Overview of atomic layer etching in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanarik, Keren J.; Lill, Thorsten; Hudson, Eric A.; Sriraman, Saravanapriyan; Tan, Samantha; Marks, Jeffrey; Vahedi, Vahid; Gottscho, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) is a technique for removing thin layers of material using sequential reaction steps that are self-limiting. ALE has been studied in the laboratory for more than 25 years. Today, it is being driven by the semiconductor industry as an alternative to continuous etching and is viewed as an essential counterpart to atomic layer deposition. As we enter the era of atomic-scale dimensions, there is need to unify the ALE field through increased effectiveness of collaboration between academia and industry, and to help enable the transition from lab to fab. With this in mind, this article provides defining criteria for ALE, along with clarification of some of the terminology and assumptions of this field. To increase understanding of the process, the mechanistic understanding is described for the silicon ALE case study, including the advantages of plasma-assisted processing. A historical overview spanning more than 25 years is provided for silicon, as well as ALE studies on oxides, III–V compounds, and other materials. Together, these processes encompass a variety of implementations, all following the same ALE principles. While the focus is on directional etching, isotropic ALE is also included. As part of this review, the authors also address the role of power pulsing as a predecessor to ALE and examine the outlook of ALE in the manufacturing of advanced semiconductor devices

  2. Analysis of layer-by-layer thin-film oxide growth using RHEED and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Eli; Sullivan, M. C.; Gutierrez-Llorente, Araceli; Joress, H.; Woll, A.; Brock, J. D.

    2015-03-01

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is commonly used as an in situ analysis tool for layer-by-layer thin-film growth. Atomic force microscopy is an equally common ex situ tool for analysis of the film surface, providing visual evidence of the surface morphology. During growth, the RHEED intensity oscillates as the film surface changes in roughness. It is often assumed that the maxima of the RHEED oscillations signify a complete layer, however, the oscillations in oxide systems can be misleading. Thus, using only the RHEED maxima is insufficient. X-ray reflectivity can also be used to analyze growth, as the intensity oscillates in phase with the smoothness of the surface. Using x-ray reflectivity to determine the thin film layer deposition, we grew three films where the x-ray and RHEED oscillations were nearly exactly out of phase and halted deposition at different points in the growth. Pre-growth and post-growth AFM images emphasize the fact that the maxima in RHEED are not a justification for determining layer completion. Work conducted at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) supported by NSF Awards DMR-1332208 and DMR-0936384 and the Cornell Center for Materials Research Shared Facilities are supported through DMR-1120296.

  3. Infrared active thermography for surface layer characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S.; Farcage, D.; Sortais, C.; Courtois, X.

    2006-05-01

    Deposited layer characterization was stated as the main goal of our studies for 2006. The investigations by DRFC/SIPP/GCFP (CEA Cadarache) were performed with the procedure of surface temperature measurements based on infrared thermography with synchronous demodulation (Lock-in Thermography). It was applied to provide the temperature surface monitoring during the modulated heating by illumination. The obtained 2D-cartography revealed the zones with a weak heat transfer resulting from a low layer/surface adhesion or poor layer thermal conductivity. The obtained lock-in cartography data should be regarded only as qualitative. For deposited layers characterization (layer depth, adhesion with the substrate), the active laser pyrometer measurements with the developed experimental device were made in LILM laboratory (CEA Saclay). Active surface pyrometry with repetitive laser heating can provide both qualitative and quantitative data on the first layer and the interface with the substrate. A 3D-numerical model of graphite deposited layer heating by a pulsed high repetition rate laser beam was developed to determine the heated surface temperature with a high temporal and spatial resolution. The theoretical data obtained with 3D-numerical model for surface heating were compared with the experimental results. It was demonstrated that for the given optical and thermo-physical parameters of materials, the theoretical temperatures may be fitted with the experimental results to assess certain unknown parameters of the layer (thermal contact resistance, diffusivity, thickness, porosity, ). Based on the comparison of the obtained experimental and theoretical results, the deposited layer characterization was made. The results of the investigations on Active Laser Pyrometry and Lock-in Thermography demonstrated that the methods can provide qualitative and quantitative data on the deposited layer and on the layer/substrate interface. The correlation and cross-check of the results

  4. Highly conductive epitaxial ZnO layers deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baji, Zs., E-mail: baji.zsofia@ttk.mta.hu [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Lábadi, Z.; Molnár, Gy.; Pécz, B. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Vad, K. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001, Debrecen (Hungary); Horváth, Z.E. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Szabó, P.J. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Műegyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Nagata, T. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Volk, J. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-07-01

    The possibility of depositing conductive epitaxial layers with atomic layer deposition has been examined. Epitaxial ZnO layers were grown on GaN and doped with Al. The resistivity of the epitaxial layers is between 0.6 and 2 * 10{sup −4} Ω cm with both the mobilities and the carrier concentrations being very high. The source of the high carrier concentration was found to be a combination of Al and Ga doping, the latter resulted by Ga atoms diffusing into the ZnO from the GaN substrate. - Highlights: • High-quality epitaxial ZnO layers were deposited with ALD on GaN above 270 °C. • In the Al-doped layers, domains with different orientations also appear. • Lower-temperature epitaxy is possible with an epitaxial seed layer. • The conductivity of the epitaxial layers is between 0.6 and 2 * 10{sup −4} Ω cm. • The high carrier concentration is resulted by the Ga and Al doping.

  5. Antireflective conducting nanostructures with an atomic layer deposited an AlZnO layer on a transparent substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun-Woo; Ji, Seungmuk; Herdini, Diptya Suci; Lim, Hyuneui; Park, Jin-Seong; Chung, Kwun-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We investigated the antireflective conducting nanostructures on a transparent substrate using atomic layer deposited AlZnO films. • The conformal AlZnO layer on a transparent nanostructured substrate exhibited 5.52 × 10 −4 Ω cm in resistivity and 88% in average visible transmittance. • The improvement of transparency was explained by the gradual changes of the refractive index in the film depth direction. • The decrease in electrical resistivity is strongly correlated to the increased surface area with the nanostructure and the change of chemical bonding states. - Abstract: The antireflective conducting nanostructures on a transparent substrate were shown to have enhanced optical and electrical properties via colloidal lithography and atomic layer deposition. The conformal AlZnO layer on a transparent nanostructured substrate exhibited 5.52 × 10 −4 Ω cm in resistivity and 88% in average visible transmittance, both of which were superior to those of a flat transparent conducting substrate. The improvement of transparency was explained by the gradual changes of the refractive index in the film depth direction. The decrease in electrical resistivity is strongly correlated to the increased surface area with the nanostructure and the change of chemical bonding states.

  6. Evidence for the Diffusion of Au Atoms into the Te UPD Layer Formed on a Au(111) Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Takahasi, Masamitu; Hojo, Nobuhiko; Miyake, Masao; Murase, Kuniaki; Tamura, Kazuhisa; Uosaki, Kohei; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2002-01-01

    The structure of a Te layer formed on a Au(111) substrate by underpotential deposition (UPD) in an electrolytic solution has been studied using in situ surface X-ray diffraction technique. The measurements were carried out for a series of samples which were kept at UPD potential for 4 to 59 h. The results revealed that the Te UPD layer is unstable. The top layer is analyzed to consist of the UPD Te atoms and Au atoms which diffuse from the Au(111) substrate. Also, the Te UPD layer does not ha...

  7. High throughput, low cost deposition of alumina passivation layers by spatial atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, A.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Gortzen, R.M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a gas phase deposition technique for depositing very high quality thin films with an unsurpassed conformality. The main drawback of ALD however is the very low deposition rate (~ 1 nm/min). Recently, record deposition rates for alumina of up to I nm/s were reached

  8. Surface-layer gusts for aircraft operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, G.S.; Kristensen, L.

    1992-01-01

    We use Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to extend the Kristensen et al. (1991) aviation gust estimation technique from the neutral to the diabatic surface layer. Example calculations demonstrate the importance of this correction. Simple stability class methods using only standard aviation surface ...

  9. Few-atomic-layered boron carbonitride nanosheets prepared by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Yu, Jie; Kuang, Shengyong; Xiao, Chang; Bai, Xuedong

    2012-01-07

    Few-atomic-layered boron carbonitride (BCN) nanosheets have been grown on Si substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of CH(4)-N(2)-H(2)-BF(3). The grown BCN nanosheets are oriented with their base planes perpendicular to the substrate surface. Ultrathin BCN nanosheets with thickness from 2 to a few atomic layers account for a considerable portion of the products, although many of them have more than 10 layers. Photoluminescence is measured for the BCN nanosheets and intense emission at 3.27 eV with very weak defect-related emission is observed for the nanosheets with the composition of B(0.38)C(0.27)N(0.35). The present BCN nanosheets are promising for applications in nanoelectronics, catalyst supports, gas adsorption, etc.

  10. Deposition of HgTe by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first instance of HgTe growth by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE). EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD), all of which are based on the growth...

  11. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  12. Phonon lineshapes in atom-surface scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez-Casado, R [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Sanz, A S; Miret-Artes, S [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-04

    Phonon lineshapes in atom-surface scattering are obtained from a simple stochastic model based on the so-called Caldeira-Leggett Hamiltonian. In this single-bath model, the excited phonon resulting from a creation or annihilation event is coupled to a thermal bath consisting of an infinite number of harmonic oscillators, namely the bath phonons. The diagonalization of the corresponding Hamiltonian leads to a renormalization of the phonon frequencies in terms of the phonon friction or damping coefficient. Moreover, when there are adsorbates on the surface, this single-bath model can be extended to a two-bath model accounting for the effect induced by the adsorbates on the phonon lineshapes as well as their corresponding lineshapes.

  13. The Growth of Gallium Nitride Films Via the Innovative Technique of Atomic Layer Epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    of excess incident atoms. Among the materials which have been deposited by ALE to date are ZnS, ZnSe, GaAs, AlI._Ga As, SnTe, GaP, SnO2 , A12 0 3...uppermost layer ,- of the film, excess incident atoms that do not form A-B bonds in the film are allowed to re-evaporate (by making use of the larger...were subsequently polished with 0.1 um diamond paste and then oxidized at 1200°C in flowing dry oxygen for 1.5 h to consume the 50 nm of surface which

  14. Atomic layer deposition of transparent semiconducting oxide CuCrO2 thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, T.S.; Niemelä, Janne-Petteri; Karppinen, Maarit

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vital gas-phase technique for atomic-level thickness-controlled deposition of high-quality thin films on various substrate morphologies owing to its self-limiting gas-surface reaction mechanism. Here we report the ALD fabrication of thin films of the semiconducting CuCrO2 oxide that is a highly prospective candidate for transparent electronics applications. In our process, copper 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate (Cu(thd)2) and chromium acetyl acetonate...

  15. Atomic Layer Deposition of zinc oxide for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, M.; Abou Chaaya, A.; Bechelany, M.; Miele, P.; Robin, Y.; Briot, O.

    2014-11-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase thin film deposition technique, performed at low substrate temperatures, which enables the deposition of extremely uniform thin films. This technique is scalable up to very large substrates, making it very interesting for industrial applications. On the other hand, ZnO, both undoped and aluminum doped is commonly used as a transparent electrode in solar cells based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and is usually deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition techniques. In this paper, we investigate the potential of ALD for the deposition of ZnO windows for solar cell applications. Thin films of a few hundreds of nanometers were grown by ALD, both undoped and doped with aluminum. They were studied by X-ray diffraction, electrical transport measurements, Atomic Force Microscopy and transmittance experiments.

  16. Mechanism of yttrium atom formation in electrothermal atomization from metallic and metal-carbide surfaces of a heated graphite atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, H.S.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanism of Y atom formation from pyrocoated graphite, tantalum and tungsten metal surfaces of a graphite tube atomizer has been studied and a mechanism for the formation for Y atoms is proposed for the first time. (author)

  17. Dynamic Modeling for the Design and Cyclic Operation of an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Travis, Curtisha; Adomaitis, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory-scale atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor system model is derived for alumina deposition using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Model components describing the precursor thermophysical properties, reactor-scale gas-phase dynamics and surface reaction kinetics derived from absolute reaction rate theory are integrated to simulate the complete reactor system. Limit-cycle solutions defining continuous cyclic ALD reactor operation are computed with a fixed point algorithm ...

  18. Self-excitation of Rydberg atoms at a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    field of the metal surface acts as an active device that supports sustained atomic dipole oscillations, which generate, in their turn, an electromagnetic field. This phenomenon does not exploit stimulated emission and therefore does not require population inversion in atoms. An experiment with Rydberg......The novel effect of self-excitation of an atomic beam propagating above a metal surface is predicted and a theory is developed. Its underlying mechanism is positive feedback provided by the reflective surface for the atomic polarization. Under certain conditions the atomic beam flying in the near...... atoms in which this effect should be most pronounced is proposed and the necessary estimates are given....

  19. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, David S.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The semiconducting materials used for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting must withstand the corrosive nature of the aqueous electrolyte over long time scales in order to be a viable option for large scale solar energy conversion. Here we demonstrate that atomic layer deposited titanium...... dioxide (TiO2) overlayers on silicon-based photocathodes generate extremely stable electrodes. These electrodes can produce an onset potential of +0.510 V vs. RHE and a hydrogen evolution saturation current of 22 mA cm−2 using the red part of the AM1.5 solar spectrum (λ > 635 nm, 38.6 mW cm−2). A PEC...

  20. Silicon protected with atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Tilley, S. David; Pedersen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that tuning the donor density of protective TiO2 layers on a photocathode has dramatic consequences for electronic conduction through TiO2 with implications for the stabilization of oxidation-sensitive catalysts on the surface. Vacuum annealing at 400 °C for 1 hour o...

  1. The surface roughness and planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, James W.

    1980-03-01

    Applications of the entrainment process to layers at the boundary, which meet the self similarity requirements of the logarithmic profile, have been studied. By accepting that turbulence has dominating scales related in scale length to the height above the surface, a layer structure is postulated wherein exchange is rapid enough to keep the layers internally uniform. The diffusion rate is then controlled by entrainment between layers. It has been shown that theoretical relationships derived on the basis of using a single layer of this type give quantitatively correct factors relating the turbulence, wind and shear stress for very rough surface conditions. For less rough surfaces, the surface boundary layer can be divided into several layers interacting by entrainment across each interface. This analysis leads to the following quantitatively correct formula compared to published measurements. 1 24_2004_Article_BF00877766_TeX2GIFE1.gif {σ _w }/{u^* } = ( {2/{9Aa}} )^{{1/4}} ( {1 - 3^{{1/2}{ a/k{d_n }/z{σ _w }/{u^* }z/L} )^{{1/4}} = 1.28(1 - 0.945({{σ _w }/{u^* }}}) {{z/L}})^{{1/4 where u^* = ( {{tau/ρ}}^{{1/2}}, σ w is the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, z is the height and L is the Obukhov scale lenght. The constants a, A, k and d n are the entrainment constant, the turbulence decay constant, Von Karman's constant, and the layer depth derived from the theory. Of these, a and A, are universal constants and not empirically determined for the boundary layer. Thus the turbulence needed for the plume model of convection, which resides above these layers and reaches to the inversion, is determined by the shear stress and the heat flux in the surface layers. This model applies to convection in cool air over a warm sea. The whole field is now determined except for the temperature of the air relative to the water, and the wind, which need a further parameter describing sea surface roughness. As a first stop to describing a surface where roughness elements

  2. Photoionization microscopy of hydrogen atom near a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hai-Feng; Wang Lei; Liu Xiao-Jun; Liu Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ionization of Rydberg hydrogen atom near a metal surface with a semiclassical analysis of photoionization microscopy. Interference patterns of the electron radial distribution are calculated at different scaled energies above the classical saddle point and at various atom—surface distances. We find that different types of trajectories contribute predominantly to different manifolds in a certain interference pattern. As the scaled energy increases, the structure of the interference pattern evolves smoothly and more types of trajectories emerge. As the atom approaches the metal surface closer, there are more types of trajectories contributing to the interference pattern as well. When the Rydberg atom comes very close to the metal surface or the scaled energy approaches the zero field ionization energy, the potential induced by the metal surface will make atomic system chaotic. The results also show that atoms near a metal surface exhibit similar properties like the atoms in the parallel electric and magnetic fields. (atomic and molecular physics)

  3. Layer-by-Layer Molecular Assemblies for Dye-Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cells Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Degao [Department; Sheridan, Matthew V. [Department; Shan, Bing [Department; Farnum, Byron H. [Department; Marquard, Seth L. [Department; Sherman, Benjamin D. [Department; Eberhart, Michael S. [Department; Nayak, Animesh [Department; Dares, Christopher J. [Department; Das, Atanu K. [Center; Bullock, R. Morris [Center; Meyer, Thomas J. [Department

    2017-08-30

    In a Dye Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cell (DSPEC) the relative orientation of catalyst and chromophore play important roles. Here we introduce a new, robust, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) procedure for the preparation of assemblies on wide bandgap semiconductors. In the procedure, phosphonated metal complex precursors react with metal ion bridging to an external chromophore or catalyst to give assemblies bridged by Al(III), Sn(IV), Ti(IV), or Zr(IV) metal oxide units as bridges. The procedure has been extended to chromophore-catalyst assemblies for water oxidation catalysis. A SnO2 bridged assembly on SnO2/TiO2 core/shell electrodes undergoes water splitting with an incident photon conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 17.1% at 440 nm. Reduction of water at a Ni(II)-based catalyst on NiO films has been shown to give H2. Compared to conventional solution-based procedures, the ALD approach offers significant advantages in scope and flexibility for the preparation of stable surface structures.

  4. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  6. Atomic Layer Deposition for the Modification and Creation of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Erinn Christine

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor-phase technique for the conformal deposition of material with sub-nanometer precision, making it an ideal process for modifying and even creating nanomaterials. The focus of this dissertation is the study of how ALD precursors interact with organic materials, namely polymers, to create selectively deposited nano-scale patterns and how ALD coatings modify biological responses to nanomaterials, namely carbon nanotubes (CNT), after inhalation. Nanoscale patterning is vital to the semiconductor industry. With features becoming smaller and more complex with each passing year, new techniques are required to meet the needs of the industry. The ability to selectively pattern a material onto a wafer is of particular interest for the replacement of costly etching steps. In the first half of this dissertation, a method for the selective deposition of nano-scale patterns is presented. Patterned polymers were used as sacrificial sponges to soak up ALD precursors for the creation of metal-oxide features. Meanwhile, deposition in areas without polymer was limited to the monolayer regime. Following infiltration, the saturated polymer was burned away and the precursor oxidized to form a metal oxide reproduction of the polymer pattern. Determining the reaction between the ALD precursor, trimethylaluminum, and polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), helped to achieve patterning by informing the proper selection of reactor temperature as well as exposure and purge times. Using this technique, features from tens of nanometers to tens of microns were patterned uniformly and simultaneously across a 150 mm wafer. Finally, this technique was extended to pattern two different materials using only one patterned polymer layer. ALD was first used to deposit a metal oxide were there was no polymer. By selecting ALD precursors that do not react within or on top of the polymer, selective deposition of the first material was achieved. Following this, the

  7. He atom-surface scattering: Surface dynamics of insulators, overlayers and crystal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory have focused on the surface structure and dynamics of ionic insulators and on epitaxial growth onto alkali halide crystals. In the later the homoepitaxial growth of NaCl/NaCl(001) and the heteroepitaxial growth of KBr/NaCl(001), NaCl/KBr(001) and KBr/RbCl(001) have been studied by monitoring the specular He scattering as a function of the coverage and by measuring the angular and energy distributions of the scattered He atoms. These data provide information on the surface structure, defect densities, island sizes and surface strain during the layer-by-layer growth. The temperature dependence of these measurements also provides information on the mobilities of the admolecules. He atom scattering is unique among surface probes because the low-energy, inert atoms are sensitive only to the electronic structure of the topmost surface layer and are equally applicable to all crystalline materials. It is proposed for the next year to exploit further the variety of combinations possible with the alkali halides in order to carry out a definitive study of epitaxial growth in the ionic insulators. The work completed so far, including measurements of the Bragg diffraction and surface dispersion at various stages of growth, appears to be exceptionally rich in detail, which is particularly promising for theoretical modeling. In addition, because epitaxial growth conditions over a wide range of lattice mismatches is possible with these materials, size effects in growth processes can be explored in great depth. Further, as some of the alkali halides have the CsCl structure instead of the NaCl structure, we can investigate the effects of the heteroepitaxy with materials having different lattice preferences. Finally, by using co-deposition of different alkali halides, one can investigate the formation and stability of alloys and even alkali halide superlattices

  8. Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Tobias G.; Fleurence, Antoine; Warner, Ben; Prüser, Henning; Friedlein, Rainer; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F.; Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko

    2017-06-01

    Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal that is formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. The 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting to the silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.

  9. Stripping scattering of fast atoms on surfaces of metal-oxide crystals and ultrathin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauth, David

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the present dissertation the interactions of fast atoms with surfaces of bulk oxides, metals and thin films on metals were studied. The experiments were performed in the regime of grazing incidence of atoms with energies of some keV. The advantage of this scattering geometry is the high surface sensibility and thus the possibility to determine the crystallographic and electronic characteristics of the topmost surface layer. In addition to these experiments, the energy loss and the electron emission induced by scattered projectiles was investigated. The energy for electron emission and exciton excitation on Alumina/NiAl(110) and SiO 2 /Mo(112) are determined. By detection of the number of projectile induced emitted electrons as function of azimuthal angle for the rotation of the target surface, the geometrical structure of atoms forming the topmost layer of different adsorbate films on metal surfaces where determined via ion beam triangulation. (orig.)

  10. Damage evaluation in graphene underlying atomic layer deposition dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Reckinger, Nicolas; Poncelet, Olivier; Louette, Pierre; Ureña, Ferran; Idrissi, Hosni; Turner, Stuart; Cabosart, Damien; Colomer, Jean-François; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Hackens, Benoit; Francis, Laurent A.

    2015-08-01

    Based on micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we study the structural damage incurred in monolayer (1L) and few-layer (FL) graphene subjected to atomic-layer deposition of HfO2 and Al2O3 upon different oxygen plasma power levels. We evaluate the damage level and the influence of the HfO2 thickness on graphene. The results indicate that in the case of Al2O3/graphene, whether 1L or FL graphene is strongly damaged under our process conditions. For the case of HfO2/graphene, μRS analysis clearly shows that FL graphene is less disordered than 1L graphene. In addition, the damage levels in FL graphene decrease with the number of layers. Moreover, the FL graphene damage is inversely proportional to the thickness of HfO2 film. Particularly, the bottom layer of twisted bilayer (t-2L) has the salient features of 1L graphene. Therefore, FL graphene allows for controlling/limiting the degree of defect during the PE-ALD HfO2 of dielectrics and could be a good starting material for building field effect transistors, sensors, touch screens and solar cells. Besides, the formation of Hf-C bonds may favor growing high-quality and uniform-coverage dielectric. HfO2 could be a suitable high-K gate dielectric with a scaling capability down to sub-5-nm for graphene-based transistors.

  11. Atomic layer deposited oxide films as protective interface layers for integrated graphene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, A.; Alexander-Webber, J. A.; Sagade, A. A.; Aria, A. I.; Braeuninger-Weimer, P.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Hofmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    The transfer of chemical vapour deposited graphene from its parent growth catalyst has become a bottleneck for many of its emerging applications. The sacrificial polymer layers that are typically deposited onto graphene for mechanical support during transfer are challenging to remove completely and hence leave graphene and subsequent device interfaces contaminated. Here, we report on the use of atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide films as protective interface and support layers during graphene transfer. The method avoids any direct contact of the graphene with polymers and through the use of thicker ALD layers (≥100 nm), polymers can be eliminated from the transfer-process altogether. The ALD film can be kept as a functional device layer, facilitating integrated device manufacturing. We demonstrate back-gated field effect devices based on single-layer graphene transferred with a protective Al2O3 film onto SiO2 that show significantly reduced charge trap and residual carrier densities. We critically discuss the advantages and challenges of processing graphene/ALD bilayer structures.

  12. Development of inverted organic solar cells with TiO₂ interface layer by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenhua; Jiang, Changyun; Zhu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) with inverted structure have attracted much attention in recent years because of their improved device air stability due to the use of stable materials for electrodes and interface layers. In this work, TiO(2) films, fabricated using low temperature (e.g., 130-170 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) on ITO substrates, are used as electron selective interface layers to investigate inverted OSCs. It is found that though the as-deposited TiO(2) films are high resistive due to the presence of oxygen defects, the defects can be significantly reduced by light soaking. PV cells with 15-nm-thick amorphous-TiO(2) layers fabricated at low temperature show better performance than those with poly crystal TiO(2) with same thickness deposited at 250 °C. The low temperature ALD-grown TiO(2) films are dense, stable and robust with capability of conformal coating on nanostructural surfaces, showing a promising interface layer for achieving air-stable plastic OSCs with roll-to-roll mass production potential.

  13. Dimensional crossover of electron weak localization in ZnO/TiOx stacked layers grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Misra, P.; Bhartiya, S.; Gupta, M.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the dimensional crossover of electron weak localization in ZnO/TiOx stacked layers having well-defined and spatially-localized Ti dopant profiles along film thickness. These films were grown by in situ incorporation of sub-monolayer TiOx on the growing ZnO film surface and subsequent overgrowth of thin conducting ZnO spacer layer using atomic layer deposition. Film thickness was varied in the range of ˜6-65 nm by vertically stacking different numbers (n = 1-7) of ZnO/TiOx layers of nearly identical dopant-profiles. The evolution of zero-field sheet resistance (R⊙) versus temperature with decreasing film thickness showed a metal to insulator transition. On the metallic side of the metal-insulator transition, R⊙(T) and magnetoresistance data were found to be well corroborated with the theoretical framework of electron weak localization in the diffusive transport regime. The temperature dependence of both R⊙ and inelastic scattering length provided strong evidence for a smooth crossover from 2D to 3D weak localization behaviour. Results of this study provide deeper insight into the electron transport in low-dimensional n-type ZnO/TiOx stacked layers which have potential applications in the field of transparent oxide electronics.

  14. Protective silicon coating for nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.; Wang, Y.H.; Zang, J.B.; Li, Y.N.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrathin silicon coating was deposited on nanodiamonds using atomic layer deposition (ALD) from gaseous monosilane (SiH 4 ). The coating was performed by sequential reaction of SiH 4 saturated adsorption and in situ decomposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structural and morphological properties of the coating. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to compare the thermal stability of nanodiamonds before and after silicon coating. The results confirmed that the deposited cubic phase silicon coating was even and continuous. The protective silicon coating could effectively improve the oxidation resistance of nanodiamonds in air flow, which facilitates the applications of nanodiamonds that are commonly hampered by their poor thermal stability

  15. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  16. Structure and stability of surface passivation layers on semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, George Jonathan

    The structure and stability of passivating layers on silicon surfaces have been examined on the molecular level using the methods of surface science. Hydrogen-terminated surfaces were prepared through wet chemical treatment with ammonium fluoride. The oxidation of these surfaces was studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), which showed that oxidation occurred through oxygen insertion in silicon backbonds, while the hydrogen termination remained intact. Oxygen was observed in both the surface layer and bulk layers, suggesting that initial oxidation was not restricted to layer-by-layer growth. Because the surface did oxidize with time, other passivating treatments, specifically self-assembled monolayers, were examined. The thermal stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized Si(100) was studied in vacuum. Using HREELS it was found that the monolayers were stable up to 740 K. Above that temperature, they began to decompose through cleavage of C-C bonds, resulting in a reduction in chain length. The thermal stability of alkyl monolayers, which form directly on silicon without requiring an oxide layer, was also examined. These monolayers were stable to 620 K, significantly lower than the alkylsiloxane monolayers. Desorption was accompanied by the appearance of Si-H bonds, suggesting that desorption took place through a hydrogen elimination reaction. The thermal behavior of these two different monolayers highlighted the importance of bonding between the surface and the chains. The bonding of alkylsiloxane monolayers was examined in more detail by forming them on both SiOsb2 and Sisb3Nsb4. It was found that cross linking between adjacent head groups was critical to the formation of high quality monolayers. Bonding between the chains and the surface was of secondary importance, but played a key role in the initial stages of growth, when nucleation occurred. The chemical stability of alkylsiloxane monolayers on oxidized silicon was also

  17. Microthermal Instrument for Measuring Surface Layer Seeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Bao; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Deng, Lin Hua; Xu, Guang

    2012-02-01

    Microthermal fluctuations are introduced by atmospheric turbulence very near the ground. In order to detect microthermal fluctuations at Fuxian Solar Observatory (FSO), a microthermal instrument has been developed. The microthermal instrument consists of a microthermal sensor, which is based on a Wheatstone bridge circuit and uses fine tungsten filaments as resistance temperature detectors, an associated signal processing unit, and a data collection, & communication subsystem. In this paper, after a brief introduction to surface layer seeing, we discuss the instrumentation behind the microthermal detector we have developed and then present the results obtained. The results of the evaluation indicate that the effect of the turbulent surface boundary layer to astronomical seeing would become sufficiently small when installing a telescope at a height of 16m or higher from the ground at FSO.

  18. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robert F; Weimer, Matthew S; Emery, Jonathan D; Hock, Adam S; Martinson, Alex B F

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 225 °C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low-temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150 °C, while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225 °C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  19. Oxygen-Free Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Robert F.; Weimer, Matthew S.; Emery, Jonathan D.; Hock, Adam S.; Martinson, Alex B. F.

    2014-08-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium sulfide (In2S3) films was achieved using a newly synthesized indium precursor and hydrogen sulfide. We obtain dense and adherent thin films free from halide and oxygen impurities. Self-limiting half-reactions are demonstrated at temperatures up to 200°C, where oriented crystalline thin films are obtained without further annealing. Low temperature growth of 0.89 Å/cycle is observed at 150°C while higher growth temperatures gradually reduce the per-cycle growth rate. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) together with depth-profiling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) reveal a S/In ratio of 1.5 with no detectable carbon, nitrogen, halogen, or oxygen impurities. The resistivity of thin films prior to air exposure decreases with increasing deposition temperature, reaching <1 ohm-cm for films deposited at 225°C. Hall measurements reveal n-type conductivity due to free electron concentrations up to 1018 cm-3 and mobilities of order 1 cm2/(V*s). The digital synthesis of In2S3 via ALD at temperatures up to 225°C may allow high quality thin films to be leveraged in optoelectronic devices including photovoltaic absorbers, buffer layers, and intermediate band materials.

  20. Nanoengineering and interfacial engineering of photovoltaics by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Jonathan R.; Pickrahn, Katie L.; Brennan, Thomas P.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2011-09-01

    Investment into photovoltaic (PV) research has accelerated over the past decade as concerns over energy security and carbon emissions have increased. The types of PV technology in which the research community is actively engaged are expanding as well. This review focuses on the burgeoning field of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for photovoltaics. ALD is a self-limiting thin film deposition technique that has demonstrated usefulness in virtually every sector of PV technology including silicon, thin film, tandem, organic, dye-sensitized, and next generation solar cells. Further, the specific applications are not limited. ALD films have been deposited on planar and nanostructured substrates and on inorganic and organic devices, and vary in thickness from a couple of angstroms to over 100 nm. The uses encompass absorber materials, buffer layers, passivating films, anti-recombination shells, and electrode modifiers. Within the last few years, the interest in ALD as a PV manufacturing technique has increased and the functions of ALD have expanded. ALD applications have yielded fundamental understanding of how devices operate and have led to increased efficiencies or to unique architectures for some technologies. This review also highlights new developments in high throughput ALD, which is necessary for commercialization. As the demands placed on materials for the next generation of PV become increasingly stringent, ALD will evolve into an even more important method for research and fabrication of solar cell devices.

  1. Measurements of electrostatic double layer potentials with atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamberardino, Jason

    The aim of this thesis is to provide a thorough description of the development of theory and experiment pertaining to the electrostatic double layer (EDL) in aqueous electrolytic systems. The EDL is an important physical element of many systems and its behavior has been of interest to scientists for many decades. Because many areas of science and engineering move to test, build, and understand systems at smaller and smaller scales, this work focuses on nanoscopic experimental investigations of the EDL. In that vein, atomic force microscopy (AFM) will be introduced and discussed as a tool for making high spatial resolution measurements of the solid-liquid interface, culminating in a description of the development of a method for completely characterizing the EDL. This thesis first explores, in a semi-historical fashion, the development of the various models and theories that are used to describe the electrostatic double layer. Later, various experimental techniques and ideas are addressed as ways to make measurements of interesting characteristics of the EDL. Finally, a newly developed approach to measuring the EDL system with AFM is introduced. This approach relies on both implementation of existing theoretical models with slight modifications as well as a unique experimental measurement scheme. The model proposed clears up previous ambiguities in definitions of various parameters pertaining to measurements of the EDL and also can be used to fully characterize the system in a way not yet demonstrated.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition of Bismuth Vanadates for Solar Energy Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefik, Morgan

    2016-07-07

    The fabrication of porous nanocomposites is key to the advancement of energy conversion and storage devices that interface with electrolytes. Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4 , is a promising oxide for solar water splitting where the controlled fabrication of BiVO4 layers within porous, conducting scaffolds has remained a challenge. Here, the atomic layer deposition of bismuth vanadates is reported from BiPh3 , vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide, and water. The resulting films have tunable stoichiometry and may be crystallized to form the photoactive scheelite structure of BiVO4 . A selective etching process was used with vanadium-rich depositions to enable the synthesis of phase-pure BiVO4 after spinodal decomposition. BiVO4 thin films were measured for photoelectrochemical performance under AM 1.5 illumination. The average photocurrents were 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode using a hole-scavenging sulfite electrolyte. The capability to deposit conformal bismuth vanadates will enable a new generation of nanocomposite architectures for solar water splitting. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Simulations of atomic trajectories near a dielectric surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, N P; Alton, D J; Kimble, H J, E-mail: hjkimble@caltech.edu [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    We present a semiclassical model of an atom moving in the evanescent field of a microtoroidal resonator. Atoms falling through whispering-gallery modes can achieve strong, coherent coupling with the cavity at distances of approximately 100 nm from the surface; in this regime, surface-induced Casmir-Polder level shifts become significant for atomic motion and detection. Atomic transit events detected in recent experiments are analyzed with our simulation, which is extended to consider atom trapping in the evanescent field of a microtoroid.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  6. Atomic Layer Deposition to Enable the Production, Optimization and Protection of Spaceflight Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a cost effective nano-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign...

  7. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Atomic layer deposited high-k dielectric on graphene by functionalization through atmospheric plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong Woo; Kang, Myung Hoon; Oh, Seongkook; Yang, Byung Chan; Seong, Kwonil; Ahn, Hyo-Sok; Lee, Tae Hoon; An, Jihwan

    2018-05-01

    Atomic layer-deposited (ALD) dielectric films on graphene usually show noncontinuous and rough morphology owing to the inert surface of graphene. Here, we demonstrate the deposition of thin and uniform ALD ZrO2 films with no seed layer on chemical vapor-deposited graphene functionalized by atmospheric oxygen plasma treatment. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the ALD ZrO2 films were highly crystalline, despite a low ALD temperature of 150 °C. The ALD ZrO2 film served as an effective passivation layer for graphene, which was shown by negative shifts in the Dirac voltage and the enhanced air stability of graphene field-effect transistors after ALD of ZrO2. The ALD ZrO2 film on the functionalized graphene may find use in flexible graphene electronics and biosensors owing to its low process temperature and its capacity to improve device performance and stability.

  9. Soft-landing deposition of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurens, C.R; Rosu, M.F; Pleiter, F; Niesen, L

    1999-01-01

    We present a method to deposit a wide range of radioactive probe atoms on surfaces, without introducing lattice damage or contaminating the surface with other elements or isotopes. In this method, the probe atoms are mass-separated using an isotope separa-tor, decelerated to 5 eV, and directly

  10. Ionic double layer of atomically flat gold formed on mica templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilcott, Terry C.; Wong, Elicia L.S.; Coster, Hans G.L.; Coster, Adelle C.F.; James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy characterisations of gold surfaces formed on mica templates in contact with potassium chloride electrolytes were performed at the electric potential of zero charge over a frequency range of 6 x 10 -3 to 100 x 10 3 Hz. They revealed constant-phase-angle (CPA) behaviour with a frequency exponent value of 0.96 for surfaces that were also characterised as atomically flat using atomic force microscopy (AFM). As the frequency exponent value was only marginally less than unity, the CPA behaviour yielded a realistic estimate for the capacitance of the ionic double layer. The retention of the CPA behaviour was attributed to specific adsorption of chloride ions which was detected as an adsorption conductance element in parallel with the CPA impedance element. Significant variations in the ionic double layer capacitance as well as the adsorption conductance were observed for electrolyte concentrations ranging from 33 μM to 100 mM, but neither of these variations correlated with concentration. This is consistent with the electrical properties of the interface deriving principally from the inner or Stern region of the double layer.

  11. CMUTs with High-K Atomic Layer Deposition Dielectric Material Insulation Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Toby; Tekes, Coskun; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2014-01-01

    Use of high-κ dielectric, atomic layer deposition (ALD) materials as an insulation layer material for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) is investigated. The effect of insulation layer material and thickness on CMUT performance is evaluated using a simple parallel plate model. The model shows that both high dielectric constant and the electrical breakdown strength are important for the dielectric material, and significant performance improvement can be achieved, especially as the vacuum gap thickness is reduced. In particular, ALD hafnium oxide (HfO2) is evaluated and used as an improvement over plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride (SixNy) for CMUTs fabricated by a low-temperature, complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistor-compatible, sacrificial release method. Relevant properties of ALD HfO2 such as dielectric constant and breakdown strength are characterized to further guide CMUT design. Experiments are performed on parallel fabricated test CMUTs with 50-nm gap and 16.5-MHz center frequency to measure and compare pressure output and receive sensitivity for 200-nm PECVD SixNy and 100-nm HfO2 insulation layers. Results for this particular design show a 6-dB improvement in receiver output with the collapse voltage reduced by one-half; while in transmit mode, half the input voltage is needed to achieve the same maximum output pressure. PMID:25474786

  12. Scattering of atomic and molecular ions from single crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoest, J.M. van.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis deals with analysis of crystal surfaces of Cu, Ag and Fe with Low Energy Ion scattering Spectroscopy (LEIS). Different atomic and molecular ions with fixed energies below 7 keV are scattered by a metal single crystal (with adsorbates). The energy and direction of the scattered particles are analysed for different selected charge states. In that way information can be obtained concerning the composition and atomic and electronic structure of the single crystal surface. Energy spectra contain information on the composition of the surface, while structural atomic information is obtained by direction measurements (photograms). In Ch.1 a description is given of the experimental equipment, in Ch.2 a characterization of the LEIS method. Ch.3 deals with the neutralization of keV-ions in surface scattering. Two different ways of data interpretation are presented. First a model is treated in which the observed directional dependence of neutralization action of the first atom layer of the surface is presented by a laterally varying thickness of the neutralizing layer. Secondly it is shown that the data can be reproduced by a more realistic, physical model based on atomic transition matrix elements. In Ch.4 the low energy hydrogen scattering is described. The study of the dissociation of H 2 + at an Ag surface r0230ted in a model based on electronic dissociation, initialized by electron capture into a repulsive (molecular) state. In Ch.5 finally the method is applied to the investigation of the surface structure of oxidized Fe. (Auth.)

  13. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    The micro direct methanol fuel cell (µDMFC) has been proposed as a candidate to power portable applications. The device can operate at room temperature on inexpensive, energy-dense methanol fuel, and it can be easily "recharged" by fuel refilling. Microfabrication techniques could be one route...... for the realization of such tiny devices. It is a mature technology, suitable for mass production, where versatile structuring is available at the micro and nano regime. Carbon black supported catalysts synthesized by wet chemistry methods are not readily applicable for standard microfabrication techniques. Atomic...... on the sample surface. Its unique growth characteristic enables conformal and uniform lms of controlled thickness and composition. In certain conditions ALD commences by island growth, resulting in discrete nanoparticle formation, which is generally preferred for catalytic applications. Pt-Ru is the best...

  14. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  15. Use of surface area computations to describe atom-atom interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Cruz, X; Calvo, M

    2001-06-01

    Accessible surface (ASA) and atomic contact (ACA) areas are powerful tools for protein structure analysis. However, their use for analysis purposes could be extended if a relationship between them and protein stability could be found. At present, this is the case only for ASAs, which have been used to assess the contribution of the hydrophobic effect to protein stability. In the present work we study whether there is a relationship between atomic contact areas and the free energy associated to atom-atom interactions. We utilise a model in which the contribution of atomic interactions to protein stability is expressed as a linear function of the accessible surface area buried between atom pairs. We assess the validity of this hypothesis, using a set of 124 lysozyme mutants (Matthews, 1995, Adv Protein Chem, 249-278) for which both the X-ray structure and the experimental stability are known. We tested this assumption for residue representations with increasing numbers of atom types. Our results indicate that for simple residue representations, with only 4 to 5 atom types, there is not a clear linear relationship between stability and buried accessible area. However, this relationship is observed for representations with 6 to 9 atom types, where gross heterogeneities in the atom type definition are eliminated. Finally, we also study a version of the linear model in which the atom- atom interactions are represented utilising a simple function for the buried accessible area, which may be useful for protein structure prediction studies.

  16. Electron Scattering at Surfaces of Epitaxial Metal Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jasmeet Singh

    In the field of electron transport in metal films and wires, the 'size effect' refers to the increase in the resistivity of the films and wires as their critical dimensions (thickness of film, width and height of wires) approach or become less than the electron mean free path lambda, which is, for example, 39 nm for bulk copper at room temperature. This size-effect is currently of great concern to the semiconductor industry because the continued downscaling of feature sizes has already lead to Cu interconnect wires in this size effect regime, with a reported 2.5 times higher resistivity for 40 nm wide Cu wires than for bulk Cu. Silver is a possible alternate material for interconnect wires and titanium nitride is proposed as a gate metal in novel field-effect-transistors. Therefore, it is important to develop an understanding of how the growth, the surface morphology, and the microstructure of ultrathin (few nanometers) Cu, Ag and TiN layers affect their electrical properties. This dissertation aims to advance the scientific knowledge of electron scattering at surfaces (external surfaces and grain boundaries), that are, the primary reasons for the size-effect in metal conductors. The effect of surface and grain boundary scattering on the resistivity of Cu thin films and nanowires is separately quantified using (i) in situ transport measurements on single-crystal, atomically smooth Cu(001) layers, (ii) textured polycrystalline Cu(111) layers and patterned wires with independently varying grain size, thickness and line width, and (iii) in situ grown interfaces including Cu-Ta, Cu-MgO, Cu-vacuum and Cu-oxygen. In addition, the electron surface scattering is also measured in situ for single-crystal Ag(001), (111) twinned epitaxial Ag(001), and single-crystal TiN(001) layers. Cu(001), Ag(001), and TiN(001) layers with a minimum continuous thickness of 4, 3.5 and 1.8 nm, respectively, are grown by ultra-high vacuum magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates with

  17. Surface atomic relaxation and magnetism on hydrogen-adsorbed Fe(110) surfaces from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chohan, Urslaan K.; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Koehler, Sven P.K., E-mail: sven.koehler@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, The University of Manchester, Moor Row CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Potential energy surfaces for H diffusion on Fe(110) calculated. • Full vibrational analysis of surface modes performed. • Vibrational analysis establishes lb site as a transition state to the 3f site. • Pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer. - Abstract: We have computed adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, surface relaxation and buckling for hydrogen adsorbed on a body-centred-cubic Fe(110) surface as a function of the degree of H coverage. This adsorption system is important in a variety of technological processes such as the hydrogen embrittlement in ferritic steels, which motivated this work, and the Haber–Bosch process. We employed spin-polarised density functional theory to optimise geometries of a six-layer Fe slab, followed by frozen mode finite displacement phonon calculations to compute Fe–H vibrational frequencies. We have found that the quasi-threefold (3f) site is the most stable adsorption site, with adsorption energies of ∼3.0 eV/H for all coverages studied. The long-bridge (lb) site, which is close in energy to the 3f site, is actually a transition state leading to the stable 3f site. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies collectively span from 730 to 1220 cm{sup −1}, for a range of coverages. The increased first-to-second layer spacing in the presence of adsorbed hydrogen, and the pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer, may facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into the bulk, and therefore impact the early stages of hydrogen embrittlement in steels.

  18. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Onoda, J.; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Apr (2017), 1-6, č. článku 15155. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC14-16963J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : AFM * DFT * electronegativity * surface science Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  19. Controlled Synthesis of Pd/Pt Core Shell Nanoparticles Using Area-selective Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kun; Zhu, Qianqian; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-02-16

    We report an atomic scale controllable synthesis of Pd/Pt core shell nanoparticles (NPs) via area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a modified surface. The method involves utilizing octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) to modify the surface. Take the usage of pinholes on SAMs as active sites for the initial core nucleation, and subsequent selective deposition of the second metal as the shell layer. Since new nucleation sites can be effectively blocked by surface ODTS SAMs in the second deposition stage, we demonstrate the successful growth of Pd/Pt and Pt/Pd NPs with uniform core shell structures and narrow size distribution. The size, shell thickness and composition of the NPs can be controlled precisely by varying the ALD cycles. Such core shell structures can be realized by using regular ALD recipes without special adjustment. This SAMs assisted area-selective ALD method of core shell structure fabrication greatly expands the applicability of ALD in fabricating novel structures and can be readily applied to the growth of NPs with other compositions.

  20. Epitaxial growth of barium titanate thin films on germanium via atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Edward L.; Posadas, Agham B.; Wu, Hsin Wei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-10-01

    Barium titanate BaTiO3 (BTO) thin films were epitaxially grown at 225 °C on 2 × 1-reconstructed Ge(001) surfaces via atomic layer deposition (ALD). Approximately 2 nm of BTO film was grown directly on Ge(001) as an amorphous film. Electron diffraction confirmed the epitaxy of the BTO films after post-deposition annealing at 650 °C. Additional BTO layers grown on the crystalline BTO/Ge(001) film were crystalline as-deposited. X-ray diffraction indicated that the epitaxial BTO films had a c-axis out-of-plane orientation, and the abrupt BTO/Ge interface was preserved with no sign of any interfacial germanium oxide. Scanning transmission electron microscopy provided evidence of Ba atoms occupying the troughs of the dimer rows of the 2 × 1-reconstructed Ge(001) surface, as well as preservation of the 2 × 1-reconstructed Ge(001) surface. This study presents a low-temperature process to fabricate BTO/Ge heterostructures.

  1. Continuous production of nanostructured particles using spatial atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ommen, J. Ruud van; Kooijman, Dirkjan; Niet, Mark de; Talebi, Mojgan; Goulas, Aristeidis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors demonstrate a novel spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) process based on pneumatic transport of nanoparticle agglomerates. Nanoclusters of platinum (Pt) of ∼1 nm diameter are deposited onto titania (TiO 2 ) P25 nanoparticles resulting to a continuous production of an active photocatalyst (0.12–0.31 wt. % of Pt) at a rate of about 1 g min −1 . Tuning the precursor injection velocity (10–40 m s −1 ) enhances the contact between the precursor and the pneumatically transported support flows. Decreasing the chemisorption temperature (from 250 to 100 °C) results in more uniform distribution of the Pt nanoclusters as it decreases the reaction rate as compared to the rate of diffusion into the nanoparticle agglomerates. Utilizing this photocatalyst in the oxidation reaction of Acid Blue 9 showed a factor of five increase of the photocatalytic activity compared to the native P25 nanoparticles. The use of spatial particle ALD can be further expanded to deposition of nanoclusters on porous, micron-sized particles and to the production of core–shell nanoparticles enabling the robust and scalable manufacturing of nanostructured powders for catalysis and other applications

  2. Gyroidal mesoporous multifunctional nanocomposites via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jörg G; Scherer, Maik R J; Steiner, Ullrich; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-08-07

    We demonstrate the preparation of rationally designed, multifunctional, monolithic and periodically ordered mesoporous core-shell nanocomposites with tunable structural characteristics. Three-dimensionally (3D) co-continuous gyroidal mesoporous polymer monoliths are fabricated from a solution-based triblock terpolymer-resol co-assembly and used as the functional templates for the fabrication of free-standing core-shell carbon-titania composites using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The deposition depth into the torturous gyroidal nanonetwork is investigated as a function of ALD conditions and the resulting composites are submitted to different thermal treatments. Results suggest that ALD can homogenously coat mesoporous templates with well defined pore sizes below 50 nm and thicknesses above 10 μm. Structural tunability like titania shell thickness and pore size control is demonstrated. The ordered nanocomposites exhibit triple functionality; a 3D continuous conductive carbon core that is coated with a crystalline titania shell that in turn is in contact with a 3D continuous mesopore network in a compact monolithic architecture. This materials design is of interest for applications including energy conversion and storage. Gyroidal mesoporous titania monoliths can be obtained through simultaneous titania crystallization and template removal in air.

  3. Atomization of Impinging Droplets on Superheated Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Preston; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Water droplets impinging smooth superheated surfaces may be characterized by dynamic vapor bubbles rising to the surface, popping, and causing a spray of tiny droplets to erupt from the droplet. This spray is called secondary atomization. Here, atomization is quantified experimentally for water droplets impinging superheated superhydrophobic surfaces. Smooth hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces with varying rib and post microstructuring were explored. Each surface was placed on an aluminum heating block, and impingement events were captured with a high speed camera at 3000 fps. For consistency among tests, all events were normalized by the maximum atomization found over a range of temperatures on a smooth hydrophobic surface. An estimate of the level of atomization during an impingement event was created by quantifying the volume of fluid present in the atomization spray. Droplet diameter and Weber number were held constant, and atomization was found for a range of temperatures through the lifetime of the impinging droplet. The Leidenfrost temperature was also determined and defined to be the lowest temperature at which atomization ceases to occur. Both atomization and Leidenfrost temperature increase with decreasing pitch (distance between microstructures).

  4. Multiple atomic scale solid surface interconnects for atom circuits and molecule logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachim, C; Martrou, D; Gauthier, S; Rezeq, M; Troadec, C; Jie Deng; Chandrasekhar, N

    2010-01-01

    The scientific and technical challenges involved in building the planar electrical connection of an atomic scale circuit to N electrodes (N > 2) are discussed. The practical, laboratory scale approach explored today to assemble a multi-access atomic scale precision interconnection machine is presented. Depending on the surface electronic properties of the targeted substrates, two types of machines are considered: on moderate surface band gap materials, scanning tunneling microscopy can be combined with scanning electron microscopy to provide an efficient navigation system, while on wide surface band gap materials, atomic force microscopy can be used in conjunction with optical microscopy. The size of the planar part of the circuit should be minimized on moderate band gap surfaces to avoid current leakage, while this requirement does not apply to wide band gap surfaces. These constraints impose different methods of connection, which are thoroughly discussed, in particular regarding the recent progress in single atom and molecule manipulations on a surface.

  5. Influence of titanium-substrate roughness on Ca–P–O thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananda Sagari, A.R., E-mail: arsagari@gmail.com [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Malm, Jari [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Rahkila, Paavo [Department of Biology of Physical Activity, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Hongqiang, Ma [Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 35 (L), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Putkonen, Matti [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Beneq Oy, P.O. Box 262, FI-01511 Vantaa (Finland); Karppinen, Maarit [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 16100, FI-00076 Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Whitlow, Harry J.; Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous Ca–P–O films were deposited on titanium substrates using atomic layer deposition, while maintaining a uniform Ca/P pulsing ratio of 6/1 with varying number of atomic layer deposition cycles starting from 10 up to 208. Prior to film deposition the titanium substrates were mechanically abraded using SiC abrasive paper of 600, 1200, 2000 grit size and polished with 3 μm diamond paste to obtain surface roughness R{sub rms} values of 0.31 μm, 0.26 μm, 0.16 μm, and 0.10 μm, respectively. The composition and film thickness of as-deposited amorphous films were studied using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The results showed that uniform films could be deposited on rough metal surfaces with a clear dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films. The in vitro cell-culture studies using MC3T3 mouse osteoblast showed a greater coverage of cells on the surface polished with diamond paste in comparison to rougher surfaces after 24 h culture. No statistically significant difference was observed between Ca–P–O coated and un-coated Ti surfaces for the measured roughness value. The deposited 50 nm thick films did not dissolve during the cell culture experiment. - Highlights: ► Atomic layer deposition of Ca–P–O films on abraded Ti substrate ► Surface analysis using Time-Of-Flight Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis ► Dependence of substrate roughness on the Ca/P atomic ratio of thin films ► An increase in Ca/P atomic ratio with decreasing roughness ► Mouse osteoblast showed greater coverage of cells in polished surface.

  6. Characteristics of layered tin disulfide deposited by atomic layer deposition with H2S annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungjin Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tin disulfide (SnS2 has attracted much attention as a two-dimensional (2D material. A high-quality, low-temperature process for producing 2D materials is required for future electronic devices. Here, we investigate tin disulfide (SnS2 layers deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD using tetrakis(dimethylaminotin (TDMASn as a Sn precursor and H2S gas as a sulfur source at low temperature (150° C. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved by H2S gas annealing. We carried out H2S gas annealing at various conditions (250° C, 300° C, 350° C, and using a three-step method. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS results revealed the valence state corresponding to Sn4+ and S2- in the SnS2 annealed with H2S gas. The SnS2 annealed with H2S gas had a hexagonal structure, as measured via X-ray diffraction (XRD and the clearly out-of-plane (A1g mode in Raman spectroscopy. The crystallinity of SnS2 was improved after H2S annealing and was confirmed using the XRD full-width at half-maximum (FWHM. In addition, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM images indicated a clear layered structure.

  7. Interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Vázquez, Gerardo; Magaña, Fernando; Sansores, Enrique

    2012-12-01

    It is known that graphene reacts with atomic hydrogen to form a hydrogenated sheet of graphene. In order to understand the nature of the interaction between hydrogen and lithium in hydrogenated samples, we have carried out first principle calculations. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster, and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom. It was found that a hydrogen atom is levitated from the graphene layer and absorbed into the cluster of Li at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, with a binding energy far exceeding that of the adsorption energy of a hydrogen atom on the graphene layer.

  8. Surface atomic relaxation and magnetism on hydrogen-adsorbed Fe(110) surfaces from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Urslaan K.; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique; Koehler, Sven P. K.

    2016-11-01

    We have computed adsorption energies, vibrational frequencies, surface relaxation and buckling for hydrogen adsorbed on a body-centred-cubic Fe(110) surface as a function of the degree of H coverage. This adsorption system is important in a variety of technological processes such as the hydrogen embrittlement in ferritic steels, which motivated this work, and the Haber-Bosch process. We employed spin-polarised density functional theory to optimise geometries of a six-layer Fe slab, followed by frozen mode finite displacement phonon calculations to compute Fe-H vibrational frequencies. We have found that the quasi-threefold (3f) site is the most stable adsorption site, with adsorption energies of ∼3.0 eV/H for all coverages studied. The long-bridge (lb) site, which is close in energy to the 3f site, is actually a transition state leading to the stable 3f site. The calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies collectively span from 730 to 1220 cm-1, for a range of coverages. The increased first-to-second layer spacing in the presence of adsorbed hydrogen, and the pronounced buckling observed in the Fe surface layer, may facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen atoms into the bulk, and therefore impact the early stages of hydrogen embrittlement in steels.

  9. Electric field sensing near the surface microstructure of an atom chip using cold Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. D. D.

    2013-05-01

    Rydberg atoms may enable hybrid systems that combine the benefits of gas-phase atoms with those of solid-state devices. However, these hybrid systems will require atoms to be located near a heterogeneous surface with exposed metal electrodes and dielectric insulators, which are sources of uncontrollable and unwanted electric fields. With this motivation, we have measured the electric fields near the heterogeneous metal-dielectric surface of an atom chip using cold Rydberg atoms. We have also developed a technique for reducing the influence of dc and low-frequency electric fields on Rydberg atom transitions, while retaining their sensitivity to high-frequency resonant fields. Work performed in collaboration with J. D. Carter, L. A. Jones, and O. Cherry and supported by NSERC.

  10. Sealing of hard CrN and DLC coatings with atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkönen, Emma; Kolev, Ivan; Díaz, Belén; Swiatowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe; Fenker, Martin; Toth, Lajos; Radnoczi, György; Vehkamäki, Marko; Ritala, Mikko

    2014-02-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that is based on alternating and saturating surface reactions of two or more gaseous precursors. The excellent conformality of ALD thin films can be exploited for sealing defects in coatings made by other techniques. Here the corrosion protection properties of hard CrN and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on low alloy steel were improved by ALD sealing with 50 nm thick layers consisting of Al2O3 and Ta2O5 nanolaminates or mixtures. In cross sectional images the ALD layers were found to follow the surface morphology of the CrN coatings uniformly. Furthermore, ALD growth into the pinholes of the CrN coating was verified. In electrochemical measurements the ALD sealing was found to decrease the current density of the CrN coated steel by over 2 orders of magnitude. The neutral salt spray (NSS) durability was also improved: on the best samples the appearance of corrosion spots was delayed from 2 to 168 h. On DLC coatings the adhesion of the ALD sealing layers was weaker, but still clear improvement in NSS durability was achieved indicating sealing of the pinholes.

  11. Study on the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Duan Rongliang; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1997-01-01

    The influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas chromatography (GC). Carbon monoxide adsorption on the oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy. The content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased and the atomic ratio (O/U) is decreased by 7.2%. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere after the surface reaction is increased by 11.0%. The investigation indicates that the surface layer can prevent the further oxidation uranium metal in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

  12. Stripping scattering of fast atoms on surfaces of metal-oxide crystals and ultrathin films; Streifende Streuung schneller Atome an Oberflaechen von Metalloxid-Kristallen und ultraduennen Filmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauth, David

    2010-03-11

    In the framework of the present dissertation the interactions of fast atoms with surfaces of bulk oxides, metals and thin films on metals were studied. The experiments were performed in the regime of grazing incidence of atoms with energies of some keV. The advantage of this scattering geometry is the high surface sensibility and thus the possibility to determine the crystallographic and electronic characteristics of the topmost surface layer. In addition to these experiments, the energy loss and the electron emission induced by scattered projectiles was investigated. The energy for electron emission and exciton excitation on Alumina/NiAl(110) and SiO{sub 2}/Mo(112) are determined. By detection of the number of projectile induced emitted electrons as function of azimuthal angle for the rotation of the target surface, the geometrical structure of atoms forming the topmost layer of different adsorbate films on metal surfaces where determined via ion beam triangulation. (orig.)

  13. Atomic layer deposition for photovoltaics: applications and prospects for solar cell manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Delft, J. A.; Garcia-Alonso, D.; Kessels, W. M. M.

    2012-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapour-phase deposition technique capable of depositing high quality, uniform and conformal thin films at relatively low temperatures. These outstanding properties can be employed to face processing challenges for various types of next-generation solar cells; hence, ALD for photovoltaics (PV) has attracted great interest in academic and industrial research in recent years. In this review, the recent progress of ALD layers applied to various solar cell concepts and their future prospects are discussed. Crystalline silicon (c-Si), copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) benefit from the application of ALD surface passivation layers, buffer layers and barrier layers, respectively. ALD films are also excellent moisture permeation barriers that have been successfully used to encapsulate flexible CIGS and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Furthermore, some emerging applications of the ALD method in solar cell research are reviewed. The potential of ALD for solar cells manufacturing is discussed, and the current status of high-throughput ALD equipment development is presented. ALD is on the verge of being introduced in the PV industry and it is expected that it will be part of the standard solar cell manufacturing equipment in the near future.

  14. Single atom self-diffusion on nickel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, R.T.; Graham, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a field ion microscope study of single atom self-diffusion on Ni(311), (331), (110), (111) and (100) planes are presented, including detailed information on the self-diffusion parameters on (311), (331), and (110) surfaces, and activation energies for diffusion on the (111), and (100) surfaces. Evidence is presented for the existence of two types of adsorption site and surface site geometry for single nickel atoms on the (111) surface. The presence of adsorbed hydrogen on the (110), (311), and (331) surfaces is shown to lower the onset temperature for self-diffusion on these planes. (orig.)

  15. Atomic forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions for surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Outlaw, R. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    The components of the physical forces between noble gas atoms, alkali ions, and halogen ions are analyzed and a data base developed from analysis of the two-body potential data, the alkali-halide molecular data, and the noble gas crystal and salt crystal data. A satisfactory global fit to this molecular and crystal data is then reproduced by the model to within several percent. Surface potentials are evaluated for noble gas atoms on noble gas surfaces and salt crystal surfaces with surface tension neglected. Within this context, the noble gas surface potentials on noble gas and salt crystals are considered to be accurate to within several percent.

  16. Surface analysis of topmost layer of epitaxial layered oxide thin film: Application to delafossite oxide for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kenji; Adachi, Hideaki; Miyata, Nobuhiro; Hinogami, Reiko; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2018-02-01

    Delafossite oxides (ABO2) have a layered structure with alternating layers of A and B elements, the topmost layer of which appears to determine their performance, such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity. In this study, we investigated the topmost layer of single-domain (0 0 1)-oriented AgCoO2 epitaxial thin film for potential use as an OER catalyst. The thin film was confirmed to possess OER activity at a level comparable to the catalyst in powder form. Atomic scattering spectroscopy revealed the topmost layer to be composed of CoO6 octahedra. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the oxidation of Co at the surface did not change under different potentials, which suggests that there is no valence fluctuation of Co in the stable CoO6 octahedral structure. However, the oxidation number of Co at the surface was lower than that in the bulk. Our density functional theoretical calculations also showed the Co atoms at the surface to have a slightly higher electron occupancy than those in the bulk, and suggests that the unoccupied t2g states of Co at the surface have an influence on OER activity.

  17. Atomic Structure of a Spinel-like Transition Al2O3 (100) Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Nørregaard; Meinander, Kristoffer; Helveg, Stig

    2014-01-01

    We study a crystalline epitaxial alumina thin film with the characteristics of a spinel-type transition Al2O3(100) surface by using atom-resolved noncontact atomic force microscopy and density functional theory. It is shown that the films are terminated by an Al-O layer rich in Al vacancies...

  18. Organic light emitting diode with surface modification layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basil, John D.; Bhandari, Abhinav; Buhay, Harry; Arbab, Mehran; Marietti, Gary J.

    2017-09-12

    An organic light emitting diode (10) includes a substrate (12) having a first surface (14) and a second surface (16), a first electrode (32), and a second electrode (38). An emissive layer (36) is located between the first electrode (32) and the second electrode (38). The organic light emitting diode (10) further includes a surface modification layer (18). The surface modification layer (18) includes a non-planar surface (30, 52).

  19. Numerical investigation of metal-semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor passivated hole contacts based on atomic layer deposited AlO x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Cangming; Xin, Zheng; Ling, Zhi Peng; Aberle, Armin G.; Stangl, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    Excellent c-Si tunnel layer surface passivation has been obtained recently in our lab, using atomic layer deposited aluminium oxide (ALD AlO x ) in the tunnel layer regime of 0.9 to 1.5 nm, investigated to be applied for contact passivation. Using the correspondingly measured interface properties, this paper compares the theoretical collection efficiency of a conventional metal-semiconductor (MS) contact on diffused p+ Si to a metal-semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (MSIS) contact on diffused p+ Si or on undoped n-type c-Si. The influences of (1) the tunnel layer passivation quality at the tunnel oxide interface (Q f and D it), (2) the tunnel layer thickness and the electron and hole tunnelling mass, (3) the tunnel oxide material, and (4) the semiconductor capping layer material properties are investigated numerically by evaluation of solar cell efficiency, open-circuit voltage, and fill factor.

  20. System for removing contaminated surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Kozo.

    1987-04-01

    The object of the present invention is to offer a new type of useful decontamination system, with which the contaminated surface layers can be removed effectively by injection of such solid microparticles. Liquid carbon dioxide is passed from a liquid carbon dioxide tank via the carbon dioxide supply line into the system for injecting solid carbon dioxide particles. Part of the liquid carbon dioxide introduced into the system is converted to solid carbon dioxide particles by the temperature drop resulting from adiabatic expansion in the carbon dioxide expansion space of the injection system. The solid carbon dioxide particles reach the injection nozzle, which is connected through the expansion space. The carbon dioxide microparticles are further cooled and accelerated by nitrogen gas injected from the nitrogen gas nozzle at the tip of the nitrogen gas supply line, which is connected to a liquid nitrogen tank. The cooled and accelerated solid carbon dioxide microparticles are injected from the injection nozzle for the solid carbon dioxide and directed against the contaminated surface to be cleaned, and, as a result, the surface contamination is removed

  1. Surface modification of passive iron by alkyl-phosphonic acid layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszternak, A. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Stichleutner, S. [Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, 1117 Budapest, Pazmany P. setany 1/a (Hungary); Felhosi, I.; Keresztes, Z. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary); Nagy, F.; Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A.; Homonnay, Z. [Research Group for Nuclear Methods in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, 1117 Budapest, Pazmany P. setany 1/a (Hungary); Peto, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary); Kalman, E. [Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1025 Budapest, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67 (Hungary)], E-mail: erika.kalman@chemres.hu

    2007-12-01

    Phosphonate layer formation on passive iron surface has been investigated by electrochemical, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Electrochemical methods revealed that the prepassivation of iron surface results in stabilization of the phosphonate layer exhibiting favorable corrosion resistance. The rate of anodic dissolution is continuously decreasing due to the time-dependent formation of a protective phosphonate layer. The large R{sub ct} values of 1-20 M{omega} cm{sup 2} indicate rather high blocking effect of metal dissolution by the phosphonate layer. The phosphonate layer formation has been also followed by the decrease of capacitance. CEMS investigations were carried out to evaluate the differences in the composition of the passive layer as a result of the phosphonate treatment. Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated the presence of iron phosphonate. Changes in morphology due to the phosphonate layer formation have been observed.

  2. Modeling noncontact atomic force microscopy resolution on corrugated surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Burson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Key developments in NC-AFM have generally involved atomically flat crystalline surfaces. However, many surfaces of technological interest are not atomically flat. We discuss the experimental difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images of rough surfaces, with amorphous SiO2 as a specific case. We develop a quasi-1-D minimal model for noncontact atomic force microscopy, based on van der Waals interactions between a spherical tip and the surface, explicitly accounting for the corrugated substrate (modeled as a sinusoid. The model results show an attenuation of the topographic contours by ~30% for tip distances within 5 Å of the surface. Results also indicate a deviation from the Hamaker force law for a sphere interacting with a flat surface.

  3. SASP - Symposium on atomic, cluster and surface physics '94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.D.; Schrittwieser, R.; Smith, D.

    1994-01-01

    This international symposium (Founding Chairman: W. Lindinger, Innsbruck) is one in a continuing biennial series of conferences which seeks to promote the growth of scientific knowledge and its effective exchange among scientists in the field of atomic, molecular, cluster and surface physics and related areas. The symposium deals in particular with interactions between ions, electrons, photons, atoms, molecules, and clusters and their interactions with surfaces. (author)

  4. The nanostructure and microstructure of SiC surface layers deposited by MWCVD and ECRCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dul, K.; Jonas, S.; Handke, B.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to investigate ex-situ the surface topography of SiC layers deposited on Si(100) by Microwave Chemical Vapour Deposition (MWCVD) -S1,S2 layers and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) - layers S3,S4, using silane, methane, and hydrogen. The effects of sample temperature and gas flow on the nanostructure and microstructure have been investigated. The nanostructure was described by three-dimensional surface roughness analysis based on digital image processing, which gives a tool to quantify different aspects of surface features. A total of 13 different numerical parameters used to describe the surface topography were used. The scanning electron image (SEM) of the microstructure of layers S1, S2, and S4 was similar, however, layer S3 was completely different; appearing like grains. Nonetheless, it can be seen that no grain boundary structure is present in the AFM images.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of NiO hole-transporting layers for polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chen; Su, Heng-Wei; Hou, Cheng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-09-01

    NiO is an attractive hole-transporting material for polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to its excellent stability and electrical/optical properties. This study demonstrates, for the first time, fabrication of uniform, defect-free, and conformal NiO ultra-thin films for use as hole-transporting layers (HTLs) in PSCs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) through optimization of the ALD processing parameters. The morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ALD NiO films were determined to be favorable for their HTL application. As a result, PSCs containing an ALD NiO HTL with an optimized thickness of 4 nm achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.4%, which was comparable to that of a control device with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) HTL. The high quality and manufacturing scalability of ALD NiO films demonstrated here will facilitate the adoption of NiO HTLs in PSCs.

  6. Interaction of slow and highly charged ions with surfaces: formation of hollow atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Grether, M.; Spieler, A.; Niemann, D. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany). Bereich Festkoerperphysik; Arnau, A.

    1997-03-01

    The method of Auger spectroscopy was used to study the interaction of highly charged ions with Al and C surfaces. The formation of hollow Ne atoms in the first surface layers was evaluated by means of a Density Functional theory including non-linear screening effects. The time-dependent filling of the hollow atom was determined from a cascade model yielding information about the structure of the K-Auger spectra. Variation of total intensities of the L- and K-Auger peaks were interpreted by the cascade model in terms of attenuation effects on the electrons in the solid. (author)

  7. Ion doping of surface layers in conducting electrical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukowski, P.; Karwat, Cz.; Kozak, Cz. M.; Kolasik, M.; Kiszczak, K.

    2009-01-01

    The presented article gives basic component elements of an implanter MKPCz-99, its parameters and methods for doping surface layers of conducting electrical materials. The discussed device makes possible to dope the materials with ions of gaseous elements. At the application of cones made of solid-element sheets it is possible to perform doping with atoms that do not chemically react with the modified material. By performing voltage drop measurements with a specialized circuit between a movable testing electrode and the modified sample the dependence of transition resistance on pressure force of the testing electrode on the sample can be determined. The testing can be performed at the current passage of a determined value for surfaces modified with ions of gaseous elements or atoms of solid elements. A computer stand for switch testing makes possible to measure temperature of switch contacts and voltage drop at the contact and thereby to determine contact resistance of a switch depending on the number of switch cycles (ON-OFF). Pattern recording of current and voltage at the switch contacts and the application of an adequate computer software makes possible to determined the value of energy between fixed and moving contacts at their getting apart. In order to eliminate action of the environment onto the switch operation measurements can be performed at placing the tested switch together with the driving system in an atmosphere of noble gas like argon. (authors)

  8. Characterization and modeling of atomic layer deposited high-density trench capacitors in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matters-Kammerer, M.K.; Jinesh, K.B.; Rijks, T.G.S.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Klootwijk, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed electrical analysis of multiple layer trench capacitors fabricated in silicon with atomic-layer-deposited Al 2O 3 and TiN is presented. It is shown that in situ ozone annealing of the Al 2O 3 layers prior to the TiN electrode deposition significantly improves the electric properties of

  9. Optimized Model Surfaces for Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Surface Nanobubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Zhou, Yi; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-11-01

    The formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of binary mixtures of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) and 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) on ultraflat template-stripped gold (TSG) surfaces was systematically investigated to clarify the assembly behavior, composition, and degree of possible phase segregation in light of atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of surface nanobubbles on these substrates. The data for SAMs on TSG were compared to those obtained by adsorption on rough evaporated gold, as reported in a previous study. Quartz crystal microbalance and surface plasmon resonance data acquired in situ on TSG indicate that similar to SAM formation on conventional evaporated gold substrates ODT and MHDA form monolayers and bilayers, respectively. The second layer on MHDA, whose formation is attributed to hydrogen bonding, can be easily removed by adequate rinsing with water. The favorable agreement of the grazing incidence reflection Fourier transform infrared (GIR FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle data analyzed with the Israelachvili-Gee model suggests that the binary SAMs do not segregate laterally. This conclusion is fully validated by high-resolution friction force AFM observations down to a length scale of 8-10 nm, which is much smaller than the typical observed surface nanobubble radii. Finally, correspondingly functionalized TSG substrates are shown to be valuable supports for studying surface nanobubbles by AFM in water and for addressing the relation between surface functionality and nanobubble formation and properties.

  10. The impact of atomization on the surface composition of spray-dried milk droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Martin; Gengenbach, Thomas; Woo, Meng Wai; Selomulya, Cordelia

    2016-04-01

    The dominant presence of fat at the surface of spray-dried milk powders has been widely reported in the literature and described as resulting in unfavourable powder properties. The mechanism(s) causing this phenomenon are yet to be clearly identified. A systematic investigation of the component distribution in atomized droplets and spray-dried particles consisting of model milk systems with different fat contents demonstrated that atomization strongly influences the final surface composition. Cryogenic flash-freezing of uniform droplets from a microfluidic jet nozzle directly after atomization helped to distinguish the influence of the atomization stage from the drying stage. It was confirmed that the overrepresentation of fat on the surface is independent of the atomization technique, including a pressure-swirl single-fluid spray nozzle and a pilot-scale rotary disk spray dryer commonly used in industry. It is proposed that during the atomization stage a disintegration mechanism along the oil-water interface of the fat globules causes the surface predominance of fat. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements detected the outermost fat layer and some adjacent protein present on both atomized droplets and spray-dried particles. Confocal laser scanning microscopy gave a qualitative insight into the protein and fat distribution throughout the cross-sections, and confirmed the presence of a fat film along the particle surface. The film remained on the surface in the subsequent drying stage, while protein accumulated underneath, driven by diffusion. The results demonstrated that atomization induces component segregation and fat-rich surfaces in spray-dried milk powders, and thus these cannot be prevented by adjusting the spray drying conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition of conformal nanostructured silver films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Chalker, Sophia; Sutcliffe, Christopher J.; Potter, Richard J., E-mail: rjpott@liverpool.ac.uk

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We grow metallic silver by direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition. • Highly conformal silver nanoparticle coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces. • An ALD temperature growth window between 123 and 128 °C is established. • ALD cycles provides sub nanometre control of silver growth. • Catalytic dehydrogenation ALD mechanism has been elucidated by in-situ QCM. - Abstract: The controlled deposition of ultra-thin conformal silver nanoparticle films is of interest for applications including anti-microbial surfaces, plasmonics, catalysts and sensors. While numerous techniques can produce silver nanoparticles, few are able to produce highly conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces, together with sub-nanometre control and scalability. Here we develop a self-limiting atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for the deposition of conformal metallic silver nanoparticle films. The films have been deposited using direct liquid injection ALD with ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) and propan-1-ol. An ALD temperature window between 123 and 128 °C is identified and within this range self-limiting growth is confirmed with a mass deposition rate of ∼17.5 ng/cm{sup 2}/cycle. The effects of temperature, precursor dose, co-reactant dose and cycle number on the deposition rate and on the properties of the films have been systematically investigated. Under self-limiting conditions, films are metallic silver with a nano-textured surface topography and nanoparticle size is dependent on the number of ALD cycles. The ALD reaction mechanisms have been elucidated using in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, showing chemisorption of the silver precursor, followed by heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of the alcohol to form metallic silver and an aldehyde.

  12. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  13. Analysis of arrayed nanocapacitor formed on nanorods by flow-rate interruption atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo-Cheng; Ku, Ching-Shun; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Chakroborty, Subhendu; Wu, Albert T.

    2017-12-01

    Flow-rate interruption (FRI) atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique was adopted to fabricate AZO/Al2O3/AZO thin film on a ZnO nanorod array template at low temperature. The high quality amorphous dielectric Al2O3 layer was deposited at 50 °C. The template with an average of 0.73 μm in length was made by a simple hydrothermal method on a c-plane sapphire with an AZO seed layer. Using Polystyrene (PS) microspheres were served as a mask to form vertical and well-aligned ZnO nanostructures. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show ALD to have achieved good step coverage and thickness control in the thin films structure coating. The capacitance density of the arrayed template nanocapacitor increased more than 100% than those of the thin film capacitor at an applied frequency of 10 kHz. These results suggest that the ZnO-arrayed template could enhance energy storage capability by providing significant surface area. This structure provides a concept for high surface-area nanocapacitor applications.

  14. Chromophore-Catalyst Assembly for Water Oxidation Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibabaei, Leila; Dillon, Robert J; Reilly, Caroline E; Brennaman, M Kyle; Wee, Kyung-Ryang; Marquard, Seth L; Papanikolas, John M; Meyer, Thomas J

    2017-11-08

    Visible-light-driven water splitting was investigated in a dye sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell (DSPEC) based on a photoanode with a phosphonic acid-derivatized donor-π-acceptor (D-π-A) organic chromophore, 1, and the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(bda)(4-O(CH 2 ) 3 P(O 3 H 2 ) 2 -pyr) 2 ], 2, (pyr = pyridine; bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate). The photoanode was prepared by using a layering strategy beginning with the organic dye anchored to an FTO|core/shell electrode, atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a thin layer (core/shell photoanodes, with either SnO 2 or nanoITO core materials, in acetate-buffered, aqueous solutions at pH 4.6 or 5.7. The absolute magnitudes of photocurrent changes with the core material, TiO 2 spacer layer thickness, or pH, observed photocurrents were 2.5-fold higher in the presence of catalyst. The results of transient absorption measurements and DFT calculations show that electron injection by the photoexcited organic dye is ultrafast promoted by electronic interactions enabled by orientation of the dye's molecular orbitals on the electrode surface. Rapid injection is followed by recombination with the oxidized dye which is 95% complete by 1.5 ns. Although chromophore decomposition limits the efficiency of the DSPEC devices toward O 2 production, the flexibility of the strategy presented here offers a new approach to photoanode design.

  15. Photodesorption of Na atoms from rough Na surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Gerlach, R.; Manson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the desorption of Na atoms from large Na clusters deposited on dielectric surfaces. High-resolution translational energy distributions of the desorbing atoms are determined by three independent methods, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence, as well as single-photon and resonance......-enhanced two-photon ionization techniques. Upon variation of surface temperature and for different substrates (mica vs lithium fluoride) clear non-Maxwellian time-of-flight distributions are observed with a cos θ angular dependence and most probable kinetic energies below that expected of atoms desorbing from...... atoms are scattered by surface vibrations. Recent experiments providing time constants for the decay of the optical excitations in the clusters support this model. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory indicates the importance of both absorption of the laser photons via direct excitation...

  16. Photodesorption of Na atoms from rough Na surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Gerlach, R.; Manson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    atoms are scattered by surface vibrations. Recent experiments providing time constants for the decay of the optical excitations in the clusters support this model. The excellent agreement between experiment and theory indicates the importance of both absorption of the laser photons via direct excitation......We investigate the desorption of Na atoms from large Na clusters deposited on dielectric surfaces. High-resolution translational energy distributions of the desorbing atoms are determined by three independent methods, two-photon laser-induced fluorescence, as well as single-photon and resonance......-enhanced two-photon ionization techniques. Upon variation of surface temperature and for different substrates (mica vs lithium fluoride) clear non-Maxwellian time-of-flight distributions are observed with a cos θ angular dependence and most probable kinetic energies below that expected of atoms desorbing from...

  17. Visualization of arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers by Raman mapping and atomic-resolution TEM

    KAUST Repository

    Cong, Chunxiao

    2013-02-01

    In-plane and out-of-plane arrangements of carbon atoms in graphene layers play critical roles in the fundamental physics and practical applications of these novel two-dimensional materials. Here, we report initial results on the edge/crystal orientations and stacking orders of bi-and tri-layer graphene (BLG and TLG) from Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments performed on the same sample. We introduce a new method of transferring graphene flakes onto a normal TEM grid. Using this novel method, we probed the BLG and TLG flakes that had been previously investigated by Raman scattering with high-resolution (atomic) TEM.

  18. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surfac...

  19. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  20. Recent Development of Advanced Electrode Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Wang, John

    2016-10-01

    Electrode materials play a decisive role in almost all electrochemical energy storage devices, determining their overall performance. Proper selection, design and fabrication of electrode materials have thus been regarded as one of the most critical steps in achieving high electrochemical energy storage performance. As an advanced nanotechnology for thin films and surfaces with conformal interfacial features and well controllable deposition thickness, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been successfully developed for deposition and surface modification of electrode materials, where there are considerable issues of interfacial and surface chemistry at atomic and nanometer scale. In addition, ALD has shown great potential in construction of novel nanostructured active materials that otherwise can be hardly obtained by other processing techniques, such as those solution-based processing and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. This review focuses on the recent development of ALD for the design and delivery of advanced electrode materials in electrochemical energy storage devices, where typical examples will be highlighted and analyzed, and the merits and challenges of ALD for applications in energy storage will also be discussed.

  1. Consequences of atomic layer etching on wafer scale uniformity in inductively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Chad M.; Lanham, Steven J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2018-04-01

    Atomic layer etching (ALE) typically divides the etching process into two self-limited reactions. One reaction passivates a single layer of material while the second preferentially removes the passivated layer. As such, under ideal conditions the wafer scale uniformity of ALE should be independent of the uniformity of the reactant fluxes onto the wafers, provided all surface reactions are saturated. The passivation and etch steps should individually asymptotically saturate after a characteristic fluence of reactants has been delivered to each site. In this paper, results from a computational investigation are discussed regarding the uniformity of ALE of Si in Cl2 containing inductively coupled plasmas when the reactant fluxes are both non-uniform and non-ideal. In the parameter space investigated for inductively coupled plasmas, the local etch rate for continuous processing was proportional to the ion flux. When operated with saturated conditions (that is, both ALE steps are allowed to self-terminate), the ALE process is less sensitive to non-uniformities in the incoming ion flux than continuous etching. Operating ALE in a sub-saturation regime resulted in less uniform etching. It was also found that ALE processing with saturated steps requires a larger total ion fluence than continuous etching to achieve the same etch depth. This condition may result in increased resist erosion and/or damage to stopping layers using ALE. While these results demonstrate that ALE provides increased etch depth uniformity, they do not show an improved critical dimension uniformity in all cases. These possible limitations to ALE processing, as well as increased processing time, will be part of the process optimization that includes the benefits of atomic resolution and improved uniformity.

  2. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition of MgO thin films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelista, S.; Mantovan, R.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Kutrzeba-Kotowska, B.; Spiga, S.; Fanciulli, M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) films have been grown by atomic layer deposition in the wide deposition temperature window of 80-350 °C by using bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium and H2O precursors. MgO thin films are deposited on both HF-last Si(1 0 0) and SiO2/Si substrates at a constant growth rate of ˜0.12 nm cycle-1. The structural, morphological and chemical properties of the synthesized MgO thin films are investigated by x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy measurements. MgO layers are characterized by sharp interface with the substrate and limited surface roughness, besides good chemical uniformity and polycrystalline structure for thickness above 7 nm. C-V measurements performed on Al/MgO/Si MOS capacitors, with MgO in the 4.6-11 nm thickness range, allow determining a dielectric constant (κ) ˜ 11. Co layers are grown by chemical vapour deposition in direct contact with MgO without vacuum-break (base pressure 10-5-10-6 Pa). The as-grown Co/MgO stacks show sharp interfaces and no elements interdiffusion among layers. C-V and I-V measurements have been conducted on Co/MgO/Si MOS capacitors. The dielectric properties of MgO are not influenced by the further process of Co deposition.

  3. Absorption and reflectivity of the lithium niobate surface masked with a graphene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Salas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed simulations of the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate utilizing density functional theory and molecular dynamics at 300K and atmospheric pressure. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed on the lithium niobate surface with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/(carbon-atom. Subsequently, the energy band structure, the optical absorption and reflectivity of the new system were calculated. We found important changes in these physical properties with respect to the corresponding ones of a graphene layer and of a lithium niobate crystal.

  4. Low energy atomic and molecular collision with graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bercu, M.; Grecu, V. V.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species of hydrogen with basal plane of graphite has been investigated by means of atomic cluster models of 10, 24 and 48 carbon atoms using Hartree-Fock - Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals (HF-LCAO) theory at the ab-initio and semiempirical level of approximation. The last approach was based on an original package developed for carbon clusters. Atomic migration between consecutive basal planes was described by cluster models of two sheets of carbon atoms. Our contribution presents the theoretical results about atomic and molecular interactions with graphite. It was found for H atom bonding energy the value 2.6 eV, using the largest cluster model. The migration of H atoms above the surface and between consecutive basal planes was simulated by extended calculations of potential energy in each point of a mesh containing 450 points describing a local surface of 0.25 nm 2 . A 3D interpolation approach gives the image of a hypersurface potential energy projection at a given distance to the graphite surface. The semi-quantitative results have indicated two significant facts related to atomic species migration. The first is that H atom has the smallest displacement barrier along C-C bonds at a distance of 1.3 A from the basal plane. In the case of absorbed atoms between graphite basal planes an almost free motion channel has been found parallel to the surface. The interaction potential barrier for H atom collision with graphite surface at the center of the carbon ring has been calculated neglecting surface vibration modes and found to be 5.9 eV . The hyperfine interaction between the electron of hydrogen and the proton has been taken as a measure of the interaction between the incident atom and the target local states. The isotropic hyperfine constant obtained at the level of the semiempiric calculations was found to be 402 Gs at the equilibrium position of H atom above a C atom at a distance of 1.3 A. The corresponding value

  5. Surface Adsorption in Nonpolarizable Atomic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Jonathan K; Joshi, Abhijeet A; Carlton, Rebecca J; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2014-12-09

    Many ionic solutions exhibit species-dependent properties, including surface tension and the salting-out of proteins. These effects may be loosely quantified in terms of the Hofmeister series, first identified in the context of protein solubility. Here, our interest is to develop atomistic models capable of capturing Hofmeister effects rigorously. Importantly, we aim to capture this dependence in computationally cheap "hard" ionic models, which do not exhibit dynamic polarization. To do this, we have performed an investigation detailing the effects of the water model on these properties. Though incredibly important, the role of water models in simulation of ionic solutions and biological systems is essentially unexplored. We quantify this via the ion-dependent surface attraction of the halide series (Cl, Br, I) and, in so doing, determine the relative importance of various hypothesized contributions to ionic surface free energies. Importantly, we demonstrate surface adsorption can result in hard ionic models combined with a thermodynamically accurate representation of the water molecule (TIP4Q). The effect observed in simulations of iodide is commensurate with previous calculations of the surface potential of mean force in rigid molecular dynamics and polarizable density-functional models. Our calculations are direct simulation evidence of the subtle but sensitive role of water thermodynamics in atomistic simulations.

  6. MoS2 solid-lubricating film fabricated by atomic layer deposition on Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yazhou; Liu, Lei; Lv, Jun; Yang, Junjie; Sha, Jingjie; Chen, Yunfei

    2018-04-01

    How to reduce friction for improving efficiency in the usage of energy is a constant challenge. Layered material like MoS2 has long been recognized as an effective surface lubricant. Due to low interfacial shear strengths, MoS2 is endowed with nominal frictional coefficient. In this work, MoS2 solid-lubricating film was directly grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on Si substrate using MoCl5 and H2S. Various methods were used to observe the grown MoS2 film. Moreover, nanotribological properties of the film were observed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Results show that MoS2 film can effectively reduce the friction force by about 30-45% under different loads, indicating the huge application value of the film as a solid lubricant. Besides the interlayer-interfaces-sliding, the smaller capillary is another reason why the grown MoS2 film has smaller friction force than that of Si.

  7. ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TITANIUM OXIDE THIN FILMS ONNANOPOROUS ALUMINA TEMPLATES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.

    2009-05-05

    Nanostructured materials may play a significant role in controlled release of pharmacologic agents for treatment of cancer. Many nanoporous polymer materials are inadequate for use in drug delivery. Nanoporous alumina provides several advantages over other materials for use in controlled drug delivery and other medical applications. Atomic layer deposition was used to coat all the surfaces of the nanoporous alumina membrane in order to reduce the pore size in a controlled manner. Both the 20 nm and 100 nm titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes did not exhibit statistically lower viability compared to the uncoated nanoporous alumina membrane control materials. In addition, 20 nm pore size titanium oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes exposed to ultraviolet light demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Nanostructured materials prepared using atomic layer deposition may be useful for delivering a pharmacologic agent at a precise rate to a specific location in the body. These materials may serve as the basis for 'smart' drug delivery devices, orthopedic implants, or self-sterilizing medical devices.

  8. Atomic Layer Co3O4Nanosheets: The Key to Knittable Zn-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Zhong, Cheng; Liu, Bin; Liu, Zhi; Bi, Xuanxuan; Zhao, Naiqing; Han, Xiaopeng; Deng, Yida; Lu, Jun; Hu, Wenbin

    2018-02-01

    Flexible, wearable, and portable energy storage devices with high-energy density are crucial for next-generation electronics. However, the current battery technologies such as lithium ion batteries have limited theoretical energy density. Additionally, battery materials with small scale and high flexibility which could endure the large surface stress are highly required. In this study, a yarn-based 1D Zn-air battery is designed, which employs atomic layer thin Co 3 O 4 nanosheets as the oxygen reduction reaction/oxygen evolution reaction catalyst. The ultrathin nanosheets are synthesized by a high-yield and facile chemical method and show a thickness of only 1.6 nm, corresponding to few atomic layers. The 1D Zn-air battery shows high cycling stability and high rate capability. The battery is successfully knitted into clothes and it shows high stability during the large deformation and knotting conditions. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Modular injector integrated linear apparatus with motion profile optimization for spatial atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Li, Yun; Lin, Jilong; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2017-11-01

    A spatial atomic layer deposition apparatus integrated with a modular injector and a linear motor has been designed. It consists of four parts: a precursor delivery manifold, a modular injector, a reaction zone, and a driving unit. An injector with multi-layer structured channels is designed to help improve precursor distribution homogeneity. During the back and forth movement of the substrate at high speed, the inertial impact caused by jerk and sudden changes of acceleration will degrade the film deposition quality. Such residual vibration caused by inertial impact will aggravate the fluctuation of the gap distance between the injector and the substrate in the deposition process. Thus, an S-curve motion profile is implemented to reduce the large inertial impact, and the maximum position error could be reduced by 84%. The microstructure of the film under the S-curve motion profile shows smaller root-mean-square and scanning voltage amplitude under an atomic force microscope, which verifies the effectiveness of the S-curve motion profile in reducing the residual vibration and stabilizing the gap distance between the injector and the substrate. The film deposition rate could reach 100 nm/min while maintaining good uniformity without obvious periodic patterns on the surface.

  10. Alkali-resistant low-temperature atomic-layer-deposited oxides for optical fiber sensor overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiel, K.; Dominik, M.; Ściślewska, I.; Kalisz, M.; Guziewicz, M.; Gołaszewska, K.; Niedziółka-Jonsson, J.; Bock, W. J.; Śmietana, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an investigation of properties of selected metallic oxides deposited at a low temperature (100 °C) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, relating to their applicability as thin overlays for optical fiber sensors resistant in alkaline environments. Hafnium oxide (Hf x O y with y/x approx. 2.70), tantalum oxide (Ta x O y with y/x approx. 2.75) and zirconium oxide (Zr x O y with y/x approx. 2.07), which deposition was based, respectively, on tetrakis(ethylmethyl)hafnium, tantalum pentachloride and tetrakis(ethylmethyl)zirconium with deionized water, were tested as thin layers on planar Si (100) and glass substrates. Growth per cycle (GPC) in the ALD processes was 0.133-0.150 nm/cycle. Run-to-run GPC reproducibility of the ALD processes was best for Hf x O y (0.145 ± 0.001 nm/cycle) and the poorest for Ta x O y (0.133 ± 0.003 nm/cycle). Refractive indices n of the layers were 2.00-2.10 (at the wavelength λ = 632 nm), with negligible k value (at λ for 240-930 nm). The oxides examined by x-ray diffractometry proved to be amorphous, with only small addition of crystalline phases for the Zr x O y . The surfaces of the oxides had grainy but smooth topographies with root-mean square roughness ˜0.5 nm (at 10 × 10 μm2 area) according to atomic force microscopy. Ellipsometric measurements, by contrast, suggest rougher surfaces for the Zr x O y layers. The surfaces were also slightly rougher on the glass-based samples than on the Si-based ones. Nanohardness and Young modules were 4.90-8.64 GPa and 83.7-104.4 GPa, respectively. The tests of scratch resistance revealed better tribological properties for the Hf x O y and the Ta x O y than for the Zr x O y . The surfaces were hydrophilic, with wetting angles of 52.5°-62.9°. The planar oxides on Si, being resistive even to concentrated alkali (pH 14), proved to be significantly more alkali-resistive than Al2O3. The Ta x O y overlay was deposited on long-period grating sensor induced in optical

  11. Antireflection Coatings for Strongly Curved Glass Lenses by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Pfeiffer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antireflection (AR coatings are indispensable in numerous optical applications and are increasingly demanded on highly curved optical components. In this work, optical thin films of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2 and Ta2O5 were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD, which is based on self-limiting surface reactions leading to a uniform film thickness on arbitrarily shaped surfaces. Al2O3/TiO2/SiO2 and Al2O3/Ta2O5/SiO2 AR coatings were successfully applied in the 400–750 nm and 400–700 nm spectral range, respectively. Less than 0.6% reflectance with an average of 0.3% has been measured on a fused silica hemispherical (half-ball lens with 4 mm diameter along the entire lens surface at 0° angle of incidence. The reflectance on a large B270 aspherical lens with height of 25 mm and diameter of 50 mm decreased to less than 1% with an average reflectance < 0.3%. The results demonstrate that ALD is a promising technology for deposition of uniform optical layers on strongly curved lenses without complex in situ thickness monitoring.

  12. Structure fragmentation of a surface layer of commercial purity titanium during ultrasonic impact treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozelskaya, Anna; Kazachenok, Marina; Sinyakova, Elena; Pochivalov, Yurii; Perevalova, Olga; Panin, Alexey; Hairullin, Rustam

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of surface layer fragmentation of titanium specimens subjected to ultrasonic impact treatment is investigated by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is shown that the twin boundaries Σ7b and Σ11b are unable to be strong obstacles for propagation of dislocations and other twins

  13. Angular behavior of the Berreman effect investigated in uniform Al2O3 layers formed by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarel, Giovanna; Na, Jeong-Seok; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-04-21

    Experimental transmission absorbance infrared spectra of γ-Al(2)O(3) showing evidence of the angular dependence of the peaks of surface modes appearing next to the longitudinal optical phonon frequency ω(LO) (the Berreman effect) are collected from heat-treated thin oxide films deposited with thickness uniformity on Si(100) using atomic layer deposition. The peak area of the most intense surface longitudinal optical mode is plotted versus the infrared beam incidence angle θ(0). The experimental points closely follow the sin(4)(θ(0)) function in a broad thickness range. The best match occurs at a critical thickness, where a linear relationship exists between the surface longitudinal optical mode intensity and film thickness. Simulations suggest that below the critical thickness the sin(4)(θ(0)) behavior can be explained by refraction phenomena at the air/thin film and thin film/substrate interfaces. Above the critical thickness, the experimentally obtained result is derived from field boundary conditions at the air/thin film interface. The sin(4)(θ(0)) functional trend breaks down far above the critical thickness. This picture indicates that infrared radiation has a limited penetration depth into the oxide film, similarly to electromagnetic waves in conductors. Consequently, surface longitudinal optical modes are viewed as bulk phonons excited down to the penetration depth of the infrared beam. Comparison with simulated data suggests that the infrared radiation absorptance of surface longitudinal optical modes tends to approach the sin(2)(θ(0)) trend. Reflection phenomena are considered to be the origin of the deviation from the sin(4)(θ(0)) trend related to refraction.

  14. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  15. Enhanced Kinetics of Electrochemical Hydrogen Uptake and Release by Palladium Powders Modified by Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David M; Tsang, Chu F; Sugar, Joshua D; Jagannathan, Kaushik; Robinson, David B; El Gabaly, Farid; Cappillino, Patrick J; Stickney, John L

    2017-05-31

    Electrochemical atomic layer deposition (E-ALD) is a method for the formation of nanofilms of materials, one atomic layer at a time. It uses the galvanic exchange of a less noble metal, deposited using underpotential deposition (UPD), to produce an atomic layer of a more noble element by reduction of its ions. This process is referred to as surface limited redox replacement and can be repeated in a cycle to grow thicker deposits. It was previously performed on nanoparticles and planar substrates. In the present report, E-ALD is applied for coating a submicron-sized powder substrate, making use of a new flow cell design. E-ALD is used to coat a Pd powder substrate with different thicknesses of Rh by exchanging it for Cu UPD. Cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate an increasing Rh coverage with increasing numbers of deposition cycles performed, in a manner consistent with the atomic layer deposition (ALD) mechanism. Cyclic voltammetry also indicated increased kinetics of H sorption and desorption in and out of the Pd powder with Rh present, relative to unmodified Pd.

  16. Dopant Distribution in Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO:Al Films Visualized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yizhi; Giddings, A Devin; Verheijen, Marcel A; Macco, Bart; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J; Roozeboom, Fred; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2018-02-27

    The maximum conductivity achievable in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is limited by the low doping efficiency of Al. To better understand the limiting factors for the doping efficiency, the three-dimensional distribution of Al atoms in the ZnO host material matrix has been examined on the atomic scale using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Although the Al distribution in ZnO films prepared by so-called "ALD supercycles" is often presented as atomically flat δ-doped layers, in reality a broadening of the Al-dopant layers is observed with a full-width-half-maximum of ∼2 nm. In addition, an enrichment of the Al at grain boundaries is observed. The low doping efficiency for local Al densities > ∼1 nm -3 can be ascribed to the Al solubility limit in ZnO and to the suppression of the ionization of Al dopants from adjacent Al donors.

  17. Dopant Distribution in Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO:Al Films Visualized by Transmission Electron Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The maximum conductivity achievable in Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is limited by the low doping efficiency of Al. To better understand the limiting factors for the doping efficiency, the three-dimensional distribution of Al atoms in the ZnO host material matrix has been examined on the atomic scale using a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Although the Al distribution in ZnO films prepared by so-called “ALD supercycles” is often presented as atomically flat δ-doped layers, in reality a broadening of the Al-dopant layers is observed with a full-width–half-maximum of ∼2 nm. In addition, an enrichment of the Al at grain boundaries is observed. The low doping efficiency for local Al densities > ∼1 nm–3 can be ascribed to the Al solubility limit in ZnO and to the suppression of the ionization of Al dopants from adjacent Al donors.

  18. Measurement of near neighbor separations of surface atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.I.

    Two techniques are being developed to measure the nearest neighbor distances of atoms at the surfaces of solids. Both measures extended fine structure in the excitation probability of core level electrons which are excited by an incident electron beam. This is an important problem because the structures of most surface systems are as yet unknown, even though the location of surface atoms is the basis for any quantitative understanding of the chemistry and physics of surfaces and interfaces. These methods would allow any laboratory to make in situ determinations of surface structure in conjunction with most other laboratory probes of surfaces. Each of these two techniques has different advantages; further, the combination of the two will increase confidence in the results by reducing systematic error in the data analysis

  19. Electron Beam-Induced Deposition for Atom Probe Tomography Specimen Capping Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, David R; Gorman, Brian P; Mulders, Johannes J L

    2017-04-01

    Six precursors were evaluated for use as in situ electron beam-induced deposition capping layers in the preparation of atom probe tomography specimens with a focus on near-surface features where some of the deposition is retained at the specimen apex. Specimens were prepared by deposition of each precursor onto silicon posts and shaped into sub-70-nm radii needles using a focused ion beam. The utility of the depositions was assessed using several criteria including composition and uniformity, evaporation behavior and evaporation fields, and depth of Ga+ ion penetration. Atom probe analyses through depositions of methyl cyclopentadienyl platinum trimethyl, palladium hexafluoroacetylacetonate, and dimethyl-gold-acetylacetonate [Me2Au(acac)] were all found to result in tip fracture at voltages exceeding 3 kV. Examination of the deposition using Me2Au(acac) plus flowing O2 was inconclusive due to evaporation of surface silicon from below the deposition under all analysis conditions. Dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co2(CO)8] and diiron nonacarbonyl [Fe2(CO)9] depositions were found to be effective as in situ capping materials for the silicon specimens. Their very different evaporation fields [36 V/nm for Co2(CO)8 and 21 V/nm for Fe2(CO)9] provide options for achieving reasonably close matching of the evaporation field between the capping material and many materials of interest.

  20. Synthesis and stabilization of supported metal catalysts by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junling; Elam, Jeffrey W; Stair, Peter C

    2013-08-20

    Supported metal nanoparticles are among the most important catalysts for many practical reactions, including petroleum refining, automobile exhaust treatment, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The catalytic performance strongly depends on the size, composition, and structure of the metal nanoparticles, as well as the underlying support. Scientists have used conventional synthesis methods including impregnation, ion exchange, and deposition-precipitation to control and tune these factors, to establish structure-performance relationships, and to develop better catalysts. Meanwhile, chemists have improved the stability of metal nanoparticles against sintering by the application of protective layers, such as polymers and oxides that encapsulate the metal particle. This often leads to decreased catalytic activity due to a lack of precise control over the thickness of the protective layer. A promising method of catalyst synthesis is atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a variation on chemical vapor deposition in which metals, oxides, and other materials are deposited on surfaces by a sequence of self-limiting reactions. The self-limiting character of these reactions makes it possible to achieve uniform deposits on high-surface-area porous solids. Therefore, design and synthesis of advanced catalysts on the nanoscale becomes possible through precise control over the structure and composition of the underlying support, the catalytic active sites, and the protective layer. In this Account, we describe our advances in the synthesis and stabilization of supported metal catalysts by ALD. After a short introduction to the technique of ALD, we show several strategies for metal catalyst synthesis by ALD that take advantage of its self-limiting feature. Monometallic and bimetallic catalysts with precise control over the metal particle size, composition, and structure were achieved by combining ALD sequences, surface treatments, and deposition temperature control. Next, we describe

  1. Electronic state of europium atoms on surface of oxidized tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The energy scheme of the europium atoms adsorption system on the tungsten surface, coated with the oxygen monolayer, is considered. The evaluations of the europium adatoms charged state on the oxidized tungsten surface are performed. It is established, that europium, adsorbed at the oxidized tungsten surface, is a positive ion with the charge close to the unit. The zonal scheme of the Eu-O/W adsorption system for the europium low and high concentrations is proposed

  2. Surface spectroscopy using inelastic scattering of He atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doak, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    A low energy (∼0 meV) neutral helium atomic beam has been scattered from crystal surfaces. Energy gain and face phonons may be measured by time-of-flight analysis of single phonon scattering dominates, allowing the frequency and wave vector of individual surface phonons to be determined and their dispersion relations plotted. Resonant interaction with bound states of the helium in the surface potential well is found to greatly affect the inelastic scattering cross-sections. 23 references, 27 figures

  3. Fabrication of AlN/BN bishell hollow nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haider, Ali; Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer; Biyikli, Necmi; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)/boron nitride (BN) bishell hollow nanofibers (HNFs) have been fabricated by successive atomic layer deposition (ALD) of AlN and sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of BN on electrospun polymeric nanofibrous template. A four-step fabrication process was utilized: (i) fabrication of polymeric (nylon 6,6) nanofibers via electrospinning, (ii) hollow cathode plasma-assisted ALD of AlN at 100 °C onto electrospun polymeric nanofibers, (iii) calcination at 500 °C for 2 h in order to remove the polymeric template, and (iv) sequential CVD growth of BN at 450 °C. AlN/BN HNFs have been characterized for their chemical composition, surface morphology, crystal structure, and internal nanostructure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Measurements confirmed the presence of crystalline hexagonal BN and AlN within the three dimensional (3D) network of bishell HNFs with relatively low impurity content. In contrast to the smooth surface of the inner AlN layer, outer BN coating showed a highly rough 3D morphology in the form of BN nano-needle crystallites. It is shown that the combination of electrospinning and plasma-assisted low-temperature ALD/CVD can produce highly controlled multi-layered bishell nitride ceramic hollow nanostructures. While electrospinning enables easy fabrication of nanofibrous template, self-limiting reactions of plasma-assisted ALD and sequential CVD provide control over the wall thicknesses of AlN and BN layers with sub-nanometer accuracy

  4. Nucleation and growth of copper selective-area atomic layer deposition on palladium nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, J; Zimmerman, D T; Weisel, G J; Willis, B G

    2017-10-21

    The nucleation and growth of copper atomic layer deposition (ALD) on palladium have been investigated for applications in nanoscale devices. Palladium nanostructures were fabricated by electron beam lithography and range in size from 250 nm to 5 μm, prepared on oxidized silicon wafers. Copper ALD using Cu(thd) 2 (s) and H 2 (g) as reactants was carried out to selectively deposit copper on palladium seeded regions to the exclusion of surrounding oxide surfaces. Nuclei sizes and densities have been quantified by scanning electron microscopy for different growth conditions. It is found that growth occurs via island growth at temperatures of 150-190 °C and alloy growth at temperatures above 210 °C. In the lower temperature window, nucleation density increases with decreasing temperature, reaching a maximum of 4.8 ± 0.2 × 10 9 /cm 2 at 150 °C, but growth is too slow for significant deposition at the lowest temperatures. At higher temperatures, individual nuclei cannot be quantified due to extensive mixing of copper and palladium layers. For the lower temperatures where nuclei can be quantified, rates of nucleation and growth are enhanced at high H 2 partial pressures. At the smallest length scales, conformality of the deposited over-layers is limited by a finite nuclei density and evolving grain structure that cause distortion of the original nanostructure shape during growth.

  5. Atomic-layer-deposition-assisted formation of carbon nanoflakes on metal oxides and energy storage application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Li, Xianglin; Cao, Xiehong; Fan, Yu; Xia, Xinhui; Pan, Guoxiang; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-01-29

    Nanostructured carbon is widely used in energy storage devices (e.g., Li-ion and Li-air batteries and supercapacitors). A new method is developed for the generation of carbon nanoflakes on various metal oxide nanostructures by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) and glucose carbonization. Various metal oxide@nanoflake carbon (MO@f-C) core-branch nanostructures are obtained. For the mechanism, it is proposed that the ALD Al2 O3 and glucose form a composite layer. Upon thermal annealing, the composite layer becomes fragmented and moves outward, accompanied by carbon deposition on the alumina skeleton. When tested as electrochemical supercapacitor electrode, the hierarchical MO@f-C nanostructures exhibit better properties compared with the pristine metal oxides or the carbon coating without ALD. The enhancement can be ascribed to increased specific surface areas and electric conductivity due to the carbon flake coating. This peculiar carbon coating method with the unique hierarchical nanostructure may provide a new insight into the preparation of 'oxides + carbon' hybrid electrode materials for energy storage applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  7. Uniform Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 on Graphene by Reversible Hydrogen Plasma Functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A novel method to form ultrathin, uniform Al2O3 layers on graphene using reversible hydrogen plasma functionalization followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. ALD on pristine graphene is known to be a challenge due to the absence of dangling bonds, leading to nonuniform film coverage. We show that hydrogen plasma functionalization of graphene leads to uniform ALD of closed Al2O3 films down to 8 nm in thickness. Hall measurements and Raman spectroscopy reveal that the hydrogen plasma functionalization is reversible upon Al2O3 ALD and subsequent annealing at 400 °C and in this way does not deteriorate the graphene’s charge carrier mobility. This is in contrast with oxygen plasma functionalization, which can lead to a uniform 5 nm thick closed film, but which is not reversible and leads to a reduction of the charge carrier mobility. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations attribute the uniform growth on both H2 and O2 plasma functionalized graphene to the enhanced adsorption of trimethylaluminum (TMA) on these surfaces. A DFT analysis of the possible reaction pathways for TMA precursor adsorption on hydrogenated graphene predicts a binding mechanism that cleans off the hydrogen functionalities from the surface, which explains the observed reversibility of the hydrogen plasma functionalization upon Al2O3 ALD. PMID:28405059

  8. Epitaxial Growth of Perovskite Strontium Titanate on Germanium via Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Edward L; Edmondson, Bryce I; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G

    2016-07-26

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a commercially utilized deposition method for electronic materials. ALD growth of thin films offers thickness control and conformality by taking advantage of self-limiting reactions between vapor-phase precursors and the growing film. Perovskite oxides present potential for next-generation electronic materials, but to-date have mostly been deposited by physical methods. This work outlines a method for depositing SrTiO3 (STO) on germanium using ALD. Germanium has higher carrier mobilities than silicon and therefore offers an alternative semiconductor material with faster device operation. This method takes advantage of the instability of germanium's native oxide by using thermal deoxidation to clean and reconstruct the Ge (001) surface to the 2×1 structure. 2-nm thick, amorphous STO is then deposited by ALD. The STO film is annealed under ultra-high vacuum and crystallizes on the reconstructed Ge surface. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used during this annealing step to monitor the STO crystallization. The thin, crystalline layer of STO acts as a template for subsequent growth of STO that is crystalline as-grown, as confirmed by RHEED. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to verify film stoichiometry before and after the annealing step, as well as after subsequent STO growth. This procedure provides framework for additional perovskite oxides to be deposited on semiconductors via chemical methods in addition to the integration of more sophisticated heterostructures already achievable by physical methods.

  9. Phosphorus atomic layer doping in SiGe using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Heinemann, Bernd; Murota, Junichi; Tillack, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe is investigated at temperatures between 100 °C to 600 °C using a single wafer reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition system. SiGe(100) surface is exposed to PH 3 at different PH 3 partial pressures by interrupting SiGe growth. The impact of the SiGe buffer/cap growth condition (total pressure/SiGe deposition precursors) on P adsorption, incorporation, and segregation are investigated. In the case of SiH 4 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, steeper P spikes due to lower segregation are observed by SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric (ATM) pressure compared with reduced pressure (RP). The steepness of P spike of ∼ 5.7 nm/dec is obtained for ATM pressure without reducing deposition temperature. This result may be due to the shift of equilibrium of P adsorption/desorption to desorption direction by higher H 2 pressure. Using Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system for SiGe cap deposition in RP, lowering the SiGe growth temperature is possible, resulting in higher P incorporation and steeper P profile due to reduced desorption and segregation. In the case of Si 2 H 6 -GeH 4 -H 2 gas system, the P dose could be simulated assuming a Langmuir-type kinetics model. Incorporated P shows high electrical activity, indicating P is adsorbed mostly in lattice position. - Highlights: • Phosphorus (P) atomic layer doping in SiGe (100) is investigated using CVD. • P adsorption is suppressed by the hydrogen termination of Ge surface. • By SiGe cap deposition at atmospheric pressure, P segregation was suppressed. • By using Si 2 H 6 -based SiGe cap, P segregation was also suppressed. • The P adsorption process is self-limited and follows Langmuir-type kinetics model

  10. Surface morphology study on CdZnTe crystals by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, M.; George, M.A.; Burger, A.; Collins, W.E.; Silberman, E. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The study of the crystal surface morphology of CdZnTe is important for the understanding of the fundamentals of crystal growth in order to improve the crystal quality which is essential in applications such as substrates for epitaxy or performance of devices, i.e., room temperature nuclear spectrometers. We present a first atomic force microscopy study on CdZnTe. Cleaved (110) surfaces were imaged in the ambient and an atomic layer step structure was revealed. The effects of thermal annealing on the atomic steps together with Te precipitation along these steps are discussed in terms of deformation due to stress relief and the diffusion of tellurium precipitates. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Al2O3 dielectric layers on H-terminated diamond: Controlling surface conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Koeck, Franz A.; Dutta, Maitreya; Wang, Xingye; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates how the surface conductivity of H-terminated diamond can be preserved and stabilized by using a dielectric layer with an in situ post-deposition treatment. Thin layers of Al2O3 were grown by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) on H-terminated undoped diamond (100) surfaces. The changes of the hole accumulation layer were monitored by correlating the binding energy of the diamond C 1s core level with electrical measurements. The initial PEALD of 1 nm Al2O3 resulted in an increase of the C 1s core level binding energy consistent with a reduction of the surface hole accumulation and a reduction of the surface conductivity. A hydrogen plasma step restored the C 1s binding energy to the value of the conductive surface, and the resistance of the diamond surface was found to be within the range for surface transfer doping. Further, the PEALD growth did not appear to degrade the surface conductive layer according to the position of the C 1s core level and electrical measurements. This work provides insight into the approaches to establish and control the two-dimensional hole-accumulation layer of the H-terminated diamond and improve the stability and performance of H-terminated diamond electronic devices.

  12. Classical theory of atom-surface scattering: The rainbow effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador; Pollak, Eli

    2012-07-01

    The scattering of heavy atoms and molecules from surfaces is oftentimes dominated by classical mechanics. A large body of experiments have gathered data on the angular distributions of the scattered species, their energy loss distribution, sticking probability, dependence on surface temperature and more. For many years these phenomena have been considered theoretically in the framework of the “washboard model” in which the interaction of the incident particle with the surface is described in terms of hard wall potentials. Although this class of models has helped in elucidating some of the features it left open many questions such as: true potentials are clearly not hard wall potentials, it does not provide a realistic framework for phonon scattering, and it cannot explain the incident angle and incident energy dependence of rainbow scattering, nor can it provide a consistent theory for sticking. In recent years we have been developing a classical perturbation theory approach which has provided new insight into the dynamics of atom-surface scattering. The theory includes both surface corrugation as well as interaction with surface phonons in terms of harmonic baths which are linearly coupled to the system coordinates. This model has been successful in elucidating many new features of rainbow scattering in terms of frictions and bath fluctuations or noise. It has also given new insight into the origins of asymmetry in atomic scattering from surfaces. New phenomena deduced from the theory include friction induced rainbows, energy loss rainbows, a theory of super-rainbows, and more. In this review we present the classical theory of atom-surface scattering as well as extensions and implications for semiclassical scattering and the further development of a quantum theory of surface scattering. Special emphasis is given to the inversion of scattering data into information on the particle-surface interactions.

  13. Multi-Directional Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Over Catalyst Film Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Kai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The structure of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs severely depends on the properties of pre-prepared catalyst films. Aiming for the preparation of precisely controlled catalyst film, atomic layer deposition (ALD was employed to deposit uniform Fe2O3 film for the growth of CNT arrays on planar substrate surfaces as well as the curved ones. Iron acetylacetonate and ozone were introduced into the reactor alternately as precursors to realize the formation of catalyst films. By varying the deposition cycles, uniform and smooth Fe2O3 catalyst films with different thicknesses were obtained on Si/SiO2 substrate, which supported the growth of highly oriented few-walled CNT arrays. Utilizing the advantage of ALD process in coating non-planar surfaces, uniform catalyst films can also be successfully deposited onto quartz fibers. Aligned few-walled CNTs can be grafted on the quartz fibers, and they self-organized into a leaf-shaped structure due to the curved surface morphology. The growth of aligned CNTs on non-planar surfaces holds promise in constructing hierarchical CNT architectures in future.

  14. Spatially separated atomic layer deposition of Al2O3, a new option for high-throughput Si solar cell passivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermang, B.; Werner, F.; Stals, W; Lorenz, A.; Rothschild, A.; Racz, A.; John, J.; Poortmans, J.; Mertens, R.; Gortzen, R.M.W.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Tiba, V.; Roozeboom, F.; Schmidt, J.

    2011-01-01

    A next generation material for surface passivation of crystalline Si is Al2O3. It has been shown that both thermal and plasma-assisted (PA) atomic layer deposition (ALD) A l2O3 provide an adequate level of surface passivation for both p- and n-type Si substrates. However, conventional time-resolved

  15. Theory of inelastic effects in resonant atom-surface scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    The progress of theoretical and experimental developments in atom-surface scattering is briefly reviewed. The formal theory of atom-surface resonant scattering is reviewed and expanded, with both S and T matrix approaches being explained. The two-potential formalism is shown to be useful for dealing with the problem in question. A detailed theory based on the S-matrix and the two-potential formalism is presented. This theory takes account of interactions between the incident atoms and the surface phonons, with resonant effects being displayed explicitly. The Debye-Waller attenuation is also studied. The case in which the atom-surface potential is divided into an attractive part V/sub a/ and a repulsive part V/sub r/ is considered at length. Several techniques are presented for handling the scattering due to V/sub r/, for the case in which V/sub r/ is taken to be the hard corrugated surface potential. The theory is used to calculate the scattered intensities for the system 4 He/LiF(001). A detailed comparison with experiment is made, with polar scans, azimuthal scans, and time-of-flight measurements being considered. The theory is seen to explain the location and signature of resonant features, and to provide reasonable overall agreement with the experimental results

  16. Effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvikorpi, Terhi; Vaehae-Nissi, Mika; Harlin, Ali; Marles, Jaana; Miikkulainen, Ville; Karppinen, Maarit

    2010-01-01

    The effect of corona pre-treatment on the performance of Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 gas barrier layers applied by atomic layer deposition onto polymer-coated paperboards was studied. Both polyethylene and polylactide coated paperboards were corona treated prior to ALD. Corona treatment increased surface energies of the paperboard substrates, and this effect was still observed after several days. Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 films were grown on top of the polymer coatings at temperature of 100 deg. C using the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. For SiO 2 depositions a new precursor, bis(diethylamido) silane, was used. The positive effect of the corona pre-treatment on the barrier properties of the polymer-coated paperboards with the ALD-grown layers was more significant with polyethylene coated paperboard and with thin deposited layers (shorter ALD process). SiO 2 performed similarly to Al 2 O 3 with the PE coated board when it comes to the oxygen barrier, while the performance of SiO 2 with the biopolymer-coated board was more moderate. The effect of corona pre-treatment was negligible or even negative with the biopolymer-coated board. The ALD film growth and the effect of corona treatment on different substrates require further investigation.

  17. Atomically-thin molecular layers for electrode modification of organic transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Yuseong; Kang, Boseok; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Sun-Guk; Lee, Joong-Hee; Cho, Kilwon; Ku, Bon-Cheol; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2015-08-01

    Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically enhanced the electrical performances of both p-type and n-type OFETs relative to the performances of OFETs prepared without the GO modification layer. Among the functionalized rGOs, CH3O-Ph-rGO yielded the highest hole mobility of 0.55 cm2 V-1 s-1 and electron mobility of 0.17 cm2 V-1 s-1 in p-type and n-type FETs, respectively. Two governing factors: (1) the work function of the modified electrodes and (2) the crystalline microstructures of the benchmark semiconductors grown on the modified electrode surface were systematically investigated to reveal the origin of the performance improvements. Our simple, inexpensive, and scalable electrode modification technique provides a significant step toward optimizing the device performance by engineering the semiconductor-electrode interfaces in OFETs.Atomically-thin molecular layers of aryl-functionalized graphene oxides (GOs) were used to modify the surface characteristics of source-drain electrodes to improve the performances of organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GOs were functionalized with various aryl diazonium salts, including 4-nitroaniline, 4-fluoroaniline, or 4-methoxyaniline, to produce several types of GOs with different surface functional groups (NO2-Ph-GO, F-Ph-GO, or CH3O-Ph-GO, respectively). The deposition of aryl-functionalized GOs or their reduced derivatives onto metal electrode surfaces dramatically

  18. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kuang Liao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new ”paradigm shift” non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD and chemical bath deposition (CBD as used by the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  19. Breakthrough to Non-Vacuum Deposition of Single-Crystal, Ultra-Thin, Homogeneous Nanoparticle Layers: A Better Alternative to Chemical Bath Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Kuang; Liu, Yung-Tsung; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Shen, Tien-Lin; Hsieh, Ming-Yang; Tzou, An-Jye; Chen, Shih-Chen; Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Chan, Sheng-Wen; Shen, Yen-Ping; Cheng, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Chen, Hao-Ming; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Charlton, Martin D B; Hsieh, Tung-Po; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-04-06

    Most thin-film techniques require a multiple vacuum process, and cannot produce high-coverage continuous thin films with the thickness of a few nanometers on rough surfaces. We present a new "paradigm shift" non-vacuum process to deposit high-quality, ultra-thin, single-crystal layers of coalesced sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable thickness down to a few nanometers, based on thermal decomposition. This provides high-coverage, homogeneous thickness, and large-area deposition over a rough surface, with little material loss or liquid chemical waste, and deposition rates of 10 nm/min. This technique can potentially replace conventional thin-film deposition methods, such as atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) as used by the Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) thin-film solar cell industry for decades. We demonstrate 32% improvement of CIGS thin-film solar cell efficiency in comparison to reference devices prepared by conventional CBD deposition method by depositing the ZnS NPs buffer layer using the new process. The new ZnS NPs layer allows reduction of an intrinsic ZnO layer, which can lead to severe shunt leakage in case of a CBD buffer layer. This leads to a 65% relative efficiency increase.

  20. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  1. Atomic structure of the adsorption of transition metals on silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocoletzi, G.H.; Takeuchi, N.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Solid state devices are useful for their high sensitivity in a small volume. Applications of such devices as dose materials include semi-conducting dose-rate, and dose-reading measuring devices. Transition metals (TM) have electronic and atomic properties similar to those of rare earth elements when they are adsorbed on silicon surfaces. The interfaces of transition metals silicides with Si (111) have very small lattice mismatches, sharp interfaces, and low Schottky barrier, making them ideal in electronic devices, such as infrared detectors and rectifying contacts. In this work we shall describe our first principles total energy calculations to investigate structural properties of bulk ScSi and YSi, the two dimensional arrangement of ScSi 2 and YSi 2 on the Si(111) surface, and the growth of a few layers of ScSi 1.7 and YSi 1.7 on the Si(111) surface. Our calculated bulk structural parameters are in excellent agreement with experimental values. It will be shown that one monolayer of a TM on Si( l l 1) yields a two dimensional phase with (lxl) periodicity consisting of a layer of TM atoms on T4 sites and a Si bilayer on top. This double layer of Si atoms is very close to ideal Si(111)-(1x1) surface, but rotated 180 with respect to the rest of the crystal. More layers of TM silicide epitaxially grown on Si(l 11) result in a hexagonal structure similar to bulk ScSi2 and YSi2: graphite-like Si planes (with vacancies) intercalated with TM planes, and forming a (√3x√3) arrangement with a ScSi 1.7 and YSi 1.7 stoichiometry. The top Si layer does not contain vacancies and it does not present a graphite-like structure, but forms a bilayer arrangement as in bulk Si. (Author)

  2. Atomic structure of the adsorption of transition metals on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocoletzi, G.H. [IF-BUAP, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Takeuchi, N. [CCMC-UNAM, Ensenada, BCN (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Solid state devices are useful for their high sensitivity in a small volume. Applications of such devices as dose materials include semi-conducting dose-rate, and dose-reading measuring devices. Transition metals (TM) have electronic and atomic properties similar to those of rare earth elements when they are adsorbed on silicon surfaces. The interfaces of transition metals silicides with Si (111) have very small lattice mismatches, sharp interfaces, and low Schottky barrier, making them ideal in electronic devices, such as infrared detectors and rectifying contacts. In this work we shall describe our first principles total energy calculations to investigate structural properties of bulk ScSi and YSi, the two dimensional arrangement of ScSi{sub 2} and YSi{sub 2} on the Si(111) surface, and the growth of a few layers of ScSi{sub 1.7} and YSi{sub 1.7} on the Si(111) surface. Our calculated bulk structural parameters are in excellent agreement with experimental values. It will be shown that one monolayer of a TM on Si( l l 1) yields a two dimensional phase with (lxl) periodicity consisting of a layer of TM atoms on T4 sites and a Si bilayer on top. This double layer of Si atoms is very close to ideal Si(111)-(1x1) surface, but rotated 180 with respect to the rest of the crystal. More layers of TM silicide epitaxially grown on Si(l 11) result in a hexagonal structure similar to bulk ScSi2 and YSi2: graphite-like Si planes (with vacancies) intercalated with TM planes, and forming a ({radical}3x{radical}3) arrangement with a ScSi{sub 1.7} and YSi{sub 1.7} stoichiometry. The top Si layer does not contain vacancies and it does not present a graphite-like structure, but forms a bilayer arrangement as in bulk Si. (Author)

  3. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1999-08-11

    Aug 11, 1999 ... This paper discusses the observations of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) parameters dur- ing the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999. Intensive surface layer experiments were conducted at. Ahmedabad (23◦21 N, 72◦36 E), the western part of India, which was close to the totality path. This rare event ...

  4. Surface structure investigations using noncontact atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, J.J.; Such, B.; Goryl, M.; Krok, F.; Piatkowski, P.; Szymonski, M.

    2006-01-01

    Surfaces of several A III B V compound semiconductors (InSb, GaAs, InP, InAs) of the (0 0 1) orientation have been studied with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Obtained atomically resolved patterns have been compared with structural models available in the literature. It is shown that NC-AFM is an efficient tool for imaging complex surface structures in real space. It is also demonstrated that the recent structural models of III-V compound surfaces provide a sound base for interpretation of majority of features present in recorded patterns. However, there are also many new findings revealed by the NC-AFM method that is still new experimental technique in the context of surface structure determination

  5. Formation of biocompatible surface layers depending on the sputtering distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasakina, E. O.; Seregin, A. V.; Baikin, A. S.; Kaplan, M. A.; Konushkin, S. V.; Sergiyenko, K. V.; Kovaleva, E. D.; Kolmakova, A. A.; Leonov, A. V.; Sevost'yanov, M. A.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Simakov, S. V.

    2017-05-01

    Nano- and micro-dimensional surface layers of silver and tantalum on flat and wire NiTi substrates by the method of magnetron sputtering in vacuum were produced. The structure and composition of the samples were determined using SEM and Auger spectroscopy. With an increase in the sputtering distance, the thickness of the surface layers decreases, and the thickness of the transition layer and the dependence of the thickness change as a whole depend on the nature of the sputtered substance.

  6. Contact mechanics for layered materials with randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2012-03-07

    The contact mechanics model of Persson is applied to layered materials. We calculate the M function, which relates the surface stress to the surface displacement, for a layered material, where the top layer (thickness d) has different elastic properties than the semi-infinite solid below. Numerical results for the contact area as a function of the magnification are presented for several cases. As an application, we calculate the fluid leak rate for laminated rubber seals.

  7. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-09-01

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm-2 increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  8. ATOMIC POSITIONS ON OXYGEN-COVERED CU(110) SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DORENBOS, G; BREEMAN, M; BOERMA, DO

    The reconstructed Cu(110)-p(2 x 1)O and Cu(110)-c(6 x 2)O surfaces were studied using low-energy ion scattering combined with time of flight. Azimuthal scans were measured with 6 keV Ar ions for recoiling O, scattered Ar and recoiling Cu atoms. Part of the scans were analysed using a newly developed

  9. Tribological Properties of Nanometric Atomic Layer Depositions Applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomic Layer Deposition ( ALD is a modern technique that Allows to deposit nanometric, conformal coatings on almost any kind of substrates, from plastics to ceramic, metals or even composites. ALD coatings are not dependent on the morphology of the substrate and are only regulated by the composition of the precursors, the chamber temperature and the number of cycles. In this work, mono- and bi -layer nanometric, protective low-temperature ALD Coatings, based on Al2O3 and TiO2 were applied on AISI 420 Stainless Steel in orderto enhance its relatively low corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments. Tribological testing were also performed on the ALD coated AISI 420 in order to evaluate the wear and scratch resistance of these nanometric layers and thus evaluate their durability. Scratch tests were performed using a standard Rockwell C indenter, under a variable load condition, in order to evaluate the critical loading condition for each coating. Wear testing were performed using a stainless steel counterpart, in ball-on-discconfiguration, in order to measure the friction coefficient and wear to confront the resistance. All scratch tests scars and wear tracks were then observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM in order to understand the wear mechanisms that occurred on the sample surfaces. Corrosion testing, performed under immersion in 0.2 M NaCl solutions, clearly showed that the ALD coatings have a strong effect in protecting the Stainless Steel Substrate against corrosion, reducing the corrosion current density by two orders of magnitude.Tribological The preliminary results showed that ALD depositions obtained at low Temperatures have a brittle behavior caused by the amorphous nature of their structure, and thus undergo delamination phenomena during Scratch Testing at relatively low applied loads. During ball-on-disc testing, the coatings were removed from the substrate, in particular for monolayer ALD configurations

  10. Atomic Layer Deposited Thin Films for Dielectrics, Semiconductor Passivation, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Runshen

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) utilizes sequential precursor gas pulses to deposit one monolayer or sub-monolayer of material per cycle based on its self-limiting surface reaction, which offers advantages, such as precise thickness control, thickness uniformity, and conformality. ALD is a powerful means of fabricating nanoscale features in future nanoelectronics, such as contemporary sub-45 nm metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors, photovoltaic cells, near- and far-infrared detectors, and intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. High dielectric constant, kappa, materials have been recognized to be promising candidates to replace traditional SiO2 and SiON, because they enable good scalability of sub-45 nm MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) without inducing additional power consumption and heat dissipation. In addition to high dielectric constant, high-kappa materials must meet a number of other requirements, such as low leakage current, high mobility, good thermal and structure stability with Si to withstand high-temperature source-drain activation annealing. In this thesis, atomic layer deposited Er2O3 doped TiO2 is studied and proposed as a thermally stable amorphous high-kappa dielectric on Si substrate. The stabilization of TiO2 in its amorphous state is found to achieve a high permittivity of 36, a hysteresis voltage of less than 10 mV, and a low leakage current density of 10-8 A/cm-2 at -1 MV/cm. In III-V semiconductors, issues including unsatisfied dangling bonds and native oxides often result in inferior surface quality that yields non-negligible leakage currents and degrades the long-term performance of devices. The traditional means for passivating the surface of III-V semiconductors are based on the use of sulfide solutions; however, that only offers good protection against oxidation for a short-term (i.e., one day). In this work, in order to improve the chemical passivation efficacy of III-V semiconductors

  11. Atomic layer deposition of copper thin film and feasibility of deposition on inner walls of waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuqing, XIONG; Hengjiao, GAO; Ni, REN; Zhongwei, LIU

    2018-03-01

    Copper thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition at low temperature, using copper(I)-N,N‧-di-sec-butylacetamidinate as a precursor and hydrogen as a reductive gas. The influence of temperature, plasma power, mode of plasma, and pulse time, on the deposition rate of copper thin film, the purity of the film and the step coverage were studied. The feasibility of copper film deposition on the inner wall of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic waveguide with high aspect ratio was also studied. The morphology and composition of the thin film were studied by atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The square resistance of the thin film was also tested by a four-probe technique. On the basis of on-line diagnosis, a growth mechanism of copper thin film was put forward, and it was considered that surface functional group played an important role in the process of nucleation and in determining the properties of thin films. A high density of plasma and high free-radical content were helpful for the deposition of copper thin films.

  12. Direct Measurements of Half-Cycle Reaction Heats during Atomic Layer Deposition by Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lownsbury, James M. [Department; Gladden, James A. [Department; Campbell, Charles T. [Department; Department; Kim, In Soo [Materials; Martinson, Alex B. F. [Materials

    2017-10-05

    We introduce a new high-temperature adsorption calorimeter that approaches the ideal limit of a heat detector whereby the signal at any time is proportional to the heat power being delivered to the sample and prove its sensitivity for measuring pulse-to-pulse heats of half-reactions during atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 400 K. The heat dynamics of amorphous Al2O3 growth via sequential self-limiting surface reaction of trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O is clearly resolved. Calibration enables quantitation of the exothermic TMA and H2O half-reactions with high precision, -343 kJ/mol TMA and -251 kJ/mol H2O, respectively. A time resolution better than 1 ms is demonstrated, allowing for the deconvolution of at least two distinct surface reactions during TMA microdosing. It is further demonstrated that this method can provide the heat of reaction versus extent of reaction during each precursors half-reaction, thus providing even richer mechanistic information on the surface processes involved. The broad applicability of this novel calorimeter is demonstrated through excellent signal-to-noise ratios of less exothermic ALD half-reactions to produce TiO2 and MnO.

  13. Improvement of carrier diffusion length in silicon nanowire arrays using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Yuya; Yamada, Akira; Ohta, Yoshimi; Niwa, Yusuke; Hirota, Masaki

    2013-08-01

    To achieve a high-efficiency silicon nanowire (SiNW) solar cell, surface passivation technique is very important because a SiNW array has a large surface area. We successfully prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) high-quality aluminum oxide (Al2O3) film for passivation on the whole surface of the SiNW arrays. The minority carrier lifetime of the Al2O3-depositedSiNW arrays with bulk silicon substrate was improved to 27 μs at the optimum annealing condition. To remove the effect of bulk silicon, the effective diffusion length of minority carriers in the SiNW array was estimated by simple equations and a device simulator. As a result, it was revealed that the effective diffusion length in the SiNW arrays increased from 3.25 to 13.5 μm by depositing Al2O3 and post-annealing at 400°C. This improvement of the diffusion length is very important for application to solar cells, and Al2O3 deposited by ALD is a promising passivation material for a structure with high aspect ratio such as SiNW arrays.

  14. Al2O3 on WSe2 by ozone based atomic layer deposition: Nucleation and interface study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcatl, Angelica; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J.; Wallace, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the atomic layer deposition process using ozone and trimethylaluminum (TMA) for the deposition of Al2O3 films on WSe2 was investigated. It was found that the ozone-based atomic layer deposition enhanced the nucleation of Al2O3 in comparison to the water/TMA process. In addition, the chemistry at the Al2O3/WSe2 interface and the surface morphology of the Al2O3 films exhibited a dependence on the deposition temperature. A non-covalent functionalizing effect of ozone on WSe2 at low deposition temperatures 30 °C was identified which prevented the formation of pinholes in the Al2O3 films. These findings aim to provide an approach to obtain high-quality gate dielectrics on WSe2 for two-dimensional transistor applications.

  15. Assessment of WRF Surface Layer Formulations Over a Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P.; Sharan, M.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate and efficient estimation of surface turbulent fluxes is crucial to predict an adequate atmospheric evolution by atmospheric models. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, which is used to compute these fluxes in numerical models, utilizes the empirical stability correction functions. In the present study, impact of various functional forms of similarity functions on the computation of the surface fluxes under both unstable and stable stratification is analyzed. In addition, this study compares two surface layer parametrization schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting model over Ranchi (India). The model is run with three nested domains at a high resolution (1 Km) for `five' 4-day periods covering 15 days of Premonsoon season. The two surface layer schemes chosen for the analysis includes MM5 surface layer scheme having Businger-Dyer similarity functions, and revised MM5 scheme utilizing the functions those are valid for full ranges of atmospheric stabilities. The five planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes are selected to assess the influence of the surface layer schemes on the structure of the boundary layer. The schemes are- Asymmetric Convective Model Version 2 (ACM2), Bougeault-Lacarrere (Boulac), Medium Range Forecast (MRF), Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN), and Yonsei University (YSU) PBL schemes. The impact of surface layer parametrizations on the near surface diagnostic variables is analyzed and results are compared with the observations.The bias in the 2 m temperature (T2) and 10 m wind speed (U) across the PBL schemes is very small and each PBL scheme is able to reproduce the diurnal variation of T2 irrespective of the surface layer scheme used for the simulations. A relatively higher value nocturnal T2 is predicted with the revised MM5 surface layer scheme as compared to that obtained with the old MM5 scheme, while both the surface layer schemes reproduce almost similar T2 during convective conditions. However, compare to the

  16. Highly reproducible planar Sb2S3-sensitized solar cells based on atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    KimThese Two Authors Have Equally Contributed To This Work., Dae-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ju; Park, Mi Sun; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk; Sung, Shi-Joon

    2014-11-01

    A high-quality Sb2S3 thin-absorber with controllable thickness was reproducibly formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Compared with conventional chemical bath deposition (CBD), the Sb2S3 absorber deposited by ALD did not contain oxide or oxygen impurities and showed a very uniform thickness of Sb2S3 absorbers formed on a rough surface of dense blocking TiO2/F-doped SnO2 (bl-TiO2/FTO) substrate. The planar ALD-Sb2S3 solar cells comprised of Au/Poly-3-hexylthiophene/ALD-Sb2S3/bl-TiO2/FTO showed significantly improved power conversion efficiency of 5.77% at 1 sun condition and narrow efficiency deviation, whereas the planar CBD-Sb2S3 solar cells exhibited 2.17% power conversion efficiency. The high efficiency and good reproducibility of ALD-Sb2S3 solar cell devices is attributed to reduced backward recombination because of the inhibition of oxide defects within ALD-Sb2S3 absorber and the conformal deposition of very uniform Sb2S3 absorbers on the blocking TiO2 surface by ALD process.A high-quality Sb2S3 thin-absorber with controllable thickness was reproducibly formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Compared with conventional chemical bath deposition (CBD), the Sb2S3 absorber deposited by ALD did not contain oxide or oxygen impurities and showed a very uniform thickness of Sb2S3 absorbers formed on a rough surface of dense blocking TiO2/F-doped SnO2 (bl-TiO2/FTO) substrate. The planar ALD-Sb2S3 solar cells comprised of Au/Poly-3-hexylthiophene/ALD-Sb2S3/bl-TiO2/FTO showed significantly improved power conversion efficiency of 5.77% at 1 sun condition and narrow efficiency deviation, whereas the planar CBD-Sb2S3 solar cells exhibited 2.17% power conversion efficiency. The high efficiency and good reproducibility of ALD-Sb2S3 solar cell devices is attributed to reduced backward recombination because of the inhibition of oxide defects within ALD-Sb2S3 absorber and the conformal deposition of very uniform Sb2S3 absorbers on the blocking TiO2

  17. Atomic layer deposited cobalt oxide: An efficient catalyst for NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Dip K.; Manna, Joydev; Dhara, Arpan; Sharma, Pratibha; Sarkar, Shaibal K., E-mail: shaibal.sarkar@iitb.ac.in [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Thin films of cobalt oxide are deposited by atomic layer deposition using dicobalt octacarbonyl [Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}] and ozone (O{sub 3}) at 50 °C on microscope glass substrates and polished Si(111) wafers. Self-saturated growth mechanism is verified by x-ray reflectivity measurements. As-deposited films consist of both the crystalline phases; CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} that gets converted to pure cubic-Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase upon annealing at 500 °C under ambient condition. Elemental composition and uniformity of the films is examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion-mass spectroscopy. Both as-deposited and the annealed films have been successfully tested as a catalyst for hydrogen evolution from sodium borohydride hydrolysis. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction in the presence of the as-grown catalyst is found to be ca. 38 kJ mol{sup −1}. Further implementation of multiwalled carbon nanotube, as a scaffold layer, improves the hydrogen generation rate by providing higher surface area of the deposited catalyst.

  18. Atomic layer deposition of dielectrics on graphene using reversibly physisorbed ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandhyala, Srikar; Mordi, Greg; Lee, Bongki; Lee, Geunsik; Floresca, Carlo; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Ahn, Jinho; Wallace, Robert M; Chabal, Yves J; Kim, Moon J; Colombo, Luigi; Cho, Kyeongjae; Kim, Jiyoung

    2012-03-27

    Integration of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) requires the ability to grow or deposit high-quality, ultrathin dielectric insulators on graphene to modulate the channel potential. Here, we study a novel and facile approach based on atomic layer deposition through ozone functionalization to deposit high-κ dielectrics (such as Al(2)O(3)) without breaking vacuum. The underlying mechanisms of functionalization have been studied theoretically using ab initio calculations and experimentally using in situ monitoring of transport properties. It is found that ozone molecules are physisorbed on the surface of graphene, which act as nucleation sites for dielectric deposition. The physisorbed ozone molecules eventually react with the metal precursor, trimethylaluminum to form Al(2)O(3). Additionally, we successfully demonstrate the performance of dual-gated GFETs with Al(2)O(3) of sub-5 nm physical thickness as a gate dielectric. Back-gated GFETs with mobilities of ~19,000 cm(2)/(V·s) are also achieved after Al(2)O(3) deposition. These results indicate that ozone functionalization is a promising pathway to achieve scaled gate dielectrics on graphene without leaving a residual nucleation layer. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  19. Formation and characterization of Sb2Te3 nanofilms on Pt by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junyou; Zhu, Wen; Gao, Xianhui; Bao, Siqian; Fan, Xian; Duan, Xingkai; Hou, Jie

    2006-03-16

    A nanocrystalline Sb2Te3 VA-VIA group compound thin film was grown via the route of electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (ECALE) in this work for the first time. The electrochemical behavior of Te and Sb on Pt, Te on Sb-covered Pt, and Sb on Te-covered Pt was studied by methods of cyclic voltammetry, anode potentiodynamic scanning, and coulometry. A steady deposition of the Sb2Te3 compound could be attained after negatively stepped adjusting of the UPD potentials of Sb and Te on Pt in each of the first 40 depositing cycles. The structure of the deposit was proven to be the Sb2Te3 compound by X-ray diffraction. The 2:3 stoichiometric ratio of Sb to Te was verified by EDX quantitative analysis, which is consistent with the result of coulometric analysis. A nanocystalline microstructure was observed for the Sb2Te3 deposits, and the average grain size is about 20 nm. Cross-sectional SEM observation shows an interface layer about 19 nm in thickness sandwiched between the Sb2Te3 nanocrystalline deposit and the Pt substrate surface. The optical band gap of the deposited Sb2Te3 film was determined as 0.42 eV by FTIR spectroscopy and it is blueshifted in comparison with that of the bulk Sb2Te3 single crystal because of its nanocrystalline microstructure.

  20. Highly conductive and flexible nylon-6 nonwoven fiber mats formed using tungsten atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanyan, Berç; Oldham, Christopher J; Sweet, William J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-12

    Low-temperature vapor-phase tungsten atomic layer deposition (ALD) using WF6 and dilute silane (SiH4, 2% in Ar) can yield highly conductive coatings on nylon-6 microfiber mats, producing flexible and supple nonwovens with conductivity of ∼1000 S/cm. We find that an alumina nucleation layer, reactant exposure, and deposition temperature all influence the rate of W mass uptake on 3D fibers, and film growth rate is calibrated using high surface area anodic aluminum oxide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals highly conformal tungsten coatings on nylon fibers with complex "winged" cross-section. Using reactant gas "hold" sequences during the ALD process, we conclude that reactant species can transport readily to reactive sites throughout the fiber mat, consistent with conformal uniform coverage observed by TEM. The conductivity of 1000 S/cm for the W-coated nylon is much larger than found in other conductive nonwovens. We also find that the nylon mats maintain 90% of their conductivity after being flexed around cylinders with radii as small as 0.3 cm. Metal ALD coatings on nonwovens make possible the solvent-free functionalization of textiles for electronic applications.

  1. Surface Preparation of InAs (110 Using Atomic Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Veal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Atomic hydrogen cleaning has been used to produce structurally and electronically damage-free InAs(110 surfaces.  X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS was used to obtain chemical composition and chemical state information about the surface, before and after the removal of the atmospheric contamination. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED and high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS were also used, respectively, to determine the surface reconstruction and degree of surface ordering, and to probe the adsorbed contaminant vibrational modes and the collective excitations of the clean surface. Clean, ordered and stoichiometric  InAs(110-(1×1 surfaces were obtained by exposure to thermally generated atomic hydrogen at a substrate temperature as low as 400ºC.  Semi-classical dielectric theory analysis of HREEL spectra of the phonon and plasmon excitations of the clean surface indicate that no electronic damage or dopant passivation were induced by the surface preparation method.

  2. Atomic-scale friction on stepped surfaces of ionic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Pascal; Gnecco, Enrico; Krok, Franciszek; Budzioch, Janusz; Walczak, Lukasz; Konior, Jerzy; Szymonski, Marek; Meyer, Ernst

    2011-05-06

    We report on high-resolution friction force microscopy on a stepped NaCl(001) surface in ultrahigh vacuum. The measurements were performed on single cleavage step edges. When blunt tips are used, friction is found to increase while scanning both up and down a step edge. With atomically sharp tips, friction still increases upwards, but it decreases and even changes sign downwards. Our observations extend previous results obtained without resolving atomic features and are associated with the competition between the Schwöbel barrier and the asymmetric potential well accompanying the step edges.

  3. STIR: Improved Electrolyte Surface Exchange via Atomically Strained Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-03

    PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Delaware 210 Hullihen Hall Newark, DE 19716 -0099 9-Jan-2015 ABSTRACT Number of Papers... Planck system modified to include reaction terms was built in COMSOL Multiphysics to describe the mass and charge fluxes related to electrons and both...include that the adsorption rate constant controls the behavior of platinum electrodes on YSZ surfaces much more than the reaction rate constant for

  4. Attractive interaction between an atom and a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, J.R.; Ritchie, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Using a general self-energy formalism we examine the interaction between an atom and a surface. Considered in detail are deviations from the Van der Waals force due to recoil and finite velocity of the particle. Calculations for positronium near a metal surface show that for such systems recoil and velocity effects are significant even at very low energies. We also examine the mechanisms for energy exchange with the surface and calculations show that single quantum events do not always dominate the exchange rates. 8 references, 2 figures

  5. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  6. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-01-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record. PMID:27221593

  7. Calculation of growth per cycle (GPC) of atomic layer deposited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-06

    Mar 6, 2014 ... Abstract. In this paper a theoretical calculation is presented for the growth per cycle (GPC) of the film and the variation of GPC with OH concentration on the substrate surface. The calculated GPC range (0.179 nm–0.075 nm) agrees well with reported experimental values. The present approach yielded a ...

  8. Propagation of a videopulse through a thin layer of two-level dipolar atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyutin, Sergei O

    2007-01-01

    The excitation of a thin layer of two-level permanent dipole moment atoms by ultimately short (less than the field oscillation period) electromagnetic pulses (videopulse) is observed. The numerical analysis of the matter equations free of the rotating wave approximation and relaxation reveals a strong influence of the local field and the Stark effect on temporal behaviour of transmitted field. Specifically, it is demonstrated that a dense film irradiated by a videopulse emits a short response with a delay much longer even than the characteristic cooperative time of the atom ensemble. It is supposed that the local field in the thin layer of permanent dipole atoms is able to re-pump the atomic subsystem. A close analogy with nonlinear pendulum motion is discussed

  9. Engineering the mechanical properties of ultrabarrier films grown by atomic layer deposition for the encapsulation of printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulusu, A.; Singh, A.; Kim, H. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wang, C. Y.; Dindar, A.; Fuentes-Hernandez, C.; Kippelen, B. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Cullen, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Graham, S., E-mail: sgraham@gatech.edu [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 MS-6064, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Direct deposition of barrier films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) onto printed electronics presents a promising method for packaging devices. Films made by ALD have been shown to possess desired ultrabarrier properties, but face challenges when directly grown onto surfaces with varying composition and topography. Challenges include differing nucleation and growth rates across the surface, stress concentrations from topography and coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch, elastic constant mismatch, and particle contamination that may impact the performance of the ALD barrier. In such cases, a polymer smoothing layer may be needed to coat the surface prior to ALD barrier film deposition. We present the impact of architecture on the performance of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})/hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ALD nanolaminate barrier films deposited on fluorinated polymer layer using an optical calcium (Ca) test under damp heat. It is found that with increasing polymer thickness, the barrier films with residual tensile stress are prone to cracking resulting in rapid failure of the Ca sensor at 50 °C/85% relative humidity. Inserting a SiN{sub x} layer with residual compressive stress between the polymer and ALD layers is found to prevent cracking over a range of polymer thicknesses with more than 95% of the Ca sensor remaining after 500 h of testing. These results suggest that controlling mechanical properties and film architecture play an important role in the performance of direct deposited ALD barriers.

  10. Cubic crystalline erbium oxide growth on GaN(0001) by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Posadas, Agham B.; Kwon, Sunah; Wang, Qingxiao; Kim, Moon J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-12-01

    Growth of crystalline Er2O3, a rare earth sesquioxide, on GaN(0001) is described. Ex situ HCl and NH4OH solutions and an in situ N2 plasma are used to remove impurities on the GaN surface and result in a Ga/N stoichiometry of 1.02. Using atomic layer deposition with erbium tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl) [Er(iPrCp)3] and water, crystalline cubic Er2O3 (C-Er2O3) is grown on GaN at 250 °C. The orientation relationships between the C-Er2O3 film and the GaN substrate are C-Er2O3(222) ǁ GaN(0001), C-Er2O3⟨-440⟩ ǁ GaN ⟨11-20⟩, and C-Er2O3⟨-211⟩ ǁ GaN ⟨1-100⟩. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy are used to examine the microstructure of C-Er2O3 and its interface with GaN. With post-deposition annealing at 600 °C, a thicker interfacial layer is observed, and two transition layers, crystalline GaNwOz and crystalline GaErxOy, are found between GaN and C-Er2O3. The tensile strain in the C-Er2O3 film is studied with x-ray diffraction by changes in both out-of-plane and in-plane d-spacing. Fully relaxed C-Er2O3 films on GaN are obtained when the film thickness is around 13 nm. Additionally, a valence band offset of 0.7 eV and a conduction band offset of 1.2 eV are obtained using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  11. SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSITIONAL DISKS DRIVEN BY FAR-ULTRAVIOLET IONIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel; Chiang, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. Disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by small condensates, ranging from ∼0.01 μm sized grains to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. Here we show that ionization by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. The FUV-ionized layer, of thickness 0.01-0.1 g cm -2 , behaves in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit and can accrete at observationally significant rates at radii ∼> 1-10 AU. Surface layer accretion driven by FUV ionization can reproduce the trend of increasing accretion rate with increasing hole size seen in transitional disks. At radii ∼<1-10 AU, FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance, and unless turbulent mixing of plasma can thicken the MRI-active layer, an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets.

  12. Change of Surface Roughness and Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1978-01-01

    The ratio between upstream and far downstream surface friction velocities relative to a change in surface roughness is given on the basis of results from surface Rossby number similarity theory. By simple theories for the internal boundary layer, which are found to compare quite well with recent ...

  13. Optical properties of Al2O3 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wiedmann, Monika K; Winter, Charles H; Avrutsky, Ivan

    2009-10-01

    We employed the atomic layer deposition technique to grow Al(2)O(3) films with nominal thicknesses of 400, 300, and 200 nm on silicon and soda lime glass substrates. The optical properties of the films were investigated by measuring reflection spectra in the 400-1800 nm wavelength range, followed by numerical fitting assuming the Sellmeier formula for the refractive index of Al(2)O(3). The films grown on glass substrates possess higher refractive indices as compared to the films on silicon. Optical waveguiding is demonstrated, confirming the feasibility of high-index contrast planar waveguides fabricated by atomic layer deposition.

  14. Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal Oxides for High Temperature Moving Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0166 Atomic-Scale Tuning of Layered Binary Metal OxideS ASHLIE MARTINI UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED Final Report 06/01/2015...TASK NUMBER 5f.  WORK UNIT NUMBER 7.  PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA MERCED 5200 N LAKE RD MERCED , CA 95343...Organization / Institution name University of California Merced Grant/Contract Title The full title of the funded effort. Atomic-scale Tuning of Layered Binary

  15. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO 2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 protective coatings.

  16. Highly reproducible planar Sb₂S₃-sensitized solar cells based on atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ju; Park, Mi Sun; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk; Sung, Shi-Joon

    2014-11-06

    A high-quality Sb₂S₃ thin-absorber with controllable thickness was reproducibly formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Compared with conventional chemical bath deposition (CBD), the Sb₂S₃ absorber deposited by ALD did not contain oxide or oxygen impurities and showed a very uniform thickness of Sb₂S₃ absorbers formed on a rough surface of dense blocking TiO₂/F-doped SnOv (bl-TiO₂/FTO) substrate. The planar ALD-Sb₂S₃ solar cells comprised of Au/Poly-3-hexylthiophene/ALD-Sb₂S₃/bl-TiO₂/FTO showed significantly improved power conversion efficiency of 5.77% at 1 sun condition and narrow efficiency deviation, whereas the planar CBD-Sb₂S₃ solar cells exhibited 2.17% power conversion efficiency. The high efficiency and good reproducibility of ALD-Sb₂S₃ solar cell devices is attributed to reduced backward recombination because of the inhibition of oxide defects within ALD-Sb₂S₃ absorber and the conformal deposition of very uniform Sb₂S₃ absorbers on the blocking TiO₂ surface by ALD process.

  17. Atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition of Al₂O₃ using trimethyl aluminum and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Moataz Bellah M; Oldham, Christopher J; Parsons, Gregory N

    2014-04-08

    High throughput spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) often uses higher reactor pressure than typical batch processes, but the specific effects of pressure on species transport and reaction rates are not fully understood. For aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ALD, water or ozone can be used as oxygen sources, but how reaction pressure influences deposition using ozone has not previously been reported. This work describes the effect of deposition pressure, between ∼2 and 760 Torr, on ALD Al2O3 using TMA and ozone. Similar to reports for pressure dependence during TMA/water ALD, surface reaction saturation studies show self-limiting growth at low and high pressure across a reasonable temperature range. Higher pressure tends to increase the growth per cycle, especially at lower gas velocities and temperatures. However, growth saturation at high pressure requires longer O3 dose times per cycle. Results are consistent with a model of ozone decomposition kinetics versus pressure and temperature. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) results confirm the trends in growth rate and indicate that the surface reaction mechanisms for Al2O3 growth using ozone are similar under low and high total pressure, including expected trends in the reaction mechanism at different temperatures.

  18. Atomic layer deposition as pore diameter adjustment tool for nanoporous aluminum oxide injection molding masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miikkulainen, Ville; Rasilainen, Tiina; Puukilainen, Esa; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A

    2008-05-06

    The wetting properties of polypropylene (PP) surfaces were modified by adjusting the dimensions of the surface nanostructure. The nanostructures were generated by injection molding with nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) as the mold insert. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of molybdenum nitride film was used to control the pore diameters of the AAO inserts. The original 50-nm pore diameter of AAO was adjusted by depositing films of thickness 5, 10, and 15 nm on AAO. Bis(tert-butylimido)-bis(dimethylamido)molybdenum and ammonia were used as precursors in deposition. The resulting pore diameters in the nitride-coated AAO inserts were 40, 30, and 20 nm, respectively. Injection molding of PP was conducted with the coated inserts, as well as with the non-coated insert. Besides the pore diameter, the injection mold temperature was varied with temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 degrees C tested. Water contact angles of PP casts were measured and compared with theoretical contact angles calculated from Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter theories. The highest contact angle, 140 degrees , was observed for PP molded with the AAO mold insert with 30-nm pore diameter. The Cassie-Baxter theory showed better fit than the Wenzel theory to the experimental values. With the optimal AAO mask, the nanofeatures in the molded PP pieces were 100 nm high. In explanation of this finding, it is suggested that some sticking and stretching of the nanofeatures occurs during the molding. Increase in the mold temperature increased the contact angle.

  19. Effect of passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition and sputtering processes on Si quantum dot superlattice to generate high photocurrent for high-efficiency solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksudur Rahman, Mohammad; Higo, Akio; Sekhar, Halubai; Erman Syazwan, Mohd; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka; Samukawa, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    The effect of passivation films on a Si quantum dot superlattice (QDSL) was investigated to generate high photocurrent in solar-cell applications. Three types of passivation films, sputter-grown amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC), hydrogenated a-SiC (a-SiC:H), and atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (ALD-Al2O3), were used to passivate the Si QDSLs containing a stack of four 4 nm Si nanodisks (NDs) and 2 nm silicon carbide (SiC) films fabricated by neutral beam etching (NBE). Because of the high surface-to-volume ratio typically present in quantum Si-NDs formed in the top-down NBE process, there is a tendency to form larger surface dangling bonds on untreated Si-ND surfaces as well as to have short distance (RMS) of 1.09 nm with respect to sputter-grown a-SiC (RMS: 1.75 nm) and a-SiC:H (RMS: 1.54 nm) films. Conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) revealed that ALD-Al2O3 passivation decreased the surface-leakage current as a result of proper passivation of side-wall surface defects in the QDSLs. The carrier transport characteristics were extracted from the QDSLs using the photovoltaic (PV) properties of p++/i/n+ solar cells, where the QDSLs consisted of different passivation layers acting as intermediate layers (i-layers) between the high-doping-density p++ Si (1 × 1020 cm-3) and n+ Si (1 × 1019 cm-3) substrates. High-doping-density p++ Si acted as a hole conductor instead of a photocarrier generator, hence, we could observe the PV properties of the i-layers. The highest short-circuit current density of 4.75 mA cm-2 was generated from the QDSL with the ALD-Al2O3-passivated surface, which is suitable for high-efficiency QD solar cells compared with a-SiC-passivated (0.04 mA cm-2) and a-SiC:H-passivated (0.37 mA cm-2) QDSL surfaces.

  20. Atomic layer deposition on polymer fibers and fabrics for multifunctional and electronic textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Oldham, Christopher J.; Parsons, Gregory N., E-mail: gnp@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7905 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Textile materials, including woven cotton, polymer knit fabrics, and synthetic nonwoven fiber mats, are being explored as low-cost, flexible, and light-weight platforms for wearable electronic sensing, communication, energy generation, and storage. The natural porosity and high surface area in textiles is also useful for new applications in environmental protection, chemical decontamination, pharmaceutical and chemical manufacturing, catalytic support, tissue regeneration, and others. These applications raise opportunities for new chemistries, chemical processes, biological coupling, and nanodevice systems that can readily combine with textile manufacturing to create new “multifunctional” fabrics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has a unique ability to form highly uniform and conformal thin films at low processing temperature on nonuniform high aspect ratio surfaces. Recent research shows how ALD can coat, modify, and otherwise improve polymer fibers and textiles by incorporating new materials for viable electronic and other multifunctional capabilities. This article provides a current overview of the understanding of ALD coating and modification of textiles, including current capabilities and outstanding problems, with the goal of providing a starting point for further research and advances in this field. After a brief introduction to textile materials and current textile treatment methods, the authors discuss unique properties of ALD-coated textiles, followed by a review of recent electronic and multifunctional textiles that use ALD coatings either as direct functional components or as critical nucleation layers for active materials integration. The article concludes with possible future directions for ALD on textiles, including the challenges in materials, manufacturing, and manufacturing integration that must be overcome for ALD to reach its full potential in electronic and other emerging multifunctional textile systems.

  1. The structure of the NiTi surface layers after the ion-plasma alloying of Ta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Meisner, L. L., E-mail: lm@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Schmidt, E. Yu., E-mail: shmidt.rin@yandex.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The effect of the Ta-ion beam implantation on the micro- and nanostructures of the surface layers of NiTi alloy was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and Auger spectroscopy. It is found that the elements are distributed non-uniformly with depth, so that the sublayers differ significantly in structure. The modified surface layer was found to consist of two sublayers, i.e. the upper oxide layer and the lower-lying amorphous layer that contains a maximum of Ta atoms.

  2. Optical spectroscopy study of c(4 x 2) Ge (001)-surfaces, covered with atomic Au wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Utz; Meyer, Sebastian; Schaefer, Joerg; Geurts, Jean [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Physikalisches Institut, Am Hubland, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Speiser, Eugen; Esser, Norbert [ISAS, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Novel quasi-1D systems like e.g. atomic gold chains on a c(4x2) reconstructed Ge(001)-surfaces enable the investigation of 1D-effects like the possible occurrence of the Luttinger- to Fermi liquid transition. As there is a crucial interplay of the lattice vibrations and the electrical and structural properties on such sensitive systems, phonon dynamics are in the focus of this work. The phonons were addressed by Raman spectroscopy and reveal a clear change from the Ge-oxide layer to the final surface with Au-nano wires. Thermally deoxidizing the Ge-surface under UHV leads to a distinct low-frequency vibration around 65cm-1. Its frequency range and its persistence after Gold deposition in the submonolayer range indicate that this signal is surface related. Additionally, the surface-induced anisotropy of the optical reflectance was complementary investigated by Reflectance-Anisotropy-Spectroscopy (RAS) and IR-ellipsometry.

  3. Investigation of MOS Interfaces with Atomic-Layer-Deposited High-k Gate Dielectrics on III-V Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rahul

    The purpose of this research work was to investigate the surface passivation methods and metal gate/high-k dielectric gate stacks for metal-oxide-semiconductor devices (MOS) on III-V compound semiconductor materials -- (i) GaAs for future high-speed low-power logic devices and (ii) AlGaN/GaN heterostructure for future high-speed high-power devices. GaAs is a candidate material for high-mobility channel in a NMOS transistor to extend the CMOS scaling up to and beyond the 16-nm technology node. AlGaN/GaN heterostructure is useful in a MOS-high electron mobility transistor (MOS-HEMT) device for providing a high current-carrying two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channel. The interaction of GaAs surface with atomic layer deposition of high- k dielectrics was investigated to gain fundamental insights into the chemical properties of GaAs surface oxides and high-k/GaAs interface. Electrical characterization of devices was performed to understand the impact of high-k/GaAs interface on MOS device characteristics in order to form a suitable metal/high-k/GaAs gatestack for future high-speed logic and power devices. Reduction of native oxides on GaAs was found to occur during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-k dielectrics- HfO2 and Al2O3/HfO 2 nanolaminates on GaAs. Reaction between ALD metal precursor and native oxides on GaAs was identified to be the cause for consumption of native oxides. It was established that the ALD growth temperature has a strong impact on this phenomenon. During post-dielectric annealing the residual arsenic oxides at the interface decomposed leading to an increase in the interfacial gallium oxides. Presence of gallium oxide, Ga2O3 was identified as a cause for observed frequency dispersion in MOS capacitance-voltage curves indicative of a high interface state density. The chemical properties of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure surface prepared by wet chemical treatment using HCl/HF and NH4OH solutions were investigated and compared. Both HCl and

  4. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A multilayered waveguide, which supports surface plasmon polaritons, is considered as an absorption modulator. The waveguide core consists of a silicon nitride layer and ultrathin layer with the varied carrier density embedded between two silver plates, which also serve as electrodes. Under apply...

  5. High-k dielectrics on n-Al0.25Ga0.75N via atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, N.; Garces, N. Y.; Meyer, D.; Anderson, T. J.; Hite, J. K.; Mastro, M. A.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.

    2012-02-01

    AlGaN/GaN and AlInN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) are promising devices for high-temperature and high-power electronics applications. A key issue with these devices is the high gate leakage current, particularly for enhancement-mode HEMTs. There has been an increased interest in developing high quality gate insulators to reduce gate leakage current. Al2O3 and HfO2 layers (21nm thick)were deposited via atomic layer deposition on n-Al0.25Ga0.75N pretreated with one of two different surface preparations, H2O2:H2SO4 (1:5) (piranha) or HF:H2O (1:3). Dielectrics were characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. AFM shows that Al2O3 and HfO2 layers are continuous and uniform in thickness on both HF and piranha pretreated surfaces. However, C-V measurement shows smaller (15%) hysteresis for HF pretreated samples. The estimated dielectric constants (ɛ) are 9 and 18 for Al2O3 and HfO2 on HF pretreated surfaces, respectively, in general agreement with theoretical values of 9 and 25. Al2O3 layers on Al0.25Ga0.75N exhibited a lower leakage (7x10-8 A/cm^2 at 5 V) current and higher forward breakdown voltage of 7.5 MV/cm compared to that of HfO2 layer. The higher breakdown voltage and lower leakage current for Al2O3 is due to larger conduction band offset with Al0.25Ga0.75N.

  6. 2nd international conference on ion beam surface layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The papers of this conference are concerned with the fundamental aspects and with the application of surface layer analysis. It is reported amongst others about backscattering analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, channelling and microprobe. (HPOE) [de

  7. Preliminary studies in the electrodeposition of PbSe/PbTe superlattice thin films via electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ALD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Raman; Cox, Steven M; Happek, Uwe; Banga, Dhego; Mathe, Mkhulu K; Stickney, John L

    2006-12-05

    This paper concerns the electrochemical growth of compound semiconductor thin film superlattice structures using electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ALD). Electrochemical ALD is the electrochemical analogue of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and ALD, methods based on nanofilm formation an atomic layer at a time, using surface-limited reactions. Underpotential deposition (UPD) is a type of electrochemical surfaced-limited reaction used in the present studies for the formation of PbSe/PbTe superlattices via electrochemical ALD. PbSe/PbTe thin-film superlattices with modulation wavelengths (periods) of 4.2 and 7.0 nm are reported here. These films were characterized using electron probe microanalysis, X- ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and infrared reflection absorption measurements. The 4.2 nm period superlattice was grown after deposition of 10 PbSe cycles, as a prelayer, resulting in an overall composition of PbSe0.52Te0.48. The 7.0 nm period superlattice was grown after deposition of 100 PbTe cycle prelayer, resulting for an overall composition of PbSe0.44Te0.56. The primary Bragg diffraction peak position, 2theta, for the 4.2 superlattice was consistent with the average (111) angles for PbSe and PbTe. First-order satellite peaks, as well as a second, were observed, indicating a high-quality superlattice film. For the 7.0 nm superlattice, Bragg peaks for both the (200) and (111) planes of the PbSe/PbTe superlattice were observed, with satellite peaks shifted 1 degrees closer to the (111), consistent with the larger period of the superlattice. AFM suggested conformal superlattice growth on the Au on glass substrate. Band gaps for the 4.2 and 7.0 nm period superlattices were measured as 0.48 and 0.38 eV, respectively.

  8. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris, E-mail: cyuan@uwm.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Jen, Tien Chien [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 and School of Engineering, University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, Alaska 99508 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  9. Site-selective substitutional doping with atomic precision on stepped Al (111) surface by single-atom manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang; Zhang, Jinhu; Dong, Guofeng; Shao, Hezhu; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Zhao, Li; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhuang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In fabrication of nano- and quantum devices, it is sometimes critical to position individual dopants at certain sites precisely to obtain the specific or enhanced functionalities. With first-principles simulations, we propose a method for substitutional doping of individual atom at a certain position on a stepped metal surface by single-atom manipulation. A selected atom at the step of Al (111) surface could be extracted vertically with an Al trimer-apex tip, and then the dopant atom will be positioned to this site. The details of the entire process including potential energy curves are given, which suggests the reliability of the proposed single-atom doping method.

  10. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Udo D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science; Altman, Eric I. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3DAFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  11. Adsorption/desorption kinetics of Na atoms on reconstructed Si (111)-7 x 7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Govind; Shivaprasad, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures on a periodic template are fundamentally and technologically important as they put forward the possibility to fabricate and pattern micro/nano-electronics for sensors, ultra high-density memories and nanocatalysts. Alkali-metal (AM) nanostructure grown on a semiconductor surface has received considerable attention because of their simple hydrogen like electronic structure. However, little efforts have been made to understand the fundamental aspects of the growth mechanism of self-assembled nanostructures of AM on semiconductor surfaces. In this paper, we report organized investigation of kinetically controlled room-temperature (RT) adsorption/desorption of sodium (Na) metal atoms on clean reconstructed Si (111)-7 x 7 surface, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The RT uptake curve shows a layer-by-layer growth (Frank-vander Merve growth) mode of Na on Si (111)-7 x 7 surfaces and a shift is observed in the binding energy position of Na (1s) spectra. The thermal stability of the Na/Si (111) system was inspected by annealing the system to higher substrate temperatures. Within a temperature range from RT to 350 o C, the temperature induced mobility to the excess Na atoms sitting on top of the bilayer, allowing to arrange themselves. Na atoms desorbed over a wide temperature range of 370 o C, before depleting the Si (111) surface at temperature 720 o C. The acquired valence-band (VB) spectra during Na growth revealed the development of new electronic-states near the Fermi level and desorption leads the termination of these. For Na adsorption up to 2 monolayers, decrease in work function (-1.35 eV) was observed, whereas work function of the system monotonically increases with Na desorption from the Si surface as observed by other studies also. This kinetic and thermodynamic study of Na adsorbed Si (111)-7 x 7 system can be utilized in fabrication of sensors used in night vision devices.

  12. The physical structure of the oceanic surface-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, K.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented of the structure of the near-surface layer of the ocean under various hydrometeorological conditions. Such a study allows the isolation of border measures for a four characteristic regime for the top ocean layer: 1) intensive wind-wave mixing; 2) Langmuir circulation; 3) intense solar heating during still and calm weather (with and without internal wave modulations); 4) a pressing-out of surface sediment. It is demonstrated that the spatial temperature change in the ocean surface, the thermal structure, and the heat attainment in the top layer have various characteristics during different regimes and this must be considered during the measuring of the ocean surface temperature with the contact method as well as during the comparison of contact and satallite data on the ocean surface temperature. The necessity for more research in this area is underscored.

  13. Fabrication of Nanolaminates with Ultrathin Nanolayers Using Atomic Layer Deposition: Nucleation & Growth Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Tecnologia de Superficies y Materiales (SMCTSM), XXVII Congreso Nacional, Oaxaca, Oaxaca, Mexico, September 26, 2007. 26. "Atomic Layer Deposition of...Nanolaminates: Fabrication and Properties" (Plenary Lecture), Sociedad Mexicana de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Superficies y Materiales (SMCTSM), XXVII

  14. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of in-doped ZnO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Scherpenborg, R.; Roozeboom, F.; Poodt, P.

    2014-01-01

    Indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition at atmospheric pressure (spatial-ALD). Trimethyl indium (TMIn), diethyl zinc (DEZ) and deionized water have been used as In, Zn and O precursor, respectively. The metal content of the films is controlled in the range

  15. Colloidal atomic layer deposition growth of PbS/CdS core/shell quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilowski, Michel; Nienhaus, Lea; Bertram, Sophie N; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2017-01-10

    Traditionally, PbS/CdS quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized via a cation exchange method, making fine control over shell growth challenging. We show here that colloidal atomic layer deposition (c-ALD) allows for the sequential growth of single monolayers of the shell, thus creating a 'true' CdS shell on PbS QDs.

  16. Low-temperature atomic layer deposition delivers more active and stable Pt-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, H.V.; Grillo, F.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Bevaart, Ronald; Nguyên, V.T.; van der Linden, B.; Moulijn, J.A.; Makkee, M.; Kreutzer, M.T.; van Ommen, J.R.

    2017-01-01

    We tailored the size distribution of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) on graphene nanoplatelets at a given metal loading by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition carried out in a fluidized bed reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. The Pt NPs deposited at low temperature (100 °C) after 10 cycles

  17. A simple model for atomic layer doped field-effect transistor (ALD-FET) electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora R, M.E.; Gaggero S, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a simple potential model based on the Thomas-Fermi approximation to reproduce the main properties of the electronic structure of an atomic layer doped field effect transistor. Preliminary numerical results for a Si-based ALD-FET justify why bound electronic states are not observed in the experiment. (Author)

  18. Atomic-Layer-Deposition of Indium Oxide Nano-films for Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zheng, He-Mei; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Bao; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2018-01-01

    Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) of In2O3 nano-films has been investigated using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as precursors. The In2O3 films can be deposited preferentially at relatively low temperatures of 160-200 °C, exhibiting a stable growth rate of 1.4-1.5 Å/cycle. The surface roughness of the deposited film increases gradually with deposition temperature, which is attributed to the enhanced crystallization of the film at a higher deposition temperature. As the deposition temperature increases from 150 to 200 °C, the optical band gap (Eg) of the deposited film rises from 3.42 to 3.75 eV. In addition, with the increase of deposition temperature, the atomic ratio of In to O in the as-deposited film gradually shifts towards that in the stoichiometric In2O3, and the carbon content also reduces by degrees. For 200 °C deposition temperature, the deposited film exhibits an In:O ratio of 1:1.36 and no carbon incorporation. Further, high-performance In2O3 thin-film transistors with an Al2O3 gate dielectric were achieved by post-annealing in air at 300 °C for appropriate time, demonstrating a field-effect mobility of 7.8 cm2/Vṡs, a subthreshold swing of 0.32 V/dec, and an on/off current ratio of 107. This was ascribed to passivation of oxygen vacancies in the device channel.

  19. ATOMIC PHYSICS PROCESSES IMPORTANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCRAPE-OFF LAYER OF TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEST, W.P.; GOLDSMITH,; B. EVANS,T.E.; OLSON, R.J.

    2002-05-01

    The region between the well-confined plasma and the vessel walls of a magnetic confinement fusion research device, the scrape-off layer (SOL), is typically rich in atomic and molecular physics processes. The most advanced magnetic confinement device, the magnetically diverted tokamak, uses a magnetic separatrix to isolate the confinement zone (closed flux surfaces) from the edge plasma (open field lines). Over most of their length the open field lines run parallel to the separatrix, forming a thin magnetic barrier with the nearby vessel walls. In a poloidally-localized region, the open field lines are directed away from the separatrix and into the divertor, a region spatially separated from the separatrix where intense plasma wall interaction can occur relatively safely. Recent data from several tokamaks indicate that particle transport across the field lines of the SOL can be somewhat faster than previously thought. In these cases, the rate at which particles reach the vessel wall is comparable to the rate to the divertor from parallel transport. The SOL can be thin enough that the recycling neutrals and sputtered impurities from the wall may refuel or contaminate the confinement zone more efficiently than divertor plasma wall interaction. Just inside the SOL is a confinement barrier that produces a sharp pedestal in plasma density and temperature. Understanding neutral transport through the SOL and into the pedestal is key to understanding particle balance and particle and impurity exhaust. The SOL plasma is sufficiently hot and dense to excite and ionize neutrals. Ion and neutral temperatures are high enough that charge exchange between the neutrals and fuel and impurity ions is fast. Excitation of neutrals can be fast enough to lead to nonlinear behavior in charge exchange and ionization processes. In this paper the detailed atomic physics important to the understanding of the neutral transport through the SOL will be discussed.

  20. Surface-layer lattices as patterning element for multimeric extremozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner-Ortner-Bleckmann, Judith; Gelbmann, Nicola; Tesarz, Manfred; Egelseer, Eva M; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2013-11-25

    A promising new approach for the production of biocatalysts comprises the use of surface-layer (S-layer) lattices that present functional multimeric enzymes on their surface, thereby guaranteeing most accurate spatial distribution and orientation, as well as maximal effectiveness and stability of these enzymes. For proof of concept, a tetrameric and a trimeric extremozyme are chosen for the construction of S-layer/extremozyme fusion proteins. By using a flexible peptide linker, either one monomer of the tetrameric xylose isomerase XylA from the thermophilic Thermoanaerobacterium strain JW/SL-YS 489 or, in another approach, one monomer of the trimeric carbonic anhydrase from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina thermophila are genetically linked to one monomer of the S-layer protein SbpA of Lysinibacillus sphaericus CCM 2177. After isolation and purification, the self-assembly properties of both S-layer fusion proteins as well as the specific activity of the fused enzymes are confirmed, thus indicating that the S-layer protein moiety does not influence the nature of the multimeric enzymes and vice versa. By recrystallization of the S-layer/extremozyme fusion proteins on solid supports, the active enzyme multimers are exposed on the surface of the square S-layer lattice with 13.1 nm spacing. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Atomic configuration of hydrogenated and clean tantalum(111) surfaces: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment and electron polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Maolin; Li, Lei; Guo, Yongling; Yao, Chuang; Peng, Cheng; Sun, Chang Q.

    2018-01-01

    By studying the tantalum (Ta)(111) surface with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, we determined binding energy values for the clean Ta(111) (+3.068 eV) and hydrogenated Ta(111) (+3.421 eV) surfaces with an isolated atom level of 18.977 eV. Using the bond-band barrier and zone-selective electron spectroscopy correlation, we investigated the mechanism of hydrogenation adsorption on the Ta(111) surface. We found the local densities of states of the first layer of Ta atoms in the reconstructed structure, which formed on the adsorbent hydrogen of the surface chemical bond contracts and dipole polarization. Moreover, we showed that on the Ta(111) surface, the hydrogen-induced surface core level shifts are dominated by quantum entrapment and are proportional to the calculated hybridized orbitals of the valence band. The latter is therefore correlated to the local surface chemical reactivity and is useful for other adsorbate systems on transition metals.

  2. Epitaxial TiO 2/SnO 2 core-shell heterostructure by atomic layer deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2012-01-01

    Taking TiO 2/SnO 2 core-shell nanowires (NWs) as a model system, we systematically investigate the structure and the morphological evolution of this heterostructure synthesized by atomic layer deposition/epitaxy (ALD/ALE). All characterizations, by X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Raman spectra, reveal that single crystalline rutile TiO 2 shells can be epitaxially grown on SnO 2 NWs with an atomically sharp interface at low temperature (250 °C). The growth behavior of the TiO 2 shells highly depends on the surface orientations and the geometrical shape of the core SnO 2 NW cross-section. Atomically smooth surfaces are found for growth on the {110} surface. Rough surfaces develop on {100} surfaces due to (100) - (1 × 3) reconstruction, by introducing steps in the [010] direction as a continuation of {110} facets. Lattice mismatch induces superlattice structures in the TiO 2 shell and misfit dislocations along the interface. Conformal epitaxial growth has been observed for SnO 2 NW cores with an octagonal cross-section ({100} and {110} surfaces). However, for a rectangular core ({101} and {010} surfaces), the shell also derives an octagonal shape from the epitaxial growth, which was explained by a proposed model based on ALD kinetics. The surface steps and defects induced by the lattice mismatch likely lead to improved photoluminescence (PL) performance for the yellow emission. Compared to the pure SnO 2 NWs, the PL spectrum of the core-shell nanostructures exhibits a stronger emission peak, which suggests potential applications in optoelectronics. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  3. Semiclassical perturbation theory for diffraction in heavy atom surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret-Artés, Salvador; Daon, Shauli; Pollak, Eli

    2012-05-28

    The semiclassical perturbation theory formalism of Hubbard and Miller [J. Chem. Phys. 78, 1801 (1983)] for atom surface scattering is used to explore the possibility of observation of heavy atom diffractive scattering. In the limit of vanishing ℏ the semiclassical theory is shown to reduce to the classical perturbation theory. The quantum diffraction pattern is sensitive to the characteristics of the beam of incoming particles. Necessary conditions for observation of quantum diffraction are derived for the angular width of the incoming beam. An analytic expression for the angular distribution as a function of the angular and momentum variance of the incoming beam is obtained. We show both analytically and through some numerical results that increasing the angular width of the incident beam leads to decoherence of the quantum diffraction peaks and one approaches the classical limit. However, the incoherence of the beam in the parallel direction does not destroy the diffraction pattern. We consider the specific example of Ar atoms scattered from a rigid LiF(100) surface.

  4. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt nanostructures on fuel cell gas diffusion layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available technologies including gasoline internal combustion engines. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) consists of a membrane, two dispersed catalyst layers, and two gas diffusion layers (GDLs). The electrochemical performance of the fuel cells is strongly...+ (small Overpotential Deposition (OPD) - to produce sacrificial Cu adlayer on active sites of the substrate; Rinse with BE Cu 2+ Cu 2+ S S S S S S S Cu Cu Cu Cu Cu -2e S S S S S S S Pt Cu Pt Cu Cu (3) Inject H 2PtCl 6 solution and allow...

  5. Metal–Organic Framework Thin Films as Platforms for Atomic Layer Deposition of Cobalt Ions To Enable Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Chung-Wei; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Wang, Timothy C.; Bury, Wojciech; Hoffeditz, William; Klahr, Benjamin M.; Klet, Rachel C.; Pellin, Michael J.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-12-30

    Thin films of the metal organic framework (MOP) NU-1000 were grown on conducting glass substrates. The films uniformly cover the conducting glass substrates and are composed of free-standing sub-micrometer rods. Subsequently, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized to deposit Co2+ ions throughout the entire MOF film via self-limiting surface-mediated reaction chemistry. The Co ions bind at aqua and hydroxo sites lining the channels of NU-1000, resulting in three-dimensional arrays of separated Co ions in the MOF thin film. The Co-modified MOF thin films demonstrate promising electrocatalytic activity for water oxidation.

  6. Investigation of magnetorheological elastomer surface properties by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacobescu, G.E.; Balasoiu, M.; Bica, I.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers consist of a natural or synthetic rubber matrix interspersed with micron-sized ferromagnetic particles. The magnetoelastic properties of such a composite are not merely a sum of elasticity of the polymer and stiffness and magnetic properties of the filler, but also the result of a complex synergy of several effects, relevant at different length scales and detectable by different techniques. In the present work we investigate the microstructures, the surface magnetic properties and the elastic properties of new isotropic and anisotropic magnetorheological elastomer prepared using silicone rubber and soft magnetic carbonyl iron microspheres. The measurements were performed by atomic force microscopy in the following modes: standard imaging-non-contact atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy and nanoindentation. A comparative study for the samples with different particle concentrations and strength of magnetic field applied during the polymerization process is developed

  7. The Mechanical Robustness of Atomic-Layer- and Molecular-Layer-Deposited Coatings on Polymer Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    represent the ceramic and poly- merlike spacer layers, respectively. The numerical analysis ABAQUS , Dassault Systèmes Inc. was conducted using an automated...routine PYTHON , Python Software Foundation. Analysis here was solely limited to the linear elastic regime for all materials considered. IV. RESULTS

  8. Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael; Steinmann, Vera; Yang, Chuanxi; Hartman, Katy; Chakraborty, Rupak; Poindexter, Jeremy R; Castillo, Mariela Lizet; Gordon, Roy; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-05-22

    Tin sulfide (SnS) is a candidate absorber material for Earth-abundant, non-toxic solar cells. SnS offers easy phase control and rapid growth by congruent thermal evaporation, and it absorbs visible light strongly. However, for a long time the record power conversion efficiency of SnS solar cells remained below 2%. Recently we demonstrated new certified record efficiencies of 4.36% using SnS deposited by atomic layer deposition, and 3.88% using thermal evaporation. Here the fabrication procedure for these record solar cells is described, and the statistical distribution of the fabrication process is reported. The standard deviation of efficiency measured on a single substrate is typically over 0.5%. All steps including substrate selection and cleaning, Mo sputtering for the rear contact (cathode), SnS deposition, annealing, surface passivation, Zn(O,S) buffer layer selection and deposition, transparent conductor (anode) deposition, and metallization are described. On each substrate we fabricate 11 individual devices, each with active area 0.25 cm(2). Further, a system for high throughput measurements of current-voltage curves under simulated solar light, and external quantum efficiency measurement with variable light bias is described. With this system we are able to measure full data sets on all 11 devices in an automated manner and in minimal time. These results illustrate the value of studying large sample sets, rather than focusing narrowly on the highest performing devices. Large data sets help us to distinguish and remedy individual loss mechanisms affecting our devices.

  9. Atomic layer deposited ZrO2 nanofilm on Mg-Sr alloy for enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiuyue; Yuan, Wei; Liu, Xiangmei; Zheng, Yufeng; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Pan, Haobo; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-08-01

    The biodegradability and good mechanical property of magnesium alloys make them potential biomedical materials. However, their rapid corrosion rate in the human body's environment impairs these advantages and limits their clinical use. In this work, a compact zirconia (ZrO 2 ) nanofilm was fabricated on the surface of a magnesium-strontium (Mg-Sr) alloy by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) method, which can regulate the thickness of the film precisely and thus also control the corrosion rate. Corrosion tests reveal that the ZrO 2 film can effectively reduce the corrosion rate of Mg-Sr alloys that is closely related to the thickness of the film. The cell culture test shows that this kind of ZrO 2 film can also enhance the activity and adhesion of osteoblasts on the surfaces of Mg-Sr alloys. The significance of the current work is to develop a zirconia nanofilm on biomedical MgSr alloy with controllable thickness precisely through atomic layer deposition technique. By adjusting the thickness of nanofilm, the corrosion rate of Mg-Sr alloy can be modulated, thereafter, the degradation rate of Mg-based alloys can be controlled precisely according to actual clinical requirement. In addition, this zirconia nanofilm modified Mg-Sr alloys show excellent biocompatibility than the bare samples. Hence, this work provides a new surface strategy to control the degradation rate while improving the biocompatibility of substrates. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. α-Ga2O3 grown by low temperature atomic layer deposition on sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. W.; Jarman, J. C.; Johnstone, D. N.; Midgley, P. A.; Chalker, P. R.; Oliver, R. A.; Massabuau, F. C.-P.

    2018-04-01

    α-Ga2O3 is a metastable phase of Ga2O3 of interest for wide bandgap engineering since it is isostructural with α-In2O3 and α-Al2O3. α-Ga2O3 is generally synthesised under high pressure (several GPa) or relatively high temperature (∼500 °C). In this study, we report the growth of α-Ga2O3 by low temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) on sapphire substrate. The film was grown at a rate of 0.48 Å/cycle, and predominantly consists of α-Ga2O3 in the form of (0001) -oriented columns originating from the interface with the substrate. Some inclusions were also present, typically at the tips of the α phase columns and most likely comprising ε-Ga2O3. The remainder of the Ga2O3 film - i.e. nearer the surface and between the α-Ga2O3 columns, was amorphous. The film was found to be highly resistive, as is expected for undoped material. This study demonstrates that α-Ga2O3 films can be grown by low temperature ALD and suggests the possibility of a new range of ultraviolet optoelectronic and power devices grown by ALD. The study also shows that scanning electron diffraction is a powerful technique to identify the different polymorphs of Ga2O3 present in multiphase samples.

  11. Interface Engineering through Atomic Layer Deposition towards Highly Improved Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Tian, Wei; Guo, Jun; Li, Liang

    2015-08-01

    A composite photoanode comprising ultralong ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles was prepared and its performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was optimized and compared to the photoanode consisting of conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. The ultralong ZnO nanobelts were synthesized in high yield by a facile solution approach at 90 oC followed by annealing at 500 oC. The effect of the ratio of ZnO nanobelts to TiO2 nanoparticles on the light scattering, specific surface area, and interface recombination were investigated. An optimum amount of ZnO nanobelts enhanced the photon-conversion efficiency by 61.4% compared to that of the conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. To further reduce the recombination rate and increase the carrier lifetime, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technique was utilized to coat a continuous TiO2 film surrounding the ZnO nanobelts and TiO2 nanoparticles, functioning as a barrier-free access of all electrons to conductive electrodes. This ALD treatment improved the interface contact within the whole photoanode system, finally leading to significant enhancement (137%) in the conversion efficiency of DSSCs.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles for catalysis: on the mechanisms of nanoparticle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackus, Adriaan J M; Weber, Matthieu J; Thissen, Nick F W; Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Vervuurt, René H J; Assali, Simone; Bol, Ageeth A; Verheijen, Marcel A; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of Pd and Pt nanoparticles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been studied extensively in recent years for the synthesis of nanoparticles for catalysis. For these applications, it is essential to synthesize nanoparticles with well-defined sizes and a high density on large-surface-area supports. Although the potential of ALD for synthesizing active nanocatalysts for various chemical reactions has been demonstrated, insight into how to control the nanoparticle properties (i.e. size, composition) by choosing suitable processing conditions is lacking. Furthermore, there is little understanding of the reaction mechanisms during the nucleation stage of metal ALD. In this work, nanoparticles synthesized with four different ALD processes (two for Pd and two for Pt) were extensively studied by transmission electron spectroscopy. Using these datasets as a starting point, the growth characteristics and reaction mechanisms of Pd and Pt ALD relevant for the synthesis of nanoparticles are discussed. The results reveal that ALD allows for the preparation of particles with control of the particle size, although it is also shown that the particle size distribution is strongly dependent on the processing conditions. Moreover, this paper discusses the opportunities and limitations of the use of ALD in the synthesis of nanocatalysts. (paper)

  13. Electrical Characterization of Ti-Silicate Films Grown by Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjae; Yong, Kijung

    2007-08-01

    Electrical characterization was performed for Ti-silicate films, which were deposited by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). Before the deposition of Ti-silicate films, the silicon substrates were pretreated differently using hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching, chemical oxidation, and thermal oxidation. Regardless of the pretreatment methods, the grown films showed a highly smooth surface with rms below 0.52 nm. The electrical properties of the grown Ti-silicate films showed a strong dependence on the substrate pretreatments. The 5-nm-thick Ti-silicate films grown on hydrogen-passivated Si and chemically oxidized Si showed rather high leakage currents, whereas the films grown on thermally oxidized Si showed low leakage currents below 1× 10-7 A/cm2 at a bias of -1 V. All of the films showed a positive shift in the flatband voltage (VFB) upon annealing. Also, each film showed low a hysteresis below 180 mV and the hysteresis decreased upon annealing.

  14. Atomic layer deposition-A novel method for the ultrathin coating of minitablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautala, Jaana; Kääriäinen, Tommi; Hoppu, Pekka; Kemell, Marianna; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Cameron, David; George, Steven; Juppo, Anne Mari

    2017-10-05

    We introduce atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a novel method for the ultrathin coating (nanolayering) of minitablets. The effects of ALD coating on the tablet characteristics and taste masking were investigated and compared with the established coating method. Minitablets containing bitter tasting denatonium benzoate were coated by ALD using three different TiO 2 nanolayer thicknesses (number of deposition cycles). The established coating of minitablets was performed in a laboratory-scale fluidized-bed apparatus using four concentration levels of aqueous Eudragit ® E coating polymer. The coated minitablets were studied with respect to the surface morphology, taste masking capacity, in vitro disintegration and dissolution, mechanical properties, and uniformity of content. The ALD thin coating resulted in minimal increase in the dimensions and weight of minitablets in comparison to original tablet cores. Surprisingly, ALD coating with TiO 2 nanolayers decreased the mechanical strength, and accelerated the in vitro disintegration of minitablets. Unlike previous studies, the studied levels of TiO 2 nanolayers on tablets were also inadequate for effective taste masking. In summary, ALD permits a simple and rapid method for the ultrathin coating (nanolayering) of minitablets, and provides nanoscale-range TiO 2 coatings on porous minitablets. More research, however, is needed to clarify its potential in tablet taste masking applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface Layer Turbulence and Aerosol Profiles During MAPTIP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, K.L.; Frederickson, P.A.; Leeuw, G. de

    1995-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory (TNO-FEL) deployed in situ sensors near and on Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN) during MAPTIP to describe the surface layer processes and also to evaluate models for near-surface aerosol profiles. Vertical profiles of aerosol

  16. Whisker Formation On Galvanic Tin Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radanyi A.L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the effect of substrate composition, thickness of the tin electroplate and its morphology on pressure-induced tin whisker formation. Pure tin deposits of different thickness were obtained on a copper and brass substrates using methane sulfonic industrial bath. The deposits were compressed by a steel bearing ball forming imprint on the surface. The microstructure of tin whiskers obtained at the boundary of each imprint, their length and number were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that the most intensive formation and growth of whiskers was observed in the first two hours. In general, brass substrate was shown to be more prone to whisker formation than copper independently of the tin coating thickness. The results have been compared with industrial bright tin finish on control unit socket leads and proposals have been made as to modification of the production process in order to minimize the risk of whiskering.

  17. Electron microscopy of an aluminum layer grown on the vicinal surface of a gallium arsenide substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovygin, M. V., E-mail: lemi@miee.ru; Borgardt, N. I. [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation); Kazakov, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Seibt, M. [Universität Göttingen, IV. Physikalisches Institut (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    A thin Al layer grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a misoriented GaAs (100) substrate is studied by transmission electron microscopy. Electron diffraction data and bright-field, dark-field, and high-resolution images show that, in the layer, there are Al grains of three types of crystallographic orientation: Al (100), Al (110), and Al (110)R. The specific structural features of the interfaces between the differently oriented grains and substrate are studied by digital processing of the high-resolution images. From quantitative analysis of the dark-field images, the relative content and sizes of the differently oriented grains are determined. It is found that atomic steps at the substrate surface cause an increase in the fraction and sizes of Al (110)R grains and a decrease in the fraction of Al (100) grains, compared to the corresponding fractions and sizes in the layer grown on a singular substrate surface.

  18. Atomic and electronic structure of surfaces theoretical foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Lannoo, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces and interfaces play an increasingly important role in today's solid state devices. In this book the reader is introduced, in a didactic manner, to the essential theoretical aspects of the atomic and electronic structure of surfaces and interfaces. The book does not pretend to give a complete overview of contemporary problems and methods. Instead, the authors strive to provide simple but qualitatively useful arguments that apply to a wide variety of cases. The emphasis of the book is on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces but it also includes a thorough treatment of transition metals, a general discussion of phonon dispersion curves, and examples of large computational calculations. The exercises accompanying every chapter will be of great benefit to the student.

  19. Single atom anisotropic magnetoresistance on a topological insulator surface

    KAUST Repository

    Narayan, Awadhesh

    2015-03-12

    © 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. We demonstrate single atom anisotropic magnetoresistance on the surface of a topological insulator, arising from the interplay between the helical spin-momentum-locked surface electronic structure and the hybridization of the magnetic adatom states. Our first-principles quantum transport calculations based on density functional theory for Mn on Bi2Se3 elucidate the underlying mechanism. We complement our findings with a two dimensional model valid for both single adatoms and magnetic clusters, which leads to a proposed device setup for experimental realization. Our results provide an explanation for the conflicting scattering experiments on magnetic adatoms on topological insulator surfaces, and reveal the real space spin texture around the magnetic impurity.

  20. Multi-layer enhancement to polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachine Dept.

    1997-10-01

    A multi-level polysilicon surface-micromachining technology consisting of 5 layers of polysilicon is presented. Surface topography and film mechanical stress are the major impediments encountered in the development of a multilayer surface-micromachining process. However, excellent mechanical film characteristics have been obtained through the use of chemical-mechanical polishing for planarization of topography and by proper sequencing of film deposition with thermal anneals. Examples of operating microactuators, geared power-transfer mechanisms, and optical elements demonstrate the mechanical advantages of construction with 5 polysilicon layers.

  1. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  2. Superconductivity in thallium double atomic layer and transition into an insulating phase intermediated by a quantum metal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinokura, S.; Bondarenko, L. V.; Tupchaya, A. Y.; Gruznev, D. V.; Zotov, A. V.; Saranin, A. A.; Hasegawa, S.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the first observation of superconductivity in a double atomic layer of Tl on Si(1 1 1) using in situ electrical resistivity measurements in ultrahigh vacuum. The structure of the Tl bilayer was characterized by a set of techniques, including scanning tunneling microscopy, electron diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy, which confirmed the metastability and metallic nature of the Tl bilayer. The epitaxial growth of atomically thin ‘soft’ metallic film over the entire surface of substrate enabled us to find a macroscopic superconducting transition at 0.96 K, accompanied by thermal and quantum fluctuations of order parameter. The system also demonstrates a perpendicular-magnetic-field-induced superconductor-insulator transition, together with an intermediate metallic state. We have found that the magnetoresitivity at the lowest temperature is consistent with the Bose metal picture, which is a consequence of strong quantum fluctuations.

  3. High-speed spatial atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide layers for solar cell passivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Lankhorst, A.M.; Roozeboom, F.; Spee, C.I.M.A.; Maas, D.; Vermeer, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this Communication we show that with spatially separated ALD of Al2O3 growth rates of 1.2 nm s-1 can be achievd, showing excellent surface passivation (surface recombination velocities of <2 cm s-1). This implies a revolutionary breakthrough in industrial throughput ALD of Al2O3 passivation of

  4. Study of surface plasmon resonance of Au nanoparticles coated with dielectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-Yu; Huang, Chan-yan; Dai, Ning; Zhu, Da-ming

    2011-08-01

    In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit different thickness layers of Al2O3 on Au nanoparticles fabricated by thermal annealing of Au thin films. The effects of the Au-coated Al2O3 layer thickness variation to local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in gold (Au) nanoparticles was investigated using transmission surface plasmon resonance (T-SPR) spectroscopy. Thermal annealing of ultrathin films of Au sputtered on transparent substrates can get a dispersed metal particles system which exhibit transmission spectra showing an extinction band attributed to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The particles prepared by thermal annealing are much more like elliptical rather than sphere. The dielectric medium layer Al2O3 was deposited on these Au particles with the thickness from few nanometers to tens of nanometers by ALD. We found that All the LSPR peak positions of particles on different substrates red shifted as the thickness of deposition layer increase, but the LSPR red-shift effect of particles on alumina substrate was much more remarkable than particles on glass substrate. The results in this paper show that it is a very continent method to manipulate LSPR position which is a profound useful effect in solar cell application by controlling the deposition layer thickness on particles prepared by thermal annealing on suitable substrate.

  5. Double Charged Surface Layers in Lead Halide Perovskite Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Sarmah, Smritakshi P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding defect chemistry, particularly ion migration, and its significant effect on the surface’s optical and electronic properties is one of the major challenges impeding the development of hybrid perovskite-based devices. Here, using both experimental and theoretical approaches, we demonstrated that the surface layers of the perovskite crystals may acquire a high concentration of positively charged vacancies with the complementary negatively charged halide ions pushed to the surface. This charge separation near the surface generates an electric field that can induce an increase of optical band gap in the surface layers relative to the bulk. We found that the charge separation, electric field, and the amplitude of shift in the bandgap strongly depend on the halides and organic moieties of perovskite crystals. Our findings reveal the peculiarity of surface effects that are currently limiting the applications of perovskite crystals and more importantly explain their origins, thus enabling viable surface passivation strategies to remediate them.

  6. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-01-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle

  7. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathomarco, R.V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C.N.; Prioli, R

    2004-06-30

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 {mu}m, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 {mu}m. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  8. Nucleation and growth mechanisms of Al2O3 atomic layer deposition on synthetic polycrystalline MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Chiappe, D.; Meersschaut, J.; Conard, T.; Franquet, A.; Nuytten, T.; Mannarino, M.; Radu, I.; Vandervorst, W.; Delabie, A.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of great interest for applications in nano-electronic devices. Their incorporation requires the deposition of nm-thin and continuous high-k dielectric layers on the 2D TMDs. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-k dielectric layers is well established on Si surfaces: the importance of a high nucleation density for rapid layer closure is well known and the nucleation mechanisms have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, the nucleation of ALD on 2D TMD surfaces is less well understood and a quantitative analysis of the deposition process is lacking. Therefore, in this work, we investigate the growth of Al2O3 (using Al(CH3)3/H2O ALD) on MoS2 whereby we attempt to provide a complete insight into the use of several complementary characterization techniques, including X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. To reveal the inherent reactivity of MoS2, we exclude the impact of surface contamination from a transfer process by direct Al2O3 deposition on synthetic MoS2 layers obtained by a high temperature sulfurization process. It is shown that Al2O3 ALD on the MoS2 surface is strongly inhibited at temperatures between 125°C and 300°C, with no growth occurring on MoS2 crystal basal planes and selective nucleation only at line defects or grain boundaries at MoS2 top surface. During further deposition, the as-formed Al2O3 nano-ribbons grow in both vertical and lateral directions. Eventually, a continuous Al2O3 film is obtained by lateral growth over the MoS2 crystal basal plane, with the point of layer closure determined by the grain size at the MoS2 top surface and the lateral growth rate. The created Al2O3/MoS2 interface consists mainly of van der Waals interactions. The nucleation is improved by contributions of reversible adsorption on the MoS2 basal planes by using low

  9. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 on GaSb using in situ hydrogen plasma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppalt, Laura B.; Cleveland, Erin R.; Champlain, James G.; Prokes, Sharka M.; Brad Boos, J.; Park, Doewon; Bennett, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we study the effectiveness of hydrogen plasma surface treatments for improving the electrical properties of GaSb/Al 2 O 3 interfaces. Prior to atomic layer deposition of an Al 2 O 3 dielectric, p-GaSb surfaces were exposed to hydrogen plasmas in situ, with varying plasma powers, exposure times, and substrate temperatures. Good electrical interfaces, as indicated by capacitance-voltage measurements, were obtained using higher plasma powers, longer exposure times, and increasing substrate temperatures up to 250 °C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the most effective treatments result in decreased SbO x , decreased Sb, and increased GaO x content at the interface. This in situ hydrogen plasma surface preparation improves the semiconductor/insulator electrical interface without the use of wet chemical pretreatments and is a promising approach for enhancing the performance of Sb-based devices.

  10. ZnO: Hydroquinone superlattice structures fabricated by atomic/molecular layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynell, Tommi; Karppinen, Maarit

    2014-01-01

    Here we employ atomic layer deposition in combination with molecular layer deposition to deposit crystalline thin films of ZnO interspersed with single layers of hydroquinone in an effort to create hybrid inorganic–organic superlattice structures. The ratio of the ZnO and hydroquinone deposition cycles is varied between 199:1 and 1:1, and the structure of the resultant thin films is verified with X-ray diffraction and reflectivity techniques. Clear evidence of the formation of a superlattice-type structure is observed in the X-ray reflectivity patterns and the presence of organic bonds in the films corresponding to the structure of hydroquinone is confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. We anticipate that hybrid superlattice structures such as the ones described in this work have the potential to be of great importance for future applications where the precise control of different inorganic and organic layers in hybrid superlattice materials is required. - Highlights: • Inorganic–organic superlattices can be made by atomic/molecular layer deposition. • This is demonstrated here for ZnO and hydroquinone (HQ). • The ratio of the ZnO and HQ layers is varied between 199:1 and 14:1. • The resultant thin films are crystalline

  11. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigge, T.; Hafke, B.; Witte, T.; Krenzer, B.; Streubühr, C.; Samad Syed, A.; Mikšić Trontl, V.; Avigo, I.; Zhou, P.; Ligges, M.; von der Linde, D.; Bovensiepen, U.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.; Wippermann, S.; Lücke, A.; Sanna, S.; Gerstmann, U.; Schmidt, W. G.

    2017-03-01

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  12. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO 6 octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces

  13. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2 n...... nanoparticles synthesized on Au(lll), and establishes a new picture of the active edge sires of the nanoclusters. The results demonstrate a way to get detailed atomic-scale information on catalysts in general....

  14. Engineering Nanoscale Multiferroic Composites for Memory Applications with Atomic Layer Deposition of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Diana

    2016-01-01

    This work focuses on the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (PZT). Leveraging the surface-reaction controlled process based on alternating self-limiting surface reactions, PZT can be synthesized not only with elemental precision to realize the desired composition (Zr/Ti = 52/48) but also with outstanding conformality. The latter enables the integration of PZT with a ferromagnetic phase to realize multiferroism (MF) and magnetoelectric (ME...

  15. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Jing [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Aisawa, Sumio, E-mail: aisawa@iwate-u.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Hirahara, Hidetoshi [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Kudo, Takahiro [Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan); Mori, Kunio [Department of Frontier Materials and Function Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Sulfur Chemical Institute, 210, Collabo MIU, 4-3-5, Ueda, Morioka 020-0066 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In situ adsorption behaviors of TES on PA6 surface were clarified by QCM. • Highest adsorption of TES on PA6 was obtained in pH 3 and 0.1 M solution. • Molecular layers of TES with uniform structures were prepared on PA6 surface. • TES layer improved PA6 local heat resistance from 150 °C to 230 °C. • TES molecular layer successfully reduced Ag ion to Ag{sup 0}. - Abstract: Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag{sup +} ion to Ag{sup 0}. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  16. Seasonality in onshore normalized wind profiles above the surface layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jesper Nielsen; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2010-01-01

    This work aims to study the seasonal difference in normalized wind speed above the surface layer as it is observed at the 160 m high mast at the coastal site Høvsøre at winds from the sea (westerly). Normalized and stability averaged wind speeds above the surface layer are observed to be 20 to 50......% larger in the winter/spring seasons compared to the summer/autumn seasons at winds from west within the same atmospheric stability class. A method combining the mesoscale model, COAMPS, and observations of the surface stability of the marine boundary layer is presented. The objective of the method...... is to reconstruct the seasonal signal in normalized wind speed and identify the physical process behind. The method proved reasonably successful in capturing the relative difference in wind speed between seasons, indicating that the simulated physical processes are likely candidates to the observed seasonal signal...

  17. Analysis of Surface Waves in Saturated Layered Poroelastic Half-Spaces Using the Thin Layer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Huayou; Cui, Yujun; Zhang, Dianji

    2018-03-01

    There are multiple modes of surface waves in saturated layered poroelastic half-spaces. The phase velocity and the attenuation of the modes are frequency dependent. The frequency behaviour of the modes can be studied using the layer transfer, stiffness and the transmission/reflection matrix methods. However, it is very difficult to find the complex roots of the determinants because the entries of the matrices involve the complex exponential functions of the wavenumber and the thickness of layer. To overcome this difficulty, the entries in the matrix are expressed in the form of algebraic functions using the thin layer method. Thus, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors can be easily solved using the matrix decomposition techniques instead of the root-searching ones. Some of the eigenvalues correspond to the wavenumbers of the surface waves, and can be picked out based on the characteristics of the surface waves. The frequency behaviour, variations of the pore pressure and the skeleton's displacements with the depth can be then investigated from the corresponding eigenvalues and eigenvectors, respectively. The method is verified by comparing the analytical and the discrete results in the saturated poroelastic half-space with the permeable surface. The method is applied to appreciate the effects of an impermeable surface on Rayleigh waves (R-waves) and the existence of Stoneley waves in the poroelastic half-space. The frequency behaviour of Rayleigh waves in three typical layered poroelastic half-spaces is also analyzed.

  18. Scalable control program for multiprecursor flow-type atomic layer deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 and Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the development and implementation of a scalable control program to control flow type atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor with multiple precursor delivery lines. The program logic is written and tested in LABVIEW environment to control ALD reactor with four precursor delivery lines to deposit up to four layers of different materials in cyclic manner. The programming logic is conceived such that to facilitate scale up for depositing more layers with multiple precursors and scale down for using single layer with any one precursor in the ALD reactor. The program takes precursor and oxidizer exposure and purging times as input and controls the sequential opening and closing of the valves to facilitate the complex ALD process in cyclic manner. The program could be used to deposit materials from any single line or in tandem with other lines in any combination and in any sequence.

  19. Atomic Layer Deposited Corrosion Protection: A Path to Stable and Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Andrew G; McIntyre, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    A fundamental challenge in developing photoelectrochemical cells for the renewable production of solar chemicals and fuels is the simultaneous requirement of efficient light absorption and robust stability under corrosive conditions. Schemes for corrosion protection of semiconductor photoelectrodes such as silicon using deposited layers were proposed and attempted for several decades, but increased operational lifetimes were either insufficient or the resulting penalties for device efficiency were prohibitive. In recent years, advances in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thin coatings have made novel materials engineering possible, leading to substantial and simultaneous improvements in stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. The self-limiting, layer-by-layer growth of ALD makes thin films with low pinhole densities possible and may also provide a path to defect control that can generalize this protection technology to a large set of materials necessary to fully realize photoelectrochemical cell technology for artificial photosynthesis.

  20. Fabrication of metallic single electron transistors featuring plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of tunnel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasian, Golnaz

    lithography and lift-off, while atomic layer deposition provides precise control over the thickness of the tunnel barrier and significantly increases the choices for barrier materials. As described below in detail, the fabrication of ultra-thin (~1nm) tunnel transparent barriers with PEALD is in fact challenging; we demonstrate that in fabrication of SETs with PEALD to form the barrier in the Ni-insulator-Ni tunnel junctions, additional NiO layers are parasitically formed in the Ni layers that form the top and bottom electrodes of the tunnel junctions. The NiO on the bottom electrode is formed due to oxidizing effect of the O 2 plasma used in the PEALD process, while the NiO on the bottom of the top electrode is believed to form during the metal deposition due to oxygen-containing contaminants on the surface of the deposited tunnel barrier. We also show that due to the presence of these surface parasitic layers of NiO, the resistance of Ni-insulator-Ni tunnel junctions is drastically increased. Moreover, the transport mechanism is changed from quantum tunneling through the dielectric barrier to one consistent with the tunnel barrier in series with compound layers of NiO and possibly, NiSixOy. The parasitic component in the tunnel junctions results in conduction freeze-out at low temperatures, deviation of junction parameters from ideal model, and excessive noise in the device. The reduction of NiO to Ni is therefore necessary to restore the metal-insulator-metal structure of the junctions. We have studied forming gas anneal as well as H2 plasma treatment as techniques to reduce the NiO layers that are parasitically formed in the junctions. Using either of these two techniques, we reduced the NiO formed on the island after being covered with the PEALD dielectric and before defining the top source and drain. Later, the NiO formed on the bottom of the source/drain is reduced during a second reducing step after the source/drain are formed on the tunnel barrier. Electrical

  1. Surface tension in plasmas related to double layer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Sebastian; Lozneanu, Erzilia [Al. I. Cuza University, Dept. of Plasma Physics, Iasi (Romania)

    2001-07-01

    Self-organized space charge configurations bordered by electric double layers appear in plasma as the result of the transition into a state characterized by local minimum of the free energy. Considering the self-assemblage process of such a complex well-confined space-charge configuration in plasma, known by the name of ball of fire, as a nucleation process, it becomes possible to define an equivalent surface tension for the double layer that covers the core of the ball of fire and to make some predictions for its surface tension coefficient and capacitance. (author)

  2. Morphology and atomic-scale structure of single-layer WS2 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchtbauer, Henrik G; Tuxen, Anders K; Moses, Poul G; Topsøe, Henrik; Besenbacher, Flemming; Lauritsen, Jeppe V

    2013-10-14

    Two-dimensional sheets of transition metal (Mo and W) sulfides are attracting strong attention due to the unique electronic and optical properties associated with the material in its single-layer form. The single-layer MoS2 and WS2 are already in widespread commercial use in catalytic applications as both hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts. Consequently, characterization of the morphology and atomic structure of such particles is of utmost importance for the understanding of the catalytic active phase. However, in comparison with the related MoS2 system only little is known about the fundamental properties of single-layer WS2 (tungstenite). Here, we use an interplay of atom-resolved Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) studies of Au(111)-supported WS2 nanoparticles and calculated edge structures using Density Functional Theory (DFT) to reveal the equilibrium morphology and prevalent edge structures of single-layer WS2. The STM results reveal that the single layer S-W-S sheets adopt a triangular equilibrium shape under the sulfiding conditions of the synthesis, with fully sulfided edges. The predominant edge structures are determined to be the (101[combining macron]0) W-edge, but for the smallest nanoclusters also the (1[combining macron]010) S-edges become important. DFT calculations are used to construct phase diagrams of the WS2 edges, and describe their sulfur and hydrogen coordination under different conditions, and in this way shed light on the catalytic role of WS2 edges.

  3. Three-dimensional spirals of atomic layered MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; Liu, Kaihui; Wong, Andrew Barnabas; Kim, Jonghwan; Hong, Xiaoping; Liu, Chong; Cao, Ting; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Feng; Yang, Peidong

    2014-11-12

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, including graphene, boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), can exhibit novel phenomena distinct from their bulk counterparts and hold great promise for novel electronic and optoelectronic applications. Controlled growth of such 2D materials with different thickness, composition, and symmetry are of central importance to realize their potential. In particular, the ability to control the symmetry of TMD layers is highly desirable because breaking the inversion symmetry can lead to intriguing valley physics, nonlinear optical properties, and piezoelectric responses. Here we report the first chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of spirals of layered MoS2 with atomically thin helical periodicity, which exhibits a chiral structure and breaks the three-dimensional (3D) inversion symmetry explicitly. The spirals composed of tens of connected MoS2 layers with decreasing areas: each basal plane has a triangular shape and shrinks gradually to the summit when spiraling up. All the layers in the spiral assume an AA lattice stacking, which is in contrast to the centrosymmetric AB stacking in natural MoS2 crystals. We show that the noncentrosymmetric MoS2 spiral leads to a strong bulk second-order optical nonlinearity. In addition, we found that the growth of spirals involves a dislocation mechanism, which can be generally applicable to other 2D TMD materials.

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition on Porous Materials: Problems with Conventional Approaches to Catalyst and Fuel Cell Electrode Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzia Ming Onn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD offers exciting possibilities for controlling the structure and composition of surfaces on the atomic scale in heterogeneous catalysts and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC electrodes. However, while ALD procedures and equipment are well developed for applications involving flat surfaces, the conditions required for ALD in porous materials with a large surface area need to be very different. The materials (e.g., rare earths and other functional oxides that are of interest for catalytic applications will also be different. For flat surfaces, rapid cycling, enabled by high carrier-gas flow rates, is necessary in order to rapidly grow thicker films. By contrast, ALD films in porous materials rarely need to be more than 1 nm thick. The elimination of diffusion gradients, efficient use of precursors, and ligand removal with less reactive precursors are the major factors that need to be controlled. In this review, criteria will be outlined for the successful use of ALD in porous materials. Examples of opportunities for using ALD to modify heterogeneous catalysts and SOFC electrodes will be given.

  5. Surface Modification of the Ti6Al4V Alloy with Silicon Carbonitride Layer Deposited by PACVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Stanisława; Konefał-Góral, Jadwiga; Małek, Anna; Kluska, Stanisława; Grzesik, Zbigniew

    2014-09-01

    Four different layers of various silicon, carbon and nitrogen contents on the Ti6Al4V alloy and (001)Si wafers have been deposited by means of Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD) method. The layers were obtained from reactive gas mixture containing SiH4, CH4, NH3 and Ar. After deposition the structure and chemical composition of modified surfaces have been analyzed with use of SEM/EDS technique. Based on these results and thermodynamic calculations, the diffusion coefficients, D, for nitrogen and carbon in alloy were discussed. Scratch test shown that silicon carbonitride layers have good adhesion to metal surface. In order to determine atomic structure of obtained layers, FTIR spectra for layer-(001)Si and layer-Ti6Al4V were registered.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of zinc sulfide with Zn(TMHD){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, Andrew; Jewell, Leila; Doshay, Sage; Church, Carena; Keiber, Trevor; Bridges, Frank; Carter, Sue; Alers, Glenn [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnS films with Zn(TMHD){sub 2} and in situ generated H{sub 2}S as precursors was investigated, over a temperature range of 150-375 Degree-Sign C. ALD behavior was confirmed by investigation of growth behavior and saturation curves. The properties of the films were studied with atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible-infrared spectroscopy, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure. The results demonstrate a film that can penetrate a porous matrix, with a local Zn structure of bulk ZnS, and a band gap between 3.5 and 3.6 eV. The ZnS film was used as a buffer layer in nanostructured PbS quantum dot solar cell devices.

  7. Controlled amino-functionalization by electrochemical reduction of bromo and nitro azobenzene layers bound to Si(111) surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullien, D.; Thüne, P.C.; Jager, W.F.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    4-Nitrobenzenediazonium (4-NBD) and 4-bromobenzenediazonium (4-BBD) salts were grafted electrochemically onto H-terminated, p-doped silicon (Si) surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry experiments clearly showed layer thicknesses of 2–7 nm, which indicate multilayer formation.

  8. Modification of surfaces and surface layers by non equilibrium processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beamson, G.; Brennan, W.J.; Clark, D.T.; Howard, J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasmas are examples of non-equilibrium phenomena which are being used increasingly for the synthesis and modification of materials impossible by conventional routes. This paper introduces methods available by describing the construction and characteristics of some equipment used for the production of different types of plasmas and other non-equilibrium phenomena. This includes high energy ion beams. The special features, advantages and disadvantages of the techniques will be described. There are a multitude of potential application relevant to electronic, metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials. However, scale-up from the laboratory to production equipment depends on establishing a better understanding of both the physics and chemistry of plasma as well as plasma-solid interactions. Examples are given of how such an understanding can be gained. The chemical analysis of polymer surfaces undergoing modification by inert gas, hydrogen or oxygen plasmas is shown to give physical information regarding the relative roles of diffusion of active species, and direct and radiative energy transfer from the plasma. Surface modification by plasma depositing a new material onto an existing substrate is discussed with particular reference to the deposition of amorphous carbon films. Applications of the unique properties of these films are outlined together with our current understanding of these properties based on chemical and physical methods of analysis of both the films and the plasmas producing them. Finally, surface modification by ion beams is briefly illustrated using examples from the electronics and metals industries where the modification has had a largely physical rather than chemical effect on the starting material. (orig.)

  9. Elastic layer under axisymmetric indentation and surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarit, Pong-in; Senjuntichai, Teerapong; Rungamornrat, Jaroon

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a continuum-based approach is adopted to investigate the contact problem of an elastic layer with finite thickness and rigid base subjected to axisymmetric indentation with the consideration of surface energy effects. A complete Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is employed to consider the influence of surface stresses. The indentation problem of a rigid frictionless punch with arbitrary axisymmetric profiles is formulated by employing the displacement Green's functions, derived with the aid of Hankel integral transform technique. The problem is solved by assuming the contact pressure distribution in terms of a linear combination of admissible functions and undetermined coefficients. Those coefficients are then obtained by employing a collocation technique and an efficient numerical quadrature scheme. The accuracy of proposed solution technique is verified by comparing with existing solutions for rigid indentation on an elastic half-space. Selected numerical results for the indenters with flat-ended cylindrical and paraboloidal punch profiles are presented to portray the influence of surface energy effects on elastic fields of the finite layer. It is found that the presence of surface stresses renders the layer stiffer, and the size-dependent behavior of elastic fields is observed in the present solutions. In addition, the surface energy effects become more pronounced with smaller contact area; thus, the influence of surface energy cannot be ignored in the analysis of indentation problem especially when the indenter size is very small such as in the case of nanoindentation.

  10. The structure of alteration layers on cast glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.; Phinney, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    Alteration layers developed on SRL-165 simulated waste glasses in dilute sodium silicate/bicarbonate leaching solutions have been examined by Secondary Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) using fine-scale, multiple-element depth profiling. Selected samples were examined with an imaging detector system, which demonstrated the horizontal homogeneity of the layer development at all depths within the layer. After 1 day of reaction at 90 degrees C the reaction layer shows depletion of glass elements to a depth of 0.2 μm. The surface of the layer in contact with the solution shows enrichment of Si, Al, and alkali elements even at this short reaction time, suggesting the early stages of development of secondary aluminosilicate phases. With increased reaction time, the layer thickens to about 1.3 μm at 91 days, while the evidence for aluminosilicate development at the surface of the layer becomes more prominent. Penetration of hydrogen into the ''unreacted'' glass proceeds to a depth of about 0.5 μm deeper than the alkali depletion zone. This suggests the mechanism of initial reaction of the glass is by attack of the silicate structure by molecular water or hydroxide ion rather than by alkali-hydrogen ion exchange. The simple structure of the layers developed in the silicate solution is in contrast to the complexity of layer structure found when glasses are reacted in deionized water. Since the conditions for geologic disposal will be closer to those used in the silicate leaching experiments, these results hold promise for the ability to model the system to predict long-term performance after disposal in a repository

  11. Influence of the atomic structure of crystal surfaces on the surface diffusion in medium temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousty, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    In this work, we have studied the influence of atomic structure of crystal surface on surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range. Two ways are followed. First, we have measured, using a radiotracer method, the self-diffusion coefficient at 820 K (0.6 T melting) on copper surfaces both the structure and the cleanliness of which were stable during the experiment. We have shown that the interaction between mobile surface defects and steps can be studied through measurements of the anisotropy of surface self diffusion. Second, the behavior of an adatom and a surface vacancy is simulated via a molecular dynamics method, on several surfaces of a Lennard Jones crystal. An inventory of possible migration mechanisms of these surface defects has been drawn between 0.35 and 0.45 Tsub(m). The results obtained with both the methods point out the influence of the surface atomic structure in surface self-diffusion in the medium temperature range [fr

  12. Review on one-dimensional nanostructures prepared by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilágyi, Imre Miklós; Nagy, Dávidné

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the various lD nanostructures, which were prepared by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition (ALD). On the one hand, electrospinning served to make sacrificial polymer templates for the ALD growth; and thus various single or multilayer inorganic nanotubes were obtained. On the other hand, polymer, polymer/inorganic or inorganic nanowire templates were produced by electrospinning. By a consecutive ALD reaction various core/shell nanowires were synthesized

  13. A brief review of atomic layer deposition: from fundamentals to applications

    OpenAIRE

    Richard W. Johnson; Adam Hultqvist; Stacey F. Bent

    2014-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a vapor phase technique capable of producing thin films of a variety of materials. Based on sequential, self-limiting reactions, ALD offers exceptional conformality on high-aspect ratio structures, thickness control at the Angstrom level, and tunable film composition. With these advantages, ALD has emerged as a powerful tool for many industrial and research applications. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to ALD and highlight select applications, ...

  14. Vibrations of microemulsion droplets and vesicles with compressible surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, V.; Brutovsky, B.; Zatovsky, A. V.

    1998-12-01

    The surface vibration spectra of liquid droplets with flexible interfaces, like microemulsion droplets or vesicles, are studied. As distinct from the previous theories, we proceed with exact solutions of hydrodynamic equations for incompressible bulk fluids inside and outside the droplet. The dynamical equations for the interface are those obtained by Lebedev and Muratov [JETP 68, 1011 (1989)] but with the improved continuity equation for the surface layer. Within the Helfrich's concept of the interfacial elasticity and taking into account the compressibility of the surface layer, the exact equation is obtained for the frequencies of the droplet vibrations. The equation describes uniformly a broad region of frequencies from the lowest, almost purely relaxation modes, up to the modes determined mainly by the change of the area per molecule of the layer. The dispersion laws for some of the modes are obtained analytically in the limits of large and small penetration depths of the corresponding waves. Our analysis corrects the previous results concerning the relaxation modes, the capillary wave frequency and the frequency of the mode connected with the fluctuations of molecules in the surface layer. An additional mode of this kind is obtained for almost incompressible layers. In the region corresponding to large penetration depths, a couple of modes exist with frequencies depending both on the surface elasticity and compressibility. In the limit of infinite compressibility of the layer, the lower of the two modes disappears. The conditions necessary for the existence of all the modes were specified. Some representative numerical solutions of the obtained equation are presented as depending on various values of the model parameters including those for realistic microemulsion systems.

  15. Hydrogel brushes grafted from stainless steel via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for marine antifouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingjing, E-mail: jjwang1@hotmail.com; Wei, Jun

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from SS surfaces for marine antifouling. • All brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of biofouling. • The antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density of hydrogels. - Abstract: Crosslinked hydrogel brushes were grafted from stainless steel (SS) surfaces for marine antifouling. The brushes were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) respectively with different fractions of crosslinker in the feed. The grafted layers prepared with different thickness were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and water contact angle measurements. With the increase in the fraction of crosslinker in the feed, the thickness of the grafted layer increased and the surface became smooth. All the brush-coated SS surfaces could effectively reduce the adhesion of bacteria and microalgae and settlement of barnacle cyprids, as compared to the pristine SS surface. The antifouling efficacy of the PEGMA polymer (PPEGMA)-grafted surface was higher than that of the MPC polymer (PMPC)-grafted surfaces. Furthermore, the crosslinked hydrogel brush-grafted surfaces exhibited better fouling resistance than the non-crosslinked polymer brush-grafted surfaces, and the antifouling efficacy increased with the crosslinking density. These hydrogel coatings of low toxicity and excellent anti-adhesive characteristics suggested their useful applications as environmentally friendly antifouling coatings.

  16. Hyperthermal (10-500 eV) collisions of noble gases with Ni(100) surface. Comparison between light and heavy atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.

    1995-01-01

    Collisional events between 10-500 eV atomic beams (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) and a Ni(100) surface are investigated by the classical trajectory method. The calculation employs a molecular dynamics approach combined with a Langevin method for treating energy dissipation to infinite solid. We find that low energy collisions of heavy atoms (Xe and Kr) are characterized by extensive many-body interactions with top layer surface atoms. On the other hand, light atom (Ne and He) collisions can be approximated as a sequence of binary collisions even at these energies. Such a difference in the collisional nature gives rise to the following consequences. Low energy heavy atoms transfer energy mostly to the surface atoms during 45 angle collision. They scatter from the surface with a narrow angular distribution centered in a supraspecular direction. The ratio of the scattered to incident particle energy rapidly decreases with increasing beam energy of heavy atoms. The sputtering yield for Ni atoms by heavy atom bombardment increases quite linearly with beam energy, which is attributed to a linear proportionality between the beam energy and the energy transfered to a surface. Near the threshold energy sputtering can occur more efficiently by light atom bombardment. The energy transfer ratio to solid continuously increases with beam energy for light atoms. For heavy projectiles, on the other hand, this ratio reaches a maximum at the energy of ca, 100 eV, above which it stays nearly constant but slightly decreases. ((orig.))

  17. Atomically-Precise Layer Controlled Synthesis and Characterization of cm-Scale Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.-H.; Brar, V. W.; Jariwala, D.; Sherrott, M. C.; Tseng, W.-S.; Wu, C.-I.; Yeh, N.-C.; Atwater, H. A.

    Hexagonal boron nitride is the most promising two-dimensional insulator for device applications because of its large band gap and low density of charged impurities in addition to being isostructural and isoelectronic with graphene. Here we report the synthesis of h-BN films over cm2 area on Cu foils via chemical vapor deposition, with layer control from 1 to 20 layers. We have characterized these large-area h-BN films at both atomic and macroscopic scales. Raman and infrared spectroscopy indicate the presence of B-N bonds and reveal a linear dependence of thickness with growth time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provides the film stoichiometry, showing the B/N atom ratio to be 1 for all thicknesses. Atomically resolved STM images of monolayer h-BN films on graphene and Au substrates display both the atomic h-BN honeycomb lattice and a Moiré superlattice between h-BN and graphene. Electrical current transport in Au/h-BN/Au heterostructures indicates that these h-BN films behave like excellent tunnel barriers and also possess a high value of the hard-breakdown field strength. Our large-area h-BN films are therefore structurally, chemically and electronically uniform over cm2 areas. Department of Energy DE-FG02- 07ER46405 and DE-SC0001293.

  18. Single-Atom Pd₁/Graphene Catalyst Achieved by Atomic Layer Deposition: Remarkable Performance in Selective Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Cheng, Hao; Yi, Hong; Lin, Yue; Yao, Tao; Wang, Chunlei; Li, Junjie; Wei, Shiqiang; Lu, Junling

    2015-08-26

    We reported that atomically dispersed Pd on graphene can be fabricated using the atomic layer deposition technique. Aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy both confirmed that isolated Pd single atoms dominantly existed on the graphene support. In selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene, the single-atom Pd1/graphene catalyst showed about 100% butenes selectivity at 95% conversion at a mild reaction condition of about 50 °C, which is likely due to the changes of 1,3-butadiene adsorption mode and enhanced steric effect on the isolated Pd atoms. More importantly, excellent durability against deactivation via either aggregation of metal atoms or carbonaceous deposits during a total 100 h of reaction time on stream was achieved. Therefore, the single-atom catalysts may open up more opportunities to optimize the activity, selectivity, and durability in selective hydrogenation reactions.

  19. Highly photocatalytic TiO2 interconnected porous powder fabricated by sponge-templated atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shengqiang; Zhao, Yuting; Huang, Gaoshan; Wang, Jiao; Baunack, Stefan; Gemming, Thomas; Li, Menglin; Zheng, Lirong; Schmidt, Oliver G; Mei, Yongfeng

    2015-09-11

    A titanium dioxide (TiO2) interconnected porous structure has been fabricated by means of atomic layer deposition of TiO2 onto a reticular sponge template. The obtained freestanding TiO2 with large surface area can be easily taken out of the water to solve a complex separation procedure. A compact and conformal nanocoating was evidenced by morphologic characterization. A phase transition, as well as production of oxygen vacancies with increasing annealing temperature, was detected by x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The photocatalytic experimental results demonstrated that the powder with appropriate annealing treatment possessed excellent photocatalytic ability due to the co-action of high surface area, oxygen vacancies and the optimal crystal structure.

  20. Enhanced Dry Reforming of Methane on Ni and Ni-Pt Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Troy D.; Montemore, Matthew M.; Lubers, Alia M.; Ellis, Lucas D.; Weimer, Alan; Falconer, John L.; Medlin, James W.

    2015-02-25

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit Ni and Pt on alumina supports to form monometallic and bimetallic catalysts with initial particle sizes of 1–2.4 nm. The ALD catalysts were more active (per mass of metal) than catalysts prepared by incipient wetness (IW) for dry reforming of methane (DRM), and they did not form carbon whiskers during reaction due to their sufficiently small size. Catalysts modified by Pt ALD had higher rates of reaction per mass of metal and inhibited coking, whereas NiPt catalysts synthesized by IW still formed carbon whiskers. Temperature-programmed reduction of Ni catalysts modified by Pt ALD indicated the presence of bimetallic interaction. Density functional theory calculations suggested that under reaction conditions, the NiPt surfaces form Ni-terminated surfaces that are associated with higher DRM rates (due to their C and O adsorption energies, as well as the CO formation and CH4 dissociation energies).

  1. AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT using NbAlO dielectric layer grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhi-Wei; Feng, Qian; Hao, Yue; Wang, Dang-Hui; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Quan, Si; Xu, Sheng-Rui

    2010-07-01

    We present an AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) with an NbAlO high-k dielectric deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Surface morphology of samples are observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), indicating that the ALD NbAlO has an excellent-property surface. Moreover, the sharp transition from depletion to accumulation in capacitance-voltage (C-V)curse of MIS-HEMT demonstrates the high quality bulk and interface properties of NbAlO on AlGaN. The fabricated MIS-HEMT with a gate length of 0.5 μm exhibits a maximum drain current of 960 mA/mm, and the reverse gate leakage current is almost 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of reference HEMT. Based on the improved direct-current operation, the NbAlO can be considered to be a potential gate oxide comparable to other dielectric insulators.

  2. AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT using NbAlO dielectric layer grown by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-Wei, Bi; Qian, Feng; Yue, Hao; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Jin-Cheng, Zhang; Si, Quan; Sheng-Rui, Xu; Dang-Hui, Wang

    2010-01-01

    We present an AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) with an NbAlO high-k dielectric deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Surface morphology of samples are observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), indicating that the ALD NbAlO has an excellent-property surface. Moreover, the sharp transition from depletion to accumulation in capacitance–voltage (C–V)curse of MIS-HEMT demonstrates the high quality bulk and interface properties of NbAlO on AlGaN. The fabricated MIS-HEMT with a gate length of 0.5 μm exhibits a maximum drain current of 960 mA/mm, and the reverse gate leakage current is almost 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of reference HEMT. Based on the improved direct-current operation, the NbAlO can be considered to be a potential gate oxide comparable to other dielectric insulators. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Sub-nanometer dimensions control of core/shell nanoparticles prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M J; Verheijen, M A; Bol, A A; Kessels, W M M

    2015-03-06

    Bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) are the subject of intense research due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Accurate and independent control over the dimensions of both core and shell would allow for unprecedented catalytic performance. Here, we demonstrate that both core and shell dimensions of Pd/Pt core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Al2O3 substrates can be controlled at the sub-nanometer level by using a novel strategy based on atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results it is derived that the main conditions for accurate dimension control of these core/shell NPs are: (i) a difference in surface energy between the deposited core metal and the substrate to obtain island growth; (ii) a process yielding linear growth of the NP cores with ALD cycles to obtain monodispersed NPs with a narrow size distribution; (iii) a selective ALD process for the shell metal yielding a linearly increasing thickness to obtain controllable shell growth exclusively on the cores. For Pd/Pt core/shell NPs it is found that a minimum core diameter of 1 nm exists above which the NP cores are able to catalytically dissociate the precursor molecules for shell growth. In addition, initial studies on the stability of these core/shell NPs have been carried out, and it has been demonstrated that core/shell NPs can be deposited by ALD on high aspect ratio substrates such as nanowire arrays. These achievements show therefore that ALD has significant potential for the preparation of tuneable heterogeneous catalyst systems.

  4. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.

  5. Quantized layer growth at liquid-crystal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocko, B. M.; Braslau, A.; Pershan, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    of the specular reflectivity is consistent with a sinusoidal density modulation, starting at the surface and terminating abruptly, after an integral number of bilayers. As the transition is approached the number of layers increases in quantized steps from zero to five before the bulk undergoes a first...

  6. Whirlwinds and hairpins in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oncley, Steven P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Tong, Chenning

    2016-01-01

    Vortices in the atmospheric surface layer are characterized using observations at unprecedented resolution from a fixed array of 31 turbulence sensors. During the day, these vortices likely are dust devils, though no visual observations are available for confirmation. At night, hairpin vortices

  7. Measurement of grassland evaporation using a surface-layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A dual-beam surface-layer scintillometer (SLS) was used to estimate sensible heat flux (H) every 2 min for a path length of either 50 or 101 m, for more than 30 months in a mesic grassland in eastern South Africa. The SLS method relies on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, the correlation between the laser beam signal ...

  8. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins,

  9. The determination of turbulent structures in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The turbulent flow in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) contains turbulent structures, which are defined as spatially coherent, organized flow motions. 'Organized' means that characteristic patterns, observed at a point in space, occur almost simultaneously in more than one turbulence signal and

  10. DESIGN AND CALCULATION OF AERODROMECOAING WITH HEATED SURFACE LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Piskunov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available  The developed constructions with heated by surface layers for aerodromes and auto roads when developed composition of electroconductive concrete reinforced with chemical electrical conductive fibres being used was researched. The experimentally obtained characteristics of ended conductive concrete reinforced with fibers were presented. Calculation by developed heated construction of shell was made.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of high performance ultrathin TiO₂ blocking layers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Han; Woodroof, Mariah; Lee, Kyoungmi; Parsons, Gregory N

    2013-06-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) often use a thin insulating or semiconducting layer (typically TiO₂) between the transparent conductive oxide and the mesoporous TiO₂ to block electron/hole recombination at the conducting oxide/electrolyte interface. The blocking layer (BL) is essential to maintain efficient charge generation under low light conditions, at which DSSCs perform well compared to common semiconductor-based photovoltaic devices. In this work, we show that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can produce ultrathin (ALD BLs are the thinnest optimized DSSC BLs reported to date. The BL retards the open-circuit voltage decay and extends the electron lifetime from ≈0.2 s to more than 10 s at 0.3 V, confirming that the ALD films significantly impede photogenerated charge recombination. By preparing BLs through other deposition techniques, we directly demonstrate that ALD results in better performance, even with thinner films, which is ascribed to the lower pinhole density of ALD materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Layer-by-layer generation of PEG-based regenerable immunosensing surfaces for small-sized analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Maria; Ben Haddada, Maroua; Méthivier, Christophe; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar; Boujday, Souhir

    2015-05-15

    Small molecules (haptens) like pharmaceuticals or peptides can serve as targets for antibody binding in competitive immunoassay-based flow-through assays. In this work, a strategy for preparing polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings for subsequent hapten immobilization on glass-type silica surfaces is presented and characterized in detail. Two substrates bearing terminal silanol groups were utilized, a glass slide and a silicon wafer. First, surfaces were thoroughly cleaned and pretreated to generate additional silanol groups. Then, a silane layer with terminal epoxy groups was created using 3-glycidyloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GOPTS). Epoxy groups were used to bind a layer of diamino-poly(ethylene glycol) (DAPEG) with terminal amino groups. Finally, the low molecular weight compound diclofenac was bound to the surface to be used as model ligand for competitive biosensing of haptens. The elementary steps were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle measurement, grazing-angle attenuated total reflection (GA-ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The data collected using these techniques have confirmed the successive grafting of the molecular species, evidencing, that homogeneous monolayers were created on the silica surfaces and validated the proposed mechanism of functionalization. The resulting surfaces were used to investigate polyclonal anti-diclofenac antibodies recognition and reversibility using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements or an automated flow-through immunoassay with chemiluminescence (CL) read-out. For both techniques, recognition and reversibility of the antibody binding were observed. The stability of sensors over time was also assessed and no decrease in CL response was observed upon 14 days in aqueous solution. The herein presented strategy for surface functionalization can be used in the future as reproducible and reusable universal platform for hapten

  13. Electrical double layer interactions between dissimilar oxide surfaces with charge regulation and Stern-Grahame layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Derek Y C; Healy, Thomas W; Supasiti, Tharatorn; Usui, S

    2006-04-01

    Models of surfaces with intrinsic ionisable amphoteric surface sites governed by the dissociation of acid-base potential determining ion species together with the capacity for the adsorption of anion and cations of the supporting electrolyte are required to describe both the results of electrokinetic and titration measurements of inorganic oxides. The Gouy-Chapman-Stern-Grahame (CGSG) model is one such model that has been widely used in the literature. The electrical double layer interaction between two dissimilar CGSG surfaces has been studied by Usui recently [S. Usui, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 280 (2004) 113] where erroneous discontinuities in the slope of the pressure-separation relation were observed. We revisit this calculation and provide a simple general methodology to analyse the electrical double layer interaction between dissimilar ionisable surfaces with ion adsorption.

  14. Study on the GaAs(110) surface using emitted atom spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayone, J.E.; Sanchez, E.A.; Grizzi, O.; Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza

    1998-01-01

    The facilities implemented at Bariloche for the ion scattering spectrometry is described, and recent examples of the technique application to determine the atomic structure and the composition of metallic and semiconductor surfaces, pure and with different adsorbates. The surface analysis technique using emitted atom spectrometry is discussed. The sensitivity to the GaAs(110) surface atomic relaxation is presented, and the kinetic of hydrogen adsorption by the mentioned surface is studied

  15. Characterization of polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour by sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opdahl, Aric; Koffas, Telly S; Amitay-Sadovsky, Ella; Kim, Joonyeong; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to study polymer surface structure and surface mechanical behaviour, specifically to study the relationships between the surface properties of polymers and their bulk compositions and the environment to which the polymer is exposed. The combination of SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM has been used to study surface segregation behaviour of polyolefin blends at the polymer/air and polymer/solid interfaces. SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM experiments have also been performed to characterize the properties of polymer/liquid and polymer/polymer interfaces, focusing on hydrogel materials. A method was developed to study the surface properties of hydrogel contact lens materials at various hydration conditions. Finally, the effect of mechanical stretching on the surface composition and surface mechanical behaviour of phase-separated polyurethanes, used in biomedical implant devices, has been studied by both SFG surface vibrational spectroscopy and AFM. (topical review)

  16. Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide and zinc tin oxide using tetraethyltin and ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Ellis J.; Gladfelter, Wayne L., E-mail: wlg@umn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Johnson, Forrest; Campbell, Stephen A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Silicon or glass substrates exposed to sequential pulses of tetraethyltin (TET) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were coated with thin films of SnO{sub 2}. Self-limiting deposition was found using 8 s pulse times, and a uniform thickness per cycle (TPC) of 0.2 nm/cycle was observed in a small, yet reproducible, temperature window from 290 to 320 °C. The as-deposited, stoichiometric SnO{sub 2} films were amorphous and transparent above 400 nm. Interspersing pulses of diethylzinc and O{sub 3} among the TET:O{sub 3} pulses resulted in deposition of zinc tin oxide films, where the fraction of tin, defined as [at. % Sn/(at. % Sn + at. % Zn)], was controlled by the ratio of TET pulses, specifically n{sub TET}:(n{sub TET} + n{sub DEZ}) where n{sub TET} and n{sub DEZ} are the number of precursor/O{sub 3} subcycles within each atomic layer deposition (ALD) supercycle. Based on film thickness and composition measurements, the TET pulse time required to reach saturation in the TPC of SnO{sub 2} on ZnO surfaces was increased to >30 s. Under these conditions, film stoichiometry as a function of the TET pulse ratio was consistent with the model devised by Elliott and Nilsen. The as-deposited zinc tin oxide (ZTO) films were amorphous and remained so even after annealing at 450 °C in air for 1 h. The optical bandgap of the transparent ZTO films increased as the tin concentration increased. Hall measurements established that the n-type ZTO carrier concentration was 3 × 10{sup 17} and 4 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} for fractional tin concentrations of 0.28 and 0.63, respectively. The carrier mobility decreased as the concentration of tin increased. A broken gap pn junction was fabricated using ALD-deposited ZTO and a sputtered layer of cuprous oxide. The junction demonstrated ohmic behavior and low resistance consistent with similar junctions prepared using sputter-deposited ZTO.

  17. Quantum Hall states of atomic Bose gases: Density profiles in single-layer and multilayer geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N. R.; Lankvelt, F. J. M. van; Reijnders, J. W.; Schoutens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the density profiles of confined atomic Bose gases in the high-rotation limit, in single-layer and multilayer geometries. We show that, in a local-density approximation, the density in a single layer shows a landscape of quantized steps due to the formation of incompressible liquids, which are analogous to fractional quantum Hall liquids for a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field. In a multilayered setup we find different phases, depending on the strength of the interlayer tunneling t. We discuss the situation where a vortex lattice in the three-dimensional condensate (at large tunneling) undergoes quantum melting at a critical tunneling t c 1 . For tunneling well below t c 1 one expects weakly coupled or isolated layers, each exhibiting a landscape of quantum Hall liquids. After expansion, this gives a radial density distribution with characteristic features (cusps) that provide experimental signatures of the quantum Hall liquids

  18. Probing surfaces with single-polymer atomic force microscope experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedsam, C; Gaub, H E; Netz, R R

    2006-03-01

    In the past 15 years atomic force microscope (AFM) based force spectroscopy has become a versatile tool to study inter- and intramolecular interactions of single polymer molecules. Irreversible coupling of polymer molecules between the tip of an AFM cantilever and the substrate allows one to study the stretching response up to the high force regime of several nN. For polymers that glide or slip laterally over the surface with negligible friction, on the other hand, the measured force profiles exhibit plateaus which allow one to extract the polymer adsorption energies. Long-term stable polymer coatings of the AFM tips allow for the possibility of repeating desorption experiments from solid supports with individual molecules many times, yielding good sampling statistics and thus reliable estimates for adsorption energies. In combination with recent advances in theoretical modeling, a detailed picture of the conformational statistics, backbone elasticity, and the adsorption characteristics of single polymer molecules is obtained.

  19. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Patankar, Neelesh A; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-09-13

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling--by heat transfer--the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating.

  20. Stabilization of Leidenfrost vapour layer by textured superhydrophobic surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2012-09-12

    In 1756, Leidenfrost observed that water drops skittered on a sufficiently hot skillet, owing to levitation by an evaporative vapour film. Such films are stable only when the hot surface is above a critical temperature, and are a central phenomenon in boiling. In this so-called Leidenfrost regime, the low thermal conductivity of the vapour layer inhibits heat transfer between the hot surface and the liquid. When the temperature of the cooling surface drops below the critical temperature, the vapour film collapses and the system enters a nucleate-boiling regime, which can result in vapour explosions that are particularly detrimental in certain contexts, such as in nuclear power plants. The presence of these vapour films can also reduce liquid-solid drag. Here we show how vapour film collapse can be completely suppressed at textured superhydrophobic surfaces. At a smooth hydrophobic surface, the vapour film still collapses on cooling, albeit at a reduced critical temperature, and the system switches explosively to nucleate boiling. In contrast, at textured, superhydrophobic surfaces, the vapour layer gradually relaxes until the surface is completely cooled, without exhibiting a nucleate-boiling phase. This result demonstrates that topological texture on superhydrophobic materials is critical in stabilizing the vapour layer and thus in controlling-by heat transfer-the liquid-gas phase transition at hot surfaces. This concept can potentially be applied to control other phase transitions, such as ice or frost formation, and to the design of low-drag surfaces at which the vapour phase is stabilized in the grooves of textures without heating. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. A many-body embedded atom potential for describing ejection of atoms from surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, B.J.; Walzl, K.; El-Maazawi, M.; Winograd, N.; Reimann, C.T.; Deaven, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we show that many-body interactions are important for describing the energy- and angle-resolved distributions of neutral Rh atoms ejected from keV-ion-bombarded Rh{111}. We compare separate classical-dynamics simulations of the sputtering process assuming either a many-body potential or a pairwise additive potential. The most dramatic difference between the many-body potential and the pair potential is the predicted kinetic energy distributions. The pair-potential kinetic energy distribution peaks at ∼ 2 eV, whereas the many-body potential predicts a broader peak at ∼ 4 eV, giving much better agreement with experiment. This difference between the model potentials is due to the predicted nature of the attractive interaction in the surface region through which all ejecting particles pass. (author)

  2. Functionalized polymer film surfaces via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Y.; Li, J.S.; Yang, W.T.; Xu, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to manipulate and control the surface properties of polymer films, without altering the substrate properties, is crucial to their wide-spread applications. In this work, a simple one-step method for the direct immobilization of benzyl chloride groups (as the effective atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators) on the polymer films was developed via benzophenone-induced coupling of 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC). Polyethylene (PE) and nylon films were selected as examples of polymer films to illustrate the functionalization of film surfaces via surface-initiated ATRP. Functional polymer brushes of (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, sodium 4-styrenesulfonate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and glycidyl methacrylate, as well as their block copolymer brushes, have been prepared via surface-initiated ATRP from the VBC-coupled PE or nylon film surfaces. With the development of a simple approach to the covalent immobilization of ATRP initiators on polymer film surfaces and the inherent versatility of surface-initiated ATRP, the surface functionality of polymer films can be precisely tailored. - Highlights: ► Atom transfer radical polymerization initiators were simply immobilized. ► Different functional polymer brushes were readily prepared. ► Their block copolymer brushes were also readily prepared

  3. Aluminum oxide barrier coating on polyethersulfone substrate by atomic layer deposition for barrier property enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Kim, Sung Soo

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum oxide layers were deposited on flexible polyethersulfone (PES) substrates via plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and oxygen as precursor and reactant materials. Several process parameters in PEALD process were investigated in terms of refractive index and layer thickness. Number of process cycle increased the thickness and refractive index of the layer to enhance the barrier properties. Non-physisorbed TMA and unreacted oxygen were purged before and after the plasma reaction, respectively. Identical purge time was applied to TMA and oxygen and it was optimized for 10 s. Thinner and denser layer was formed as substrate temperature increased. However, the PES substrate could be deformed above 120 o C. Aluminum oxide layer formed on PES at optimized conditions have 11.8 nm of thickness and reduced water vapor transmission rate and oxygen transmission rate to below 4 x 10 -3 g/m 2 day and 4 x 10 -3 cm 3 /m 2 day, respectively. Polycarbonate and polyethylene naphthalate films were also tested at optimized conditions, and they also showed quite appreciable barrier properties to be used as plastic substrates.

  4. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal: Main characteristics and related mechanisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Suresh, I.; Gautham, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Lengaigne, M.; Rao, R.R; Neetu, S.; Hegde, A

    Surface layer temperature inversion (SLTI), a warm layer sandwiched between surface and subsurface colder waters, has been reported to frequently occur in conjunction with barrier layers in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), with potentially commensurable...

  5. Dynamic change in the surface and layer structures during epitaxial growth of Si on a Si(111)-7x7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Y.; Shigeta, Y.; Maki, K.

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic process during growth of a Si layer on the Si(111)-7x7 surface held at 380 deg. C, the rocking curve of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is continuously measured at 0.5 deg. to 6 deg. at intervals of 0.05 deg. to the glancing angle of the incident electron beam which takes 18 sec. At the initial growth stage, the multilayer islands are grown on the native 7x7 surface with broader Bragg peaks in the rocking curve than those from the native surface. The sharpness of the Bragg peak is subsequently recovered after the thickness of the Si layer reaches 3 BL (1 BL=0.31 nm), at which the growth transforms to layer-by-layer growth. The comparison of the measured rocking curve with the calculated one based on the dynamical theory of RHEED intensity is also performed by optimizing each atomic position in the growing layer so as to minimize the difference between both curves. The space of the double layer of the (111) plane in the multilayer islands expands and is restored to the normal spacing after the growth mode transforms to the layer-by-layer mode. The broadening of the Bragg peaks at the initial growth stage relates to the rearrangement process of a stacking-fault layer in the 7x7 structure on the substrate surface

  6. THz detectors using surface Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco

    2006-01-01

    We describe a proposal for THz detectors based on the excitation of surface waves, in layered superconductors, at frequencies lower than the Josephson plasma frequency ω J . These waves propagate along the vacuum-superconductor interface and are attenuated in both transverse directions out of the surface (i.e., towards the superconductor and towards the vacuum). The surface Josephson plasma waves are also important for the complete suppression of the specular reflection from a sample (Wood's anomalies, used for gratings) and produce a huge enhancement of the wave absorption, which can be used for the detection of THz waves

  7. Double layer of platinum electrodes: Non-monotonic surface charging phenomena and negative double layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Eikerling, Michael

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a refined double layer model of platinum electrodes accounting for chemisorbed oxygen species, oriented interfacial water molecules, and ion size effects in solution is presented. It results in a non-monotonic surface charging relation and a peculiar capacitance vs. potential curve with a maximum and possibly negative values in the potential regime of oxide-formation.

  8. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. Fabrication of Robust and Antifouling Superhydrophobic Surfaces via Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao-Hua; Guo, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Jian-Zhong; Jia, Shun-Tian

    2015-04-22

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of fluorinated methacrylates on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics. The hydrophobicity of the PET fabric was systematically tunable by controlling the polymerization time. The obtained superhydrophobic fabrics showed excellent chemical robustness even after exposure to different chemicals, such as acid, base, salt, acetone, and toluene. Importantly, the fabrics maintained superhydrophobicity after 2500 abrasion cycles, 100 laundering cycles, and long time exposure to UV irradiation. Also, the surface of the superhydrophobic fabrics showed excellent antifouling properties.

  10. Boundary layers of aqueous surfactant and block copolymer solutions against hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steitz, Roland; Schemmel, Sebastian; Shi Hongwei; Findenegg, Gerhard H

    2005-01-01

    The boundary layer of aqueous surfactants and amphiphilic triblock copolymers against flat solid surfaces of different degrees of hydrophobicity was investigated by neutron reflectometry (NR), grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Solid substrates of different hydrophobicities were prepared by appropriate surface treatment or by coating silicon wafers with polymer films of different chemical natures. For substrates coated with thin films (20-30 nm) of deuterated poly(styrene) (water contact angle θ w ∼ 90), neutron reflectivity measurements on the polymer/water interface revealed a water depleted liquid boundary layer of 2-3 nm thickness and a density about 90% of the bulk water density. No pronounced depletion layer was found at the interface of water against a less hydrophobic polyelectrolyte coating (θ w ∼ 63). It is believed that the observed depletion layer at the hydrophobic polymer/water interface is a precursor of the nanobubbles which have been observed by AFM at this interface. Decoration of the polymer coatings by adsorbed layers of nonionic C m E n surfactants improves their wettability by the aqueous phase at surfactant concentrations well below the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Here, GISANS experiments conducted on the system SiO 2 /C 8 E 4 /D 2 O reveal that there is no preferred lateral organization of the C 8 E 4 adsorption layers. For amphiphilic triblock copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO) it is found that under equilibrium conditions they form solvent-swollen brushes both at the air/water and the solid/water interface. In the latter case, the brushes transform to uniform, dense layers after extensive rinsing with water and subsequent solvent evaporation. The primary adsorption layers maintain properties of the precursor brushes. In particular, their thickness scales with the number of ethylene oxide units (EO) of the block copolymer. In the case of dip-coating without

  11. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Yeung, Kelvin W.K. [Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics & Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wu, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilin.wu@gmail.com [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials, Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  12. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes/chitosan hybrids on Ti implants by atom layer deposited ZnO nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yizhou; Liu, Xiangmei; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Chu, Paul K.; Wu, Shuilin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon naonotubes/chitosan/ZnO coating was first constructed on Ti implants. • This system endowed Ti implants with excellent self-antibacterial activity. • The amount of Zn could be precisely controlled by atom layer deposition. • This system could regulate cell behaviors on metallic implants. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ZnO using atomic layer deposition (ALD) on chitosan (CS) modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first introduced onto the surfaces of biomedical implants. When the content of ZnO is not sufficient, CNTs can strengthen the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus by 8% and 39%, respectively. CS can improve the cytocompatibility of CNTs and ZnO. The amount of Zn content can be controlled by changing the cycling numbers of ALD processes. This hybrid coating can not only endow medical implants with high self-antibacterial efficacy against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) of over 73% and 98%, respectively, but also regulate the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts by controlling the amount of ZnO.

  13. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of Zn(O,S) buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Poodt, P.; Illeberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxysulfide has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) and successfully applied as buffer layer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. S-ALD combines high deposition rates (up to nm/s) with the advantages of conventional ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and superior

  14. Superficial hardened layer of cut surface by turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croitoru Sorin Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of research methods in metal cutting process is to measure hardness in the contact zone between cutting tool and workpiece. The objective of the performed research was to determine thickness and hardness of the superficial layer of cut surface due to cutting process, both orthogonal and complex cutting. The most important finding was that thickness of the superficial hardened layer is very thin under considered conditions, less than 0.01 … 0.02 mm. This research should be continued.

  15. Growth of micrometric oxide layers to explore laser decontamination of metallic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear industry produces a wide range of radioactive waste in terms of hazard level, contaminants and material. For metallic equipment like steam generators, the radioactivity is mainly located in the oxide surface. In order to study and develop safe techniques for dismantling and for decontamination, it is important to have access to oxide layers with a representative distribution of non-radioactive contaminants. In this paper we propose a method for the creation of oxide layers on stainless steel 304L with europium (Eu as contaminant. This technique consists in spraying an Eu-solution on stainless steel samples. The specimens are firstly treated with a pulsed nanosecond laser after which the steel samples are placed in a 873 K furnace for various durations in order to grow an oxide layer. The oxide structure and in-depth distribution of Eu in the oxide layer were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray microanalyzer, as well as by glow discharge optical emission or mass spectrometry. The oxide layers were grown to thicknesses in the range of 200 nm–4.5 μm depending on the laser treatment parameters and the heating duration. These contaminated oxides had a ‘duplex structure’ with a mean concentration of the order of 6 × 1016 atoms/cm2 (15 μg/cm2 of europium in the volume of the oxide layer. It appears that europium implementation prevented the oxide growth in the furnace. Nevertheless, the presence of the contamination had no impact on the thickness of the oxide layers obtained by preliminary laser treatment. These oxide layers were used to study the decontamination of metallic surfaces such as stainless steel 304L using a nanosecond pulsed laser.

  16. An identification of the soft polyelectrolyte gel-like layer on silica colloids using atomic force and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škvarla, Jiří; Škvarla, Juraj

    2017-10-01

    A procedure is introduced for measuring the radius of spherical colloid particles from the curvature of upper parts of their central cross-sectional profiles obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). To minimize the possible compression and displacement of the spheres, AFM is operated in a mode rendering a constant ultralow pN force on the tip. The procedure allows us to evaluate the mean radius of nearly monodisperse submicrometer spheres of silica in their natively hydrated state in aqueous electrolyte solutions, irrespective of whether they are coagulated or not. A variation in the volume (swelling degree) of layers delimited by the AFM mean radii of these spheres in KCl solutions and their invariable mean radius in vacuum is obtained that follows a scaling power law derived in polymer physics for swellable polyelectrolyte gels and deduced previously by us from coagulation tests. This supports our former suggestion about the existence of soft polyelectrolyte gel-like layer developed spontaneously around silica surfaces and colloids. We discuss this finding in the context of recent knowledge about the structure of the silica/water interface obtained from direct surface force measurements between macroscopic silica surfaces and from particle size measurements of silica colloids and highlight its importance for colloid chemistry and condensed mattter physics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Surface morphology evolution of amorphous Fe-Si layers upon thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C M; Tsang, H K; Wong, S P; Ke, N [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Hark, S K [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: cmsun@ee.cuhk.edu.hk

    2008-04-21

    Changes in the surface morphology of ion-beam-synthesized amorphous Fe-Si layers after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and furnace annealing (FA) were investigated using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Completely amorphous Fe-Si layers were formed by Fe implantation at a dosage of 5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} using a metal vapour vacuum arc ion source under 80 kV extraction voltage and cryogenic temperature. After RTA at 850 deg. C, {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates in Si are completely aggregated from this amorphous Fe-Si layer and the surface of the implanted layer remains flat. To date, no obvious photoluminescence (PL) spectrum has been reported from RTA treated {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates. However, after annealing at 850 deg. C for 40 s, high-quality {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates in Si are obtained which clearly show 1.5 {mu}m PL at 80 K for the first time. Even though additional long-term FA at 850 deg. C can enhance PL intensity to a limited extent, the longer thermal treatment induces the outdiffusion of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} precipitates and degrades the surface flatness.

  18. Atom probe study on microstructure change in severely deformed pearlitic steels: application to rail surfaces and drawn wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Pearlitic steel is used as the material for high tensile steel wires, rails and wheels due to its high work hardening and wear resistance. These properties arise from a layered structure comprising deformable lamellar ferrite and hard lamellar cementite. This paper reviews the microstructural change in heavily drawn pearlitic steels wires and worn surfaces of pearlitic rails using atom probe tomography analysis. The cementite decomposition mechanism was elucidated for heavily drawn pearlitic steel wires. For pearlitic rail steels, atomic scale characterization of worn surfaces and of the white etching layer (WEL) were performed, and a mechanism for the formation of the WEL was proposed. The differences and similarities in microstructure and in the state of the cementite in these severely deformed pearlitic steels are discussed.

  19. Thin-film encapsulation of inverted indium-tin-oxide-free polymer solar cells by atomic layer deposition with improvement on stability and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kan; Fan, Huanhuan; Huang, Chaofan; Hong, Xia; Fang, Xu; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu; Li, Chengshuai; Huang, Zhuoyin; Zhen, Hongyu

    2012-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is employed to encapsulate inverted indium-tin-oxide-free polymer solar cells (IFSCs) with a structure of Al/TiOx/P3HT:PC61BM/PEDOT:PSS. The encapsulation layer, Al2O3, is deposited by ALD on the light incident surface. The thickness of the Al2O3 layer can thus be optimized through optical simulation to minimize light loss of IFSCs. Based on optical calculation, we encapsulated the device (85 nm thick active layer) with a 30 nm thick Al2O3 layer. The resulting ALD encapsulated IFSCs show much better device performance and higher stability than the glass-encapsulated ones.

  20. Effect of dangling bonds of ultra-thin silicon film surface on electronic states of internal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiyama, Eiji, E-mail: ejkamiyama@aol.com [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan); Sueoka, Koji, E-mail: sueoka@c.oka-pu.ac.jp [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-1197 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    We investigate how dangling bonds at the surface of ultra-thin films affect electronic states inside the film by first principles calculation. In the calculation models, dangling bonds at the surface are directly treated, and the impact on the electronic states of the internal atoms was estimated. Models with a H-terminated surface at both sides have no state in the bandgap. Whereas, new states appear at around the midgap by removing terminated H at surfaces of one or both sides. These mid-gap states appear at all layers, the states of which decrease as the layer moves away from the surface with dangling bonds. The sum of local DOS corresponds to the number of dangling bonds of the model. If the activation rate is assumed as 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, which is an ordinary value of thermal oxide passivation on Si (1 0 0) surface, volume concentration and surface concentration at the 18th layer from the surface in a 36-layer model are estimated to be 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, respectively. These numbers are comparable to the values, especially the dopant volume concentration of Si substrate used in current VLSI technology ({approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}). Therefore, the midgap states inside ultra-thin films may degrade performance of the FinFETs.

  1. Surface roughness effects on the hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the response of a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer to a step change in surface roughness has been performed. The boundary layer on a flat nozzle wall of a Mach 6 wind tunnel was subjected to abrupt changes in surface roughness and its adjustment to the new surface conditions was examined. Both mean and fluctuating flow properties were acquired for smooth-to-rough and rough-to-smooth surface configurations. The boundary layer was found to respond gradually and to attain new equilibrium profiles, for both the mean and the fluctuating properties, some 10 to 25 delta downstream of the step change. Mean flow self-similarity was the first to establish itself, followed by the mass flux fluctuations, followed in turn by the total temperature fluctuations. Use of a modified Van Driest transformation resulted in good correlations of smooth and rough wall data in the form of the incompressible law of the wall. This is true even in the nonequilibrium vicinity of the step for small roughness heights. The present data are found to correlate well with previously published roughness effect data from low and high speed flows when the roughnesses are characterized by an equivalent sand grain roughness height.

  2. Effect of local metal microstructure on adsorption on bimetallic surfaces: Atomic nitrogen on Ni/Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption of atomic nitrogen on Ni/Pt(111) surface bimetallics has been investigated as a function of the local microstructure of Ni and Pt atoms via density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Microstructures include surface and subsurface Ni atoms on Pt(111) as limiting cases, and also small clusters of Ni in the first and/or second layer of Pt. It is shown that the binding energy of N can be approximated as a perturbation from that on the host metal (Pt) with a linear short-ranged correction from the guest metal (Ni) that accounts for the coordination environment of nitrogen up to the 3rd nearest Ni neighbor. This model is rationalized with the d-band center theory. Coverage effects are also included. The model can be parameterized with a limited number of DFT calculations and applied to other bimetallic catalysts to estimate the coverage dependent binding energy on complex metal microstructures.

  3. Local triboelectrification of an n-GaAs surface using the tip of an atomic-force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunkov, P. N., E-mail: brunkov@mail.ioffe.ru; Goncharov, V. V.; Rudinsky, M. E.; Gutkin, A. A.; Gordeev, N. Yu.; Lantratov, V. M.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Sokolov, R. V.; Konnikov, S. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The method of scanning Kelvin-probe microscopy is used to show that the effect of triboelectrification is observed when the tip of an atomic-force microscope interacts with the surface of n-GaAs epitaxial layers. The sign of the change in the potential indicates that the sample surface after triboelectrification becomes more negative. The observed specific features of the phenomena can be attributed to the thermally activated generation of point defects in the vicinity of the sample surface due to deformation caused by the tip.

  4. Characterizing the surface charge of clay minerals with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The engineering properties of clayey soils, including fluid permeability, erosion resistance and cohesive strength, are quite different from those of non-cohesive soils. This is mainly due to their small platy particle shape and the surrounding diffuse double layer structure. By using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, the surface topography and the interaction force between the silicon dioxide tip and the kaolinite/montmorillonite clay minerals have been measured in the 1.0 mM NaCl solution at neutral pH. From this, the surface potential of the clay minerals is determined by mathematical regression analyses using the DLVO model. The length/thickness ratio of kaolinite and montmorillonite particles measured ranges from 8.0 to 15.0. The surface potential and surface charge density vary with particles. The average surface potential of montmorillonite is −62.8 ± 10.6 mV, and the average surface potential of kaolinite is −40.9 ± 15.5 mV. The measured results help to understand the clay sediment interaction, and will be used to develop interparticle force model to simulate sediment transport during erosion process.

  5. Triboelectric charge generation by semiconducting SnO2 film grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, No Ho; Yoon, Seong Yu; Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, Seong Keun; Choi, Byung Joon

    2017-07-01

    Improving the energy harvesting efficiency of triboelectric generators (TEGs) requires exploring new types of materials that can be used, and understanding their properties. In this study, we have investigated semiconducting SnO2 thin films as friction layers in TEGs, which has not been explored thus far. Thin films of SnO2 with various thicknesses were grown by atomic layer deposition on Si substrates. Either polymer or glass was used as counter friction layers. Vertical contact/separation mode was utilized to evaluate the TEG efficiency. The results indicate that an increase in the SnO2 film thickness from 5 to 25 nm enhances the triboelectric output voltage of the TEG. Insertion of a 400-nm-thick Pt sub-layer between the SnO2 film and Si substrate further increased the output voltage up to 120 V in a 2 cm × 2 cm contact area, while the enhancement was cancelled out by inserting a 10-nm-thick insulating Al2O3 film between SnO2 and Pt films. These results indicate that n-type semiconducting SnO2 films can provide triboelectric charge to counter-friction layers in TEGs.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  7. Atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide optical modulator for visible coherent light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Shuxian; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    Coherent light sources in the visible range are playing important roles in our daily life and modern technology, since about 50% of the capability of the our human brains is devoted to processing visual information. Visible lasers can be achieved by nonlinear optical process of infrared lasers and direct lasing of gain materials, and the latter has advantages in the aspects of compactness, efficiency, simplicity, etc. However, due to lack of visible optical modulators, the directly generated visible lasers with only a gain material are constrained in continuous-wave operation. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of a visible optical modulator and pulsed visible lasers based on atomic-layer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), a ultrathin two-dimensional material with about 9–10 layers. By employing the nonlinear absorption of the modulator, the pulsed orange, red and deep red lasers were directly generated. Besides, the present atomic-layer MoS2 optical modulator has broadband modulating properties and advantages in the simple preparation process. The present results experimentally verify the theoretical prediction for the low-dimensional optoelectronic modulating devices in the visible wavelength region and may open an attractive avenue for removing a stumbling block for the further development of pulsed visible lasers. PMID:26067821

  8. Observation of anomalous Stokes versus anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    We grow hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor, with chemical vapor transport methods and investigate its atomic layers with Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. We report observation of all six types of zone center optical phonons. Quite remarkably, the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, creating an illusion of 'negative temperature'. This effect is tunable, and can be switched from anti-Stokes enhancement to suppression by varying the excitation wavelength. We interpret this observation to be a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center, which are robust even for multiple layers of MoTe2. The intense anti-Stokes Raman scattering provides a cooling channel for the crystal and opens up opportunities for laser cooling of atomically thin TMDC semiconductor devices. Supported by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the National Science Foundation Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CMMI-1025020) and Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-1433496).

  9. Atomic Layer Deposition of SnO2 on MXene for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2017-02-24

    In this report, we show that oxide battery anodes can be grown on two-dimensional titanium carbide sheets (MXenes) by atomic layer deposition. Using this approach, we have fabricated a composite SnO2/MXene anode for Li-ion battery applications. The SnO2/MXene anode exploits the high Li-ion capacity offered by SnO2, while maintaining the structural and mechanical integrity by the conductive MXene platform. The atomic layer deposition (ALD) conditions used to deposit SnO2 on MXene terminated with oxygen, fluorine, and hydroxyl-groups were found to be critical for preventing MXene degradation during ALD. We demonstrate that SnO2/MXene electrodes exhibit excellent electrochemical performance as Li-ion battery anodes, where conductive MXene sheets act to buffer the volume changes associated with lithiation and delithiation of SnO2. The cyclic performance of the anodes is further improved by depositing a very thin passivation layer of HfO2, in the same ALD reactor, on the SnO2/MXene anode. This is shown by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to also improve the structural integrity of SnO2 anode during cycling. The HfO2 coated SnO2/MXene electrodes demonstrate a stable specific capacity of 843 mAh/g when used as Li-ion battery anodes.

  10. Atom condensation on an atomically smooth surface: Ir, Re, W, and Pd on Ir(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.C.; Ehrlich, G.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of condensing metal atoms over the two types of sites present on an atomically smooth Ir(111) has been measured in a field ion microscope. For Ir, Re, W, and Pd from a thermal source, condensing on Ir(111) at ∼20 K, the atoms are randomly distributed, as expected if they condense at the first site struck

  11. Bulk and surface controlled diffusion of fission gas atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    in UO{sub 2{+-}x}, which compare favorably to available experiments. This is an extension of previous work [13]. In particular, it applies improved chemistry models for the UO{sub 2{+-}x} nonstoichiometry and its impact on the fission gas activation energies. The derivation of these models follows the approach that used in our recent study of uranium vacancy diffusion in UO{sub 2} [14]. Also, based on the calculated DFT data we analyze vacancy enhanced diffusion mechanisms in the intermediate temperature regime. In addition to vacancy enhanced diffusion we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface. This is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation, for which surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting transport step. Diffusion of such bubbles constitutes an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials.

  12. Boundary layer for non-newtonian fluids on curved surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenger, N.

    1981-04-01

    By using the basic equation of fluid motion (conservation of mass and momentum) the boundary layer parameters for a Non-Newtonian, incompressible and laminar fluid flow, has been evaluated. As a test, the flat plate boundary layer is first analized and afterwards, a case with pressure gradient, allowing separation, is studied. In the case of curved surfaces, the problem is first developed in general and afterwards particularized to a circular cylinder. Finally suction and slip in the flow interface are examined. The power law model is used to represent the stress strain relationship in Non-Newtonian flow. By varying the fluid exponent one can then, have an idea of how the Non-Newtonian behavior of the flow influences the parameters of the boundary layer. Two equations, in an appropriate coordinate system have been obtained after an order of magnitude analysis of the terms in the equations of motion is performed. (Author) [pt

  13. Dynamics of gas-surface interactions atomic-level understanding of scattering processes at surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Díez Muniño, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    This book gives a representative survey of the state of the art of research on gas-surface interactions. It provides an overview of the current understanding of gas surface dynamics and, in particular, of the reactive and non-reactive processes of atoms and small molecules at surfaces. Leading scientists in the field, both from the theoretical and the experimental sides, write in this book about their most recent advances. Surface science grew as an interdisciplinary research area over the last decades, mostly because of new experimental technologies (ultra-high vacuum, for instance), as well as because of a novel paradigm, the ‘surface science’ approach. The book describes the second transformation which is now taking place pushed by the availability of powerful quantum-mechanical theoretical methods implemented numerically. In the book, experiment and theory progress hand in hand with an unprecedented degree of accuracy and control. The book presents how modern surface science targets the atomic-level u...

  14. Decay mechanism of double-layer islands on close-packed surfaces: Silver on Ag(111) and copper on Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Xiufang; Hu Biao; Ning Xijing; Zhuang Jun

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are preformed to investigate the diffusion behaviors of double-layer islands on close-packed surfaces: Ag on Ag(111) and Cu on Cu(111), showing that the top layer moves mostly via concerted motions with its shape unchanged, and the top-layer atoms descend into the lower layer mainly by two-atom exchange only when they move to the verge of the lower layer. Especially, once a descent event takes place, other atoms of the top layer descend frequently at the same place in a short period. Compared to the Cu system, the dragging and the reattachment events take place much more frequently on the Ag surface and the Ag top layer shows a stronger tendency to form a compact configuration, e.g., a hexagon, by dragging one or two atoms from the lower layer, or even the Ag island can change from the initial double-layer into a three-layer structure due to upward diffusions

  15. The studies of scale surface produced on outer diffusion layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Augustyn-Pieniążek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study at attempt was made to examine the scale formed on ferritic-austenitic duplex type steel subjected to previous thermochemical treatment. The treatment consisted in diffusion aluminising in a metallising mixture composed of Fe-Al powder. As an activator, ammonium chloride (NH4Cl added in an amount of 2 wt.% was used. Then, both the base material and samples with the diffusiondeposited surface layers were oxidised at 1000°C in the air. Thus formed scales were identified by light microscopy, SEM and X-ray phase analysis. The aim of the oxidation tests carried out under isothermal conditions was to compare the scale morphology when obtained on untreated substrate material and on the surface layers rich in aluminium.

  16. Durability of simulated waste glass: effects of pressure and formation of surface layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Mosley, W.C.; Whitkop, P.G.; Saturday, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    The leaching behavior of simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste glass was studied at elevated pressures and anticipated storage temperatures. An integrated approach, which combined leachate solution analyses with both bulk and surface studies, was used to study the corrosion process. Compositions of leachates were evaluated by colorimetry and atomic absorption. Used in the bulk and surface analyses were optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy spectroscopy, wide-angle x-ray, diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, infrared reflectance spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results from this study show that there is no significant adverse effect of pressure, up to 1500 psi and 90 0 C, on the chemical durability of simulated SPR waste glass leached for one month in deionized water. In addition, the leached glass surface layer was characterized by an adsorbed film rich in minor constituents from the glass. This film remained on the glass surface even after leaching in relatively alkaline solutions at elevated pressures at 90 0 C for one month. The sample surface area to volume of leachant ratios (SA/V) was 10:1 cm -1 and 1:10 cm -1 . The corrosion mechanisms and surface and subsurface layers produced will be discussed along with the potential importance of these results to repository storage

  17. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range. Keywords: surface acoustic wave, surface plasmon resonance, collagen, fibrinogen, density, thickness

  18. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ZT ). The initial acceleration of the rising buoyant air will be a = g∆T/TA. This is simply Archimedes ’ principle applied to the buoyant air. The... applications . 1 Various rules are employed to model C2n in the surface layer, but a key question is how to extend this estimation technique into the lower...in terms of wind turbulence the structure of the fluctuations produces a Reynolds stress tensor whose principle axes are not equal, meaning that at the

  19. Surface layer softing in mechanically polished molybdenum monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchenko, R.K.; Kostyuchenko, V.G.; Lotsko, D.V.; Lukinov, I.V.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Novikov, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Softening of the surface layer together with growth of dislocation density is found in molybdenum single crystals mechanically polished with diamond suspension in water solution of CuSO 4 . The penetration of small amount of copper into molybdenum is observed by SIMS. A supposition has been made about molybdenum solid solution softening influenced by copper penetrating into molybdenum by means of a dynamic dislocation mechanism

  20. Surfactant-induced layered growth in homoepitaxy of Fe on Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiko, Masao; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Chihaya, Hiroaki; Xu, Junhua; Kojima, Isao; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of several surfactants (Pb, Bi, and Ag) on the homoepitaxial growth of Fe(100) were studied and compared. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements clearly reveal that these surfactants enhance the layer-by-layer growth of Fe on an Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface. The dependence of growth on the surfactant layer thickness suggests that there exists a suitable amount of surfactant layer that induces a smoother layer-by-layer growth. Comparisons between the atomic force microscopy images reveal that the root-mean-square surface roughness of Fe films mediated by Pb and Bi surfactants are considerably smaller than those of the films mediated by Ag surfactant. The Auger electron spectra show that Pb and Bi segregate at the top of the surface. It has been concluded that Pb and Bi are effective surfactants for enhancing layer-by-layer growth in Fe homoepitaxy. Ag has the same effect, but it is less efficient due to the weak surface segregation of Ag

  1. The effect of surface structure on Ag atom adsorption over CuO(111) surfaces: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Riming; Zhou, Xiaolong; Yu, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The interactions of Ag atom with different types of CuO(111) surface, including the perfect, oxygen-vacancy and precovered oxygen surfaces, have been systematically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine the effect of surface structures on Ag atom adsorption. The calculated results indicate that the Cu1-Cu1 bridge site and the oxygen-vacancy site are the active centres for atomic Ag adsorption on the perfect surface and the oxygen-vacancy surface respectively, while atomic Ag preferentially adsorbs at the Op site on the precovered oxygen surface. The activity of the CuO(111) surface for atomic Ag adsorption can be improved both on the perfect and oxygen-vacancy surfaces, while the activity of the CuO(111) surface for atomic Ag adsorption will be suppressed on precovered oxygen surfaces. Furthermore, the adsorption of NO on different CuO(111) surfaces with Ag adsorption was investigated, and the calculation results show that the adsorption of NO on an Ag-loaded CuO(111) surface is greater than that on the pure CuO(111) surface.

  2. A Method for Atomic Layer Deposition of Complex Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Ge, H. Wang, M. Wang, M. Wang, Z. Liu, N. Ming , Thin Solid Films 375 (2000) 220. [15] D. Bao, X. Yao, N. Wakiya, K. Shinozaki, N. Mizutani, Mater...2008. [3] Jonathan R. Scheffe, Andrea Francés, David M. King, Xinhua Liang , Brittany A. Branch, Andrew S. Cavanagh, Steven M. George, and Alan W...atomic-layer deposition. Journal of Crystal Growth, 254(3-4):443–448, July 2003. 71 [12] Chih-Yi Pan, Dah-Shyang Tsai , and Lu-Sheng Hong. Abnormal

  3. (Invited) Atomic Layer Deposition for Novel Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tétreault, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Herein we present the latest fabrication and characterization techniques for atomic layer deposition of Al 2O 3, ZnO, SnO 2, Nb 2O 5, HfO 2, Ga 2O 3 and TiO 2 for research on dye-sensitized solar cell. In particular, we review the fabrication of state-of-the-art 3D host-passivation-guest photoanodes and ZnO nanowires as well as characterize the deposited thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction, Hall effect, J-V curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  4. Growth and characterization of titanium oxide by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2013-09-01

    The growth of TiO2 films by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition using Star-Ti as a precursor has been systematically studied. The conversion from amorphous to crystalline TiO2 was observed either during high temperature growth or annealing process of the films. The refractive index and bandgap of TiO2 films changed with the growth and annealing temperatures. The optimization of the annealing conditions for TiO2 films was also done by morphology and density studies. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt–Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta; Larsen, Jackie Vincent; Verheijen, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    (ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium (Ru(EtCp)2), respectively. O2 was used as the reactant in both processes. The composition of the catalysts was easily tuned by varying the Pt-to-Ru ALD cycle ratio. The catalysts were tested toward the CO oxidation and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in a three-electrode electrochemical set......Pt–Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250°C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and bis...

  6. Atomic layer epitaxy of hematite on indium tin oxide for application in solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Alex B.; Riha, Shannon; Guo, Peijun; Emery, Jonathan D.

    2016-07-12

    A method to provide an article of manufacture of iron oxide on indium tin oxide for solar energy conversion. An atomic layer epitaxy method is used to deposit an uncommon bixbytite-phase iron (III) oxide (.beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3) which is deposited at low temperatures to provide 99% phase pure .beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 thin films on indium tin oxide. Subsequent annealing produces pure .alpha.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 with well-defined epitaxy via a topotactic transition. These highly crystalline films in the ultra thin film limit enable high efficiency photoelectrochemical chemical water splitting.

  7. Metallic nanoparticle-based strain sensors elaborated by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyoo, E.; Malhaire, C.; Thomas, D.; Rafaël, R.; R'Mili, M.; Malchère, A.; Roiban, L.; Koneti, S.; Bugnet, M.; Sabac, A.; Le Berre, M.

    2017-03-01

    Platinum nanoparticle-based strain gauges are elaborated by means of atomic layer deposition on flexible polyimide substrates. Their electro-mechanical response is tested under mechanical bending in both buckling and conformational contact configurations. A maximum gauge factor of 70 is reached at a strain level of 0.5%. Although the exponential dependence of the gauge resistance on strain is attributed to the tunneling effect, it is shown that the majority of the junctions between adjacent Pt nanoparticles are in a short circuit state. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of an all-plastic pressure sensor integrating Pt nanoparticle-based strain gauges in a Wheatstone bridge configuration.

  8. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  9. Fluorine contamination in yttrium-doped barium zirconate film deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An Jihwan; Beom Kim, Young; Sun Park, Joong; Hyung Shim, Joon; Guer, Turgut M.; Prinz, Fritz B. [Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States) and Korea University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Stanford University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 440 Escondido Mall, Bldg. 530, Rm. 226, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The authors have investigated the change of chemical composition, crystallinity, and ionic conductivity in fluorine contaminated yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BYZ) fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). It has been identified that fluorine contamination can significantly affect the conductivity of the ALD BYZ. The authors have also successfully established the relationship between process temperature and contamination and the source of fluorine contamination, which was the perfluoroelastomer O-ring used for vacuum sealing. The total removal of fluorine contamination was achieved by using all-metal sealed chamber instead of O-ring seals.

  10. Fluorine contamination in yttrium-doped barium zirconate film deposited by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Jihwan; Beom Kim, Young; Sun Park, Joong; Hyung Shim, Joon; Guer, Turgut M.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have investigated the change of chemical composition, crystallinity, and ionic conductivity in fluorine contaminated yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BYZ) fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). It has been identified that fluorine contamination can significantly affect the conductivity of the ALD BYZ. The authors have also successfully established the relationship between process temperature and contamination and the source of fluorine contamination, which was the perfluoroelastomer O-ring used for vacuum sealing. The total removal of fluorine contamination was achieved by using all-metal sealed chamber instead of O-ring seals.

  11. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Ledieu, J.; Dubois, J. M.; Fournée, V.

    2008-08-01

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the γ-Al4Cu9 approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]_{\\mathrm {Al}}\\parallel [110]_{\\mathrm {Al_4Cu_9}}\\parallel [5\\mathrm {f}]_{i\\mbox {-}\\mathrm {Al\\mbox {--}Cu \\mbox {--}Fe}} .

  12. Surface alloys as interfacial layers between quasicrystalline and periodic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguet, T; Ledieu, J; Dubois, J M; Fournee, V [Laboratoire de Science et Genie des Materiaux et de Metallurgie, UMR 7584 CNRS-Nancy Universite, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy (France)], E-mail: fournee@lsg2m.org

    2008-08-06

    Low adhesion with normal metals is an intrinsic property of many quasicrystalline surfaces. Although this property could be useful to develop low friction or non-stick coatings, it is also responsible for the poor adhesion of quasicrystalline coatings on metal substrates. Here we investigate the possibility of using complex metallic surface alloys as interface layers to enhance the adhesion between quasicrystals and simple metal substrates. We first review some examples where such complex phases are formed as an overlayer. Then we study the formation of such surface alloys in a controlled way by annealing a thin film deposited on a quasicrystalline substrate. We demonstrate that a coherent buffer layer consisting of the {gamma}-Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9} approximant can be grown between pure Al and the i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal. The interfacial relationships between the different layers are defined by [111]{sub Al} parallel [110]{sub Al4Cu9} parallel [5f]{sub i-Al-}C{sub u-Fe}.

  13. Modification of SnO2 Anodes by Atomic Layer Deposition for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yesibolati, Nulati

    2013-05-01

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) is considered one of the most promising anode materials for Lithium ion batteries (LIBs), due to its large theoretical capacity and natural abundance. However, its low electronic/ionic conductivities, large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and agglomeration prevent it from further commercial applications. In this thesis, we investigate modified SnO2 as a high energy density anode material for LIBs. Specifically two approaches are presented to improve battery performances. Firstly, SnO2 electrochemical performances were improved by surface modification using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Ultrathin Al2O3 or HfO2 were coated on SnO2 electrodes. It was found that electrochemical performances had been enhanced after ALD deposition. In a second approach, we implemented a layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled graphene/carbon-coated hollow SnO2 spheres as anode material for LIBs. Our results indicated that the LBL assembled electrodes had high reversible lithium storage capacities even at high current densities. These superior electrochemical performances are attributed to the enhanced electronic conductivity and effective lithium diffusion, because of the interconnected graphene/carbon networks among nanoparticles of the hollow SnO2 spheres.

  14. He-atom surface scattering apparatus for studies of crystalline surface dynamics. Progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The primary goal of this grant is the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom-crystal surface scattering apparatus which will be capable of measuring both elastic and inelastic scattering of He atoms from crystal surfaces of metals, semiconductors and insulators. First, the apparatus will be constructed and characterized, after which a program of studies on the surface dynamics of a variety of crystal surfaces will be started. 6 refs., 2 figs

  15. New chemistry for the growth of first-row transition metal films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klesko, Joseph Peter

    Thin films containing first-row transition metals are widely used in microelectronic, photovoltaic, catalytic, and surface-coating applications. In particular, metallic films are essential for interconnects and seed, barrier, and capping layers in integrated circuitry. Traditional vapor deposition methods for film growth include PVD, CVD, or the use of plasma. However, these techniques lack the requisite precision for film growth at the nanoscale, and thus, are increasingly inadequate for many current and future applications. By contrast, ALD is the favored approach for depositing films with absolute surface conformality and thickness control on 3D architectures and in high aspect ratio features. However, the low-temperature chemical reduction of most first-row transition metal cations to their zero-valent state is very challenging due to their negative electrochemical potentials. A lack of strongly-reducing coreagents has rendered the thermal ALD of metallic films an intractable problem for many elements. Additionally, several established ALD processes for metal films are plagued by low growth rates, impurity incorporation, poor nucleation, high surface roughness, or the need for hazardous coreagents. Finally, stoichiometric control of ternary films grown by ALD is rare, but increasingly important, with emerging applications for metal borate films in catalysis and lithium ion batteries. The research herein is focused toward the development of new ALD processes for the broader application of metal, metal oxide, and metal borate thin films to future nanoscale technologies. These processes display self-limited growth and support the facile nucleation of smooth, continuous, high-purity films. Bis(trimethylsilyl) six-membered rings are employed as strongly-reducing organic coreagents for the ALD of titanium and antimony metal films. Additionally, new processes are developed for the growth of high-purity, low-resistivity cobalt and nickel metal films by exploiting the

  16. Higher order reconstructions of the Ge(001) surface induced by a Ba layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczorowski, W.; Grzela, T.; Puchalska, A.; Radny, M. W.; Jurczyszyn, L.; Schofield, S. R.; Czajka, R.; Curson, N. J.

    2018-03-01

    Structural properties of Ba-induced reconstructions on a Ge(001) surface, based on atomic-resolution ultra high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy measurements, are discussed. It is shown that while the Ba - Ge layer, which fully covers the surface, is dominated by a phase with an internal 2 × 3 periodicity, it also includes portions of higher order 2 × 6 and 4 × 3 surface reconstructions, always accompanied by 1D protrusions embedded into the dominating phase. Modelling the observed higher order structures, using the elementary cell of the 2 × 3 phase calculated within the density functional theory, is shown to reproduce the experimental data very well. As such the higher order reconstructions can be treated as local defects of the dominating 2 × 3 phase.

  17. Atomically thin heterostructures based on single-layer tungsten diselenide and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Wallace, Robert M; Mayer, Theresa S; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A

    2014-12-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF).

  18. Atomic layer deposited borosilicate glass microchannel plates for large area event counting detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmund, O.H.W.; McPhate, J.B.; Tremsin, A.S.; Jelinsky, S.R.; Hemphill, R.; Frisch, H.J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 40 μm pores have been deposited with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Device formats of 32.7 mm and 20 cm square have been fabricated and tested in analog and photon counting modes. The tests show amplification, imaging, background rate, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area microchannel plates of this type facilitate the construction of 20 cm format sealed tube sensors with strip-line readouts that are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Complementary work has resulted in Na 2 KSb bialkali photocathodes with peak quantum efficiency of 25% being made on borosilicate glass. Additionally GaN (Mg) opaque photocathodes have been successfully made on borosilicate microchannel plates.

  19. Atomic layer deposited borosilicate glass microchannel plates for large area event counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A. S.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Hemphill, R.; Frisch, H. J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Lappd Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 40 μm pores have been deposited with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Device formats of 32.7 mm and 20 cm square have been fabricated and tested in analog and photon counting modes. The tests show amplification, imaging, background rate, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area microchannel plates of this type facilitate the construction of 20 cm format sealed tube sensors with strip-line readouts that are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Complementary work has resulted in Na2KSb bialkali photocathodes with peak quantum efficiency of 25% being made on borosilicate glass. Additionally GaN (Mg) opaque photocathodes have been successfully made on borosilicate microchannel plates.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of Al-doped ZnO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynell, Tommi; Yamauchi, Hisao; Karppinen, Maarit; Okazaki, Ryuji; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition has been used to fabricate thin films of aluminum-doped ZnO by depositing interspersed layers of ZnO and Al 2 O 3 on borosilicate glass substrates. The growth characteristics of the films have been investigated through x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflection, and x-ray fluorescence measurements, and the efficacy of the Al doping has been evaluated through optical reflectivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The Al doping is found to affect the carrier density of ZnO up to a nominal Al dopant content of 5 at. %. At nominal Al doping levels of 10 at. % and higher, the structure of the films is found to be strongly affected by the Al 2 O 3 phase and no further carrier doping of ZnO is observed.